Probation/Suspension Policies

Probation

All students whose overall grade point average (GPA) falls below at 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. Academic Probation is a period of restricted enrollment for a student. Also, if you have a deficit of 1 to 19 quality points, you will be placed on probation.

All students on academic probation are subject to the following restrictions:

  1. Meet with the College of Science Associate Dean and/or designated advisor before registering for classes to develop an Academic Improvement Plan to achieve good academic standing.
    • Students on probation are not allowed to register on-line or without the Associate Dean's signature (or designated advisor's signature).
  2. All probation students must sign an Academic Improvement Plan and agree to reduce his/her quality deficiency points by a certain amount in a required period of time.
    GPA Hours 0-25 26-57 58-89 90 or more
    Quality Deficiency Points 20 15 12 9
  3. Students on probation must earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher during every semester they are on probation.
    • Failure to achieve a 2.0 GPA or higher while on Academic Probation will result in suspension.
  4. Student are encouraged to repeat classes based on Marshall University D & F Repeat Rule.
  5. Register for a maximum of 14 credit hours per semester.
    • Students who pre-register for classes will be required to drop to at least 14 credit hours.
    • If a student fails to drop to or below 14 credit hours by the end of the 1st week of the semester, the Associate Dean will have classes dropped for him/her.

See the Marshall Undergraduate Catalog for more information.

D & F Repeat Rule (Academic Forgiveness)

As a Marshall undergraduate, you have one opportunity to repeat at any course in which you earned a grade of "D" or "F" during your first sixty (60) semester hours. The second grade will replace the first in determining your GPA, hours attempted, and hours credited. The second grade counts (excluding "W") even if it is a lower grade than the original one. The original grade remains on your transcript, but it is noted as a repeated course.

If you plan to repeat a course under the D & F Repeat Rule, you must submit a D&F Course Repeat Application to the College of Science Dean's Office within the first two (2) weeks of the semester in which you are repeating the course.

Financial Aid/Scholarships

In general, a student receiving financial aid must complete a certain percentage of classes in order to keep his/her financial aid. Also, a student must maintain a certain GPA. Guidelines vary according to overall hours completed. Scholarships typically require a student to maintain and meet certain criteria.

Speak with the Financial Aid Office located in Old Main to receive specific information concerning your situation.

Suspension

Academic Suspension is defined as a period in which a student cannot enroll in courses at Marshall. A student who has pre-registered and is subsequently suspended will have his/her registration automatically cancelled. Students who earn less than a 2.0 semester GPA while on Academic Probation or who accumulate or exceed the quality point deficiency listed for the GPA will be suspended for one regular semester. Summer terms do not count as a term of suspension.

When a student returns to the College of Science after any suspension, a student is placed on probation and must follow all of the requirements of his/her Academic Improvement Plan (see above). Failure to meet all the requirements of the Academic Improvement Plan or exceeding the Quality Point Deficits in the above table will result in a second suspension will be for a period of one calendar year. Third and subsequent suspensions will be for a period of two calendar years each.

A transfer student suspended from any college at Marshall University shall not be considered for transfer until his/her period of suspension has expired.

See the Marshall Undergraduate Catalog for more information.

My GPA

Marshall uses a 4.0 scale to express GPAs. A GPA is a numeric value calculated by dividing total quality points by total credit hours for courses in which the student earned a letter grade. Each letter grade has a specific value assigned to it.

Grade Quality Points per Semester Hour
Letter Value
Meaning
Numeric Value
A
superior
4
B
above average
3
C
average
2
D
below average
1
F
failure
0
I*
incomplete
0
CR**
credit
0
NC**
no credit
0
W**
withdrawal
0
AU**
audit
0
*A grade of "I" becomes "F" if the course is not completed within one (1) year after initially taking the course.
**This grade is not included in your GPA.

For example, a student takes four 3 credit hour classes and receives 2 B's, 1 C and 1 F. The student's GPA is as follows:

Letter Grade
Numeric Grade Value
Credit Hours
Quality Points
B
3
x
3.0
=
9.0
B
3
x
3.0
=
9.0
C
2
x
3.0
=
6.0
F
0
x
3.0
=
0.0
 
12 total credit hours
24 total quality points

24.0 total quality points / (divided by) 12.0 total credit hours = (equal) 2.0 GPA.

Deficit Points

If a student's GPA is below a 2.0 the student will have a deficiency of quality points (deficit). Based on number of credit hours attempted, deficit points are calculated to let a student know how far he/she is below a 2.0 GPA. With grades of "A" and "B" a student gains points. Grades of "D" or "F" a student loses points. With a "C" grade a student neither gains nor loses points.

Improving my Academic Standing

A student can improve his/her academic standing a number of ways. One of the quickest ways to improve a GPA is through D & F repeats. Another is earning "A"s and "B"s. How many deficit points and the student's GPA determine how long it would take a student to improve his/her academic standing.

Self-Assessment

Do some serious self-assessment to understand why you are in academic difficulty. Some questions you might consider are the following:

  • Did you go to all your classes?
  • Did you do your homework and turn your assignments in on time?
  • Do you have poor learning skills and study habits?
  • Did you have a clear academic direction/goal?
  • Did you focus on your classes or social activities?
  • Did you take too heavy a course load considering your work and/or family obligations?
  • Do you procrastinate or manage your time poorly?
  • Did you take higher-level classes you weren't prepared for?
  • Was there something truly unique or unusual happening in your life?
  • Did you get help if you didn't understand the material being covered?

Be honest with yourself! You may want to discuss your answers when you meet with the Associate Dean or an academic advisor.

 
 
College of Science • One John Marshall Drive • Science Building 270 • Huntington, WV 25755
(304) 696-2372