>EVENT: Guest Speaker Series: Junious Brickhouse

Event Flyer: Junious Brickhouse (PDF)

Thursday, March 2, 6-7:30 pm. MSC BE5

JUNIOUS “HOUSE” BRICKHOUSE IS AN INTERNATIONALLY ESTABLISHED EDUCATOR, CHOREOGRAPHER AND CULTURAL PRESERVATIONIST with over 30 years of experience in Urban Dance Culture. As the Founding Executive Director of Urban Artistry Inc., Junious has inspired and created a movement of artists dedicated to the authentic preservation of urban
dance culture, specifically within communities of practice. From ring shouts and acoustic county blues to hip hop, understanding the nature and meaning of these art forms and their influences, is what motivates this artist.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Robin Riner conleyr@marshall.edu

>EVENT: SOCiety Naloxone Training

NaloxoneTraining_Flyer

The SOCiety, Marshall’s Student Sociology Association, is hosting a Naloxone Training (an opioid overdose reversal treatment) by the Cabell-Huntington Harm Reduction Program. The event, held on Monday, March 13th at 7:00pm in BE5, is free and open to students, faculty, staff, and the general public. Participants will learn about opioid overdose signs and symptoms as well as response techniques, including the administration of naloxone. One free dose pack of the reversal drug will be made available to each participant completing the training. Pre-registration (by email to herman17@live.marshall.edu) is required. Please direct any questions to Dr. Maggie Stone, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, stonem@marshall.edu.

INFO > Scholarships for Students

Are you looking to distinguish yourself and achieve something with lasting impact for your academic and professional career?  Try for a competitive, national scholarship. Check out the information available at the MU Office of National Scholarships which maintains lists of many of the prestigious national scholarships that are out there.  If you feel interested, contact their office for help deciding whether to and how to apply.  Of course, you should also speak with your academic advisor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology. Specific application dates change from year to year, so check with their office, website calendar, or the scholarship’s website for deadlines.

http://www.marshall.edu/nationalscholarships/links-to-scholarships/

>EVENT: Guest Speaker Series

Jack Shuler, PhD – Public Lecture (PDF)

Department of Sociology & Anthropology Guest Lecture Series Presents

Dr. Jack Shuler giving a public lecture titled “Buckeyes and Dixie:Race Relations in America’s Heartland”

Author, independent journalist, Denison University professor

Shuler’s published works include:

The Thirteenth Turn: A History of the Noose (2014),

Blood and Bone: Truth and Reconciliation in a Southern Town (2012)

Thursday Jan. 19, 2017

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Drinko Library 402

 

INFO > Where do Anthropologists Work? (via AAA)

The American Anthropological Association’s 2016 report on a membership survey that provides details on the distribution of work among them–both within and outside academia.  Synopsis available here.

Full report available here.

Where do AAA members work?

>EVENT: HOEY presents at DPH Health Research Seminar

Dr. Brian A. Hoey (AnHoey Research Seminar in Healththropology) will present his current research at the second session of a new series of “brown bags” sponsored by the Department of Public Health at Marshall University.

Contamination Experience and the Doubling of the World:  Placing the West Virginia Water Crisis in the Context of Psychosocial Health

Abstract:  There is a rich, diverse, and growing literature both documenting and examining disasters that have profoundly affected communities around the world.  These range from so-called natural disasters—such as Hurricane Katrina—to those deemed human-made or technological, including the now well-researched Exxon-Valdez oil spill and other such “contaminating” events.  This presentation to the Department of Public Health’s newly-launched Health Seminar Series is designed to help situate the West Virginia Water Crisis within a broad field of disaster events that share important elements at both the analytic and experiential levels.  My intent is to suggest some conceptual tools through which we may examine accounts of those affected by the Freedom Industries chemical spill in West Virginia in early 2014.  Principle among these is the notion that disasters such as toxic contamination create a “doubling of the world” wherein affected persons develop a sense of their lifeworld at odds with their common sense, everyday perceptions of it.  Given the project team’s methodological focus on capturing unadorned oral histories of a demographically varied group of persons directly impacted by the spill, my role has been one of facilitating interpretation of recurring elements revealed in narratives of the ongoing, lived experience of the water crisis.  Drawing on my own history of fieldwork on the role of place in the construction of individual and community identity, I give special attention to emergent themes of disruption in relationship to place and the potential long-term psychosocial impact of shifts in personal and group understandings of place and meaningful relationships with it.

 

The former Freedom Industries site just outside of Charleston is shown in April 2014. Credit: DAILY MAIL FILE PHOTO/TOM HINDMAN
The former Freedom Industries site just outside of Charleston is shown in April 2014. Credit: DAILY MAIL FILE PHOTO/TOM HINDMAN

> EVENT: Works in Progress Series – Fall 2016 – Session 04

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues.  We’re now in our third year!

We’ll be meeting for our last session of the Fall 2017 semester on Friday, November 11th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have had the same room and time slot all semester for all sessions of the series.  Refreshments will be served.

Our fourth and final presenter of the series will be Dr. Paul Kadetz (Chair, Department of Public Health) who will present “Contagious words: Tracing antimicrobial resistance in rural China through the categories of naming antibiotics.”

Abstract:  This mixed-methods Medical Research Council/Newton Fund/National Science Foundation of China funded research will trace the causal factors leading to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in rural Anhui province, China. In leading the qualitative component of this research, various anthropological methods (semi-structured interviews, participant observation, free lists and pile sorts) will be employed to identify which factors may be contributing to antimicrobial resistance in Anhui province, particularly cultural factors of treatment. One, heretofore unexamined, cultural factor may be the variations in understanding and naming of the English word “antibiotic” in Chinese. There is no single direct Chinese corollary for the word “antibiotic”. Nor is there a singular understanding of the term “antibiotic” either within generations of Chinese physicians or between physicians and the lay public. Part of this talk will examine how best to investigate the relationship between cultural transfers of biomedical knowledge that may become “lost in translation”, the mimesis that may result in such transfers, and the ultimate impact of these cultural differences on human health.

Works in Progress - Fall 2016, Session 04
Download a copy of this poster image in PDF by clicking on it.

Please join us for what is sure to be a fascinating presentation and lively discussion.

We have OPENINGS for our sessions in Spring 2017 (TBA), so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

> NEW: Research Seminars in Health

Research Seminars in Health - Brown Bag Series

> EVENT: Works in Progress Series – Fall 2016 – Session 03

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues.  We’re now in our third year!

We’ll be meeting on Friday, October 28th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have the same room and time slot all semester for all sessions of the series.  Each session will have 1-2 speakers.  A flyer for the series is attached.  Refreshments will be served.

Our third presenter of the series will be Ms Hailey Horn (with Preserve WV and Americorps) speaking about her work with MU History faculty member Dr. David Trowbridge on the Clio app.

clio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We still have an OPENING for the remaining session, so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

WORKS IN PROGRESS SERIES_Fall 2016