INFO > Where do Anthropologists Work? (via AAA)

The American Anthropological Association’s 2016 report on a membership survey that provides details on the distribution of work among them–both within and outside academia.  Synopsis available here.

Full report available here.

Where do AAA members work?

>EVENT: HOEY presents at DPH Health Research Seminar

Dr. Brian A. Hoey (AnHoey Research Seminar in Healththropology) will present his current research at the second session of a new series of “brown bags” sponsored by the Department of Public Health at Marshall University.

Contamination Experience and the Doubling of the World:  Placing the West Virginia Water Crisis in the Context of Psychosocial Health

Abstract:  There is a rich, diverse, and growing literature both documenting and examining disasters that have profoundly affected communities around the world.  These range from so-called natural disasters—such as Hurricane Katrina—to those deemed human-made or technological, including the now well-researched Exxon-Valdez oil spill and other such “contaminating” events.  This presentation to the Department of Public Health’s newly-launched Health Seminar Series is designed to help situate the West Virginia Water Crisis within a broad field of disaster events that share important elements at both the analytic and experiential levels.  My intent is to suggest some conceptual tools through which we may examine accounts of those affected by the Freedom Industries chemical spill in West Virginia in early 2014.  Principle among these is the notion that disasters such as toxic contamination create a “doubling of the world” wherein affected persons develop a sense of their lifeworld at odds with their common sense, everyday perceptions of it.  Given the project team’s methodological focus on capturing unadorned oral histories of a demographically varied group of persons directly impacted by the spill, my role has been one of facilitating interpretation of recurring elements revealed in narratives of the ongoing, lived experience of the water crisis.  Drawing on my own history of fieldwork on the role of place in the construction of individual and community identity, I give special attention to emergent themes of disruption in relationship to place and the potential long-term psychosocial impact of shifts in personal and group understandings of place and meaningful relationships with it.

 

The former Freedom Industries site just outside of Charleston is shown in April 2014. Credit: DAILY MAIL FILE PHOTO/TOM HINDMAN
The former Freedom Industries site just outside of Charleston is shown in April 2014. Credit: DAILY MAIL FILE PHOTO/TOM HINDMAN

> EVENT: Works in Progress Series – Fall 2016 – Session 04

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues.  We’re now in our third year!

We’ll be meeting for our last session of the Fall 2017 semester on Friday, November 11th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have had the same room and time slot all semester for all sessions of the series.  Refreshments will be served.

Our fourth and final presenter of the series will be Dr. Paul Kadetz (Chair, Department of Public Health) who will present “Contagious words: Tracing antimicrobial resistance in rural China through the categories of naming antibiotics.”

Abstract:  This mixed-methods Medical Research Council/Newton Fund/National Science Foundation of China funded research will trace the causal factors leading to antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in rural Anhui province, China. In leading the qualitative component of this research, various anthropological methods (semi-structured interviews, participant observation, free lists and pile sorts) will be employed to identify which factors may be contributing to antimicrobial resistance in Anhui province, particularly cultural factors of treatment. One, heretofore unexamined, cultural factor may be the variations in understanding and naming of the English word “antibiotic” in Chinese. There is no single direct Chinese corollary for the word “antibiotic”. Nor is there a singular understanding of the term “antibiotic” either within generations of Chinese physicians or between physicians and the lay public. Part of this talk will examine how best to investigate the relationship between cultural transfers of biomedical knowledge that may become “lost in translation”, the mimesis that may result in such transfers, and the ultimate impact of these cultural differences on human health.

Works in Progress - Fall 2016, Session 04
Download a copy of this poster image in PDF by clicking on it.

Please join us for what is sure to be a fascinating presentation and lively discussion.

We have OPENINGS for our sessions in Spring 2017 (TBA), so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

> NEW: Research Seminars in Health

Research Seminars in Health - Brown Bag Series

> EVENT: Works in Progress Series – Fall 2016 – Session 03

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues.  We’re now in our third year!

We’ll be meeting on Friday, October 28th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have the same room and time slot all semester for all sessions of the series.  Each session will have 1-2 speakers.  A flyer for the series is attached.  Refreshments will be served.

Our third presenter of the series will be Ms Hailey Horn (with Preserve WV and Americorps) speaking about her work with MU History faculty member Dr. David Trowbridge on the Clio app.

clio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We still have an OPENING for the remaining session, so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

WORKS IN PROGRESS SERIES_Fall 2016

> EVENT: Works in Progress Series – Fall 2016 – Session 02

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues.  We’re now in our third year!

Next week we’ll be meeting on Friday, October 14th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have the same room and time slot all semester for all sessions of the series.  Each session will have 1-2 speakers.  A flyer for the series is attached.  Refreshments will be served.

Our second presenter of the series will be MA candidate in Sociology, Mr. Christopher Lucas, presenting his work in progress project titled “Why Witches and Gays Get Along So Well: A Study of the American Midwestern Neopagan Community’s Views on LGBT People.”

Much of the extant literature on the intersection of sexuality and religion establishes a correlation between level of religiosity and approval of same-sex marriage and attitudes towards LGBT people. The levels of measurement for religious categories are usually not exhaustive, however, causing the literature to equate intensity of Christianity to religiosity. This paper attempts to tease out the difference between religiosity and religious category membership by conducting an ethnographic study of the American Midwestern Neopagan community and its opinions on LGBT people: what do they think? What informs these opinions? How to LGBT people situate themselves within the community? The results show that not only does the Neopagan community typically accept LGBT people and same-sex marriage but that many Neopagans consider themselves at the forefront of the fight for LGBT rights and that this drive is influenced by the nature of their spirituality. Religiosity and opinion on LGBT people seem to have no apparent correlation in this study.

We still have OPENINGS for the remaining two sessions, so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

WORKS IN PROGRESS SERIES_Fall 2016

>EVENT: Women Chef’s Experiences in Professional Kitchens

Download an event flyer.

Women Chef's Experiences in Professional Kitchens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

>Works in Progress Series Returns

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology sponsored Works in Progress Series continues this semester.  We’re now in our fifth year!

Next week we’ll be meeting on Friday, September 9th at 1 PM in Drinko Library, Room 402.  We have the same room and time slot all semester for the four sessions of the series.  Each session will have 1-2 speakers.  A flyer for the series is attached.

Our first presenter of the series at our first session will be Dr. Dan Holbrook (History) who will be speaking on “Discipline and Polish: Wiping and Wipers.”  No, you don’t need to be into Foucault to appreciate it—though it will allow you the opportunity to get the inside jokes.  Refreshments will be served.  Holbrook presentation flyer attached.

We still have openings for the remaining three sessions, so if you would like to submit a proposal for presenting at the WIP Series and getting valuable feedback on your works in progress, please see the submission portal here:  https://tinyurl.com/MUWIPseries.  Find more information about the series  in general here:  http://www.marshall.edu/dosa/calendar/wip/.

From the archives:  Check out the MU DoSA Works in Progress Series (#13) from Spring 2016:

“The International Context of Huntington’s Drug Crisis,” Dr. Chris White (History) and “Fair Trade: Helping Communities Invest in their Local,” Heidi Dennison (Communications)

https://ensemble.marshall.edu/Watch/g7Q8CxYt

WORKS IN PROGRESS SERIES_Fall 2016

 

 

>MU Anthropology Alum Dives on Great Lakes Shipwreck

Tyler Ball (Anthropology BA, 2013) is seen here in Summer 2016 working on the shipwreck Atlanta near Sheboygan, Wisconsin.  The Atlanta, built in 1891, burnt and sank in Lake Michigan in 1906.  Tyler is pursuing a graduate degree in Maritime Studies and Historical Archaeology at East Carolina University.

Tyler Ball (MU ANT, 2013) Dives on the "Atlanta" in Lake Michigan, 2016