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Comprehensive List of Approved Service Learning Courses

The following comprehensive list of approved “SL” courses are instructor-specific. Please note frequency of offering below. Click here for Spring 2010 SL course offerings. 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

ENG 354
Scientific and Technical Writing
Instructor: David Hatfield
Accounting
ACC 412
Governmental Accounting
Instructor: Marie Archambault
Credit Hours: 3 
Frequency: Once per year
Pre-req: None

A study of the use of accounting information in the financial management of governmental and nonprofit entities. As part of this course, the student will gain experience with a governmental or nonprofit entity in the Huntington area. These assignments involve completing accounting-related tasks for the entity. Students will keep a journal of their activities and write a reflective paper concerning the impact of the project on the community and themselves.

Communication Disorders
CD 101
Introduction to Communication Disorders
Instructor: Pam Holland
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req: None

This course is an introduction to the field of Communication Disorders for persons interested in selecting Communication Disorders as their major. There will be discussion of the various communication disorders, as well as the roles and responsibilities of a Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist. In addition, students will be introduced to the ideas of service learning through participating in various activities scheduled at the Huntington City Mission within Project Hope and the Women's and Children's Emergency Shelter. One of the main purposes of speech-language pathologists providing service to such agencies is for the prevention of communication delays. In our participation at the City Mission, we will interact and develop relationships with the staff, family and children. We will provide language stimulation activities including reading books, writing in journals, making crafts, and playing age appropriate games to assist in the development of communication and social skills for all of the children. Because parents who find themselves at the city Mission with their families need guidance and assistance with transition into the working force, we may also be assisting the adults in the learning and resource room with their computer skills and aid the staff in preparing the adults for job interviews and other professional skills.

CD 422
Lab: Field Experience in Speech and Language
Instructor: Susan Thomas Frank
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency:
Pre-req: None

The purpose of this course is to allow undergraduate Communication Disorders majors to prepare and conduct language stimulation activities with preschool-aged children. The course has at its core a service learning component where students engage in a partnership with local childcare centers to provide shared reading experiences with the children enrolled in the centers. Students will work in teams to choose pieces of children's literature and develop and present language activities which support the emergent literacy skills of three to five year olds. Students will spend the first five weeks of the course learning about naturalistic language stimulation, shared reading techniques and how to evaluate books written for children. The following eight weeks will be spent working with children in partnering childcare centers. The final week of the class will be devoted to reflection of the experience including the development of a reflective essay.

Communication Studies
CMM 302
Professional Presentations
Instructor: Susan Gilpin
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency:
Every semester
Pre-req.: CMM103 or CMM 104H or CMM 207 or CMM 305 or YGS 161 or IST 101

Oral communication skills are increasingly valued in workplaces and communities.  Effective presentational speaking, in particular, is crucial for successfully performing many professional and civic roles.  In this course, you will explore theories of presentational speaking, civic engagement, and the use of presentational technology.  You will apply these theories by creating and delivering various genres of professional presentations, one of which will publicly address an identified community need.  Analysis and critique of samples, rehearsal, peer feedback, reflection, and development of a critical civic self-consciousness also will be part of our collaborative classroom practice.

CMM 315--Sect. 103
Group Communication
Instructor: Barbara Tarter
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req.: CMM103 or CMM 104H or CMM 207 or CMM 305 or YGS 161 or IST 101

The Group Communication course meets both the writing intensive and the service learning requirements. The course reviews communication skills as they relate to the small group process. Students have the option of either writing a grant for a local service agency or participating in the development of a project for an agency. Projects have included building a bridge at Beech Fork, developing a program for the children of women being served by Branches Domestic Violence Shelter, painting a wall for a local community center, growing a garden for the Marshall Childcare Center and acquiring funds for local agencies through grant writing and fundraising activities. This course will specifically work with the Tri-State Literacy Council in the development of grants and programs that will serve their clients.

Communications--MCTC
COM 112--Sect. 108
Oral Communication
Instructor: Linda Wilkinson
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req: None

COM 112 provides instruction and experience in preparation and delivery of presentations in public settings and group discussions.  Emphasis is placed on research, preparation, delivery, and evaluation of informative, persuasive, and special occasion public speaking.  The Service-Learning section will require students to participate in 10 hours of service with a service organization of their choice.  The speeches, class discussions, and group project will be about the service organizations and will include reference to the students’ experiences volunteering.  Upon completion, students should be able to prepare and deliver well organized presentations and participate in group discussions with appropriate audiovisual support as well as be better community citizens.

Criminal Justice
CJ 325
Juvenile Justice
Instructor: Kimberly A. DeTardo-Bora
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency:
Once per Year
Pre-req.:

Students will learn the historical development, legal foundations, and present system of juvenile justice.  The course will explore an in-depth view of children as offenders through historical and theoretical concepts as well as first hand experience in the juvenile justice system.  Students will also become familiar with treatment implications and preventative measures for youth.

Education
ESS435
Adapted Physical Education and Mainstreaming
Instructor: David Robertson
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency:
Once per year
Pre-req.: PE 201, PE 345, and CI 421 or CISP 421

Theory of remedial exercise and individualizing of physical activities to meet the needs of the physically, mentally and emotionally disturbed will be the focus of this course. This course will provide prospective physical education teachers the principles and practices of adapted physical education emphasizing the nature and needs of exceptional persons. This course will include history, recent legislation, growth and developmental factors, assessments, and individualized education plans related to adapted physical education. A service project in the community (totaling 20 hours) will provide students with experience in assisting individuals with special needs by actively engaging them in activities that will enhance their motor abilities.

English
ENG 102-- 230
English Composition II

Instructor:
Whitney Douglas
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req: ENG 101
English 102 focuses on the study and practice of argument, and asks you to take up argument in various ways in writing.  Arguments emerge in rhetorical contexts, and in this course, we will locate and analyze arguments connected to and located in rhetorical contexts in the larger Huntington community.  A critical component of this course is your service learning partnership with a community organization.  Through this partnership, you will provide 10 hours of service to the organization over the course of the semester.  The writing projects you complete in this class will be based on your experiences working with and observations of your community organization, as well as research you conduct on an issue that your community organization seeks to address or a relevant issue that your community organization faces or is affected by.
ENG 354
Scientific and Technical Writing
Instructor: David Hatfield
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req.: ENG 102, 202, 302, or 201H

Technical writing is all about empowerment:  making information accessible, usable and relevant.  Much of your career success will depend on how well you communicate.  English 354 will prepare you to write in your profession. This section of ENG 354 is also designated Service Learning, meaning that one important course component entails civic engagement through our helping a new non-profit organization, Dress for Success River Cities. We will be contributing help on designing effective resumes and writing effective letters of application.

ENG 475
Intro to Linguistics
Instructor: Hyo-Chang Hong
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req.: Any 300- or 400-level ENG course except 302

This course is designed as a hands-on practical learning class where students 1) learn basic linguistics, 2) become acquainted with ESL (English as a Second Language) students, 2) diagnose speech problems/errors, and 4) work with and help ESL students improve their English proficiency skills. The language analysis skills that are taught in the class will also be applicable to L1 (English as the First Language) speakers with language problems.

Journalism and Mass Communications
JMC 245
Fundamentals of Advertising
Instructor: Allyson Goodman
Credit Hours: 3  Pre-req: None

This course will examine the role and structure of the Advertising industry.  It will cover advertisers, advertising agencies, media and advertising industry vendors.  It will also examine the processes and procedures involved in planning, creating, distributing and evaluating advertising messages.  Students will work with local nonprofit organizations to develop a public service advertising campaign based on emersion in the nonprofit organization.

JMC 462
Web Design for Mass Media
Instructor: Rebecca Johnson
Credit Hours: 3 
Frequency: Once per year
Pre-req: JMC 241

Students will learn basic Web design by working in a group with a local nonprofit organization to design and produce a Web site appropriate to the mission of the organization. Students will learn basic hypertext markup language, Dreamweaver, to create static and/or animated graphics, how to edit photos and how to digitize audio and video clips for online publication

Political Science
PSC 499
Capstone Experience
Instructor: Cheryl Brown and Robert Behrman
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every fall
Pre-req.: Permission

Capstones are designed to be the culmination of your undergraduate studies. There are six distinct areas of study within the field of political science. These six areas include: Political Theory, American National, State, Local and Urban, Public Administration, Comparative Politics and International Politics. Many of you have specialized in one or two of these areas. In this course, we will engage in a service learning project that will combine your scholarly interests with real-life skills by researching public issues concerning Huntington and the surrounding area and creating a web site for that information. The web site, accessible by the community, will provide a needed resource of information and analysis on the current state of Huntington by focusing on several quality of life issues.

Psychology
PSY 480
Psychology of Women
Instructor: Wendy Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Once per year
Pre-req.: Permission

This course explores contemporary theories, findings, and social issues regarding the psychology of women. Emphasis is placed on understanding how gender role socialization influences women's beliefs and behaviors across the lifespan including issues of work and motherhood, mental and physical health, and violence against women. The course is guided by a feminist analysis that recognizes the intersection of gender, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation. A major goal of the class is that students think critically about issues surrounding gender at the individual and societal levels (including media representations of women and public policy). Learning will take place using readings, lecture, discussion, media analysis, guest speakers, and service learning community placements.

Women's Studies

WS 101
Intro to Women’s Studies
Instructor: Sherri Smith
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req.: None
WS 101 offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of a range of gender-related issues, from sexuality, violence, pornography, and sexual difference, to religion, Appalachian sexism, motherhood, and feminism. Two governing questions will drive our inquiry: What can we learn about women, women’s lives, and gendered culture through real-world engagement with learning, and how can we facilitate constructive change in our communities as we learn? In our analysis of these issues, we will use a number of methods, including question-centered reading, discussion, and writing; a service project in the community (totaling 15 hours); critical reflection; and immersion in multimedia. As a course with both writing intensive and service learning designations, WS 101 will require that you engage in writing and community service not as ends in themselves. Rather, writing and service are the means by which you will learn to identify the nuances of socialized oppression and translate the theories we study in class into the practice of your everyday life as a citizen.   

GRADUATE COURSES

English
ENG 575 
Intro to Linguistics
Instructor: Hyo-Chang Hong
Credit Hours: 3 
Frequency: Every semester
Pre-req.: None
This course is designed as a hands-on practical learning class where students 1) learn basic linguistics, 2) become acquainted with ESL (English as a Second Language) students, 2) diagnose speech problems/errors, and 4) work with and help ESL students improve their English proficiency skills. The language analysis skills that are taught in the class will also be applicable to L1 (English as the First Language) speakers with language problems.
Journalism and Mass Communication
JMC 562
Web Design for Mass Media
Instructor: Rebecca Johnson
Credit Hours: 3 
Frequency: Once per year
Pre-req: JMC 241

Students will learn basic Web design by working in a group with a local nonprofit organization to design and produce a Web site appropriate to the mission of the organization. Students will learn basic hypertext markup language, Dreamweaver, to create static and/or animated graphics, how to edit photos and how to digitize audio and video clips for online publication

Physics
PHY 651                                                       
Remote Sensing Detectors                                            Credit Hours: 3                      Pre-req: Permission            
Instructor: Maria Babiuc                                               Frequency: Once per year
The course will present the physical principles underlying the remote observations of the Earth by optical, infrared, and microwave sensors, and the techniques for extracting geophysical information from remote sensor observations.   The primary objective of the course will be to give the student the opportunity to offer useful scientific expertise through a service-learning project for the local community.  Students will broaden their education by including the civic perspective in the learning process, larger than but related to the science of remote sensing.
Psychology
PSY 580
Psychology of Women
Instructor: Wendy Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Frequency: Once per year
Pre-req.: Permission

This course explores contemporary theories, findings, and social issues regarding the psychology of women. Emphasis is placed on understanding how gender role socialization influences women's beliefs and behaviors across the lifespan including issues of work and motherhood, mental and physical health, and violence against women. The course is guided by a feminist analysis that recognizes the intersection of gender, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation. A major goal of the class is that students think critically about issues surrounding gender at the individual and societal levels (including media representations of women and public policy). Learning will take place using readings, lecture, discussion, media analysis, guest speakers, and service learning community placements.



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