Frequently Asked Questions

Getting Started at Marshall

My Major

My Progress at Marshall

Graduation

My Career


Getting Started at Marshall
When getting started in a university setting, it can be overwhelming. The following questions will help you lay the foundation for a successful college career.

How do I get admitted to Marshall University?

Students applying for admission to Marshall University must first submit an application form available from the Admissions Office or apply online. All applications for admission or re-admission must be submitted to the Admissions Office, along with all required credentials, at least two weeks prior to the start of a term. Applications that are submitted after this deadline or that are not complete by this deadline may not be evaluated in time for applicants to register for the current term. Applicants who apply later or who fail to ensure that their application files are complete at least two weeks prior to the start of a term must recognize that admission may be deferred to a future term and assume all responsibility for failure to complete the application process by the stated deadline.

All materials and credentials submitted to the Admissions Office become the property of Marshall University. Materials and credentials will not be returned or released to third parties. Any student admitted on the basis of false and/or incomplete information is subject to immediate dismissal or other disciplinary action.

Required Application Materials:

  • Completed application for admission
  • A non-refundable application fee of $40 ($50 transfer evaluation fee for transfer students)
  • An official, final transcript, including graduation date, sent directly from the student’s high school to the Marshall University Admissions Office.
  • Official college transcript sent to the Marshall University Admissions Offices directly from the college or university if a student has completed a non-Marshall college course while in high school or in summer school.
  • American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores sent directly from the testing agency. The Higher Education Policy Commission requires that all freshmen submit the ACT or SAT scores except applicants who graduated from high school five years or more ago. (Applicants who graduated from high school five years or more ago and who lack test scores must pass placement exams or designated English and mathematics prerequisites before they are permitted to enroll in courses in English and mathematics.)
  • A valid immunization record including measles and rubella vaccinations (or MMR) and all other required vaccinations or screenings. Applicants can provide an immunization records signed by a physician or an official copy of the permanent high school health record including a report of the required immunizations. Students must provide proof of immunity before or during the first semester of enrollment or they will not be permitted to enroll in subsequent terms. If an applicant has religious beliefs that prohibit vaccination, the applicant must submit a notarized statement from a member of his or her clergy. Requests for exemptions should be made to the Admissions Office. Students born prior to January 1, 1957 are exempt from the measles and rubella (MMR) immunization requirement.

General Requirements:

  • A high school diploma (official transcript with graduation date required).
  • An overall Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.00 on a 4.00 scale and a composite score of at least 19 on the ACT or SAT equivalent; OR an overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.00 on a 4.00 scale and a composite score of at least 16 on the ACT or SAT equivalent.
  • Recommended completion of the Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC) academic core unit requirements:
    • 4 units of English
    • 4 units of mathematics
    • 3 units of social studies
    • 3 units of science
    • 2 units of world language
    • 1 unit of arts

First-time freshmen pursuing a four-year baccalaureate degree who meet all admission requirements will be admitted unconditionally.

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What is Satisfactory Academic Progress?

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is the term used to define successful completion of degree requirements to maintain eligibility for federal and state financial aid. As required by regulations, Marshall University must determine whether a student meets SAP requirements. SAP evaluation for undergraduate students occurs at the conclusion of each payment period, which is at the end of the fall semester, spring semester, and summer terms. Financial aid eligibility determination for a future term of enrollment cannot be done until SAP evaluation occurs.

The student’s entire academic history must be considered when determining SAP status irrespective of whether or not the student received financial aid. This includes Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits, as well as transfer credits that reflect on the student’s academic transcript as courses that apply to a Marshall University degree.

Requirements of the SAP Policy

  • The student must have a minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0, including transfer credits where applicable.
  • The student must meet a 67% completion ratio or higher, which means that a student has to earn 67% or more of the credits which they have attempted.
  • For undergraduate students pursuing a bachelor’s degree, no more than 180 attempted credit hours.

The full SAP policy and appeals procedure may be found by clicking here.

Will my credits transfer from another institution?

Students may have counted toward a bachelor’s degree no more than 72 credit hours and grades completed at one or more community colleges.

Transfer students who have successfully earned 26 or more semester credit hours must complete one Critical Thinking Course in Core I and in Core II of the University’s General Education Curriculum.

Transfer students with fewer than 26 earned semester hours must complete Marshall University’s First Year Seminar and all other courses in the General Education Curriculum that have not been fulfilled by transfer courses.

All transfer students must also complete 6 hours of writing intensive credits, 3 hours of multicultural or international coursework, a capstone project in the major, and other degree requirements not fulfilled with transfer courses.

To see which credits could potentially be transferred, click here.

Transfer Students from West Virginia State Colleges or Universities:

Credits and grades earned for all baccalaureate level courses at any accredited baccalaureate degree-granting institution in the West Virginia state-supported system of higher education are transferable to Marshall University.

Transfer Students from Community Colleges or Branch Colleges:

Seventy-two hours of credits and grades completed at community colleges or branch colleges may be applied toward graduation at Marshall University.

Evaluation of Transfer Credit:

Transfer students should apply to Marshall University and submit their credentials at least one month before course registration to allow ample time for an evaluation of credits.

All materials and credentials submitted to the Admissions Office become the property of Marshall University and will not be returned or released to third parties.

Marshall University accepts all transferable coursework from accepted, accredited institutions. Coursework taken at another accepted, accredited institution transfers at the level at which it was taken. This is something important to consider since Marshall students must have a minimum number of upper division credits (300/400 level credit), determined by their college, in order to graduate. If, for example, a student takes ENG 220, American Literature, at another institution, and this course converts at Marshall to ENG 320, American Literature, the student will get credit for ENG 320 at Marshall, but those credits will count as lower division (100- to 200-level credits.

Grades earned for coursework taken at other institutions are calculated in the overall GPA (includes courses taken at Marshall University and other institutions), but have no impact on the Marshall GPA (includes only Marshall University coursework), except for D/F repeats.

How do I transfer credits from another institution?

When applying for admission to Marshall University, indicate that you are a transfer student on your application and have the institution send copies of the official transcript to the Admissions Office.

General Transfer Admission Requirements:

  • All transfer students must be eligible to return to the institution they most recently attended. In addition, transfer students who have fewer than 30 earned semester hours must meet one of the following criteria
    • Must meet the current freshman admission standards; OR
    • Have earned 12 graded college-level semester hours while maintaining a 2.00 cumulative GPA.
  • Transfer students who do not meet either of these requirements may appeal the decision through the Admission Appeals Committee. If a transfer student is admitted with a cumulative GPA below 2.00, he or she is on academic probation and is eligible to register for a limited number of credit hours. Please contact the appropriate dean’s office for specific guidelines.

Required Application Materials:

  • Completed application for admission
  • A non-refundable transfer evaluation fee of $50
  • Official transcripts from the Registrar’s Office of all accepted, accredited institutions attended must be sent directly to the Marshall Admissions Office by those institutions.
  • Transfer applicants with fewer than 30 earned semester hours must also submit an official high school transcript with graduation date
  • American College Test (ACT) or Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores sent directly from the testing center. The Higher Education Policy Commission requires that all freshmen submit the ACT or SAT scores except applicants who graduated from high school five years or more ago.
  • A valid immunization record, including measles and rubella (or MMR) and all other required vaccinations or screenings, is required of all transfer students. Applicants can provide an immunization record signed by a physician or an official copy of the permanent high school health record including a report of the required immunizations. Students must provide proof of immunity before or during the first semester of enrollment or they will not be permitted to enroll in subsequent terms. If an applicant has religious beliefs which prohibit vaccination, the applicant must submit a notarized statement from a member of his or her clergy. Requests for exemptions should be made to the Admissions Office. Students born prior to January 1, 1957 are exempt from the measles and rubella (or MMR) immunization requirement.

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Who is my academic advisor?

Your academic advisor is a person who helps guide you in curricular decisions throughout your time at Marshall University. Your advisor is someone who is associated with the program you are studying, and may be either a full-time professional advisor or a faculty member who also advises students. They are your direct resource if you encounter any problems while trying to map out your road to graduation.

To find your specific advisor, click here.

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My Major

Students often struggle with the decision of which major to pursue. Once declared, your advisor can help guide you through the courses and requirements for graduation in your chosen area.

Who is my academic advisor?

Your academic advisor is a person who helps guide you in curricular decisions throughout your time at Marshall University. Your advisor is someone who is associated with the program you are studying, and may be either a full-time professional advisor or a faculty member who also advises students. They are your direct resource if you encounter any problems while trying to map out your road to graduation.

To find your specific advisor, click here.

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How do I declare or change my major?

Each college at Marshall has a contact person who can assist you with the process.

  • See a representative in the college that houses the major you no longer wish to have. Please consult the list below to find your college contact person.
  • If you are switching to a major in the same college, this college contact person will continue to oversee the entire process.
  • If you are switching to a major in a different college (this is called Inter-College Transfer), your current college contact person will initiate your transfer paperwork and ask you to take it to the contact person in your new college (the college that has your new major).

College of Arts and Media

Tammy Reynolds, Student Services Specialist

Smith Hall 161

304-696-3107

reynolds5@marshall.edu

College of Business

Lacie Bittenger, Director of Student Services

Corbly Hall 334

304-696-2612

bittinger@marshall.edu

College of Education and Professional Development

Kandice Napier, Director of Student Center of Professional Education Services

Jenkins Hall 226

304-696-6842

kandice.napier@marshall.edu

College of Health Professions

Marilyn Fox, Program Coordinator

PH 221

foxm@marshall.edu

304-696-2620

College of Information Technology and Engineering

Elizabeth Hanrahan, Associate Dean

WAEC 2103A

304-696-5455

hanrahan@marshall.edu

College of Liberal Arts

Samantha Stalknaker, Program Advisor

OM 110

fox53@marshall.edu

304-696-2699

Regents Bachelor of Arts

Rita Spears, Program Advisor

SH 223

304-696-5402

spearsr@marshall.edu

College of Science

Vicki Cole, Program Manager

S 270

colev@marshall.edu

304-696-6672

University College

Amber Bentley, Counselor II

Smith Hall Communications 212-F

bentley@marshall.edu

304-696-7039

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Do I have a 4-year plan?

Yes, all degrees offered at Marshall University have a corresponding 4-year plan. While it is possible to take courses in a different order, the 4-year plan offers the most direct way to make sure you graduate in 4 years.

Click here to find your 4-year plan.

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How do I prepare for an advising appointment?

Once you know who your advisor is, you can contact them to set up an appointment.

Prior to the meeting, have the questions or concerns that you would like to address prepared. You don’t want to waste the limited time you have with your advisor, so it is always a good idea to come prepared to your meeting. If you are meeting with your advisor to discuss your class schedule or registering for a new semester, it’s preferable that you bring a copy of your schedule or potential schedule to the meeting with you.

Some colleges require multiple advisor meetings each semester. You should check with your advisor to schedule your appointments. All students should plan to meet with their advisors around mid-semester to begin planning the course selections for the next semester. For freshman and sophomore students, your advisor will be monitoring your midterm academic progress by reviewing midterm D/F/NC grade reports provided by your instructors. It is also important to consult with your academic advisor any time you plan to add a course, drop a course, or consider withdrawing from all courses. Please remember that your academic advisor is a key resource to your academic success.

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My Progress at Marshall

Students who intend to graduate on-time need to always be aware of their progress towards a degree.

What is Satisfactory Academic Progress?

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is the term used to define successful completion of degree requirements to maintain eligibility for federal and state financial aid. As required by regulations, Marshall University must determine whether a student meets SAP requirements. SAP evaluation for undergraduate students occurs at the conclusion of each payment period, which is at the end of the fall semester, spring semester, and summer terms. Financial aid eligibility determination for a future term of enrollment cannot be done until SAP evaluation occurs.

The student’s entire academic history must be considered when determining SAP status irrespective of whether or not the student received financial aid. This includes Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) credits, as well as transfer credits that reflect on the student’s academic transcript as courses that apply to a Marshall University degree.

Requirements of the SAP Policy

  • The student must have a minimum cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.0, including transfer credits where applicable.
  • The student must meet a 67% completion ratio or higher, which means that a student has to earn 67% or more of the credits which they have attempted.
  • For undergraduate students pursuing a bachelor’s degree, no more than 180 attempted credit hours.

The full SAP policy and appeals procedure may be found by clicking here.

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How many hours should I take?

A full-time load for purposes of tuition is 12 hours, but do the math. If you plan to graduate in four years, you will need to complete at least 15 hours per term in order to earn the minimum 120 credit hours. If you are receiving Student Financial Assistance, you will need to “keep pace” with the requirements to renew that aid each year/semester. Students receiving the Promise Scholarship are required to complete 30 hours per year.

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What is required in the Core Curriculum?

Core I: 9 Hours

  • 3 Hours: First Year Seminar (100-level)
  • 6 hours of discipline-specific courses with an emphasis on critical thinking and active learning (100- or 200- level). Specific courses that fulfill the requirements are designated in Banner as “CT”.

Core II: 25 Hours (100- or 200- level)

  • 6 Hours: Composition
  • 3 Hours: Communication
  • 3 Hours: Math
  • 4 Hours: Physical or Natural Science
  • 3 Hours: Social Science
  • 3 Hours: Humanities
  • 3 Hours: Fine Arts

Additional University Requirements

  • 6 hours of Writing Intensive (WI) credit in any discipline at any level
  • 3 hours of Multicultural or International coursework in any discipline at any level
  • Capstone project in the major

Transfer students with 30 or more college credits must complete one CT course in Core I, all of Core II and the additional university requirements. Students enrolled at Marshall University prior to Summer 2010 who change majors and/or colleges may choose to remain under their current general education requirements or they may opt into the Core Curriculum under the same terms as transfer students. Core II may be fulfilled through a combination of transfer and Marshall credit hours.

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I just failed a class, do I have to take it again?

The D/F Repeat Rule allows students to repeat a course in which they first received a grade of D or F and replace the first grade with the grade received the second time. The original grade will still appear on the student’s transcript but the first grade will be excluded from the cumulative GPA calculation. This rule applies only to courses taken within the student’s first 60 hours of enrollment. The course can be repeated at any time prior to graduation for the policy to apply as long as the course was originally taken in the first 60 hours. The rule is explained in detail in the Academic Information section of the Marshall University Undergraduate Catalog.

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I just found out I’m on Academic Probation, now what?

All undergraduate students whose Overall or Marshall GPA drops below a 2.0 will be placed on Academic Probation. Academic Probation is a period of restricted enrollment for a student. All probation students are subject to the following restrictions:

  • Students on probation may take a maximum of 15 hours and should repeat courses under the D/F Repeat Rule to reduce deficiency points.
  • Students on probation must earn a 2.0 GPA or higher during every semester they are on probation. Failure to achieve a 2.0 semester GPA or higher while on Academic Probation will result in suspension.
  • Students on probation are not allowed to register online.
  • Students on probation must participate in their college’s retention program.
  • Other requirements may be imposed in the Academic Improvement Plan (AIP).

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Graduation

It’s what you’ve worked so hard to achieve during the last four years. We’ll give you the information you need to know before you end this phase of your higher education journey.

Am I ready to graduate?

Students are responsible for staying informed about and ensuring that they meet the requirements for graduation.

Many colleges and majors require students to complete a graduation check once they have finished their 80th credit hour. This allows students to sit down with an advisor and go over course which are still needed to complete their degree.

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When do I need to apply for graduation?

All candidates for graduation should file an Application for Graduation form in the semester PRIOR to the semester in which all requirements for the degree are to be met. This will enable the student to make all necessary schedule adjustments to correct potential graduation deficiencies in the final semester.

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What is required for me to graduate?

At minimum, to receive a baccalaureate degree from Marshall University, a student must:

  • Have a minimum of 120 unique credit hours (some colleges or majors require more);
  • Have an overall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher;
  • Have a Marshall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher;
  • Have an overall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher in the major;
  • Have earned a grade of C or better in English 102 or 201H;
  • Satisfaction of all university requirements for graduation.

Completion of all curricular requirements specified for the major and degree.

Completion of the following residency requirements:

  • Earn at least 36 semester hours at Marshall.
  • Earn at least x hours of senior level coursework in the college at Marshall.
  • Earn at least 15 hours in the major field at Marshall.
  • Earn at Marshall 16 or more of the last 32 hours credited toward the degree.

Earn at least a 2.0 Grade Point Average (GPA) in each of the following three categories:

  • All coursework attempted at Marshall and elsewhere.
  • All Marshall coursework.
  • All coursework attempted and included in the major(s) at Marshall.

Successful validation of transfer work as required.

Removal of all incompletes.

At most, 18 semester hours of coursework (consisting only of general education requirements and/or free electives) taken under the Credit/No Credit option may be applied toward graduation requirements. College and other courses in your major may not be taken on a Credit/No Credit basis.

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My Career

You’re getting ready to enter the workforce, so now what? We will provide you with some helpful information about where to go next, and how to get help along the way.

How do I choose what career field to go into?

Often, this question can be a major source of stress for undergraduate students. While there are resources available to you, ultimately the decision will depend on you.

Career Services is a great resource for students who find themselves looking for the right career field. From learning what you can do with your major to aptitude testing, Career Services has it all.

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What if I’m not sure what I want to do for a career?

Career Services can provide career advising and career assessment if you are undecided about what you would like to do. Many times, students don’t realize what types of careers their major will allow them to do, and so it can be helpful to have some outside help to judge their options.

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Are there resources to help me find employment after graduation?

Yes! Marshall University Career Services offers JobTrax for all current and former Marshall University students. JobTrax is a database of open employment opportunities, which are searchable by your chosen field.

In addition, Career Services offers help with cover letters, resumes, networking and interview tips.

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