W. Elaine Hardman, PhD

W. Elaine Hardman, Ph.D. Professor
Department: Biochemistry and Microbiology
Office: BBSC 336-S | Laboratory: BBSC 315
Phone: (304) 696-7339 | Fax: (304) 696-7207
E-mail: hardmanw@marshall.edu

Research Interests

My research interests are to identify the mechanisms of action of omega-3 fatty acids to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of cancer chemotherapy and to prevent cancer. It seems so simple, yet there are good biological explanations for the how dietary omega-3 fatty acids can profoundly affect the efficacy of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. These activities include altering: the potential for lipid peroxidation and free radical damage to cancer cells, prostaglandin production in cancer and normal cells, cell membrane fluidity, membrane transport, membrane permeability, the activities of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor and/or nuclear factor kB, membrane receptor function, estrogen metabolism and the inflammatory process. We have completed much preclinical work. My future plans include continued investigation of mechanisms and conducting small clinical trials to determine whether omega 3 will provide benefit to patients with cancer.

Education and Experience

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Ph.D., Cell Biology, 1992

Instructor, Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, 1993-1997

Research Assistant Professor, Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, 1997 – 2001

Assistant Professor, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 2001 to 2005

Associate Professor, Marshall University School of Medicine, Dept. of Biochemistry and Microbiology Huntington, WV, 2005 to 2011

Professor, Marshall University School of Medicine, Dept. of Biochemistry and Microbiology Huntington, WV, 2011 to present

Selected Publications

Witte TR and Hardman WE, The Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Consumption on Mammary Carcinogenesis. Lipids 2015 May;50(5):437-46 PMID: 25860692

Tsoukas MA1,2, Ko B-J1, Witte TR3, Dincer F1, Hardman WE3, Mantzoros CS1, Dietary Walnut Suppression of Colorectal Cancer in mice: mediation by miRNA patterns and fatty acid incorporation. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry 2015 Jul;26(7):776-83 PMID: 25882694.

Cameron IL, Markov MS, Hardman WE. Optimization of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) to retard breast cancer tumor growth and vascularity. Cancer Cell Int. 2014 Dec 7;14(1):125. doi: 10.1186/s12935-014-0125-5 PMID: 25530714

Hardman, WE. Diet components can suppress inflammation and reduce cancer risk. Nutr Res Pract. 2014 Jun;8(3):233-240. Epub 2014 May 15

Lau JK, Brown KC, Dom AM, Witte TR, Thornhill BA, Crabtree CM, Perry HE, Brown JM, Ball JG, Creel RG, Damron CL, Rollyson WD, Stevenson CD, Hardman WE, Valentovic MA, Carpenter AB, Dasgupta P. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway. Apoptosis. 2014 Aug;19(8):1190-201. doi: 10.1007/s10495-014-1007-y. PMID: 24878626

Hardman WE. Walnuts have potential for cancer prevention and treatment in mice. J Nutr. 2014 Apr;144(4 Suppl):555S-560S. doi: 10.3945/jn.113.188466. Epub 2014 Feb 5. PMID: 24500939

Akinsete, JA, Ion, G., Witte, TR and Hardman, WE. Consumption of omega 3 fatty acids slows progression of prostate cancer in C(3)1 TAg mice. Carcinogenesis, Nov. 2011

Hardman, WE, Ion, G, Akinsete, JA, Witte, TR. Dietary walnut suppressed mammary gland tumorigenesis in the C(3)1 TAg mouse. Nutrition and Cancer, online: 20 Jul 2011

Varney, ME, Buchanan, JT, Dementieva,Y, Hardman, WE, and Vincent E. Sollars.  A high omega-3 fatty acid diet has different effects on early and late stage myeloid progenitors Lipids 2011 Jan;46(1):47-57. Epub 2010 Oct 31