The following courses are offered in the College of Science during Fall 2018. View all courses offered over the past 5 years.

  • BSC 104 - Introduction to Biology
    Fundamentals of biology with emphasis on the unity of life, energetics, genetics and the world of living things. Intended for non-science majors. 3 lec-2 lab.
  • BSC 105 - Human Biology
    Fundamentals of biological human structure, function, and interactions with the environment. Intended for non-science majors. Does not count for health professions credit. 3 lec-2 lab.
  • BSC 120 - Principles of Biology
    Study of basic biological principles common to all organisms through lecture and laboratory activities. Intended for science majors and pre-professional students. 3 lec-2 lab.
  • BSC 121 - Principles of Biology
    A continuation of the study of basic biological principles common to all organisms. Intended for science majors and pre-professional students. 3 lec-2 lab.
  • BSC 227 - Human Anatomy
    Principles of gross and microscopic anatomy of human body systems and their development. Provides preparation for degrees in health professions. Does not count towards a major in Biological Science. 3 lec-2 lab (ACT composite 19 or higher or 12 hrs. college credit, 100 level or above with minimum GPA of 2.3)
  • BSC 228 - Human Physiology
    Fundamentals of normal human physiology, from cells to systems. Provides the scientific background for understanding pathophysiology and preparation for degrees in health professions. Does not count toward a major in Biological Science. 3 lec-3 lab (PR: BSC 227 with grade C or better)
  • BSC 250 - Microbiol and Human Disease
    Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on the role of microorganisms in the disease process.
  • BSC 302 - Principles of Microbiology
    Basic microbiological techniques, fundamental principles of microbial action, physiological processes, immunology , serology disease process. 2 lec-4 lab.
  • BSC 304 - Microbiology Lab
    A laboratory course emphasizing basic microbiological techniques including preparation of culture media, gram staining, isolation and identification of bacteria from diverse environments, and evaluation of antiseptics and disinfectants.
  • BSC 320 - Principles of Ecology
    A fundamental approach to the basic principles underlying the interrelationships of organisms with their biotic and abiotic environments. A variety of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems will be studied in the field and in the laboratory. 3 lec-3 lab.
  • BSC 322 - Principles Cell Biology
    A fundamental approach to the princples of cell biology covering general cellular structure and function, organelles, intercellular interactions, molecular inter- actions, and modern cellular and molecular methods. 3 lec-3 lab.
  • BSC 324 - Principles of Genetics
    The fundamental principles and mechanisms of inheritance. 3 lec-4 lab.
  • BSC 409 - Mammalogy
    A study of the structural features, evolution and classifi- cation of mammals; other topics will include ecology, zoo- geography, behavior, reproductive strategies, physiological adaptation to extreme environments and economic aspects. 2 lec-2 lab and field.
  • BSC 417 - Biostatistics
    Statistical skills for biological/biomedical research, with emphasis on applications. Experimental design/survey sampling, estimation/hypothesis testing procedures, regression, ANOVA, multiple comparisions. Implementation using statistical software such as SAS, BMDP. Pre: Permission (consistent with MTH 518 description)
  • BSC 422 - Animal Physiology
    Physiological principles operating in cells, organs, and systems of animals, with a focus on vertebrate, including human, function. 3 lec-3 lab (PR: BSC 322, CHM 355, MTH 140 or 132 or 229; or permission)
  • BSC 426 - Medical Entomology
    Role of certain insects and other arthropods in the trans- mission of disease organisms and methods of control. 2 lec-4 lab.
  • BSC 431 - Limnology
    Study of inland waters; ecological factors affecting lake and stream productivity and various aquatic communities.
  • BSC 438 - Emerging Infect Diseases
    Introduces students to infectious diseases that are either newly emergent or have returned to prominence within the last decade.
  • BSC 450 - Molecular Biology
  • BSC 480 - SpTp: Human Genetics
  • BSC 480 - SpTp: Molecular Medicine
  • BSC 481 - SpTp: Metabolic Systems
  • BSC 491 - Capstone Experience
    An independent study involving a research project or intern- ship. Must be approved by Biological Science Faculty.
  • BSC 509 - Mammalogy
    A study of the structural features, evolution and classifi- cation of the mammals; other topics will include ecology, zoogeography, behavior, reproductive strategies, physiologi- cal adaptations to extreme environments and economic aspects. 2 lec-2 lab.
  • BSC 517 - Biostatistics
    Statistical skills for biological/biomedical research, with emphasis on applications.Experimental design/survey sampling, estimation/hypothesis testing procedures, regression, AVONA, multiple comparisons. Implementation using statistical software such as SAS, BMDP. Permission (consistent with MTH 518 description)
  • BSC 522 - Animal Physiology
    Physiological principles operating in cells, organs, and systems of animals, with a focus on vertebrate, including human, function.
  • BSC 526 - Medical Entomology
    The characteristics and control of certain insects and other arthropods which transmit disease-causing organisms. 2 lec-4 lab.
  • BSC 531 - Limnology
    The study of inland waters; ecological factors affecting lake and stream productivity and various aquatic communities. 2 lec-4 lab.
  • BSC 550 - Molecular Biology
    Advanced principles in molecular function emphasizing current research using recombinant DNA methodology. (PR: BSC 322 or equivalent)
  • BSC 580 - SpTp: Molecular Medicine
    (PR: Permission)
  • BSC 581 - SpTp: Emerg Infectious Disease
    (PR: Permission)
  • BSC 660 - Seminar I
    Topics relevant to preparation for a career in the life sciences including: literature mining and interpretation, scientific ethics, preparation and delivery of scientific presentations, and career development tools.
  • BSC 662 - Seminar II
    Oral presentation of individual topics.
  • BSC 679 - Problem Report
    Preparation and completion of a written report from experimental or field research in biological sciences. (PR: permission)
  • BSC 680 - SpTp: Population Genetics
  • BSC 680 - SpTp: Using R in data analysis
  • BSC 681 - Thesis
    By permission of adviser.
  • BSC 717 - Ana Physio Pathophy Nur Anes I
    Anatomy, Physiology, pathophysiology and anesthetic considerations related to the respiratory and renal systems.
  • BSC 718 - Ana Psy Path Nurse Anes II
    Anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and anesthetic considerations related to the cardiovascular system.
  • CHM 109 - Chemistry in the Home
    An introduction to basic concepts of chemical science as it applies to materials commonly found within the household. Students will be expected to learn to evaluate potential hazards of such materials.
  • CHM 111 - Foundations of Chemistry
    This course will introduce students to basic chemical facts and concepts. Topics will include units, dimensional analysis, nomenclature, solutions, atomic structure, and stoichiometry.
  • CHM 204 - General Chemistry II
    A continuation of chemistry 203 with emphasis on intro- ductory organic and biochemistry. 3 lec.
  • CHM 205 - General, Organic, and Biochem
    Introductory course for health professions students and non-science majors covering basic chemical principles with applications in organic chemistry and biochemistry.
  • CHM 211 - Principles of Chemistry I
    A study of the properties of materials and their inter- actions with each other. Development of theories and applications of the principles of energetics, dynamics and structure. Intended primarily for science majors and pre-professional students. 3 lec.
  • CHM 212 - Principles Chemistry II
    A continuation of chemistry 211 with emphasis on the inorganic chemistry of the representative elements and transition metals. 3 lec.
  • CHM 217 - Principles of Chem Lab I
    A laboratory course that demonstrates the application of concepts introduced in Chemistry 2ll. (CR or PR: CHM 2ll)
  • CHM 218 - Principles of Chem Lab II
    A laboratory course that demonstrates the application of concepts introduced in Chemistry 2l2. (CR or PR: CHM 2l2).
  • CHM 305 - Research Methods Chem
    A survey course concerning the use of the chemical literature with an emphasis on online computer searching and ethical issues relating to the conduct of scientific research and the relationship of science to society.
  • CHM 327 - Intro Organic Chemistry
    A one semester introduction to organic chemistry emphasizing structure, nomenclature, and reactivity. (Cannot fulfill an upper division chemistry elective.) 3 lec. (PR: CHM 212)
  • CHM 328 - Intro Organic Chem Laboratory
    The laboratory to accompany CHM 327. Students learn the basic techniques used in the modern organic chemistry laboratory.
  • CHM 331 - Chemistry Seminar
    Students attend lectures presented by internal and external speakers to learn about the nature and variety of chemical research.
  • CHM 332 - Chemistry Seminar
    Students attend lectures presented by internal and external speakers to learn about the nature and variety of chemical research.
  • CHM 345 - Intro to Analytical Chem
    An introduction to basic techniques of analytical chemistry and data analysis through statistical procedures. Traditional wet and contemporary instrumental methods are covered with an emphasis on experimental care and craftsmanship.
  • CHM 355 - Organic Chemistry I
    A systematic study of organic chemistry including modern structural theory, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry; app- lication of these topics to the study of reactions and their mechanisms and applications to synthesis. 3 lec.
  • CHM 356 - Organic Chemistry II
    Continuation of Chemistry 355. 3 lec.
  • CHM 357 - Physical Chemistry: Quantum
    A study of quantum mechanics applied to atomic structure, chemical bonding, and spectroscopy. 3 lec.-2 lab.
  • CHM 361 - Intro Organic Chm Lab
    An introduction to of experimental organic chemistry with emphasis on fundamental techniques and their application to the preparation and identification of organic compounds. 6 lab.
  • CHM 365 - Introductory Biochemistry
    A survey course including introduction to basic biochemical concepts, metabolic pathways, and bioenergetics. 3 lec.
  • CHM 390H - Honors in Chemistry
    Independent study or undergraduate research project for outstanding students.
  • CHM 401 - Research for Undergrad
    Students engage in research project in collaboration with a faculty member.
  • CHM 431 - Chemistry Seminar
    Students attend lectures presented by internal and external speakers to learn about the nature and variety of chemical research.
  • CHM 432 - Chemistry Seminar
    Students attend lectures presented by internal and external speakers to learn about the nature and variety of chemical research. Students also present an oral and written presentation of their capstone experience.
  • CHM 448 - Adv Inorganic Chemistry I
    Study of physical properties and periodic relationships of inorganic materials. 3 lec, 2 lab (PR: CHM 356, CHM 307 or 357)
  • CHM 481 - Special Topics
  • CHM 490 - Internship
    Students engage in supervised chemical laboratory work in a professional setting.
  • CHM 491 - Capstone Experience
    Students engage in a collaborative research project with a faculty member.
  • CHM 548 - Adv Inorganic Chemistry I
    Study of physical and chemical properties and periodic relationships of inorganic materials. 3 lec, 2 lab (PR: CHM 356, CHM 307, or CHM 357)
  • CHM 631 - Seminar
  • CHM 632 - Seminar
  • CHM 682 - Research
    Credit in the course is earned by pursuing a directed original investigation in a field of chemistry. Twelve semester hours credit in research are applied toward the M.S. degree. Students may sign for one or more credit hurs per semester depending upon the time to be spent on research. A grade of PR may be reported at the close of each term or semester.
  • CIT 163 - Intro to Programming: C++
    Concepts of software development and maintenance using C++, including syntax of the language, loops, functions, pointers, decision structures, and file processing. Proper program design using object-oriented programming techniques are emphasized.
  • CIT 236 - Data Structures
    Covers fundamental topics of information technology including the concepts of object-orientation, linear data structures, data representation, data manipulation algorithms and their applications, and project participations.
  • CIT 260 - Instrumentation
    The course introduces students to modern data gathering methods, laboratory instrumentation, and programming. Focuses range from transportation development, forensics, to environmental issues.
  • CIT 263 - Web Programming I
    Students will learn techniques for creating advanced documents and programs for the Web using HTML, DHTML, XML, JavaScript, and PHP scripting. Students will also learn how to install and maintain a Web server.
  • CIT 265 - C# NET Programming
    Covers the essentials for developing robust and secure applications using C#, Windows forms, and the .NET framework. Also covers ADO.NET, writing secure .NET applications and web services.
  • CIT 280 - SpTp: Coding for Digital Hum
  • CIT 313 - Web Programming II
    The second semester of two course sequence on Web programming. This course focuses on server-side programming and databases. Topics covered include PHP, mySQL, web services, and security.
  • CIT 332 - Software Engineering I
    Introduction to the industrial process of software systems development. The course covers project management and planning risk management issues; software quality and configuration issues; and processes, methods, and development tools.
  • CIT 340 - Game Development I:2D
    Covers computer software industry, history and the role of a creative game development team. Students will participate in the game development process, including art, animation, programming, music, sound and writing.
  • CIT 352 - Network Protocols and Admin
    This course provides students with knowledge of network terminology, structures, topologies, protocols, and inter-faces involving Local Area and Wide Area networks.
  • CIT 365 - Database Management
    To understand the logical and physical design of data stored and retrieved from a relational database. Exposure to distributed databases, database administration and structured query language will also be done.
  • CIT 413 - iOS Development
    Students will learn to develop iOS applications using HTML5/PhoneGap, Objective-C, and Swift, using Apple and third-party SDKs. Also covers basic concepts for designing intuitive and usable user-interfaces.
  • CIT 440 - Computer Graphics for Gaming
    Fundamental concepts dealing with the display of graphic information on semi-interactive storage tube displays. The course includes techniques for hidden line display, hidden line removal, and two- and three-dimensional transformation.
  • CIT 447 - Modeling/Simuation Dev
    Course applies fundamentals of game development to educational games or simulations within a virtual world. Explores virtual worlds, basic scripting/modeling techniques and role-playing simulations to teach any concept.
  • CIT 466 - Database Programming
    This course teaches students database programming available to relational database systems. Students will work with fourth generation languages to analyze, design and develop, and execute programs in a database environment.
  • CJ 200 - Intro to Criminal Justice
    This survey course examines the various components of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, courts, and corrections. Students will be introduced to various criminal justice agencies and career possibilities.
  • CJ 211 - Intro to Law Enforcement
    Designed to examine the philosophical and historical background of law enforcement in the United States. Addresses constitutional limitations on law enforcement, objectives of law enforcement, and processes of law enforcement.
  • CJ 221 - Intro to Criminal Courts
    This course addresses the evolution of current functioning of the American criminal court system. Students are exposed to court administration, court procedures, and the state and federal court system.
  • CJ 231 - Intro to Corrections
    A survey of the historical development of the systems of punishment and rehabilitation. Analysis of the reasons for incarceration of offenders.
  • CJ 300 - Admin of Criminal Justice
    This course provides an analysis of the theories of organization and the administration of criminal justice agencies, including management styles, techniques of leadership, and decision-making. (Pre-Requisite: CJ 200)
  • CJ 302 - CJ Research Methods
    Logic of social research methods, survey research, methods of evaluation, sampling, and the contrast between qualitative and quantitative CJ research. (PR: CJ 200: Introduction to Criminal Justice)
  • CJ 314 - Crime Scene Investigation
    This course exposes students to crime scene evidence, collection techniques, and the various uses of modern technology in preserving and analyzing evidence. (PR: CJ 211 :Introduction to Law Enforcement)
  • CJ 322 - Criminal Law
    History and development of criminal law, elements of a crime; parties to a crime, types of offenses.
  • CJ 325 - Juvenile Justice
    A survey of the process--the police, the courts, and corrections--through which the juvenile delinquent passes.
  • CJ 331 - Probation and Parole
    Organization of systems of after-care treatment of juvenile and adult offenders released under probation and parole.
  • CJ 340 - Drugs and Crime
    Examines the history and consequences of mind altering drugs, and criminal behavior as it is affected by drugs, the legal response to substance abuse, treatment and prevention of substance abuse. (PR: CJ 200: Introduction to Criminal Justice)
  • CJ 403 - Understanding Cybercrime
    Examination of hacking, piracy, cyber stalking, cyber bullying, identity theft, and other cybercrimes through the lens of various criminological theories with an emphasis on research methodology and criminal justice policy.
  • CJ 404 - Theoretical Criminology
    A critical analysis of the major criminological theories and their empirical foundations. Current theory and research receive greater emphasis than historical development. PR: CJ200.
  • CJ 416 - Terrorism
    Provides students with a working knowledge of the history of terrorism, the current status of terrorist groups, terrorism tactics, and methods to counteract terrorism.
  • CJ 422 - Law of Evidence
    Leading rules and principles of exclusion and selection; burden of proof, nature and effect of presumptions; proof of authenticity and contents of writings; examinations, compentency and privilege of witnesses.
  • CJ 424 - Computer Crime
    Students will identify and define criminal acts committed with computers or directed toward computer systems, electronic search and seizure and electronic evidence.
  • CJ 453 - Seminar in Crime Prevention
    This course examines theory, operation, and evaluation of crime prevention as a function of the criminal justice system. Techniques for crime prevention are analyzed from various orientations, including environmental design.
  • CJ 481 - SpTp: Homeland Security
    A study of special interest criminal justice topics under the supervision of a qualified faculty member.
  • CJ 492 - Senior Seminar
    Integrates theory with practice; identifies relationship between research and practice of criminal justice. Examines current and future research issues in criminal justice. Capstone course. (CR: CJ 404 or CJ 423)
  • CJ 503 - Understanding Cybercrime
    Examination of hacking, piracy, cyber stalking, cyber bullying, identity theft, and other cybercrimes through the lens of various criminological theories with an emphasis on research methodology and criminal justice policy.
  • CJ 504 - Theoretical Criminology
    A critical analysis of the major criminological theories and their empirical foundations. Current theory an research receive greater emphasis than historical development.
  • CJ 516 - Terrorism
    This course provides students with a working knowledge of the history of terrorism, the current status of terrorist groups, terrorism tactics, and methods to counteract terrorism.
  • CJ 522 - Law of Evidence
    Leading rules and principles of exclusion and selection; burden of proof, nature and effect of presumptions; proof of authenticity and contents of writing; examinations competency and privilege of witnesses.
  • CJ 524 - Computer Crime
    Students will identify and define criminal acts committed with computers or directed toward computer systems, electronic search and seizure and electronic evidence.
  • CJ 553 - Seminar Crime Prevention
    This course examines theory, operation, and evaluation of crime prevention as a function of the criminal justice system. Techniques for crime prevention are analyzed from various orientations, including environmental design.
  • CJ 601 - Seminar Criminal Justice
    A forum to acquaint students, faculty and guests with each others' research and experiences in dealing with criminal justice issues.
  • CJ 655 - Research Methods in CJ
    Elements of scientific research; interaction between research and theory; use of data processing resources.
  • CJ 699 - Capstone Experience
    A culminating experience where students will apply knowledge and skills learned in their program of study to create, in collaboration with an agency or organization in the field, an original, scholarly work that addresses a current issue of concern.
  • DFIA 305 - Open Source Intelligence
    This course identifies and demonstrates free online resources that can aid investigators in searching the Internet for resources that can be applied to domestic and international investigations.
  • DFIA 357 - Network Penetration and Attack
    Students will explore tools and techniques used to penetrate, exploit and ex filtrate data from computers and networks.
  • DFIA 400 - Intro to Digital Forensics
    This course teaches students how information is recovered from electronic devices and the forensic techniques used to perform forensic examinations. In addition, legal issues regarding electronic data will be discussed.
  • DFIA 448 - Forensic Image and Video
    Course will introduce principles of forensic image and video analysis and their application to digital forensics. Practical forensic enhancement and analysis techniques, including how to prepare forensically-sound exhibits, are covered.
  • DFIA 454 - Network Defense
    An in-depth examination of the principles, strategies, and tools used to defend, detect, and respond to a variety of common network attacks.
  • DFIA 460 - App Dig Evidence and eDisc
    Introduction to the principles, practices and tools of digital forensics and electronic discovery. Hands-on exercises in a simulated real-world environment are a critical component of the course.
  • DFIA 461 - Cyber Warfare
    Broad examination of this new form of conflict including the role of nation states, the challenge of attribution, potential impact on the physical world, and current government policy and doctrine.
  • DFIA 464 - Network Security
    Addresses security issues for TCP/IP-based networks. Access Control and Communications are covered as well as Internet security in areas of cryptography, protocols, applications, encryption, hash functions, digital signatures, etc.
  • DFIA 467 - Mobile Device Forensics
  • DFIA 490 - Capstone
    This course reinforces and assesses the student's ability to apply core digital forensic and information assurance knowledge and skills in a series of realistic practical exercises.
  • FSC 600 - Cell and Molecular Biology
    A study of the molecular biology of the cell and its organelles, cell interactions, and differentiation.
  • FSC 606 - Crime Scene/Death Investiga
    Establishes foundations and techniques for proper crime scene investigation with or without a victim's body. Logical approach for collecting evidence and documenting scene and collection process.
  • FSC 607 - Blood Stain Pattern Analysis
    A comprehensive bloodstain pattern analysis course including bullet trajectory, courtroom testimony, and report writing. This course is taught as a combination of lectures, laboratories, and practical exercises.
  • FSC 608 - Forensic Toxicology
    An in-depth analysis of both clinical and forensic aspects of toxicology from the viewpoint of the forensic and medical examiner's toxicology laboratories.
  • FSC 609 - Network Forensics
    Teaches the basics of how computers and networks function, how they can be involved in crimes as well as used as a source of evidence.
  • FSC 612 - Intro Foren Micro/Trace
    Introduction to various types of microscopy used in foren- sics, including scanning electron microscopy, light and fluorescence microscopy and polarizing microscopy. Photo- graphic techniques used for documentation will also be discussed.
  • FSC 622 - Forensic Analytical Chem
    Analytical chemistry instrumentation and methods used by forensic scientists for analysis of drugs, toxicology, arson, explosives, trace evidence and sample collection and processing.
  • FSC 624 - Biochemistry: Forensic Science
    This comprehensive course in biochemistry focuses on concepts appropriate to forensic science and designed to meet forensic science educational standards at a national level.
  • FSC 628 - Chem Analysis Trace Evidence
    A continuation of FSC 622 emphasizing additional types of evidence including paint, inks, fibers, and plastics. Methods Include pyrolysis-GCMS, micro-FTIR, GPC and capillary electrophoresis. Required course for Forensic Chemistry emphasis.
  • FSC 629 - Advanced DNA Technologies
    This course will provide advanced instruction in DNA technologies to assist in the preparation for a career in a forensic DNA laboratory.
  • FSC 632 - FoundandFundDigitalForensics
    The course provides fundamental information to lay the foundation for the Digital Forensics Area of Emphasis. A range of topics includes laws and regulations relating to stored digital data, quality assurance and ethics in a digital laboratory, basic terminology, computer hardware and various storage media, software, including operating and file systems, and basics concepts of computer security. The course is taught primarily in a lecture format. Class discussions and participation in practical exercises supplement lectures.
  • FSC 640 - Firearms Toolmarks I
    This course provides an enhanced learning experience designed to reduce the time to competency typical of the knowledge required component fo a firearms examiner training program. FSC 640 is the first of two firearms and toolmarks examiner training courses.
  • FSC 642 - DNA Tech Assistance I
    The goal of the DNA Technical Assistance Program (DNA TAP) is to prepare select students for placement in host forensic laboratories for validation and evaluation research studies. The student undergoes acclerated lectures and intense hands-on laboratory exercises including analytical procedures, instrument training, and data analysis.
  • FSC 680 - Seminar
    Faculty, student and guest speaker presentations of topics pertinent to forensic science.
  • GLY 100 - Geologic Hazards and Resources
    Introductory course for non-science majors focusing on (i) Earth Hazards; and mitigation, (ii) Climate change and its impacts; and (iii) Earth and Energy resources, their origin, development, and environmental impacts.
  • GLY 150 - Intro Oceanography
    Origin of the seas and ocean basins. Processes of marine sedimentation and seawater chemistry. Dynamics of air/sea interaction, circulation, waves and tides. Description of coastal and other marine environments.
  • GLY 150L - Intro Oceanography Lab
    A complementary laboratory to Introductory Oceanography, GLY 150. A series of exercises relating to bathymetry, accoustic profiling, marine charts, properties of seawater, sea floor sediments, currents, waves and tides.
  • GLY 200 - Physical Geology
    An elementary but comprehensive physical geology course that deals with the earth's origin, composition, structures, tectonics and processes. Intended primarily for, but not limited to, the science major. 3 lec.
  • GLY 210L - Earth Materials Lab
    An introduction to laboratory methods and materials as applied to the identification, classification, recovery and uses of earth resources. 2 lab.
  • GLY 212 - Introduction to Field Methods
    Introduction to geologic map interpretation, qualitative and quantitative methods of geologic map and cross-section preparation, and basic ArcGIS mapping methods. 2 lec 1 lab. (Field Work). (PR: GLY 110 or 200, and 210L. Required of majors).
  • GLY 320L - Geology Lab Techniques
    Techniques of collection, preparation and analysis of mineral, rock and water samples, and the use of different instruments for obtaining quality data. Will also cover tools used for data interpretation.
  • GLY 325 - Stratigraphy and Sediment
    Formation, organization, sequence, and correlation of sedimentary rocks; study of the orgin, transportation and deposition of rock-forming sediments. 3 lec-2 lab.
  • GLY 457 - Engineering Geology
    Consideration of geotechnical problems faced by geologists and engineers. Major topics include mechanics and classification of soil and rock, and geotechnical aspects of groundwater. (PR: GLY 200, 210L, MTH 132).
  • GLY 492 - Capstone Experience
    An independent study involving a research project or intern- ship. Must be approved by Geology faculty. (PR: 20 hours of Geology coursework).
  • IST 150 - Spreadsheet and Database Prin
    Comprehensive coverage of spreadsheets and databases. Includes techniques to collect, manage, and analyze data; solve problems; and effectively communicate results for scientific research. Includes macro development and introduction to scripting.
  • IST 224 - Intro to Forensic Science
    The relationship between scientific process and crime solutions is explored. DNA technology, probability theory, fingerprints, blood spatter, questioned documents, crime scene investigation will be examined using laboratories and case studies.
  • IST 264 - Technology Foundations
    This course introduces the student to the common hardware and technology that pervades business and society as a whole. Topics include pc's, networks, software, the internet, cellular phones, etc.
  • IST 301 - Public Service Experience
    At least 30 contact hours in a public service/volunteer experience with a group, organization or agency that offers a service to the general public. Advisor permission required.
  • IST 441 - Metabolic Systems
    Discusses basic molecules, processes, and mechanisms responsible for the activity of all living systems, and the methods of their analysis. Provides necessary theoretical background for the understanding of industrial biotechno- logy.
  • IST 470 - Internship in IST
    A supervised internship in an area of Integrated Science and Technology.
  • IST 480 - SpTp: CAD and GIS
  • IST 490 - Senior Project I
    Senior Capstone Experience.
  • IST 491 - Senior Project II
    Senior Capstone Experience
  • IST 580 - SpTp: CAD and GIS
    Courses on special topics not listed among the current course offerings.
  • MTH 102 - Prep for College Math B
    A mastery-based course that will prepare students for college algebra.
  • MTH 102B - Abr Prep for College Math B
    An abridged mastery-based course that will prepare students for College Algebra.
  • MTH 121 - Concepts and Applications (CT)
    Critical thinking course for non-science majors that develops quantitative reasoning skills. Topics include logical thinking, problem-solving, linear modeling, beginning statistics and probability, exponential and logarithmic models, formula use, and financial concepts.
  • MTH 121B - Cncpts and Apps-Expanded (CT)
    Critical thinking course for non-science majors that develops quantitative reasoning skills. Topics include logical thinking, linear modeling, statistics and probability, exponential and logarithmic modeling, and financial concepts, with arithmetic review.
  • MTH 122 - Plane Trigonometry
    Definitions of circular functions; graphs to trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, and applications.
  • MTH 127 - College Algebra-Expanded
    A brief but careful review of the main techniques of alge- bra. Polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Graphs, equations and inequalities, sequences.
  • MTH 130 - College Algebra
    Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic func- tions. Graphs, equations and inequalities, sequences.
  • MTH 132 - Precalculus with Sci Applica
    Functions used in calculus including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric. Systems of equations and inequalities, conic sections, polar and parametric equations, sequences and series, Binomial Theorem.
  • MTH 140 - Applied Calculus
    A brief survey of calculus including both differentiation and integration with applications. Not to be substituted for Mathematics 131 or Mathematics 190.
  • MTH 140H - Applied Calculus Honors
    A brief survey of calculus including both differentiation and integration with applications. This honors course will also introduce topics from differential equations with applications.
  • MTH 160 - Applied Math Reasoning (CT)
    A critical thinking course in applied mathematical reasoning. Topics include logic, problem solving, linear modeling, beginning statistics and probability, exponential and logarithmic modeling, formula use.
  • MTH 220 - Discrete Structures
  • MTH 229 - Calculus/Analytic Geom I (CT)
    An introduction to calculus and analytic geometry, emphasizing critical thinking. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of the elementary functions of one variable, including transcendental functions.
  • MTH 229H - Calculus I Honors (CT)
    An introduction to calculus and analytic geometry for honors students, emphasizing critical thinking. Limits, derivatives, and integrals of the elementary functions of one variable, including transcendental functions.
  • MTH 230 - Calculus/Analytic Geom II
    A study of the conics and transcendental functions, tech- niques of integraton, improper integrals, indeterminate forms and infinite series.
  • MTH 231 - Calculus/Analytic Geom III
    Analytic geometry of two and three dimensions, partial dif- ferentiation, and multiple integrals.
  • MTH 300 - Intro to Higher Math
    A transition between elementary calculus and higher math- ematics with emphasis on techniques of proofs. (PR or CR: MTH 23l or equivalent)
  • MTH 329 - Elementary Linear Algebra
    Systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications.
  • MTH 331 - Linear Algebra
  • MTH 335 - Ordinary Diff Equations
    A study of differential equations, their solutions, and applications to physical systems, emphasizing closed-form solving methods. Laplace transforms, orthogonal functions, approximation and numerical methods with applications. (PR: C or better in MTH 231 and REC: MTH 331 or MTH 329)
  • MTH 360 - Intro to Complex Variables
    An introductory survey of complex numbers, analytic functions, properties of elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles, with a focus on practical applications.
  • MTH 400 - Structure of Algebra
    Emphasis on the language of Modern Elementary Algebra. Recommended for pre-service elementary teachers and for elementary and secondary in-service teachers. May not be used for either a degree offered by the Department of Mathematics or for a 7-9 or 7-12 mathematics specialization.
  • MTH 427 - Advanced Calculus I
    The number system, limits, sequences, partial different- iation with applications, maxima and minima of functions of several variables. Theory of definite integrals, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, improper integrals, infinite series.
  • MTH 443 - Numerical Analysis
    The theory and technique of numerical computation involving the difference calculus, the summation calculus, inter- polation methods, solution of systems of equations, and methods of solution of ordinary differential equations.
  • MTH 448 - Modern Geometries
    Finite geometrics, basic background material for the modern development of Euclidean Geometry, other geometries.
  • MTH 450 - Modern Algebra I
    Structure of the abstract mathematicl systems; groups, rings, fields, with illustrations and applications from number theory.
  • MTH 455 - Number Theory
    A survey of some basic properties of the integers: divisibility (prime numbers, factorization, perfect numbers), congruences (modular arithmetic, linear and quadratic congruences, the Chinese Remainder Theorem), and Diophantine equations.
  • MTH 480 - SpTp: Design Theory
  • MTH 480 - SpTp: Practical Mathematics
  • MTH 480 - SpTp: VTRMC
  • MTH 490 - Internship in Mathematics
    A supervised internship in an area of mathematics, applied mathematics, or statistics. By permission only.
  • MTH 491 - Senior Seminar
    Capstone experience in reading, doing writing and speaking mathematics. Student will explore topics related to a theme chosen by the instructor. (PR: MTH 300 and Permission)
  • MTH 500 - Structure of Algebra
    Emphasis on the language of Modern Elementary Algebra. Recommended for preservice elementary teachers and for elementary and secondary in-service teachers. May not be used for a degree offered by the Department of Mathematics of in the twelve hour content block of the Secondary Education MA Degree program for students with mathematics certification in grades 7-12.
  • MTH 527 - Advanced Calculus I
    The number system, limits, sequences, partial differentia- tion with applications, maxima and minima of functions of several variables. Theory of definite integrals, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, improper integrals, infinite series.
  • MTH 548 - Modern Geometries
    Finite geometrics, basic background material for the modern development of Euclidean Geometry, other geometries.
  • MTH 550 - Modern Algebra I
    Structure of the abstract mathematical systems; groups, rings, fields, with illustrations and applications from Number Theory.
  • MTH 580 - Special Topics
    Courses on special topics not listed among the current course offerings.
  • MTH 589 - Graduate Mathematics Seminar
    A seminar on topics relevant to graduate students in mathematics, including college-level teaching, conducting research, professional ethics, and mathematics careers. THis course does not satisfy any degree requirements.
  • MTH 643 - Numerical Analysis
  • MTH 650 - Real Variables I
    A study of measure and integration and related topics.
  • MTH 655 - Number Theory
    A survey of some basic properties of the integers: divisibility (prime numbers,factorization,perfect numbers), congruences (modular arithmetic, linear and quadratic congruences, the Chinese Remainder Theorem), and Diophantine equations.
  • MTH 667 - Num Partial Diff Equations
    Finite difference methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic PDEs. Study of properties such as consistency, convergence, and stability. Computer implementation.
  • MTH 681 - Thesis
  • MTH 690 - SpTp: Design Theory
    Courses on special topics not listed among the current course offerings. (PR: Permission of Instructor)
  • NRE 111 - Living Systems
    This course is designed to equip students to observe and create their own questions, test them, and continue the process of scientific inquiry related to living systems.
  • NRE 120 - Discussions in Envrion Science
    Critical thinking course designed to examine and explore issues in environmental science including protection of terrestrial and aquatic resources and production of energy and food for a growing population.
  • NRE 212 - Energy
    The course introduces the students to the properties and the interfaces of biological and physical systems with emphasis on energy concepts, production and distribution in both systems.
  • NRE 320 - Nature Enviro Problems
    The effects of human activity on ecological, political, economic, and cultural systems are examined. Particular attention is given to present human population growth, industrial activities, and energy availability.
  • NRE 323 - Assessment II: Aquatic Ecology
    Use of scientific procedures and current technology to characterize and quantify sensitive elements of aquatic ecosystems and to assess human impact on these systems.
  • NRE 423 - GIS and Data Systems
    Course focuses on the relationships among the scientific method, data structures, and geographic images. Students relate hypothesis formation and databases through the development of ARCMap documents.
  • NRE 480 - SpTp: Watershed Protection
    A course covering topics not treated in regular course offerings.
  • NRE 481 - SpTp: Resort Management
    A course covering topics not treated in regular course offerings.
  • NRE 482 - SpTp: Hospitality and Tourism
    A course covering topics not treated in regular course offerings.
  • NRE 490 - ES/NRRM Capstone Prep
    Prepares students for the senior project, internship experience, and for careers beyond graduation. Life skills are introduced by building on communication, organization, and project management skills (capstone).
  • NRE 491 - ES Senior Capstone
    Students develop and complete a research project under the direction of a faculty member in the NRE department (capstone).
  • NRRM 101 - Intro Natural Res and Rec Mgmt
    An orientation to the profession and its settings, emphasizing history, trends, concepts, and relationships to other fields.
  • NRRM 200 - Analytical Methods: Statistics
    Students develop an understanding of statistical reasoning through the use of software to generate, summarize, and draw conclusions from data. Course enhances statistical technique dexterity through analysis of applied problems.
  • NRRM 231 - Nature Study
    Designed to provide students with the fundamental understanding of and for the delivery of nature based educational programs offered through an experiential framework.
  • NRRM 361 - Visitor Behavior in NRRM
    This course provides an overview and analysis of individual and group behavior as it pertains to consumer activity in the context of recreation and tourism resource environments.
  • NRRM 432 - Wilderness/Protected Area Mgmt
    This course will examine the historic and current philosophies of wilderness and protected area management as applicable to NGOs, local, state, and federal land management programs.
  • PHY 101 - Conceptual Physics
    Introduces nonscience majors to applications of physics in life. Emphasises conceptual understanding of basic prin- ciples in classical and modern physics. Recommended for science students with no high school physics. (PR: MTH 120, 121 or MTH 123).
  • PHY 101L - Conceptual Physics Lab
    Conceptual Physics Laboratory. A laboratory course designed to include the principles and applications of physics that are introduced in Physics 101. (CR: PHY 101) 2 lab.
  • PHY 201 - General Physics
    First half of an introduction to physics for life-science students, using algebra and vectors by triangles: force, energy, particle dynmaics, rotation, fluids, waves, thermal phenomena.
  • PHY 202 - General Physics I Laboratory
    Laboratory to accompany PHY 201 or PHY 211, focusing on mechanics concepts and applications.
  • PHY 203 - College Physics II
    Second half of an introduction to physics for students of natural (life) sciences, using algebra and vectors by triangles: E&M fields, circuits; ray optics, interference; atoms, nuclei.
  • PHY 204 - General Physics Lab
    Laboratory to accompany PHY 203 or PHY 213, focusing on classical E&M, circuits, and optics.
  • PHY 211 - Principles of Physics
    First half of an introduction to physics for students of physical science or engineering, using calculus and vectors by components: force, energy, particle dynamics, rotation, fluids, waves, thermodynamics.
  • PHY 213 - Principles of Physics
    Second half of an introduction to physics for students of physical science or engineering, using calculus and vectors by components: E&M fields, circuits; ray optics, interference; atoms, nuclei.
  • PHY 300 - Electricity and Magnetism
    A course including the study of electrostatics, magneto- statics, electromagnetic induction, introduction to Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. 3 lec.
  • PHY 308 - Thermal Physics
    An intermediate course in geometrical and physical optics. 3 lec.
  • PHY 420 - Astrophysics
    A detailed study of core problems in Astrophysics such as orbital dynamics, radiation processes, stellar structure and evolution, galactic dynamics, and cosmology.
  • PHY 443 - Quantum Mechanics II
    This is the second part of a two-semester introduction to quantum mechanics. Emphasis is on applications of quantum theory including approximation techniques and the study of more realistic quantum systems.
  • PHY 444 - Advanced Laboratory
    Developments in producing and detecting correlated photon pairs has enabled implementation of undergraduate laboratories demonstrating fundamental quantum mechanical principles. This laboratory also incorpates fundamental solid state and materials science experiments.
  • PHY 445 - Math Methods of Physics
    An introduction to theory of orthogonal functions, curvilinear coordinate systems, vector and tensor fields, and their applications in physics. Problems are drawn from different areas of physics. 3 lec.
  • PHY 481 - SpTp: SPOT Training
    By permission of department chairman.
  • PHY 491 - Capstone
    To give a capstone expeience to physics majors in their junior or senior years by applying the principles of physics to the solution of real life problems. (PR: CSD 203, or 218 and lab).
  • PHY 543 - Quantum Mechanics II
    This is the second part of a two-semester introduction to quantum mechanics. Emphasis is on applications of quantum theory including approximation techniques and the study of more realistic quantum systems.
  • PHY 544 - Advanced Lab
    Developments in producing and detecting correlated photon pairs has enabled implementation of undergraduate laboratories demonstrating fundamental quantum mechanical principles. This laboratory also incorporates fundamental solid state and materials science experiments.
  • PHY 545 - Math Methods of Physics
    An introduction to the theory of orthogonal functions, curv- ilinear coordinate systems, vector and tensor fields and their applications in Physics. Problems are drawn from different areas of physics. 3 lec.
  • PHY 580 - SpTp: Astro Physics
  • PHY 581 - SpTp: SPOT Training
  • PHY 630 - Classical Mechanics
    Study of variational principes and Lagrange's equations, the two-body central force problem, the kinematics and dynamics of rigid-body motion, Hamilton equations of motion, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, and small oscillations.
  • PHY 645 - Methods of Math. Physics
    This course will review and develop theories of real and complex analysis, group theory, tensors, special functions, differential and integral transforms, emphasizing their application to electrodynamics, quantum statistical mechanics, etc.
  • PS 121 - PS for Teachers: Chemistry
    PS 121 is a part of a 3 course sequence of Physical Science for K-9 Education majors. Includes 2-hr, 1 credit lab.
  • PS 660 - Independent Studies
    Advanced independent study topics to provide additional individual research and classroom/laboratory opportunities.
  • STA 225 - Introductory Statistics (CT)
    Introduction to statistical analysis.
  • STA 345 - Applied Prob and Stat
    Statistical methods in scientific/engineering research, with emphasis on applications. Probability modeling, experimental design/survey sampling, estimation/hypothesis testing procedures, regression, ANOVA/factor analysis. Implementation using statistical software such as Excel/SAS.
  • STA 412 - Regression Analysis
    Determining regression models; deriving parameter estimates using calculus; detailed coverage of tests of assumptions and remedial procedures (transformations and weithted least-squares); multiple and polynomial regression; tests and corrections for autocorrelation.
  • STA 445 - Probability and Statistics I
    Probability spaces, conditional probability, and applications. Random variables, distributions, expectation, and moments.
  • STA 464 - Statistical Computing
    Introduction to the commonly used statistical computing techniques, procedures and methods, with extensive use of R language and environment, and SAS for statistical computing and graphics.
  • STA 466 - Stochastic Processes
    Review of probability theory. Topics include stationary processes, discrete and continuous time Markov chains, Markovian queuing systems, random walks, renewal processes, Brownian motion and Markov Chain Monte Carlo.
  • STA 470 - Applied Survival Analysis
    Survival and hazard functions, parametric and non-parametric methods, models and inferences for survival data, and regression diagnosis. (PR: C or better in STA 445, or by permission).
  • STA 512 - Regression Analysis
    Determining regression models; deriving parameter estimates using calculus; detailed coverage of tests of assumptions and remedial procedures (transformations and weighted least-squares); multiple and polynomial regression; tests and corrections for autocorrelation.
  • STA 518 - Biostatistics
    Statistical skills for biological/biomedical research, with emphasis on applications. Experimental design/survey sampling, estimation/hypothesis testing procedures, regression, ANOVA, multiple comparisons. Implementation using statistical software such as SAS, BMDP. May not be used for any degree offered by the Department of Mathematics.
  • STA 545 - Probability and Statistics I
    Probability spaces, conditional probability, and applications. Random variables, distributions, expectations, and moments.
  • STA 564 - Statistical Computing
    Introduction to the commonly used statistical computing techniques, procedures and methods, with extensive use of R language and environment, and SAS for statistical computing and graphics. (CR/PR: STA 545 or STA 546)
  • STA 570 - Applied Survival Analysis
  • STA 660 - Stochastic Processes
    Theory and applications of Markov chains. (PR: MTH 545)
  • STA 661 - Adv Math Statistics
    Topics in mathematical statistics including distribution theory for functions of random variables, convergence concepts, sufficient statistics, finding optimal estimates for parameters, optimal test of hypotheses. (PR: MTH 546)

Subjects

* This course listing is not authoritative. It provides an example of courses offered; actual course offerings may vary. Course information, including prerequisites and co-requisites, may be incomplete or missing. Students should refer to their catalog, their academic advisor(s), and/or the COS Office of Student Services for current course information.