Program Description

Applied Science Accreditation Commission of the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology (415 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21201; telephone 410-347-7700) accredits the Safety Technology undergraduate program.

The Bachelor of Science degree in Safety Technology offers students the opportunity of preparing for entry-level positions in industry, governmental agencies, and related service industries. The need for Safety Professionals has expanded due to Federal and State legislation governing safety and health in the workplace and an increase in public awareness of safety and health factors.

The safety profession is an occupational field concerned with the preservation of both human and material resources through the application of various principles drawn from such disciplines as engineering, education, psychology, physiology, enforcement, hygiene, health, physics and management. “Safety Science” is a term for everything that goes into the prevention of accidents, illnesses, fires, explosions and other events which damage people, property and the environment.

The Program Educational Objectives of Marshall University’s BS in Safety Technology have been developed to prepare graduates to achieve the professional accomplishments and recognition appropriate for successful careers in occupational safety and health including:

  1. Graduates will be able to apply a broad educational background in mathematics, science, technology, communications, and management to the challenges and demands of occupational safety and health in industrial, commercial, governmental, and service organizations of today’s global economy.
  2. Graduates will be able to apply critical thinking skills to the anticipation, identification, evaluation, prevention and control of occupational and environmental hazards relative to accident prevention, construction safety, environmental protection, emergency preparedness, ergonomics and human factors, fire prevention, hazardous materials safety, industrial hygiene, process safety, and occupational health.
  3. Graduates will be able to apply communication, problem solving, and teambuilding skills to facilitate the continuous improvement of occupational safety, environmental health, and risk control management systems.
  4. Graduates will develop ethical, societal, and professional responsibility, recognize the limits of their knowledge, and pursue life-long learning opportunities to enhance their value to the organizations, communities and stakeholders they serve.

It is the responsibility of the Safety Technology Department to ensure that baccalaureate degree students graduating from the Safety Technology Program at Marshall University will be able to demonstrate the following Student Outcomes with respect to the occupational safety and health profession:

  1. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences
  2. An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. An ability to formulate or design a system, process, or program to meet desired needs
  4. An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  5. An ability to identify and solve applied science problems
  6. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  7. An ability to communicate effectively
  8. The broad education necessary to understand the impact of solutions in a global and societal context
  9. A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. A knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern scientific and technical tools necessary for professional practice

B.S.in Safety Technology
Academic Year
2012-2013
Academic Year
2011-2012
Academic Year
2010-2011
Academic Year
2009-2010
Academic Year
2008-2009
Annual Enrollment
70
82
75
79
78
Graduation Data
16
14
15
10
10
Note: Enrollment is from the fall term of the year specified for the past five years. Graduations are for the Summer/Fall/Spring of the year specified.

Admission Requirements

General Marshall Admission requirements and a minimum MTH ACT of 19 (Math SAT 460).

B.S. Degree Requirements

The B.S. degree program requires 120 credit hours (CH) of coursework. Students are advised to pay careful attention to General Education requirements; please consult an advisor.

1. Core Curriculum

Core I (9 CH)

  • FYS 100 – First Year Seminar or FYS 100H – First Year Seminar – Honors(3 CH)
  • Two Critical Thinking courses (CT)(6 CH)

Core II (18 CH)

  • Composition:
    ENG 101 – English Composition I (3 CH) and ENG 201 – Advanced Composition (3 CH)
    or ENG 201H – English Composition Honors (6 CH)
  • Communication:
    CMM 103 – Fundamentals of Speech Communications or CMM 207 – Business and Professional Communication (3 CH)
  • Math: requirement met in major
  • Physical or Natural Science: requirement met in major
  • Social Science (Requirement met in major)
  • Humanities (3 CH)
  • Fine Arts (3 CH)

Additional University Requirements

  • Writing Intensive courses (W) (6 CH)
  • Multicultural or International course (requirement met in major: SFT 235 – Introduction to Safety is an International course) (3 CH)

Freshmen transfer students must complete Core I at Marshall. Core II can be completed with Marshall or transfer courses.

Transfers with 26 or more credit hours must complete one CT course but are exempt from the remaining Core I requirements. Core II can be completed with Marshall or transfer courses.

2. Scientific and Technical Writing

  • ENG 354 – Scientific and Technical Writing (3 CH)

3. Mathematics (5 – 9 CH)

Note: The mathematics a student must take will depend upon several factors such as student’s ACT score and mathematics proficiency. It is very important for the student to talk to their advisor.

Math ACT score of 19 or 20 (8 to 10 CH)

  • MTH 127 – College Algebra – Expanded (5 CH)
  • MTH 122 – Plane Trigonometry (3 CH) or MTH 132 – Precalculus with Scientific Applications (5 CH)

Math ACT score of 21-23 (6 to 8 CH)

  • MTH 130 – College Algebra (3 CH)
  • MTH 122 – Plane Trigonometry (3 CH) or MTH 132 – Precalculus with Scientific Applications (5 CH)

MTH ACT score of 24-26 (5 CH)

  • MTH 132 – Precalculus with Scientific Applications (5 CH)

Note: Math 140 or Math 229 should also be considered if the student is considering graduate school.

The B.S. degree is an accredited program by ASAC/ABET. Students must be able to demonstrate “proficiency” in the areas of mathematics and statistics; chemistry, physics, and sciences; communication studies; psychology and physiology; and major field of study, i.e. safety. To demonstrate proficiency in the areas, a grade of no less than “C” in all courses listed below is required. Students are reminded that a 2.00 GPA overall and in area of specialization is required.

4. Basic Studies for Safety Technology Program (25 CH)

  • CHM 211 – Principles of Chemistry I (3 CH)
  • CHM 217 – Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I (2 CH)
  • CHM 212 – Principles of Chemistry II (3 CH)
  • CHM 218 – Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II (2 CH)
  • CHM 204 – General Chemistry II (3 CH)
  • BSC 104 – Introduction to Biology or BSC 120 – Principles of Biology (4 CH)
  • PHY 201 – General Physics I (3 CH)
  • PHY 202 – General Physics Laboratory I (1 CH)
  • PHY 203 – General Physics II (3 CH)
  • PHY 204 – General Physics Laboratory II (1 CH)

5. Management Course (3 CH)

Student should choose ONE of the following courses:

  • MGT 320 – Principles of Management (3 CH)
  • ACC 215 – Principles of Accounting (3 CH)

6. Statistics (3 CH)

Student should choose ONE of the following courses:

  • MTH 225 – Introductory Statistics (3 CH)
  • PSY 223 – Elem. Behav. Statistics (3 CH)
  • MGT 218 – Business Statistics (3 CH)

7. Psychology Courses (6 CH)

  • PSY 201 – General Psychology (3 CH)
  • PSY 420 – Introduction to Industrial Org Psy (3 CH)

8. Anatomy/Physiology

  • ESS 201 – Introduction to Applied Anatomy and Physiology (3 CH)

9. Engineering-Related Course (3 CH)

  • ENGR 221 – Engineering Economy (3 CH)

10. Professional Safety Core (39 CH Total)

Note: Courses in this area MAY NOT be taken under the Credit/No Credit option.

  • SFT 235 – Introduction to Safety Education (3 CH)
  • SFT 340 – Industrial Fire Prevention (3 CH)
  • SFT 372 – Safety and Industrial Technology I (3 CH)
  • SFT 373 – Principles in Ergonomics and Human Factors (3 CH)
  • SFT 373L – Principles of Ergonomics Lab (1 CH)
  • SFT 375 – Construction Safety (3 CH)
  • SFT 454 – Industrial Environmental Protection (3 CH)
  • SFT 454L – Industrial Env Protection Lab (2 CH)
  • SFT 460 – Safety Training Methods (3 CH)
  • SFT 465 – Incident Investigation (3 CH)
  • SFT 489 – Process Safety Management (3 CH)
  • SFT 498 – Env Safety and Health Legislation (3 CH)
  • SFT 499 – Org, Admin & Supervision of Safety Prog (3 CH)
  • SFT 490 – Safety Internship – Capstone Experience (3 CH)

11. Occupational Safety Electives (6 CH)

Student must select 6 hours.

  • SFT 378 – Safety Evaluation (3 CH)
  • SFT 453 – International Safety and (3 CH)
  • SFT 458 – Hospital Safety
  • SFT 497 – Occupational Safety & Health Program (3 CH)
  • SFT 480-483 – Special Topics (3 CH)
  • SFT 485-488 – Independent Study (1-4 CH)
  • SFT 491-494 – Workshop (1-4 CH)

Or Other SFT electives approved by advisor.

A minimum of 128 hours is required for graduation.

Four Year Curriculum Plan Template

The following plan is a sample; please consult your advisor when creating your own plan of study.

Year 1

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
FYS 100 – First Year Seminar 3 Fine Arts (ART112, MUS142, THE112) 3
SFT 235 – Introduction to Safety 3 SFT 372 – Safety and Industrial Technology I 3
ENG 101 – English I 3 Humanities (CT) 3
CMM 103 or CMM 207 – Communication 3 BSC 104 or 120 – Intro to Biology 4
MTH 127 – College Algebra OR MTH 130 (3 hrs) 5 MTH 122 – Trigonometry OR MTH 132 (5hrs) – Pre-Calculus 3
Total 17 Total 16

Year 2

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
ENG201 – Advanced Composition 3 PHY 203 – General Physics II 3
PHY 201 – General Physics I 3 PHY 204 – General Physics Laboratory II 1
PHY 202 – General Physics Laboratory I 1 SFT 373 – Principles in Ergonomics and Human Factors 3
PSY 201 – General Psychology 3 SFT 373L – Principles of Ergonomics Lab 1
SFT 340 – Industrial Fire Prevention 3 SFT 465 – Incident Investigation 3
SFT 375 – Construction Safety I 3 Statistics 3
Total 16 Total 14

Year 3

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
CHM 211 – Principles of Chemistry I 3 CHM 212 – Principles of Chemistry II 3
CHM 217- Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I 2 CHM 218 – Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II 2
CORE II CT and/or W Course 3 ENG 354 – Scientific and Technical Writing 3
SFT 460 – Safety Training Methods 3 SFT 498 – Env Safety and Health Legislation 3
SFT 489 – Process Safety Management 3 SFT Elective I 3
ENGR 221 – Engineering Economy 3
Total 17 Total 14

Year 4

Fall Semester
Spring Semester
CHM 204 – General Chemistry II 3 HS 201 – Intro to Applied Anatomy and Physiology 3
MGT 320 – Principles of Management 3 PSY 420 or PSY 4183ACC 215 – Principles of Accounting 3
SFT 490** – Safety Internship – Capstone Experience 3 SFT 454 – Industrial Hygiene I 3
SFT 499 – Occupational Safety Program Management 3 SFT 454L – Enviro Prog/Sampling Lab 2
CORE II CT and/or W course 3 SFT Elective II 3
Total 14 Total 15

Legend:
CT – Critical Thinking designated course
I – International course
W – Writing Intensive designated course

** SFT 490 is often taken in Summer

Minor Options

There are two minors offered in the Safety Technology program.

Occupational Safety and Health Minor (16 CH)

The courses in this minor include CHM and PHY prerequisites.

  • SFT 235 – Introduction to Safety (3 CH)
    Note: this is a Marshall Plan International course
  • SFT 372 – Safety and Industrial Technology (3 CH)
  • SFT 373 – Principles of Ergonomics (3 CH)
  • SFT 373L – Principles of Ergonomics Lab (1 CH)
  • SFT 499 – Occupational Safety Program Management (3 CH)
  • Safety Elective (3 CH)

Safety Technology Minor (15 CH)