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Strategic Planning at Marshall University

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Contents

Strategic Planning Committee - 1999

1999 Strategic Plan Update:

A Decade of Excellence
High Quality UndergraduateEducation
Technological Sophistication
The Interactive University
Financial Management
The Drinko Library and Information Center
Vision 2020

MU 1999 Strategic Plan Executive Summary
Accomplishments in the Academic Area - Highlights
Accomplishments in Partnerships - Highlights
Accomplishments in Financial Management - Highlights
Accomplishments in Information Technology - Highlights
Merger Accomplishments - Highlights
Facilities and Operations Accomplishments - Highlights
Expectations for the Future - Highlights

MU 1999 Community and Technical College Executive Summary
1999 Academic Programs
Staffing Changes
1999 Professional Development Activities
Community Service Project
Future Expectations

Note:  The entire Strategic Planning Update - 1999 can be found in any of the Marshall University libraries, the offices of any Vice President, dean, progam director or coordinator.   For additional informtion, call the Office of Institutional Research and Planning at extension 2043 or 2084.

The Strategic Planning Committee - 1998

1998 Strategic Plan Update:

MU 1998 Strategic Plan Executive Summary
Accomplishments in Academic Programs
Accomplishments in Information Technology
Fiscal Accomplishments
Merger Accomplishments
Facilities and Operations
Athletics
Expectations for the Future

MU Community and Technical College Executive Summary
Academic Programs
Structural Change
Professional Development Activities
Facilities
Expectations for the Future

Note:  To see the complete Strategic Plan Update complete with fiscal tables, copies are available in the Library and in academic and administrative offices; or you may contact Institutional Research and Planning at extension 2043 or 2084. 

1997 Strategic Plan Update:

A Message from J. Wade Gilley, President

The Marshall University Strategic Plan Narrative:
Initial Challenges
Challenges 1997-2000
The Merger
Technology Challenges
The Marshall University Capital Plan

Marshall University Strategic Plan Update--11/1/97--Executive Summary:
Major Accomplishments in 1996/97
Strategies Planned for 1997/98
Through the Year 2001

 

The Strategic Planning Committee 1999

Donna Donathan, President, Faculty Senate

Elaine Baker, Professor of Psychology and Past President of the Faculty Senate

Winston Baker, Director, Residence Services

Donnalee Cockrille, Dean of Student Affairs

Martha Deel, Vice President of Classified Staff Council and Chair of Classified Staff Finance Committee

Sarah N. Denman, Vice President for Academic Affairs

James W. Hooper, President of Research Corporation and Executive Director of the Office of Research and Economic Development

Brandi Jacobs, President, Marshall University Student Government

Herbert Karlet, Vice President for Finance

Robert Hayes, Provost of the Community and Technical College

Michael Perry, Interim President

Martha Pierson, Classified Staff Representative, Marshall University Graduate College

Patricia P. O'Reilly, Associate Vice President, Institutional Research and Planning

Bob Rubenstein, Associate Professor of Counseling, Marshall University Graduate College

Jim Schneider, Associate Dean, School of Medicine

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Marshall University Strategic Plan Update--November 1, 1999

A Decade of Excellence

When the 90's began, Marshall embarked upon an ambitious agenda filled with energy and vision. The achievements of the decade would lay the foundation for the new millennium. The new President in 1991, J.Wade Gilley, cast a wide net to create a plan to reach every sphere of university life and beyond. The stated vision was that in the 21st century, Marshall University would be known for four characteristics:

High quality undergraduate education;

The most technologically sophisticated university of its size and type in the nation;

The prototypical interactive university in America;

Sound management of human and financial resources.

High Quality Undergraduate Education. As the decade closes, so does the century, and a new millennium begins. Marshall has indeed achieved the vision and more. In his Annual Report to the Board of Trustees (January, 1999), Gilley summarized the accomplishments:

The whole new approach to undergraduate education through the Marshall Plan for Quality Undergraduate Education ensures that every student who graduates from Marshall is prepared for the 21st Century. The emphasis on Mathematics, Writing and Global Studies develops essential competencies in students and an understanding of the shrinking world and other cultures.

New undergraduate admission standards emphasizing higher academic expectations among potential students.

The Marshall Plan puts a quality academic plan in place; its success is evident in a growing undergraduate enrollment over the decade, and, at the start of the millennium, reaching a maximum for the current university resources and services available.

Technological Sophistication requires commitment, resources, leadership, and support. Marshall has sustained all of these requirements. For its size, Marshall is unmatched as evidenced by its technological achievements over the decade:

First to connect to Governor Underwood's West Virginia network 2001;

First to provide online courses to the SREB;

First to provide data, video, audio, and teleconferencing via desktop computers to rural, under-served communities;

First in the state to have a fiber optic campus network;

An ATM voice, data, and video system connecting both major campuses; touchtone telephone registration; application and admission via the Internet;

Steady funding streams enabling upgrades, new technology additions, and training for all university personnel and students;

An on-line integrated student information system with Finance and Human Resources providing Web access for Students and Faculty.

As the decade closes, Marshall has achieved a vision for excellence in technological sophistication as an integral part of instruction, learning, fiscal management, and services.

The Interactive University. The concept of a "prototypical interactive university" involves creative connectedness within the University, between the community and the University, and with agencies and organizations. Some examples of the emerging interactive university are:

Affiliations between the MU School of Medicine and Cabell Huntington Hospital, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, St. Mary's Hospital, and University Physicians and Surgeons, the faculty practice group;

Partnerships with county school systems in West Virginia to provide teacher training programs in math, science, reading and Spanish;

Partnerships with other West Virginia colleges and WVU enabling cooperative academic program delivery without duplication;

Partnering in the NSF program to assist teachers in using the Internet in 14 West Virginia, seven Kentucky, and four Ohio counties in using the Internet.

Partnering with the FBI, the WV State Police, and the State Fire Marshall's Office to provide a coherent Forensic Science program in West Virginia;

Merging with the former West Virginia Graduate College to create the new Marshall University Graduate College. This added the new campus to the network of MU off-campus centers expanding the MU service region.

Additionally, Marshall has a statewide role in reaching out to West Virginians through work force preparation, by offering scholarships to high achieving West Virginia high school graduates, and through the six centers of the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advance Flexible Manufacturing which are a statewide resource for economic development.

Financial Management. At the beginning of the decade, Marshall University faced many financial challenges.  Achieving the financial goals was, and continues to be, tied to sound fiscal management and conservation of human resources. Many of these financial goals were shaped by S.B. 547 with special emphasis on faculty and salary goals. As the decade closes, success in fiscal management is evident through the following:

MU has continued to improve salaries for faculty and classified salary.

In the course of the decade, Marshall has invested over $231 million in its physical plant including projects on-line to be completed by 2001.

At least 19 degree programs have been eliminated creating the opportunity for new programs to be established that meet the needs of the graduates of the 21st century.

Positions vacated by attrition and retirement were eliminated when possible. Other positions were reassigned when possible to undeserved areas. This ongoing review of vacated positions continues as an effective strategy.

Additional reduction in costs and elimination of duplication were achieved at the academic and administrative unit level by collaboration, partnering, a merger, and on-going review and reallocating of resources.

Instituted the Banner Finance System which allows the integration of all finance information.

The Drinko Library and Information Center is the hallmark of Marshall's Decade of Excellence. Opened in October, 1998, the John Deaver Drinko Library provides technological sophistication for new approaches to teaching, learning, and communication, using all forms of media and technology. The Drinko transcends boundaries and enables its patrons to interact with resources all over the world. $31 million dollars and seven years produced a cutting-edge facility, undoubtedly one of the most complex education facilities in West Virginia. The library is open to everyone - citizens and students, faculty and staff and is the expression of a vision that became reality. The 21st century is not tomorrow. In the Drinko Library, the 21st century is today. Some of the outstanding features are:

300 workstations and notebooks for patron use running on an ultra fast telecommunications backbone.

Sophisticated teleconferencing facilities and a networked training room.

A specialized electronic presentation room with two-way video capabilities and an auditorium with notebook computers, presentation capabilities and two-way video.

A blending of traditional and modern architecture creating an interface with the other buildings on campus.

200,000 volumes supporting on-site research.

Electronic document delivery to and from most locations.

Vision 2020, an ad hoc Committee on the Future of Marshall University, was appointed by former President J. Wade Gilley in December 1998, and charged with finding possible recommendations to a series of questions concerning the future of the institution. The Committee, composed of 24 faculty, staff and the Student Government vice-president, reported its findings in April 1999. The Committee framed its response within the context of the changes happening within higher education nationally, and within the state. The future in higher education will be competitive, will challenge institutional resources, will not be place bound, and needs to address faculty workload and compensation. The potential student population from West Virginia high schools will decline and non-traditional students will look for creative responses from the university that acknowledges their work and family responsibilities. The recommendations from Vision 2020 are to:

Develop a campus population goal of 16,000 and a total university population including South Charleston, regional centers and on-line students of 20 to 25,000.

Maintain of a strong undergraduate broad-based liberal arts education that serves as a foundation and to address the needs of the workforce through non-degree, certification and retraining programs.

Build on the strength of undergraduate and graduate programs and consider graduate programs in geriatric studies, human services and hospital administration. Other areas include a Master of Fine Arts with the range of possibilities such as degree offerings in creative writing, arts management and media studies.

Consider a degree program in Management Information Systems and expand health related programs. Offer more graduate offerings in engineering in the Ohio and the Kanawha Valleys.

Develop additional degree offerings through the Community and Technical College to respond to the needs of the workforce.

Other possibilities are proposed in Vision 2020 in technology, student life as well as an emphasis in preparing students for a multi cultural world. As Marshall's technological sophistication increases, the connections as a diverse university community increases. The Vision 2020 statement believes this is an opportunity for Marshall.

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Strategic Planning Update - November 1, 1999

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Accomplishments in the Academic Area - Highlights

• Reorganized the Graduate School of Information Technology and Engineering to include the B.S. and M.S. in Safety Technology and the Pre-Engineering Program, all formerly programs in other MU Colleges.

• Instituted the MBA program in Accounting which allows students to complete the 150 hours required for the CPA, earn a MU bachelor's degree and an MBA in five years.

• Provided electronic reserves enabling faculty to electronically digitize and store curriculum materials.

• Created a 2+2 program in Geography with the MU-CTC enabling 2-year degree students to move into the four year program and earn bachelor's degrees.

• Initiated the only active graduate certification program for preparing School Social Services and Attendance Personnel. MUGC is also offering, for the first time, a program to prepare teachers for English as a Second Language.

• Established a Center for Teaching Excellence to provide mentoring and professional development activities to faculty.

• Established a new University College to focus on retention and student success.

• Received a six year federal matching grant to address the impact of the transportation of people, goods, and services in the Appalachian region.

• Provided a coherent forensic science program in West Virginia to the FBI, the WV State Police and the State Fire Marshall's Office.

• Established the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications as a free-standing academic unit in 1999.

• Opened the John Marshall Research Center in 1999 with presentations by a panel of national John Marshall Scholars including Jean Edward Smith, the first John Marshall professor.

• Started to test pilot in Fall 1999 Graduate School Electronic Theses and Dissertations.

Accomplishments in Partnerships - Highlights

• Continue work between the MU Center for Instructional Technology and staff from WVU-Tech, the Southern Mountain Regional Center, and Glenville State College to use WEB based instruction.

• Partner with the Library Commission and other West Virginia colleges to share electronic subscriptions.

• Offered ten courses through the Lewis College of Business and Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College using IITV.

• Integrated desk top video from MU to K-12 as part of the One Room School Project .

• Instituted a formal Drop-In Program to invite K-12 students, seniors, and community members with disabilities to learn how to use technology.

• Hosted the 1999 WV Governor's School for the Arts in July 1999 and the College of Fine Arts will do so again in the year 2000.

• Provided advanced information technology training through the Marshall Institute of Information Technology to teams from ten Kanawha County high schools.

• Developed a collaboration between the College of Fine Arts and high school faculty to develop CD-Rom modules for art education in the state.

• Provided MUGC teacher training programs in math, science, reading, and Spanish for teachers in Kanawha, Raleigh, McDowell, and Calhoun counties.

• Initiated four major studies by the Center for Business and Economic Research for the Governor's Commission on Fair Taxation.

Accomplishments in Financial Management - Highlights

• Increased faculty and staff salaries by an average 4.7% and 4.96% respectively, continuing the commitment to achieve salary goals.

• Continue to improve faculty salaries.

• Funded salary increases through state appropriations, and a reduction of personnel through attrition, and a reduction of costs.

•Marshall's undergraduate resident tuition and fees were increased by 3.9% (which included an $8 increase for the child care initiative)while our peer institutions raised tuition and fees by an average of 4.4%.

•Effective July 1, 1999 the Banner Finance System was implemented. The Human Resources System will be implemented soon, allowing all of our management information systems to be integrated and interactive.

•Through costs savings and reallocating in the budget, the University was able to end the 1998-1999 fiscal year with an increase in the current fund balance.

• Trained all department budget managers to encumber and authorize purchases making the Banner Finance System fully operational for budget management at the user level.

• Instituted Purchase Cards for all purchases under $1000 eliminating paper requisitions for small purchases.

• Implemented the new West Virginia State Auditor's Payroll System (EPICS).

• For fiscal year 1999-2000, the university will increase expenditures for scholarships by 25%.

• Established a Marshall University Dependent's Scholarship Program.

• Maintain strong financial support from the Marshall University Foundation associated with a steady increase in gifts and contributions from Marshall friends and alumni.

Accomplishments in Information Technology - Highlights

• Offered 32 courses in Fall 99 that were 100% electronically delivered.

• Provided 25 WEB courses to the SREB.

• Registered, enrolled, and reported all students from all sites making the Banner Student Information System fully functional.

• Provided resources to the blind and visually impaired students using assistive technology equipment provided through a grant from the Teubert Foundation.

• Operated over 500 networked computers in specialized departmental labs. Wired and provided networked computer access to Residence Halls.

• Received a grant from the Cisco Corporation to establish the state's first Academy to train teachers in computer networking.

• Created a Learning Resource Center and interactive video distance learning classroom at the Larry Joe Harless Community Center in Gilbert and one computer classroom and two interactive video distance learning classrooms in the new Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant.

Merger Accomplishments - Highlights

• Completed the merging of duplicative academic programs, administrative and fiscal operations.

• Created departmental units across campuses enabling the merging of faculty and unifying instructional planning.

Facilities and Operations Accomplishments - Highlights

• Opened the Child Care Academy offering day-care with a program based on a developmental education curriculum.

• Opened the University Heights Housing Facility for Students in Fall 99, the first in a public/private partnership in campus housing.

• Completed a Master Plan for the South Charleston Property

• Completed the Mid Ohio Valley Conference Center which opens in November 99. It will be one of the first sites to receive DVD technology.

• Developed the Concept Design for the proposed Bio Medical Center.

• Created the Visual Design for the proposed Student Recreation Center.

• Opened the Larry Joe Harless Community Center in Gilbert, WV creating recreational opportunities for the community and classroom space for MU.

• Dedicated the new Center for Rural Health at the MU-Cabell Medical Center.

• Completed the Central Landscaping Project on the Huntington campus.

Expectations for the Future - Highlights

• Select a new President for Marshall University in FY 1999-2000.

• Fully fund the Classified Staff Salary Schedule in FY 2000-2001.

• Achieve the 95% SREB salary target for faculty salaries.

• Act on the findings of the Vision 2020 ad hoc Committee Report on the Future of Marshall.

• Make Printing Operations fully self-sufficient in FY 2000-2001.

• Implement the Banner Fixed Asset Module.

• Launch a new $125 million capital campaign.

• Complete the Jomie Jazz Center.

• Complete the H.E.L.P. Building addition.

• Create a Visual Arts Center.

• Complete the Morrow Library Renovation.

• Finish the Stadium Seating Addition .

• Construct the Baseball Complex.

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COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Strategic Planning Update 1999

Executive Summary

The Community and Technical College at Marshall University pursued its vision during 1998-99 by continuing to be a center for lifelong learning, by providing training for the current workforce, and by increasing access to post-secondary education. Through anticipated changes in the college structure, curriculum development, and building partnerships, the College is meeting the mandates of Senate Bills 547 and 591.

Academic Programs

The Community and Technical College at Marshall University realized significant progress in academic program development and in addressing workforce development needs during the 1998-99 academic year. New programs that were implemented during the time included the following:

  • AAS in Hospitality Management - in partnership with the career technology and vocational centers in Cabell, Wayne, Putnam, and Mason counties in addition to Marriott, Inc.
  • AAS in Paramedic Science
  • AAS in Occupational Development - Mine Inspection in partnership with the National Mine, Health and Safety Academy in Beckley
  • AAS in Computer Technology - Network Systems Administration option (CISCO)
  • AAS in Technical Studies - Machinist Technology in partnership with the Robert C. Byrd Institute
  • AAS in Police Science - reinstated partnership with the West Virginia State Police Academy
  • CISCO Certificate Program (non-credit)

Academic programs now in the planning stage or anticipated to begin planning by year 2000 include the following:

  • Certificate in Customer Service
  • AAS in Pharmacist Assistant
  • AAS in Fire Science (to be revised)
  • Credit courses in Microsoft leading toward certification

A major initiative in the delivery of customized training continues to be the credit and non-credit programs with the International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades Union, which had 310 participants, of which 211 registered for college courses.

The Community and Technical College during 1998-99 continued to offer credit courses in alternative delivery formats to meet the needs of students. Last spring, six OT courses were offered as Dual-Credit courses (now called College Courses for High School Students) to Mason County students. Four developmental courses continued to be delivered not only in the traditional classroom, but also via self-paced and electronic distance delivery. A pilot program, the Marshall Academy, was offered in Summer Session D to 30 freshmen who took expanded versions of ENG 101 and MAT 121, called "Gateway" courses (that included time for developmental instruction), thus avoiding having to take 7 hours of developmental courses. Also, 25 credit courses are offered in an electronic, Web-based format in addition to the traditional classroom delivery. Many of these e-courses are also included in the SREC.

Staffing Changes

A faculty member was hired part-time during the summer to serve as a part-time Instructional Technologist. This individual will coordinate the MCTC Web Site as well as facilitate all e-course development and revision and coordinate faculty/staff technology development. In addition, the MCTC plans to add a Director for Off-Campus Credit Instruction in 1999-00.

Professional Development Activities

The major types of professional development activities for the faculty/staff of the Community and Technical College continued in 1998-99 to primarily deal with technology and instruction, with 100% of the faculty/staff participating in one or more activities.

Community Service Project

To continue the tradition of serving youth, the MCTC wants to help reduce the nationwide literacy problem and, thus, implemented in 1998-99 a college-wide community service reading aloud project for at-risk children in partnership with VFW Post 9738. The VFW Post donates funds that the MCTC uses to purchase books that are read to Guyandotte Elementary first-graders. MCTC faculty and staff, who have had Read Aloud training provided by Read Aloud West Virginia of Cabell County, go to the school each of the nine months of the school year and read the "Book-of-The-Month" to the children. Each child then receives a copy of the book for his/her personal library.

Future Expectations

The following activities are being planning for 1999-00 to help the Community and Technical College achieve its mission and vision:

  • Reorganize the college into five academic divisions that will report to the Provost and develop an area reporting to the Associate Provost that is devoted to expanding workforce development.
  • Through the Tech Prep partnerships, develop and implement a seamless curriculum with the high schools in the counties of Cabell, Mason, Putnam and Wayne.
  • Increase customized and workforce training in a timely manner for business/industry.
  • Stabilize the number of electronic courses available via the Internet and aim for 1 complete degree/certificate program delivered by 2001.
  • Reorganize the General Studies degree for the easier facilitation of 2+2 programs with other colleges within Marshall University.
  • Develop an Assessment Strategic 3-year Plan.
  • Reorganize the Engineering Technology Program in partnership with the Robert C. Byrd Institute.
  • Examine the expected effects that the new admission standards for the University are having on the Community and Technical College enrollments and resources, and establish policies/procedures to deal with the changing enrollment patterns.
  • Implement an Academic Advising Center specifically targeted to MCTC students.
  • Continue working with the District Consortium to identify the district workforce needs and to find solutions to meet the needs.
  • Continue to have the MCTC faculty review the current policies/procedures relating to promotion and tenure and recommend changes which are more compatible to the community college mission in teaching and learning.
  • Work collaboratively with the other Community Colleges to provide a statewide Information Technology curriculum that can be utilized on campus or via the web.

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The Strategic Planning Committee 1998

Elaine Baker, Professor of Psychology and Past President of the Faculty Senate

Winston Baker, Director, Residence Services

Mary G. Brown, Graduate Student in the MBA Program; Comptroller, St. Mary’s Hospital

Donnalee Cockrille, Dean of Student Affairs

Martha Deel, Vice President of Classified Staff Council and Chair of Classified Staff Finance Committee

Sarah N. Denman, Vice President for Academic Affairs

J. Wade Gilley, President

Matthew Glover, President, Marshall University Student Government

James W. Hooper, President of Research Corporation and Executive Director of the Office of Research and Economic Development

Herbert Karlet, Vice President for Finance

Betty L. Kyger, Provost of the Community and Technical College

Martha Pierson, Classified Staff Representative, Marshall University Graduate College

Patricia P. O’Reilly, Associate Vice President, Institutional Research and Planning

Dennis P. Prisk, Senior Vice President for Graduate and Extended Studies and Technology

Bob Rubenstein, Associate Professor of Counseling, Marshall University Graduate College

Jim Schneider, Associate Dean, School of Medicine

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Marshall University Strategic Plan Update--November 1, 1998

Executive Summary

Marshall University has a bold vision for the future, one that builds upon its rich history of quality higher education and a strong record of outreach in the state as well as the region. Through a series of strategic decisions, Marshall has transformed itself during the 20th century to be a multi-faceted institution with nationally recognized undergraduate programs, market-driven successful graduate programs including its growing doctoral program in the biomedical sciences, and a medical school that is a national model for rural health care medical education.

Marshall has pursued its vision as an interactive university serving West Virginia and the nation on many fronts. In addition to leadership to rural health care medical education, Marshall has become the state's leader in the use of technology for delivering and enhancing educational programs and increasing efficiencies in communication. With the merger of the West Virginia Graduate College and its record of serving central and southern West Virginia, Marshall University has positioned itself to be a forceful and effective provider of quality higher education at the graduate as well as the undergraduate level.

This Strategic Planning Update - 1998 reports Marshall University's accomplishments in complying with the requirements of Senate Bills 547, 591, and 67. This Update lists the technological achievements, administrative and academic program changes, and fiscal management strategies that move Marshall closer to its vision for the 21st century. Listed below are some of the accomplishments of 1997-1998, and a partial listing of our expectations for the future through the year 2000. A more complete inventory of accomplishments and expectations may be found in the Narrative.

Accomplishments in Academic Programs - Highlights:

A new Multidisciplinary Degree was added in the College of Liberal Arts;

Every discipline in the College of Liberal Arts continues to work on including capstone courses and courses with international or multicultural credit;

The departments of Mathematics, Geology, Biological Science, and Chemistry are all participating in the development and implementation of a new Environmental Science program.

3 + 2 MBA partnering programs were contracted with Bluefield State, West Virginia State, and the WVU Institute of Technology.

An enhanced freshman seminar continues to help students make the transition into University life.

Faculty have developed more than 30 on-line Internet courses.

Initial accreditation of the Lewis College of Business by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) was achieved.

The MSM in Public Administration in the College of Business and selected areas of emphasis in Psychology were eliminated or consolidated to streamline the curriculum.

Computer Science and Mathematics were consolidated into one department.

The College of Business expanded its use of IITV to increase delivery of undergraduate and graduate courses to remote sites.

New freshman enrollments increased and overall enrollment in the University increased.

A College of Nursing and Health Professions was created on July 1, 1998 within the Division of Health Sciences by combining the School of Nursing and the departments of Communication Disorders, Medical Technology, and Dietetics.

The College of Science was reorganized on July 1, 1998 into three divisions: Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences and Mathematical and Computer Sciences.

A $2.1 million NSF grant was secured by Dr. Somerville in Biological Sciences and Drs. Price, Frost, and Morgan in Chemistry.

Accomplishments in Information Technology- Highlights:

CD-ROM and electronic library subscriptions at MU, MUGC and MUSOM were combined and networked to avoid duplication and expand service to all clients.

New database services are being implemented to avoid retention and duplicated paper subscriptions.

Marshall University and MUGC merged computing services and library faculty and staff. Both are unified institutionally under the Office of Information Technology to provide greater efficiency.

Numerous technical training opportunities amounted to 4100 hours in training and development for faculty and staff. Approximately 63% of faculty have participated in some form of technical training.

All South Charleston networked computers have moved to WIN 95 or NT environment running Microsoft applications.

The University libraries implemented several additional Wilson Web databases which can be accessed via the library web page.

One hundred percent of student residence hall rooms are provided free 10BaseT service for student owned computers.

The status of networking at the Marshall University Huntington campus is the product of over ten years of planning and progressive investment in technology changes. Currently, the main campus has been networked with an FDDI 100 MBPS fiber backbone servicing all buildings. Service is delivered to the desktop as Ethernet 10/100 Mbps. All faculty desktops and all professional staff are connected to the campus network MUNET that is administered and managed solely by University Computing Services.

The Marshall Technology Institute (MTI) has been created for the coordination of campus-wide technical training, student training internships, Cisco Networking Academies, and Microsoft Certification.

Fiscal Accomplishments - Highlights:

Faculty and staff salaries increased by an average 4.7 percent and 6 percent respectively, a record of six straight years of salary increases.

The classified salary schedule is progressing at a rate to be fully funded by FY2000-2001.

The increases for classified staff will be funded from additional resources from state appropriations, and reduction of staff through attrition and a reduction of costs.

Academic and administrative units have realized the efficiencies gained and the opportunity to redirect savings by consolidating programs, eliminating duplicated courses and through natural staff attrition.

Strong financial support for the University with more than $30 million in cash, pledges or gifts in trust being committed to the University. Also, there was a first-time appropriation of capital funds for the medical school ($1 million).

Merger Accomplishments - Highlights

Graduate programs in counseling, psychology, education, and business were consolidated.

Duplicated graduate courses in the Biological Sciences, Criminal Justice and Justice Leadership were eliminated.

The merged programs in the Lewis College of Business are working on a series of requirements for the AACSB accreditation.

Admission and enrollment procedures for graduate students have been consolidated.

The Human Resource function has been consolidated, closing the HR Office in South Charleston and all HR functions moved to Huntington. This saved one position.

The financial reporting, accounts payable, fee assessment, and fee collection procedures have been consolidated.

All policies related to graduate programs at MU and the former WVGC were reviewed. In some instances, the MU policy prevailed; in other cases the WVGC policy was adopted. Where appropriate, either a new policy was established or a policy was modified to include elements from both MU and WVGC.

The interactive video classrooms in Huntington and South Charleston have serviced dual site course offerings. The Huntington classroom also offers classes to the locations in Point Pleasant, Beckley and SWVCTC.

Facilities and Operations - Highlights:

A new $32 million medical center was completed.

The new $29 million John Deaver Drinko Library, with state of the art information technology design, neared completion toward the end of 1997/98 and was dedicated on October 24, 1998.

The University has a new bookstore.

A new $5 million facility, The Robert C. Byrd Academic and Technology Center was completed in South Charleston on the site with MUGC.

The $5 million renovation of the Henderson Center was initiated providing better fire and safety standards as well as better quality and more flexible space for athletic and academic programs and will be available for use on November 14, 1998.

Efficiency and economy were achieved by contracting housekeeping services in several campus facilities. Positions were reassigned to other areas. Housekeeping will be contracted in new facilities creating a cost avoidance. All savings are redirected to 1998-1999 salary increases and increased operating costs.

Athletics-Highlights:

The MU Football Team won the Mid-American Conference Championship and played in its first bowl game (the Motor City Bowl) in 50 years. The Women's Basketball Team advanced to the NCAA Tournament for the first time in school history in 1997. External support/funding for the athletic program continues to increase.

Expectations for the Future

The budget is balanced.

Salary goals are met.

Merger objectives are met: restructuring programs, combining faculties, staffs, and integrating services as appropriate.

Library services are provided to more remote sites and distance education centers.

Cross-college interdisciplinary programs are developed.

The commitment to continue graduate education in southern West Virginia and the region will be manifest.

Most significant, Marshall University will have achieved the goals in its strategic plan for high quality in undergraduate education; technological sophistication unmatched by any university of its size and type in the region; status as a prototypical interactive university, and demonstrated sound management of its financial and human resources.

The mission of the Marshall University Graduate College will have taken on a new life within the context of the university structure without abandoning the mission to serve nontraditional students who are dispersed geographically.

An enrollment management strategy will be used to forecast growth and establish enrollment goals. Changes in admissions standards will be incorporated in the Enrollment Management Plan.

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Marshall University Community and Technical College
Strategic Plan Update 1998

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Community and Technical College at Marshall University pursued its vision during 1997-98 by becoming a center for lifelong learning, by providing training for the current workforce and by increasing access to a user-friendly learning environment. Through the college structure, curriculum development, and building partnerships, the College is meeting the mandates of Senate Bills 547 and 591.

Academic Programs

The Community and Technical College at Marshall University realized significant progress in academic program development and in addressing workforce development needs during the 1997-98 academic year. New programs that were implemented during that time included:

  • AAS in Interior Design in partnership with Cabell County Career Technology Center
  • AAS in Medical Assistant Technology
  • AAS in Respiratory Therapy in partnership with Collins Career Center in Ohio
  • AA in General Studies

Academic programs that were in developing stage during 1997-98 and will be implemented in 1998-99 include the following:

  • AAS in Hospitality Management in partnership with the career technology and vocational centers in Cabell, Wayne, Putnam and Mason Counties, in addition to Marriott, Inc.
  • Credit courses in Cisco networking leading toward certification
  • AAS in Paramedic Science
  • Renewal of AAS in Police Science in partnership with the State Police Academy

Academic programs now in the planning stage or anticipated to begin planning by year 2000 include the following:

  • Certificate in Customer Service
  • AAS in Pharmacist Assistant Technology
  • AAS in Fire Science to be revised
  • AAS in River Towing Industry
  • Credit courses in Microsoft leading toward certification
  • AAS in Technical Studies: Machinist Technology in partnership with the BYRD Institute
  • AAS in Occupational Development: Mine Inspection in partnership with the Mining Academy in Beckley

A major initiative in the delivery of customized training continues to be the credit and non-credit programs with the International Brotherhood of Painters and Allied Trades union, which had 292 participants for 1997-98.

Another major development within the Community and Technical College during 1997-98 was the preparation of credit courses into alternative delivery formats to meet the needs of students. All the developmental courses are now delivered through a traditional classroom, self-paced and electronic distance delivery. Also, 23 other credit courses were developed into an electronic, Web-based format in addition to the traditional classroom delivery.

Structural Change

The only structural change within the Community & Technical College during 1997-98 was the merging of departments into one unit as the Division of Continuing Education and Economic Development. The units combined into the new division were:

  • Non-credit programs
  • Institute for Business Development
  • Small Business Development Center
  • Federal Procurement Technical Assistance Center
  • Economic Development Administration Center

Professional Development Activities

The major types of professional development activities for the faculty/staff of the Community and Technical College were primarily dealing with technology, with 100% of the faculty/staff participating in one or more activities.

Facilities

Several departments of the Community and Technical College were relocated to a newly renovated building, named Cabell Hall, during this past summer. All components of the Division of Continuing Education and Economic Development were centralized within Cabell Hall, in addition to the academic departments of Legal Assistant Technology, Health Information Technology, Physical Therapy Assistant, Medical Assistant Technology and Paramedic Science.

Expectations for Future

The following activities are being planned for 1998-2000 to help the Community and Technical College to achieve its mission and vision:

  • Through the Tech Prep partnerships, develop and implement a seamless curriculum with the high school in the Counties of Cabell, Mason, Putnam and Wayne.
  • Increase the number of electronic courses available via the Internet with at least 3 complete degree/certificate programs delivered by 2001.
  • Increase customized and workforce training in a timely manner for business/industry.
  • Develop 2+2 programs with other colleges within Marshall University.
  • Establish an Engineering Technology lab on campus to be shared with other engineering courses within the University.
  • Examine the expected effects that the proposed new admission standards for the University will have on the Community and Technical College enrollments and resources, and establish policies/procedures to deal with the changing enrollment patterns.
  • Design and implement an Academic Advising Center specifically targeted to MCTC students.
  • Continue working with the District Consortium to identify the district workforce needs and solutions in meeting the needs.
  • MCTC faculty will review the current policies/procedures relating to promotion and tenure, and recommend changes which are more compatible to the community college mission in teaching and learning.
  • The faculty will study the compensation comparisons with peer groups and the application of the findings to MCTC faculty salaries.

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Marshall University Strategic Plan Update 1997

A Message from Dr. J. Wade Gilley, President, Marshall University

The Marshall University "Strategic Planning Update 1997" is a report of accomplishment in fulfilling the vision articulated in the 1994 Marshall University Strategic Plan. The Marshall Plan for undergraduate education has become an integral part of the curriculum. Students know our expectations for them and the rising enrollments are evidence that prospective students come seeking Marshall’s high quality undergraduate education.

Another part of the vision is to be a leader in technological sophistication and our progress in technology is unmatched by any other college of our size and type in the nation. With the integration of the Banner 2000 information system, students have direct access to personal information so that they can query their own accounts. This, coupled with the MILO telephone registration system and WEB online registration increases everyone’s efficiency as well as student access. We are particularly proud of the number of online courses faculty have developed and their use of multi-media for instruction and interactive distance learning classrooms. The technology achievements are reflected in every facet of Marshall University life, and the Planning Update 1997 is able to give only part of the story.

One of the major Marshall projects is the John Deaver Drinko Library which is a unique architectural addition to the campus, as well as a state of the art technology facility. The Drinko Library will be completed this year along with the Marshall University Medical Center and the Marshall University Graduate College Academic Center. These projects, along with others, are examples of Marshall’s foresightedness in creating physical resources using technology to serve high quality education in the 21st Century.

In a separate report, the Marshall University Community and Technical College gives a full report of its administrative restructuring and curriculum definition. The Community and Technical College will make an impact on economic development by providing up-to-date training for a changing work force. Also, in a separate report, the Marshall University School of Medicine outlines the way in which it is meeting its strategic goals associated with producing primary care physicians. The MU School of Medicine is an excellent example of the "interactive university" concept. It has defined itself as a community-integrated school working to find solutions to the community’s problems.

The merging of administrative services between MU and the new MUGC has proceeded rapidly and it is anticipated that all duplicated services will be eliminated in 1997/98. The plans for merging academic programs and policies have been laid out in Interim Executive Policy #12 and work proceeds in those areas. We anticipate, as well, that all aspects of the merger will be completed by the end of this academic year.

The MU Strategic Planning Update 1997 is based upon the work going on in many departments, in Huntington, South Charleston, and other sites. Marshall is no longer a campus bound university. Through the addition of instructional sites, through work with the community, and through the use of technology to reach distant locations, Marshall has become an interactive university. We look forward to the future.

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 The Marshall University Strategic Plan Update 1997

NARRATIVE

Initial Challenges

The Marshall University Strategic Planning process for preparing for the next millennium began early in this decade. The university moved rapidly to position itself as a leader in the academic and technology areas. Moreover, Marshall carved out a unique strategy for relating to the economic and geographic community.

After an intense period of planning and restructuring, beginning in 1991, the Marshall University community has articulated its strategy for the 21st Century. That strategy is focused on a high quality, technologically sophisticated, interactive university committed to serving two states–West Virginia and Excellence.

Marshall’s planning goal for the 21st Century was to achieve a unique identity characterized by:

High quality undergraduate education;

Technological sophistication unmatched by any other university of its size and type in the nation;

Status as the prototypical interactive university in America;

Sound management of human and financial resources.

As the plan was implemented, the university focused on six areas of emphasis in the development and redevelopment of academic programs: undergraduate liberal arts education; schools and schooling; rural health care; economic development; the fine and performing arts, and the environment. There have been important developments in graduate education. As well, the academic areas which have been emphasized for research and economic development are: the environment; biotechnology; high tech manufacturing; small business entrepreneurship, and information technology.

The Marshall Plan for Quality Undergraduate Education is recognized nationally for its public sector uniqueness. Under the Marshall Plan, every student who enters, beginning with the Fall of 1995, has a set of unique requirements including a capstone experience, intensive writing across the curriculum, computer literacy, and experiences in global studies, regardless of the student’s major.

The goal to be a national leader in technological sophistication is moving forward. This includes the $29 million libraries improvement project–particularly the new library and information center–realization of the automation of all major university functions in preparation for the Virtual University 2000 project and the seamless weaving of computing into the everyday lives of Marshall students on the campus in Huntington, the interface with the South Charleston location, and eventually the connectivity between the remaining Marshall University locations with the rest of the world.

We continue to move aggressively to streamline and update a curriculum. Through program review and the assessment process, as well as an analysis of student interest and market need, under-enrolled programs and courses have been eliminated. Moreover, academic structures have been consolidated into fewer departments. In the early part of the decade, some 300 courses and 19 undergraduate and graduate programs were eliminated from the catalog. Some of this work continues, but more recently the focus is on the consolidation of graduate programs, particularly those duplications with the new Marshall University Graduate College.

Marshall’s impact on economic development is felt in the regional economic development program, Advantage Valley. This collaborative effort brings together the energies and resources of communities, institutions, and businesses to take advantage of the opportunities provided by telecommunications and technologies. Advantage Valley serves as a catalyst for the region. Additionally, counted among Marshall’s many outreach efforts to stimulate economic development are the Environmental Center’s $1.1 million grant from the Economic Development Agency and the infusion of technical training and access to advanced technology provided by the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. As well, the Center for Business and Economic Development of the Lewis College of Business, funded by grants from foundations and external agencies, has provided training and research for business, industry, and community agencies. Growth in the research budget as well as the number of job training and procurement programs has made Marshall a leader in strengthening the state’s as well as the region’s economy.

Challenges 1997-2000

The interactive university has been developing and is evident by partnering with the community–the real stakeholders in the university–to forge real life solutions to identified issues and problems. For example, at Marshall and in the three-state region surrounding Huntington, there is a growing consensus that a synergistic economic future may be found in emphasizing biotechnology, the environment, high tech manufacturing, and information technology. This is because both communities–the academic and the economic communities of Huntington and the region–have discovered a unified 21st Century potential in these four areas.

The Merger

The merger between Marshall University and the West Virginia Graduate College in July 1997 combines two graduate institutions into a powerful force for the delivery of high quality graduate education in such diverse fields as biotechnology, information technology and knowledge systems, engineering, business administration and education, and many others. As significant is the opportunity for providing optimum services to students in the region for telephone and on-line registration, access to the new high tech library resources, on-line course delivery at multiple sites, and curriculum development that transcends institutional boundaries. These merger outcomes will be achieved, in part, by eliminating redundant programs and services and redirecting savings to other programs. Moreover, by combining the faculty from the two institutions, graduate instruction can achieve an unparalleled competitive advantage in regional higher education.

Between 1997 and the year 2000, Marshall University with its new Marshall University Graduate College will move beyond the collaboration that was started with the Coordinate Agreement between the two institutions. The impact of the merger will be felt initially by students because they will have greater access to more diverse programs and more efficient services. Ultimately, however, the impact will be apparent in region’s economy which will benefit from a better trained and educated work-force coupled with widespread use of technology.

Merger Accomplishments:

% In preparing the Strategic Planning Update 1997, fiscal analyses and projections were jointly prepared. Both campuses contributed to updating the academic elements and both campuses participated in the reviews. A single document is being submitted that reflects changes at both sites, as well as progress on merger issues.

Beginning with FY99, salaries of faculty at MUGC will follow the same model used with calculating MU faculty salaries.

% The WVGC Office of Human Resources was merged with the Marshall Office. All human resources functions are provided by the Huntington office. The WVGC director relocated to Huntington and filled a vacated position as Associate Director.

The Lewis College of Business and the former WVGC School of Business have merged their degree programs.

% The MUGC Bookstore was privatized and is now operated by Follett, the same vendor that operates the Huntington bookstore.

% The payroll function has been merged successfully and the MUGC staff member responsible for accomplishing this has been recognized as "Marshall University Employee of the Month."

Computer Services in South Charleston and Huntington have been merged. The South Charleston director is now an associate director, reporting to the Director of Computer Services in Huntington. This facilitates the merging of all computing technology functions.

% The two institutional research offices have been merged and have been combined with planning within a new Office of Institutional Research and Planning, headed by an associate vice-president (formerly the director of research and planning from South Charleston).

Some library operations have been merged, such as new document purchases. More significant is that the new library facility in South Charleston will be linked electronically with the library services in Huntington. The former South Charleston director is now an associate library director, reporting to the director in Huntington, and the services of the two sites will emerge as a seamless service, transparent to the students, faculty and other users.

Vacant library positions have been modified to add the duties associated with serving remote sites.

The new academic building in South Charleston will be completed in December 1997. The electronic seminar/presentation room will extend the electronic linkages for instruction between Huntington and South Charleston, as well as Point Pleasant, and Logan. All distance learning planning, operation and support have been merged under the Office of Technology Information. The Robert C. Byrd Institute for Flexible Manufacturing will be ready to operate, consisting of 12 flexible manufacturing work/training stations and four PC work stations plus a training room.

The offices of extended education have been merged and brought under a new School of Extended Education headed by a dean.

Eliminated are an office of sponsored programs, a duplicated program in technology management, and the office of technology (at MUGC).

% Provision has been made for representation of faculty on the Marshall Faculty Senate and of staff on the Marshall Classified Staff Council.

% The Marshall Institutional Board of Advisors is being reorganized in light of the merger and the Board of Visitors of the Marshall University Graduate College has been created (replaces the WVGC Board of Advisors).

The financial benefits associated with the merger include: (1) cost avoidance benefits, i.e., (1) expenses that the West Virginia Graduate College would have incurred if it had remained an independent institution; (2) reallocation of resources: the opportunity to redirect fiscal, human and physical resources in an effort to increase efficiency; and, (3) on-going cost savings.

% Library Information System and Server including technical support, shared internet and electronic journal subscriptions; elimination of duplicate subscriptions $324,000

Computing systems (software and maintenance) including the Banner Student Information System, HR System and Finance Systems, Banner WEB phone registration (Milo), servers and technical assistance $471,000

Information Technology including servers and software, site licenses for software, course development materials and technical assistance $85,000

Personal Services redirected and reallocated to meet new needs $300,517

Other savings associated with eliminating duplicated equipment and materials such as the student identification system, the telephone upgrade, and professional association dues $164,000

Merger Challenges Between 1998 and 1999:

% Administrative functions such as admissions, registrations, development, accounting, accounts payable and fee collections, along with all other software (BANNER/MILO) functions, will be merged no later than July 1, 1998.

The two libraries will be fully merged by January 1, 1998 and will be part of a plan developed by the new associate vice president for information technology. This plan will emphasize technology and instructional support for academic units at the South Charleston campus.

The Graduate School of Education and Professional Development within the College of Education and Human Services, consisting of those programs and faculty existing at the WVGC prior to July 1, 1997, shall recommend a plan to consolidate graduate programs.

The Graduate School of Management (formerly the WVGC School of Business), is now part of the MU Lewis College of Business and is headed by an associate dean and director of graduate management programs. The Graduate School of Management shall be considered an academic unit within the Faculty Senate Constitution definition. A plan shall be designed and implemented to consolidate the GSM programs in the Lewis College of Business addressing both the accreditation issues and the expanded mission to serve non-traditional students throughout southern West Virginia. This plan is due January 1, 1998.

The deans shall evaluate other WVGC graduate programs and make recommendations to the university president.

The Marshall governance structure has been redefined by the addition of a Graduate Council and a Community and Technical College Council. These changes, along with evolutionary changes in the health sciences and university operations, create the need for revisiting the governance structure of the University.

Technology Challenges

Marshall University’s campus backbone network is viewed as the technology foundation for all campus endeavors, supporting teaching, learning, research, administration, and community outreach. Over the years, the network has expanded and revolutionized information access, library services, and the management and delivery of centralized and decentralized information technology. Today the network encompasses classrooms, labs, offices, residence halls, remote campuses and community outreach. All full-time campus faculty have a networked computer with Internet access. The network is based on a client/server architecture supporting a set of purchased integrated administrative and academic systems.

As the network expanded, it became clear that student access and services were a high priority as the network was leveraged to support the university’s teaching and learning mission. The network is routinely upgraded based on technological advances and demand.

Accomplishments

In 1993, the network backbone was upgraded from Ethernet at 10Mbs to FDDI at 100Mbs. As of the summer of 1997 the network had grown to over 2,700 client nodes with over 30 major central servers and a variety of departmental server based systems.

Public and departmental student microcomputer labs provide a 1 to 20 student to computer ratio. The continued growth of electronic classrooms improves faculty deployment of interactive educational applications. A student library/computing technology fee begun in 1994 provides financial assistance for the expansion of technological services.

In 1996, the Board of Trustees allocated over $1.5 million in Instructional Technology faculty initiatives. Marshall University faculty members competed for these grant awards and received $620,000 from the BOT with a financial match from the university.

Integration of Molecular Methodology, Recombinant DNA Technology, and Computer Applications for Science Majors is a foundation on which the education of biology majors, science majors, secondary science teachers, pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, and pre-physical therapy students is based.

ProQuest Full-Image–The Morrow Library has just installed the second ProQuest Research II unit, an electronic workstation that provides indexing and abstracting of over 1800 periodical titles. ProQuest also includes the scanned images of the articles for over 450 titles which can be printed on a laser printer. ProQuest Research II covers a broad scope of subject areas including social sciences, humanities, business, and general science. ProQuest combines with the EBSCO Host full text subscription service already in place to expand and improve access to information for the Marshall community.

EBSCO Host– The university libraries have implemented an annual full text subscription to the online service, EBSCO Host. From any Internet-ready computer on or off campus, users gain access to information from a wide range of academic areas including business, social sciences, humanities, general academic, general science, education, and multi-cultural topics. The Academic Search FullTEXT contains over 1,000 full text records with e-mail, print, or save capabilities.

RuralNet Medical–Rural health care resources for support of the Kellogg and West Virginia Rural Health Initiative. This site uses the Internet to connect more than 150 rural clinics and health education facilities for interdisciplinary seminars and resource sharing in health care. This site integrates campus based networked computing and library resources, including full-text literature and multi-media courseware. A complete map and description of the Rural Learning Resource Centers are available from the web site, ruralnet.marshall.edu.

The Interactive Distance Learning Classroom (IDLC) seeks to provide support for students through hypertext, a "Web Technology" format which has found rapid and wide acceptance. The IDLC will invite a large number of first year students to join the Web community, providing them with an early introduction to a lifelong tool (idlc.marshall.edu).

The Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative (ARSI) is a collaborative effort among six states in Central Appalachia–Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Central Appalachia is characterized by lagging student performance, depressed economic development, and persistent isolation from opportunities. ARSI will stimulate sustainable systemic improvements in science, mathematics, and technology education for K-14 students in its 66 eligible counties, using the school and its surrounding community as the focus of its efforts.

For a complete listing of Technology Accomplishments, contact the Office of Information Technology, www.marshall.edu/it.

Library Resources

The Marshall University Library System broke technological ground when it became the first academic library to automate the book collection in 1983. During the last 14 years, the MU system has maintained a strong commitment to electronic collections and the provision of access. The new John Deaver Drinko Library is a state-of-the-art technology center which will set a standard for information retrieval and student learning. In technology design and scope it will be competitive with some of the newest university libraries on the continent. It will contain more than 180,000 current volumes, an abundance of computer stations, and 24 hour access to the computer lab seven days a week.

Today, a combination of traditional materials and electronic subscriptions to databases or journals provides students with a broad spectrum of materials. Much of the initial research process can actually be done from any lab or dorm room on campus that has full connectivity to the MUNet network. Some titles are available off-campus to students at home regardless of their location or Internet service provider. Remote access requires the student enter a password or valid login ID. All professional librarians are trained in the instruction or use of such materials.

The Drinko Library, scheduled for completion Summer 1998, will be a combination of traditional materials and innovative electronic services. Housing about 180,000 volumes, the focus will be new and circulating book collections from all disciplines. The last five years of periodical titles will be housed in Drinko in paper, bound and microform formats. CD-ROM workstations will be located in reference, reserves and circulation will be housed on the first floor. Also on the first floor, a 24-hour computer lab will allow unlimited access to all web and online subscriptions databases and indexes. Media and the microform collection will be housed in addition to all library administrative, technical and computer services. The University Computing Center and the Library staffs will share one building and work together to enhance the library and computing environment for the campus community.

All Marshall University libraries subscribe to OCLC via the PALINET library consortium for cataloging, union list and interlibrary loan services. ARIEL document delivery and document imaging software and hardware are located in reference to provide digital transfer of articles from library to library. The Health Science Library provides ARIEL with a WebEDD component that allows even smoother and faster transfer. This unit also allows quick delivery of articles from our document express vendors and reciprocal library partners in and out of West Virginia.

Technology Supporting Administrative and Student Services

The major production applications at Marshall University include SCT's Banner systems for student information, financial aid, alumni and finance; as well as MILO, an integrated touch-tone telephone registration and voice response system. The Banner Human Resources module is being implemented with a client/server architecture, and the university plans over the next two years to have a fully integrated database of all major administrative systems, all provided with an enhanced graphical user interface.

The Banner Web application allows students to directly access much of their personal record information and transact business with the university. This service will be partially implemented in 1997 with full student access scheduled for January 1998. It will enable students to look at their schedules, change addresses, get grades, change passwords, obtain billing information, check financial aid status, and register for classes.

The Marshall University Capital Plan

The complex nature of the university’s relationship with the community, with residential and commuting students, and the wide range of academic offerings are reflected in the size and scope of the physical plant. Marshall’s Capital Plan for the 21st century was outlined during the early 1990's and in the period from 1991 to 1996, Marshall completed 48 capital projects each with a cost in excess of $100,000 and another 18 projects each with costs under $100,000. Included in the former were four major projects relating to different dimensions of university life: the Football Stadium, the Performing Arts Center, the Science Building Upgrade and a new Public Safety/Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center.

During the next four-year period, 1997-2000, the Capital Plan is guided by the increasing size of the student body and the four goals stated in the Strategic Plan. Capital development will advance:

High quality undergraduate education;
Technological sophistication unmatched by any other university of its size and type in the nation;
Status for Marshall as the prototypical interactive university in America;
Sound management of human and financial resources.

Projects in the Construction Stage

John Deaver Drinko Library
Marshall University Graduate College Academic Center
Marshall University Medical Center
Memorial Student Center - Bookstore Addition

Projects in the Design Stage

Old Main Renovation
Myers Hall (HELP) Addition
Henderson Center Renovation
Center for Jazz Studies

The Marshall University Medical Center currently under construction will pave the way for building the James F. Edwards Cancer Center, by which the university, together with Cabell Huntington Hospital, will have the power to transform health care in the region.

Several projects in the planning stage are associated with HVAC renovation, roof replacement, or facility improvement. Another project, a Day Care Center, is in response to identified need among the increasing number of non-traditional students at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The Marshall University vision for the 21st Century shaped the major initiatives of this decade. As we approach the threshold of the new millennium, we will have achieved our goals.

The high quality of the undergraduate program has resulted in a growing enrollment as well as recognition by specialized accrediting agencies.

Technological sophistication is unmatched by any other university of our size or type in the nation, evident in the proficiency of the users (faculty, staff, and students), in the diverse instructional delivery systems, in the exemplary information resources made available electronically, and in the electronic connectivity to multiple geographic sites.

The interactive university, a new concept in 1992, has a life of its own in 1997. The university has created links with communities through technology as in RuralNet Medical and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. It has served as a catalyst for economic development through the multi-faceted operations of the Research and Economic Development Center. Marshall has linked with educational communities through its successful Dual Credit High School Program, using technology as one delivery mode in partnership programs with the schools. These are only a few examples of how Marshall is recognized as the interactive university.

Through sound management of human and financial resources, Marshall has, through the 90's, increased the endowment; increased grants and gifts; successfully conducted major capital campaigns, and replaced, renovated, refurbished a large part of the physical plant. Further, Marshall has constructed a long term budget that has enabled the university to increase salaries for faculty and staff, recognizing their contribution to the realization of the vision.

Finally, in the early nineties Marshall University began a pattern of collaboration with other agencies and institutions beyond its previous efforts, which culminated eventually in the merger with the West Virginia Graduate College. At a time when collaboration, partnerships, and mergers are coming of age, Marshall is a leader.

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Marshall University Strategic Plan Update—November 1, 1997

Executive Summary

Marshall University’s transformation began in 1991. Following a period of planning and restructuring, a bold vision was outlined for the University in the 21st Century. The vision focused on undergraduate education, technology, a new concept know as "an interactive university," and sound management. Through a continuing series of strategic decisions and actions in this decade, Marshall University will realize this vision and establish itself as a first-rate institution in the region. As the new millennium opens, Marshall will be characterized by:

High quality undergraduate education;
Technological sophistication unmatched by any other university of its size and type in the nation;
Status as the prototypical interactive university in America, and
Sound management of human and financial resources.

This Strategic Plan Update reports the advancements in these four areas and, as well, the progress Marshall has made in meeting West Virginia legislative mandates spelled out in Senate Bills 547, 591, and 67. The recent accomplishments in the academic areas have focused on the six areas of development: undergraduate liberal arts education, schools and schooling, rural health care, economic development, the fine and performing arts, and the environment. Moreover, there were significant achievements in graduate education, biotechnology, high tech manufacturing, and information technology.

Major Accomplishments in 1996/97

West Virginia Graduate College merged with Marshall University and became the Marshall University Graduate College.

MU faculty received a 3.25% average salary increase and MUGC faculty received a 3.3% average salary increase.

MU classified staff received a 3.25% average salary increase and MUGC staff received a 5.0% average salary increase.

The Lewis College of Business was awarded accreditation by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Initial or continuing accreditation was also earned by Athletic Training (CAAHEP); Journalism and Mass Communications (CEJMC); and Chemistry (ACE).

The College of Fine Arts and the College of Business deleted areas of emphasis, concentrations, and/or courses.

The Morrow Library and the former WVGC library have merged operations.

One position was reduced in the Registrar’s Office as a consequence of MILO, a telephone registration system.

Human Resources conducted "Connections" seminars for 752 staff members; faculty development through the Office of Academic Affairs (60), in the College of Liberal Arts (115), and the Lewis College of Business (11); seventeen sabbatical leaves; and Internet Specialization Training (300 faculty and staff).

There were eleven Technical Advantage grant proposals equal to $1.2 million.

Faculty Special Projects awards for course development ($200,000) made possible 25 courses on-line and ready.

Approximately 35% of all faculty participated in some form of technical training during 1996/97.

Distance learning interactive video classrooms were installed in Huntington and South Charleston to interconnect with Point Pleasant and Logan sites to offer classes at multiple locations simultaneously.

Other strategic initiatives undertaken by Marshall University which foster economic development include the partnership with the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing which provides statewide and regional access to advanced technology and technical training to small and medium-sized manufacturers. Additionally, the Advantage Valley Regional Economic Development Program involves community, businesses and educational agencies to take action collectively to use technology and telecommunications to transform the these agencies for the ultimate goal of economic growth. Marshall’s leadership is felt as well through its Community Outreach Partnership Center which works with multiple agencies to improve the quality of life in the City of Huntington’s Enterprise Community. These examples of strategic initiatives that create partnerships with the community demonstrate the meaning of an interactive university.

Strategies Planned for 1997-1998

! Savings realized from the merger will be redirected into programs, services, a limited number of new positions, and restructured replacement positions. Some of this has already been accomplished. (See narrative, p. 5)

! Average faculty and staff salaries at Marshall University increased 3.25%. Marshall University Graduate College increased average faculty salaries 4.46% and staff salaries 5.40%.

! Sources of funds will be increases in state appropriations and fees of 3.25%.

! Restructuring in the College of Science, College of Education, and College of Business will take the form of merging departments, or restructuring curriculum, or for the College of Business completion of the merger with the new Graduate School of Management.

! A seamless telephone system and a courier service between Huntington and South Charleston will be instituted.

! The merger strategy will be used at several levels to eliminate duplication of under utilized programs and courses; faculty at the two locations will be merged through program realignment and workload assignment.

! The student information system, payroll functions, technology planning and implementation will be merged.

! MUGC library holdings will be migrated into the existing MU VTLS database, eliminating duplication.

! Existing Morrow Library systems and automation staff will perform on-line catalog maintenance for MUGC.

! Electronic document delivery from the Morrow Library to MUGC will increase student and faculty access to library services.

! The following capital improvement projects will be completed: John Deaver Drinko Library; Marshall University Graduate College Academic Center; Marshall University Medical Center, and the Memorial Student Center bookstore addition.

! E-course development and delivery will provide a distance education alternative to students at remote sites.

Through the Year 2001

! The budget is balanced.

! Salary goals are met.

! Merger objectives are met: restructuring programs, combining faculties, staffs, and integrating services as appropriate.

! Library services are provided to more remote sites and distance education centers.

! Cross-college interdisciplinary programs are developed.

! The commitment to continue graduate education in southern West Virginia and the region will be manifest.

! Most significant, Marshall University will have achieved the goals in its strategic plan for high quality in undergraduate education; technological sophistication unmatched by any university of its size and type in the region; status as a protypical interactive university, and demonstrated sound management of its financial and human resources.

! The mission of the Marshall University Graduate College will have taken on a new life within the context of the university structure without abandoning the mission to serve nontraditional students.

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