You’re checking your email, replying to your professors, friends or colleagues, when you come across a message that says: HUGE VIRUS COMING! PLEASE READ & FORWARD! “ Hmmm. Should you forward it? Check what is real and what is not at the following web sites.

Snopes.com
Computers are not only now an integral part of our daily lives, they have also become the primary means by which urban legends and other pieces of misinformation are now spread- everything from ‘stupid computer user” stories to virus warning hoaxes (and occasional real warning).

Hoaxes from Symantec Security Response
Symantec Security Response uncovers hoaxes on a regular basis. These hoaxes usually arrive in the form of an email. Please disregard the hoax emails – they contain bogus warnings usually intent only on frightening or misleading users. The best course of action is to merely delete these hoax emails. Please refer to this page whenever you receive what appears to be a bogus message regarding a new virus, or promotion that sounds too good to be true.

Hoax-Slayer
Hoax-Slayer is dedicated to debunking email hoaxes, thwarting Internet scammers, combating spam, and educating web users about email and Internet security issues. Hoax-Slayer allows Internet users to check the veracity of common email hoaxes and aims to counteract criminal activity by publishing information about common types of Internet scams.

Podcast Series on Application Security MythBusters
Listen to the latest myths out there on Web application security from security experts around the world provided by Cenzic.com.

UrbanLegends.about.com
Urban legends, hoaxes and rumors on and about the Internet and the World Wide Web.

McAfee.com Virus Hoax Listings