Dr. Hoey received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Michigan.  His research encompasses a number of themes including personhood and place, migration, narrative identity and life-transition, community building, and negotiations between work, family, and self in different social, historical, and environmental contexts.  Longstanding interests in career change, personal identity and the moral meanings of work lead to his project as a postdoctoral fellow at the Alfred P. Sloan Center for Ethnography of Everyday Life on “New Work,” unconventional arrangements of work, family and community life explored by so-called free-agents of the post-industrial economy.  His dissertation research in Northwest Lower Michigan explored non-economic or “life-style” migration where downsized and downshifting corporate workers relocate as a means of starting over.  As a Fulbright Scholar in Indonesia, he studied the contested nature of constructing personally and culturally meaningful space within the process of creating imagined and intentional community in far-flung agrarian settlements within a government migration program.  He has also explored how  therapeutic ideals are attached to particular physical settings–including purposive communities that range from 19th century moral treatment asylums to today’s New Urbanist developments.

Hoey continues his work with migration, community development, and economic restructuring–focusing now on the Appalachian region of the United States.  Despite a recent history of often bleak economic conditions and an continued mixed prospects, He has found the communities surrounding Marshall University are, in many ways, perfect places to conduct research on new forms of work, entrepreneurship, community building, and the marketing of place according to emerging cultural and economic models that may stand in sharp contrast to the dominant order of the Industrial Era. In an area where plant closings and grim economic forecasts became commonplace over the past several decades, innovation which challenges conventional wisdom should not surprise us. Innovation is often born of necessity. We can see this kind of innovation right here at Marshall University where tight budgets necessitate strategic planning to clarify the University’s place and purpose in higher education and economic development in the state and region.

Hoey’s active research agenda is an integral part of teaching.  His goal is to work with students to find personally meaningful ways to apply anthropological knowledge and practice to real world problems.  You may learn more about his work at www.brianhoey.com.

.
academia_icon 

 

google scholar_icon 

 

facebook_find me

 

 

Curriculum Vitae

 

Selected Publications

Books

2014       Opting for Elsewhere: Lifestyle Migration in the American Middle Class. Nashville, TN:  New Book by Brian Hoey: “Opting for Elsewhere” by Vanderbilt University Press [forthcoming]

Articles

2010       “Locating Personhood and Place in the Commodity Landscape,” City and Society Vol. 22(2): 207-210

2010       “Personhood in Place: Personal and Local Character for Sustainable Narrative of Self” City and Society Vol. 22(2): 237-261

2007       “From Sweet Potatoes to God Almighty: Roy Rappaport on Being a Hedgehog” [with Tom Fricke] American Ethnologist Vol. 34(3):581-599

2006       “Grey Suit or Brown Carhartt: Narrative Transition, Relocation and Reorientation in the Lives of Corporate Refugees,” Journal of Anthropological Research Vol. 62(3):347-371

2005       “From Pi to Pie: Moral Narratives of Non-economic Migration and Starting Over in the Post-industrial Midwest,” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography Vol. 34(5):587-623

2003       “Nationalism in Indonesia: Building Imagined Community and Intentional Communities through Transmigration,” Ethnology Vol. 42(2):109-125

Book Chapters

2014       “Post-Industrial Societies” in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (2nd edition), D. Boyer and U. Hannerz, eds.  Elsevier.

2014       “Theorizing the ‘Fifth Migration’ in the United States:  Understanding Lifestyle Migration from an Integrated Approach” in Understanding Lifestyle Migration:  Theorizing Approaches to Migration and the Quest for a Better Way of Life, Benson and Osbaldiston, eds.  Hampshire, England: Palgrave, pp. 71-91.

2013       “Roy Rappaport” in Theory in Social and Cultural Anthropology, J. McGee and R. Warms, Eds.  Sage, pp. 685-688.

2009       “Pursuing the Good Life: American Narratives of Travel and a Search for Refuge” in Lifestyle Migration: Expectations, Aspirations and Experiences, K. O’Reilly and M. Benson, eds.  London: Ashgate, pp. 31-50.

2008       “American Dreaming:  Refugees from Corporate Work Seek the Good Life” in The Changing Landscape of Work and Family in the American Middle Class, E. Rudd and L. Descartes, eds.  Lanham, MD: Lexington, pp. 117-139

2007       “Therapeutic Uses of Place in the Intentional Space of Purposive Community” in Therapeutic Landscapes: Advances and Applications, A. Williams, ed.  London: Ashgate, pp. 297-314.

Selected Courses

Cultural Anthropology

Culture and Environment

Ethnographic Research

Health, Culture and Society

Human Ecology

Disease in Evolutionary and Cultural History

US Culture and the Changing Family

Anthropology of Global Problems

 

Dr. Hoey's new book from Vanderbilt University Press. Coming August 2014.
Dr. Hoey’s new book from Vanderbilt University Press. Coming August 2014.