Over the last 20 years, molecular biology and genomics have undergone a spectacular transition, in large part driven by changes in technology and use of bioinformatics.   Therefore, through the utilization of our next-generation sequencing capabilities and the development of a campus-wide bioinformatics capability, enabled by a rapidly improving cyberinfrastructure, Marshall University will be better able to contribute to the generation of genome-wide information. The purpose of the Forum is to review current next generation sequencing and bioinformatics research activity at Marshall and discuss what needs to be done to develop our bioinformatics capability to the level needed.

 

Agenda:

Session A: Applications of Sequencing and Bioinformatics
Chair: Jim Denvir
Presentations:

  1. F. Robin O’Keefe, Ph.D. Dept. of Biology. “Sequencing and Phylogenetics”
  2. Wendy Trzyna, Ph.D. Dept. of Biology. “De Novo Sequencing”
  3. Don Primerano, Pd.D. Dept. Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine. “Whole Exome Approaches to Mendelian Disease”.

Session B: Epigenetics.
Chair: Philippe Georgel
Presentations:

  1. Travis Salisbury, Ph.D. School of Medicine. “Defining the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Cistrome to Gain New Insights into Adipocyte-breast Cancer Cell Interactions”.
  2. Vincent Sollars, Ph.D. Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine. “Title to be announced”.
  3. Johannes Fahrmann, Ph.D. Student Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine. “Omega 3maternal Diet Alters MicroRNA Expression in First Generation Mouse Pups”.

Session C: Cyberinfrastructure for Bioinformatics.
Chair: Venkat Gudivada
Presentations:

  1. Jack Smith, Ph.D, Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences.  “Introduction to the Cyberinfrastructure at Marshall University”.
  2. Jim Denvir, Ph.D. Dept. Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine. “R and Bioconductor for Sequence Analysis of Genomic Data”.
  3. Hyoli Han, Ph.D. and Venkat Gudivada, Ph.D. Div. Computer Science, “Overview of Data Mining and Machine Learning Using R and Weka”.

Panel discussion: What is next?

Selby Wellman to be keynote speaker at April CI Day event
Program to promote cyberinfrastructure and high-performance computing

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – F. Selby Wellman, retired senior vice president of Cisco Systems Inc., will be the keynote speaker for the April 7 Cyberinfrastructure Day (CI Day) program at Marshall University.

Wellman, a Williamson native and 1963 graduate of Marshall, will talk about the future of the Internet.

The free, one-day CI Day conference, which will showcase state-of-the-art computing technologies available to researchers at Marshall and across the region, will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the university’s Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus, Room BE5.

Faculty, staff and students from any field and all higher education institutions are encouraged to attend. Members of the high-tech business community, representatives of government agencies, technology providers and other interested parties also are welcome.

According to Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of Marshall’s Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences and chairman of the CI Day planning committee, the goal of CI Day is to help researchers – at Marshall and elsewhere – understand the potential of technology and supercomputing to enhance research, teaching and research funding.

“We could not be more pleased to welcome Selby Wellman back to Marshall for CI Day,” Szwilski said. “His experience in the computing industry and his commitment to technology for scholarship and research makes him the ideal keynote speaker for our event. His message is powerful and inspiring, and I urge anyone with an interest in technology to attend.”

Wellman spent his entire career in the high-technology industry. Prior to joining Cisco, worldwide leader in networking for the Internet, he spent five years as corporate vice president of sales, marketing and operations at FiberCom. He also was corporate vice president of sales and marketing at Paradyne, a Florida-based networking company. Wellman started his career at IBM, where he spent 15 years in various marketing and management positions.

He remains involved in education through his private family foundation, which has funded scholarships for a number of West Virginia students to attend Marshall. The foundation also has funded the SAS Institute Curriculum Pathways software for all West Virginia schools, grades 8-12.

Wellman said, “I continue to be fascinated by the evolution of the Internet and the impact it continues to have on all of our lives throughout the world in so many ways. I always look forward to returning to the Marshall campus to participate in discussions about future technology.”

Szwilski said that cyberinfrastructure makes possible scholarly innovation and discoveries that were not possible even a decade ago, and that through targeted investments in cyberinfrastructure and visualization capabilities, Marshall now has computing power that was, until recently, available only at the most prestigious research institutions. He added that the university’s advancing cyberinfrastructure resources should be of significant interest to businesses in the region.

He said that in addition to Wellman’s talk, the CI Day program will feature presentations from faculty members who are already taking advantage of technological resources to advance research and research collaborations, win grant funding and enhance students’ classroom experiences.

Szwilski added that attendees will have the opportunity to showcase their own research in project demonstrations and a student poster competition.

A special community reception from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories will close out the program.

The CI Day event is free, but advance registration is requested.

Marshall’s CI Day is made possible through a National Science Foundation grant that funds “Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in West Virginia and Arkansas (CI-TRAIN),” a partnership among eight higher education institutions in West Virginia and Arkansas.

Event sponsors include Cisco Systems Inc.; Dell; the Marshall University Research Corporation; Verizon; Frontier Communications; Visualization Sciences Group; Organic Motion Inc.; Strictly Business Computer Systems Inc.; the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission; and Marshall University’s College of Information Technology and Engineering, College of Science, and Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences.

To register online or for more information about CI Day, including a full agenda and calls for project demonstrations and student posters, visit www.marshall.edu/ciday.

###

 

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – On April 7, 2011, Marshall University will host a one-day conference to showcase state-of-the-art computing technologies available to researchers at the university and across the region.

The free Cyberinfrastructure Day (CI Day) program will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the university’s Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus, Room BE5. Faculty, staff and students from any field and all higher education institutions are encouraged to attend. Members of the high-tech business community, representatives of government agencies, technology providers and other interested parties are welcome.

According to Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of Marshall’s Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences and chairman of the CI Day planning committee, the term cyberinfrastructure is commonly used to refer to computational systems, data and information management, visualization environments and people—all linked together by collaborative software and advanced networks.

He said the goal of CI Day is to help researchers—at Marshall and elsewhere—understand the potential of technology and supercomputing to enhance research, teaching and research funding.

“In short, cyberinfrastructure makes possible scholarly innovation and discoveries that were not possible even a decade ago,” he said. “By making targeted investments in our cyberinfrastructure and visualization capabilities, Marshall University now has computing power that was, until recently, available only at the most prestigious research institutions. We hope the CI Day program will make more people aware of the benefits this technology can offer their scholarship and work.”

Szwilski said the program will feature state and national leaders who will speak about the current state and the future of cyberinfrastructure. There also will be presentations from faculty members who are already taking advantage of the university’s technological resources to advance research and research collaborations, win grant funding and enhance students’ classroom experiences.

He added that attendees will have the opportunity to showcase their own research in a poster session during the evening reception that will close out the program.

Marshall’s CI Day is made possible through a National Science Foundation grant that funds “Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in West Virginia and Arkansas (CI-TRAIN),” a partnership among eight higher education institutions in West Virginia and Arkansas.

The CI Day event is free, but advance registration is requested.

To register online or for more information about CI Day, including a full agenda and speaker information, visitwww.marshall.edu/ciday.

 


Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304.746.1964

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – Marshall University has announced it has joined Internet2®, an advanced networking consortium. Through its membership, the university’s students, faculty and staff will have access to Internet2’s premier, ultrafast nationwide network which connects close to 70,000 research and educational institutions in the U.S. and interconnects with 80 international research networks worldwide.

According to Marshall officials, participating directly in the Internet2 community and connecting to its advanced high-performance network provides the university transformative tools for learning and discovery, and supports research, education and healthcare throughout the region.

Dr. Jan I. Fox, senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer at Marshall, said that in addition to providing access to a number of significant emerging technologies not available within the limitations of previous networks, the Internet2 Network links Marshall with people, equipment and information at partner institutions around the world.

“Internet2 gives Marshall networking power that until very recently was available only to the most prestigious research institutions,” she said. “We now have access to state-of-the-art telemedicine, bioinformatics, virtual reality and visualization technologies, in addition to advanced collaboration capabilities that connect us as never before to colleagues and information across the country. Internet2 will truly revolutionize what our students and investigators can do, how they do it and who can participate.”

Fox also acknowledged Marshall staff members who spearheaded the project, including Dr. Arnold R. Miller, assistant vice president for information technology and executive director of University Computing Services; Allen Taylor, chief technology officer; and Michael Adkins, director of information technology infrastructure.

Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, said, “Through Internet2, we have a vital new tool that will allow us to help resolve global problems that require the minds and resources of a global community. Our faculty, staff and students have access to more and better information and technology, and can collaborate with partners across the barriers presented traditionally by geography, organizational structure and disciplines of study.”

Ana Preston, Internet2 executive director of member relations and communications, said, “Our community is pleased to welcome Marshall University as a member. We look forward to engaging with its faculty, staff and students on a variety of important technology initiatives that hold the promise of significantly enhancing its campus learning and research environment as well as improving its region’s access to important new telehealth applications. Marshall’s commitment to extending the benefits of advanced networking and to participating in the development of new cyberinfrastructure will be a valuable asset to our members and global partners.”

Marshall’s connection to the Internet2 Network is made possible through a partnership with OARnet, Ohio’s statewide research and education network, and Merit, Michigan’s statewide research and education network and an Internet2 Connector organization.

For more information, contact Fox at 304-696-6706 or fox@marshall.edu.