Mars Station South Pole2
Marshall University
Huntington, WV

After attempting to land at the South pole a second time visual information shows that the rover is near but not on a the "ice".

The first South Pole at the education department was much whiter and much larger.

The Mars Station is now in a very small room so space is at a premium.
Also in the same room is "earth" or at least a LEGO City.

Earth and Mars are in communications through the Infrared Red tower.
RCX on Mars and on earth bounce signals successfully most of the time.

Your controlling the programs activates the Mars rover and other robotic vehicles at the same time.  Watch on http://legocamera.marshall.edu for more of the action.
With comments like “This is awesome” and “My kid loves this.” Are questions like “What am I supposed to do?”
That seems like a good question for real Mars, too.
A good strategy for moving around is to see where the rocks are before going toward them - much like with Spirit and Opportunity.
What is different in the Mars Station is that the “distant” hills are not really distant so running into the wall makes a fuzzy picture.
If you feel you are touching something, try running some of the programs because the rover backs up various ways when programs are run.
The most interesting comments have been from people that operated the Mars Station over the Internet and then visited in person.
"What one sees from one camera view can seem to be much different that it really is."


Spirit visited some days in January.
 


One day students were working on projects at school and at the Mars Station.

RoboLab programs run on the various RCX.

LEGO Links of Linda Hamilton hamilton@marshall.edu