Mixer brings biomedical and medical school students together

Students from the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program (BMS) and first-year Joan C.Edwards School of Medicine class enjoyed a mixer on March 18. Around 20 people, including several MS-1 class officers and BMS Graduate Student OrganizationMixer event_March 2015 leaders, shared fun conversations, chips, fruit, brownies, and sloppy joe sandwiches at the Byrd Clinical Center. After all, it was National Sloppy Joe Day!

These gatherings will be held once per semester to assist in developing comfortable relationships and peer networks between the clinical and research area participants.

Racine publishes with Rankin’s lab

Chris Racine, a Marshall Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. candidate, has been involved with two papers accepted for publication since October.

Racine RankinThe first manuscript, 3,4,5-Trichloroaniline nephrotoxicity in vitro: Potential role of free radicals and renal biotransformation, was published in the well-respected International Journal of Molecular Sciences in a Special Issue: Renal Toxicology—Epidemiology and Mechanisms. Racine is the first author on this publication. Please see http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/15/11/20900 to view the entire article.

Gary O. Rankin, Ph.D. authored the second paper with Mr. Racine and others in the lab including Adam Sweeny, Travis FergusonDeborah Preston, and Dianne K. Anestis. 4-amino-2-chlorophenol: Comparative in vitro nephrotoxicity and mechanisms of bioactivation was published in Chemico-Biological Interactions. This journal ranks in the top 25% of toxicology journals. The full article is available here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0009279714002750

Chris conducts research in the lab of Dr. Rankin, a member of the Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences Cluster. Rankin’s lab explores the role that the kidney plays in metabolizing compounds used as intermediates in the production of a wide variety of agricultural products. Exposure to these compounds can occur both in industrial and environmental settings, and therefore, an understanding of the activation mechanism is important for better insight into kidney health.

School of Medicine researchers continue to battle endometriosis in laboratory

Nalini Santanam, PhD, MPHA pair of School of Medicine researchers is making great strides in understanding endometriosis, a disorder that often leads to chronic pain and/or infertility in many women of reproductive age. Dr. Nalini Santanam, Professor, Department of Pharma- cology, Physiology & Toxicology and Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. candidate Kristeena Ray Wright have published two publications in the last two months regarding their research on endometriosis and pain. The first, “Power over Pain: a brief overview of current and novel interventions for endometriosis associated pain” was published in the Journal of Endometriosis and  Pelvic Pain Disorders at the end of 2014.

The second manuscript “Oxidation Sensitive Nociception Involved in Endometriosis Associated Pain”, is published in “Pain” which is a top impact journal in pain research, in January 2015. This study summarizes some of the seminal work performed in Dr. Santanam’s laboratory over the past several years that led to a ground-breaking discovery in the mechanisms of pain in endo- metriosis.

Both publications were in collaboration with Dr. Brenda Mitchell, Professor Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Internationally recognized kidney specialist and sodium pump researcher visits Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. — Dr. Anita Aperia, professor of pediatrics at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm and former member of the Nobel Assembly, who is widely recognized for her groundbreaking research to medicine’s understanding of how the ‪‎kidneys function in health and disease, visited Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine this week.

The visit was part of a series of public lectures hosted by the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research where work is focused on Na+/K+-ATPase—a protein often referred to as the “sodium potassium pump” because it directs many cellular processes in the heart, kidney and other tissues. By studying how this cellular signaling occurs, the institute’s researchers are working to develop new treatments for cancer, heart and kidney disease.

Aperia also served as a guest speaker at Marshall’s Department of Pediatrics grand rounds.

aperia photoA native of Sweden, Aperia graduated from the Karolinska Institutet medical school and received her Ph.D. training at Yale University. She has been at the Karolinska Institutet since 1976, and as chairman of the department of pediatrics from 1987 to 1999, was the founder and project leader for Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, the largest children’s hospital in Northern Europe.

In 1987, she was appointed to the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm, where she served as a member until 2003. From 1991 to 1996, she was a member of the Nobel Committee and in 2001 she was the first woman to chair the Nobel Assembly.

Cutline:
Dr. Anita Aperia speaks Thursday at the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center during a visit to Marshall University.

Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University

Internationally recognized kidney specialist and sodium pump researcher to speak as part of MIIR lecture series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – One of the world’s leading kidney authorities and researchers will be speaking next week at Marshall University.

Dr. Anita Aperia, professor of pediatrics at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm and a former member of the Nobel Assembly, is widely recognized for her groundbreaking research contributions to medicine’s understanding of how the kidneys function in health and disease.

Her talk titled “The Physiological Function of Na+/K+-ATPase” will begin at 1 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 12, in Room 101 of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on Marshall University’s Huntington campus.

The free event is part of a series of public lectures hosted by the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research.Dr. Anita Aperia

Research at MIIR is focused on Na+/K+-ATPase—a protein often referred to as the “sodium potassium pump” because it directs many cellular processes in the heart, kidney and other tissues. By studying how this cellular signaling occurs, the institute’s researchers are working to develop new treatments for cancer, heart and kidney disease.

A native of Sweden, Aperia graduated from the Karolinska Institutet medical school and received her Ph.D. training at Yale University. She has been at the Karolinska Institutet since 1976, and as chairman of the department of pediatrics from 1987-99, was the founder and project leader for Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital, the largest children’s hospital in Northern Europe.

In 1987, she was appointed to the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm, where she served as a member until 2003. From 1991-96, she was a member of the Nobel Committee and in 2001 she was the first woman to chair the Nobel Assembly.

She has served as a council member of the International Society of Nephrology, the International Pediatric Society of Nephrology and the European Society of Nephrology.

Aperia was the 2001 recipient of the Jean Hamburger Award from the International Society of Nephrology—the first pediatrician to receive the prestigious international award. In 2011, she received the Homer W. Smith Award from the American Society of Nephrology and in 2013 was the presenter of the Robert Berliner lecture at Yale. She also has received the Torsten and Ragnar Soderberg Prize in Medicine from the Swedish Society of Medicine, and another Swedish honor, His Majesty the King’s Medal.

A dedicated teacher, Aperia has trained numerous undergraduate students and pediatric residents, and has supervised nearly 50 Ph.D. students and 30 postdoctoral fellows. She also has published approximately 300 original papers, 40 review articles and 10 textbook chapters.

In addition to the public lecture, Aperia will present Grand Rounds in the Department of Pediatrics at Cabell Huntington Hospital at 8 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 13. Her topic will be “How being a pediatric nephrologist has influenced my scientific work and vice versa.”

For more information about the programs, contact Hollie Bailey at bailey134@marshall.edu or 304-696-3549.

MIIR is Marshall’s key vehicle to advancing regional economic development through entrepreneurship and commercialization of scientific discoveries. Scientists at the institute are developing an intensive program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.

Marshall SOM Biomedical Sciences’ professors awarded American Heart Association research grants for students

Congratulations to Nalini Santanam, Ph.D. and her team (Elsa Mangiarua, Ph.D. and Monica Valentovic, Ph.D.) on receiving the Great Rivers Affiliate Undergraduate Student
Research Program Award from the American Heart Association for Marshall University. The grant encourages promising Marshall University students from all disciplines, including women and members of minority groups underrepresented in the sciences, to consider research careers while supporting the highest quality scientific investigation broadly related to cardiovascular disease and stroke.

American Heart Association logo 1.8.15

Because of this grant, Marshall University undergraduate students have an opportunity to conduct graduate-level research this summer for nine-weeks with outstanding school of medicine faculty and in amazing research facilities. Interns will receive a $4,000 stipend. Applications are due by February 20th. Click the logo above to see the application.

The peer-reviewed process focuses on evaluation of program organization, training opportunities, science and academic qualifications
of faculty, resources and funding available to students and history of student research training.

Students will learn and utilize a variety of genetic, epigenetic, molecular, morphological and physiological experimental techniques and apply them to models at the animal, tissue, cell and molecular levels. The students will also have an opportunity to work on translational research projects with leading scientists and clinical faculty. The results of each student’s research would contribute directly to a greater understanding of cardiovascular diseases, obesity and diabetes, their interrelationships and the development of improved treatments.

The Research Program is scheduled for summer 2015, and the application deadline is February 20th.

Interns will receive a $4,000 stipend for the nine-week research experience.

Learn More

Apply Now

Recent Biomedical Sciences graduate, Miranda Carper, PhD, publishes in prestigious journal

Miranda Carper, Ph.D., a December 2014 graduate of Marshall University’s Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. program, had her manuscript published in Genes and Cancer, a leading journal in the field. Dr. Carper worked in the lab of Pier Paolo Claudio, M.D./Ph.D.

RGS16, a novel p53 and pRb cross-talk candidate inhibits migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells focuses on the identification of a protein that is able to inhibit Carper, Miranda_12.14.14pancreatic cancer cell invasion and migration. The research provides information on why this protein is down-regulated in metastatic pancreatic cancer and makes the case for continued investigation. Read the entire article here (November Issue): http://www.impactjournals.com/Genes&Cancer/files/papers/1/43/43.pdf.

Congratulations on your publication and recent graduation, Dr. Miranda B. Carper!