2016 Participants
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NAME: Austin Akers

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by rapid doubling time, early metastasis and a dismal survival rate. The high metastatic ability of NSCLC is one of the factors responsible for the poor treatment outcomes in SCLC patients. Recent studies have shown dietary compounds can suppress the growth and progression of several human cancers. Our preliminary data shows that capsaicin can potently ablate the invasion of multiple human NSCLC cell lines in two distinct experimental models. Since the invasion of tumor cells is one of the crucial step of metastasis, our data raise the possibility that capsaicin may attenuate metastasis in human NSCLC. The present grant aims to investigate the anti-metastatic activity of capsaicin in human NSCLC using mouse models. The main aim of this research project is to investigate the anti-metastatic activity of capsaicin in syngenic mouse models of lung cancer metastasis. In addition, the present grant also aims to explore the signaling pathways underlying the anti-invasive activity of capsaicin in human NSCLC. Our hypothesis will be explored in the following two specific aims:


Specific Aim 1. To examine the anti-metastatic activity of capsaicin in syngenic mouse models of lung metastasis.


Specific Aim 2. To investigate the role of TRPV receptors in the anti-invasive effects of capsaicin in human NSCLCs.


The studies in the present grant may lead to the development of capsaicin as a novel nutrition-based therapeutic agent for the treatment of metastatic human NSCLC.

 

To view their website click here: Austinakerscapre.webs.com