New Media Studies online Master’s emphasis

Adoption of nontraditional media is moving forward at a rapid pace. Consumers of information expect content to be available across platforms, including mobile devices. Publishers are preparing to combine platforms into a single product. Content creation demands versatility in writing, designing, preparing images and packaging messages for access through a variety of media.

The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications now offers a New Media Studies Master’s emphasis completely online. The 30-hour program allows veterans in mass communications to retool and those just launching their careers to prepare to use new systems. The New Media Master’s emphasis stresses the design, development and dissemination of information using emerging technology. All courses are delivered online to accommodate flexible schedules.

Required courses for the New Media Studies Master’s emphasis:

  • JMC 604—JMC Law and Ethics
  • JMC 605—Master’s Initiative Network
  • JMC 606—Depth Reporting
  • JMC 640—Design Thinking
  • JMC 682—Master’s Initiative (6 hrs.)

Select six hours from:

  • JMC 500—Photojournalism
  • JMC 562—Web Design for Mass Media
  • JMC 612—History of Mass Communication
  • JMC 641—Web/Online Strategies for JMC
  • JMC 678—Organizational Storytelling
  • JMC 643—New Media Cultures

Select six additional hours, with adviser’s approval, from graduate courses outside Journalism and Mass Communications.

Admission to the master’s programs requires:

  • a completed admission form,
  • an earned bachelor’s degree, and
  • a 3.0 undergraduate gpa (on a 4.0 scale) and a total score of 370 on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE), OR
  • a 2.5 to 2.99 undergraduate gpa (on a 4.0 scale) and a total score of 396 on the GRE.

Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in all course work with no more than two C’s.

Make your mark. Leave your legacy.

 

“Those who have adapted to the new media and are comfortable writing for and working with a variety of electronic and digital tools will have an advantage in finding new work.”

(2010-11 U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook/Media and Communications-related Occupations.)