FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 21, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners announced in design contests at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Joseph Huter, a senior in the Marshall University Department of Art and Design's Graphic Design Program, is the winner of the 2009 Holiday Card Design Contest, sponsored by MU President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp.

Huter's card design, which was digitally rendered, features an abstract holiday impression and spots of varnish emphasizing important parts of the design.

"I wanted to try something different, something totally off the grid and totally different," said Huter, who is from Hurricane, W.Va. "It worked out for my benefit."

Prof. Hayson Harrison, Huter's graphic design teacher, said she has always enjoyed working with Huter.

"He is the most hard-working student I've ever seen," Harrison said. "His solution was pretty strong and his final product was quite wonderful and appropriate."

Kyle Quinn, a senior fine arts major with an emphasis in sculpture, won the 2009 Commemorative Plate Design Contest, also sponsored by President and Mrs. Kopp.

Quinn, who is from Huntington, used Marshall University logo motifs to create a repeated pattern in the center of the plate. He used the buffalo head logo and the MU logo.

"My design is very pattern oriented," Quinn said. "Specifically, the M and the U are almost quilt like."

Huter and Quinn received $700 apiece for their winning designs.

President and Mrs. Kopp began the card design and plate design competition in 2007 as a way of recognizing the talent of Marshall's students. The card designed by Huter is being mailed to everyone on President Kopp's mailing list.  

In the card design contest, Kimberly Archer, a junior from Parkersburg, W.Va., was the second-place winner and received $350 and Erin Mulvaney, a senior from Ashland, Ky., was third and received $150. Kelli Gagnon, a senior from Huntington, was the honorable mention winner and received $50.

Another category was added to the design competition this year. Jacob Hall, a senior from Ripley, W.Va., finished first in the 2009 New Media Design Contest featuring animations. He won $700 for the entry he titled "Thought."

Jetwichen Chaowadee, a graduate student from Huntington, won $350 with his second-place entry of "Canon Ad." Finishing third was Stephen Preston, a senior from Russell, Ky., with "Wendy's." He received $150.

Prof. Brent Patterson said all three works by Hall, Chaowadee and Preston were animations, with Chaowadee's being an animation combined with real video shot in New York City.

"The videos' technical complexity ranged from advanced compositing techniques to simple hand-drawn animation," Patterson said. "The subject matter ranged from humorous to dreamlike and poetic. Mr. Hall took first place with a beautiful, but simple animation of a character moving through profound experiences of life."

All the videos can be viewed online at www.marshall.edu/art.

Two students received honorable mention. They were Melissa Moran, a senior from Daphne, Ala., and Stephanie Lloyd, a senior from Huntington.

---------------

Photos: Joseph Huter (left) of Hurricane, W.Va., finished first in the 2009 Holiday Card Design Contest. Kyle Quinn (right) of Huntington won the 2009 Commemorative Plate Design Contest. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday December 18, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

National Science Foundation grant to fund scholarship program for nontraditional students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Elizabeth Murray of Marshall University's Department of Integrated Science and Technology (IST) has been awarded a four-year $586,500 grant to develop a scholarship program for nontraditional students at the university and the Marshall Community and Technology College (MCTC).

According to Murray, the grant from the National Science Foundation will underwrite a Trailblazer Scholars program for nontraditional students who have dependents and are interested in pursuing a degree in the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

Murray's co-investigators in the project include, at Marshall, Dr. James Leonard of the Geography Department; Brian Morgan of IST; Dr. Patricia Logan of the College of Information Technology and Engineering; and at MCTC, Dr. Randall Jones of the Information Technology program and Dr. Jason Black of the Bioscience program.

Beginning in the fall 2010 semester, full scholarships (up to $8,500 above and beyond Pell Grant or other government financial assistance) will be awarded to at least 15 students. In addition to being responsible for dependents, applicants to the Trailblazer Scholars program must have a track record of academic accomplishments at the high school and/or college level and demonstrate financial need.

"The program is being designed for smart, motivated nontraditional students who are unemployed or employed in low-wage, unskilled jobs with no real room for advancement," said Murray. "If they are eager for a challenge, we will help them succeed and earn a degree in a high-tech field at either Marshall University or MCTC."

In addition to financial assistance, other support, including mentoring and enrichment programs, will be provided to increase the likelihood scholarship recipients will be successful in the program.

She added, "Not only will this program improve educational opportunities and student services for nontraditional students at both Marshall and MCTC, and build a stronger relationship between the two institutions, but it will also help expand the technical and science-based workforce in the region. That is important if we are going to improve the economic climate in our communities."

Students interested in applying for the Trailblazer Scholars program should contact either Murray at murraye@marshall.edu or 304-696-3515 or Black at blackj@mctc.edu or 304-696-3889.


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Friday December 18, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor receives national service award from the Research Consortium of AAHPERD



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Dr. Jennifer Y. Mak, professor and director of sport management at Marshall University, received a national service award from the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD). The Research Consortium is a group of more than 5,500 research scholars and other members of AAHPERD who have a strong interest in research.

"It is my pleasure to serve my colleagues at a national level. It is very encouraging to be recognized by peers for my contributions to the Research Consortium," Mak said. "I will continue to work hard and serve the profession. My recognition is only one example of Marshall's national prominence for excellence in the areas of high quality teaching, research and service."

Mak has assumed a variety of leadership roles in her field. For example, she has been the executive board member of the AAHERD Research Consortium, the President of West Virginia AHPERD, the Convention Chairperson for different conferences, Director of Sports Education Camps for Students who are Visually Impaired, Editorial Review Board member and reviewer for several journals and national conventions.

In addition, Mak received the 2009 Scholar Award from West Virginia Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (West Virginia AHPERD).

Mak has been honored with numerous awards such as the Scholar Awards from both the College of Education and Human Services and the Mid-West District of AAHPERD; induction as a Fellow from AAHPERD Research Consortium; the AAHPERD Mabel Lee Award for the outstanding young professor of the year; the MU Distinguished Artists & Scholars Award junior recipient; and the Honor Award from the West Virginia AHPERD. She also has joined other eminent scholars from outside Hong Kong to be named a University Fellow by Hong Kong Baptist University.

The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) is the largest organization of professionals supporting and assisting those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, and education and all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. AAHPERD is an alliance of five national associations, six district associations and a research consortium and is designed to provide members with a comprehensive and coordinated array of resources, support, and programs to help practitioners improve their skills and so further the health and well-being of the American public.

The mission of the AAHPERD Research Consortium is to advance, promote and disseminate quality research within and across the disciplines and the professions served by AAHPERD. For more information on the Consortium, visit www.aahperd.org/research.


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Friday December 18, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University joins with Census Bureau to urge people to fill out 2010 U.S. Census questionnaires

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is joining with the United States Census Bureau in an effort to communicate to everyone in the MU and Huntington communities the importance of filling out 2010 U.S. Census questionnaires, which will be mailed or delivered to households on March 15 of next year.

The census is a count of everyone residing in the United States. The U.S. Constitution requires a national census once every 10 years to count the population and determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Marshall officials met recently with Richard Hartman, Senior Partnership Specialist with the U.S. Census Bureau, and members of his staff to discuss communication strategy and to form a census committee at MU.

"The goal is to get the word out on the importance of everyone filling out their questionnaires," Hartman said. "It is very important that everyone be counted because funds allocated each year by the federal government are based, in part, on the census count. A higher population allows them to obtain more funds."

Determining congressional seats and federal funding is only part of the important uses of census data. For example, the federal government uses population data to allocate funds in areas such as:

  • Title 1 grants to educational agencies

  • Head Start programs

  • Women, Infants and Children programs

  • Public transportation

  • Road rehabilitation and construction

  • Programs for the elderly

  • Emergency food and shelter programs

  • Empowerment zones

As part of a national kickoff to the 2010 census, the Census Bureau is planning a January Road Tour throughout Michigan, Ohio and West Virginia. The tour will include a day-long stop on Monday, Jan. 25 at the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus that will include displays, guest speakers, representation by community organizations, music, giveaways and lots of information.

Members of Hartman's staff will be on hand to answer questions about the census and the questionnaires. More details on the road tour will be available soon.

Hartman said a person's residence is determined by where he or she lives and sleeps most of the time. Thus, Marshall students who live in residence halls on the Huntington campus are, according to the Census Bureau, Huntington residents - not residents in their hometowns. Marshall's nearly 500 international students, in fact, should fill out the questionnaires and be counted as Huntington residents. Persons do not have to be citizens of the United States to be counted.

Every residence will receive a short questionnaire of 10 questions for the 2010 census. The individual in whose name the housing unit is owned or rented should complete the questionnaire on behalf of every person living in the residence.

Census Bureau workers undertake extensive operations to take in-person counts of people living in group quarters, such as college dormitories.

The questionnaires will be mailed out on March 15 with Census Day on April 1. Forms will be available at all public libraries for persons who do not receive them at home. It is crucial that persons mail back completed forms as soon as possible after receiving them. By law, the Census Bureau delivers the population counts to the president on Dec. 31, 2010.

For more information, contact Hartman at 304-348-6710.

 
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Thursday December 17, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

SGA offering students free trip, tickets to bowl game in Detroit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association is sponsoring a free tailgate bus and free tickets for MU students to the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl in Detroit on Dec. 26, SGA President Sean Hornbuckle announced today. Marshall's Thundering Herd plays Ohio University at 1 p.m. at Ford Field.

Game tickets will be given to the first 50 students who go to the lobby of the Memorial Student Center at 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 21. Those students also will be invited to board a tailgate charter bus to and from Detroit at no cost. The bus will leave the student center at 4 a.m. Dec. 26 and return immediately after the game.

Hornbuckle said new Herd football Coach Doc Holliday will help him distribute the free tickets to the students.

"This is a perfect opportunity to give back to our students with a Christmas gift of this magnitude and re-energize our fan base heading into next season," Hornbuckle said. "To send any number of students to a bowl game is remarkable. This free trip couldn't have been done without the help of the president's office, athletics and the ticket office, and my adviser, Steve Hensley (dean of student affairs). It's hard to beat partying with your friends on the way to the Motor City to watch your classmates beat up on the Bobcats all for free. I know I wouldn't miss it if I had the chance!"

The only requirement is a $10 deposit needed from each person to hold a seat on the bus. The deposit will be returned to the students after the trip. Hornbuckle said students who already have purchased tickets to the game also can board the tailgate bus for the ride to and from Detroit.

For more information, contact Hornbuckle at 304-360-1015.


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Thursday December 17, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Huntington campus to observe holiday hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities on Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open at various times during the holiday break, which takes place from midday Tuesday, Dec. 22 through Sunday, Jan. 3.

Departments and facilities scheduled to be open and offering assistance from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Wednesday, Dec. 28-30 include the Office of the Registrar, Admissions, the Bursar's Office, Financial Aid, Academic Affairs and Academic Advising, all located in Old Main.

The Marshall Bookstore will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 22 and Monday-Wednesday, Dec. 28-30, and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 31. 

The Marshall University Foundation, Inc.'s office in Old Main 323 will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 30-31 to answer calls, accept gifts and handle other requests. The foundation's main number (304-696-6264) will be answered by Foundation and Development staff throughout the holiday break.

The Marshall Recreation Center will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Dec. 22-23 and Monday-Wednesday, Dec. 28-30, and from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 26-27 and Saturday-Sunday, Jan. 2-3.

Also, the residence halls on the Huntington campus will be offering break housing for students in Twin Towers East and West. Interested students may contact the Department of Residence Services at 304-696-6765 before the holiday break begins Dec. 23.  Residence Services will be closed throughout the break.

Below are locations and contact information for some of the services that will be available during the break:

         Academic Affairs (Old Main 110, 304-696-6704)

         Academic Advising - located in the Registrar's Office (Old Main 106B, 304-696-6410)

  • Admissions (Old Main 102, 304-696-3160)
  • Bursar's Office (Old Main 101, 304-696-6620)
  • Financial Aid (Old Main 116, 304-696-3162 or 800-438-5390)
  • Registrar's Office (Old Main 106B, 304-696-6410)
  • MU Foundation (Old Main 323, 304-696-6264)
  • Marshall Recreation Center (304-696-4732, www.marshallcampusrec.com)

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Wednesday December 16, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduate College Advisory Board formed at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Graduate College Advisory Board has been formed at Marshall University, Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the MU Graduate College, announced today.

Spindel said the board is a group of distinguished educational, corporate, professional and community leaders with a strong commitment to enhancing the quality of graduate education at Marshall University. The board's mission is to promote the activities of the graduate college to the external community, to provide advice and input on graduate education to the dean, and to help identify and obtain private funding for graduate student professional activities.

The advisory board's first meeting took place on Dec. 4 at the Forensic Science Center in Huntington, the home of the Forensic Science master's program. 

Graduate College Advisory Board members include:

Dr. Duke Haddad, Vice President for Development/CDO, The Children's Medical Center of Dayton

David Haden, MU Alumni Association, graduate college representative, iSource, LLC, Charleston, W.Va.

Monica Hatfield, educator, past president, MU Foundation, Charleston, W.Va.

Mark H. Hayes, attorney, Robinson & McElwee, Charleston, W.Va.

William Sawran, retired, corporate Vice President, Ashland Oil, Lexington, Ky.

Elizabeth Appell Sheets, Student Legal Aid Advisor, Marshall University, board member, Huntington Museum of Art

Brandon B. Roisman, Vice President-Wealth Management, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, Huntington, W.Va.

Lawrence Tweel, managing partner, Green, Ketchum, Bailey & Tweel, Huntington, W.Va.

Dr. Thomas Wilkinson, DDS, SOM admissions committee, Hospice Board, Barboursville, W.Va.


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Tuesday December 15, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Youth programming planned during holidays at Marshall Recreation Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will be hosting various programming for youth in the community during the holidays.

The Healthy Herd Holiday Camps focus on developing healthy lifestyles through participation in physical and educational activities for children ages 5-13. The Speed & Agility Camp is geared towards competitive athletes ages 12-18 who want to improve techniques necessary for all athletic events.

The Healthy Herd Holiday Camps will run two separate events, a one-day camp from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 19 and a three-day camp following Christmas from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily Monday, Dec. 28 to Wednesday, Dec. 30. Cost for the one-day camp is $40 for members and $50 for non-members and includes lunch and a camp t-shirt. The cost for the three-day camp is $100 for members and $125 for non-members.

During the Healthy Herd Holiday Camps the campers will swim, climb the rock wall, participate in games, arts and crafts, and learn about nutrition. The camps emphasize self-esteem, self-responsibility and self-worth for all campers.

The Speed & Agility Camp will run from noon to 4 p.m. daily Monday, Dec. 28 to Wednesday, Dec. 30. Instruction will focus on proper technique, injury prevention, exercise drill selection, acceleration, agility and balance. Each athlete will receive expert instruction from certified personal trainers, former collegiate athletes and a registered dietician.

During the intensive three-day program, each camper will receive a specialized fitness assessment and be given a workout drill program which can be followed after the camp is over. The cost for the camp is $125 per camper and includes a t-shirt.

Persons with questions about either camp may visit www.marshallcampusrec.com or call the recreation center at 304-696-4732.


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Monday December 14, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

River City Jazz Ensemble to give holiday concert Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Professor of Music and Director of Jazz Studies Dr. Ed Bingham will be the featured saxophone soloist at a performance of the River Cites Jazz Ensemble Tuesday, Dec. 15.  The concert, sponsored by the Jazz Studies area of the Marshall Department of Music, will take place at 7 p.m. in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus and is free and open to the public.

This concert will celebrate the season with well-known holiday selections arranged for Big Band. The River Cities Jazz Ensemble (RCJE) was established in February 2008 by two former U.S. Air Force Band members, Carl Toler and Frank Hayes.  They have worked to gather the finest musicians in the Huntington area to form a cohesive big band dedicated to preserving, producing, performing, and promoting big band jazz.

"From the dance band tunes of the 1940s to the bold big band charts of today, the RCJE offers an exciting and entertaining program for your listening pleasure," Bingham said.

The ensemble consists of a versatile group of 18 musicians from all walks of life, but who share an enthusiasm for offering the public the highest level of professional entertainment. The RCJE repertoire includes music made famous by such great bandleaders as Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, and Duke Ellington.


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Thursday December 10, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Autism Training Center's executive director shares information at Community Psychiatry Workshop in Taiwan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University recently gained international recognition for its unique approach in providing children with autism and their families with the ability to lead happy and productive lives.

Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the Autism Training Center, recently returned from a meeting of the Chinese Community Psychiatry Workshop in Taiwan where she shared information about how the West Virginia Autism Training Center best works with the families of children with autism. She said the shared information comes at a critical time for the Taiwanese culture, as their rates of prevalence of autism spectrum disorders are under review.

"It was an honor to be invited to share our good work with the Taiwanese community," Becker-Cottrill said. "The first study to determine the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders is under way in Taiwan. I anticipate that their prevalence rates will be similar to ours in the United States - approximately one in 100.  Their government appears to be keenly aware that services for this population of individuals will be critical."

Becker-Cottrill made two presentations during the workshop, which took place in the Calo Psychiatric Center in Taiwan. During the first, she spoke to a group of about 100 special education teachers at the Kaohsiung Medical University about educating students on the autism spectrum. The second presentation was geared to a smaller group during a series of community based seminars and addressed how the Autism Training Center successfully serves families with autism in West Virginia and how to further enhance development of similar services in Taiwan.  

Becker-Cottrill explained how the center utilizes a comprehensive service delivery model that is highly individualized for each family and child. Key features of this model include family and person-centered planning; building a team for the person with the autism spectrum disorder that includes the family; educational personnel and other support staff and friends; and developing and implementing a comprehensive behavior support plan for the person with the disorder that focuses on teaching new skills, reducing challenging behaviors and increasing quality of life.

"I learned that much of the current system to help families of children with autism spectrum disorders in Taiwan is clinic-based. They were very interested in how the center at Marshall University provides community-based therapeutic services in homes and schools across our state," she said. "It was also a pleasure to speak to special educators and psychologists and psychology students at Kaohsiung Medical University.   They wanted to learn more evidence-based practices for teaching students with autism spectrum disorders and, specifically, about using applied behavior analysis in their classrooms and their practices."

The West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University was established through the efforts of parents of children with autism throughout West Virginia. Led by Ruth C. Sullivan, these parents convinced state legislators of their need for intensive, individualized educational and behavioral training for families, educators and other individuals involved with the person with autism. In 1983, the West Virginia Legislature established the Autism Training Center at Marshall University in Huntington. Since then, more than 1,800 families of children with autism have registered for services from the center.

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Photo: Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, third from the right in the front row, poses for a picture with participants in the Chinese Community Psychiatry Workshop in Taiwan.


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Wednesday December 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College of Education and Human Services at Marshall University announces third faculty award donor for 2009

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara Guyer, current Marshall University professor and retired founder and director of the Marshall H.E.L.P. program, has made a gift to create a faculty award endowment in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS), the college announced today.

The award, which has been renamed the "Dr. Barbara Guyer Faculty Award for Excellence in Service," will annually recognize COEHS faculty for excellence in service. Barbara and her husband Dr. Kenneth Guyer, associate professor in Marshall's School of Medicine, have made the contribution to support and recognize COEHS faculty for commitment to service.

The award originally was established in 2006 by Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, dean of the College of Education and Human Services. Current, full-time, tenured faculty in the COEHS are eligible to apply for this yearly recognition and $500 award stipend. Templeton also established awards in the areas of research and teaching.

Barbara Priddy Guyer grew up in Richmond, Va., where she attended public schools. Her experiences at Virginia Commonwealth University instilled in her a great love of teaching.  She earned a master's degree in administration and learning disabilities from The Ohio State University, a master's in psychology from West Virginia University, and a doctorate in learning disabilities and administration from the University of Virginia.

While living in five different states, Guyer taught grades two through six, remedial reading, learning disability classes and remedial reading to inmates in a women's prison.  She has also served as a supervisor of Special Education, a principal of two learning disability centers, and from 1975 to the present she has served as coordinator of the graduate program in learning disabilities at Marshall University.

In 1981, Guyer founded the H.E.L.P. (Higher Education for Learning Problems) program at Marshall.  H.E.L.P. provides support for undergraduate students with dyslexia, attention deficit disorder and other learning problems. She also founded the Medical H.E.L.P. program in 1986 for medical students and physicians needing remedial reading support.

In addition, she began Diagnostic H.E.L.P., Remedial H.E.L.P., and Community H.E.L.P. Guyer retired as director of the Higher Education for Learning Problems Program (H.E.L.P.) in August 2005 although she continues to work part time in the Medical H.E.L.P. area while maintaining a full-time faculty position in the COEHS.

"Dr. Guyer has successfully combined her academic career with outstanding community service to benefit literally thousands of individuals at the local, state, national and international levels," Templeton said. "She is truly a blessing for West Virginia and most deserving to have this award named after her."

Guyer has received the Charles Hedrick Award, which is the highest honor that Marshall University can bestow on a professor.  She also has received the Distinguished Artists and Scientists Award, the MU Alumni Association Award for Community Service and the Learning Disabilities Association of America Teacher of the Year Award.  She also has been an Unsung Hero in Newsweek magazine.

Guyer and her husband have two daughters.  Greta is a physician and Jennifer is an attorney.  Through them Guyer said said she has gained an understanding of learning problems, dyslexia and attention deficit disorder from a parent's perspective.

Those wishing to contribute to COEHS endowments, programs and services are encouraged to contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, at 304-696-7081 or via e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday December 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Wii are Marshall' raffle tickets available through Dec. 15

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Activities Programming Board (SAPB) is raffling a "Wii are Marshall" Nintendo Wii gaming console with proceeds going to the school's 2009 United Way campaign.

Ticket sales already have begun and continue through Tuesday, Dec. 15. Raffle tickets, available in Memorial Student Center Room 2W31, cost $1 each.

For more information, contact James Clark with SAPB at 304-696-6770.


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Monday December 7, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Authors available to sign biography of 'Ruth Etting: America's Forgotten Sweetheart'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor emeritus with a lifelong interest in American popular music has co-authored the first full-length biography of Ruth Etting, a pioneering singer of the early 20th Century.

Dr. Charles O. Lloyd, who earned his doctorate in Classics from Indiana University and taught at Marshall University for 35 years, co-wrote "Ruth Etting: America's Forgotten Sweetheart" with Chicago native Kenneth Irwin. Both authors will be featured at a book signing from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 19 at Empire Books, 30 Pullman Square, Huntington.

Lloyd's interest in Etting began in the late '60s when he heard her voice on a Columbia re-release. He began to research the recording artist and visited her hometown to interview friends who had known her.

"Ruth Etting was enormously popular throughout the 1930s and her story is yet untold," said Lloyd. "We examine her unique place in the history of American entertainment, specifically her trend-setting vocal style and her pioneering work in phonograph recordings and radio, as well as her enormous popularity throughout the 1930s."

In 2003, Lloyd met Irwin and began a collaboration that led to "Ruth Etting: America's Forgotten Sweetheart," a 360-page hardbound book now available from Scarecrow Press (www.scarecrowpress.com). Etting (1897-1978) was among the most important performers of her time with an influence that extended from Broadway to radio and film. Her successes include more than 60 popular recordings including a 1928 rendition of "Love Me or Leave Me," which was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2005.

The book recounts Etting's early years as a radio performer who quickly attained national celebrity, her recording career as "Sweetheart of Columbia Records," and her innovative work in film. The authors detail Etting's unhappy marriage to her husband and manager, Martin (Moe "The Gimp") Snyder, her second marriage to pianist arranger Myrl Alderman, and her Colorado Springs retirement. The work also includes anecdotes, previously unavailable photos, and both a discography and filmography.

Lloyd has published articles on the ancient Greek polis, Euripides, Vergil, and the teaching of writing. In keeping with his passion for American popular music, he has played improvisational piano for public events for the past 25 years.

Irwin is a computer specialist who has spent more than 15 years researching the life and career of Ruth Etting. His writings include articles on Etting and the liner notes for the CD Ruth Etting: Glorifier of American Song (1997).


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Monday December 7, 2009
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

Marshall University Graduate Humanities program celebrates 30th anniversary with reception, release of anthology

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Graduate Humanities program is celebrating its 30th anniversary with a reception and the release of a Humanities anthology, Constellations, on Friday, Dec. 11 on the South Charleston campus.

The public is invited to join the celebration at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Graduate College Library.  Copies of Constellations will be available and students in Mark Moore's fall collage seminar will be exhibiting their work.  In addition, there will be music, stories and slides reflecting the breadth and scope of work done by Humanities students over the past 30 years. 

"The Graduate Humanities Program is an interdisciplinary program that brings together faculty and students from a variety of backgrounds to collaboratively explore the intersection of the arts, culture, literature, and history within an open, exploratory, and experimental graduate-level educational environment," Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, program director, said. 

Recent Humanities graduate Kathryn Santiago edited the anthology, which includes submissions from present and past students and faculty. 

"We wanted to do something to celebrate the 30th anniversary and we hit upon the idea of expanding it from taking submissions from just one class to a program-wide project.  The book's articles are very diverse; there are different writing styles and wildly different subjects," Santiago said.

The anthology contains poetry, essays, fiction and personal narratives along with articles from past Humanities newsletters. In addition, there is a section devoted to the display of work done by students in various art classes.  

The 150-page Constellations was printed by the University of Nebraska Press. 

The Humanities program has gone through several transitional stages since it was first established in 1979.  Its origins can be traced back to a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to establish an M.A. in Humanistic Studies (now the M.A. in Humanities) at what was then known as the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies - or COGS as it was often called.  After a move from Institute to South Charleston in 1992, the graduate college merged with Marshall University in 1997 and was renamed the Marshall University Graduate College (MUGC).

Since 1980 when the program graduated its first student, 134 people have earned an M.A. in Humanities.  It was to commemorate the creative and scholarly work done by students and faculty over the past 30 years that prompted Santiago to take on the task of compiling a volume showcasing their work.

"I can attest that it is a fitting tribute to the diverse perspectives of our program's students and faculty," said Lassister. "Indeed the collection of articles and essays aptly reflects the varied interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches that have long made our program one of the most distinctive in the region."

"I would like to see something along the lines of this anthology continue.  We were able to put out a really high quality product."  Santiago said.   "People who take Humanities classes continue to contribute; they write or draw or work in many other ways.  It would be a wonderful way to showcase their work with an occasional anthology."

For more information about the Graduate Humanities Program or the 30th anniversary celebration call 304-746-1923 or 304-746-2022 or e-mail lassiter@marshall.edu


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Wednesday December 2, 2009
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DVDs of Marshall University's Winter Commencement to be available

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will make available DVDs of the 2009 Winter Commencement, set for 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5 at Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus.

Nancy Pelphrey, Marshall University's coordinator of alumni programs, said a table with order forms will be set up in the upstairs lobby of Henderson Center from noon until commencement is over. DVDs cost $15 each, and payment can be made by using Visa, MasterCard, Discover or cash, or by check made payable to the Marshall University Alumni Association.

The DVDs will be produced by Marshall University Instructional Television Services. For more information, contact Pelphrey at 304-696-3134.

In addition, participants and audience members are reminded of the following important information:

Where to enter

Guests are requested to enter the arena through the ramped 3rd Avenue entrance on Level E, located where the bridge from the parking garage connects to the building. Seating accommodations for persons with disabilities are located on Level E. Ushers will be on hand to offer assistance.

Parking

Jim Terry, Marshall's Director of Public Safety, said plenty of free parking will be available on all surface lots at MU. The most convenient parking, he said, is in the parking garage across 3rd Avenue from Henderson Center and on the West Lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Still time to sign up

Graduates from July and August 2009, and tentative December 2009 graduates may participate in Winter Commencement. Those who have not yet signed up to take part may do so by calling Marshall's Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410 by noon Friday, Dec. 4.


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Tuesday December 1, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Choral Collage Concert debuts Dec. 5 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 150 singers from three Marshall University choral ensembles and their conductors will participate in two performances of a Choral Collage Concert beginning Saturday, Dec. 5.

Saturday's performance will take place at 8 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The second performance will be at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6, also in Smith Recital Hall.

Participating in the concerts are the Marshall University Choral Union, University Chorus and Chamber Choir, conducted by Mark Smith, Robert Wray and Dr. David Castleberry.

"There will be something on the program to appeal to everyone," Castleberry said. "The chance to bring our choirs together is fun for both the singers and audiences."

The choirs will be heard individually and together in works that include Benjamin Britten's "Ceremony of Carols,"  J. S. Bach's Magnificat, Henry Purcell's "Hear My Prayer, O Lord," Morton Lauridsen's "Sure on this shining night," and Gustav Holst's "Christmas Day."

The performances are free and open to the public. For further information, contact the Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
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Houchin, Stringer to read from their work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poets Ron Houchin and A. E. Stringer will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3 in Room 2W16 of the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The reading marks the American release of Houchin's Museum Crows and Stringer's Human Costume, both recently published by Salmon Poetry of Ireland.  The event is also a celebration of the Marshall Visiting Writers Series' Twentieth Anniversary.

Stringer is professor of English at Marshall University and the author of two poetry collections.  His work has appeared in such journals as The Nation, Shenandoah, Poetry Northwest, Prairie Schooner, and Denver Quarterly, as well as in the anthology Backcountry: Contemporary Writing in West Virginia.

Stringer recently edited and introduced a new edition of Louise McNeill's classic Appalachian poetry book Paradox Hill (West Virginia University Press, 2009).  He has traveled to read his work in a wide range of American locales and also in Galway, Ireland.  For the past 20 years, Stringer has taught writing and literature at Marshall, where he coordinates the Visiting Writers Series.

A Huntington native, Houchin is the author of five books of poetry.  His work has appeared in Poetry Ireland Review, The Southwest Review, Poetry Northwest, Appalachian Heritage, The New Orleans Review, and many others. He has been awarded an Ohio Arts Council Grant for teachers of the arts, and his collection Among Wordless Things received the 2005 Book of the Year Award from the Appalachian Writers' Association.

Houchin was a featured writer at the Dublin Writers Festival in 2001 and has read his work internationally in locales as diverse as Key West and the Czech Republic.  He taught writing and literature at Fairland High School for 30 years.

Their appearance is sponsored by Salmon Poetry of Ireland and NSI Productions.

For more information, contact Stringer at 304-696-2403.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
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Mary and Churchill Hodges to receive honorary doctoral degrees during Marshall University's 2009 Winter Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges, lifelong Huntington residents and long-standing supporters of Marshall University, will receive honorary doctoral degrees Saturday, Dec. 5 during Marshall's 2009 Winter Commencement.

Commencement begins at 1 p.m. at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Churchill Hodges will receive a Doctor of Science degree and Mary Hodges will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the Hodges are special friends of the university.

"Marshall University students have benefited for many years from the dedication, generosity and community leadership of Mary and Churchill Hodges," Kopp said. "Mention their first names and everyone at Marshall knows who you are talking about. They are a very special couple who have touched the lives and futures of many Marshall students over the years. Words cannot express how grateful we are to Mary and Churchill for the loyalty, benevolence and devotion they've shown to Marshall University." 

Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, said the Hodges were the first couple he met when he came to Marshall in 2007. That first impression, Area said, was a lasting one.

"Mary and Churchill are very significant donors to the university," he said. "They help out across the university - the library, fine arts, the College of Business, athletics ... they are everywhere. And they are always saying, 'How can we help more?' They epitomize what major donors can and should do for the university."

Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said the Hodges have a long-standing commitment to the College of Fine Arts and their generosity extends to programs throughout the university.

"The Hodges have spent their lives in Huntington making it a better community in which to live and helping position Marshall University as an institution ready to respond to the need of its students and faculty," Van Horn said. "Their collective vision for a better tomorrow guides their own lives and how they use their time and resources to benefit those around them."

Churchill Hodges is a two-time graduate of Marshall, earning an A.B. in chemistry in 1948 and a master's in geography in 1953. He also received a National Science Foundation Academic Year Institute Scholarship at The Ohio State University in 1957-58.

Mary Hodges started at Marshall in 1950 before leaving school in favor of a job. "Times were tough," she says today. "I couldn't finish and there were few scholarships. So, I went to work."

Both Churchill and Mary grew up in Huntington. He attended the Marshall Lab School before transferring to the Kentucky Military Institute (KMI) in the 10th grade, and she attended Cammack Junior High and graduated from Huntington High.

Churchill spent 35 years as an educator in Cabell County, teaching biology at Huntington East High School for five years before attending Ohio State for a year. He then began serving as Cabell County's first Supervisor of Science and Mathematics. Most of his career in Cabell County Schools was spent as Supervisor of Science and Director of Purchasing. He also coached tennis at Marshall from 1949 through 1953.

He grew to love Marshall University - then Marshall College - at a very young age. In fact, he remembers well a big football game in 1937 in which the Big Green won at Dayton, 7-0, to remain undefeated. Churchill was there.

"Bob Adkins from Point Pleasant ran the ball 70 yards and scored a touchdown on a soggy field," he said.

Churchill attended many athletic and theatre events at Marshall, even as a child. He recalls Marshall students living in his home often took him with them to events on campus.

"That made me love Marshall, even as a little boy," he said. "I developed a love for Marshall from the people that stayed with us."

One of his classmates in the first grade at the Marshall Lab School was Charlie Kautz, a lifelong friend who was Marshall's athletic director in 1970 and died in the Marshall plane crash on Nov. 14 of that year. Rick Tolley, head coach of the 1970 squad and one of the 75 plane crash victims, and his wife, Mary Jane, were next-door neighbors of Mary at the time of the crash. The Hodges endowed scholarships in honor of Rick Tolley and Charlie Kautz.

Mary worked for AAA Travel Services for 21 years, serving as director of domestic travel for many of those years. She has been active with the Huntington Museum of Art, the United Way of Huntington, the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Meriwether Society. She was president of the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in West Virginia. 

Mary is a member of the Marshall Library Associates and the newly formed College of Fine Arts Dean's Council. 

Mary retired from AAA in 1975 when she and Churchill married.

"He told me, 'I don't want you to work. We're going to be too busy,' " Mary said.

Churchill is past president of the Huntington Museum of Art and the Huntington YMCA. He also serves on the board of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and the Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation. He received the Drinko Distinguished Service Award in 2004.

Mary and Churchill have traveled worldwide, visiting every continent. Through all of their activities, they have continued to support Marshall University in a major way.

"It's part of us," Churchill said. "It's an important part of our social life. We're fortunate to be in a university town; we appreciate all the things it offers us."

Mary concurred with her husband.

"We're lucky to have Marshall University in Huntington. It really has flourished," she said of the university. "We like the sports and the plays and the scholarships are special because they weren't available to me."

The Hodges' generosity has supported many areas, including athletic and academic scholarships, the J. Churchill Hodges Summer Science Scholars, Marshall Libraries, the Geography Department GIS Laboratory, the President's Home and the Erickson Alumni Center. Their contributions to science were honored with the naming of the Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges Biotechnology Capstone Research Laboratory in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

The Hodges also enjoy supporting the Marching Thunder. Churchill was the drum major at Kentucky Military Institute, where he spent three years before graduating. KMI campuses were located near Louisville, Ky., and in Venice, Fla.

"It's nice that we can give to things that we are particularly interested in," Churchill said.

Including the Hodges, the total number of honorary degree recipients at Marshall University is 165. The first two recipients were Dwight Whitney Morrow and Guy Fielding Yost, both of whom received the Doctor of Laws degrees in 1928.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
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Nearly 1,200 students to graduate from Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 1,200 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, Dec. 5 when the university celebrates its 2009 Winter Commencement at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus. The ceremony begins at 1 p.m.

Among the 1,179 students receiving degrees are 665 undergraduates, 513 graduates and one from the School of Medicine.

The Winter Commencement will honor graduates from July and August 2009, and tentative December 2009 graduates. It will be Marshall's first Winter Commencement since 1945. Marshall conducted a December Convocation in 2008.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 159 students will graduate with honors. Eighteen will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 46 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 89 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and five associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

"Last year's convocation was a tremendous success, prompting us to take the event a step further this year with a full commencement ceremony for these deserving graduates," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We look forward to this special day and to celebrating with family and friends the impressive achievements of each of our graduates."

Graduates will be recognized individually at the Winter Commencement. They will walk to the area in front of the stage, where their names will be announced, and they will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during Winter Commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages, three students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are Bryon Douglas Collier of Huntington, Jared Michael Lawson of Scott Depot, W.Va., and Lyndsey June Roush of New Haven, W.Va.

Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges will receive honorary doctoral degrees during the ceremony. They are lifelong Huntington residents and longtime major supporters of Marshall University. Mary Hodges will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree while Churchill Hodges will receive an Honorary Doctor of Science degree.

Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science and member of Marshall University's faculty for 48 years, will deliver the keynote address.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
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H1N1 informational meeting set for Nov. 30 at Marshall University

The Cabell-Huntington Health Department will have an H1N1 informational meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus in preparation for H1N1 clinics scheduled Dec. 1-2 at MU.

The focus of the informational meeting will be on the distribution of the H1N1 vaccine. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask public health officials questions about the H1N1 flu and the H1N1 vaccine.

The Cabell-Huntington Health Department Panel will include Dr. Harry Tweel, physician director; Kathleen Napier, nursing director; and Elizabeth Ayers, public information officer. The meeting is open to anyone who would like more information about the H1N1 flu.

 

The health department will conduct H1N1 clinics for high-risk individuals who live or work in Cabell County or the City of Huntington Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University.

 

The clinics will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 1-2, at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. High-risk individuals for H1N1 include:

  • Pregnant women and nursing mothers
  • People who live with or care for children under 6 months of age
  • Children and adults, 6 months to 24 years of age
  • Adults 24 to 64 years of age who have chronic health conditions (Chronic heart or lung disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease, anemia, neurologic/neuromuscular, immunosuppression caused by  HIV or medication, cancer, leukemia or other blood disorders (not including high blood pressure)
  • Health care workers who provide direct patient care with acutely ill patients.

Adults must show proof of age.  Both mist and injectable forms of the vaccine are available.

 

For those taking an antibiotic, the health department asks that they wait until they have completed the antibiotic before getting the H1N1 vaccine.  They should not get an H1N1 vaccine if they have been on Tamiflu or other anti-viral in the 48 hours leading up to the clinic.

 

No appointment is necessary for these free clinics.  There is no fee for the H1N1 flu vaccine.


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Friday November 20, 2009
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MU History professor emeritus publishes World War I Almanac

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. David R. Woodward, History professor emeritus at Marshall University, has published World War I Almanac, a volume in Facts On File's Almanacs of American Wars series.

Facts On File asked Woodward, an international authority on WWI, to undertake this detailed, day-by-day chronology of the events and people involved in the war.  He examines all theaters in this global conflict, from the Middle East to the Balkans to German East Africa, paying particular attention to America's involvement in the war.

Unlike many accounts of WWI, the almanac does not end with the Armistice.  Rather it continues through July of 1923 with the Treaty of Lausanne, the last peace treaty of the Great War.  Also unlike other accounts, it sets the stage for the clash of nations beginning with the creation of Germany's Second Reich which destroyed the old European equilibrium in 1871.

The work includes maps, some 100 illustrations, a glossary, notes and an extensive bibliography so that it is useful and readable for the scholar and the armchair history enthusiast. The book has headings and dates that the reader can cross reference, making it possible to follow a particular topic whether it is the role of the U.S. military, intervention in Russia, the air war, the Italian front, the Paris Peace Conference, or some other aspect of the war and its immediate aftermath. 

Woodward, who gives credit to the staff at the Drinko and Morrow libraries for their assistance on this project, taught in the MU History Department from 1970 until his retirement in 2006. The book is his eighth on subjects pertaining to the political, diplomatic and military history of World War I.  Some titles include Hell in the Holy Land:  World War I in the Middle East, Lloyd George and the Generals and Trial by Friendship:  Anglo-American Relations 1917-1918.  He is currently working on several articles for The Encyclopedia of War, edited by Gordon Martel, which will be published by Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.

For more information, contact Woodward at 304-525-7404 or via e-mail at woodwadr@marshall.edu.


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Thursday November 19, 2009
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Dr. Simon Perry to deliver keynote address at Marshall University's 2009 Winter Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science and member of Marshall University's faculty for 48 years, will deliver the keynote address at Marshall's 2009 Winter Commencement.

Commencement is set to begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5 at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Perry, a native of Gilbert, W.Va., said he plans to speak on "Going Out Into The World."

"I am, of course, very honored to be speaking at Winter Commencement and I am looking forward to it," Perry said. "I've got to really try to develop some words of interest for the audience that will be there."

Perry is the longest serving member of the Marshall faculty. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Michigan State University in 1961 and came to Marshall from the University of Michigan in 1962. He currently is a full professor in the department after having been chair for many years.

Perry has received many awards in his long and distinguished career, beginning with the Leonard D. White Award for the Best Dissertation in Public Administration (presented by the American Political Science Association) in 1962.

He also has received the Marshall Distinguished Service Award (1989-90), was the first Drinko Fellow (1994-95) and was the John Deaver Drinko Distinguished Fellow (1998). He won the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher Award (2001, 2004) and was named a Distinguished West Virginian (presented by Gov. Arch Moore in 1988 and Gov.  Joe Manchin in 2007).

In spring 2007, Perry was selected as one of five "Living Legends" (by alumni, colleagues and current students) in Marshall Magazine.

Perry's interests lie at the intersection of theory, history, and the empirical in American politics. He is especially interested in pivotal moments in American history, such as the founding, the tenure of John Marshall, and the Civil War. His book, Morality, Self-Interest, and the Cities, was published in 1997 by the John Deaver Drinko Academy.


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Thursday November 19, 2009
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H1N1 clinics scheduled Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Cabell-Huntington Health Department will conduct H1N1 clinics for high-risk individuals who live or work in Cabell County or the City of Huntington Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University.

The clinics will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 1-2, at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. High-risk individuals for N1N1 include:

  • Pregnant women and nursing mothers
  • People who live with or care for children under 6 months of age
  • Children and adults, 6 months to 24 years of age
  • Adults 24 to 64 years of age who have chronic health conditions (Chronic heart or lung disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease, anemia, neurologic/neuromuscular, immunosuppression caused by  HIV or medication, cancer, leukemia or other blood disorders (not including high blood pressure)
  • Health care workers who provide direct patient care with acutely ill patients.

Adults must show proof of age.  Both mist and injectable forms of the vaccine are available.

For those taking an antibiotic, the health department asks that they wait until they have completed the antibiotic before getting the H1N1 vaccine.  They should not get an H1N1 vaccine if they have been on Tamiflu or other anti-viral in the 48 hours leading up to the clinic.

Children who are brought to these clinics by someone other than their parent or legal guardian must have a signed permission statement from the parent or legal guardian allowing the children to be vaccinated.

No appointment is necessary for these free clinics.  There is NO fee for the H1N1 flu vaccine.

Future clinics will be planned as vaccine becomes available to include the general population.  For information about when clinics will be scheduled, continue to check the Flu Information Hotline at 304-526-3397 or visit the health department online at www.cabellhealth.org.


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Wednesday November 18, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall faculty awarded $3 million in federal stimulus funds for biomedical research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded five grants totaling $3 million to faculty members at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. The grants, awarded competitively through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, will support biomedical research and workforce development programs.

Four of the funded projects are associated with the West Virginia-IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE).

According to Dr. Gary Rankin, chairman of the university's Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology and WV-INBRE principal investigator, the awards will further the network's efforts to build biomedical research infrastructure, develop research programs at the state's undergraduate institutions, provide student research opportunities and train the state's high-tech work force.

"These awards will allow more students and faculty members from the state's undergraduate institutions, as well as high school science educators, to participate in biomedical research projects and gain valuable skills and experience," Rankin said. "In addition, two new research projects have been funded that will tackle problems in cancer and cardiovascular disease that could benefit West Virginians and all individuals. We are excited about the opportunities these awards have created and are grateful to our congressional delegation for their continuing support of research at Marshall."

The WV-INBRE projects include:

Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease

A grant of $529,000 will fund a project led by Dr. Nalini Santanam, associate professor of pharmacology, to discover biomarkers that could help identify people predisposed to heart disease.

If the research is successful, it could lead to non-invasive testing to predict who might be at risk of having a heart attack and allow for preventive treatment.

Dr. Ken Cushman of West Liberty University is a collaborator on the project. 

Prevention of Kidney Damage Caused By Anticancer Drug

Dr. Monica Valentovic, professor of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology, will use a $651,000 award to further her lab's efforts to evaluate methods for reducing the side effects of the widely used cancer chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

Dr. Elaine Hardman, associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology, and Dr. Tim Troyer of West Virginia Wesleyan College are collaborators on the project.

Summer Research Experiences for Students and Science Educators

A two-year $751,000 grant is supporting summer research interns at Marshall, West Virginia University (WVU) and the state's undergraduate institutions. In addition, faculty from the undergraduate institutions and high school science teachers are involved in biomedical research projects, including cardiovascular disease and cancer summer research programs, on the Marshall and WVU campuses.

Research Workforce Development and Dissemination

In a complementary effort to encourage students to choose a career in biomedical research, a $590,000 grant will fund a two-year program to pay undergraduate students and high school science teachers to work on WV-INBRE-funded projects in campus labs. The students will be graduates of the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA) program funded by NIH for minority and other underserved high school students, while the teachers will work with HSTA students at their local high schools

The funds will support students working on research projects in undergraduate institution labs during the academic year and high school science teachers working in Marshall, WVU and undergraduate labs during the summer.

The fifth grant, for a project called "Transcription Factors in Cancer," supplements existing funding for Marshall's NIH-funded Center of Biomedical Research Excellence, which emphasizes research related to melanoma, reproductive/endocrine cancers and the role of nutrition in cancer.

The $490,000 award will be used to help set up a network between Marshall and West Virginia University's Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center to help researchers study the genetic makeup of donated tumor material. Researchers hope to use the information collected through the network to create more customized prognoses and cancer treatments.

Dr. Richard Niles, chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is the principal investigator. 

"The goal of the cancer genomics network is to use the power of new sequencing technology to uncover changes in the composition or expression of genes that might predict the future behavior of a particular tumor, or predict the tumor's susceptibility to specific types of therapy," Niles said. "These technologies are part of the development of personalized medicine and I am excited that we will be able to contribute to these advancements here in the state of West Virginia."


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Tuesday November 17, 2009
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'Adopt a Jesus' documentary to be shown at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local filmmaker Bob Wilkinson and producer Charessa Wilkinson, a 2001 graduate of Marshall University, will bring their documentary film, "Adopt a Jesus," to Marshall's Huntington campus for a special showing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, in Smith Hall 154.

The film focuses on Brandt Russo, a young minister from Louisiana who quit his job, sold all his earthly goods and dedicated his life to helping the homeless and ministering to the poor.  Russo travels the country in a bus powered by cooking oil and emblazoned with the slogan, "Can't Ignore the Poor."  He gathers food, advocates for the homeless and hungry and often irritates local church authorities and law enforcement in his efforts to follow the path of the apostles. 

"Adopt a Jesus" raises challenging questions about the place of the homeless and disadvantaged in society and about the Christian response to their plight. Bob Wilkinson traveled with Russo for 14 days on his bus, following his journey, interviewing the people he encountered, learning about his philosophy and documenting his message, his unorthodox ministry and the mixed reactions of locals to Russo's presence in their communities.

Bob Wilkinson is a producer and editor at West Virginia Public Broadcasting.  He has produced several previous documentaries including, "Rounding Third," a history of minor league ballpark Watt Powell Park; "John Brown's Body," a look at the lasting legacy of John Brown's raid in Harpers Ferry; and "hom'sted," a history of the homestead movement in West Virginia and those left out of the New Deal initiative.  Charessa Wilkinson earned an M.A. in Communication Studies in 2001 and has since worked as a producer, promoter, and event coordinator.

Bob Wilkinson, Charessa Wilkinson and Russo will attend the screening on campus and discuss their work with the audience following the screening.  Attendance is free and open to the public.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies.  For further information, contact Dr. Robert Bookwalter at 304-696-2815 or bookwalt@marshall.edu.


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Monday November 16, 2009
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Bottoms' scheduled appearance at Museum of Art postponed

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The scheduled appearance Tuesday, Nov. 17 of Georgia Poet Laureate David Bottoms at the Huntington Museum of Art has been postponed.

 

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, said hopefully Bottoms' visit will be rescheduled during the spring semester. His appearance at the Museum of Art is a featured presentation of the Visiting Writers Series, which is sponsored by Marshall University's English Department and College of Liberal Arts.

 

For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday November 13, 2009
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Marshall cafeterias going without trays for a few days

Experiment expected to lessen university's environmental impact on community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's cafeterias are going trayless for a few days to promote more environmentally responsible choices for students, faculty and staff during mealtimes.

Margie Phillips, sustainability manager for the university, is asking students to not use trays from Nov. 15 through 17 in Twin Towers Cafeteria and Harless Dining Hall in recognition of West Virginia Recycles Day. Diners will be asked to make their food choices without trays as an experiment to reduce food waste, lower energy costs, and make the Huntington campus more environmentally sustainable. 

"The reasoning behind going trayless is that when a student uses a tray, he or she walks around the cafeteria, putting food on the tray until space runs out," Phillips explained. "If they don't use trays, they make their selections more carefully and are generally more satisfied with their choices, which results in less food waste. No trays mean dishwashers have fewer dishes to wash, and that saves on water and energy."

Many colleges and universities across the country have actually eliminated the cafeteria tray from their food service offerings. The University of California at Santa Cruz and Virginia Tech are examples of two that don't offer a tray at the entrance of their cafeterias and the move is greatly reducing their environmental impact, Phillips explained.

"Dining facilities are one area in which we can work to lessen our environmental impact at Marshall," Phillips said. "Generally speaking, cafeterias use five times more water, five times more energy and produce five times more waste than residence halls alone. Our students can give up the cafeteria tray and make a huge difference in the impact it has on our community."

The idea to go trayless stems from the work of Residence Services, Sodexo and Marshall University's new Sustainability Department.


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Thursday November 12, 2009
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Dot Hicks makes gift to create faculty award endowment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Retired Marshall University professor Dr. Dorothy E. "Dot" Hicks has made a gift to create a faculty award endowment in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS), the college announced today.

The fund will support the renamed Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks Annual Award for Teaching Excellence. Current, full time, tenured faculty in the COEHS are eligible to apply for this yearly recognition and $500 award stipend.

The award originally was established in 2006 by Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, dean of the College of Education and Human Services. Templeton also established awards in the areas of research and service.

Hicks retired as a faculty member from the Division of Exercise Science Sports and Recreation, formerly Health, Physical Education and Recreation (currently School of Kinesiology), after 30 years of service (1969-1999). Her academic service included being a professor of education and coordinator of clinical supervision of teachers.

While at Marshall she also coached women's golf, tennis, badminton and volleyball. Hicks also served as chairperson of the women's physical education department. She helped develop the women's intercollegiate athletic program and served as an associate athletic director. She also was faculty representative for the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and for the Southern Conference, of which Marshall University is a former member.

Hicks also has received the alumni association's honorary alumnus award, the university's Distinguished Service Award and the COEHS Distinguished Education and Human Service Award.  She is a member of the Marshall University Athletic Hall of Fame

Before coming to Marshall University, Hicks taught at DuPont High School, Central Middle School, and East Tennessee State University. She holds B.S. and M.A. degrees from Peabody College and a Doctor of Education from the University of Tennessee, and has done other advanced work at the University of Pittsburgh.

Hicks is recognized as a benefactor to Marshall University as a member of the President's Circle, the John Marshall Society and the Heritage Society. She established the Dorothy Hicks Physical Education Scholarship, the Dorothy Hicks Athletic Graduate Scholarship and the Dorothy Hicks Lady Herd Athlete of the Year Award.

"Dr. Hicks is definitely a role model for the College, Marshall University, and its faculty," Templeton said. "Her teaching expertise, commitment to students, and generous giving of her time to help individuals succeed shows that she is truly deserving of the award for teacher excellence to be named in her honor." 

Anyone wishing to contribute to COEHS endowments, programs and services is encouraged to contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, at 304-696-7081 or via e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Dean of College of Fine Arts recognized by regional academic art group

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University since 1995, received the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) Presidential Award for Exemplary Achievement at the organization's annual conference Oct. 24.

"I am humbled by the President's Award from SECAC," Van Horn said. "When I served as president, I was privileged to make a number of those awards myself, and I am not sure I belong in the same league as those I was fortunate enough to be able to recognize.  Nonetheless, it is an honor to have been presented the award and it comes from an organization that serves the visual arts in higher education, which is an important cause."

The award, considered the organization's most prestigious, reflects Van Horn's personal and professional development, his contributions to his university and local communities as well as long-standing service to SECAC. According to officials of the organization, Van Horn's many contributions include his tenure as editor of the SECAC Review, his role as conference chair in 2007, editing an issue of the Southeastern College Art Conference Review, his service as the chair of the artist fellowship committee, his commitment to moving SECAC to a year-round organization, and his service as first vice president and president from 2004 to 2008.

Van Horn's commitment to the arts is well known in West Virginia and particularly Huntington, where he was named the recipient of The Herald-Dispatch Award for the Arts in 2006 for his "steady vision and vibrant outreach with the community." Van Horn was nominated for that award by a wide breadth of community members thanking him for his tireless work on campus and with the Huntington Museum of Art, the Snowshoe Institute for the Arts, the Governor's School for the Arts, the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center and other endeavors.

SECAC facilitates cooperation and fosters ongoing dialogue about pertinent creative, scholarly and educational issues between teacher and administrators in universities, colleges, community colleges, professional art schools, and museums. Although the organization represents the 12 states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia, members are located across the United States and abroad.

SECAC fulfills its purpose in part by sponsoring an annual fall conference, hosted by an institution of higher learning. The conference provides members with a forum for the exchange of ideas and concerns relevant to the practice and study of art. The organization also publishes a newsletter and the scholarly, peer-reviewed journal, The Southeastern College Art Conference Review.


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75 crash victims to be remembered on 39th anniversary of tragedy



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Student Government Association will conduct the annual memorial service honoring the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash at noon Saturday, Nov. 14 on the Huntington campus.

This year's service, on the 39th anniversary of the crash, will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Marshall's next football game, a home encounter with Southern Mississippi, kicks off at 4:30 p.m. that same day.

The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970 occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five.

"Even though it has been 39 years since the tragic crash, the students at Marshall University are well aware of what a tremendous loss the university and the community suffered on November 14th, 1970," said Sean Hornbuckle, president of Marshall's student body. "It is our duty and our honor to remember the victims each year on November 14th and we are proud to do so again this year. Once again, the memories of those who died will resurface and the sad story of their loss retold as we conduct this important memorial service."

Joe Gillette, a 1973 Marshall graduate now living in Atlanta, will be the keynote speaker. Gillette was a freshman in 1969 and would have been a member of the 1970 team had he not suffered a severe shoulder injury in the summer of '69. He tried to rehabilitate the shoulder during winter conditioning, but later realized during spring practice in 1970 that he could not take the contact.

"I found out pretty quick during spring ball that I could not take a sustained hit on that shoulder," Gillette said. "So, I quit the team in March or April, then in November just a few months later the plane crashed."

Gillette said it took him many years to be able to talk about the crash, even to his own family.

"The movie, 'We Are Marshall,' and the time since the movie has allowed me to heal and to be able to talk about my experience on the team and staying at Marshall after the crash," he said. "It is a distinct honor for me to be able to finally speak openly about how I feel about all the kids and coaches that perished."

Gillette and his wife, Pam, have supported Marshall for many years. In addition to generous financial support, Joe Gillette has provided dedicated leadership by serving on many boards of directors, including the Society of Yeager Scholars, the MU Alumni Association, and the Marshall Foundation and as president of the Thunder Club. He currently is president of the Society of Yeager Scholars board of directors and vice president of the Foundation board of directors.

Last spring, Gillette received the Distinguished Alumni Award during the Marshall University Alumni Weekend 2009 activities.

In addition to Hornbuckle and Gillette, other speakers at the memorial service include Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall Athletic Director Mike Hamrick, Marshall Alumni Association President Nancy Campbell, Student Body Vice President Lashawna Sampson and Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs.

The service will conclude with the traditional placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.


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MU Chamber Choir to present concert Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will appear in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov.15, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

The Chamber Choir is a select, thirty-two voice touring ensemble, performing works that span the past five centuries. Last spring, the choir gave nine concerts in six days as part of a tour to the Washington, D.C., area and was received with standing ovations at each stop. This fall's performance will feature a cappella works by Palestrina, Purcell, Bruckner and Stanford, in addition to selections from J.S. Bach's Magnificat and Ralph Vaughan Williams' "Lord, Thou Hast Been Our Refuge." 

"I'm very excited about this concert," Castleberry said. "The singers are enthused about the music we are performing and they have done wonderful work preparing some very challenging selections."

For further information about concerts presented by the Department of Music at Marshall University, contact the music office at 304-696-3117 or visit the Web site at www.marshall.edu/cofa/music .


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WMUL-FM receives first-place Podcast Best of Show award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received a first-place Podcast Best of Show award at the 88th Annual National College Media Convention/2009 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) Annual College Competition ceremony.

The ceremony took place Sunday, Nov. 1 in the Austin Grand Ballroom, Austin Hilton Hotel and Convention Center in Austin, Texas.

The award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was a regular 30-minute edition of a sports program that airs Friday and Saturday during Marshall University football weekends. The winning entry was "Herd Roundup," broadcast the first time Friday, Oct. 23, 2009.

The students who participated in this edition of "Herd Roundup" were: host Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery, W. Va.; host Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans, W.Va.; reporter Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, W.Va.; and reporter Dave Traube, a senior from Beckley, W.Va.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the campus radio station competed with other media outlets with online Web sites from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the 88th Annual National College Media Convention.       

The Best of Show competition is open only to publications and media outlets that send student delegates to the national convention.

"This is an honor for WMUL-FM and all the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications students featured on the Best of Show winning entry," Bailey said. "Winning first place for the third time in this relatively new realm of media speaks well for Marshall University as it demonstrates that its students are working with new technologies which will help prepare them for the changing digital media landscape."


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'Up Late' host learns to cook from famous star chef

Jamie Oliver shares secrets to healthy food on Marshall University student show

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Television food star Jamie Oliver challenged host Jamie LoFiego to make a healthy stir fry as part of this week's "Up Late" show.

Oliver's next prime time series for ABC, "Jamie Oliver Project," is being taped in Huntington. Oliver hopes to teach residents in Huntington and viewers of his show a healthier way to prepare food and how to cook with fresh ingredients. Lofiego prepares the dish during "Up Late" with only a few mishaps and minor injuries.

"If I can do it, anyone can," LoFiego said about his adventures in cooking. At the end of the segment, LoFiego had his photo made with the dish to help Oliver win a bet with area radio DJ Rod from the Dawg Radio Station that he could get 1,000 people to try this meal and e-mail him a picture of it.

The recipe can be found at www.jamieoliver.com/news/jamie-s-huntington-1000.

"Up Late" will air at 1 a.m. Sunday following "Saturday Night Live" on WSAZ-3 and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The award-winning show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.

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Photo: TV chef Jamie Oliver (left) shows "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego how to make a stir fry.


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Marshall University faculty jazz ensemble to perform at Culture Center Tuesday

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Division of Culture and History will kick off this season's Collegiate Series with a concert by Bluetrane, Marshall University's faculty jazz ensemble, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10. The program, which will take place in the Norman L. Fagan West Virginia State Theater at the Culture Center in the State Capitol Complex in Charleston, is free and open to the public.

Bluetrane features Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies, on saxophone; Steve Hall, professor of percussion and director of the Percussion Ensemble and the African Drumming and Dance ensemble, on drums; Dr. Sean Parsons, assistant professor of jazz piano and instructor of improvisation, history and theory, on piano; Dr. Martin Saunders, director of combos, on trumpet; Dr. Mike Stroeher, professor of trombone and music education, on trombone; and Dr. Mark Zanter, head of theory and composition, on bass/guitar.

"It's a delight to be a part of the Collegiate Series at the Culture Center. The College of Fine Arts at Marshall University is composed of many talented faculty and students, and to represent such these artists is an honor," Parsons said.

The Tuesday performance will feature compositions from the group's namesake album, "Blue Trane," recorded by John Coltrane in 1957.

Bluetrane was created to provide a professional model for students at Marshall and to establish a musical ensemble devoted to the performance of what has been termed "America's National Treasure." The jazz faculty members at MU continue a tradition of presenting America's best-recognized musical art form, jazz, to the people of West Virginia.

The ensemble is central to the jazz studies program at MU, according to Bingham. Housed in the Jomie Jazz Center, the jazz program enjoys a state-of-the-art rehearsal, performance and recording facility. Members of Bluetrane teach classes in performance, jazz history and improvisation and prepare the next generation of musicians and educators for the challenges of preserving the past and energizing the future of jazz.

The Collegiate Series consists of performances and lectures by students and faculty from West Virginia's colleges and universities. First Lady Gayle Manchin is the host of the program.

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History, an agency of the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts, brings together the state's past, present and future through programs and services in the areas of archives and history, the arts, historic preservation and museums. Its administrative offices are located at the Culture Center in the State Capitol Complex in Charleston, which also houses the state archives and state museum. The Culture Center is West Virginia's official showcase for the arts. The agency also operates a network of museums and historic sites across the state. For more information about the Division's programs, visit www.wvculture.org. The Division of Culture and History is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

For more information about the Collegiate Series or the Bluetrane concert performance, contact Jacqueline Proctor, deputy commissioner for the Division, at 304-558-0220.


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Debate tournament at Marshall University 'a huge success'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first collegiate speech and debate tournament at Marshall University in several years was "a huge success,'' the coach of the Thundering Word said today.

Coach Danny Ray said eight teams participated in the Chief Justice/Alumni Swing Tournament last Friday and Saturday, Oct. 30-31, on Marshall's Huntington campus. Ohio University finished first in the tournament, followed by Western Kentucky University and Bowling Green State University.

As the host school, Marshall was not eligible to win the tournament, although some of its team members did participate and perform well, according to Ray.

"The tournament was a huge success," Ray said. "As I started the awards ceremony, I mentioned that this was the first time in years that Marshall had hosted a collegiate speech tournament on campus and everyone cheered, happy to see Marshall's Thundering Word on the circuit once again."

Marshall students received the following awards:

After-Dinner Speaking

Third place - Kayla Johnson, Gallipolis sophomore, French/English education major and John Marshall Scholar

Duo Interpretation

Second place - Kayla Johnson and Ryan Jackson, Huntington sophomore, political science major
Top novice - Shayne Gue, Barboursville junior, biomedical science major and John Marshall Scholar, and Mark Radford, Huntington freshman, theatre major

Informative Speaking

Third place - Ryan Jackson; fifth place - Shayne Gue; Top novice - Kendrick Vonderschmitt, Louisville sophomore and John Marshall Scholar

Dramatic Interpretation

Top novice - Shayne Gue

Poetry

Third place - Zack Frame, St. Albans senior, oral communications education major

Programmed Oral Interpretation

First place - Ryan Jackson; second place - Kayla Johnson; third place - Kegan Angel, Gallipolis sophomore, biomedical science major

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Semifinalist and third-best debater - Kendrick Vonderschmitt. He was 6-0 in preliminary rounds and the top seed going into the semifinals

Quadrathon

            The best four events per contestant or the individual sweepstakes - Ryan Jackson, fifth place with 50 points. Kayla Johnson finished in ninth place

Marshall has qualified 20 slots for the national tournament in April. Considering the team has only nine members, that number is "an extremely good thing unheard of," Ray said.

For more information, contact Ray at 304-696-2807.


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WMUL students receive five CBI awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received one first-place award and four finalist awards in the 88th Annual National College Media Convention/2009 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony.

The event took place Friday, Oct. 30 at the Hilton Austin Hotel and Convention Center in Austin, Texas.

Marshall's students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States, according to Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

He said the contest, in its eighth year, is sponsored by the CBI, which administers the contest in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

"I am proud of our broadcasting students who continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be outstanding representatives for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities," Bailey said.

WMUL's first-place award winning entry was:

Best Radio News Reporting 

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery. It was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.
 

WMUL's finalist award-winning entries were:

Best Documentary

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009. 
 

Best Radio Promo

"Cutting Stuff," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008 through the present time, written and produced by Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.
 

Best Radio Technical Production

"Marshall vs. UCF Homecoming Game Tease and Intro," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. It was broadcast Saturday, Nov. 10, 2008.
 

Best Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Houston football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008.  The students calling the game were play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; color commentator Adam Cavalier; sideline reporter Deven Swartz; and engineer Tony Viola, a sophomore from Follansbee.
 

A total of 443 entries were submitted for judging in the 2009 CBI National Student Production Awards.


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Financial aid training for high school counselors to take place Nov. 13 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be a host site for financial aid training for high school counselors on Friday, Nov. 13.

Kathy J. Bialk, director of student financial assistance, said Marshall is one of 11 schools throughout West Virginia serving as a host site for the Financial Aid Workshops for Counselors and Mentors, coordinated by the West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (WVASFAA).

Bialk said the workshop at MU will provide information, tools and resources necessary to counsel students and their families about preparing for college and the financial aid process. Although the workshop is sponsored by the WVASFAA, Bialk said counselors from Ohio and Kentucky also are invited to attend.

"I look forward to having the opportunity to provide important information and training materials that will help our area high school counselors advise students and parents about the financial aid application process and the financial aid opportunities available to students," Bialk said. "Students and families need to know that financial barriers should never be a reason not to consider college. It is imperative that financial aid awareness occur during students' middle school and high school years so that they can see early on that attending college is a reality."

The training begins at 9 a.m. in Room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Bialk is hoping 40-50 counselors take part in the training.

Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment, will speak to the group of participants during lunch about the university's academic programs. Denise Hogsett, Marshall's director of career services, will also speak to the group about the top 10 reasons first-year college students should connect with the Office of Career Services. Also, Michelle Wicks, from the Office of Financial Aid and Outreach Services, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (WVHEPC), will assist Bialk with training on WVHEPC financial aid program opportunities.

For more information or to register for the workshop, contact Bialk by calling 304-696-2281 or via e-mail at bialkk@marshall.edu. Or, visit the West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators' Web site at http://www.wvasfaa.org/docs/toc_training.html for more information.


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More than 300 students expected for open house Saturday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 300 students, most of them high school seniors, have registered to participate in an open house Saturday, Nov. 7 at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment at Marshall, said check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center, and the program begins at 9 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's playhouse and Booth Experimental Theatre.

Wolfe said students are coming from 16 states, including New Mexico.

"Open House allows us to showcase the best part of Marshall University, our people," Wolfe said. "Prospective students will meet our students, staff, faculty, even our president. It's a great way for them to see if Marshall is the place where they want to live and learn for the next four years."

For more information, contact Wolfe at 304-696-6007.


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Larsen serving as Drinko Academy Fellow at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eldon Larsen, professor of engineering at Marshall University, is serving as the 2009-2010 Drinko Academy Fellow.

Drinko Fellows receive reduced teaching loads to undertake research or curriculum development. Larsen will be completing work on a textbook on project management.

The Drinko Academy was founded in 1985 by John Deaver Drinko, a Marshall alumnus and noted attorney, when he and his wife, Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, established a million dollar chair, the university's first, in the College of Liberal Arts. The initial program proved so successful that in the spring of 1994, the Drinko Chair was redesigned, enlarged and renamed to encompass revised objectives.

The academy is devoted to enhancing public understanding of American institutions and the responsibilities of citizens to their society and particularly the public's sense of shared values and common purposes.

Larsen has three degrees in chemical engineering, a B.S. and an M.S. from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a development and project scientist and senior engineer for Union Carbide Corporation before becoming a full-time faculty member at Marshall University in 1999. Widely published, he has received numerous awards, including the Ashland Outstanding Graduate Advisor of the Year Award in 2004 and the Union Carbide Corporation Chairman's Award, the corporation's highest recognition award for individual achievement, in 1996.

He is the first faculty member from the College of Information Technology and Engineering to be named a Drinko Fellow.

"It is a big honor to be given this award and I'm grateful to the university for the opportunity to serve as a Drinko Fellow," Larsen said. "I appreciate everyone's support."

He will present his research to the university community at a symposium next spring during Marshall's annual Celebration of Academics. The symposium is presented in tandem with the other centerpiece, the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation. Established in 1994, it is the time the university collectively acknowledges its honor students.


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Marshall welcomes Festival Chorus participants this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will welcome 130 high school students from across West Virginia and Ohio to the Huntington campus for the 2009 MU Festival Chorus Nov. 6 and 7.

Students attending will have the opportunity to participate in rehearsals alongside members of Marshall's University Chorus and Chamber Choir, according to Robert Wray, Assistant Professor of Choral Music Education and organizer of the event. They will also participate in workshops presented by Marshall faculty members in the vocal/choral area.

"This festival is not only a great opportunity to bring high school students interested in music to our campus, but is a wonderful chance to highlight the students involved with the MU Department of Music," Wray said.

The first of two concerts connected with the event is at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6 in Smith Recital Hall, which will showcase the two student-only choral ensembles at Marshall in addition to solo performances by other MU music faculty.  

The second concert, at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 in Smith Recital Hall, is the finale of the two-day festival. Those in attendance will see and hear the attending high school students along with the participating MU students perform the music selections rehearsed over the course of the festival.

Music for the festival was selected from both the West Virginia Music Educators Association (WVMEA) and West Virginia American Choral Directors Association (WVACDA) All-State ensemble repertoire lists.

Both concerts associated with this event are free and open to the public.  Any questions should be directed to Wray at wrayr@marshall.edu.


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Marshall percussion ensemble to perform Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Percussion Ensemble will perform in concert at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in Smith Recital Hall on the university's Huntington campus. The group, which is under the direction of Steven Hall, coordinator of percussion at Marshall, will perform selections ranging in style from ragtime to the Puerto Rican plena.

"This performance is a wonderful opportunity to hear a wide variety of interesting and exotic percussion music played by a talented and dedicated group of university students," said Hall.  The repertoire includes a wide variety of ethnic music, including "Leyenda," an arrangement by Spanish composer Isaac Albeniz of a piece originally written for piano; "Highlife," an African-inspired selection, and several ragtime pieces featuring xylophone soloists Levi Billiter and Mike Cochran.

Members of the ensemble are primarily music education and performance students specializing in percussion at Marshall.  However, the ensemble is open to any MU student with percussion experience, according to Hall.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Appalachian memoirist to read from her work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Linda Tate will read from her work at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Tate is the author of two books: A Southern Weave of Women: Fiction of the Contemporary South, and, most recently, Power in the Blood: A Family Narrative.

Author Lee Smith has called Power in the Blood "a remarkable memoir, honestly and beautifully written."  A dramatic family history that reads like a novel, it traces Tate's investigation of the Cherokee-Appalachian branch of her family and explores the poverty, discrimination, and violence that marked their lives. In a journey through her own past, Tate visited archives, libraries, and courthouses throughout Appalachia, the deep South, and the Midwest.  She toured cemeteries and combed through court records, local histories, maps, and photographs, eventually locating distant relatives, all linked to her great-great grandmother. In kitchens and living-room reunions, the family's buried past slowly emerged, as each relative shared with Tate another memorable part of the tale.

Tate taught at Shepherd University in West Virginia for 15 years. She now lives in Boulder, Colo., and teaches at the University of Denver.

Her appearance is a part of the Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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BB&T Chairman to deliver lecture Nov. 3 at Marshall University



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John A. Allison, Chairman of BB&T Corporation, the 10th-largest financial services holding company in the United States,  will deliver the 2009 BB&T Discussion on American Capitalism Lecture at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3 at Marshall University.

Allison's lecture, titled "Principled Leadership," will take place in Corbly Hall 105 on Marshall's Huntington campus. The event, which is open to the public, is sponsored by the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism and Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

The Center was established in 2008 as part of a $1 million grant from the BB&T Charitable Foundation. It is part of the Lewis College of Business.

"In a time when the ethics and abilities of financial institution executives are under scrutiny, John Allison is an example of what a leader should be," said Dr. Cal Kent, Vice President for Business and Economic Research, and director of the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism.

"Under his leadership BB&T has remained profitable by sticking with the fundamental principals of sound banking.  His high ethical code permeates the organization. If his example had been followed much of the nation's current economic misery would not have come to pass.  It is an honor to host him on our campus."

Allison began his service with BB&T in 1971 and has managed a wide variety of responsibilities throughout the bank.  He became president of BB&T in 1987 and was elected Chairman and CEO in July 1989.  During Allison's tenure as CEO from 1989 to 2008, BB&T grew from $4.5 billion to $152 billion in assets. In March 2009, he joined the faculty of Wake Forest University School of Business as Distinguished Professor of Practice.

Allison is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he received a B.S. degree in business administration in 1971.  He received his master's degree in management from Duke University in 1974.  He also is a graduate of the Stonier Graduate School of Banking and has received Honorary Doctorate Degrees from Clemson University (2005), East Carolina University (1995), Mount Olive College (2002), Marymount University (2008), and Mercer University (2009).  Allison received the Corning Award for Distinguished Leadership in 2009.

He serves on the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Board of Visitors, the Board of Visitors at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill.  He also is a member of the boards of directors of the Independent College Fund and the Global TransPark Foundation. 

A native of Charlotte, N.C., Allison is married to the former Elizabeth McDonald of Elkin, N.C.  They have two sons and one daughter.


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Marshall takes look back at Kanawha County textbook controversy with series of events on Huntington campus

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services and its Information Technology division will look back on the 1974 Kanawha County textbook controversy next week on the Huntington campus beginning Thursday, Nov. 5. The events will include the opening of a historical traveling exhibition, the premiere of a radio documentary on the controversy and two panel discussions.

The traveling exhibit, on loan courtesy of the Kanawha Valley Historical and Preservation Society, will be installed in the atrium of the John Deaver Drinko Library beginning Nov. 5 and continuing through Monday, Nov. 30.

The radio documentary will have its Marshall University premiere at 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Drinko Library presentation room (DL 349).

"In 1974, Kanawha County was the first battleground in the American culture wars," said Trey Kay, who produced the radio documentary titled The Great Textbook War.  "Controversy erupted over newly adopted school textbooks. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners. Textbook supporters thought they would introduce students to new ideas about multiculturalism. Opponents felt the books undermined traditional American values. The controversy extended well beyond the Kanawha Valley. The newly formed Heritage Foundation found a cause to rally an emerging Christian conservative movement. This documentary tells the history of that local confrontation and the effect that it had on future American politics."

Presentation of the documentary will be followed by a panel discussion in the atrium covering both sides of the issue presented in the broadcast. Panel participants include Kay, the Rev. Jim Lewis, Kelly Wills-Carson and Stan Bumgardner, designer of the traveling exhibit. The panel will be followed by a light reception at 6 p.m.

At 10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 6, in the Drinko atrium, Kay will participate in a discussion of the controversy and its impact on the university teacher education classroom, then and now. The discussion will be facilitated by Dr. Kathy Seelinger, professor of education at Marshall. Immediately after the discussion, participants can view Part II of the PBS documentary, "With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America - The Zeal of Thy House," which is about the events in Kanawha County, in the Drinko Library presentation room.

Members of the Marshall and Huntington communities are invited to attend any or all of these events, according to Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, executive dean of the College of Education and Human Services. For further information, persons may contact Templeton's office by e-mail at templetonr@marshall.edu or by telephone at 304-696-3131 or contact Dr. Monica Brooks, assistant vice president for information technology/online learning and libraries, by e-mail at brooks@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-6474.

Here is the complete schedule of events:

Thursday, Nov. 5 through Monday, Nov. 30

Drinko Library Atrium: 1974 Kanawha County Textbook Controversy Display courtesy of Henry Battle, president, Kanawha Valley Historical and Preservation Society

Thursday, Nov. 5

4 p.m., Drinko Library Presentation Room 349: Audio documentary airing of The Great Textbook War, produced by Trey Kay

5 p.m., Drinko Atrium: Panel discussion led by Trey Kay and including Stan Bumgardner, the Rev. Jim Lewis and Kelly Wills-Carson

6 p.m., Drinko Atrium: Reception

Friday, Nov. 6

10 a.m., Drinko Atrium: Presentation and discussion on impact of controversy on the classroom then and now facilitated by Dr. Kathy Seelinger, MU professor, and with Trey Kay

11 a.m., Drinko Presentation Room 349: Airing of Part II of "With God on Our Side," PBS documentary originally broadcast in 1996

 

More about the Audio Documentary, The Great Textbook War

More than 40 interviews and archival sound of school board meetings, public debates and news reports bring the story of the Kanawha County textbook wars to life. School board member Alice Moore, who led the opposition to the books, describes what she found objectionable, and more broadly, how she felt traditional family values were under attack. Superintendent Kenneth Underwood recalls that a reasonable conclusion felt impossible after the debate was hijacked by a mob of angry fundamentalist Christians. Reverend Henry Thaxton remembers feeling dismissed and disregarded by an arrogant governing class.

English teacher Mildred Holt, who had grown up in Kanawha's black community, was excited to teach the works of African American writers, but when the KKK began to protest the books, she felt sure the protest was racially based. Their memories describe the charged political environment of 1974, and show how messy and destructive cultural confrontations can be, particularly in a narrow river valley where there is not much room for retreat.

Host Trey Kay was a 7th grader during the textbook protests. He rode the bus into junior high past a crowd of mothers holding picket signs. Telling the story as both the chronicler and a witness, the documentary has the personal tone of a first-person account. Combined with   exclusive interviews and archival sound of national news coverage, the documentary guides the listener through the tumultuous protests that tore this community apart while setting a new course for conservative religious politics.

The Production Team

Trey Kay (host, producer and reporter) has produced segments for This American Life, Marketplace, Weekend America, Day to Day, Morning Edition and Studio 360. In 2005, he shared in a Peabody Award for 360's "American Icons: Moby Dick" show. He was also an associate producer for "News Wars: Secrets, Sources and Spin," a two-hour report for PBS Frontline. He is a native of Charleston, where he was a junior high school student in 1974.

Deborah George (editor) has been an NPR editor for more than 15 years. Deb's work has received numerous awards, including the DuPont-Columbia Gold and Silver Batons, the Robert F. Kennedy Award, the Edward R. Murrow Award, and the Casey Award for reporting on children.

Anna Sale (associate producer) was a reporter and Assistant News Director at West Virginia Public Broadcasting before moving to Connecticut Public Radio in 2008.  She is now in New York working as a producer for WNYC's The Takeaway.  She was named West Virginia Radio Broadcast Journalist of the Year by the Associated Press in 2005.

Stan Bumgardner (traveling exhibit designer) has been a professional historian for 20 years. Since 2005, he has served as creative director for the West Virginia State Museum renovation, overseeing all content, artifact selection, and audiovisual production.

Kanawha Valley Historical and Preservation Society is the not-for-profit fiscal agent for the tax-deductible contributions to the project. President Henry Battle is advising on historical content and promotion, and is organizing the roundtable discussion that will feature key textbook supporters and opponents.


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Fall in love with Film at the Marshall Artists Series Fall International Film Festival

 Nov 6-8 at the Keith Albee-Performing Arts Center

 

The Marshall Artists Series is delighted to bring the Fall International Film Festival to the Keith Albee's Silver Screen.  Filled with award winning films from around the world the fall festival promises to be an exciting enlightening experience for young and old from Friday November 6-Sunday November 8.

 

Kicking off the festival is the comedic drama Rudo Y Cursi (Mexico), the story of brothers Beto & Tato Verdusco, who work at a banana plantation and play soccer for the village team.  Beto dreams of becoming a professional soccer player while Tato's dream is to be a famous singer, but both share the dream of building a house for their mother.  Their luck changes when they are accidentally discovered by a soccer talent scout and move to Mexico City and become stars on Rival teams. At the very real possibility of fulfilling all of their dreams, the siblings must face an innate rivalry, as well as their own demons and limitations.   (This film is presented in Spanish with English Subtitles). Rudo Y Cursi shows Friday, Nov. 6 at 5:30 PM, and Saturday, Nov. 7 at 9:45 PM

 

From documentary filmmaker Robert Kenner (Fast Food Nation) Food, Inc. (USA) is the much anticipated documentary that allows audiences a peek into our nation's food industry, exposing the highly mechanized underbelly that has been hidden from the American consumer with the consent of our government's regulatory agencies, USDA and FDA. Our nation's food supply is now controlled by a handful of corporations that often put profit ahead of consumer health, the livelihood of the American farmer, the safety of workers and our own environment. We have bigger-breasted chickens, the perfect pork chop, herbicide-resistant soybean seeds, even tomatoes that won't go bad, but we also have new strains of E. coli the harmful bacteria that causes illness for an estimated 73,000 Americans annually. We are riddled with widespread obesity, particularly among children, and an epidemic level of diabetes among adults. Food, Inc. reveals surprising and often shocking truths about what we eat, how it's produced, who we have become as a nation and where we are going from here. (This film is presented in English). Food, Inc. shows Friday, Nov. 6 at 7:30 PM, Saturday, Nov. 7 at 2:30 PM, and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 5:30 PM

 

The Country Teacher (Czech Republic) A gifted and well-qualified young teacher takes a job teaching natural sciences at a grammar school in the country.  Here he makes the acquaintance of a woman and her troubled 17-year old son. The teacher has no romantic interest in the woman but they quickly form a strong friendship, each recognizing the other's uncertainties, hopes and longing for love. When the teacher's ex-boyfriend comes to visit from the city, he quickly realizes that nobody in the village knows that the teacher is gay and harbors a secret affection for the teenage boy. His jealous actions set in motion a series of events that will test the inner strength and compassion of the teacher, the woman and her son to a breaking point. A beautifully shot, powerfully acted, profoundly moving story of desire, responsibility, forgiveness and the need to belong, from the internationally-acclaimed director of Something Like Happiness and Wild Bees. (This Film is presented in Czech with English subtitles). The Country Teacher shows Friday, Nov. 6 at 9:45 PM and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 7:30 PM.

 

The Song of Sparrows (Iran) tells the story of Karim who works at an ostrich farm outside of Tehran, Iran. He leads a simple and contented life with his family in his small house, until one day when one of the ostriches runs away. Karim is blamed for the loss and is fired from the farm. Soon after, he travels to the city in order to repair his elder daughter's hearing aid but finds himself mistaken for a motorcycle taxi driver. Thus begins his new profession: ferrying people and goods through heavy traffic. But the people and material goods that he deals with daily starts to transform Karim's generous and honest nature, much to the distress of his wife and daughters. It is up to those closest to him to restore the values that he had once cherished. (This film is presented in Persian with English subtitles).The Song of Sparrows shows Saturday, Nov. 7 at 12:30 PM and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 9:45 PM

 

Waltz With Bashir (Israel) was nominated for Best Foreign Film at the 2009 Academy Awards and named winner of the Best Animated Feature by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. This animated, quasi-documentary follows Director Ari Folman's attempt to decipher the horrors that unfolded one night in September of 1982, when Christian militia members massacred more than 3,000 Palestinian refugees in the heart of Beirut as Israeli soldiers surrounded the area. Ari was one of those soldiers, but nearly 20 years after the fact, his memories of that night remain hazy. After hearing an old friend recall a vivid nightmare, Folman concludes that the dream must somehow relate to that fateful mission during the first Lebanon War. Realizing that his recollections seem to have somehow been wiped clean, Folman interviews old friends and fellow soldiers from the war. Later, as his memory begins to emerge in a series of surreal images, he begins to uncover a truth about himself that will haunt him for the rest of his days. (This film is presented in Hebrew with English subtitles). Waltz With Bashir shows Saturday, Nov. 7 at 5:30 PM, and Sunday, Nov. 8 at 2:30 PM

Lastly, Summer Hours (France) One of the most celebrated films in World Cinema today, and a standout hit of the Toronto, AFI and New York Film Festivals, SUMMER HOURS (L'HEURE D'T) is Olivier Assayas' (IRMA VEP, LES DESTINES) latest film superbly acted by some of France's finest performers - Academy Award-winner Juliette Binoche, Charles Berling and Jrmie Rnier. The divergent paths of three forty-something siblings collide when their mother, heiress to her uncle's exceptional 19th-century art collection, dies suddenly. Left to come to terms with themselves and their differences, Adrienne (Binoche), a successful New York designer, Frdric (Berling), an economist and university professor in Paris, and Jrmie (Rnier), a dynamic businessman in China, confront the end of childhood, their shared memories, background and unique vision of the future. Incisively written, Assayas' new film moves effortlessly through its narrative with all the grace of Renoir at the height of his powers. (This film is presented in French with English subtitles). Summer Hours shows Saturday, Nov. 7 at 7:30 PM, and Sunday Nov. 8 at 12:30 PM

 

Tickets for Individual films are $7, and $70 for the Full Film Season (12 films includes Fall & Spring Films). Tickets may be purchased at the door, advance tickets are not necessary.  Tickets for full-time Marshall Students are offered at no charge to the student and tickets for Marshall's staff and faculty are $5.50 each.  MU Staff and Students MUST present a valid MU ID prior to admission.   Individual tickets may be purchased at the door 15 minutes prior to each film.  Season ticket holders will be admitted 30 minutes. For more information, call (304) 696-6656 or visit our website at www.marshallartistsseries.org

 

The Fall 2009 International Film Festival is sponsored by BB & T, Hooters, Cabell Huntington Convention & Visitors Bureau, WKEE, WVHU, The Herald Dispatch, Marshall University, The College of Fine Arts , and The Marshall Artists Series.

 

 

Fall Film Schedule

Friday Nov. 6

Saturday Nov. 7

Sunday Nov. 8

5:30 Rudi Y Cursi (Mexico)

12:30 Song of Sparrows (Iran)

12:30 Summer Hours (France)

7:30 Food, Inc. (USA)

2:30 Food, Inc.  (USA)

2:30 Waltz with Bashir (Israel)

9:45 The Country Teacher (Czech Republic)

5:30 Waltz with Bashir (Israel)

5:30 Food, Inc. (USA)

 

7:30 Summer Hours (France)

7:30 The Country Teacher (Czech Republic)

 

9:45 Rudi Y Cursi (Mexico)

9:45 The Song of Sparrows (Iran)

 


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Tuesday October 27, 2009
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New, adjunct faculty showcased in exhibit beginning Oct. 27 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Art and Design is showcasing new and adjunct faculty in an exhibit that opened today. The exhibit, titled 2009 Faculty Exhibition: Showcasing the Artworks of New and Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Art and Design, will be on display in the Birke Art Gallery through Nov. 5.

"We have a diverse and talented faculty in our department," Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art and Design, said. "In this exhibition we chose to feature our new and adjunct faculty. We wanted to announce the arrival of these new artists to the campus and local community. Additionally, we felt it was appropriate - and somewhat overdue - to allow the adjuncts to share the stage."

New full-time faculty represented in the show include Miyuki Cook, Daniel Kaufmann, Natalie Larsen and Eric Ruegg. Adjunct faculty include Linda Anderson, Daniel Cook, Mark Earnhart, John Farley, Natalie Gibbs and Kristin Zammiello.

Farley, who is also director of the gallery, notes the breadth of the work displayed at Marshall University. "Among the numerous disciplines represented are painting, drawing, prints, sculpture, jewelry, photography and textiles," Farley said.  "The skillful and eclectic nature of this show illustrates the broad  range of talent in our faculty."

Clercx added that an exhibit of faculty work is particularly valuable for students to experience. "It is important for students to see that arts educators are also active arts practitioners and scholars," Clercx said.

A reception will take place in the atrium outside the gallery from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3. The reception includes a "slide jam" at 7 p.m. in 154 Smith Hall. The slide jam is a compilation of brief visual presentations by each participating artist of a broader spectrum of his or her work.

The Birke Art Gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 6 to 8 p.m. on Monday evenings. It is located in Smith Hall on the corner of Hal Greer Blvd. and 3rd Avenue in Huntington. Admission is free and all events are open to the public.

------------------------

Photo: Eric Ruegg (left), assistant professor of art and design, assists sophomore art student Adam Howell measure and analyze the proportion and alignment of his drawing.  Photo by Sholten Singer.

 
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Marshall announces top 10 scoring seniors on Collegiate Learning Assessment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last spring, 107 Marshall University seniors voluntarily took the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a test that measures students' critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving and written communication skills.

Dr. Mary Reynolds, director of assessment at Marshall, said the CLA is an open-ended test in which the students do a lot of writing and solve real-world problems.

"As a group, Marshall's seniors' performance on the CLA last spring was outstanding," Reynolds said. "After adjusting for incoming ACT/SAT scores, mean performance of Marshall's seniors was better than that of seniors at 89 percent of other participating institutions.  We are very proud of the accomplishments of our students and their professors!"

The following 10 students scored the highest on the test. They are listed in alphabetical order with their hometowns, majors and colleges:

  • Robert D. Brumfield of Lesage, W.Va., Economics, College of Liberal Arts

  • Kassandra D. Friedman of Barboursville, W.Va., Criminal Justice, College of Liberal Arts

  • Ashley R. Deem Hager of Mineral Wells, W.Va., Print Journalism, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications

  • Daniel B. Hager of Hurricane, W.Va., Management, Lewis College of Business

  • Alicia K. Hess of Hedgesville, W.Va., Finance, Lewis College of Business

  • Rachel Huff of Dillsburg, Pa., Communication Studies and Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts

  • William Koch of Elkins, W.Va., Accounting, Lewis College of Business

  • Angelina Lowers of Chester, W.Va., Political Science, College of Liberal Arts

  • Miriam Katherine Reasons of Huntington, W.Va., Public Relations, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications

  • Emily Vargo of Scott Depot, W.Va., Environmental Science, College of Science

For more information, contact Reynolds at 304-696-2987.


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Marshall University Chorus to be joined by Cabell Midland group in concert Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Cabell Midland High School's Collegium Musicum, under the direction of T. Edwin Harkless, will join the Marshall University Chorus in a performance at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29 in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"This is the largest choir I've had in three years here," Robert Wray, director of the Marshall group, said. "The increase in number has led to us being able to perform a wider variety of music including music being used by both high school all-state ensembles this year. Cabell Midland is one of the premier high school choirs We have a great relationship with CMHS so we consider this a great step in strengthening our relationship with them."

The program includes works by Palestrina, Victoria, Dickau and Lauridsen as well as a special performance by Dr. Stephen Lawson, horn.


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Tuesday October 27, 2009
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Children invited to trick-or-treat Wednesday at the Marshall Recreation Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Recreation Center will celebrate Halloween Wednesday, Oct. 28 by inviting children in the community to trick-or-treat and turning the new facility on MU's Huntington campus into "The Haunted Rec."

Trick-or-treat for the little ghosts, goblins and ghouls is scheduled from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at the recreation center. The Halloween celebration continues until 11 p.m.

Featured throughout the first floor of the recreation center will be various stations with different levels of fright. Visitors are invited to traipse through the graveyard in the lobby, visit the Great Pumpkin at Equipment Issue, load up on candy at the Candyland Candywalk, and test their mettle by navigating the Outdoor Pursuits Bat Cave and Haunted Wall. 

Rocktober Caf, featuring local bands and Marshall students performing in the lobby of the reaction center, will follow trick-or-treat.  Rocktober Caf is from 8:30 p.m. until 11 p.m.   Prizes will be given away for best, most creative, scariest and other categories of costumes.

Light refreshments will be provided and the Freshens Juice Bar will stay open until 10 p.m.


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Monday October 26, 2009
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'Graduation Celebration' for summer, December 2009 graduates set for Nov. 3-4

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - All summer 2009 and tentative December 2009 graduates of Marshall University are invited to attend a "Graduation Celebration" next week in Room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The purpose of the event is to give students the opportunity to purchase caps and gowns, class rings, announcements and other items to commemorate their graduation. They also will be able to meet with representatives from the Office of the Registrar, the Marshall Bookstore, Jostens, Alumni Relations, the MU Graduate College, Career Services, the Office of the Bursar, the Campus ID office and Financial Aid.

The celebration will take place from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3 and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 4. Room BE5 is located on the lower level of the student center.

The following services will be available at this event:

Registrar's Office - Students may verify their graduation status, degree record, name format and mailing address for their 2009 diploma. They also will receive information related to Marshall's 2009 Winter Commencement, which will take place Dec. 5 at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Marshall University Bookstore - Students may purchase or pre-order their "official" Marshall University gown, cap and tassel and purchase a custom diploma frame. They also may order personalized graduation announcements and class rings.

Classic Photography - Cap and gown portraits will be taken during the Graduation Celebration.

Alumni Relations - Students will have the opportunity to learn about the benefits of joining the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Graduate College - Students will be able to meet with a Graduate Admission Counselor to discuss graduate programs and the admission process.

Career Services - Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance and interview skills.

Office of the Bursar - Students can discuss account holds and account balances and take part in loan counseling sessions. To complete a loan counseling session, a student needs to bring his or her student ID and the addresses and phone numbers of two references.

Campus ID office - Students can resolve any outstanding issues with their HigherOne accounts or Points account.

Financial Aid - Personnel will answer questions and provide procedures regarding consolidation of student loans.

For more information, call the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Monday October 26, 2009
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'Octubafest' returns to Marshall University this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University Tuba and Euphonium Studio will present solo performances this evening to kick off their annual celebration of "Octubafest." This is the first of two events and will take place at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 26 in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Octubafest will continue Wednesday, Oct. 28 with a performance of "Tubonium," the university's tuba/euphonium ensemble, at 8 p.m. in Smith Music Hall. The group will perform a concert with several traditional Oktoberfest marches and polkas complemented by an array of fun compositions to celebrate Halloween.

"Come enjoy the festive costumes, decorations and free candy," said Dr. George Palton, instructor of tuba, who directs the ensemble. "There will be 'kid-friendly' activities and costumes are welcome!" 

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at george@georgepalton.com


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Friday October 23, 2009
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College of Education and Human Services announces award donors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Retired Marshall University professor Dr. C. Robert "Bob" Barnett has agreed to fund a faculty award endowment in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS), the college announced today.

The C. Robert Barnett Award for Excellence in Research will perpetually support this award for faculty selected for excellence in research.

The award originally was established in 2006 by Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, dean of the College of Education and Human Services. Current, fulltime tenured faculty in the COEHS are eligible to apply for this yearly recognition and $500 award stipend. Templeton also established excellence awards in the areas of teaching and service for COEHS faculty in 2006.

Barnett retired in December 2007 after 35 years of service to Marshall as a coach, faculty member and administrator. He served as division chair from 1994 through 2002 and retired as a faculty member in the Division of Exercise Science, Sports and Recreation, formerly known as the Department of Health Physical Education and Recreation. This division within the COEHS is now known as the School of Kinesiology.

Barnett holds both master's and doctoral degrees from The Ohio State University and he received his BA in physical education from Marshall in 1965. He is widely known for his research, publications and teaching in the area of sports history both nationally and internationally.

Barnett and his wife, Elizabeth, also an educator, have been longtime contributors to Marshall University. The Barnetts have given back regularly in numerous areas at Marshall with special consideration to the Dr. C. Robert Barnett Scholarship and Dr. Wayne G. Taylor Graduate Scholarship in the School of Kinesiology. The Barnetts are members of both the John Marshall and Heritage giving societies at Marshall.

Barnett said that he has always believed in the value of faculty members conducting research. He has led by example, authoring more than 300 articles, book reviews, encyclopedia entries and research presentations, with his work appearing in many nationally recognized journals. Barnett said he wanted to show his support of the COEHS research award to encourage faculty to pursue research that will keep them current in their fields and will help them always help students find the answer to their questions of "why?" 

"Dr. Barnett is an outstanding example of a faculty member who knows the true meaning of scholarship," Templeton said. "He used research results to inform his teaching and guide his service in many Marshall and community projects. Therefore, his students received the very best Marshall has to offer - a well-informed and dedicated mentor, who supported their academic and career successes."

Anyone wishing to contribute to COEHS endowments are encouraged to contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, at 304-696-7081 or via e-mail at robinsonr@marshall.edu.


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Thursday October 22, 2009
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Starlight Behavioral Health owners donate space for MU Department of Psychology's clinical services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Psychology is expanding its clinical services off campus, thanks to the generosity of MU graduates Amy and Jack Ingles, owners of Starlight Behavioral Health in Huntington.

The Ingles have given the Marshall Department of Psychology about 3,000 square feet of office space at Starlight, rent free. In addition, they supplied office furniture and telephones.

"The generosity of the Ingles is extremely important to us because our psychology graduate programs have grown quickly and are now larger than our on-campus facilities can accommodate," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "The new space will mean that we can give our students a better work environment in which to develop their clinical skills."  

Dr. Pamela Mulder, a professor of psychology at Marshall, said the new clinic in Huntington will allow the department to have greater contact with the community and give students a larger setting in which to practice clinical psychology.

"This clinic will help us to provide services for underserved clients, to provide services for some clients more quickly than they are currently able to access given the existing options, and also to meet the needs of clients who want an alternative to services that are currently available," Mulder said.

The primary mission of Marshall University's Psy.D. (Doctor of Psychology) program is to train students to become clinical psychologists, who will then be able to serve people living in rural areas where mental health services are not readily available.

At the new clinic, the department will offer many psychological services on a sliding fee scale that should be within reach of anyone in need. When necessary, some individuals will receive services at no cost.

The Marshall Department of Psychology maintains and will continue to maintain the clinic in Harris Hall on the Huntington campus. The department plans to have at least three students at the new clinic at all times and six overall.

Amy (Searls) Ingles received her bachelor's degree in communication disorders in 1998. Jack Ingles received a bachelor's degree in political science in 1987, a master's in journalism in 1990, and a master's in clinical psychology in 2000.

Jack Ingles spent several years in the Army in Iraq before opening Starlight. During that time, he maintained close ties with Mulder.

Starlight Behavioral Health is a private corporation of around 250 employees that provides a broad range of behavioral and mental health services to individuals who have mental retardation, developmental disabilities and/or mental illness issues in the Huntington region.

The Department of Psychology's Psy.D. program is accredited by the American Psychological Association. Students who complete the degree are eligible to practice psychology in all 50 states.

For more information, contact Mulder at (304) 696-2770.

------------------------------------

Photo: Seated are, from left, Amy Ingles, co-owner of Starlight Behavioral Health, and Dr. Pamela Mulder, a professor of psychology at Marshall University. Standing are, from left, Dr. Steven Mewaldt, chair of Marshall's Department of Psychology; Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts; and Jack Ingles, co-owner of Starlight Behavioral Health. Amy and Jack Ingles have donated 3,000 square feet of office space at Starlight to Marshall University to be used by students as they practice clinical psychology.


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Thursday October 22, 2009
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Marshall debate team finishes second in West Chester tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University finished in second place recently at the Carolyn Keefe Memorial Speech and Debate Tournament at West Chester University in Pennsylvania.

Ohio University, which finished in the top 10 at both the National Forensic Association (NFA) and American Forensic Association (AFA) tournaments last year, won the tournament, which took place Oct. 10-11. Schools finishing behind Marshall's "Thundering Word" were third place, St. Joseph's University; fourth place, Cedar Crest College; fifth place, Lafayette College; and sixth place, Creighton University.

Also competing were Bloomsburg University, James Madison University, Lincoln University, Loyola University-Md., Nassau Community College, Suffolk Community College, University of Pennsylvania, and West Chester University.

Finalists from Marshall University were:

 Dramatic Interpretation

Ryan Jackson, a Huntington sophomore and Political Science major, first place

Mark Radford, a Huntington freshman and theatre major, third place

Kegan Angel, a Gallipolis, Ohio, sophomore and Biomedical Science major, fifth place

Kathleen Bartley, a Wheeling freshman and athletic training major, sixth place

Poetry Interpretation

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a Louisville, Ky., sophomore and Political Science major
and John Marshall Scholar, second place

Kayla Johnson, a Gallipolis, Ohio sophomore and French/English education major and John Marshall Scholar, third place

Hannah McCargish, a Beckley sophomore and art major and honors student, fifth place

Informative Speaking

Zack Frame, a St. Albans senior and oral communication education major, third place

Dramatic Duo Interpretation

Zack Frame and Hannah McCargish, first place

Kayla Johnson and Kegan Angel, third place

"All of us at Marshall University are extremely proud of our team," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts. "When I came to campus two years ago, there was no team, only the desire to rebuild the program to its former glory. Building from the ground up, the Department of Communication Studies has been able to create a new team that has achieved accomplishment typically seen in more mature programs."

Marshall has now qualified 12 slots for the NFA nationals, which will take place in April at Ohio University. The Thundering Word travels to Berea College in Kentucky this weekend (Oct. 23-24) to compete in the UC  Cumberlands / Berea College Invitational Swing Tournament. Marshall hosts the Chief Justice / Alumni Swing Tournament Oct. 30-Nov. 1 on the Huntington campus.

For more information, contact Danny Ray, Marshall's coach, at 304-696-2807 or via e-mail at ray102@marshall.edu.


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Brazilian guest artists to give concert Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two guitarists from Brazil will give a program featuring music from Latin America at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23 in Smith Recital Hall on the Marshall University Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

Dr. Eduardo Meirinhos and Andr de Moura are visiting Marshall as part of the MAGNETS Project, a consortium of two American and two Brazilian universities (Marshall, Morehead State, Universidade Federal de Gois and Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina) that includes an exchange program of students and faculty.

Meirinhos is the director of the School of Music of the Universidade Federal de Gois (Federal University of Gois), Brazil where he teaches guitar, guitar literature and chamber music. He holds a Doctor of Music degree from Florida State University, a master's degree in musicology from Universidade de Sao Paulo (University of Sao Paulo) and a degree in music performance from the Staatliche Hochschule fr Musik und Theater Hannover in Germany. He has performed extensively in South America, Germany and the United States, participating in music festivals as both teacher and performer. Among these festivals were the Festival de Musica de Londrina, Festival de Inverno de Campos do Jordao, Seminario de Musica de Montenegro, Curso de Verao de Brasolia and the Festival de Vale Vneto.

De Moura has been an assistant professor at the Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (Santa Catarina State University) since 2004, where he teaches classical guitar, guitar literature, guitar pedagogy and chamber music.  He holds both a Master of Music degree in guitar performance from the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University and a Bachelor of Music degree in guitar performance from the  Universidade Estadual de Campinas (University of Campinas).

He frequently performs as a member of Camerata de Violaes UDESC (UDESC Guitar Ensemble) and is the music coordinator of the Quarteto de Violaes UDESC (UDESC Guitar Quartet), a group devoted to playing a wide scope of music styles and genres, in which he also serves as an arranger.


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Marshall University Executive MBA students to be honored during special hooding ceremony

Secretary of Commerce to address University's newest MBAs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty-eight professional students in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration class will be honored Saturday, Oct. 24 during a special hooding ceremony at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington. The event begins at 6 p.m.

The students will be formally hooded in their academic regalia by Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, after having successfully completed all the requirements of the Marshall Executive MBA program including a recent international residency in Santiago, Chile, according to Dr. Uday Tate, director of Marshall's Executive MBA program.

"This ceremony recognizes the accomplishments of our professional business students in a formal, professional setting befitting the hard work and dedication that went into earning their Executive MBA degrees," Tate said. "We are proud of these students and we appreciate the sacrifices they made to advance their education and careers."

The Executive MBA is an accredited accelerated weekend program for professionals offered at Marshall University's South Charleston campus. Students sacrificed 66 Saturdays to complete the program without interruption to their current careers. The Marshall EMBA curriculum is designed for small class interaction using state-of-the-art technology and hands-on experiential learning that focuses on business ethics, leadership and global issues, along with management skills and tools.

West Virginia's Secretary of Commerce Kelley Goes will be the featured speaker at the hooding ceremony. Secretary Goes serves as the executive director of the West Virginia Development Office and is a native of Braxton County. She attended Vanderbilt University and is a graduate of the University of Kentucky's College of Law. Her private law practice focused primarily on intellectual property and business litigation.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Chong Kim, dean of the Lewis College of Business, also will address the Executive MBA students.

The Marshall EMBA Class of 2009 includes:

R. Scott Anderson of Huntington

Rachael Blount of Charleston

Brian Bracey of Huntington

Charlie Bradley of Huntington

Celia Cooper of Williamstown

Adam Daniels of Ona

Paul Davis of Huntington

Kimberly Estep of Nitro

Shonee Amy Ferrebee of Ashford

Shane Finster of Huntington

Patricia Garren of Hurricane

Keith Hainer of Chapmanville

Ben Hardman of Huntington

Linda Holley of Prichard

Jeremy Holton of Huntington

David Horst of Milton

Justin Hunter of Huntington

Kelly May of Matewan

Damon McDaniel of Chesapeake, Ohio

Michelle Muth of Huntington

Troy Nedrich of Cannonsburg, Pa.

Victoria Quintrell-Paul of Charleston

Valerie Ray of Charleston

Chris Roberts of Hurricane

Kristen Schneider of Morgantown

Anand Shah of Huntington

Thomas Stevens of Huntington

Peter Tsai of South Point, Ohio

The students will have their official degrees conferred at Marshall's Winter Commencement ceremony Dec. 5. The next session of the EMBA program gets under way Nov. 7.


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Students expect hundreds to attend Appalachia PowerShift Summit at Marshall University's Huntington Campus

Renewable energy theme of event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Renewable energy remains controversial in political circles, but hundreds of concerned youth want to tackle the topic and look toward the future of "green" jobs during Appalachia PowerShift Summit this weekend on the Huntington campus of Marshall University, according to student organizers.

Appalachia PowerShift is a social reform movement hosted by Marshall University's Sierra Student Coalition and the Marshall Environmental Students' Association along with statewide assistance from the West Virginia Youth Action League and its counterpart in the Bluegrass State, the Kentucky Student Environmental Coalition.

As many as 200 young participants from West Virginia and Kentucky are expected to gather at Marshall Friday through Sunday to attend workshops centered on sustainable jobs and discuss environmentally responsible energy concerns. Appalachia PowerShift has been designed and organized entirely by students to help prepare the next generation of Appalachian residents for a more sustainable future.

Marshall student organizers say that the rising generation of Appalachian residents has a unique perspective on the need to be leaders in green jobs and clean energy. According to Lauren Kemp, president of Marshall University's Sierra Student Coalition, organizers are particularly interested in bringing in young people, including high school students and younger, who can share ideas and learn what it will take to create a greener future.

"Shaping the future doesn't stop with college students; high school students are taking responsibility and leadership in the climate movement," Kemp said. "We all realize that we are the ones making the difference."

Kemp and others at Marshall worked with student counterparts from across West Virginia and Kentucky to make the summit possible. It stems from an event in Washington, D.C., called PowerShift 09, during which more than 12,000 students from across the country gathered to demand bold action on climate and energy issues. West Virginia and Kentucky alone had 272 student representatives travel as far as 800 miles to attend the national PowerShift conference, Kemp said. This weekend's event at Marshall is one of 11 taking place in October across the country.

Joe Gorman, a student from West Virginia University's Sierra Student Coalition and co-organizer of the event, said the U.S. Geological Survey states that there are only a few decades of coal left in Appalachia. Part of the conversation taking place this weekend will be how to handle that information.

"We're taking action before it runs out," Gorman said.

Erin Stockhausen, another Marshall University student, got involved in this weekend's event because the national conference made a lasting impression on her.

"It was so amazing and I wanted share it with the people at home," Stockhausen said.

Registration for the event can be accomplished online at http://appalachia.powershift09.org/register and is $20 per person. For group discounts contact Lauren Kemp at sierrastudentcoalition.mu@gmail.com. Low-income youth and families can register at http://www.powershift09.org/variable.reg. Housing and travel scholarships are available. The weekend includes two lunches, light breakfasts and one dinner. Walk-ins are also welcome.

###

 
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Marshall University Public Relations Student Society teams up with Habitat to change the world, one pair of jeans at a time

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - That old pair of unwanted blue jeans lying in the back of the closet now has a chance to be given "new life."

Cotton Incorporated launched the Cotton: From Blue to Green denim drive across eight college campuses this fall, including Marshall University's Huntington campus. The Public Relations Student Society of America has teamed up with Cotton and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity to promote this cause. It is a call to action for the donation of denim that will be recycled, converted into insulation and used in Habitat homes.

"Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity and the Habitat ReStore  are very excited to be in a position to partner with the PRSSA students at Marshall on this project," said Teddy Kluemper III, Habitat's director of development and communications. "By recycling the denim, those who participate not only provide a 'green alternative' for insulating Habitat homes, but importantly they are doing their part to help keep our houses affordable."

Since the national campaign began in 2006, the denim donated has been converted into UltraTouch Natural Cotton Fiber Insulation and used in the construction of houses for hurricane-affected families in Baton Rouge, La. To date, the natural cotton fiber insulation produced has been used in more than 200 homes in the Gulf Coast region.

Habitat for Humanity's Re-Store on 3rd Avenue in Huntington will serve as a drop-off location for anyone wishing to donate. The store hours are Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donation bins have also been placed throughout Marshall's Huntington campus and tables will be set up in the Memorial Student Center every Tuesday in October from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Denim of any type is accepted including pants, skirts, shorts and jackets. Since all material will be recycled, donations may be in any condition, even ripped or stained.

The campaign runs until Nov. 2. For more information on where to donate contact Angela Sundstrom, PRSSA president, at prssa.mu@gmail.com or 304-222-0286.


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6th annual Marshall University Marathon set for Nov. 1


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- More than 1,000 runners and walkers from more than 35 states are expected to take part in the sixth annual Marshall University Marathon in Huntington.

The event, which features a USA Track & Field-certified 26.2-mile marathon, half-marathon run or walk, half-marathon relay and 5-mile noncompetitive walk, will take place at 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 1.

It begins on 3rd Avenue near Cam Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The last mile takes runners and walkers through the Huntington campus for a goal-line finish at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Footballs will be available for runners to carry the last 100 yards if desired.

The flat marathon course, described as perfect for runners who hope to qualify for the Boston Marathon, runs through downtown Huntington past Pullman Square, next to the Ohio River and through Ritter Park among other places.

Race Director Tom Dannals describes the event as "the run for everyone because we have the walk, relay and both half and full marathons."

As always, Dannals is encouraging race fans to line the streets and cheer on the runners and walkers. They also can bring stereos and play music during the event.

Registration can be done online at active.com through 11:59 p.m. Monday, Oct. 26. Registration in person is available only at the race expo/packet pickup from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31 at the Marshall Recreation Center. There is no race day registration for any event. For more information, visit www.healthyhuntington.org.


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The Marshall Artists Series Presents Broadway's smash hit 'Avenue Q'!

Keith Albee Performing Arts Center Tuesday Nov. 3, 2009 at 8:00PM

"A breakthrough musical of a very different stripe. Savvy, sassy and delicious!" - The New York Times

Avenue Q comes bursting onto the Keith Albee's Stage Tuesday November 3, 2009 at 8 PM presented by Chapman Printing Company, American Babbitt Bearing, The Law Office of Doug Reynolds, and Prichard Electric.  Don't miss this 3 time Tony award winning musical's first ever appearance in West Virginia.  It's people, it's puppets, it's complete pandemonium!  It's Sesame Street for the grownups. Join them all on a journey through New York City's burrows as its inhabitance try to find what we're all looking for, our "Purpose".

Face it Broadway's smash hit Avenue Q is for you! If you're a hipster, a monster, in college, in the closet, a scientologist, a gynecologist, a potty mouth, even if you have no mouth if you're looking for a Tony Award winning Broadway musical with something for everyone, Avenue Q is your ticket to fun! 

 AVENUE Q is the story of Princeton, a bright-eyed college grad who comes to New York City with big dreams and a tiny bank account. He soon discovers that the only neighborhood in his price range is Avenue Q; still, the neighbors seem nice. There's Brian the out-of-work comedian and his therapist fiance Christmas Eve; Nicky the good-hearted slacker and his roommate Rod -- a Republican investment banker who seems to have some sort of secret; an Internet addict called Trekkie Monster; and a very cute kindergarten teaching assistant named Kate. And would you believe the building's superintendent is Gary Coleman?!? (Yes, that Gary Coleman.) Together, Princeton and his newfound friends struggle to find jobs, dates, and their ever-elusive purpose in life.

"One of the funniest shows you're ever likely to see!" -Entertainment Weekly Avenue Q promises to not disappoint. Don't wait!  Get your tickets now for Nov. 3 2009 8PM at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center.

Tickets for Avenue Q are on sale NOW, and may be purchased at The Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, open Monday Friday, noon 5 P.M.  Or call the Box Office at (304)-696-6656, or (304)-523-5757. Adults tickets range from $45-$55 and Youth may receive a %20 discount. Tickets can be purchased on-line at www.marshallartistsseries.org, or www.ticketmaster.com.

Due to adult situations (like full-puppet nudity), AVENUE Q may be inappropriate for kids under 13.

Avenue Q is also sponsored by, WKEE, WTCR, WOWK, The Herald Dispatch, Marshall University, & The Marshall University College of Fine Arts.


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Marshall Society for Human Resource Management to be recognized as official student chapter

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The Marshall University Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) will be recognized as an official student chapter of SHRM at a chapter charter ceremony Wednesday, Oct. 21 on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The event will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center. All students interested in joining the chapter are invited to attend.

Betty McHale, director of West Virginia SHRM State Council, will be the guest speaker. McHale is president and owner of Workplace Solutions LLC, a human resources and business consulting company in Hurricane, W.Va. McHale will speak on the topic, "Why Choose HR as a Career?"

For more information, contact Twyla Blair, Marshall University SHRM student chapter president, at 304-208-9004.


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23rd annual Yeager Symposium Lecture Series starts Oct. 20



Theme is 'Redefining Tourism: Culture, History and Nature as Economic Assets'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 23rd annual Yeager Symposium Lecture Series, featuring the theme "Redefining Tourism: Culture, History and Nature as Economic Assets," will take place Oct. 20, 22 and 28 at Marshall University.

All events will begin at 7 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus and are free to the public. This year's series is in participation with Marshall's Latin American Studies Program.

"The goal of this theme is to bring awareness to the changing face of tourism and its economic impact on its local community," said Marshall student Jessica Beres, co-chair of the Yeager Symposium. "Through the three different lectures we hope to define 'ecotourism' and how it's being implemented in Huntington, Appalachia and other parts of the world."

The first lecture Tuesday, Oct. 20 will feature Dr. Sterling Evans. Evans, the Louise Welsh Chair at the University of Oklahoma, will discuss the history and economic impact of ecotourism.

Thursday, Oct. 22, the series will feature Serafin Gomez, Leonor Marquez and Benito Chica, who are from Prodetur, an ecotourism company for El Salvador. Prodetur's main goal is to teach people about the area's heritage while providing economic benefits to the local community.

The Harry and Betty Wolfe Lecture Series will present the final event on Wednesday, Oct. 28, which will focus on ecotourism in Appalachia and Huntington. The speakers include Phyllis Baxter from the Appalachia Forest Heritage Area and Audy Perry and Tyson Compton from the Cabell Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau.


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Public schools music specialist from Maryland to work with music education students at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Timothy Bodamer from the Charles County, Md., Public Schools will visit Marshall University's Department of Music to present three different sessions to music education majors. The sessions are designed to better prepare the students for their first years as music teachers.

The first session will take place at 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 22, in the new marching band rehearsal room in Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus.  Topics to be covered include job searching, "what to do when you don't know what to do," and the "do's and don'ts of taking over an established program."  

The second session will occur later the same day at 6:30 p.m. in room 112 of Smith Music Hall, also on the Huntington campus, in conjunction with the monthly Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (CMENC) meeting. At this session, Bodamer will discuss the practical classroom applications of music technology.

The third session will take place at 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23, also in the marching band rehearsal room. It is open to all music education students, particularly those who are currently student teaching, as the discussion will focus on job searching, job interviews and some of the most commonly made mistakes by new teachers.

Bodamer, who has spent his entire career working for Charles County Public Schools, is currently the content specialist for fine and performing arts. Prior to this, he served as an instructional support teacher and band director at La Plata High School. As the content specialist, he develops curriculum, assists with interviewing candidates, observes teachers and assists school-level administrators, managing county-wide events, and multiple funding sources.  Bodamer received his B.A. degree in music from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and his master's degree from Bowie State University in Maryland.

Charles County, Md., is located approximately 30 miles south of Washington, D.C.  Over the past three years, a strong relationship has been forged between the Charles County Public Schools and Marshall University, according to Robert Wray, assistant professor of choral music education. Wray taught in the school district from 2001 to 2005. In addition, Steve Barnett, director of the marching band at Marshall, along with Wray, conducted the All-County band and choral ensembles respectively in December of 2008. Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the Marshall Department of Music, conducted an honors ensemble in southern Maryland that included students from the district this past February; and in March, the Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, included a full day of workshops for the choral students and teachers of Charles County as part of their spring tour. Blake Racer, a recent graduate of Marshall, is in his first year as director of choral activities at La Plata High School in the district and this year's freshman class in the Marshall Department of Music includes four graduates from the district.


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Three Marshall University students from southern West Virginia awarded Friends of Coal scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University freshmen from southern West Virginia have been awarded the Friends of Coal scholarships for 2009.

The recipients are Jordan A. Hatfield from Mingo County, Kimberly Hildreth from Lincoln County and Mercedes A. Swayne from Kanawha County. Hatfield is a 2009 graduate of Belfry High School in Kentucky, Hildreth is a 2009 graduate of Lincoln County High School and Swayne is a 2009 graduate of Capital High School.

Each student receives a $2,500 scholarship, which is the result of the sponsorship provided by the Friends of Coal for the Marshall-West Virginia University football series. Marshall plays WVU at 3:30 p.m. Saturday in Morgantown in the fourth game of the series.

Students eligible to receive the scholarship must have had high GPAs in high school, live in southern West Virginia and demonstrate high financial need.

"These scholarships are the most important and rewarding part of the Friends of Coal Bowl sponsorship as they may help keep our best and brightest here in West Virginia," said Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association. "The Friends of Coal Bowl is for every West Virginian who helps make the coal industry the best in the world and it is an honor to have these three outstanding students represent them.  Congratulations to each of them." 

Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs at Marshall, said the three students are true beneficiaries of the Friends of Coal Bowl, regardless of who wins the football game.

"The Friends of Coal scholarships are a wonderful benefit from this annual football game between Marshall University and West Virginia University," Hensley said. "These scholarships help these three worthy students reduce their indebtedness. As always, Marshall University appreciates the hard work and cooperative spirit that makes these scholarships possible."


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Monday October 12, 2009
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Eagle Appointed Dean of Marshall's Graduate School of Education

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Dr. Teresa R. Eagle has been appointed dean of Marshall University's Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, announced today.  She will begin her duties Oct. 17.

"We are indeed fortunate that Dr. Eagle has accepted this position," Ormiston said. "She has the perspective of 11 years of experience as a Marshall faculty member, as well as broad experience as a public school teacher and administrator, and will serve the school well."

Most recently Eagle was coordinator of Marshall's doctoral programs in education, as well as a tenured professor in the Leadership Studies program.

"I am looking forward to the leadership role in the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development," Eagle said. "We have an outstanding team of faculty and staff, and I am eager to continue working with them all."

Eagle is currently the president of the Southern Regional Council on Education Administration, which will hold its annual conference next week. She is also a member of the national and West Virginia associations of secondary school principals, the American Educational Studies Association, Phi Delta Kappa and the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration, among others.

Prior to coming to the university, Eagle served in the Kanawha County Schools in a number of roles, including curriculum supervisor at George Washington High School, assistant principal at Andrew Jackson Middle School and Roosevelt Junior High School, and acting principal at Roosevelt. She also taught mathematics in the Kanawha and Boone County schools.  She was named West Virginia State Teacher of the Year in 1989 and spent a year as an education specialist working for NASA's Project Laser at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.

Eagle holds a B.S. degree in mathematics from Morris Harvey College (now the University of Charleston), an M.A. degree in education administration from the West Virginia Graduate College (now part of Marshall University), an Ed.D. in educational leadership studies from West Virginia University, and an Ed.S. degree from Marshall.


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Ride for Life Spin-A-Thon set for Oct. 21 at Marshall Recreation Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Ride for Life Spin-A-Thon, an indoor cycling event benefitting the American Cancer Society and the Sue Niestroy-Wilson Memorial Scholarship Fund, will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 21 at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus.

Heather Smith with Marshall University Campus Recreation said all fitness levels are welcome and participants may ride from 20 minutes to two hours.  T-shirts will be given to participants who pledge at least $20 and prizes will be awarded to the riders with the most pledges/donations.

Persons may register by e-mailing hill149@marshall.edu ("Ride for Life" in subject line).

Call Smith at 304-696-3653 for more information.


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Black student leadership summit starts Oct. 16 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The iLead Black Student Leadership Summit is coming to Marshall University's Huntington campus beginning Friday, Oct. 16, and continuing until Sunday, Oct. 18. 

Sponsored locally by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, iLead's objectives are to bring black student leaders from diverse backgrounds, locations and organizations together to disseminate leadership and personal development tools to aid leaders to better themselves while helping communities, families, organizations and ultimately institutions.

Sessions will include daily presentations by professionals in the field, break-out sessions with student leaders and professionals, team building exercises and networking.

Topics to be explored include discovering the impact today's leaders will have on the future, networking with other student and professional leaders, exploring and developing  action plans for success and learning about current trends, methods and other attributes that are required for successful leaders.

Keynote presentations will cover a range of topics by professionals in the field of student leadership.  Those presenting are Dr. Genevieve E. Myers, professor of political science at Marshall; Steven T. Birdine, president/CEO of Affirmations in Action!; Dr. Jan E. Duncan, director of student teaching, Alcorn State University; and Mary Clarke, M.A., director of academic services at St. Louis University.

Author and Howard Law School graduate Patricia Russell-McCloud will be the keynote speaker at a banquet that will take place Saturday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Don Morris room of Marshall's Memorial Student Center. Listed in the Top Five Business Motivators in America by Black Enterprise Magazine, she also has been featured in Ebony, Black Enterprise and Essence magazines.  She has earned a reputation as one of the top orators of today.

Carrie Cline, who is the anchor for "First at Five" on WSAZ-TV, will serve as Mistress of Ceremonies for the banquet.

Dr. Shari Williams-Clarke, vice president for Multicultural Affairs at Marshall, said the summit offers a range of prolific presenters, including "Patricia Russell-McCloud, who is absolutely the most dynamic and engaging speaker I have heard.  Her message is strong, motivating and resonates with students and the general public.  She will hold the audience captive.  We are all looking forward to an exceptional summit."

Registration for all events is $45. There is no charge for Marshall students and high school students. Registration for the banquet only is $25 per person or $125 for a table for eight. To register, call 304-696-4677 or e-mail clarkes@marshall.edu.   

For additional information about iLead, go to http://iLEAD.webs.com    


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Visiting pianist from Turkey to be in residence at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Tűrev Berki, a visiting guest pianist from Turkey, will present a solo piano recital and participate in a chamber music concert during a week-long residency at the Marshall University Department of Music beginning Oct. 14 and continuing through Oct. 20.

The piano recital begins at noon Friday, Oct. 16, at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Avenue in Huntington. A complimentary lunch will follow the program, which will enable the audience to meet Berki. The chamber music concert, which will also feature cellist Dr. Şőlen Dikener and violinist Ian Jessee, will take place Monday, Oct. 19 in the Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Both concerts are free of charge.

"The visit of Dr. Berki to MU is the continuation of our duo collaboration that began with a concert tour in Turkey during my sabbatical leave in the spring of 2009," said Dikener, who is a member of the Marshall music faculty. "He is an outstanding musician and a virtuoso pianist. His visit will contribute tremendously to MU music students to enhance their global experience in the arts."

Berki is chair of the Musicology Department, State Conservatory of Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey. A native of Ankara, he began his piano education at the age of nine with master duo-pianists Elif and Bedii Aran. He represented Turkey in the International Steinway Piano Competition, where he was awarded first prize, and was also among the five award winners in Italy at the Senigallia International Piano Competition for Young Pianists. In 1993, having been assigned as the cultural attach of the Turkish Republic in the United States, he gave a recital in Washington D.C. on the occasion of 70th anniversary of the republic. As a soloist, he has played various concertos, as well as many recitals, in international festivals held in Turkey and in Carnegie Hall in New York.

Berki's visit is sponsored by MU Music Department and First Presbyterian Church under the MUsic Alive Guest Artist and Chamber Music Series, a program that is now in its fourth season. Dikener is the artistic director of the series, working together with Dale Capehardt from First Presbyterian Church. Each academic year, two international artists are invited to Huntington for concerts, lectures and other activities. The 2009-2010 program will feature, in upcoming events, the Degas String Quartet from North Carolina; the Capital Piano Trio from New York; violist Dr. Cetin Aydar from Izmir, Turkey; and the Nevelson Duo from Marshall University.


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Wednesday October 7, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Psychology Clinic to offer group on coping with anxiety

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - If you feel stressed out, overwhelmed, or just tired of all the things you have to juggle in life, the Marshall University Psychology Clinic has a group for you. 

"People are dealing with even greater amounts of stress and anxiety than ever before in their lives," said Dr. Keith Beard, director of the clinic. "It is easy to feel overwhelmed.  This group will help members learn better coping skills."

The group sessions will take place in the Psychology Clinic facility, located in Harris Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus, Tuesdays and Thursdays for four consecutive weeks.  The start date will be determined once group members are identified. 

Mary Beth Kees, one of the group leaders, states that this group is important because "if one does not deal with stress, it can have adverse effects on an individual's entire life." Both Kees and her co-leader, Kristina Isaacs, say they are confident that the group sessions will help participants to learn to cope with the stressors that they will face in life.

Marshall students and members of the community who would like to join the group should contact Kees by e-mail at kees8@marshall.edu or Isaacs at isaacs17@marshall.edu.  To leave a  telephone message, persons should call Beard at 304-696-2781.


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Wednesday October 7, 2009
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JobTrax kiosk unveiled in Corbly Hall Lounge

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business and the Office of Career Services unveiled a Job Trax kiosk in the Corbly Hall Lounge on the Huntington campus Friday, Oct. 2.

The kiosk was given by Ruth E. Butler Executive in Residence John Rulli and will assist business students in finding job opportunities and internships.

"We appreciate his [Rulli's] spirit of paying back to his alma mater," said Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean of the college. "Also, I am glad students were able to hear the success story from one of our own. Mr. Rulli had very good advice for students trying to be successful in their careers."

Rulli, who received his Bachelor of Business Administration from Marshall in 1979, gave the executive in residence lecture after the kiosk was unveiled. He  is executive vice president, chief administrative officer and president of Simon Management Group for Indianapolis-based Simon Property Group Inc.

JobTrax is an online database available to employers to post open positions to specifically reach Marshall University students and alumni.

"I hope students take full advantage of the kiosk and other career planning and enhancement services," said Alissa Sikula, a senior at Marshall.   "I am excited about using the kiosk. It is convenient since most of my classes are here in Corbly."





Photos:  Top: Glen Midkiff, event and public relations coordinator for the Office of Career Services at Marshall University, demonstrates the new Job Trax kiosk in Corbly Hall. Bottom: Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp (second from left) unveils the Job Tax kiosk in Corbly Hall Oct. 2. With Kopp are, from left, Dr. Ron Area, Chief Executive Officer of the Marshall University Foundation; John Rulli, Marshall alumnus and Butler Executive in Residence;  Rick Slater from Dixon-Hughes, Marshall alumnus and president of the college's advisory board; and Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean of the Lewis College of Business at Marshall.


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Tuesday October 6, 2009
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Performances, art sale to benefit A.D. Lewis Community Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association will sponsor live music and an art sale on the Huntington campus Thursday evening, Oct. 8, to benefit the A.D. Lewis Community Center on Hal Greer Blvd. in Huntington.

Entertainment begins at 8 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza after a pre-show at 6:30 p.m. in the John Marshall Room. Headlining the musical acts will be Nashville artist JJ Heller and local musicians will perform as well.

General admission for the 8 p.m. show is $10; a premium package is also available for $25. The premium package includes a reception, a "meet and greet" with Heller and a preview of the art available for sale. Tickets are available at the door or through the Marshall Artists Series box office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, which is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m.

All proceeds support the community center, which provides services for citizens of all ages. For further information, persons may contact Sean Hornbuckle, student body president, by phone at 304-696-2949 or by e-mail at sean.hornbuckle@marshall.edu.

 

Photo: Nashville artist JJ Heller will perform Oct. 8 on Marshall's Huntington campus.


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Monday October 5, 2009
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Visiting Writers Series kicks off with Rachael and Joel Peckham

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writers Rachael and Joel Peckham will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Their appearance is the first of three fall events in the Marshall University Visiting Writers Series.  Appalachian memoirist Linda Tate appears on campus Nov. 9, and acclaimed southern poet David Bottoms reads Nov. 17 at an evening hosted by the Huntington Museum of Art.

Rachael Peckham, new member of the creative writing faculty at Marshall, is the author of The Black Box Confessions, a dissertation in creative nonfiction from Ohio University. It is a collection of essays inspired by the life and death of aviator Harriet Quimby.  Peckham's work has appeared in many journals including Passages North, Oxford Magazine, Lake Effect and The Southeast Review.  Her several awards include a nonfiction prize from Briar Cliff Review.

Joel Peckham is the author of two collections of poetry from Pecan Grove Press, Nightwalking and The Heat of What Comes.  His work has appeared in such journals as Black Warrior Review, Southern Review, Prairie Schooner, Ascent and many others.  He is the recipient of an award in poetry from the Academy of American Poets.  He has also published creative nonfiction and is currently on the faculty of the University of Cincinnati's Clermont College.

Their joint appearance is sponsored by the Marshall University Visiting Writers Series, the College of Liberal Arts and the English Department.  The event is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday October 2, 2009
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Marshall to launch Text-2-Give Program this weekend


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- The Marshall University Office of Development is launching a Text-2-Give Program to coincide with homecoming weekend, Rebecca McPhail-Samples, assistant vice president for development, announced today. 

The campaign features two elements, which are:

A general campaign that will be highlighted during a promotion at Marshall's homecoming football game Saturday with East Carolina University, which begins at noon at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. This will serve as the official launch of the public portion of the text campaign.  Fans will be encouraged to text the word LEARN to 40579 to give $5 in support of Marshall University's General Scholarship Fund. Fans can text a contribution up to five times and the tax-deductible gift will appear on their mobile phone bill. Standard text messaging rates apply.

A student campaign will run from Oct. 3 to Oct. 31 and feature competition between class years. Freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors will be encouraged to text the keyword for their class to 40579 during the month of October.  The winning class will then choose one of three projects to which the funds can be directed.  The three projects up for vote by the winning class are the Memorial Fountain Maintenance Fund, the General Scholarship Fund or the campus's Be Marshall Green initiative.

"We are excited about the prospect of introducing a new way to give to the Marshall community," said McPhail-Samples. "We are also thrilled to give students the opportunity to get involved. Not only do our students have the opportunity to support the university, but the class who records the most contributions will also get to choose one of the three projects the funds will support."

A Lewis College of Business Marketing and Promotions class is helping with the student campaign. For more information contact McPhail-Samples at 304-696-3292 or 304-767-5189.


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Campus Conversations start Tuesday, Oct. 6, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A series of discussions to identify and develop priorities that will become elements of an academic master plan at Marshall University begins Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 6 and 7, on the Huntington campus.

Campus Conversations, which are open to all Marshall faculty, students and staff, will take place throughout the 2009-10 academic year to enable those attending to provide input for the draft of the Academic Master Plan, which is expected to be completed in April 2010.  The conversations are scheduled at alternate times in an effort to encourage broad participation.

Each session will have a thematic focus but discussions are expected to be open, direct, and not necessarily limited to the theme.  Those on the South Charleston campus can participate in all sessions via video conference.

The first conversation, "Developing a Student Body:  Recruitment, Retention, Success and Leadership," will take place at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 6 in room 2E28 in the Memorial Student Center.  It will be repeated at noon Wednesday, Oct. 7 in room 105 of Corbly Hall.

Subsequent dates and topics include:

Conversation 2

"Developing Faculty:  Recruitment, Retention, Success, and Leadership," 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct 27, in room 2E28, Memorial Student Center; and, noon Wednesday, Oct. 28 in room 105 of Corbly Hall.

Conversation 3

"Developing Academic Programs:  Resources, Facilities, and Structures," 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12, in room 2E28, Memorial Student Center; and, noon Friday, Nov. 13, in the Alumni Lounge (2W16), Memorial Student Center.

Conversation 4

"Financial Considerations and Context," time, place and date to be announced during the Spring Semester 2010.

The discussions are sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs and MU-ADVANCE.  Light refreshments will be provided. 

Questions and requests for additional information should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs, academic-affairs@marshall.edu


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Thursday October 1, 2009
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Homecoming car bash set for Friday at Buskirk Field

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, and the Student Activities Programming Board (SAPB) will be destroying a car from noon to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2 on Buskirk Field on Marshall's Huntington campus as part of homecoming activities.

In the seventh installment of the event, a Lincoln Continental Mark V will be painted purple and yellow - the colors of East Carolina University, Marshall's homecoming opponent - and then destroyed by Marshall students and community members.

SAPB will be providing inflatable games for a carnival in conjunction with the car bash.

WMUL will bring sledgehammers, gloves and goggles. Station Manager Adam Cavalier said the only thing participants need to bring is "anger, muscles and one dollar for the best therapy money can buy."

"It's getting close to midterms and students probably have a lot of stress," Cavalier said.  "What better way is there to work that stress out than demolish a car that's painted in dishonor of Marshall's homecoming opponent?"

The dollar admission fee will get participants access to two car-bashing minutes with the Lincoln Continental and a pass to play on SAPB's inflatable games.

For more information, contact Cavalier at cavalier@marshall.edu or at 304-696-2295.


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Thursday October 1, 2009
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Chamber/YPC scholarship established by MU Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce and Young Professionals Committee (YPC) Scholarship has been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

The Chamber and YPC recently pledged $10,000 to fund the scholarship and the YPC recently provided an additional $1,500 to help fund the Lewis College of Business' new Lounge project. The Young Professionals Committee is a subcommittee of the Chamber that fosters leadership skills for professionals ages 21 to 45.

Scholarship guidelines call for one award of $2,000 to be given to a Marshall University student annually for five years beginning with the current academic year.

The recipient must be a full-time undergraduate student who does not qualify for the PROMISE Scholarship. He or she also must be an employee or an immediate family member of an employee of a business that is a member of the chamber or an affiliated subcommittee.

"The Chamber is happy to provide this opportunity to a deserving student," said Mark Bugher, president of the chamber. "Creating education opportunities is critical to our overall economic climate and the success of local businesses."

The recipient must perform a minimum of 20 hours of unpaid community service or 20 hours in an unpaid internship at a chamber or YPC member business during the year he or she receives the scholarship. The recipient must live in campus housing and maintain full-time status and a minimum grade point average of 2.5.

"It is with great pleasure and excitement that the YPC can partner with the chamber to offer this scholarship to Marshall University," said Christie White, chair of the YPC. "It will be a wonderful opportunity to assist in advancing the higher education of the future young professionals of the Huntington area."

 

Photo: From left to right are Matt White, Cassey Bowden, Christie White, Dr. Ron Area, Mark Bugher, Brandy Roisman and Romy Mundy. All but Area, who is Senior Vice President for Development and Chief Executive Officer for the Marshall University Foundation, are members of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce and Young Professionals Committee (YPC) Scholarship Committee. White is chair of the YPC and Bugher is president of the Chamber.


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Thursday October 1, 2009
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Marshall University Executive MBA class heads to Chile for international residency

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Twenty-two professional students in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration class will embark on an international study abroad residency to Santiago, Chile, this Saturday afternoon.

The students, who have been studying together on Saturdays at Marshall's South Charleston campus for the past 15 months, depart from Charleston Saturday afternoon and return to Charleston on Sunday, Oct. 11. While in Santiago, students will interact with locally owned and operated businesses and international companies during the weeklong residency abroad.

The excursion is an important part of the Marshall Executive MBA experience and involves five full days of class, lectures, presentations and on-site tours, said Dr. Uday Tate, director of the Executive MBA program.

"This is the last leg of the cohort's journey," Tate said. "Our students, who will graduate later this month, can now take the principles they have mastered in class and learned through their classmates and see how it comes together to work on an international level. This is an amazing opportunity for our students."

While in Santiago, the cohort and accompanying professors will experience an economic briefing by the U.S. Department of Commerce at the U.S. Embassy, a presentation by the Association of Chilean Exporters, a tour of Drillco and a presentation by the nonprofit Endeavor on its role in the development of the mining-related company. Other presentations and tours include an overview of the continent's economy given by BBVA's chief economist for South America, a lecture at Adolfo Ibanez University on why Chile is one of Latin America's most competitive economies, and a corporate presentation at the country's largest and most successful wineries.

Students also will experience another American connection during a tour and overview of Finning, a Caterpillar dealer in the region, which was arranged by one of the Executive MBA students with connections and an interest in the mining and construction industries.

Students participating in the residency include Scott Anderson of Huntington, Rachael Blount of Charleston, Brian Bracey of Huntington, Charlie Bradley of Huntington, Celia Cooper of Williamstown, Paul Davis of Huntington, Shonee Amy Ferrebee of Ashford, Shane Finster of Huntington, Patricia Garren of Hurricane, Keith Hainer of Chapmanville, Ben Hardman of Huntington, Linda Holley of Prichard, Jeremy Holton of Huntington, David Horst of Milton, Justin Hunter of Huntington, Kelly May of Matewan, Michelle P. Muth of Huntington, Troy Nedrich of Cannonsburg, Pa., Victoria Quintrell-Paul of Charleston, Valerie Ray of Charleston, Chris Roberts of Hurricane, and Kristen Schneider of Morgantown.

Also accompanying the cohort on the trip are professors Lorraine Anderson and Deepak Subedi, and Lalena Price from University Communications.


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Wednesday September 30, 2009
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Rulli to deliver Ruth E. Butler Executive in Residence Lecture; JobTrax kiosk to be unveiled in Corbly Hall Lounge

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate John Rulli, executive vice president, chief administrative officer and president of Simon Management Group for Indianapolis-based Simon Property Group, Inc., will deliver the Ruth E. Butler Executive in Residence Lecture Friday, Oct. 2 at Marshall University.

Rulli, who received his Bachelor of Business Administration from Marshall in 1979, will speak at 11 a.m. in Corbly Hall, room 105, on Marshall's Huntington campus. The lecture is open to the public.

Rulli's lecture will be preceded at 10:30 a.m. by the unveiling of a JobTrax kiosk in the Corbly Hall Lounge. JobTrax is an online database available to employers to post open positions to specifically reach Marshall University students and alumni.

The Executive in Residence program was created in 1984 by Dr. Robert P. Alexander, then dean of the Lewis College of Business, with the purpose of providing students with the opportunity to hear and interact with successful business executives. The program provides role models with outstanding business experience related to students through lectures, discussions and informal dialogue.

Rulli is on the advisory board for Marshall's Lewis College of Business and was inducted into its Hall of Fame in 2006. He is vice chairman of the board for Indianapolis Downtown, Inc.

Simon Property Group is an S&P 500 company and the largest U.S. publicly traded real estate company. Simon Property Group is a fully integrated real estate company that operates from five retail real estate platforms: regional malls, Premium Outlet Centers, The Mills Corporation, community/lifestyle centers and international properties. The company currently owns or has an interest in approximately 380 properties in North America, Europe and Asia.

Prior to being appointed to his current position in 2007, Rulli was instrumental in building the operating foundation upon which Simon Property Group has grown. He has led the integration of all acquisitions including DeBartolo, CPI, IBM, New England Development Company and The Mills Corporation portfolios. Rulli has been a key member of the Simon Property Group management team for more than 20 years.


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Tuesday September 29, 2009
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Marshall University faculty member's new book released

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University English Department Professor A. E. (Art) Stringer recently published a new collection of poems, Human Costume, through Salmon Poetry in Ireland.  Stringer is the author of a previous collection, Channel Markers, and has taught writing and literature at Marshall for 20 years. 

"Professor Stringer continues to prove himself to be an extremely deep well of talent and inspiration for our students," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "Having an accomplished author of his distinction is an undeniable asset for the Department of English, the College of Liberal Arts and the university. An extraordinary teacher, he leads his students by example to demonstrate the majesty of writing."

Stringer and southern Ohio poet Ron Houchin, whose book Museum Crows is also new from Salmon, just returned from a public reading in Galway, Ireland to launch both of their titles.  They will appear together in Huntington in early December and elsewhere in West Virginia in the coming year. 

Stringer said Human Costume sees the human figure as being costumed in flesh and feeling, by which human nature is both revealed and concealed.  "The heart of the book," he said, "is our seasonal celebration of Halloween on the eve of All Saints Day."  He said it was only after moving to West Virginia and experiencing the area's elaborate rituals and celebrations of these holidays that he came to appreciate their connection. 

Human Costume includes poems about nature, war, love, and art that have appeared over the past decade in journals such as The Ohio Review, Shenandoah, Antaeus, Denver Quarterly, Southern Poetry Review, and others. 

The book was supported by a grant from Marshall University's John Deaver Drinko Academy and is available at the Marshall bookstore and at http://www.salmonpoetry.com/humancostume.html.


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Monday September 28, 2009
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Country musician and Marshall University alumna Dana Romanello added as opening act for Mike Birbiglia show

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumni typically come home for homecoming, but this year, one of our own will be part of the homecoming festivities as Dana Romanello, a county music artist and former Herd cheerleader, warms up the crowd during Homecoming Week for the Mike Birbiglia "I'm in the Future Also" show on Friday, Oct. 2nd at the Veterans Memorial Field House. 

 

Romanello graduated from Marshall University in 2004 with her B.A. in Communications Studies with a minor in music.  Dana was very active in campus activities during her tenure at Marshall.  She was a varsity cheerleader beginning in 2000 and rising to cheerleading captain in 2003.  She was also very active in MU choir and MU dance team.

 

Dana is a current resident of Music City USA, otherwise known as Nashville, Tenn., where she recently released her debut album, Dana Romanello.  The ten tracks are all written by Romanello herself.  Some tracks are bittersweet, retrospective thoughts put to music; some fun "sassy grass" tunes as she calls them; all representing the sweet and spirited person she is.  "She's somewhere between June Carter and Dolly Parton!" says Steve Hayes, WNXT. 


Mike Birbiglia tickets are $22. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series box office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, or by calling (304) 696-6656 or (304) 523-5757. Patrons can also visit www.marshallartistsseries.org for ticket information. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets can also be purchased at any Ticketmaster location, including online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can also pick up tickets at FYE stores in the Huntington Mall and Ashland Town Center or the Macy's in the Charleston Town Center.

 

Mike Birbiglia's "I'm in the Future Also" is sponsored by The Marshall Artists Series, MU's Student Activities Programming Board, Marshall University's  Alumni Association,  CSX Transportation, American Electric Power, Dr. Phil Zambos, WKEE, WAMX, The DAWG, BOB FM, The Planet, Magic 97.9, WKAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, WOWK, Marshall University and the College of Fine Arts.


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Monday September 28, 2009
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Marshall University graduate student selected to participate in prestigious fellowship program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University graduate student has been selected as a participant in the prestigious Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program in Washington, D.C.

Janet Fraser, a native of Burnaby, British Columbia, who is pursuing an M.S. degree in Technology Management, has been assigned to the Transportation Research Board, where she will conduct research on a variety of topics relating to transportation safety and emergency medical services.

She is the only one of the 26 fellows who was accepted without having completed an advanced degree.

"Janet is an ambitious and focused Technology Management student driven to excel in the field of transportation.  I have enjoyed working with her throughout her graduate program - she is a young woman to keep an eye on," said Dr. Tracy Christofero, program director for the Technology Management program at Marshall.

"Janet Fraser is an outstanding student who is already on the path to great success in the field of transportation," said Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of Marshall's Graduate College. "Her achievement is a testament to her own impressive abilities and to the fine faculty in Marshall University's Department of Technology Management."

Fraser also provided significant technical testimony at the Chemical Safety Board meeting in Institute, W.Va., in April on the 2008 Bayer CropScience pesticide waste tank explosion.


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Friday September 25, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Dedication of Marching Thunder band complex set for Oct. 2

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The new home of Marshall University's marching band, Marching Thunder, will be dedicated officially in a ceremony at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2.

Guests are invited to the multi-purpose field near the Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus to watch the band prepare for Saturday's homecoming game performance.

The ceremony will include words from Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the Department of Music; Dr. David Castleberry, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts, speaking on behalf of Dean Donald Van Horn; President Stephen J. Kopp and Steve Barnett, director of bands.

"It will be a wonderful day because we are dedicating this marvelous space," Van Horn said. "Years ago, when the marching band was relatively small in number, the band room and Recital Hall in the Smith Music building were used for practice.  However, the band quickly outgrew those facilities."

Light refreshments will be served following the ceremony.

For more information contact Jaye Ike, Special Projects Coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Thursday September 24, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall test of MU Alert Emergency Messaging System

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University communications officials conducted a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 24.

 

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message this morning. If a message has not been received by noon, please review your contact information in the myMU/MU Alert web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then please send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, email, voice) did not work as expected.


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Thursday September 24, 2009
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Marshall University's Fall Career Expo set for Oct. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Career services' 2009 Fall Career Expo will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. All Marshall University students and alumni are invited to attend this bi-annual event.

More than 80 organizations are expected to attend, providing participants with full-time, part-time, internship and networking opportunities.

"Career fairs are a great way to connect with employers and give your job search a shot in the arm if you plan and prepare," Denise Hogsett, director of the Office of Career Services, said. "Maximize this career fair ex­perience by knowing your job interests, researching organizations in advance, asking questions and arranging interviews, among other things."

Participants are encouraged to dress professionally and bring copies of their rsums. Members of the Career Services staff will be on hand to assist students in their preparation for the event with rsum workshops, mock interview opportunities and the printing of business cards for students.

"We also offer Fall Career Expo Preparation Workshops," Hogsett said. "In those workshops, we will help students learn how to target employers, develop their 30-second ads, and give them some networking tips. It's our goal to prepare students for a successful Career Expo."

The preparation workshop will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 30, one week before the Expo.

Employers and organizations scheduled to attend this year's event include AFLAC; Amazon.com; Ameri­can Electric Power; BB&T; Brayman Construction; Cabell Huntington Hospital; Charleston Area Medical Center; Cintas Corp. - Ashland; Dixon-Hughes; Enterprise Rent-A-Car; Federated Insurance; Gibbons & Kawash, CPAs; Huntington Federal Savings Bank; Huntington Police Department; the Internal Revenue Ser­vice; Kroger Mid-Atlantic; Marshall University; Massey Coal Services, Inc.; Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital, Panhandle Support Services; Papa John's Pizza; Pepsi Bottling Group; Prestera Center; Rite Aid; Speedway SuperAmerica LLC; Target Corporation; Total Quality Logistics, Inc.; U.S. Department of State; Diplomatic Security; U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service; U.S. Peace Corps; Verizon Wireless; Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.; West Virginia American Water; Workforce 2000; WSAZ-3; West Virginia Electric and a number of others.

Visit the Career Services Web site for a complete and updated list of all attending organizations.

For more information or assistance with Career Expo preparation, contact the Office of Career Services at 304-696-2370, stop by the office at 1681 5th Ave., next to the Harless Dining Hall, or visit its Web site at www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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Thursday September 24, 2009
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'Traditions to Treasure' is theme of Homecoming 2009 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate Homecoming 2009 the week of Monday, Sept. 28 through Saturday, Oct. 3 with the theme of "Traditions to Treasure."

Former Thundering Herd star football player Troy Brown will be the grand marshal in the homecoming parade, which will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1 beginning at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

In the homecoming football game, Marshall will take on the East Carolina Pirates in a Conference USA battle that begins at noon Saturday, Oct. 3 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

As always, homecoming will feature numerous activities throughout the week. Some of them include:

Monday, Sept. 28

Campus office staffs are invited to decorate their offices to show how the university gets into the spirit of homecoming. Prizes will be awarded at the Coaches' Breakfast at 9:15 a.m. Friday, Oct. 2 at the Erickson Alumni Center.

The naming of the homecoming court will take place at noon on the Memorial Student Center plaza. In case it rains, activities will be moved inside the student center. The Marshall University Jazz Ensemble, which performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland and France this past summer, will play on the plaza from noon to 1 p.m. 

Thursday, Oct. 1

Office decoration judging begins at noon.

The homecoming parade, sponsored by the Student Government Association, begins at 7 p.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, then heads south to 4th Avenue, east to Hal Greer Boulevard, south to 5th Avenue and east to Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Marco, the Marshall cheerleaders, the Marching Thunder and dignitaries such as Brown and Jessi Pierson, Miss West Virginia USA and a December 2008 Marshall graduate, will be in the parade.

Friday, Oct. 2
Green and White Day

The first official Alumni Association event of homecoming weekend is the Coaches' Breakfast from 6 to 10 a.m. at the Erickson Alumni Center. This event features a live radio broadcast that enables those attending the event as well as those listening to the broadcast to get to know some

of Marshall's coaches. The DAWG, 93.7 FM, will start broadcasting at 6 a.m. and coaches will join in throughout the broadcast.

A Parent and Family Weekend Open House will take place from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the H.E.L.P. Center in Myers Hall.

The H.E.L.P. Program's annual golf scramble will be played at Riviera Country Club. The event features a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Contact Renna Moore at 304-696-6252 or visit www.marshall.edu/help for more information.

Parent and Family Weekend will have a First Year Residence Halls Open House from 3 to 4 p.m. in the lobbies of the North and South halls. Parents and families are invited to visit Marshall University's newest residence halls.

Registration for Black Alumni Inc. events is from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Pullman Plaza Hotel.

Parent and Family Weekend continues with a One Book Parent Discussion Group on My Sister's Keeper from 4 to 5 p.m. in the classroom on the first floor of the First Year Residence Hall (North).

The dedication of the Marching Thunder Band Complex will take place at 5:30 p.m. in the Band Classroom in Cam Henderson Center, Level A, east end. A reception follows at 6:30 p.m.

The Parent and Family Weekend Picnic and Pep Rally is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Harless Dining Hall courtyard.

Marshall's Criminal Justice program will celebrate its 35th anniversary by inviting graduates of the program back for a celebration. Activities include a reception from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center, Room BE5. A detailed schedule of events and hotel information is available at www.marshall.edu/criminal-justice.

A joint reception sponsored by Black Alumni Inc. and the MU Alumni Association in support of the Nate Ruffin Initiative will take place from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Cooking and Culinary Institute at 937 3rd Ave. Cost is $20 per person. Call 304-696-2901 for reservations.

The MU Homecoming Concert/Marshall Artists Series Evening of Comedy with Mike Birbiglia of Comedy Central starts at 8 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Field House. Special reserved seating for active MUAA members is available. To order these special tickets, call the Marshall Box Office at 304-696-6656 and use the code MUalumni. These special tickets are $22 each.

Black Alumni Inc. Hospitality will take place from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Pullman Plaza Hotel.

Saturday, Oct. 3

The Alumni 5K Run begins at 8 a.m. at Pullman Square in downtown Huntington. Call Sharon Stanton at 304-696-4REC for reservations, or visit www.marshallcampusrec.com.

The ROTC alumni homecoming tailgate reception is from 9 a.m. to noon at parking spot 56 on the West Lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Food and refreshments will be served. Red Dawson will attend and sign "We Are Marshall" DVDs while thanking Marshall alumni veterans for their service. For more information, contact Capt. Michael G. Armstrong at 304-696-6450 or e-mail him at Armstrong@marshall.edu.

The annual MU Black Alumni Inc. Business Meeting and Continental Breakfast is from 9 to 10 a.m. at the Memorial Student Center.

The Marshall Alumni Association and Black Alumni Inc. will hold a Brunch Under the Tent/Tailgate and Fish Fry at the corner of 3rd Avenue and 18th Street. Food, beverages, games and entertainment for the family will be featured. Cost is $15. Reservations may be made by calling 304-696-2901.

The Criminal Justice program will have a pre-game tailgate as part of its 35th anniversary celebration. The tailgate will take place from 10 a.m. to noon in the parking lot across 3rd Avenue from Morrow Library.

The Parent and Family Weekend pre-game tailgate party will be from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the corner of 3rd Avenue and 18th Street, next to the Henderson Center west stairs.

Post-game festivities

The Boogie Fever Post-Game Party for all Marshall alumni and friends will take place at Mac-Reedo's, located on the corner of 7th Avenue and 8th Street, immediately following the game until 11 p.m. Cost is $20 per person in advance, $25 at the door. Call 304-696-2901 to purchase tickets in advance. The party will feature entertainment, food, beer and soft drinks.

A reunion for those who were Greeks or friends of Greeks who went to The Varsity, The Union, The Castle, etc., between 1985 and 1995 will take place at the American Legion from 7 p.m. to midnight. Deejay Bill France, a PIKE alum, will be taking care of the music. Tickets are $25 for singles and $45 for couples. For more information, contact Delta Zeta alum Vicki Shelton Parrish at mrsvickiparrish@yahoo.com or log on to Facebook and search the group called "Marshall Greeks and Friends Reunion 1985-1995."

Black Alumni Inc. will have its Casino Royale/Dance Night from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Pullman Plaza Hotel grand ballroom. DJ DelRay from Washington, D.C., will provide music. Visit www.muba-alumni.com for more information.


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Wednesday September 23, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall research shows safe dosages of common pain reliever may help prevent muscle loss, other conditions related to aging

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Recent studies conducted by Dr. Eric Blough and his colleagues at Marshall University have shown that use of the common pain reliever acetaminophen may help prevent age-associated muscle loss and other conditions.

Their study examined how acetaminophen may affect the regulation of protein kinase B (Akt), an enzyme known to play an important role in regulation of cellular survival, proliferation and metabolism.

The researchers' data indicates that aging skeletal muscles experience a decrease in the proper functioning of the enzyme and that acetaminophen intervention in aged animals could be used to restore Akt activity to a level comparable to that seen in young animals. In turn, this improvement in Akt activity was associated with improvements in muscle cell size and decreased muscle cell death.

"Using a model that closely mimics many of the age-associated physiological changes observed in humans, we were able to demonstrate that chronic acetaminophen treatment in a recommended dosage is not only safe but might be beneficial for the treatment of the muscle dysfunction many people experience as they get older," said Blough, an associate professor in the university's Department of Biological Sciences.

The lab's work, which was published in the July 29 issue of the international research journal PLoS One, is the first study to show that acetaminophen ingestion, at least in animals, can be safely used for the treatment of age-related muscle loss. This finding could have far-reaching implications, given the fact that people age 65 and older make up the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population.

Additional research in their laboratory, which was published in the March issue of the journal Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, demonstrates the medication may also be useful in diminishing the severity of age-associated hyperglycemia, commonly referred to as high blood sugar.

"It is thought that acetaminophen may exert its action by decreasing the amount of reactive oxygen species," explained Dr. Miaozong Wu, the lead author and a postdoctoral fellow in Blough's lab. "Given the finding that increases in reactive oxygen species may play a role in the development of several age-associated disorders, it is possible that acetaminophen could be used to treat many different types of conditions."

Dr. John Maher, vice president for research and executive director of the Marshall University Research Corporation, said, "These findings are yet another indication that Marshall's researchers are conducting vital research in areas of great importance to human health and safety. I could not be more pleased and wish Dr. Blough and his team continued success."

The research was supported with funding from McNeil Pharmaceutical.

According to Blough, scientists in his lab will now turn their attention to examining other physiological systems, such as the heart and blood vessels, to see if acetaminophen therapy might have similar benefits for people with cardiovascular disease.

For more information, contact Blough at blough@marshall.edu or call 304-696-2708.

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Photo: Dr. Eric Blough and his colleagues at Marshall University have shown that use of the common pain reliever acetaminophen may help prevent age-associated muscle loss and other conditions.


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Tuesday September 22, 2009
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President Kopp to deliver State of the University address at General Faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp will deliver a State of the University address during the fall General Faculty meeting, which starts at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 29 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The agenda includes:

  • Welcoming remarks by the Faculty Senate Chair Dr. Cam Brammer
  • Singing of the Star Spangled Banner by Dr. Larry Stickler
  • Announcements and the discussion of proposed amendments to The Constitution of the Marshall University Faculty by Dr. Brammer
  • Introduction of faculty representatives by Dr. Brammer
  • Introduction of new administrators by Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston, and the introduction of 64 new faculty by Dr. Brammer and School of Medicine Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs Dr. Robert C. Nerhood
  • A State of the Faculty address by Dr. Brammer
  • A State of the University address by University President, Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.

All faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the new university personnel will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

New faculty representatives to be introduced are: Advisory Council of Faculty (ACF), Dr. Chuck Bailey, and MU Board of Governors, Dr. Larry Stickler.

New administrative positions to be introduced are: Dr. Monica Brooks, assistant vice president for information technology, online learning and libraries; Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies; Dr. Chong Kim, dean, Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business; Dr. Gretchen Oley, interim dean, College of Health Professions; Dr. Charles Somerville, dean, College of Science; Dr. Donna Spindel, dean, Graduate College; Dr. Mary Todd, founding dean, University Honors College; Dr. David Castleberry, associate dean, College of Fine Arts; and Dr. Jamie Warner, associate dean, College of Liberal Arts.

New faculty to be introduced are:

  • College of Education & Human Services - Anthony Dixon and James Farmer
  • College of Fine Arts - Miyuki Akai Cook, Daniel Kaufmann, Natalie Larsen and Eric Ruegg
  • College of Health Professions - Muhammad Amjad, Susan Booton, Andrea Criss, Penny Daniels, Nancy Elkins, Klara Kovacs and Jeremy Mullins
  • College of Information Technology and Engineering - Paulus Wahjudi and Isaac Wait
  • College of Liberal Arts - Kevin Cline, Jamie Hickman-Weaver, Jane Hill, Nicholas Kelling, Cheryl Lentes, Genevieve Meyers, Cody Mullins, David Peavler, Rachel Peckham, Paula Sanchez-Rebollo, Anara Tabyshalieva, Jennifer Tiano, Cynthia Torppa  and Jill Treftz
  • College of Science - Leonard Hand, Derrick Kolling, Jeffrey Kovatch, Seungjin Lim, Carl Mummert, John Sammons and Suman Sanyal
  • Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - Rolland Fields and Doohee Lee
  • Marshall University Graduate College - Andrew Burck and Lori Ellison
  • W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications - Christine Ingersoll
  • Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Rene Battista, Vincent Battista, Amy Chambers, Holly Dudash, Holly Dyer, Carol Foster, Kausar Jabbar, Jung Han Kim, Benjamin Lafferty, Richard Matthews, Jeffrey Miles, Magdalena Muchlinski, Steven Novotny, Adenrele Olajide, Omolola Olajide, Peter Ottaviano, Eva Patton-Tackett, Sarah Price, Travis Salisbury, Rajesh Sehgal, Maria Serrat, Wei-ping Zeng and Margie Zdrojewski.

For more information on the General Faculty meeting, contact Bernice Bullock with the Faculty Senate at 304-696-4376.


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Monday September 21, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Funds collected in fundraiser benefit Honaker ROTC Scholarship at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A recent fundraiser conducted by American Legion Post 16 on 6th Avenue in Huntington raised $1,150 to be donated to the Marshall University Foundation for the John J. Honaker Memorial ROTC Scholarship at Marshall. The money was raised at a spaghetti dinner at the Legion.

Honaker died in an automobile accident in summer 2000 just six months after being commissioned a second lieutenant in Marshall University's ROTC program. The scholarship was established in January 2001 in Honaker's memory. The recipient of the Honaker scholarship must be an outstanding ROTC Cadet at Marshall University.

The addition of the $1,150 from the fundraiser brings the endowed fund total to $4,650. Capt. Michael G. Armstrong with Marshall ROTC said the goal is to raise at least $350 more to bring the scholarship fund total to $5,000.

Contributions by check should be made payable to the Marshall University Foundation and earmarked for the John J. Honaker Memorial ROTC Scholarship. Checks may be mailed to Armstrong at 216 Gullickson Hall, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755.

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Photo: From left, Lance West, vice president for development with the Marshall University Foundation, Dr. Chong Kim, dean of Marshall's Lewis College of Business, Capt. Michael G. Armstrong with Marshall ROTC, and Dr. Dan Evans, a Marshall University biology professor and vice commander of American Legion Post 16, pose with an oversized check of $1,150 presented by Post 16 to the MU Foundation on Friday, Sept. 18.


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Monday September 21, 2009
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Smoke on the Water - A fundraiser to benefit the Marshall Artists Series will be held Saturday, October 10th from 3 - 8 p.m.

If you were asked to sample bourbons, beers and tasty grilled foods - all for a good cause, would that be enticing?  If so, then Smoke on the Water - A fundraiser to benefit the Marshall Artists Series is the event for you!  Smoke on the Water will be held at The Grover Farm - The beautiful riverside home of Carl and Annette Grover on Saturday, October 10th from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m.  Limited space is available, so be sure to reserve your ticket today!

Guests will enjoy sumptuous grilled delights from area restaurants and local cooking enthusiasts, all designed to pair beautifully with the selection of beers that will be on hand for guests to try.  The setting - The Grover Farm - located at 7676 Ohio River Road in Lesage - is a destination itself, and will be the perfect setting for the inaugural Smoke on the Water event.  

You will not want to miss this extraordinary evening full of beer and bourbon sampling, music, games, and even the big game - Marshall vs. Tulane on the big screen. This event is part of the successful Kindred Spirits series of fundraisers benefitting the Marshall Artists Series. All Kindred Spirits fundraisers - including Smoke on the Water - have been spearheaded by Marshall Artists Series board member Terry Deppner-Hardin. Her efforts over the past few years have helped to raise much needed funds for the Marshall Artists Series, as well as creating unique events for our guests to enjoy.  Gather a group of friends and come on out to this one of a kind event and support the Marshall Artists Series all while having a blast! 

Wayne X-Press will provide optional round-trip shuttle transportation from both the West lot at MU's football stadium, as well as the YMCA's Kennedy Center on Rt. 2.  The shuttle transportation is free, but must be reserved in advance.  Guests may reserve the shuttle when purchasing tickets.

Tickets are $75 per person. A portion of your ticket is tax deductible.  Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series box office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, or by calling (304) 696-6656 or (304) 523-5757. The box office is open Monday-Friday from noon -5 p.m. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can pick up tickets at any Ticketmaster outlet, as well as FYE in the Huntington Mall, and at Macy's in the Charleston Town Center.

Smoke on the Water is sponsored by Media Promotions Enterprises, Setzer's World of Camping, Wayne X-Press, La Fontaine's Tobacco and Wine Shop, WKEE, WTCR, B-97, WSAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, Pepsi, Big Sandy Superstore, Marshall University and the College of Fine Arts.


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Friday September 18, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Half-hour video showcases professor's work



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - It's the season for television premieres and Marshall University's cable channel 25 is having one of its own.

Marshall Journalism Professor Dan Hollis has won numerous awards for his videos showcasing some of the people, events and places of West Virginia.  Now he has put clips of several of those videos together in a retrospective commemorating his first 10 years at Marshall.

The 30-minute show titled "A Collection" will air on Comcast Channel 25 at 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday after "We Are Marshall Today" starting Monday, Sept. 21.

"We just thought it would be a fun thing to do, to go back and look at some of my favorite stories," Hollis said. "I certainly had fun remembering some of those times and people as I put this show together."

Some of the clips included in the showcase are the winning moment of the 1999 Mid-American Conference championship football game, a look at Bridge Day and the most recent video about this spring's Vandalia Gathering.


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Friday September 18, 2009
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New Parthenon Web site debuts Monday, Sept. 21

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A software upgrade for the Web site of The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper, will go live Monday, Sept. 21. 

"This upgrade will give the site video capability on the Web," said Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. "Our students will be able to participate fully in the new media, which often combine the written word, video, audio and graphics."

Parthenon Executive Editor Kyle Hobstetter, a senior from Portsmouth, Ohio, said the Web site basically has been overhauled.

"The new-looking site will give the Marshall University community, including current and prospective students, along with alumni, a new way to receive their Marshall news," Hobstetter said. "We'll mix the best of all student media, whether it's video, text, pictures or audio, to create a brand new experience for anyone using The Parthenon Web site."

The site will include "a goody bag of information," Hobstetter said, including links to sports, news and videos.

"It'll be much easier to navigate," he said. "Overall, the design is more professional. Students will have a chance to share their voice in video blogs and we'll have breaking news videos."

Hobstetter said The Parthenon, for the first time ever, now has a Web site editor. He is Solomon Fizer, a junior broadcast major.

The Parthenon publishes five days a week, Monday through Friday. Visit the newspaper's Web site at www.marshallparthenon.com.


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Thursday September 17, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington freshman is first winner of O'Hanlon essay competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced the first winners of the 2009 Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition during a news conference in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Aaron N. Preece, a freshman History major from Huntington, took first place and will receive $1,500. The second-place winner was Katherine Nicole Bush, a junior Forensic Chemistry major from Huntington, and she will receive $750.

The new essay competition, announced in June, pays tribute to former Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall and local Circuit Court Judge Dan O'Hanlon. It was created with a $50,000 anonymous donation, and its purpose is to encourage Marshall University undergraduate students to study the historical and contemporary significance of the Constitution of the United States of America and the effect the Marshall court had in establishing the importance of the Supreme Court.

The topic of the 2009 essay was as follows: Free speech in the "marketplace of ideas" is a cherished but much debated right in this society. Nowhere is it deemed more valuable, constructive and necessary than on a university campus. Should colleges and universities be allowed to place restrictions on what is reasonable speech for faculty?

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, said he is excited that Marshall University is honoring the Constitution and John Marshall through this exercise.

"I was greatly impressed with the work of the two students who won the awards and the others who submitted essays," Pittenger said. "We are looking forward to lively competition for next year and are hopeful more students from more colleges will submit essays. It is important to reward student civic engagement by studying this essential document that defines our government."

Preece said he is honored to receive the first Dan O'Hanlon essay contest award.

"I was surprised that I won for I found the essay to be quite challenging to write," Preece said. "Also, I have never written an essay of the caliber required before."

Preece said he originally attempted to write the essay from information online, but found it lacking.

"I visited the Drinko Library and there, Jennifer Sias (associate professor/information literacy librarian) introduced me to the databases available on campus," he said. "I found these to be very useful, and the information was of very high quality. This wealth of sources greatly helped me in my essay." 

The announcement today of the essay winners was part of the University's Constitution Week activities, which continue through Sept. 24.
 

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Photo: Judge Dan O'Hanlon, middle, poses with Marshall University students Katherine Nicole Bush, left, and Aaron N. Preece during a ceremony today in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Preece took first place and Bush was the second-place winner in the Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition.
 


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Wednesday September 16, 2009
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, 304-696-3334

Comedy Central's Mike Birbiglia will bring humor to homecoming weekend

The Marshall Artists Series, MU's Student Activities Programming Board and Marshall University's  Alumni Association are teaming up to bring Comedy Central's Mike Birbiglia  and his "I'm in the Future Also" tour to the Veterans Memorial Field House at 8 p.m.,  Friday, Oct. 2.  Marshall University's 2009 Homecoming theme - Traditions to Treasure - is especially fitting this year, as the tradition of having a concert for Homecoming weekend will be revived with the Mike Birbiglia show. 

Gaining a dedicated fan base with his hilarious personal blog "My Secret Public Journal," Mike Birbiglia starred in three Comedy Central Presents specials and grabbed attention with the release of his CD "Two Drink Mike" in 2006. The self-proclaimed "awkward" guy continued his success with a slice-of-life Off-Broadway show, "Sleepwalk With Me," which chronicles his quirky tales of near-death sleepwalking, breakups and denial. His storytelling stand-up style has gained him praise as a regular contributor to the nationally syndicated "The Bob and Tom Radio Show" and National Public Radio's "This American Life." Hailed as one of comedy's most prominent fresh talents, Birbiglia is among the youngest comedians to appear on "The Late Show with David Letterman," and he has also been featured on "Late Night with Conan O'Brien" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live."

"I'm in the Future Also" will feature Birbiglia's blunt honesty about embarrassing and awkward moments in his life. He relays simple jokes in a conversational style, drawing in audiences who can identify with his casual reflections on humorous moments. He will pull material from his blog, which was also released as a CD, "My Secret Public Journal Live." The web diary details Birbiglia's childhood stories with his easygoing wit.

"He is a man whose stage persona an affable, self-deprecating everyman who consistently gets into awkward situations and invariably says the wrong thing seems to be his real personality," said the New York Times.  The New York Post says "This clever New York comedian is on the cusp of comic greatnesshis observations on life- and panda bears- have created a cult following. With lines wrapped around the block for Birbiglia's shows. Soon it will be impossible to see this funnyman." 

Tickets are $22. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series box office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, or by calling (304) 696-6656 or (304) 523-5757. Patrons can also visit www.marshallartistsseries.org for ticket information. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets can also be purchased at any Ticketmaster location, including online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can also pick up tickets at FYE stores in the Huntington Mall and Ashland Town Center or the Macy's in the Charleston Town Center.

Mike Birbiglia's "I'm in the Future Also" is also sponsored by CSX Transportation, American Electric Power, Dr. Phil Zambos, WKEE, WAMX, The DAWG, BOB FM, The Planet, Magic 97.9, WKAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, WOWK, Marshall University and the College of Fine Arts.


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Monday September 14, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall art professor chosen for exhibition in Wisconsin

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Daniel Kaufmann, a photographer who just joined the art and design faculty in Marshall University's College of Fine Arts, has been chosen to participate in Residual Reality, an exhibition at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. The exhibition began Sept. 10 and will continue through Oct. 1.

"Residual Reality" presents photo collages, virtual environments, sculptures and video installations. It highlights artists such as Robert Heinecken, Joyce Neimanas and Ken Josephson, who are not photographers in the traditional sense but rather artists who used photographs to make art and invented visual images that are not documents of the world. While they do deal with existence and observation of the concrete, they use photography in ways that challenge process, rules and forms.

"Participating in the Residual Reality exhibition has been a wonderful opportunity for me, as an artist who enjoys pushing the boundaries of photography," Kaufmann said. "The range of participants in the exhibition represents artists who have challenged the medium of photography from the 1960s to the present."

Originally from north Florida, Kaufmann received his B.S. from Florida State University and his M.F.A. in Photography from the University of New Mexico. His most recent work explores the relationships among living spaces, construction of identity and consumerism. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including the Pingyao Photography Festival in China. 

"We're excited to bring someone of Daniel Kaufmann's caliber to the Department of Art and Design at Marshall University," said Byron Clercx, chair of Marshall's Department of Art and Design. "This rich exhibition features nationally renowned photographers with emerging new voices in the field, like Kaufmann's. Daniel's highly detailed photographs of domestic spaces challenge viewers to reconsider how (their) identity is constructed through metaphoric and material objects."

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Photos: (Left) Daniel Kaufmann, a new faculty member in the College of Fine Arts, has been chosen to participate in an exhibition at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. His project was titled "House Home" and each individual image was numbered, such as (Right) "House Home #5."


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Friday September 11, 2009
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West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals to convene at Marshall University as part of Constitution Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will observe Constitution Week 2009 with a variety of events on its Huntington campus, including the annual quoits tournament, a session by the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and the celebration of John Marshall's 254th birthday.

Although Constitution Week officially runs from Thursday, Sept. 17 (Constitution Day) through Thursday, Sept. 24 (John Marshall's birthday), the university has scheduled events from Monday, Sept. 14 through Sept. 24. The Supreme Court will convene at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 22 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center and hear arguments on the following cases:

  • State of West Virginia v. John R. Mullens; State of West Virginia v. Linda S. Sigler aka Linda S. Mullens

  • Charleston Town Center Co., LP v. The West Virginia HRC and Steven and Cynthia Bumpus; Charleston Town Center Co., LP v. The West Virginia HRC and August Robinson

  • State of West Virginia v. Michael E. Martin

  • State of West Virginia v. Ronnie Allen Rush

The roster and briefs for this session are posted on the Supreme Court's Web site - http://www.state.wv.us/wvsca/calendar/sept22_09ad.htm.

"It's an opportunity for people of our community, both on campus and off, to see the most important state court in operation," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of Marshall's John Deaver Drinko Academy, which sponsors Constitution Week activities at MU. "Also, the docket this year for the fall session contains some very interesting, if not significant, cases to be heard."

Gould said some new events have been added to the Constitution Week agenda at Marshall. The first of those is the presenting of the winners of the first Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 17 in the John Marshall Dining Room, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center.

Next is a panel discussion titled "Blogging and the potential limits of the First Amendment," moderated by Chief Justice Brent Benjamin. It begins at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 22 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center and is open to the public. Members of the panel include:

Lucy Dalglish, executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in Washington, D.C.; Gene Policinski, vice president and executive director of the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University; Howard J. Bashman, an appellate attorney in suburban Philadelphia who has a blog, howappealinglaw.com; Kevin Qualls, attorney and Professor of Media Law at Murray State University in Kentucky; and Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

The panel discussion will be streamed live on Marshall University's Web site (www.marshall.edu) and televised live on Comcast Channel 25.

Another new event, "Congress on Campus," features former Congressmen Dawson Mathis, a Democrat from Georgia, and Ed Foreman, a Republican from Texas. Mathis and Foreman will be on campus Wednesday, Sept. 23 and Thursday, Sept. 24, meeting with various student groups, including political organizations and honoraries.

Dr. Marybeth Beller, chair of Marshall University's Department of Political Science, said they also will visit two or three classrooms.

"The Congressmen are still very much involved in civic events," Beller said. "They travel the country to talk about civic engagement. The reason they come together is they want to make students aware of how precious our democracy is, and that it only works if people participate and communicate to their elected officials. Their message is about becoming an active citizen. They talk to people about being engaged in their government."

Traditional Constitution Week events begin at 9 a.m. Monday, Sept. 14 with "An introduction to the game of quoits" on the west end of Buskirk Field. Quoits is an ancient and little-known sport related to horseshoe pitching that dates back to the early days of Olympic discus throwers. Quoits are donut shaped and as literature from the Drinko Academy relates, "If you can play horseshoes, you can play quoits." Gould said quoits was John Marshall's favorite game.

Teams are forming now to play in a quoits tournament that begins Tuesday, Sept. 15 and concludes Thursday, Sept. 17. Marshall University faculty, staff and students may participate, and the deadline for team registration is 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 14. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/recsport/intramural.htm.

The President's Invitational Quoits Media Challenge, featuring Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and members of the media, will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 17. That event will be preceded at 11 a.m. by the cutting of the John Marshall Birthday Cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza.


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Friday September 11, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Autism Society of America - West Virginia Chapter Conference theme is 'Climbing Mountains to Inclusion'



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- The Autism Society of America - West Virginia Chapter (ASA-WV) 2009 Conference will take place Friday and Saturday, Sept. 18 and 19, at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington. Pre-conference workshops are planned for Thursday, Sept. 17.

Hosts of the conference are the Huntington Area Autism Society, the Autism Services Center and the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University. The theme of the conference is "Climbing Mountains to Inclusion."

Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person's ability to communicate and interact with others (Autism Society of America, 2009).

"With the alarming increases in the prevalence of this syndrome, there is a great need for information for families, educators and the community," said Barbara Becker-Cottrill, chair of the conference and executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University. "This conference will offer state of the art information about educating individuals with autism and great insight about living with this syndrome."

Pre-conference workshop topics include Early Intervention and Autism, with Jim Ball, Autism and Comprehensive Program Planning, with Shawn Henry, and Autism and Self-advocacy, with Stephen Shore.

The keynote speaker on Friday morning, Sept. 18 is Paula Kluth, a national expert on working with students with autism in inclusive settings, and the author of several nationally acclaimed books and films on the topic. A variety of sessions for parents and educators and others interested in learning more about autism will be held throughout the afternoon. These sessions will be conducted by recognized authorities in their topic areas from West Virginia.

Saturday's keynote speaker will be Stephen Shore.  As a child, Shore was diagnosed with "Atypical Development with strong autistic tendencies." Doctors recommended that he be institutionalized to receive the best treatment. Today, he is a professor at Adelphi University in New York, teaching courses on autism. Shore is an international speaker on autism and spoke at the United Nations on World Autism Awareness Day in April.

The conference will conclude on Saturday with a panel of individuals on the autism spectrum who will discuss their experiences living with autism.

"This conference will be an exceptional learning opportunity for families, educators, individuals with autism spectrum disorders and anyone who would like to learn about autism," Becker-Cottrill said. "Paula Kluth is a dynamic speaker who believes all people with autism can thrive and learn. Her presentation will highlight what she continues to learn from individuals with autism themselves." 

On Saturday, Shore will share his experiences growing up with autism, highlighting how he met the challenges, Becker-Cottrill said.

"He serves to remind us all that with a dedicated support system in place and hard work and determination, people on the autism spectrum can live high quality lives and be valued contributing members of society," she said. "If you hear both of these speakers, and the many other session speakers, you will truly be inspired."

The conference logo was developed by Misho Bills of Huntington, a 16-year-old artist with autism.

"Our logo is a great example of the many talents of our citizens with autism," Becker-Cottrill said. "Misho has many gifts and talents."

Online registration is at www.regonline.com/asawv2009. Registration is also available at the door.  For more information about the conference or the Autism Society of America - West Virginia Chapter, call 304-696-2332 or e-mail beckerco@marshall.edu.

 

Conference schedule

Pre-conference Workshop Day
Thursday, Sept. 17

8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., workshops:

  • Early Intervention and Autism, Jim Ball
  • Comprehensive Educational Planning for Students with Autism, Shawn Henry
  • Self-advocacy and Disclosure for People on the Autism Spectrum: A Lifespan Approach, Stephen Shore

Friday, Sept. 18

7 a.m. - Registration opens

7:30 a.m. - Exhibition/Vendor Room opens (Autism bookstore will be in the lobby on the second floor).

8:30 a.m. - Opening remarks

9 a.m. - Paula Kluth, keynote speaker: "We Thought You'd Never Ask: Voices From The Spectrum"

10:30 a.m. - Break

10:45 a.m. - Paula Kluth continues

11:45 a.m. - Break

Noon - ASA-West Virginia business meeting and lunch

1:30 p.m. - Concurrent sessions (topic areas):

  • Sensory that Makes Sense - Susan McKinley
  • Learning the Signs: Identifying the Early Indicators of Autism - Gloria Sage
  • Civil Rights that Protect People with Disabilities - David Stewart
  • Play and Autism - Erin Lash

2:45 p.m. - Break

3 p.m. - Concurrent sessions:

  • Building a Social Skills Club: A Pilot Project with The Break Ins - Peggy Hovatter, Andrew Nelson and the Rev. Richard Work, Jr.
  • Adults on the Autism Spectrum: Life After High School - Jimmie Beirne
  • Autism Treatment 101: ABA and Autism - Dr. Susannah Poe
  • What to Expect When Your Child Has Challenging Behavior - Dr. Jennifer McFarland-Whisman

4:15 p.m. - Adjourn

6:30 p.m. - ASA-West Virginia Awards Dinner Banquet, featuring stand-up comedy and dancing

Saturday, Sept. 19

7:30 a.m. - Registration and Exhibition area (including Autism bookstore) open

9 a.m. - Stephen Shore, keynote speaker: "Life on and Slightly to the Right of the Autism Spectrum: An Inside View Towards Success"

10:30 a.m. - Break

10:45 a.m. - Panel of people on the Autism Spectrum

Noon - Adjourn


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Thursday September 10, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

West Virginia professor's art on display beginning Sept. 14


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Symbiosis, an exhibit of artwork by Erika Osborne, will be displayed at the Birke Art Gallery on the Huntington campus of Marshall University through Oct. 8.

The show opens with a reception in the gallery on Monday evening, Sept. 14 from 5 to 8 p.m. Osborne will give a lecture concerning her work at 7 p.m. 

Osborne's artwork deals directly with cultural connections to place and environment.  She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards, locally, nationally and internationally. Her work has been highlighted in regional publications along with national art magazines such as Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine and Southwest Art Magazine.

Osborne received her B.F.A. from the University of Utah in painting and drawing and her M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico. As well as being a practicing artist, Osborne has dedicated herself to university-level art education.  Before accepting a position in the Division of Art and Design at West Virginia University in 2008, she taught environmentally based field courses at the University of New Mexico. Osborne has developed two similarly driven courses at West Virginia University titled Art and Environment and Place: Appalachia, which she teaches in addition to painting and drawing. 

Birke Art Gallery, located in Smith Hall, is open Mondays through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Monday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m.

For more information contact Jaye Ike, Special Projects Coordinator for Marshall's College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Thunder in the Mountains' features golf, music and food in conjunction with Marshall game at Virginia Tech

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Thunder in the Mountains," a weekend of golf, music and food, is planned Friday and Saturday in conjunction with Marshall University's football game at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va.

The events are sponsored by the Roanoke, Va., Alumni Club, the Marshall University Alumni Association and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation. The Thundering Herd plays the Hokies at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at Virginia Tech's Lane Stadium.

The special events begin Friday, Sept. 11 with a golf scramble at The Meadows Golf and Country Club located at 1111 Round Meadow Dr. in Christiansburg, Va. Registration begins at 11:30 a.m. and the tournament begins with a shotgun start at 12:30 p.m.

The cost is $60 per person or $240 per team. Lunch and drinks are included and prizes will be awarded for the longest drive, longest putt, closest to the pin and first-, second- and third-place teams.

For those not interested in golf, New Dimensions Salon and Day Spa is offering spa packages at a special rate. Persons may call 540-394-4040, ask for Ryane and tell her they are with the Marshall University Alumni Association to receive special packages.

The Hokie-Thunder Tailgate will take place from 7 to 11 p.m. Friday on Main Street in Christiansburg. The event features music, fun and sportsmanship. THE WORX, a favorite local band, will be playing along with other entertainment. The cost is $5 per person or $50 for a table that includes six block party tickets.

On game day, a tailgate party begins at 11:30 a.m. next to Cassell Coliseum, just a short walk from Lane Stadium on the Virginia Tech campus.

For more information or to make reservations for the golf tournament, a reserved table at Friday's Hokie-Thunder Tailgate or Saturday's tailgate party, call the Marshall University Alumni Office at 800-682-5869 or 304-696-2901.


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Wednesday September 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall community to observe minute of silence Friday, Sept. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University community are being asked to observe a minute of silence at 8:45 a.m. Friday, Sept. 11, in observance of the 8th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States on Sept. 11, 2001. The time was chosen to coincide with the approximate time of the attacks in 2001.

In Huntington, the campus bells will toll nine times, pause, then toll another eleven times to commemorate the month and day.

Of particular significance to Marshall University is the memory of Dr. Paul W. Ambrose, a graduate of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, who was aboard American Airlines Flight 77 when it crashed into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. Dr. Ambrose was at the time of his death senior clinical advisor with the office of the U.S. Surgeon General in Washington, D.C. He was the son of Dr. Kenneth Paul Ambrose, professor emeritus of sociology/anthropology at Marshall, and Sharon Ambrose, former chief operating officer at St. Mary's Hospital in Huntington.


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Wednesday September 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's annual Day of Service is Saturday, Sept. 12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Affairs and Student Government Association are sponsoring the university's annual Day of Service, an organized cleanup of the Huntington campus and the community, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12

UNI 101 and Honors 101 classes, along with student organizations, will participate, along with faculty and staff wanting to get involved in the cleanup.

"Day of Service is the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and the community to show their pride in Marshall University and the Huntington area," said Lisa Martin, coordinator of the event. "We have a variety of tasks from picking up trash to washing cars to raise funds for the United Way to creating get-well cards for hospitalized children. This event will help those who participate realize the importance of giving back to the community."  

Below is a list of projects, many off campus, for people to participate in on the Day of Service.

  • Huntington Community Gardens needs 25 people to weed, work on compost bins and waste center and various other manual tasks. People will meet at the Barnett Center at 1524 10th Ave. and will be dispersed from there to various other sites.

  • The MU Greenhouse directed by Marcia Harrison needs five people to clean up storage areas and clutter around the site.

  • Habitat for Humanity is looking for five people to participate in a build. They will meet at a specified site and need to call Nikki at 304-523-4822 two days in advance to verify the site.

  • The MU Child Development Academy located at 520 22nd St. needs approximately 22 people to shovel and spread mulch in the playground area, wipe down and disinfect chairs in a classroom, and various other tasks in the academy. 

  • Ebenezer Community Outreach Center located at 1660 8th Ave. needs 10 people to pull weeds around playgrounds, plant, and mulch.

  • Goodwill needs five people to work in the main office and in the store both in the Huntington and Barboursville locations.

  • Enslow needs approximately 10 people to weed around the Little League field.

  • Career Services at Marshall University needs one class of students to wash automobiles. Proceeds will benefit the United Way.

  • Marshall University needs an unlimited amount of people to write letters for St. Jude's Hospital. Students will have the opportunity to send letters out to their friends and family members asking them if they would like to help fight childhood cancer by donating to St. Jude. St. Jude will provide the written letters and students will fill out the names and addresses. The goal for the Huntington campus is to complete 1,000 letters. Participants will need to bring a list of addresses of people they know and will also be making get-well cards for the children in the hospital. They will meet in the Don Morris room, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center.

  • Hospitality House located at 2801 South Staunton Rd. will need an unlimited amount of people for miscellaneous projects.

Student Affairs and the SGA are currently accepting names and addresses for the St. Jude's letter writing campaign. Names and addresses may be submitted to Amy Saunders at saunde22@marshall.edu through Thursday.

Day of Service registration begins at 9 a.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza. A cookout for all participants will take place on the plaza following the service projects, and the Marshall-Virginia Tech football game will be shown on TVs inside the student center beginning at 1:30 p.m.


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Wednesday September 9, 2009
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, , 304-696-3490

Pets and Things is first winner of Marshall's Green Fridays business contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The first winner of the Green Fridays business contest sponsored by Marshall University is Pets and Things, located at 100 8th Ave. W. in Huntington.

The business was chosen on Friday, Sept. 4 from nearly 40 that registered for the Green Fridays business contest. The employees of local businesses and the entire Marshall community are encouraged to wear green on Fridays and show their support for the university throughout the promotion. The contest recognizes a business each Friday before a home football game and is still open for registration.

Pets and Things received four tickets to the Marshall football game with Southern Illinois on Saturday, Sept. 5; recognition in The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper; and recognition on the video board during the football game. Prizes also were given to all of their employees.

The next home game is Saturday, Sept. 19 against Bowling Green State University.

For more information on the contest, persons may contact Mallory Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.

 

 

Photo: Employees of Pets and Things, along with three Marshall University cheerleaders, pose outside their business in Huntington. Pets and Things is the first winner of the Green Fridays business contest, sponsored by Marshall University.


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Tuesday September 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington Alert - All Clear



The traffic closure and shelter in place related to the earlier contained chemical leak has now ended. All clear.
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Tuesday September 8, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Clay Center to host lunchtime seminar on plesiosaurs presented by Marshall University professor

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - As a complement to the Clay Center's giant screen film, "Sea Monsters," Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, a professor at Marshall University, will present a lunchtime lecture Wednesday called "Plesiosaurs: In the Field and in the Lab."

O'Keefe, a paleontologist whose research on plesiosaurs has taken him around the globe in search of these prehistoric creatures, will give the talk beginning at 12:15 p.m. in the Art Gallery at the Clay Center. The event is free and open to the public.

Most recently, O'Keefe was credited with the discovery of a new plesiosaur, Tatenectes laramiensis, a type of marine animal that lived during the late Jurassic age when large dinosaurs, including apatosaurus, stegosaurus and allosaurus, roamed the Earth. O'Keefe made the discovery in what is now the Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming.

His research was made possible by a $14,000 grant from National Geographic. O'Keefe will submit his study to National Geographic and, because the fossil was discovered on public lands, it will end up in the Smithsonian Institution.
 


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Friday September 4, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Twelve Marshall University psychology majors spending a year in Europe as part of Atlantis program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve Marshall University psychology majors departed this week for a year of study in Europe as participants in the U.S. Department of Education's Atlantis Dual Degree Exchange Program.

Following a semester at the University of Debrecen in Hungary, the students will spend the spring semester at the Warsaw (Poland) School of Social Sciences and Humanities.

"The students will receive not only their Marshall degrees, but they will also be able to earn a second B.A. degree from one of the European schools," said Dr. Joe Wyatt, a Marshall University professor in the Department of Psychology and the project's director.

The students are: Stacey Smith of Kenova; William Graham of Falling Waters; Luana Sizemore of Clay; Margaret Stephens of Leon; Cody Collins of Huntington; Pat Eckert of Daphney, Ala.; Crystal Woody of Oak Hill; Catrese Thomason of St. Albans; Christina Meade of Huntington; Kimberly White of Harts, Alex Mull of Glen Dale and Owen West of Nelsonville, Ohio.

Four students from the University of Debrecen are attending Marshall University this semester as part of the Atlantis program. They are Marta Jozsa, Andrea Kezer, Barbara Pete and Veronika Takacs.

Since 2007, 23 Marshall students have studied or are studying at the two partner schools, including the 12 who recently headed to Europe. During that time, 12 students from each partner school in Europe have attended, or are attending, Marshall University.

The dual degree program in psychology, announced in December 2006, was created thanks to a $1.27 million European Union-United States Atlantis grant. The grant was the first of its kind for Marshall University and the state of West Virginia. It funds collaborative efforts to develop programs of study leading to joint or dual undergraduate degrees.

"The program has been highly successful so far," Wyatt said. "Every student in the program is progressing toward earning the dual degrees, and one has completed the program.  He is Matt McGuire of Cross Lanes, West Virginia."

For more information, contact Wyatt at 304-696-2778.

-------------------------------

Photo: Pictured from left to right are Marshall students  Stacey Smith of Kenova; William Graham of Falling Waters; Luana Sizemore of Clay; Margaret Stephens of Leon; Cody Collins of Huntington; Pat Eckert of Daphney, Ala.; Crystal Woody of Oak Hill; Catrese Thomason of St. Albans; Christina Meade of Huntington; Kimberly White of Harts, Alex Mull of Glen Dale and Owen West of Nelsonville, Ohio. The students are spending a year in Europe as participants in the U.S. Department of Education's Atlantis Dual Degree Exchange Program.


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Friday September 4, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Automobiles must be removed from West Lot

The West Lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium needs to be cleared of all automobiles this evening, or at the latest by 9 a.m. Saturday, according to Jim Terry, Director of Public Safety. Terry said towing will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday if automobiles remain in the lot. Marshall plays its first football game of the season Saturday and the West Lot is needed for game parking.

 

 


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Friday September 4, 2009
Contact: Angela Jones, Marshall Artists Series, 304-696-3334

Individual tickets to all Marshall Artists Series 2009-2010 events go on sale Tuesday, September 8th at noon

by calling 304-696-6656

 

The wait is over! Individual tickets to all Marshall Artists Series 2009-2010 events will go on sale Tuesday, Sept. 8th at noon!  From Jean-Michel Cousteau's wondrous Ocean Adventure, to Tony-Award winning Broadway musicals full of toe tapping tunes, Michael Flatley's renowned Lord of the Dance, to a homecoming event like no other, the Marshall Artists Series has prepared a fantastic season with events for everyone! Get your tickets now!

 

Homecoming will be hilarious as MU's Alumni Office, MU's Student Activities Programming Board, and the Marshall Artists Series team up to bring Comedy Central's Mike Birbiglia to the Veterans Memorial Field House just in time for homecoming, on Friday, October 2, 2009 at 8 p.m.  Birbiglia achieved cult status with the release of his Comedy Central CD "Two Drink Mike," and the accompanying "Medium Man on Campus" college tour. He just finished a successful run off Broadway with his show "Sleepwalk with Me."  Mike is a talk show regular, the star of two Comedy Central Presents specials and broadcasts to millions on the nationally-syndicated "Bob & Tom Radio Show." Mike Birbiglia is also sponsored by CSX Transportation and AEP and Dr. Phil Zambos, WKEE, WAMX, Herald-Dispatch, WOWK, Marshal University, and the College of Fine Arts.  Tickets are $22.

 

Chesapeake Energy invites you to take a deep sea adventure with the son of the legendary ocean explorer, Jacques Cousteau.  Jean-Michel Cousteau, marine explorer, filmmaker, environmental advocate and educator brings- The Great Ocean Adventure -to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, Thursday, October 15, 2009 at 7 p.m.  In this multimedia "great ocean adventure," Cousteau will share his stories, photographs and videos from over 40 years of studying the world under the sea. Patrons of all ages will experience delight and awe as he fills the theater with ocean life, inspiring our audience to protect this precious resource. The Great Ocean Adventure's Educational Outreach sponsors include: The Cabell County Commission, Dr. Stephen Nicholas, Trainer Wright & Paterno, Delegate Kevin Craig, McVay Realty, WV Dept. of Education & the Arts Kay Goodwin, Cabinet Secretary, WKEE, WVHU, WTCR, WSAZ, Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts A.  Adult Tickets are $50/ $45/ $40.

 

The Law Office of Doug Reynolds, American Babbitt Bearing, Pritchard Electric, and Chapman Printing Company present Broadway's smash hit Avenue Q on Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 8 p.m., at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Winner of Best Musical, Best Score and Best Book at the 2004 Tony Awards, Avenue Q is a hilarious show full of heart and hummable tunes about trying to make it in New York City with big dreams and a tiny bank account. Called "one of the funniest shows you're ever likely to see," Avenue Q features a cast of people and puppets who tell the story in a smart, risqu and downright entertaining way. Avenue Q is recommended for ages 13 and up.  Sponsored by WKEE, WTCR, WOWK, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts.  Adult Tickets are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

Ring-a ding-ding in the holiday season as The Rat Pack is Back! - Here for the Holidays comes to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Monday, November 30, 2009 at 8 p.m.  The swingin', free-wheelin' and festive sounds of Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Martin and Joey Bishop will certainly get you in the mood for the holiday season! The Rat Pack is Back - Here for the Holdays features uncanny vocal recreations, unbridled humor, and a hot, live orchestra featuring the original Rat Pack arrangements that will send the audience back to the coolest time in history.  The Rat Pack is Back Here for the Holidays is sponsored by Huntington Federal, Boggs Roofing, Verizon, Neighborgall Construction, Air Systems Inc., Kendall York Dentistry, WKEE, WVHU, WSAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts.  Adult Tickets are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

Cabell Huntington Hospital proudly presents CATS in its first appearance at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Monday and Tuesday, February 8 & 9, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. Winner of seven Tony Awards including Best Musical, CATS is the longest running show in Broadway's history and features 20 of Andrew Lloyd Webber's timeless melodies including the hit "Memory."  There's no better way to introduce your family to the wonders of live theatre than with the magic, the mystery and the memory of CATS! CATS is also sponsored by Heiner's Bakery, The Touma Foundation, University Physicians & Surgeons, WV Higher Education Policy Commission, WV Department of Education, WKEE, B-97 The Herald-Dispatch, WSAZ, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts.  Adult Tickets for CATS are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

Celebrate the first lady of television in An Evening with Lucille Ball: "Thank You for Asking" directed by Lucie Arnaz, Tuesday, February 23, 2010 at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. This touching, funny and uplifting play is written and performed by actress and renowned impressionist, Suzanne LaRousch, in association with Lucie Arnaz and Laurence Luckinbill. The evening recreates the comic genius and the magic behind the "Queen of Comedy". Lucy guides us through a lifetime of personal memories inspiring her timeless sketches on "I Love Lucy, her 30-year television career and never-before heard personal recollections about her tempestuous and complicated marriage to Cuban bandleader turned impresario, Desi Arnaz.  An Evening with Lucille Ball: "Thank You for Asking" is sponsored by First Sentry Bank, Farrell Farrell & Farrell, Dr. Jeff & Mrs. Brooke Leaberry, WKEE, WSAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts. Adult Tickets are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

St. Mary's Medical Center and HIMG are proud to present Mozart's Masterpiece Don Giovanni, with 30 piece orchestra, on Monday, March 15, 2010 at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Hailed by many as the greatest of all operas, Don Giovanni is based on the true-life escapades of Don Juan of Seville, an aristocratic lothario who lived during the 1600s.  The full-scale production features beautiful sets and costumes and a cast of soloists who are excellent actors as well as first class singers. Don Giovanni is performed in original Italian with English supertitles.  Don Giovanni is also sponsored by WKEE, WOWK, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts. Adult Tickets are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

Beford Auto is proud to present Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance on Thursday, April 22, 2010 at 7:30 pm bringing a mesmerizing blend of traditional and modern Celtic music and dance to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a showpiece extravaganza," the story is based upon mythical Irish folklore as Don Dorcha - Lord of Darkness, challenges the ethereal Lord of Light - The Lord of the Dance.  Battle lines are drawn, passions ignite and a love story is fueled by the dramatic leaps and turns of dancers' bodies against a backdrop of Celtic rhythm. Described by The New York Post as "fascinating and entertaining!" Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance is also sponsored by City National Bank, WV Lottery, Huntington Testing & Technology, River Cities Anesthesia, WKEE, WTCR, WOWK, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and COFA. Adult Tickets are $55/ $50/ $45.

 

As if that isn't enough excitement, don't miss the Fall and Spring International Film Festivals!  The Marshall Artists Series makes it their goal to bring world renowned and critically acclaimed films from all over the world to the big screen of the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center.  Film show times vary. The Fall and Spring International Film Festivals are sponsored by BB & T, Hooters, Cabell Huntington Convention & Visitors Bureau, WKEE, WVHU, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and the College of Fine Arts. Season passes are available in advance for $70. Individual tickets are not sold in advance; rather, they are available at the theatre 15 minutes prior to each film and are $7 per film. 

 

The Fall International Film Festival will be held November 6 8, 2009 at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center and will feature the following films:

 

Food Inc. (USA) Documentary film maker Robert Kenner uses reports by Fast Food Nation author Eric Schlosser, and The Omnivore's Dilemma author Michael Pollan as a springboard to exploring where the food we purchase at the grocery store really comes from, and what it means for the health of future generations.

 

Rudo y Cursi (Mexico) Beto and Tat Verdusco are brothers who work at a banana plantation as well as play soccer for their village team.  Beto dreams of becoming a professional soccer player; Tato's dream is to be a famous singer, and they both dream of building a house for their mother.  Things begin to turn around for them when the two are discovered by a professional soccer scout, until they move to Mexico City on rival soccer teams. 

 

The Song of Sparrows (Iran) Fired from his job on an ostrich farm after one of the birds runs away and he is blamed for the loss, a man becomes so obsessed with collecting useless rubbish that he begins to neglect his wife and daughter while becoming completely oblivious to their familial hardships. Every day, Karim returns home with a new haul of useless junk. When his wife offers a spare door from the courtyard to a neighbor in need, Karim completely loses his cool and sets out to retrieve the door. When Karim stumbles and breaks his foot while rummaging through his second-hand goods, the kindness of neighbors makes him realize that his priorities have taken a turn for the worse.

 

Waltz with Bashir (Israel) The animated, quasi documentary follows Director Ari Folman's attempt to decipher the horrors that unfolded one night in September of 1982, when Christian militia members massacred more than 3,000 Palestinian refugees in the heart of Beirut as Israeli soldiers surrounded the area.

 

Summer Hours (France) The divergent paths of three forty something siblings collide when their mother, heiress to her uncle's exceptional 19th century art collection, dies suddenly.  Left to come to terms with themselves and their differences, Adrienne (Juliette Binoche) a successful New York designer, Fredric, an economist and university professor in Paris, and Jeremie, a dynamic businessman in China, confront the end of childhood, their shared memories, background and unique vision of the future.

 

The Country Teacher (Czech Republic) A gifted and well qualified young teacher takes a job teaching natural sciences at a grammar school in the country.  He begins to form a strong friendship with a woman and her troubled son, but when the ex-boyfriend of the teacher comes to visit, a series of events go into motion - testing the inner strength of the teacher, woman and her son, to a breaking point,

 

The Spring International Film Festival will be held March 5 7, 2010 at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center and will feature the following films:

 

Burma VJ: Reporting from A Closed Country (Belgium)  Risking torture and life imprisonment, VJs (video journalists) vividly document the brutal clashes of Burma when peaceful Buddhist Monks lead a massive rebellion, protesting a cruel dictatorship that has held the country hostage for more than 40 years.  The VJs vividly document the cruel clashes with the military and undercover police even after they themselves become targets of the authorities. 

 

The Girl from Monaco (France) In this comic thriller, a brilliant and neurotic attorney goes to Monaco to defend a famous criminal.  But, instead of focusing on the case, he falls for Audrey, a beautiful she devil, who turns him into complete wreck.  Will he ever climb out of this mess?

 

Departures (Japan) Daigo is a talented musician, but when his orchestra is abruptly disbanded, he suddenly finds himself without a source of steady income. Moving back to his own small town, Daigo answers a classified ad for a company called "Departures," mistakenly thinking he will be working for a travel agency. He soon discovers his new job is to prepare bodies of the deceased for their trip into the afterlife.

 

The Lemon Tree (Israel) This personal drama gives way to political controversies as Salma, a widow who grows and sells lemons from ancestral trees on the West Bank of Palestine, forms an unexpected relationship with the Israeli Prime Minister's lonely wife.

 

Flow: For the Love of Water (USA) This documentary investigates one of the most important political and environmental issues of the 21st Century The World Water Crisis begging the question "Can anyone really own water?" FLOW give viewers a look at the people and institutions providing practical solutions to water crisis and those developing new technologies which are fast becoming blueprints for a successful global and economic turnaround.

 

Lake Tahoe (Mexico) Fleeing, teenage Juan crashes his family's car into a telegraph pole on out the outskirts of town, little does he know he's just stepped into an adventure full of absurd, and bewildering characters that have become the very thing he needs to get him back on the road, the road to accepting the very thing he's been running away from.

 

Ticketing Information

The Marshall Artists Series 2009 2010 season is jam packed with a plethora of extraordinary performances, sure to please one and all.  Adult ticket prices are listed with each event.  For most shows, The Marshall Artists Series offers a 20% discount for youth ages 17 and under.  Call 304-696-6656 for youth ticket details. Tickets may be purchased with a major credit card by calling the Box Office at (304)-696-6656, or calling Ticketmaster at (304)-523-5757.   Tickets can also be purchased in person at the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, open Monday Friday, noon 5 P.M, or at any Ticketmaster ticket center.  Tickets may also be purchased online at www.marshallartistsseries.org, or www.ticketmaster.com.


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Thursday September 3, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall research community to benefit from $2.6 million federal stimulus award to state

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University researchers and students will benefit from a $2.6 million National Science Foundation grant to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

The cyberinfrastructure award, which was announced earlier this week by U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller and West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin, will assist with scientific discovery by building capacity and promoting the use of high-performance computing cluster resources at Marshall University, West Virginia University and West Virginia State University.

More than $1 million of the grant funds will be used at Marshall over the next three years to help upgrade computing networks and enhance immersive visualization capabilities.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, professor of engineering and director of the university's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences, will coordinate the project on Marshall's campus. Other members of the Marshall community who are involved include Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer; Joseph Fuller, associate professor of  computer science; Dr. Venkat Gudivada, professor of  computer science; and Dr. Jack Smith, visualization manager.

According to Dr. John Maher, vice president for research and executive director of the Marshall University Research Corporation, the grant will be used to establish advanced high-performance computing and visualization resources at Marshall and to assist with connection to other high-performance computing systems and resources around the world, allowing faculty researchers - and their students - to collaborate in real time without geographic limitations.

"Engineering and scientific research today require computing infrastructure that will allow faculty to work with very large data sets and complex computational systems. This project will give our researchers tools to make them more competitive for outside funding, and will allow them to work with colleagues across the country and around the world," said Maher. "We are pleased to be part of this collaborative."

Fox added that the computerized visualization capabilities provided through the grant will help faculty communicate and explore both abstract and concrete ideas in health care and scientific and engineering research.

"By providing computing power that was, until recently, available only to the most prestigious research institutions, this project will assist Marshall's growing research community in its quest to address problems that require the minds and resources of a global, collaborative community," she said. "From the development of approaches to real-time, image-guided surgery to the provision of a platform for management of communities, emergencies and other complex processes, the capabilities provided by this funding will have a long-term, positive impact on our community, state and nation."

In addition to the research equipment that will be provided through the grant, the project will help develop a work force that can create and sustain cyber-based systems, tools and services. A network of faculty and information technology professional staff will be developed at Marshall to help researchers expand the use of high-performance computing and advanced visualization in their work, as well as to provide expertise on the operational and technical aspects of using supercomputing resources.

"Cyberinfrastructure includes computational systems, data and information management, visualization environments and people - all linked together by collaborative software and advanced networks," said Szwilski. "These significant resources will be a catalyst at Marshall for technology innovation and economic development."

He added that complementary outreach activities will be undertaken at the high school, undergraduate and graduate levels to help teach students computational science and visualization skills, also with the goal of developing a high-tech work force.

The award was funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. For more information, contact Szwilski at szwilski@marshall.edu.

###


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Wednesday September 2, 2009
Contact: Pat Dickson, Coordinator of Media and Community Relatios, 304-746-1971

Marshall University business graduate student member of winning team in research project competition of Beta Alpha Psi

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University student in the Lewis College of Business was a member of a four-person team that recently took first place in a research project competition at the annual national meeting of Beta Alpha Psi, an honorary organization for financial information students and professionals.

Max Billmyer, a graduate student from Martinsburg, W.Va., was one of only 60 students who were selected internationally to take part in the competition, "Project Run With It," which was held in New York City in August. Tyler Rowland, president of the Marshall chapter, was selected to serve on a separate panel.

Fifteen panels were directed to conduct research and then make recommendations for three nonprofit organizations in the New York City area which were seeking help in solving financial problems. Five teams were assigned to each agency.

Each member of the first-place team received $1,000 which will go to his or her chapter.

"Our team was assigned to the Arts and Business Council of New York (ABCNY). We spent a full day doing research and then made a presentation to a panel of judges," Billmyer said.  "Since this was on the national level, winning the award was great exposure for not only the Lewis College of Business but for Marshall as well."

Among other things, the ABCNY was looking for ways to save money on their Web site while making it more user friendly and conducive to drawing in new business sponsors.  Billmyer's team concentrated on coming up with recommendations that would increase ABCNY's membership, which was their overall goal, while addressing other concerns.

"It was a good opportunity to interact with others who were from all parts of the country," Billmyer said.  "The research we did was all about helping nonprofit groups.  It was a great learning opportunity."

Marshall faculty member Amanda Thompson-Abbot, who accompanied the group to the conference, said, "Beta Alpha Psi is a first-class professional organization and I am honored to be one of their faculty advisors. I am proud of the students' accomplishments in New York at the national meeting. They represented Marshall University and the Lewis College of Business well and I feel they will continue to achieve great success in their future professional careers.  With this in mind, I recommend that all students who are eligible to join become members, because this organization can ultimately take them from students to polished professionals."

This year was Marshall's first to participate in "Project Run With It."

More than 1,200 students from 235 schools were represented at the conference, which included representatives from Australia and New Zealand.  In addition to Billmyer, Rowland and Thompson-Abbott, LCOB student Alex Kovarik also attended from Marshall.

Beta Alpha Psi is an honorary organization that recognizes students in the fields of accounting, finance and information systems.  Students must have a high GPA to get in, which they must maintain, and they must do 40 hours of professional development and 40 hours of community service each year to remain members in good standing.  Only schools which are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) are eligible to have chapters.

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Photo: Marshall University representatives (from left) Max Billmyer, Amanda Thompson-Abbott, Tyler Rowland and Alex Kovarik attended the Beta Alpha Psi annual national meeting recently.


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Wednesday September 2, 2009
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Marshall University creates Sustainability Department; Margie J. Phillips to lead environmental efforts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has established a Sustainability Department and has appointed Margie J. Phillips to lead the University's environmental and energy efficiency efforts, Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Phillips has served as Marshall University's Energy Analyst for more than 12 years. She began her job as Sustainability Manager this week.

Kopp said the Sustainability Department at Marshall will help the University look for ways to conserve water and energy, reduce waste and incorporate green technologies and materials into its planning and operations.

"Universities can have a significant, positive impact on the environment through the incorporation of sustainable practices. We are under increasing pressure from our governments, students and communities to lessen our environmental footprint and we take that obligation seriously," Kopp said. "It is important for Marshall to have an accessible office with a leader who will keep us moving forward as we look for ways to become more environmentally sustainable.

"This goal is more than just what type of light bulbs we purchase or the volume of paper we recycle. Those things are important, but I am certain that the economic, social and environmental benefits of a sustainable Marshall University will reach far beyond the physical boundaries of our campuses and into our communities, region and, ultimately, our state. I am excited to see the effect that this department office will have on the entire Marshall University Community."

Phillips has been affiliated with Marshall University since 1977 as a student, staff or part-time faculty member. She earned a Regents Bachelor of Arts degree in 1995, a master's degree in safety in 1996, and currently is pursuing an Education Specialist degree in adult and technical education with a minor in environmental geography.

Phillips will be involved in all aspects of sustainability on campus encouraging environmental responsibility in every corner of the University from purchasing decisions to landscaping and cleaning products to lighting fixtures. She said she is particularly excited to work with environmentally passionate students to develop worthwhile energy-saving initiatives.

"My pledge is to continue to research and develop methods to save energy while enhancing and preserving the environment for our community," Phillips said. "I've seen the desire to be environmentally responsible in our students; I hear it in the voices of our faculty and staff; and I know we can work together to discover feasible ways to lessen the environmental footprint of the University."

Mark Cutlip, director of Marshall University's Physical Plant, says Phillips' promotion to Sustainability Manager is a natural progression for her and a great fit for the University.

"She has been tracking utility usage and researching ways to save on utility costs since she started at Marshall," Cutlip said. "She has saved the University thousands of dollars and has obtained several grants to finance energy efficiency projects on the Huntington Campus. She dearly loves Marshall University and has a passion for environmental responsibility and I am certain she will inspire good environmental stewardship in all of us."

The Sustainability Department will be located within the University's Physical Plant. A portion of Phillips' salary will come from the student-initiated Green Fee, which was proposed by members of the Student Sierra Coalition and the Student Government Association during an SGA-sanctioned election in 2008. The initiative was presented by President Kopp on behalf of the students and passed by the Board of Governors this summer. The $5 student fee also will be used to fund sustainability projects on campus. A group of students, faculty and staff, called the Greening Marshall Committee, will make recommendations for projects to Phillips.

For more information, contact Phillips at 304-696-2992.


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Tuesday September 1, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University students earn national honors for media work

INDIANAPOLIS - Two students with Marshall University's campus media earned top awards at the Society of Professional Journalists national Mark of Excellence ceremony Aug. 28.

Adam Cavalier, a graduate journalism student from Montgomery, W.Va., and station manager for WMUL-FM, won first place for radio news reporting with his story about The Big Dipper, the historic roller coaster at Camden Park. Cavalier produced the story while an undergraduate student.

Erin Felton, a graduate Master of Arts in Teaching student from St. Albans, was the national finalist in the editorial cartoon category for her work in The Parthenon.

Cavalier began his media career doing public-address play-by-play at Charleston Catholic High School while a student. He received the first Jim Nantz award in June for best college sportscaster in the nation.

"It is thrilling to pick up a national SPJ award," Cavalier said.  "We've had so many entries come close in years past, but it truly is wonderful to break through and pick up the gold."

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists.  This recognition for WMUL-FM's Adam Cavalier in SPJ's National Mark of Excellence contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, radio-television professor and WMUL adviser.

Felton began her art career under the tutelage of her aunt, Vicki Boatright, who owns an art studio in Ohio. "My aunt is the artist, so she facilitated a lot of painting," Felton said.

Felton's strip, Think Outside the Sidewalk, began as an occasional strip while she was an undergraduate creative writing student. The main character was a slug.

After a hiatus, she resumed the strip a year ago and began integrating other animals and humans as characters. The strip reflects her dual interests of politics and art, she said. She prefers pictures over words for her college audience because students likely shy away from extracurricular reading.

"I try to be equal, but I think it's pretty obvious that it tends toward the left," she said.  Whether it's a young snail moving into dorm housing or two children seeking a bailout for their lemonade stand, Felton said she looks for a different way to make her point.

"Erin's genius is her simplicity," said Nerissa Young, adviser to The Parthenon. "She takes a complex message and reduces it to a simple sketch and simple message in just one pane. Many cartoonists need multiple panes to tell a story."

"Winning these awards shows that Marshall's campus media are providing quality content for the campus and community. Our students regularly compete against larger and better-funded universities. The big winners in the competition were the University of Maryland and Arizona State University," said Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Presented since 1972, the Mark of Excellence Awards honor the best work from college students, members of SPJ or not. Students may submit work from campus media, internships or jobs. SPJ is divided into 12 regions for U.S. territories and the 50 states. West Virginia is in Region 4. First-place winners in each region advance to the national competition. The contest includes 39 categories for print, radio, television and online journalism. This year, judges narrowed more than 3,600 entries to a winner and one or two national finalists in each category.

Founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi, SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and to educate the next generation of journalists; and protects the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press. SPJ has more than 230 professional and campus chapters.

----------------------------------

Photo, left to right: Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, radio-television professor and WMUL adviser; Adam Cavalier, first-place winner in radio news reporting; Nerissa Young, print professor and The Parthenon adviser; Erin Felton, national finalist in editorial cartooning; and Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

 


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Tuesday September 1, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans encouraged to wear green on National College Colors Day and on Green Fridays throughout the season

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Loyal Marshall University faculty, staff, students, alumni and fans choose a variety of ways to show their support for the Thundering Herd. One of the most popular ways of displaying their allegiance is to wear Marshall green to university events.

On Friday, Sept. 4, the day before Marshall opens the 2009 football season at Joan C. Edwards Stadium against Southern Illinois University, the entire Marshall community is encouraged to participate in the fifth annual National College Colors Day and wear green in support of the Thundering Herd.

College Colors Day, organized by the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), coincides with "back to school" and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics. By participating in College Colors Day, Marshall University is continuing a tradition of encouraging members of the Marshall community to wear their Marshall gear for the event.

Marshall University employees are encouraged to show their spirit on campus by participating in Green Fridays. The university is also asking the Huntington community to continue to take part in Green Fridays throughout the fall by wearing green to show their Thundering Herd pride. In addition, employees of local businesses may take part in a contest in which they wear their Marshall gear. The winning businesses will receive prize packages from the university.

For more information on Green Fridays and the contest for businesses, contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Monday August 31, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Herdfest' to kick off 2009 season of Thundering Herd football

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Herdfest," the official kickoff for Marshall University's 2009 football season, will take place at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 3, under the marquee of the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on 4th Avenue.

The event is hosted by 93.7 FM, The Dawg, and precedes by two days the Thundering Herd's season-opening football game. Marshall plays host to Southern Illinois at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 5 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The flagship station for Marshall University athletics will celebrate the start of the Thundering Herd football season with a party featuring Marshall football Coach Mark Snyder, Herd cheerleaders, street vendors, inflatables for children and beach music from The Tams.

Participants also include Mayor Kim Wolfe, the Marching Thunder Pep Band, Marco and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.

Entertainment, in addition to the pep band and The Tams, will be provided by the 14 Karat Gold Band.

The Dawg  will begin an on-site live remote at 6 p.m. with several give-away items including official Herdfest t-shirts. The 14 Karat Gold Band will perform at 7 p.m.

At 8 p.m., a caravan with Snyder, the cheerleaders, Marco, and the pep band will depart Gino's Pub at the conclusion of the coach's first call-in show of the season. At 8:20 p.m., the pep band will perform in front of the main stage on 4th Avenue. Then, each of the dignitaries will briefly address the crowd of Herd fans and family, concluding with the famous "We Are ... Marshall" cheer. The Tams, with their patented brand of high-energy music, choreography, and showmanship, will perform at 9 p.m.

" 'Herdfest' " has been in the works since early last winter. Our company working with Marshall to insure a quality event is always a pleasure," said Mike Kirtner, president of Kindred Communications, parent company of 93.7 FM, The Dawg. "Our biggest promotions always involve Marshall, and this one will not be an exception."

The official Marshall football kickoff festival is being provided at no charge to the public.

"This event is a gift from Marshall and our company to the community and those that support Marshall University," Kirtner said. "We want this to be a special night for everyone that attends."

Kindred is working with the Marshall University Department of Athletics, the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association to present the event. Sponsors include Marshall University, St. Mary's Hospital, Atomic Distributing, the Marshall University Alumni Association, Kindred Communications, the City of Huntington, and MPE Entertainment.

"Herdfest" will represent the conclusion of Kindred Communications' "Celebrate Huntington" Concert Series. The locally-owned broadcasting company, with five other signals on the air in Huntington and the Herd Insider magazine, has hosted monthly concerts since May featuring famous musical acts, beginning with The Drifters and ending with The Tams.

The City of Huntington will close 4th Avenue at 5 p.m. at both 10th Street and 9th Street for "Herdfest."

All proceeds from Herdfest will benefit the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.


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Monday August 31, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

MIIR seminar series to kick off with free program by counterterrorism expert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The role and limitations of science and technology in addressing security challenges facing the human race will be the focus of an upcoming program featuring internationally recognized counterterrorism expert Houston T. "Terry" Hawkins, senior fellow and director of Department of Defense Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

The event, which is the first in a series of public seminars to be hosted by the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), will take place Thursday, Sept. 17, at the St. Mary's Center for Education at the corner of 5th Avenue and 29th Street in Huntington. A reception will be held from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The program will begin at 6:30 p.m.

A retired U.S. Air Force colonel, Hawkins has been at Los Alamos since 1988. He is a widely recognized specialist on modern terrorism - particularly terrorism involving the potential use of weapons of mass destruction - and has given invited lectures worldwide.

At Los Alamos, he has led major scientific and technical programs aimed at detecting, preventing and reversing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the use of those weapons by international terrorists.

"Col. Hawkins is the perfect guest to kick off our seminar series about the relationship among culture, technology and society," said Dr. Eric Kmiec, director of MIIR and the institute's lead research scientist. "From research on biological agents like anthrax and viruses like the flu to cyberwarfare to space exploration, he has experience on the front lines of some of the most pressing public safety issues of our time. I have heard him speak before and our audience is in for a fascinating, thought-provoking program."

Hawkins has received numerous awards and recognition for his work, including the Chief Justice Earl Warren Medallion, the Aviation Week and Space Technology 2000 Laurel Award, the Valley Forge Freedoms Foundation Medal, the Legion of Merit, two Defense Superior Service medals, two Air Force Superior Service medals, an Air Force Commendation Medal and numerous other service medals.

He has earned degrees from Clemson University, the National Defense University and LaSalle Extension University School of Law.

Co-sponsors of the event include Huddleston Bolen LLP and St. Mary's Center for Education.

The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are requested.

For more information or to make reservations, contact Keely Martin at martin192@marshall.edu or 304-696-3830.

MIIR was created through the state's "Bucks for Brains" research trust fund. The institute's goal is to become a self-sustaining enterprise through entrepreneurship and commercialization of scientific discoveries, while enhancing economic development, advancing intellectual infrastructure and increasing employment opportunities in the state and region.


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Wednesday August 26, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall faculty awarded $750,000 grant to continue program to diversify science and engineering faculty



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- A group of faculty members at Marshall University has been awarded $750,000 by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to continue a successful initiative to increase the number of female science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) faculty members at the university.

Dr. Marcia A. Harrison, professor of biological sciences and the principal investigator on the grant, will use the funds to further innovative recruitment, retention and policy efforts undertaken at the university over the past three years.

The Marshall University (MU)-ADVANCE program was established in 2006 with a $1.2 million grant awarded through NSF's Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers (ADVANCE) program. The new funding will extend the program for two additional years.

Harrison's MU-ADVANCE co-investigators include Dr. Beverly C. Delidow, associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology; Dr. Patricia Y. Logan, associate professor of information technology and engineering; Dr. Elizabeth E. Murray, associate professor of integrated science and technology; and Dr. Judith A. Silver, professor of mathematics.

During the initial phase of the project, Harrison and her colleagues worked with teams of faculty, staff and administrators to analyze and review existing barriers to the success of female STEM faculty, and to develop new programs and policies to increase the representation and advancement of women.

"We are exceedingly pleased to have received this additional funding for our project," said Harrison. "The ADVANCE program nationally is quite competitive, so this extension demonstrates that NSF believes what we are doing here at Marshall is working. We now plan to turn our attention to sustaining our efforts long term by ensuring continued growth and institutionalization of the program."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp congratulated MU-ADVANCE leaders for the recent milestone.

"On behalf of the entire Marshall University community, I salute Dr. Harrison and her co-investigators for securing this significant additional funding for MU-ADVANCE," he said. "The successes of this exemplary program in large part are due to the exceptional leadership and commitment Marcia and her colleagues have brought to this important initiative. I truly look forward to working with them to continue the momentum ADVANCE has created across our campus."

Dr. John Maher, vice president for research and executive director of the Marshall University Research Corporation, added, "Dr. Harrison and her colleagues are to be indeed commended. I've been pleased to work with them on a number of faculty development initiatives related to the MU-ADVANCE program and know firsthand how dedicated they are to this project. Their work has been truly transformative and it has been a pleasure to watch the program grow and succeed."

According to the NSF, women continue to be significantly underrepresented in almost all science and engineering fields. In fact, although 41 percent of all faculty members at Marshall are women, only 27 percent of STEM faculty members are female.

Research indicates that the lack of women's full participation in science and engineering academic careers is unrelated to their ability, interest and technical skills, but is more often a systemic consequence of the culture and organizational structure at institutions of higher education. Difficulty balancing work and family demands also plays a key role.

The national ADVANCE program supports projects, like the one at Marshall, to help institutions transform long-standing practices and academic climate that discourage women from pursuing careers in high-tech fields.

According to Harrison, the ultimate goal of the program is a change in institutional culture that will benefit all faculty members - men and women - across all disciplines and all departments. She said the strategies that work to recruit, retain and promote women in STEM academic positions also improve the situation for other underrepresented groups such as racial/ethnic minorities and people with disabilities, as well as for men who now enter the workforce with a greater interest in and expectation for work-life balance.

She added that the programs and policies developed through the MU-ADVANCE program will be shared with other institutions in the state with hopes of enabling similar transformative change on those campuses.

In addition, she said, the MU-ADVANCE goal of increasing the number of female faculty members in science and technology fields represents broader impacts both by providing much-needed role models for West Virginia's young, female students and by providing an additional economic development stimulus.

"Our programs help female faculty members balance and integrate their teaching and service commitments, while building competitive research programs," said Harrison. "This additional research activity has the potential to increase external funding, providing the region and state with economic development advantages."

Harrison's award was funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. For more information about MU-ADVANCE, contact Harrison at harrison@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/mu-advance.

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Photo: Working in a lab in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center are Marshall University faculty members, from left, Dr. Elizabeth E. Murray, Dr. Marcia A. Harrison, Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, Dr. Beverly C. Delidow and Dr. Judith A. Silver. Harrison is the principal investigator on a National Science Foundation grant of $750,000 awarded to a group of faculty members that includes Murray, Harrison, Delidow,  Silver and Dr. Patricia Y. Logan, who is not pictured. Dasgupta, an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, is a participant in the MU-ADVANCE initiative, which benefits from the grant.


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Monday August 24, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Marshall University's Equestrian Team schedules tryouts last weekend in August



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.- The Marshall University Equestrian Team (MUET) will have tryouts beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, at Royal Winds Farm in Ona.

Team coach Bille Rae Graham says all undergraduate students - beginner, intermediate or advanced - are eligible to join the team, which focuses mainly on hunt seat style riding. Tryouts for the 2009-2010 academic year are mainly to help Graham place riders in the appropriate division, she said.

"We have something for riders at every level, so tryouts are more of a formality," Graham said. "Mostly, I think it's just important for students - those who have been riding throughout their lives as well as those who are just getting started - to know that just because they are coming to college, it doesn't mean they have to pack their helmets and riding boots away in the attic. There is an opportunity at Marshall to continue your equestrian pursuits."

Students must schedule a time to ride during the formal tryout or, if they have a scheduling conflict, they can set up another day and time. Graham may be reached at 304-208-3130,  raverajax@aol.com, or through the MUET Facebook page.

MUET is recognized by the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association, which promotes competition for riders of all skill levels that compete individually and as teams at regional, zone and national levels. The association was founded on the principle that any college student should be able to participate in horse shows regardless of his or her financial status or riding level. Emphasis is on learning, sportsmanship and fun. Students do not have to bring their own horses to participate.

"A club like this is a great way to meet fellow students with similar interests," Graham said. "And if students don't ride hunter style riding, this is a great opportunity to learn something different and stretch themselves as riders."

To prepare for competitions, team riders are required by IHSA to take one weekly lesson with Graham and pay membership fees and team dues for the club sport. The IHSA attempts to eliminate the expense of students owning horses, so team members ride horses that are furnished by a host college and chose their mounts by drawing lots. The theory behind this structure is to equalize variables of the competition and test the true horsemanship of the contestants. Classes range from Walk/Trot for first-year students to the Open Division for the more experienced.

During the past academic year, the fledgling MUET had two members that rode to a fifth-place finish in its region, which includes Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana region. Other colleges in Zone 6 Region 2 are Midway College, Morehead State University, Northern Kentucky University, Ohio University Southern, University of Cincinnati, University of Kentucky, University of Louisville and Xavier University.


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Friday August 21, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall University projects significant increase in enrollment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Based on initial projections before the start of the 2009 fall semester, Marshall University anticipates a significant increase in enrollment for the coming academic year.

The number of overall full-time students has increased by 3.5 percent over last year. Also, the number of new, first-time freshmen has increased by 11 percent over last year's count of 1,686, including an increase of approximately 200 new freshmen from West Virginia.

Students began moving in this morning and the first class of the fall semester begins at 8 a.m. Monday.

"We are extremely pleased that, despite tough economic times, Marshall University is seeing an increase in both our overall and freshman enrollment," President Stephen J. Kopp said. "These increases are an indication of the quality of education offered by Marshall University and the hard work by our Offices of Recruitment and Admissions, and our faculty and staff. More and more people are realizing that a degree from Marshall University will prepare them well for the future."

The number of full-time undergraduates has increased by 4 percent over last year and the number of full-time graduate students has increased by less than 1/2 percent.

"While we are very happy with these numbers, we must continue to improve our retention rates," Kopp said. "We must be committed to do everything we can to ensure that students who start at Marshall University complete their education and earn their degrees."

Additional enrollments for off-campus and off-calendar classes will be added throughout the next few months, and more detailed enrollment counts are not expected until late October.


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Wednesday August 19, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New program designed to promote involvement and success of Marshall University commuter students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In a cooperative effort between Student Affairs and Residence Services, Marshall University has created a program that is designed to promote the involvement and success of its commuter students.

The goal is to get commuter students - those students who travel to campus each day for classes - involved in activities that will connect them more with campus life. About 76 percent of the students who attend Marshall University commute to classes.

"Too often commuter students maintain the same friendships, the same habits, the same social contacts, and the same daily schedule they maintained in high school," said Steve Hensley, Marshall's Dean of Student Affairs. "The risk in this lifestyle is that students may miss some of the most important parts of college - expanded social contacts, including making new friends from all over the state and country, and even other countries.  Student organizations enrich the lives and careers of students, but students have to be on campus to be a part of this."

As part of Welcome Weekend, which takes place Friday, Aug. 21 through Sunday, Aug. 23 and precedes the start of fall classes on Aug. 24, a Commuter Student Reception will take place at 3:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 21 in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. A Commuter Ice Cream Social is planned from 8 to 9 p.m. that same day in the Twin Towers East Dining Hall.

Commuter Welcome Weekend is the following weekend, Friday and Saturday, Aug. 28-29.

John Yaun, Director of Residence Services, said Marshall plans to offer commuter students a myriad of enjoyable and engaging experiences that will fulfill their college experience and get them more connected to activities and events on the Marshall campus.

"Commuter students are diverse in many ways, in age, ethnic identity, family status, working status, how they get to campus, the distance they commute, living arrangements and so forth," Yaun said. "In spite of all the differences, commuter students do have some common concerns: time management, balancing multiple roles, getting to campus, family obligations, and getting connected to campus life are all issues commuter students face. While many commuters face different challenges daily, they are an important part of the overall Marshall community and there are numerous opportunities to get involved and make the best of their college experience."

All commuters are invited to attend the Welcome Weekend reception and Ice Cream Social.

For more information, go to www.marshall.edu/welcomeweekend.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 19, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Addition of multipurpose field, alumni center/foundation hall gives different look to Marshall University's Huntington campus

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Summer time means vacation time for most Marshall University students, but that does not mean all has been quiet the past three months on the Huntington campus.

Marshall workers have been busy throughout the summer making repairs, upgrades and renovations big and small from one end of campus to the other. More than 1,100 gallons of paint have been applied indoors and out, modifications have been made to many of the restrooms in the academic buildings to make them ADA compliant, sidewalks have been repaired, roofs replaced, air conditioning systems upgraded, landscaping improved and lighting upgraded. And there's much more.   

Most noticeable to those students and faculty returning to classes on Monday, Aug. 24 is a 160-foot by 290-foot multipurpose field located near the Marshall Recreation Center just east of the First-Year Residence Halls.

The field, covered by TerraSport Turf, which is manufactured by Spectra Sports Surfaces, will be used for numerous activities, but mainly as a practice area for the Marching Thunder and a home for intramural sports.

David Stewart, director of campus recreation, said the Marshall Recreation Center will schedule activities on the field while the Marshall physical plant will maintain it.

"We want to maximize (organized) usage, but also maintain some open time where students can go out and maybe kick a football around," Stewart said. "It's going to be great for intramurals because we were down at Veterans Memorial Field House, which is 7/10th of a mile from campus."

Another facility under construction that has changed drastically in recent months is the new Erickson Alumni Center and Marshall University Foundation Hall, located on the corner of 5th Avenue and John Marshall Drive. Construction is expected to be completed in November.

Highlights of the three-story, 33,000-square-foot facility, include:

  • an alumni lounge;
  • a large hall for meetings and social events;
  • video and telephone conferencing in the meeting rooms;
  • a Heritage Room where information about alumni and the history of Marshall University can be displayed;
  • an architectural design that emphasizes an open and inviting appearance;
  • a functional workspace for the Alumni Relations, Development and Foundation staffs.

Here is a brief look at other changes for the new academic year:

Administrative changes

Marshall filled numerous administrative positions in academics since May 1. They include:

  • Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science, effective July 1. Before being named dean, Somerville was a professor of biological sciences at Marshall.
  • Dr. Mary Todd, founding dean of the Marshall University Honors College, effective Aug. 1. Before being named dean, she was vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Ohio Dominican University in Columbus, Ohio.
  • Dr. Donna J. Spindel, dean of the Marshall University Graduate College, effective July 1. Before being named dean, she was interim chair of Marshall's English Department.
  • Dr. Jamie Warner, associate dean for Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, effective July 1. Before being named associate dean, she was an associate professor of political science at Marshall.
  • Dr. Chong Kim, dean of Marshall's Lewis College of Business, effective July 1. Before being named dean, Kim was interim dean of the College of Business.
  • Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies at Marshall, effective July 1. Before being named to his new position, Pauley was interim dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development.
  • Dr. Monica Brooks, assistant vice president for information technology: Online learning and libraries at Marshall University, effective July 1. Before being named assistant VP, Brooks was MUOnline director of instructional design skills and assessment.
  • Dr. David Castleberry, associate dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, effective July 1. Castleberry remains a professor and director of choral activities in the Marshall University Department of Music.

Emergency notification system

Marshall University announced this summer a new partnership with Everbridge for emergency notifications of faculty, staff and students via text messages, e-mail and telephone.

"With this service, we've acquired the ability to quickly communicate emergency and safety-related information through multiple channels with a single click," said Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for information technology/chief information officer for the university.

Persons who already signed up for emergency text messages from Marshall have been automatically transferred to the new system, according to Jon B. Cutler, chief information security officer at Marshall. In addition, new and existing students are invited to provide alternative means of contact, such as a secondary e-mail address or cell phone number, that can be added to the system.

"Our primary objective in implementing this new service is protecting the safety and health of university community members," said Bill Bissett, the university's chief of staff and senior vice president for communications. "The more easily we can communicate vital information, and the more ways we have to contact our community members, the better."

Everbridge, formerly known as 3n Global, is a leading provider of emergency notification services to colleges and universities, health care systems, government agencies and municipalities.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/emergency/mualert.

Academic programs

Marshall University has added four new degree programs for 2009-10. They include: Early Childhood Education, BA; Medical Imaging, BS; Exercise Science, BS, and Athletic Training, BS. Anthropology is a new major under the Bachelor of Arts in Sociology.

New areas of emphasis this year include:

  • English major - Literature and Creative Writing;
  •  RBA program - Computer Forensics; Creative Writing Option; Game Development; Literature Option in English; Training & Development for Organizations; Web Application Development, and Women's Studies;
  • Exercise Science major - Exercise Physiology, Health and Wellness, and Strength and Conditioning;
  • Athletic Training major - Athletic Training Comprehensive; Athletic Training Pre-Physical Therapy; Athletic Training Pre-Physicians Assistant; Athletic Training Pre-Chiropractic; Athletic Training Pre-Med; Athletic Training Occupational Safety & Health, and Athletic Training Safety.

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Tuesday August 18, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Paint the Capital City Green rally sold out

CHARLESTON - The 12th annual Paint the Capital City Green pep rally is a sellout.

Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends will stampede into the Embassy Suites Hotel in Charleston to celebrate Marshall University athletics Wednesday, Aug. 19. Tickets will not be available at the door.

Paint The Capital City Green, sponsored by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for the university and features a tailgate spread with entertainment by Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder and performances by the Dance Team.

The event kicks off at 6 p.m. with a formal program at 7 p.m. Marshall fans will hear from Governor Joe Manchin, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, new Athletic Director Mike Hamrick and Thundering Herd football Coach Mark Snyder as they discuss the future of Marshall University athletics.

Hamrick, former director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was named director of athletics at MU in July replacing Bob Marcum, who retired this summer. Hamrick is a 1980 graduate of Marshall University.

The crowd also will learn who the winner is of a drawing for two tickets to the Herd's Sept. 12 football game with the Virginia Tech Hokies. The lucky ticket holder also will receive complimentary hotel accommodations.

The Paint the Capital City Green rally is sponsored by Friends of Coal and hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club.

Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.


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Monday August 17, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Exhibition of artwork by the late Stanley Sporny on display in Birke Art Gallery through Sept. 10

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Art and Design will present an exhibition of artwork by the late Stanley Sporny, a longtime Marshall faculty member, in the Birke Art Gallery beginning today and continuing through Thursday, Sept. 10.

The opening exhibit of the fall semester, "Stanley Sporny Paintings," will feature numerous oil paintings from the artist's River series - many completed in 2008 - as well as other select artworks spanning the past 25 years. Several watercolor paintings will also be on view, some of which have never before been publicly displayed.

Sporny, who passed away unexpectedly in October 2008, was a professor with MU's College of Fine Arts for 20 years.

"To his students, Stan Sporny was more than a professor of painting," Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts, said. "He taught them more than just art.  Stan was a philosopher and his provocative discourse helped students come to understand themselves better.  He was helping shape the entire individual and preparing the student for life and its varied challenges."

Organizing this show was particularly meaningful for Birke Art Gallery director John Farley.

"Stanley Sporny spent his life as an artist, teacher, mentor, inventor, musician, entrepreneur and a true visionary," Farley said. "As a former student, colleague and friend of Stan, it is an honor and a privilege to be involved in this exhibition." 

Sporny studied at the Philadelphia College of Art from 1964 through 1968 and earned his M.F.A. at the University of Pennsylvania where he studied from 1969 to 1972 while under the direction of celebrated artists Neil Welliver, Alex Katz, Alice Neel and Elaine de Kooning. The graduating representative for the University of Pennsylvania, he spent the summer of 1972 at the prestigious Skowhegan School in Maine. He then traveled on a Fulbright Grant to Sri Lanka, taught at various universities and was a veteran of more than 40 solo exhibitions with work held in many prominent galleries, private collections and museums throughout the nation.

College of Fine Arts alumnus Chris Worth described what viewers can expect to see at the Stanley Sporny Paintings exhibit as visually beautiful and personally moving. 

"In my mind this is a show about the colors of man's deepest nature," Worth said. "The work is bold in color as well as brush stroke. You can't help but be transported to the place of inspiration for Stan Sporny. In the moment that we enter into the place of the artist, he joins us, and we are witness to only the smallest part of a brilliant mind."

Farley echoed Worth's sentiments.

"It is a truly fantastic display of paintings, and particularly poignant for those of us so influenced by his teachings and outlook on art and life," Farley said. "In addition to numerous oil paintings, we are fortunate enough to have several watercolors, some of which have never before been publicly displayed. [It is] definitely not an event to be missed." 

The exhibition will culminate with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1. Peter Massing, professor of printmaking at Marshall University, will lead an informal discussion of Sporny and his work.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike, Special Projects Coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Monday August 17, 2009
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Students from Cabell Midland, Huntington High participate in J. Churchill Hodges Summer Scholars Program at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two soon-to-be Marshall University students from Huntington High School and Cabell Midland High School participated this summer in the J. Churchill Hodges Summer Scholars Program on Marshall's Huntington campus.

During the two-week program the students, Suzann Al-Qawasmi from Huntington High and Evan Madden from Cabell Midland, worked in MU laboratories with Marshall professors Dr. Michael Norton and Dr. Liz Murray. They studied DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA (Ribonucleic acid) and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) while learning about the Atomic Force Microscope.

At the end of the two weeks, Al-Qawasmi and Madden did a presentation of their work for Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of the College of Science, and Churchill Hodges, for whom the program is named.

Hodges and his wife, Mary, are long-standing major contributors to Marshall University. Churchill Hodges established the Hodges Summer Program five years ago for Cabell County High School seniors who will be attending Marshall in the fall.

The program is designed to generate excitement for research science, and encourage students to study physics, chemistry and biology.  Each year, students from Huntington High and Cabell Midland come to the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center for two weeks.

Cabell County high school seniors interested in attending the J. Churchill Hodges Summer Scholars program next year may contact their high school counselors, science teachers, or Dr. Norton (at 304-696-6627) in the Marshall Chemistry Department.

 

Photo: The J. Churchill Hodges Summer Scholars Program was conducted this summer on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Evan Madden from Cabell Midland High School and Suzann Al-Qawasmi from Huntington High School were this year's participants. Standing in the photo are Madden, left, Al-Qawasmi, middle, and Marshall University professor Dr. Michael Norton. Seated are Dawn Nicholas, a Chemistry graduate student, left, and Marshall professor Dr. Liz Murray, right. Drs. Norton and Murray worked with Madden and Al-Qawasmi during the program, and it was Nicholas' research that the students were contributing to/collaborating in during the DNA nanotechnology component of their program.


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Friday August 14, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Kopp unveils conceptual drawings of proposed Applied Engineering Complex

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today unveiled conceptual drawings of the university's proposed 140,000-square-foot Applied Engineering Complex during a news conference in his Old Main office on the Huntington campus.

A week ago, the Higher Education Policy Commission approved $25 million in funding toward planning and construction of the facility, which will be located on the north side of 3rd Avenue between the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Building and the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories. 

It is expected that the new facility will house several departments, including Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE); the departments of Mathematics and Computational Sciences; a Modeling and Digital Imaging Resource Facility; the new West Virginia High School S.T.E.M. Academy (Grades 9-12); Marshall University Research Corp. (MURC) offices, and engineering and bioengineering research laboratories.

Among those attending today's event were Dr. Betsy Dulin, Dean of CITE; MURC Executive Director and Vice President for Research Dr. John Maher; Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, Dean of the College of Education and Human Services; Dr. Stan Maynard, Executive Director of the June Harless Center and Associate Dean for the College of Education and Human Services, and Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc. and Senior Vice President for Development.

Also on hand was Steve Burton, Business Manager with the Tri-State Buildings and Construction Trades Council. 

"This project is very, very exciting," Kopp said. "It is the culmination of a lot of planning and it represents the collective vision of many people coming together. The impact will not only be statewide, but regional and national as well. It would not be at the stage it is now without everyone working to make it a reality."

Kopp thanked numerous people for their support of the project, including Higher Education Policy Commission Chairman David Hendrickson, members of the HEPC Board, Chancellor Brian Noland and Kay Goodwin, Secretary of Education and the Arts. He also said Gov. Joe Manchin and the West Virginia Legislature, led by President Earl Ray Tomblin and Speaker Rick Thompson, "have been phenomenal." Kopp added that Senate Education Chairman Bob Plymale has been a champion of engineering for a long time.

Kopp praised Marshall's Board of Governors for embracing the idea of the Applied Engineering Complex. 

"The seeds of this project have been planted and are beginning to show signs of life," Kopp said. "There is a lot of excitement out there."

Kopp said the funding comes from a bond sale approved earlier this year. The funds still must be approved by Gov. Manchin.



Photo: President Stephen J. Kopp uses one of the conceptual drawings of Marshall University's proposed Applied Engineering Complex to explain the location and purpose of the building.


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Friday August 14, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL claims 11 awards in Millennium competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students and the faculty manager from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received one Gold Award, seven Silver Awards and three Bronze Awards in The Millennium Awards 2009 competition.  All of WMUL-FM's entries were named winners in this professional competition.

The Gold Award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was in the category:

SPORTS PACKAGE

"Backdoor Curve," written and produced by Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, April 3, 2009.

The Silver Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the categories:

PUBLICATION/MANUAL/TRAINING

"The WMUL-FM Traffic Manual," written by Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, WMUL-FM's faculty manager, Whitney Thomas, WMUL-FM Traffic Director, who is a senior from Wheeling, and Michael Stanley, WMUL-FM Operations Manager, who is a senior from West Hamlin.  The manual was written for the student and community volunteer staff members charged with producing the campus radio station's daily programming logs.

NEWSCAST

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, April 3, 2009. The students who participated in the newscast were Robert Iddings, senior, St. Albans (producer and sports anchor); Adam Cavalier, a recent graduate, Montgomery (news anchor); and Whitney Thomas, senior, Wheeling (news anchor).

NEWS FEATURE PACKAGE

"Big Dips for 50 Years," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, July 17, 2008.

DOCUMENTARY

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009.

SPORTS PROGRAM

"Herd Roundup," with hosts Adam Cavalier and Andrew Ramspacher, a senior from Dublin, Ohio, broadcast Friday, Nov. 7, 2008.

SPORTS PLAY-BY-PLAY

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Memphis football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, color commentator Ryan Epling, sideline reporter Leannda Carey, a junior from Wellsburg, and engineer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

SPORTS PLAY-BY-PLAY

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Houston football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling, color commentator Adam Cavalier, sideline reporter Deven Swartz and engineer Tony Viola, a sophomore from Follansbee.

The Bronze Award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the categories:

NEWS FEATURE PACKAGE

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

NEWS FEATURE PACKAGE

"Be Hope to Her," written and produced by Leannda Carey, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 24, 2009.

NEWS FEATURE PACKAGE

"Holocaust Survivor - Irene Zisblatt," written and produced by Leannda Carey, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2009.

"This is a noteworthy accomplishment for WMUL-FM to be recognized as having broadcast one of the best sports packages in the country," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM. "Ryan Epling has received multiple awards for his sports reporting and this latest gold award further validates the quality of his sports reporting skills.  Likewise, Marshall fans are treated to superb coverage of Thundering Herd sports by the FM 88 Sports Team.

"Also, it is gratifying to have WMUL-FM staff members identified for writing a beneficial manual for the station's volunteer broadcasters, for producing a quality newscast, a highly regarded documentary concerning Huntington's sewage system, and some intriguing news and feature packages.  I am proud for the honor these Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University."

The Millennium Awards were created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in television/film/video/commercials, print, advertising, Web design, audio and radio.  Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals who raise the bar of excellence. There were 987 entries in the Millennium Awards 2009 competition. 


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Thursday August 13, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Visiting composer to present new works Aug. 31

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Renowned composer, flutist and pianist Byron Petty will present "Casual Notes," a program of recent compositions including several world premieres, at 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 31 in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

"A concert of music by a visiting composer lets you experience in a special way another's musical thoughts," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall, who is the organizer of and a performer on the concert. "And what's special about these inner thoughts is they're all hot off the press."

Petty will be accompanied by guest artists from sister institutions and Marshall music faculty. Hornist Wallace Easter from Virginia Tech and classical guitarist Robert Trent from Radford University will accompany Petty and his wife, Dr. Shuko Watanabe, to Marshall to perform on the concert. Flutist Wendell Dobbs, soprano Linda Dobbs, hornist Stephen Lawson and pianist Pam Johnson from the Marshall music faculty will join them.  In addition, two of Wendell Dobbs' fifers from the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, Callie Huff and Laura Simpson, will join him in performing "River Crossing," a four movement piece written especially for the Corps. "Casual Notes," a new flute duet for which the concert is named, will be premiered by Petty and Wendell Dobbs.

A graduate of the Peabody Conservatory at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Petty was trained as a flutist, studying with longtime principal of the Baltimore Symphony Britton Johnson. After graduation, Petty toured throughout the eastern U.S. and Japan with Watanabe, his classmate and wife. Currently, Petty and his wife both teach at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va.
Petty's experiments as a composer, which began at Peabody, continued to grow until now composition occupies most of his time. The Virginia Music Teachers Association, K. & W. Group Inc., Olin Conservation Inc., the Department of Geology of Virginia Polytechnical Institute, and the Toho Koto Society of Washington, D.C., have commissioned new works by him. Recent compositional performances and premieres include "Before It Happens" for clarinet and orchestra, performed by the Sweet Briar College Chamber Orchestra; "From the Helm" for flute and piano, by the Ardo Duo at the New Horizons Concerts of New Music, Radford University;  "Ach! How to be!" for voice, violin, and clarinet, by the Ardo Consort at Washington and Lee University; "Rokudan" for koto and orchestra, with the DC Youth Orchestra and the Washington Toho Koto Society at the historic Lincoln Theatre in Washington, D.C., and at the University of Maryland; "Gestures from the Bridge" for orchestra, performed by the Eurydice Community Orchestra of Roanoke, Va.; and "Moon Shadows" for small orchestra, by the Elon University Orchestra in Elon, N.C.

"Byron's music spans the emotional gamut," Wendell Dobbs added. "At times it's dark and rhythmically angular, and then, all of a sudden, jocular, light-hearted and witty."

Petty also will talk about his music at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1, also in Smith Recital Hall. Both events are free and open to the public. Contact the Marshall University Department of Music at 304-696-3117 for more information.


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Wednesday August 12, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Scholarships enable two MU students to study in Japan for a year

Huntington, W.Va. - Two Marshall University students have been awarded Japan Student Services Organization (JASSO) scholarships that will enable them to spend the 2009-2010 academic year studying at Kansai Gaidai University in Hirakata City, Osaka in Japan.

The students are Alison Tackett, a junior from Ashland, Ky., and Alex Wemm, a senior from Glenville, W.Va. The JASSO funds total about $8,800 per person, per year, and will be used for room and board expenses.

"I am extremely excited for and proud of the opportunity Alison and Alex have been given to study in Japan," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "Opportunities like these can set the occasion for great things in Alison's and Alex's personal and professional lives. Their willingness to study abroad for a year represents the spirit of inquiry and dedication to self improvement all of us at Marshall University and the College of Liberal Arts wish to instill in our students."

Marshall currently offers exchange programs with Kansai Gaidai, Tokyo Denki and Chukyo University as well as six universities through the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). Nine Marshall University students will be studying in Japan for the 2009-2010 school year.

"It is quite an honor for Alison and Alex to receive the JASSO scholarships," said Kylie Gallagher, executive study abroad advisor at Marshall University. "These two individuals have worked extremely hard to get themselves abroad. It has not been an easy road, but they never gave up. It is great to see all of their hard effort being rewarded in this way. Funding for study abroad opportunities is always one of the biggest challenges for our students, so it is wonderful when our students are able to receive scholarships like the JASSO. I think it will give our other students hope to receive more of these prestigious scholarships in the future."

Tackett is a Japanese major and graphic design minor at Marshall. Wemm, who is majoring in both history and Japanese, is interested in Japanese popular culture, history and society.

"This scholarship was an incredible blessing," Tackett said. "God always takes care of me. I hope that with what I learn in Japan I will be able to help bridge some cultural barriers by interpreting and translating."

She said she believes it is very important for anyone who has the opportunity to experience a different culture to do so.

"It is the best way to gain a new, and sometimes better, perspective of the world around you," Tackett said.

Dr. Natsuki Anderson, an assistant professor and coordinator of the Japanese program at Marshall, said she was very pleased to learn that Tackett and Wemm received the JASSO scholarships.

Anderson said Tackett transferred to Marshall University to major in Japanese and takes her study very seriously.

"I believe Alison's consistent effort to keep up her good work has paid off," Anderson said. "This is great news for students who give up applying for study abroad because of financial problems. I am sure that both of them can now concentrate on studying and not have to worry about finances while they are at Kansai Gaidai. Omedeto! (Congratulations)."

Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall University's Center for International Programs, said the Japanese government sponsored scholarships will help to further boost the success of Marshall's Japanese language program and its efforts to send more students to study abroad in Japan.

The additional scholarships were made possible when the Japanese government implemented a new budgetary plan in which a large amount of JASSO money was included for fiscal year 2009-2010.


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Wednesday August 12, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

RecFest '09, 'Late Night at the Rec,' new features of Welcome Weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Welcome Weekend at Marshall University, an annual three-day event for new students and their families that precedes the start of fall classes, will feature new events this year at the newest facility on the Huntington campus - the Marshall Recreation Center.

Welcome Weekend 2009 is Friday, Aug. 21, through Sunday, Aug. 23, and classes start at 8 a.m. Monday, Aug. 24.

Students and their families, along with Marshall University faculty and staff, are invited to "Late Nite at the Rec" from 8:30 p.m. until midnight Friday, Aug. 21. Among the features of the event are a "Dive-In Movie" in the pool area of the recreation center, Wally Ball and a rock-climbing wall contest.
That will be followed on Saturday, Aug. 22 by RecFest '09, a six-hour (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) event showcasing vendors and groups from throughout the Tri-State Area who will set up informational booths and displays on the center's four gym floors.

"RecFest is going to be awesome, a lot of fun," said Sharon Stanton, associate director of campus recreation at Marshall. "We want to overwhelm them with information about Marshall University and Huntington. We'll have all kinds of campus groups and organizations, along with off-campus vendors such as restaurants, banks and cell phone companies. The biggest thing about RecFest is information."

David Stewart, director of campus recreation, said the goal of RecFest is to provide a forum for students to interact with people from the campus and the community. "It's kind of like a one-stop information session about the Marshall community," Stewart said. "Our theme is 'Fun, Fitness, Friendship - Forever,' and RecFest certainly fits into those categories, especially the fun part."

As usual, a family picnic for all new students and their families and the annual Freshman Convocation highlight Welcome Weekend activities. The picnic starts at 4:30 p.m. Friday on Buskirk Field. The convocation starts at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center in downtown Huntington.

Thirty minutes prior to the convocation, the new students will meet for a group picture at the memorial fountain on the student center plaza. After the picture, they will walk west on 4th Avenue to the Keith-Albee to attend the convocation.

Student body president Sean Hornbuckle will be the master of ceremonies at the convocation. Other speakers include MU President Stephen J. Kopp, head football coach Mark Snyder and provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston, who will introduce deans and vice presidents.

Also giving brief remarks will be Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science and member of Marshall's faculty for 47 years; Dr. Katarina Schray, an English professor and the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award winner for 2008-09; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, a professor of mathematics at Marshall University and MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2008-09; and Dr. Nicholas Kelling, a new professor in Marshall's psychology department.

Shelby Brewster, an MU sophomore, Yeager Scholar and member of the One Book Marshall committee, will talk briefly about "My Sister's Keeper," the book selected for this year's common reading program. One Book is part of MU's First Year Experience program.

Here is the schedule for Welcome Weekend 2009:

Friday, Aug. 21

  • Residence Hall Check-In: Halls will open at 9 a.m. For residence hall students with a meal plan, Harless Dining Hall will be open for brunch and dinner on Saturday, Aug. 22, and open for brunch on Sunday, Aug. 23.
  • Immunization Clinic: Marshall Recreation Center, noon to 5 p.m.
    Commuter Student Reception:  Memorial Student Center lobby, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
  • Family Picnic:  Buskirk Field adjacent to Memorial Student Center plaza, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.  All new students and their families are invited to attend.
  • Late Nite @ the Rec.:  Marshall Recreation Center, 8:30 p.m. to midnight.  This event will include the Climbing Wall, Wally Ball and a Dive-In Movie (movie selection TBA).

Saturday, Aug. 22

  • RecFest '09: Marshall Recreation Center, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will include vendors, games and other competitions with food, drinks, and prizes.
  • Bus Transportation to Local Retail Locations
  • Tennis Party: University Tennis Courts, 4:15 p.m.
  • Welcome Weekend Tailgate:  Memorial Student Center plaza (rain location MSC lobby), 8 to 10 p.m. This event includes food, drinks, a live DJ, cornhole and prizes.

Sunday, Aug. 23

  • Class Schedule Walk-Through:  Meet at Memorial Student Center plaza at 1 p.m.
  • President's Freshman Convocation:  Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, 3 p.m. Students will meet for a group picture at the Memorial Student Center plaza at 2:30 p.m. and then walk together to the Keith-Albee.
  • Residence Hall Picnic: Harless Dining Hall Courtyard, 5:30 p.m.

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Tuesday August 11, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Shanghai teachers learn about American education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nineteen teachers from Shanghai High School in China are spending two weeks on Marshall University's Huntington campus participating in a Professional Education Development and an American Culture program.

The teachers are living in Twin Towers, participating in seminars that focus on the U.S. Education system and American culture, sampling some of the summer school classes and participating in professional seminars designed for them. They also are visiting other educational institutions as well as visiting many types of cultural attractions.

The teachers teach in the international division of Shanghai High School, which enrolls 4,000 students from all over the world.   They teach various subjects, from Chemistry and Physics to History, Art and Physical Education. All of the classes in the international division of Shanghai High are taught in English.

Most of the participants are in their late 20s, and all but two are female.

"They are a very articulate, intelligent and personable group of young professionals," said Dr. Will Edwards, retired executive director with Marshall's Center for International Programs and coordinator and trainer of the summer program for Chinese visiting teachers.

The visiting teachers have taken part in a variety of activities, including visits to the Marshall University Child Development Academy, Piedmont Elementary School in Charleston, which is one of the few year-round schools in West Virginia, and South Charleston High School, which has the only International Baccalaureate program in the state. While in Charleston, they also met Gov. Joe Manchin and talked with him about their program.

Edwards said the teachers, who arrived at Marshall on Friday, July 31, will leave Friday, Aug. 14. They plan then to visit other parts of the country, including New York, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

Shanghai High School is one of the most prestigious public high schools in China.  It is the only high school in Shanghai where students can take the SAT and TOEFL (Test Of English as a Foreign Language) and the school was the first International Baccalaureate (IB) high school in Shanghai.  The majority of students from Shanghai High's international division pursue their university education upon graduation.  More information is available by visiting the English version of its Web site at http://www.shs.sh.cn/english/index.html

"Shanghai High School is our largest placement for our Teach in China program," said QingQing Zhao, director of China Projects at Marshall. "We normally send about 50 teachers to China each year, so about half go to this school."

Marshall University sends about 25 English teachers to the school every year through its Appalachians Abroad Teach in China program (http://www.marshall.edu/gochina/). MU's teachers spend one or more years teaching at the school, so the total number of teachers Marshall has at the school is about 40, which represents more than half of all the English teachers employed by this high school.

"Because of the large number of teachers we send to this school and because Marshall University has had this relationship for more than ten years, the Center for International Programs was asked to create this special training program for Shanghai High School's teachers during the summer," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs.

For more information, contact Edwards at 304-638-3886.


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Monday August 10, 2009
Contact: Angela Jones, Marshall Artists Series, 304-696-3334

Highlights of the 74th Season of the Marshall Artists Series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Artists Series turns 74 years old this season. Over the course of those 74 years, the Marshall Artists Series has been a gateway to the world of cultural entertainment in the Tri-State and at Marshall University.

 

"The Marshall Artists Series 2009/2010 season will broaden your view of our world and through art: whether it be an opera, a foreign film, Broadway musical or a fascinating presentation of rarely seen corners of our planet, you will be transported and transformed emotionally, intellectually and spiritually," says Penny Watkins, Executive Director for the Marshall Artists Series. "The Marshall Artists Series season endeavors to take you on many diverse journeys, journeys that invite you to explore the vast array of human experiences and emotions.  These journeys offer the opportunity for laughter and humor, pathos and understanding, as well as run the gamut of personal growth to universal exploration."

The following events will be featured on this season's Baxter Series:

Chesapeake Energy proudly presents the son of the legendary Jacques Cousteau, Jean-Michel Cousteau, marine explorer, filmmaker, environmental advocate and educator - as he brings his deep sea journey - The Great Ocean Adventure - to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Thursday, October 15, 2009 at 7 p.m. In this multimedia "great ocean adventure" Cousteau will share his stories, photographs and videos from over 40 years of studying the world under the sea. Patrons of all ages will experience delight and awe as he fills the theater with ocean life, inspiring our audience to protect this precious resource.

Ring-a ding-ding in the holiday season as The Rat Pack is Back! - Here For The Holidays comes to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Monday, November 30, 2009 at 8 p.m.  The swingin', free-wheelin' and festive sounds of Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Martin and Joey Bishop will certainly get you in the mood for the holiday season! The Rat Pack is Back features uncanny vocal recreations, unbridled humor, and a hot, live orchestra featuring the original rat pack arrangements that will send the audience back to the coolest time in history.

Celebrate the first lady of television in An Evening with Lucille Ball: "Thank You for Asking" directed by Lucie Arnaz on Tuesday, February 23, 2010 at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. This touching, funny and uplifting play is written and performed by actress and renowned impressionist, Suzanne LaRousch, in association with Lucie Arnaz and Laurence Luckinbill. The evening recreates the comic genius and the magic behind the "Queen of Comedy". Lucy guides us through a lifetime of personal memories inspiring her timeless sketches on "I Love Lucy, her 30-year television career and never-before heard personal recollections about her tempestuous and complicated marriage to Cuban bandleader turned impresario, Desi Arnaz. 

 

St. Mary's Medical Center and HIMG present Mozart's Masterpiece Don Giovanni, with 30 piece orchestra,  on Monday, March 15, 2010 at 8 p.m. Hailed by many as the greatest of all operas, Don Giovanni is based on the true-life escapades of Don Juan of Seville, and aristocratic lothario who lived during the 1600s.  The full-scale production features beautiful sets and costumes and a cast of soloists who are excellent actors as well as first class singers.  Don Giovanni is performed in original Italian with English supertitles. 

 

The following events will be featured on this season's Mount Series:


Homecoming will be hilarious as MU's Alumni Office and Student Activities Programming Board team up with the Marshall Artists Series to bring Comedy Central's Mike Birbiglia to the Veterans Memorial Field House on Friday, October 2, 2009 at 8 p.m., just in time for homecoming. Birbiglia achieved cult status with the release of his Comedy Central CD "Two Drink Mike," and the accompanying "Medium Man on Campus" college tour. He just finished a successful run off Broadway with his show "Sleepwalk with Me."  Mike is a talk show regular, the star of two Comedy Central Presents specials and broadcasts to millions on the nationally-syndicated "Bob & Tom Radio Show."

Don't miss Broadway's smash hit Avenue Q on Tuesday, November 3, 2009 at 8 p.m., at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Winner of Best Musical, Best Score and Best Book at the 2004 Tony Awards, Avenue Q is a hilarious show full of heart and hummable tunes about trying to make it in NYC with big dreams and a tiny bank account.  Called "one of the funniest shows you're ever likely to see," Avenue Q features a cast of people and puppets who tell the story in a smart, risqu and downright entertaining way.  Recommended for ages 13 and up. Sponsored in part by The Law Office of Doug Reynolds, American Babbitt Bearing, Pritchard Electric, and Chapman Printing Company.

 Cabell Huntington Hospital proudly presents Cats in its first appearance at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Monday, February 8, 2010 at 7:30 p.m. Winner of seven Tony Awards including Best Musical, Cats is the longest running show in Broadway's history and features 20 of Andrew Lloyd Webber's timeless melodies including the hit "Memory."  There's no better way to introduce your family to the wonders of live theatre than with the magic, the mystery and the memory of Cats!

Hailed by the Los Angeles Times as "a showpiece extravaganza," Michael Flatley's Lord of the Dance arrives on Thursday, April 22, 2010 at 7:30 pm to bring a mesmerizing blend of traditional and modern Celtic music and dance to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The story is based upon mythical Irish folklore as Don Dorcha - Lord of Darkness, challenges the ethereal Lord of Light - The Lord of the Dance.  Battle lines are drawn, passions ignite and a love story is fueled by the dramatic leaps and turns of dancers' bodies against a backdrop of Celtic rhythm. Described by The New York Post as "fascinating and entertaining!

The Fall and Spring International Film Festival:

The Fall International Film Festival will take place November 6 - 8, 2009, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.  Featured films include: Food, Inc.  (USA), The Song of Sparrows (Iran), Rudo Y Cursi (Mexico), Waltz With Bashir (Israel), The Country Teacher (Czech Republic), and Summer Hours (France). 

 

The Spring International Film Festival will take place March 5 -7, 2010, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Featured films include: Departures (Japan), Lemon Tree (Israel), Flow: For the Love Of Water (USA), Lake Tahoe (Mexico), The Girl From Monaco (France), and Burma VJ: Reporting From A Closed Country (Belgium)

 

Avett Brothers Special - On Sale Now:

The red hot non-traditional bluegrass band, The Avett Brothers, make a tour stop at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Thursday, October 29, 2009 at 8 p.m. Brothers Seth and Scott, along with Bob Crawford, combine old-time country, bluegrass, punk, pop melodies, folk, rock and roll, honky-tonk and ragtime to produce a sound described by the Washington Post as "post civil-war modern rock." The Avett Brothers were recently signed to Columbia Records and released their fifth album with acclaimed producer Rick Rubin at the helm.

 

Season Ticketing Information


The Marshall Artists Series 2009-2010 Season is proudly sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History.

 

  • Superticket: Baxter, Mount, + choice between Avett Brothers & Films - $435, $385, $350 & $315
  • Baxter Series: 4 events - $265, $215, $195 & $175

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Monday August 10, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's student newspaper competes well in state press association contest

SNOWSHOE, W.Va. - Editors, writers and photographers from The Parthenon picked up awards from the West Virginia Press Association at its annual convention Saturday, Aug. 8 at Snowshoe Resort.

Judges awarded first-place honors to May graduates Brian Dalek and Katlyn Goots.

Dalek, spring executive editor and print major from McMechen, W.Va., took top honors in the editorial page category. The award emphasizes local content selection that serves the community, design and writing.

Goots, a public relations major and former reporter from Vienna, W.Va., earned first place in the lifestyle feature writing category for "Signs," her profile story about Marshall Community and Technical College sign language program director Leigh-Ann Brewer.

"Brian was a workhorse during his tenure in the journalism school," said Nerissa Young, Parthenon adviser. "His name stands for excellence. Katlyn was a strong reporter who covered the community and technical college beat well. I enjoyed reading her story about Brewer." 

Staff photographers earned second- and third-place honors. 

Taylor Kuykendall, Audrey Hamoy, Patrick Stanley and Beth Roberts received second place in the photo essay category with the "We Are Marshall" homecoming spread that ran on the Life page.

>Kuykendall is an August graduate print major from Moorefield, W.Va., who has had his photos published in The Herald-Dispatch, Charleston Daily Mail and Food Network magazine. He also earned second place in the news photography category for his photo of a bullet leaving the muzzle of an ROTC cadet's rifle.
Hamoy is a senior English and classics major from Leonardsville, N.Y. She has an associate degree in photography and is a former photo editor for The Parthenon.

Stanley is an August public relations graduate from Ona, W.Va. He worked as a staff photographer for University Communications and as photo editor for The Parthenon.
 
Roberts is a May public relations graduate from Rainelle, W.Va. She is a former executive editor and Life editor. She designed the page.

Myriah Hisam won third place in sports photography for her photo of Marshall tight end Cody Slate in midair at Marshall's football game against the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Hisam is a senior broadcast journalism major from Friendly, W.Va. She shoots video and stills for the university football team. 

"One of many advantages of being The Parthenon adviser is working alongside journalists whose work I admire. I can honestly say that I'm a fan of every student who was honored by the press association this year," Young said.

The Parthenon staff earned second place in the service to the community category for the United Way series. Editors, reporters and photographers worked half the semester to profile and present every agency that receives money from The United Way of the River Cities.

The Parthenon competes in Division III for newspapers with fewer than 15,000 circulation. Division III newspapers include The Times-West Virginian in Fairmont, The Inter-Mountain in Elkins and The Daily Athenaeum at West Virginia University, among others.

The association also announced winners of the West Virginia Press Foundation scholarships. Two of the four $1,000 scholarships went to Marshall students Morgan Unger and Mary Wilson. Unger is a senior from Berkeley Springs majoring in print journalism. Wilson is a junior from Gassaway majoring in print journalism. 

Young won first place for columnists in Division I, which includes The Charleston Daily Mail, The Herald-Dispatch and The Register-Herald. Young has been writing "The Back Porch" column for The Register-Herald for 16 years.

Advertising designers also picked up awards for The Parthenon. Tammy Muffley received second place in the best single ad of 33 inches or more category for the "Live Like You Mean It" ads for The Village apartments.  Jenna Hicks and Jesse Smith received second place in the best theme pages-retail category for "Congrats Grads." All are advertising employees at The Herald-Dispatch.

The Parthenon competes in Division II in the advertising contest for medium and small dailies.

The West Virginia Press Association was chartered in 1869 as a nonprofit trade association representing the state's daily and weekly newspapers. News and advertising members from the Arkansas Press Association judged the entries.


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Monday August 10, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff and Senior Vice President for Communications, (304) 696-6713

President Stephen J. Kopp's statement regarding the announcement of $25 million for an Applied Engineering Complex


"On behalf of Marshall University, I thank the West Virginia Legislature led by President Earl Ray Tomblin and Speaker Rick Thompson, along with the members of our Cabell-Wayne delegation, including Senate Education Chairman, Bob Plymale, for their continuing support of Marshall University. Last Friday, the Higher Education Policy Commission approved $25 milllion in funding toward the planning and construction of our new Applied Engineering Complex. It is expected that this new facility will house Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), the departments of Mathematics and Computational Sciences, a Modeling and Digital Imaging Resource Facility, the new West Virginia High School S.T.E.M. Academy (Grades 9-12), and engineering and bioengineering research laboratories. HEPC Chairman David Hendrickson and the members of the HEPC Board, as well as Chancellor Brian Noland and Secretary of Education and the Arts Kay Goodwin, were instrumental in moving approval of this project for funding consideration by Governor Joe Manchin. The Marshall University Board of Governors also has played a key role in advancing this project as well as the overall enrichment of Marshall University through their continuing support and dedication. Although these funds must still be approved by Governor Joe Manchin, this kind of collaborative spirit and effort is crucial to the future success not only of Marshall University, but also the State of West Virginia and our region."


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Wednesday August 5, 2009
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Gene regulation specialist joins Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joan E. Wilson has been named senior scientist at the Marshall University Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR). An expert in gene regulation, Wilson is the second scientist to join the institute created through the state's new "Bucks for Brains" research trust fund.

Wilson most recently was a researcher at System Biosciences LLC (SBI), a high-tech company based in Mountain View, Calif. At SBI, she managed a fast-growing product portfolio that contributed 40 percent of the company's total sales revenue. Prior to that, she was a senior applications scientist and product manager with Panomics (now Affymetrix) and a research fellow at the Harvard Institute of Proteomics.

The goal of MIIR is to develop a focused program of pioneering research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new high-tech businesses based on those discoveries. The institute will build on existing areas of research strength and provide opportunities for pioneering research collaborations with scientists already working at Marshall University. Wilson's group at MIIR will focus on identifying non-coding RNA disease biomarkers and developing non-coding RNA-based tools for gene regulation and genome manipulation.

"I am tremendously excited about Joan Wilson and what she brings to MIIR," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "When we envisioned this institute, she is exactly what we had in mind - a brilliant scientist with a history of commercializing research. The focus of 'Bucks for Brains' is economic development and she will be a major contributor to MIIR's efforts in that regard."

Dr. Eric Kmiec, director of MIIR and the institute's lead research scientist, added, "I could not be more pleased that Dr. Wilson has joined our institute. She is exactly the kind of person I want to attract to this organization - someone with both an academic and biotechnology corporate background, who has taken basic discoveries and made them successful in the marketplace. She represents an impressive work ethic and discipline and we all look forward to working with her."

Wilson has a bachelor's degree in biology from the College of William and Mary. She went on to complete a doctorate in biological sciences at Stanford University, supported by a National Science Foundation pre-doctoral fellowship. Her thesis work, in the lab of Dr. Paul Macdonald, focused on elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying specification of the embryonic body pattern in the model genetic organism Drosophila. Her post-doctoral work, with Dr. Peter Sarnow, also at Stanford, characterized a novel mechanism of initiation of protein synthesis in a polio-like virus, and was supported by a Jane Coffin Childs Fellowship.

"MIIR's mission - to advance local and regional economic development through biotechnology entrepreneurship - presents a unique opportunity, and the university, community and state government support for this endeavor are compelling," said Wilson. "My academic and corporate experience and interest in technology-focused science align perfectly with the institute's objectives. My research focus, on developing non-coding RNA-based tools and technologies, not only offers exciting synergies with Dr. Kmiec's group but also provides a platform for productive collaborations within the Marshall University research community as well as external corporate partnerships."

Wilson several years ago took time off from her science career to pursue another passion - bicycle racing. As a member of the United States National Cycling Team from 2000-03, she competed nationally and internationally, including such prestigious events as the Tour de France and Giro d'Italia.

The $50 million "Bucks for Brains" trust fund was created last year to match state dollars with private donations to encourage university research and leverage private giving, ultimately leading to business spin-offs, new patents and job creation. 

 

Photo: Dr. Joan E. Wilson works in a laboratory in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center at Marshall University.


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Wednesday August 5, 2009
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine,, 304-691-1713

MU ceremony a rite of passage for diverse class of entering medical students

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. -- An entering class of aspiring doctors marked by an especially wide range of prior experience will take the first step toward their new careers Thursday (Aug. 6) in the White Coat Ceremony of Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

The event, which is open by invitation to students' families and friends, will be at 7 p.m. in Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

"At the White Coat Ceremony, students receive their first white coats, a symbol of the profession of medicine that allows to us emphasize the significance of compassion as well as scientific excellence in the care of their future patients," said Dr. Marie Veitia, associate dean for student affairs. "Students find it very meaningful, and it helps them - and their families - understand why such a difficult task lies before them

Students' white coats - plus $100 in gift cards to use for textbooks - are gifts from alumni, faculty and friends of the medical school. Students also receive gifts of stethoscopes from Drs. Joseph and Omayma Touma. "It is our way to give back to the medical profession," said Dr. Joseph Touma. "In return, we hope someday they will do something meaningful for the future generations."

Incoming students include:

  • One who served in the Peace Corps in Mozambique.
  • One who served on a native American reservation through the Teach America program.
  • A former conservation biologist who worked at Yellowstone National Park through the AmeriCorps program.
  • A former teacher who taught English as a foreign language in Japan.
  • Two homeschooled students (not connected at all) who graduated from college at 18; one double-majored in biomedical engineering and math, has gone on to work in a research lab and has published research; the other double-majored in biochemistry and music and went on to get a master's degree in music (specializing in violin). One of the women was selected to the prestigious honorary society Phi Beta Kappa, the other to its engineering counterpart, Tau Beta Pi. The women are just 19 and 20 years old.
  • A Chinese-born painter who donates the proceeds of his sales to benefit children affected by the Sichuan earthquake.
  • A student who served two tours of duty in Iraq as a front-line medic.

 

Media note: Although this is an invitation-only event, we hope you will be able to join us!

 

 


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Tuesday August 4, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall University South Charleston campus sponsors blood drive Aug. 11

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Responding to a critical shortage of blood supplies in the region, the American Red Cross and Marshall University Graduate College have teamed up to sponsor a blood drive Tuesday, Aug. 11.


The blood drive will be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the South Charleston campus of Marshall University, 100 Angus E. Peyton Drive, just off the Kanawha Turnpike. The public is encouraged to participate. Parking is free.


Individuals age 17 or older, who weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health, can donate blood. Now, in West Virginia, teens 16 years old may donate blood with parental permission.  Most donors are eligible to give blood every 56 days.

 

Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are encouraged. To schedule a convenient time, please contact Kathy Zimmerman at Marshall University at 304-746-1992 or kzimmerm@marshall.edu. People with specific eligibility questions should contact the American Red Cross Nursing Collections office at 800-542-5663.

Summertime is a challenging time to maintain sufficient blood supplies for the 100-county region serviced by the Greater Alleghenies Region of the Red Cross. Vacations, school closings and corporate closings have reduced the number of blood drives in the area. According to Red Cross statistics, every two seconds someone in the United States needs a blood transfusion.

 

Currently, the Red Cross has minimal supplies of Rh negative blood types on hand, with supplies of type O negative, known as the universal blood type, at about two-day levels, according to the Red Cross.

 


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Monday August 3, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike,, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Smith succeeds Castleberry as Choral Union conductor

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the past 19 years, Dr. David Castleberry has led the Marshall University Choral Union in performances of major choral works, ranging from Handel's Messiah to Mozart's Requiem to Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms. For 18 of those 19 years, he has been assisted at the piano by Mark Smith, whom many in the Tri-State community know through his work with Huntington Outdoor Theater and many other musical productions in the area.

This fall, with Castleberry's move to the position of associate dean of the College of Fine Arts, Smith will move to the conductor's podium of the Choral Union.

"I look forward to conducting the Choral Union this year," Smith said. "After 22 years as accompanist for the choir, I'm very excited to step in as conductor. Many thanks to Dr. Castleberry and Dr. Pappas [music department chair] for this opportunity."

Castleberry will remain active in the choral program as director of choral activities and conductor of the MU Chamber Choir.

The Choral Union has been a fixture in the musical life of the region for many years and provides an opportunity for students and community members alike to present great musical works in concert. New singers are welcome each semester. Rehearsals take place each Monday evening and concerts are scheduled near the end of each fall and spring semester.

"I am very proud of the Choral Union's achievements and the opportunities the ensemble provides for participants and listeners," Castleberry said. "Since Mark has assisted for so many years at the piano, I am delighted that he will have the chance to lead the group this year. I know he will do a terrific job."

Rehearsals for the fall semester begin Monday, Aug. 24, in Smith Music Hall, Room 150, on the Huntington campus. Music will feature Benjamin Britten's Ceremony of Carols and other seasonal selections. For further information, call Smith at Trinity Episcopal Church, 304-529-6084, ext 15.


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Friday July 31, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Herd fans can meet new athletic director during Paint the Capital City Green event

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Thundering Herd fans will have an opportunity to meet Mike Hamrick, Marshall University's newly named director of athletics, during the 12th annual Paint the Capital City Green event in Charleston Wednesday, Aug. 19.

Paint The Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. The event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by mascot Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7 p.m.

Advance only tickets are on sale now and must be purchased by close of business on Monday, Aug. 17. Tickets are $40 per person and will not be sold at the door. All tickets will be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win two game tickets to the Sept. 12 Marshall vs. Virginia Tech football game in Blacksburg, Va., along with complimentary hotel accommodations.

Mike Hamrick will share the stage with President Stephen J. Kopp and Thundering Herd Football Coach Mark Snyder, as well as members of the football team as they discuss the future of Marshall University athletics. Hamrick, former director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was named director of athletics at MU earlier this month replacing Bob Marcum, who retired this summer. Hamrick is a 1980 graduate of Marshall University. 

"I hope all of our Kanawha Valley fans come out to meet members of the Thundering Herd football family, including our newest, Mike Hamrick, and see why everyone should be getting excited about the upcoming season," Coach Snyder said. "I always look forward to Paint the Capital City Green and hope our Herd fans come out and support this great event!"

For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138.


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Thursday July 30, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Painter named director of communications for Marshall University Research Corporation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ginny Painter has been selected to serve as director of communications for the Marshall University Research Corporation.

Painter assumed her duties July 27. She will operate from both Marshall University's South Charleston and Huntington Campuses.


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Thursday July 30, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Massey Energy Scholarship for Engineering Established by Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Massey Energy Scholarship for Engineering has been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and the first award is planned for the 2009-2010 academic year.

Massey Energy Company (NYSE: MEE), the fourth-largest coal company in the United States, based on produced coal revenue, will contribute $20,000 a year for five years, for a total of $100,000. Massey has operations in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia.

The scholarship recipients will be West Virginia residents who are full-time Marshall University sophomores with engineering majors in the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) and minimum grade point averages (GPA) of 2.5.

"It is my hope that these scholarships give some of our best and brightest young people the opportunity to gain the skills and education they need to help all of West Virginia grow economically," said Don Blankenship, Chairman and CEO of Massey Energy.   "To ensure that our state has a bright future, we need to do our part to keep and grow high-skill and high-wage jobs.  These scholarships are a part of making that larger goal a reality."

First preference will be given to students who are from the southern West Virginia counties of Boone, Fayette, Kanawha, Logan, Mingo, Nicholas, Raleigh and Wyoming.  Marshall University engineering students who are from eastern Kentucky, other counties in West Virginia, or other areas of the United States, are also encouraged to apply for the scholarship. Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of CITE, will select the recipients and renew the awards for up to three years (six semesters) if full-time status and a minimum GPA of 2.5 are maintained.

"Our students and faculty greatly appreciate Massey's support of Marshall's growing engineering program," Dulin said. "Massey's generous gift increases the pipeline of engineers in our region at a time when that profession will play an especially significant role in our economic growth."


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Wednesday July 29, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps to perform at convention in New York City

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps will travel to New York City for a performance at the National Flute Association convention's closing ceremonies Aug. 16. The convention begins Aug. 13 at the Marriott Marquis Hotel at Times Square.

"This is an extraordinary honor to be selected to perform before the largest congregation of flutists in the world," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall and leader of the corps. "We are very pleased the university and its supporters have made this opportunity possible for our students. The convention features back-to-back events on every sort of musical topic. In addition to performing, this is a wonderful occasion for our students to experience a much larger world."

The National Flute Association has more than 6,000 members worldwide and hosts an annual convention each August in a different American city. Organizers believe this year's convention will be one of the best attended, due to the location and the honoring of Sir James Galway with the association's lifetime achievement award.

At the closing ceremonies the corps will perform a suite of tunes historical in significance to New York City. "Lafayette's Grand March and Quick Step" was written in 1824 by New York publisher and flutist Edward Riley in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette's triumphal return to America. Arriving first in New York City in August, this hero of the American Revolution visited all 24 states during the course of the following year. More than 60 towns and counties in the eastern United States were named in his honor after the visit.

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps at Marshall University was formed in August 2007 as an initiative of the John Deaver Drinko Academy and the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University. The group specializes in music from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall and wears uniforms styled after those of the era of the American Revolution.


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Wednesday July 29, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Alumni Association, Travel Doctors sponsoring bus trip to Memphis for Herd's C-USA game with Tigers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association is teaming with Travel Doctors to sponsor a deluxe motorcoach trip Sept. 25-26 to Memphis, Tenn., for the Thundering Herd's football game with the Memphis Tigers.

The Conference USA game kicks off at 1 p.m. (ET) Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Liberty Bowl.

The trip includes:

  • Round-trip deluxe motorcoach transportation
  • One night's lodging in a superior hotel in the Beale Street entertainment district
  • One continental breakfast and one buffet breakfast
  • One lunch and one dinner meal voucher
  • Optional transportation to Graceland ($15)
  • Admission to Marshall University's pre-game tailgate party
  • Game ticket to the Marshall-Memphis football game
  • Bus trip home after the game

The total cost per person varies depending on the number of hotel room occupants: Prices are $529 per person (single occupancy), $399 per person (double), $369 per person (triple) and $339 per person (quad).

A $150 per person deposit is required at booking by Aug. 7 and the final payment is due by Sept. 4. Checks may be made payable and mailed to: Travel Doctors Travel Agency, 3554 Teays Valley Road, Suite 112, Hurricane, WV 25526.

For more information, contact the Marshall University Alumni Association at 304-696-2901 or Travel Doctors at 1-888-562-0881.

 


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Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, 304-691-1713

State's biomedical researchers meet Thursday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Approximately 170 researchers and students from throughout West Virginia will gather at Marshall University Thursday for the 8th Annual Summer Research Symposium of a statewide research network known as WV-INBRE.
 
The West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence event will run from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center. Oral presentations are scheduled for the morning, with a poster session in the afternoon.

In addition to a keynote speaker and presentations from faculty researchers, the event showcases the research findings of 29 undergraduates from colleges and smaller universities around the state who have spent the summer working on cutting-edge biomedical research projects with mentors at Marshall and West Virginia University.

The keynote speaker is Darryle Schoepp, Ph.D., a former Marshall faculty member who now leads research at pharmaceutical giant Merck and Company as senior vice president and neuroscience franchise head. Schoepp will speak on new drug therapies on the horizon for treating diseases of the central nervous system.

WV-INBRE, which is designed to support biomedical research in the state, is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to Marshall University, in cooperation with West Virginia University and several of the state's colleges and smaller universities.

Summer research program students presenting at the conference represent the University of Charleston, West Virginia State University, Bluefield State College, West Virginia Wesleyan University, West Liberty State University, Concord University, Alderson-Broaddus College, Shepherd University, Bethany College and Wheeling Jesuit University. Faculty from West Virginia State and West Virginia Wesleyan also will present.

 Symposium coordinator Dr. Elsa Mangiarua of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine said WV-INBRE's goals include promoting education and research training in the biomedical sciences, providing mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students, promoting awareness of graduate degree programs and careers in biomedical research, and providing support for collaborative research for faculty.

The lead investigator for the WV-INBRE project is Dr. Gary O. Rankin of Marshall's medical school.

 


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Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

MU's chapter of Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity receives highest award from parent organization

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's chapter of Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity has received the highest collegiate award from its parent organization. The award was announced July 17 at Delta Omicron's triennial conference in the Cincinnati metropolitan area.

The chapter received the chapter "Award of Excellence," which includes the categories of music service, outstanding music programs, campus/community service and efficiency..

"I am extremely proud of the chapter's achievements this year as represented by the Award of Excellence," said Dr. Vicki P. Stroeher, associate professor of music at Marshall, who is the chapter's advisor. "The members have worked hard to bring this recognition to Marshall."

In addition, three members of the chapter, who are students at Marshall, performed on the conference's collegiate recital, also on July 17. Angela Crum, trumpet, and Nicole McComas, piano, played "Rustiques" by Eugene Bozza. Austin Seybert, trombone, played "Parable for Solo Trombone" by Vincent Persichetti. All three played "Fandango" by Joseph Turrin.

Delta Omicron is a professional fraternity in the field of music with collegiate chapters established throughout the United States and abroad. The conference marked the organization's centennial in 2009.


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Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM to broadcast all 32 Southeast Regional games

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's national-award winning student radio station, will broadcast all 32 Little League Baseball and Softball Southeast Regional Tournament games at Mitch Stadium in Kenova.

Coverage on 88.1 WMUL-FM and the station's Web site at www.marshall.edu/wmul will begin with the softball tournament Thursday through Monday, July 30 through Aug. 3. The baseball games will be played Aug. 8-14.

WMUL broadcast the 2008 Tournament of State Champions from C-K Little League.


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Thursday July 23, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall University to utilize Everbridge for emergency notification

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has announced a new partnership with Everbridge for emergency notifications of faculty, staff and students via text messages, e-mail and telephone.

 "With this service, we've acquired the ability to quickly communicate emergency and safety-related information through multiple channels with a single click," said Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for information technology/chief information officer for the university. "We believe that once this system is up and running, our Emergency Management Team will be able to communicate far more effectively in an emergency."

Persons who have already signed up for emergency text messages from Marshall will be automatically transferred to the new system, according to Jon B. Cutler, chief information security officer at Marshall. In addition, new and existing students will be invited to provide alternative means of contact, such as a secondary e-mail address or cell phone number, that can be added to the system.

"Our primary objective in implementing this new service is protecting the safety and health of university community members," said Bill Bissett, the university's chief of staff and senior vice president for communications. "The more easily we can communicate vital information, and the more ways we have to contact our community members, the better."

As the new system is phased in, Fox said, several test messages will be broadcast. Students, faculty and staff will be made aware of the testing dates in advance and should be sure that they receive the test messages.

Everbridge, formerly known as 3n Global, is a leading provider of emergency notification services to colleges and universities, health care systems, government agencies and municipalities.


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Thursday July 23, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Music program for young children registering for fall

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Fall registration for "Time For Music," a popular program formerly known as "Grow With Music," is underway. A discount applies to registrations that take place on or before Aug. 1, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University. Sessions begin the week of Aug. 24.

Pappas said that the name change came about due to the discovery of a similar program in Minneapolis, Minn., titled "Growing With Music" that has just started to offer franchises. She emphasized that the Marshall program's curriculum and philosophy will remain the same.

Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3 year olds, and 4 and 5 year olds. Parent participation is required for the classes, which take place in the daytime and early evenings on Mondays through Wednesdays. A maximum of nine children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

"[This program] has afforded our 21-month-old a fun and caring place to learn new communication skills through song, dance, musical instruments and even sign language," said Charlotte Hoffman Norris, a parent-participant. "It has also given me, a working mom, a great opportunity to watch and participate in my son's play and interaction with other children and their parents/grandparents."

Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

For information on "Time For Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at 304-697-0211.


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Tuesday July 21, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program ranks number one in the nation on national assessment test scores

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program is ranked number one in the country for its students receiving the highest overall test scores on a national assessment test.

Five Marshall graduate students earned the Forensic Science Program highest honors on the Forensic Science Assessment Test, a qualifying test offered each year by the American Board of Criminalistics. One of Marshall's students ranked second in overall test results among students from nine other forensic science programs.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the program, said the test is useful for assessing the program's strengths and demonstrating to prospective students and the general public its ability to meet national standards.  "Support obtained by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd enabled the Marshall University Forensic Science Center to build its infrastructure and develop the academic program," he said.

Dr. Pamela Staton, program coordinator, said the test scores are evidence of the high quality education the program provides. "The quality of an academic program can be measured by a program's achievement of national accreditation and how well its students perform on national board examinations," she said. "The Forensic Science Program at Marshall University has achieved both of these honorable distinctions. This translates to high quality forensic science services to law enforcement, the legal profession, and the public as graduates of this program become forensic scientists in the field."

Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program is one of only a few such programs in the country that is Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC)-accredited by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

The students who participated in the test are now graduates of the nationally recognized Forensic Science Program. They demonstrated their knowledge in disciplines including forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent prints, questioned documents, fire debris, and firearms/tool marks.

The test is offered to students in their last semester of an academic forensic science program. While seeking their first job, recent college graduates may use their test results to demonstrate their knowledge across a broad range of forensic science disciplines.

The nine forensic science programs that participated in the exam included Marshall University, Arcadia University, Cedar Crest College, Duquesne University, Ohio University, Penn State University, Sam Houston University, University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of North  Texas.

The American Board of Criminalistics offers a wide array of testing and certification services that focus on the forensic sciences.


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Monday July 20, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mike Hamrick named director of athletics at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mike Hamrick, director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas for the past six years and a 1980 graduate of Marshall University, has been named director of athletics at Marshall University, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. Hamrick replaces Bob Marcum, who retired.

Hamrick, 51, was introduced by Kopp at a news conference this afternoon in the Hartley Room at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. He will assume his duties in mid-August.

"In Mike Hamrick, we identified an outstanding leader for our athletic program, an individual of uncompromising integrity, experience and accomplishment," Kopp said. "He brings to Marshall University a vision for athletics that we can all embrace and support. His proven experience and accomplishments unequivocally demonstrate his ability to translate vision into action that leads to success. I cannot emphasize enough the value that this individual brings to our university and community.

"An added, but by no means less important quality of this individual is that he is a proud and successful Son of Marshall."

Kopp said a diverse group of approximately 30 individuals were considered for the position. Ten formal applications were invited and received.

"I want to thank the members of the search committee and our search consultant, Mr. Bob Beaudine, for their contributions and hard work," Kopp said.

Neal Smatresk, acting president at UNLV, said UNLV's loss is Marshall University's gain.

"Our program has thrived under Mike's leadership and I'm really proud of our scholar athletes and their success," Smatresk said. "Mike has had an impact on the success of our teams and he has a place in the heart of the community here in Las Vegas. We wish Mike and Soletta (his wife) the very best at Marshall."

Hamrick played football at Marshall University from 1976 to 1980, starting at linebacker and defensive end his last two years. After receiving his bachelor's degree in education from Marshall, he earned his master's in sports administration from Ohio University in 1981.

Prior to his current position at UNLV, Hamrick was director of athletics at East Carolina University from 1995 to 2003. He also has been AD at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, assistant AD at Illinois State in Normal, Ill., and assistant AD at Kansas University in Lawrence, Kansas.

"It's great to be back home," Hamrick said. "I am thrilled to be rejoining the Marshall University family and plan to work hard to help advance the success of Thundering Herd athletics in all facets. I thank President Kopp for giving me this opportunity."      

Hamrick is a native of Clendenin, W.Va., and a graduate of Herbert Hoover High School. He and Soletta are the parents of three children - twin sons, Brett and Justin (21), and daughter, Mollie Ann (18).


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Wednesday July 15, 2009
Contact: Don Van Horn, Dean, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-2964

Marshall to participate in MAGNETS program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts and Center for International Programs are participating in a new program designed to develop and implement a model international undergraduate program in music.

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) in the U.S. Department of Education has awarded $250,000 to Marshall University for the College of Fine Arts Music Department's Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students (MAGNETS) program. Ninety percent of the $277,587 project will be funded by FIPSE, with the remaining 10 percent funded by the Music Department and the Center for International Programs.

"We are indebted to Dr. Ben Miller, the principal investigator, and Mr. Julio Alves for their work on this project and to Dr. Clark Egnor for bringing it to our attention and his support in the grant-writing process," said Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of Marshall's Department of Music. "FIPSE grants are highly competitive and we should be proud that our department has been chosen to receive one.  It is another testament to the work our faculty does on a daily basis and the strong reputation they have established for this department.  All of us are winners, and our students will once again prosper and have a unique opportunity thanks to this program."

Marshall Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston said receiving the FIPSE grant is  quite an accomplishment for the university.

"We are extremely proud of our College of Fine Arts and its Department of Music for being one of eleven institutions in the nation to be awarded this FIPSE grant," Ormiston said. "These grants are highly competitive, and it is with great esteem that we announce our award. Of those eleven programs chosen, ours was the only arts initiative to be funded."

In the planning stage since July 15 of last year, the MAGNETS project includes Morehead State University in Kentucky and Goias Federal University and Santa Catarina State University in Brazil.

The objective of this project is to develop and implement a model international program in music, utilizing an integrated curriculum that will contribute to educational excellence and innovation in the field and better prepare students for the competence level required by the modern, global job market. The program of study will utilize the strengths of each partner university.

During the implementation phase of the project 18 students from the U.S. will study in Brazil for one semester or one academic year at one of the two Brazilian universities. During the same period, 18 students from Brazil will spend one semester or one academic year in the U.S. at either Marshall or Morehead State. Six faculty members from each of the U.S. institutions will participate in the project by carrying out lecturing and performance assignments at the partner institutions.

In addition to the knowledge and skills in music, during their study abroad experience, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of international, political and economic issues. They will gain transnational competencies, cross-cultural communication skills, understanding and familiarity with local customs and traditions, and an ability to adapt to new circumstances and deal constructively with difference.

According to Dr. Clark Egnor, Executive Director of Marshall University's Center for International Programs, the grant promotes international collaboration among universities. "This project, through the exchanges of faculty and students, will create long-lasting ties between Marshall University and institutions in Brazil," he said.


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Wednesday July 15, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to participate in MAGNETS program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts and Center for International Programs are participating in a new program designed to develop and implement a model international undergraduate program in music.

 

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) in the U.S. Department of Education has awarded $250,000 to Marshall University for the College of Fine Arts Music Department's Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students (MAGNETS) program. Ninety percent of the $277,587 project will be funded by FIPSE, with the remaining 10 percent funded by the Music Department and the Center for International Programs.

 

"We are indebted to Dr. Ben Miller, the principal investigator, and Mr. Julio Alves for their work on this project and to Dr. Clark Egnor for bringing it to our attention and his support in the grant-writing process," said Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of Marshall's Department of Music. "FIPSE grants are highly competitive and we should be proud that our department has been chosen to receive one.  It is another testament to the work our faculty does on a daily basis and the strong reputation they have established for this department.  All of us are winners, and our students will once again prosper and have a unique opportunity thanks to this program."

 

Marshall Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston said receiving the FIPSE grant is  quite an accomplishment for the university.

 

"We are extremely proud of our College of Fine Arts and its Department of Music for being one of eleven institutions in the nation to be awarded this FIPSE grant," Ormiston said.
"These grants are highly competitive, and it is with great esteem that we announce our award. Of those eleven programs chosen, ours was the only arts initiative to be funded."

  

In the planning stage since July 15 of last year, the MAGNETS project includes Morehead State University in Kentucky and Goias Federal University and Santa Catarina State University in Brazil.

 

The objective of this project is to develop and implement a model international program in music, utilizing an integrated curriculum that will contribute to educational excellence and innovation in the field and better prepare students for the competence level required by the modern, global job market. The program of study will utilize the strengths of each partner university.

 

During the implementation phase of the project 18 students from the U.S. will study in Brazil for one semester or one academic year at one of the two Brazilian universities. During the same period, 18 students from Brazil will spend one semester or one academic year in the U.S. at either Marshall or Morehead State. Six faculty members from each of the U.S. institutions will participate in the project by carrying out lecturing and performance assignments at the partner institutions.

 

In addition to the knowledge and skills in music, during their study abroad experience, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of international, political and economic issues. They will gain transnational competencies, cross-cultural communication skills, understanding and familiarity with local customs and traditions, and an ability to adapt to new circumstances and deal constructively with difference.

 

According to Dr. Clark Egnor, Executive Director of Marshall University's Center for International Programs, the grant promotes international collaboration among universities. "This project, through the exchanges of faculty and students, will create long-lasting ties between Marshall University and institutions in Brazil," he said.

 

###


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Thursday July 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

About 80 high school students to attend 'Fun With Science' at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 80 rising 9th grade students from southern West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 12-17 to participate in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for the participating students. It is offered in 26 West Virginia counties. The students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools.

The opening ceremony and kickoff dinner for the summer institute at Marshall, which is titled "Fun With Science," is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 12 in multipurpose room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center.

David Cartwright, program director for the event at Marshall, said a similar "Fun With Science" camp for rising 9th graders is taking place later this summer at Shepherd University.

"The 'Fun With Science' camp at Marshall University this year will expose the students to a style of learning that we find in college," Cartwright said. "It also will prepare the students for college life in some degree, and for classes similar to those they will take in their beginning years of high school."

Cartwright said "Fun With Science" will help students develop critical thinking skills and study skills that will help them as they advance through high school and college.

The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established in 1994 with 45 students from two counties.

The emphasis this year, Cartwright said, is on diabetes.

"West Virginia is the number three state for diabetes," he said. "Through 'Fun With Science,' we want to give these kids tools to not only help themselves, but their family members as well. They will learn what can be done to prevent diabetes and then have the knowledge to teach their family members what they have learned. 

For more information on the HSTA summer institute, contact Cartwright at 304-696-6024.


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Wednesday July 8, 2009
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Dr. Monica Brooks appointed Assistant VP for Information Technology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monica Brooks, MUOnline Director of Instructional Design Skills and Assessment at Marshall University since March 2008, has been appointed Assistant Vice President for Information Technology: Online Learning and Libraries at MU.

In her new role, which took effect July 1, Brooks continues to head up the MUOnline e-course division and is adding several library departments to her new duties.

Brooks has held various positions at Marshall University with an emphasis in libraries and technology since 1995. She provides regular campus faculty training and development opportunities as the current director of MUOnline and member of the library faculty. Recent projects include the development of an award-winning online certificate program and associate degree for library paraprofessionals with an emphasis on public library training and development at the Marshall Community & Technical College.

"Dr. Brooks has an enormous amount of enthusiasm, a tremendous work ethic and is very innovative," said Dr. Jan Fox, Senior Vice President for Information Technology/CIO at Marshall. "Her professional background in libraries, online instruction and higher education gives her some unique qualifications for her new role."

Brooks' ongoing service initiatives include 2007-09 faculty representative for the Institutional Board of Governors, founding board member for the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia, member of the president's ad-hoc committee to recruit and retain diverse faculty, and ongoing participant in university-wide recruitment and retention efforts.

"It is truly a pleasure to work with some of the most accomplished librarians and staff in the profession," Brooks said. "Marshall University is poised to meet rapid technology changes and anticipate new trends.  There are also several aspects of the online learning environment and the library world that complement each other to provide our students and faculty with quality curriculum support. The IT faculty and staff have already hit the ground running with some new programs and services, and I am delighted to be a part of this team again!"

Brooks served as interim dean of libraries at Marshall University from January 1999 to August 2000, and was the associate dean from August 2000 to March 2008 when she became the director of MUOnline. Since 1997, she has taught at Marshall University as an adjunct professor in various units such as the Marshall Community & Technical College, the College of Education and Human Services, and the Department of English.

Brooks received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from West Virginia University in 1988, her Master of Science in Library Science from the University of Kentucky in 1990, her Education Specialist degree from Marshall University in 2004, and her Doctor of Education degree from Marshall in 2007.


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Tuesday July 7, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars alumni announce $75,000 greatest needs campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars alumni are announcing a $75,000 campaign to ensure the present and future quality and excellence of one of the nation's premier honors scholarship programs in higher education.

The campaign will benefit the Society of Yeager Scholars program at Marshall University, which includes student scholarships, tuition, room and board, computers and study abroad.

The purpose of the "Now More Than Ever Campaign for Yeager Scholars" is illustrated by its title. The campaign will enable the program to build upon its reputation as a leading undergraduate university honors scholarship and continue to attract students who want to take full and creative advantage of the outstanding educational opportunities it offers.

A formal presentation and update is planned for Oct. 30 as part of the 24th annual Society of Yeager Scholars Symposium dinner, which will be held at Marshall University.  All Yeager Scholars alumni are invited to celebrate the campaign and articulate the long-range vision of educational distinction that the Yeager Scholars program offers.

"This campaign is about today. But it is even more so about tomorrow and the day after. We have to think long-term for the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall," said Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim director of the Yeager Scholars program at Marshall University.

To maintain and build the quality of the program, the comprehensive goal of the campaign is to broaden the quality and accessibility of the Society of Yeager Scholars experience with increases in the operating funds of $75,000.

"I am constantly impressed by the students who come to Marshall through the Society of Yeager Scholars," LoCascio said. "Their talent, their curiosity, their motivations, their sense of teamwork, leadership and community are humbling. We want to continue to attract the most talented students based on their ability to do the work, not their ability to pay."

A Society of Yeager Scholars education should be financially accessible to any qualified student, LoCascio said, adding that the campaign will strengthen the society's ability to recruit "only the best" and brightest students, regardless of their financial circumstances.

"This campaign is about our commitment to quality," said Sharron Shaffer, chairman of the development committee of the Yeager board, adding that a campaign involves more than fundraising. "It's a way to reconnect our alumni with our program and Marshall University."

The Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University was founded in 1987. Today there are more than 200 Yeager Scholars alumni living and working in more than 25 states and in foreign countries. A substantial majority have gone on to graduate studies.  They are leaders in many professional fields including medicine, law, business, finance and science, government, politics, military and religion and education.

For more information on the campaign, contact Bob Galardi, director of major gifts with the Society of Yeager Scholars, at 800-438-5395.


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Monday July 6, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Castleberry appointed associate dean of College of Fine Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As of July 1, Dr. David Castleberry has begun serving as associate dean for the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University. He succeeds Michael Cornfeld, who retired after 42 years in the art department at Marshall.

Castleberry is also professor of music and director of choral activities at Marshall. Born and raised in Charleston, S.C., he received his Bachelor of Music degree from Furman University and his Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from The University of Texas at Austin. He has taught on the faculties of Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., and Wagner College on Staten Island, N.Y., during which time he directed the Riverside Choral Society and served as chorus master for the Piccolo Opera Company in Brooklyn.

Castleberry is a recipient of fellowships to the Aspen Choral Institute and the Chorus America Saranac Lake Conductors Workshop and participated in a residence at Les Academies Musicales de Saintes in France.

A recipient of the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award at Marshall, Castleberry has led choral performances throughout the United States and in Europe and has been featured in television and radio broadcasts, recordings, and appearances for the American Choral Directors Association and the West Virginia Music Educators Association, as well as 11 years of performances at Charleston, S.C.'s Piccolo Spoleto Festival. With the Marshall University Choral Union and Orchestra, he has led performances of more than 50 major choral-orchestral works.

He serves currently as Southern Division President of the American Choral Directors Association and chaired the 2008 convention in Louisville, Ky.

 "David Castleberry has been at Marshall for many years and he is highly regarded and respected as a faculty member and as an artist/performer by everyone associated with Marshall," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts. "David is a consummate faculty member and has distinguished himself as a teacher, mentor, scholar and artist, and constructive colleague. He has been a leader in the Department of Music for many years and people trust him."

"I feel fortunate to have worked with such talented and supportive colleagues and students at Marshall University," Castleberry said. "My work during the past 19 years has been a joy. The chance to continue these associations not only with music, but also with our programs in art and theatre, is truly exciting. I am grateful to Dean Van Horn for this chance and am humbled by the high standard that my predecessor, Michael Cornfeld, has set for this position."


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Monday July 6, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Marshall University researcher receives grant to conduct pioneering research in developmental genetics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An associate professor of biological sciences at Marshall University has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the role of genes in controlling animal development.

Dr. Simon Collier's grant is from the NSF's Developmental Systems Program. He will use the $418,000 award to study the genetic control of the basic developmental processes of the fruit fly (Drosophila). Drosophila genetics has been studied for more than 100 years because the organism has many genes and genetic pathways similar to humans.

Collier's research, formally titled "Polarizing A Cell Layer Along Two Axes," has medical significance for the professor, who has a joint appointment in biochemistry and microbiology at the College of Science and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University. He will be studying the genetic control of planar cell polarity - the way cells face within a cell layer.

"Imagine a cell layer like a crowd of people. Usually the cells face in a common direction like a crowd at a concert. We study the genetic mechanisms that align cells in a common direction," Collier explained. "Recently some cases of familial spina bifida (a failure of neural tube closure) have been shown to be due to mutations in a gene first identified as a 'planar cell polarity gene' in the fruit fly. Neural tube closure requires the movement of a cell layer in a specific direction to cover the neural tube. It appears that cells need to be facing in a common direction for the cell layer to move in the right direction."

Collier's research was funded on first submission to the NSF. His lab is considered a pioneer in this research area.

"In previous studies, researchers have looked at how cells are aligned in a single direction, along one axis of the cell layer. My research is beginning to help us understand how cells can be aligned along two axes, in two dimensions," Collier said.

The correct control of planar cell polarity is also vital for many other developmental events in humans including formation of the gut, elongation of the body axis, axon guidance, neural crest migration, cardiovascular development, kidney development (loss of planar cell polarity produces polycystic kidneys), eye lens morphology and patterning of the inner ear and skin.

Collier came to Marshall University in 2003. He earned his Ph.D. in medical genetics from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, did postdoctoral research in developmental genetics at both the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and the University of Virginia, and served as a guest lecturer in biological sciences at the University of Manchester.

His research start-up at Marshall University was funded by West Virginia's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), a National Science Foundation program that coordinates scientific research grants to academic institutions from federal and state agencies.


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Monday July 6, 2009
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Outreach and continuing studies focus of new position at Marshall University

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Dr. Rudy Pauley has been named Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies at Marshall University.

Pauley, formerly interim dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, is responsible for developing a strategic plan for outreach activities and extended education opportunities for the university, according to Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs.

"Though new in name, the responsibilities of the associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies are very much a normal part of Marshall University's daily function and educational mission," Ormiston said. "Dr. Pauley brings a broad array of experience in adult education, community outreach, and a special interest in distance learning and adult education."

The new position will be housed within the Office of Academic Affairs and replaces Marshall's long-standing position of dean of the School of Extended Education. Pauley will operate from both the Huntington and South Charleston campuses.

Pauley will oversee all aspects and activities of the university's extended educational opportunities and regional centers including the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, Teays Valley Regional Center, Marshall's activities at the Erma C. Byrd Higher Education Center in Raleigh County, and the South Charleston Campus. He also will handle the Regents Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Applied Science degree programs and all Marshall course offerings in high schools.

Pauley has served as a faculty member and administrator at Marshall University for 12 years. His doctorate is in Higher Education Administration and his special areas of interest and research include distance education, teacher certification and adult education.

"I am excited about the opportunity to move into the area of outreach and continuing studies for Marshall University," Pauley said. "I truly believe in providing exceptional educational opportunities for adult learners through a variety of venues across the state and region."


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Monday June 29, 2009
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Marshall Jazz Ensemble Leaves for Europe July 4

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nineteen members of the Marshall University Jazz Ensemble will leave Saturday, July 4 to appear at two European jazz festivals. The group will perform at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland and the Jazz e Juan Festival in France before returning to the United States July 13.

"The members of the current ensemble are part of the best jazz group at Marshall in recent memory," said Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall, who directs the group. "In the spring of 2008, the MUJE prepared a recording to submit to the Montreux Jazz Festival and to the Jazz e Juan Festival. We received word that we had been accepted to appear there last fall. The 'die was cast' and the work began."

Last fall semester, auditions were held with the understanding that those selected would be committed to this effort for the entire year not just for the semester. The students were expected to do part of the fund raising necessary to mount this project and to "step up" their level of preparation and performance. In addition, Bingham said, assistance from Marshall faculty and staff in the College of Fine Arts and financial resources provided by the Joan C. Edwards jazz endowment helped make the trip a reality.

An opportunity such as this comes along only once in a lifetime for most students and is important for a number of reasons, Bingham said. "First, it recognizes the talents and accomplishments of our students. They are being featured in two internationally recognized venues and are now ready for the challenge. Second, the opportunity to experience the cultures and environments of Switzerland, Italy and France, while valuable in itself, affirms one of the central components of the curriculum at Marshall: Internationalism. Third, performing at these festivals gives credibility to the quality of Marshall's Jazz Studies program."

Members of the 2009 Marshall University Jazz Ensemble and their home towns are:

  • Jimmy Lykens - Eunice, W.Va.
  • Sean Coughlin - Yorktown Heights, N.Y.
  • Jason Mitchell - Forest Hill, W.Va.
  • Chris Clark - Charleston, W.Va.
  • David Hamilton - Culloden, W.Va.
  • Luke Miller- Meadow Bridge, W.Va.
  • Daniel Ellis - San Angelo, Texas
  • Katie Ferber - Bridgeport, W.Va.
  • Austin Seybert - Bridgeport, W.Va.
  • John Galloway - Kenova, W.Va.
  • Isaac Winland - Sistersville, W.Va.
  • Angela Crum - Union, W.Va.
  • Dylan Elder - Barboursville, W.Va.
  • Briana Blankenship - Grantsville, W.Va.
  • Johnathan Wright - Houston, TX
  • Rodney Elkins - Salt Rock, W.Va.
  • Nicole McComas - Hamlin, W.Va.
  • Wes Hager - Teays Valley, W.Va.
  • Esin Gunduz - Istanbul, Turkey

###


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Friday June 26, 2009
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Warner named College of Liberal Arts associate dean at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jamie Warner, associate professor of political science at Marshall University since 2005, is the new associate dean for MU's College of Liberal Arts.

Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the college, said Warner begins her official duties on Wednesday, July 1.

"Dr. Warner brings much to the office. She is a superior teacher and well-regarded scholar," Pittenger said. "Moreover, she represents the student centered attitude that is the hallmark of this college. In the coming months, Dr. Warner will review our policies and procedures regarding advising and student retention. Our goal is to ensure students have the best possible educational experience while at Marshall University."

Warner has been at Marshall since 2002, when she was hired as an assistant professor of political science. In 2004, she was awarded both the Pickens-Queen and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Awards. Before coming to Marshall, she was a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of the South (Sewanee) from 2001 to 2002.

"I'm very excited about the new challenges this position will present," Warner said. "I'm also looking forward to working with students throughout the College of Liberal Arts, as well as both David and the COLA staff."

Warner received her B.A. from Millersville University in 1991, her M.A. from Penn State University in 1995 and her Ph.D. in political science with a minor in women's studies from Penn State in 2001.


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Spectacular opening ceremony for youth soccer tournament planned July 2 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The opening ceremony of the U.S. Youth Soccer Region I Championships at Marshall University, organizers say, will be a spectacular event.

For certain, the ceremony on Thursday, July 2 at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium will get off to a "flying" start when three skydivers from the All-American Freefall Team from the U.S. Army's famed 82nd Airborne Division in Fort Bragg, N.C., parachute onto the stadium turf to deliver a proclamation that will be read by Gov. Joe Manchin.

The skydivers will jump at 3:50 p.m., or 10 minutes before the official 4 p.m. start of the ceremony. Gates open at 2 p.m. and admission is free. Free parking will be available on all Marshall University surface lots and concessions will be open at the stadium. No outside food or drink will be allowed into the stadium.

The ceremony will last nearly two hours and feature an Olympics-style parade of the 5,000 young athletes from 13 states onto the field. They will be joined on the field by hundreds of referees. A torch run by West Virginia's 1997 Region 1 U-12 soccer champions will conclude the event.

"It will be a terrific ending," said Moppy Lavery, co-chairman with Diane Shattls of the opening ceremony. "They are the only team from West Virginia to ever win the region in any age group. Just about every boy is coming back from all over the country for the ceremony and we are excited to have them. What they did shows the success we can have in West Virginia. They were the number one team in the country."

Lavery said soccer fans throughout the Tri-State Area are encouraged not only to attend the ceremony, but also to attend some of the matches that start Friday, July 3 and run through Tuesday, July 7 on 22 fields at the Barboursville Soccer Complex and the Huntington YMCA Scott Orthopedic Soccer Complex.

"It's going to be so exciting for the city of Huntington," Lavery said of the opening ceremony. "It will be a very festive occasion. We are trying to make it the best ever. We are going to focus on Huntington and Barboursville and show all the good things about our area and the state of West Virginia and Marshall University."

The tournament will attract 268 boys and girls teams, with players ages 11-19, from Connecticut, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Virginia, Vermont and West Virginia. According to the Cabell-Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau, an estimated 16,000 parents, coaches and referees will attend the ceremony and the tournament, resulting in an economic impact of more than $12 million.

West Virginia and the West Virginia Soccer Association are hosting the tournament this year and in 2010 as part of the U.S. Youth Soccer National Championship Series. West Virginia Soccer Association President Len Rogers, who chairs the tournament's local organizing committee, said he expects between 16,000 and 20,000 people to attend the opening ceremony, but "we'd love to fill the stadium."

"In all my years of doing it, we've never had the opening ceremony at a Division I stadium," Rogers said. "This facility will be the best one we've ever had. Marshall's people have been super to work with and Joan C. Edwards Stadium is top notch. It's going to be a gorgeous and memorable opening ceremony."

Pre-opening ceremony activities at the stadium are planned as well. Crossbar competition starts at 3 p.m., a five on five soccer game between mascots starts at 3:25 p.m., and videos featuring Marshall University and the Huntington area will be shown on the video board beginning at 3:42 p.m.

The ceremony begins with greetings from West Virginia Sen. Bob Plymale and Rogers. A flag roll-out follows, with the 249th Army Band of the West Virginia National Guard playing and Randall Reid Smith singing America the Beautiful. Also, the band will play and Smith will sing the National Anthem.

Greetings from Manchin and other local officials, including Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, will follow.

In addition to hosting the opening ceremony, Marshall University's Huntington campus will be used to house an estimated 1,500 people, including players, their families and referees. All four of the Marshall Commons residence halls will be used, along with Buskirk Hall and rooms in Twin Towers East and West not currently occupied by Marshall students.

Breakfast will be served daily throughout the tournament (July 3-7) in the Twin Towers cafeteria and the Harless Dining Hall. Lunch and dinner will be served daily in the Harless Dining Hall.

Players and their families interested in learning more about Marshall University can visit the Gillette Welcome Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 3-4, or take part in campus tours on both days. No reservation is necessary to take campus tours, which begin on the hour from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Gillette Welcome Center, which is located on the corner of Hal Greer Boulevard and 5th Avenue.

The Marshall Recreation Center will be open for soccer tournament participants on Thursday, July 2 (6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.) and Monday, July 6 (6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.). All-day passes can be purchased for $6. Further details are available by calling 304-696-4732.

The Marshall University Bookstore also will be open during the tournament. Hours on Thursday and Friday, July 2-3, are 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday, July 4, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The recreation area on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center will have free pool and ping pong for all soccer players, families and other representatives. Eight championship size pool tables, three table tennis tables and a lounge area with a big-screen TV are available from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, July 2-5.

Volunteers are still needed to help with the opening ceremony and various duties throughout the tournament. To volunteer, persons may contact Kheng McGuire at 304-525-6042 or via e-mail at khengmcguire@aol.com.


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Thursday June 18, 2009
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Marshall University Board of Governors approves tuition increase

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors today approved a tuition and fee increase of $169 per semester for all full-time undergraduate resident and metro students for fiscal year 2009-2010. Tuition and fee increases of $240 for undergraduate non-resident students also were approved. The funds from this increase are necessary to bolster the university's operating budget in light of the recent economic situation affecting both private funds and other revenue streams, as well as expected increases in utilities, insurance and other operating costs.

"Like almost every institution of higher learning across the nation, Marshall University faces significant financial challenges during a time of extraordinary uncertainty and abrupt difficulty associated with the state of our nation's economy and efforts to stimulate its resurgence," said Dr. Stephen Kopp, Marshall University's President. "We want to thank Governor Joe Manchin and the West Virginia Legislature for their remarkable vision, leadership and forbearance in navigating through these difficult times. Thanks to them, state funding for Marshall University and the School of Medicine will remain close to last year's level. We remain vigilant and are realistic about the nature and extent of the multi-year financial challenges that lie ahead beyond this next fiscal year. We have planned and exercised sensible patience with our Board of Governors before presenting a budget plan for consideration by its members. With the passage of this year's state budget and a careful review of our other sources of revenue and the dramatic rise in anticipated operating expenditures, we were left with no choice but to raise our tuition by this amount. Marshall University remains an excellent option for higher education, offering a superb education at an affordable price, especially when compared to in-state tuition rates in neighboring states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia."

The Board, meeting in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, also approved an average room and board increase of $186 per semester.  Tuition and fees for full-time graduate resident and metro students was increased by $178 per semester, with graduate nonresident students' tuition increased by $266. Professional students in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were increased $400 for resident students and $1,000 for non-resident students.

NOTE - "Resident" refers to West Virginia students and "Non-resident" refers to non-West Virginia students.


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Wednesday June 17, 2009
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WMUL student broadcasters win record number of awards for academic year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and the faculty manager from MU's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received three Awards of Excellence and one Award of Distinction in the 15th Annual Communicator Awards 2009 Audio Competition. The winners were named Monday, June 8.

With the addition of these four awards, the WMUL-FM student broadcasters established a new station record of 89 awards for the 2008-2009 academic year with no other contests remaining to be decided. The total includes 34 first-place awards, 15 second-place awards, seven third-place awards and 33 honorable mention awards.  Since 1985, WMUL-FM student broadcasters have won 906 awards.

WMUL students and the faculty manager also received three Platinum Awards, two Gold Awards and two Honorable Mention Awards in The Hermes Creative Awards 2009 Competition. Those winners were named Friday, May 8.

The Communicator Awards come from the International Academy of Visual Arts that recognizes outstanding work in the communications field.  Entries are judged by industry professionals who seek out companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry.  The 2009 contest had more than 7,000 entries.

"I am proud and grateful for the honor these Communicator Awards of Excellence bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Marshall University," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

The Awards of Excellence winning entries by WMUL-FM are in the following categories:

Sports talk program

"Trash Talk Sports:  The Friends of Coal Bowl Edition," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a recent graduate from Montgomery, and Tom Bragg, a senior from Cross Lanes, broadcast Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008.

Employee publication/manual/training

The winner was the "WMUL-FM Promo and PSA Production Manual," written by Chuck Bailey and Adam Cavalier. The manual was written for the student and community volunteer staff members of the campus radio station and was published in December 2007.

Audio podcast

"Ye Olde C-USA Report," with host Brian Dalek, a recent graduate from McMechen; reporters Tom Bragg; Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; Dave Traube, a junior from Beckley; James Roach, a junior from Richwood; and Tony Viola, a freshman from Follansbee; broadcast Friday, Oct. 17, 2008.

The Award of Distinction winning entry by WMUL-FM was in the following category: 

Feature package

"The Toastman," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, Aug. 4, 2008.

Winners of the Communicator Awards come from radio stations, production facilities, advertising and public relations agencies, corporate communications departments, government entities, technicians, narrators, writers, and other professionals associated with the production of audio broadcasts and materials.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having broadcast one of the best sports talk programs in the country, to have WMUL-FM staff members identified for writing one of the best training manuals available and to be acknowledged as having produced a highly regarded radio sports program available online as a podcast," Bailey said.

In the Hermes Competition, the Platinum Award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

Radio newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Mark Swinkels, international student from Nieuwleoop, Holland; news anchors Whitney Thomas, a senior from Wheeling; Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; and sports anchor Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin; broadcast Thursday, April 24, 2008.

Radio sports program

"A Glimpse at Herd Heaven: The 2007-2008 Marshall Men's Basketball Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast  prior to the Marshall-Wheeling Jesuit exhibition basketball home opener Saturday, Nov. 1, 2008.

Radio sports program

"Herd Roundup" for Friday, Nov. 7, 2008. The students who participated in were: Adam Cavalier, co-host and producer; Andrew Ramspacher, co-host and producer; Brian Dalek, reporter; Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, reporter; Robert Iddings, reporter; and Dave Traube, a junior from Beckley, reporter. 

The Gold Award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

Publication/manual/training

"The WMUL-FM Traffic Manual," written by Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, Whitney Thomas, WMUL-FM Traffic Director, and Michael Stanley, WMUL-FM Operations Manager, who is a senior from West Hamlin.  The "WMUL-FM Traffic Manual" was written for the student and community volunteer staff members charged with producing the campus radio station's daily programming logs.

Radio news reporting podcast

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the

"5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

The Honorable Mention Award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

Radio sports play-by-play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Houston football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling; color commentator Adam Cavalier; sideline reporter Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi; and engineer Tony Viola, a freshman from Follansbee.

Radio news reporting podcast

"Salvation for the Powerless," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Monday, Feb. 2, 2009.

The Hermes Creative Awards are administered and evaluated by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals.  The Hermes Creative Awards are an international competition created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media. There were approximately 3,700 entries in The Hermes Creative Awards 2009 Competition from throughout the United States and several countries. 


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Tuesday June 16, 2009
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Marshall Theatre to premiere four new works

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - If you think there are no original ideas out there lately, then drop by Marshall University's Huntington campus during The New Works Festival 2009 to see the premieres of four new plays by local and national playwrights, presented by Marshall University Theatre Alliance and the Marshall University College of Fine Arts. 

The three-night festival will present both staged and un-staged readings of four new plays over three consecutive evenings, June 18 through 20. All readings will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Each evening's readings will be followed by a discussion/question-and-answer session with the playwright, director and cast.  Participation is both welcome and encouraged. The schedule of events is as follows:

        On Thursday, June 18, two new one-act plays by local/national playwright Jonathan Joy will be presented. The first, "Senate Idol," is a satirical look at the Ohio senate race using the popular reality television show as a backdrop. Contestants compete for one of the most important jobs in the state of Ohio, not in the polls, but by "phoning or texting." The only thing that will ensure their place of a senate seat is the TV viewing audience. The second, "Fly by Night," is a comedy that asks the question, "Is there extraterrestrial life out there, and if there is, are they interested in American politics, marital infidelity and life in southern Ohio?"

        On Friday, June 19, a new holiday comedy titled "The Pep Sturdley Family Christmas Special," by Clint McElroy, will be performed. Pep is an American icon and his family gathers annually to celebrate the holidays with some good ol' fashioned fun, song and humor. The problem is, Pep's family dysfunction turns the hour-long live broadcast into a chaotic nightmare of epic proportions. 

      On Saturday, June 20, "Best Imitation," a new musical drama by West Virginia playwright and Marshall University Theatre Alumnus Jeremy Richter, closes out the festival. A contemporary twist on the "boy meets girl" musical genre, this is a dark and sensitive story that follows the strained relationships of mismatched couples looking for love and rarely finding it.

To purchase tickets, visit the Marshall University Theatre box office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center or call 304-696-ARTS (2787). Box office hours are Monday through Friday from 1 to 5 p.m.  Tickets are priced at $12 per evening or $20 for a full festival pass (all three nights).

For further information, contact Jack Cirillo at 304-696-2511 or the box office at 304-696-2787.


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Tuesday June 16, 2009
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Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars program receives $15,000 grant from Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A grant of $15,000 from the Board of Trustees of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., will help support Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars.

The donation, which Marshall University received on June 11, is the second gift from the California-based Hilton Foundation, which was established in 1944 by hotel entrepreneur Conrad N. Hilton. Offices are located in Los Angeles, Calif., and Reno, Nev. The first gift, also $15,000, was presented in August 2008.

"This gift, as stipulated in our proposal, will be deposited into the Society of Yeager Scholars greatest needs fund to support our current and in-coming Yeager Scholars," said Bob Galardi, Director of Major Gifts for the Society of Yeager Scholars. "The grant will assist us in our efforts to replace the funds lost in the market over the past few months, and compete with the rising costs of our Yeager Scholars' studies at Marshall."

"The continued kindness of the Hilton Foundation demonstrates the importance of securing new funding sources needed to grow our program and our university into the 21st Century," Galardi said.

For more information or to contribute to the Society of Yeager Scholars, contact Galardi at (304) 696-3336 or e-mail him at galardi@marshall.edu.


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Thursday June 11, 2009
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Engineering Academy at Marshall University attracts students from seven states



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Thirty-six students from high schools in seven states will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, June 14 through Friday, June 19 to take part in the ninth annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE).

Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the engineering academy is one of the highlights of summer for the college. It provides an excellent opportunity for high school students to explore engineering as a career, to meet practicing engineers, and to experience living on Marshall's campus.

"We've been pleased and honored during the past eight years to host the students participating in the camp," Dulin said. "We look forward to meeting the outstanding students participating this year as well."

Dr. William Pierson, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science at Marshall, said one theme of the camp's activities is teamwork - the importance of teamwork in planning and in working together to achieve a common goal.

"The academy is a good way to make students aware of the important role of engineers in our modern society and what an exciting profession engineering is," Pierson said.

He said one of the major themes of the 2009 academy is "Engineers Make a Difference."  To help emphasize this theme, Rodney Holbert of Burgess & Niple (an engineering and architectural firm headquartered in Columbus, Ohio) will give a presentation on opening day about his experiences with Engineers Without Borders.

Beth Wolfe, MU's director of recruitment, said not only is the academy a great way for students to explore the field of engineering, it is a wonderful opportunity for them to explore Marshall University and all it has to offer.

"By living in our residence halls and interacting with our faculty and students, they get a real sense of life at Marshall," Wolfe said.

The academy is funded through donations from individuals and corporations. This year's premier sponsors, Chesapeake Energy and the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI), contributed a combined $50,000 allowing the academy to expand activities.

"RTI and Chesapeake are proud partners in supporting a program that allows students to actively participate in such a valuable learning experience," RTI Director and CEO Bob Plymale said. "The additional funding allows the academy to increase the number of students participating, and enhance the learning experience."

Students are selected for the camp based upon their interest in and aptitude for engineering. Grades, courses taken and letters of recommendation are taken into consideration. The camp primarily tries to attract rising high school juniors. 

The 2009 participants include:

Elishah Cabarrus of Huntington; J.P. Calo of Martinsburg, W.Va.; Jordan Coldsmith of Chambersburg, Pa.; Sydney Combs of London, Ky.; Grayson Davis of Huntington; Emily Deinert of Jackson, Ohio; Alex Dutkevitch of Indianapolis, Ind.; Levi Exline of Jackson, Ohio; Ronald FiField of Paw Paw, W.Va;

Colin Frosch of Fairmont, W.Va.; Ethan Garrison of Sistersville, W.Va.; Sam Huffman of Hurricane, W.Va.; Zach Humphreys of Wheelersburg, Ohio; Hollie Keesee of Huntington; Cara Lauber of Fort Collins, Colo.; David Leaphart of Thurman, Ohio; Jason Long of New Martinsville, W.Va.; Brandon Maynard of Fort Gay, W.Va.;

Tori Morgan of Glasgow, Ky.; Carly O'Dell of Fairmont, W.Va.; Mat Pack of Leon, W.Va.; Alex Poindexter of Glasgow, Ky.; Drew Price of Kenova; Conor Pyles of Chapmanville, W.Va.; Luke Rapp of Huntington; David Russell of Barboursville; Allie Shaner of Farmington, W.Va.;

Natalie Shields of Glasgow, Ky.; Tucker Simonton of Orange Park, Fla.; Connor Stephens of Hilliard, Ohio; Dylan Watson of Wayne; Emily Wells of Sistersville, W.Va.; Anthony Whaley of Ironton, Ohio; Lauren Wheeler of Bridgeport, W.Va.; Emily Wildman of Paden City, W.Va., and Ruth Williams of Summersville, W.Va.

Here is the complete schedule of events for the 2009 academy:

Sunday, June 14

  • 2 to 3 p.m.: check-in - Haymaker Hall, Marshall Commons
  • 3 to 5 p.m.: welcome and presentation by Rodney Holbert, PE, PS, Burgess and Niple, "Engineering Without Borders" - Smith Hall 154. Families of students are encouraged to stay for this event.
  • 5 to 6 p.m.: dinner - Memorial Student Center cafeteria
  • 6:30 to 9 p.m.: icebreaker and team-building activities - Marshall Recreation Center

Monday, June 15

  • 8 to 9:45 a.m.: lecture time - Weisberg Engineering Lab classroom (WEL 101)
  • 9:50 to 11:30 a.m.: introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing and environmental sampling - Buskirk Field and Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 11:30 a.m. to noon: lunch - Harless Dining Hall
  • 12:30 to 4 p.m.: introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing and environmental sampling - Buskirk Field and Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 4:30 to 5 p.m.: dinner - Harless Dining Hall
  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: introduction to GPS, Jamie Wolfe - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: work on landscape design

Tuesday, June 16

  • 8 to 9 a.m.: introduction to trebuchet design - WEL 101
  • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.: trebuchet design and construction - Buskirk Field
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: luncheon with Society of American Military Engineers members - Harless Dining Hall, Ed Grose Room
  • 12:30 to 2 p.m.: complete trebuchet construction
  • 2 to 3 p.m.: trebuchet competition
  • 3 to 4:30 p.m.: Visualization Lab presentation - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 4:30 to 5 p.m.: dinner - Harless Dining Hall
  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: Intelligent Transportation Systems presentation, Andrew Nichols - WEL 101
  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: work on landscape design

Wednesday, June 17

  • 8 to 9:30 a.m.: introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (using Lego robotics) - GH5
  • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.: work on robot design/construction - GH5
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: lunch - Harless Dining Hall
  • 12:30 to 2 p.m.: finalize robot design - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 2 to 3 p.m.: robotics competition - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 3 to 4 p.m.: concrete testing - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 4:30 to 5 p.m.: dinner - Harless Dining Hall
  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: GPS competition - Memorial Fountain
  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: work on landscape design

Thursday, June 18

  • 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.: field trips
  • 8 to 9:30 a.m.: travel to WV American Water Plant in Charleston
  • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.: WVAW Treatment Plant tour
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: lunch at Golden Corral, Cross Lanes
  • 12:30 to 1:15 p.m.: travel to Toyota Plant in Buffalo
  • 1:15 to 3:15 p.m.: tour Toyota
  • 3:15 to 4 p.m.: travel to J.H. Fletcher
  • 4 to 6 p.m.: tour J.H. Fletcher
  • 6 to 6:30 p.m.: travel to Waves of Fun
  • 6:30 to 9 p.m.: dinner and pool party, Waves of Fun
  • 9 to 9:30 p.m.: return to Marshall

Friday, June 19

  • 9 to 10:30 a.m.: landscape design presentations - Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.: EEAE evaluation and wrap-up - WEL 101
  • 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.: awards luncheon, students, families, sponsors, staff and guests - Memorial Student Center BE5.

Sponsors of the 2009 engineering academy are:

Premier sponsors: Chesapeake Energy and the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute.

Team sponsors:  J.H. Fletcher & Co.; Kanawha Stone; GRW Engineers, Inc.; Chapman Technical Group; The Dow Chemical Company; American Society of Civil Engineers, West Virginia Section, and the Society of American Military Engineers, Huntington Post.

Activity sponsors: West Virginia American Water; Toyota Motor Manufacturing West Virginia, and WV Research Challenge Fund.


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Cavalier named nation's most outstanding collegiate radio sportscaster

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Adam Cavalier of Montgomery, W.Va., a spring 2009 graduate of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and a four-year member of the WMUL-FM broadcast staff, received two prestigious national broadcasting awards this past weekend.

On Friday, June 5, Cavalier won the inaugural Jim Nantz Award as the nation's most outstanding collegiate radio sportscaster. He had qualified for the Nantz Award when the Sportscasters Talent Agency of America (STAA) ranked him as one of the top five outstanding collegiate radio sportscasters in the country.

"The Jim Nantz Award, to me, is recognition for me in a field in which I want to be associated for years to come," Cavalier said of the award named in honor of the four-time Sports Broadcaster of the Year from CBS Sports. "I want to be a play-by-play announcer, and for those skills to be acknowledged publicly on a national scale makes me want to do cartwheels."

On Saturday, June 6, Cavalier took second place and $4,000 in prize money in the National Radio Broadcast News Championship division of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards Program. He also won an additional $1,000 award for Best Use of Radio For News Coverage in the Hearst Awards. The Hearst Awards are considered by many to be the college version of the Pulitzer Prize.

"I've been working for the past two years to place this high in Hearst," Cavalier said. "The award is the culmination of a goal that started a long time ago and is what makes it truly special."

Other finalists for the Nantz Award were sports broadcasters Adam Amin from Valparaiso, Siddique Farooqi from Hofstra, Joel Godett from Syracuse, Jim MacKay from the University of Maine and Justin Shackil from Fordham. Each of the finalists has been recognized as a 2009 Sports Broadcasting STAA All-American.

"An argument can be made for any of these sports broadcasters to have won the award," said STAA CEO Jon Chelesnik. "What Adam does so well is to create great drama with his play-by-play. He isn't just describing the action. His sportscasting is telling a story. His court description and verbiage are also excellent. He is ready to hit the sports broadcasting job market running."

Ryan Epling, a Marshall University graduate student from Wayne, won an honorable mention in the STAA competition.

"These awards demonstrate not only what I can do, but also the quality of student broadcasters that WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University produce," Cavalier said.

Cavalier is Marshall University's third national placer in the Hearst Journalism Awards Program in the past four years. Jennifer Baileys, now part of the "Fox In The Morning" team at WDRB-TV in Louisville, finished third in the television competition in 2006. Paul Gessler, now a reporter and sports anchor at WSAZ, finished second in the television competition in 2007.

Cavalier was in San Francisco working on his assignment for the Hearst Awards when he was informed by phone that he had won the Nantz Award.

"These two awards get fast tracked to the top of my resume," Cavalier said. "Getting both in the same weekend makes it that much more overwhelming. This has been a wonderful two-day span that I won't forget for a very long time."

The Hearst Championships are the culmination of the 2008-2009 Journalism Awards Program, which may be entered only by students enrolled in the 110 member colleges and universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs.

From June 2 through 6, 24 finalists participated in the 49th annual Hearst Championships in San Francisco where they demonstrated their writing, photography, radio and television skills in rigorous on-the-spot assignments. The assignments were decided by media professionals who judged the finalists' work throughout the year and at the Championships. The winners were announced at the awards ceremony in San Francisco.

In early May, Cavalier received the Marvin Stone/Outstanding Contribution as a College Journalist Award from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University. He graduated from Marshall University in May with a perfect 4.0 grade point average.


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'Banjo Women in West Virginia and Eastern Kentucky' on display at the Special Collections Department

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Banjo Women in West Virginia and Eastern Kentucky," a multimedia exhibit of photographs, text, and audio that celebrates the role of women in the development of banjo music in Appalachia, has opened in the Special Collections Department of Marshall University Libraries.

The exhibition was created from information gathered in oral histories with 10 women banjoists - seven from West Virginia and three from Kentucky.  Visitors can learn about the women included in the exhibit while listening to selections of music recorded during their oral history interviews.  The Special Collections Department has the exhibit on display to highlight one of its many unique collections.

The project was completed in 1997 as a collaboration of Dr. Susan Eacker, currently a visiting professor of history at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where she teaches courses in Appalachian Studies, and Geoff Eacker, director of the Arts Center at Miami University.

Susan Eacker conducted the interviews and wrote the text for the displays and Geoff Eacker took the photographs and built the frames and stand.  They received a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship from the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA) at Marshall University and were the first resident fellows at CSEGA.  "Banjo Women" was previously displayed in 2000 at the first CSEGA conference and at the Cincinnati Appalachian Festival in 2001. 

In addition to the exhibit, Special Collections also houses the audio recordings and transcripts of the oral histories. The exhibit is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday and from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p. m. Tuesday through Friday.

Special Collections is located in Room 216 on the second floor of the Morrow Library on Marshall University's Huntington campus. For more information, call 304-696-2343 or e-mail Special Collections at speccoll@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University's 10th annual Jazz Festival to feature bassist Toby Curtright



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Jazz-MU-Tazz, Marshall University's summer jazz festival, will present the faculty combo Bluetrane, guest artist Dr. Toby Curtright and the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Bands in concert at the Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus and at Pullman Square beginning June 24.

Curtright has taught numerous years at the elementary through college level. He received his bachelor's degree and Master of Music degree from Western Illinois University in Macomb, Ill., and his Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. During his tenure at the University of Illinois' outreach program, Curtright led a group of graduate students teaching jazz at East St. Louis High School for the new Miles Davis Institute. Prior to that, he was the professor of bass and jazz studies at Minnesota State University at Moorhead.

An active performer, adjudicator and clinician, Curtright has performed with numerous jazz greats including Ron, Cecil & Dee Dee Bridgewater, Mark Colby, Tom Garling, The Four Freshmen, Little Anthony and The Imperials, Paul McKee, Mike Lee, Bobby Shew, Arturo Sandoval and Paul Wertico.

Bluetrane, the Marshall faculty jazz combo which will perform Thursday night, was created to provide a professional model for the students at Marshall and to establish a musical ensemble devoted to the performance of jazz, which has been termed "America's National Treasure." Bluetrane's personnel includes Ed Bingham, saxophone and Director of Jazz Studies at Marshall; Martin Saunders, trumpet; Mike Stroeher, trombone; Sean Parsons, piano; Mark Zanter, guitar; and Steve Hall, percussion.

Collegiate and high school students will participate in the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Bands and student combos Friday and Saturday. During the festival, they develop their skills in improvisation and learn about the history and theory of jazz. The collegiate members of the festival are primarily current students at Marshall. The high school participants represent a number of schools throughout the area, including Spring Valley, Cabell Midland, Bridgeport, Winfield, Sherman and Calhoun high schools.

Jazz-MU-Tazz was founded in 2000 to celebrate the opening of the Jomie Jazz Center and to foster jazz in Huntington. Professional musicians, Marshall University faculty, collegiate and high school musicians combine their talents to preserve America's true musical art form.

Here is a complete schedule of events:

        Wednesday, June 24, 7:30 p.m. at the Jomie Jazz Center: bassist Toby Curtright

        Thursday, June 25, 7:30 p.m. at the Jomie Jazz Center: Bluetrane with bassist Toby Curtright

        Friday, June 26, 7:30 p.m. at the Jomie Jazz Center:  Jazz-MU-Tazz Student Combos

     Saturday, June 27, 5 p.m. at Pullman Square: Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Bands with Toby Curtright

All events are free and open to the public. For further information, persons may contact Bingham at 304-696-3147 or by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts announces creation of new essay competition for undergraduate students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced a new essay competition that pays tribute to former Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall and local Circuit Court Judge Dan O'Hanlon and gives all undergraduate students the opportunity to win up to $1,500 in prize money.

The Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition was created with a $50,000 anonymous donation. Its purpose is to encourage Marshall University undergraduate students to study the historical and contemporary significance of the Constitution of the United States of America and the effect the Marshall court had in establishing the importance of the Supreme Court.

Judge O'Hanlon has served as professor and chair of the Marshall University Criminal Justice Department and has dedicated his life to the legal system and helping people in the region. Marshall, the namesake of Marshall University, was the third Chief Justice of the United States serving from Feb. 4, 1801 to his death in 1835. Under his leadership, the Supreme Court became a powerful branch of government that complements the legislative and executive branches.

"There are many goals for the essay competition," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "We wish for students to learn more about the Constitution and its importance as an essential political and legal document. We also wish to honor the namesake of this University, John Marshall, who ensured the strength of the court as a mechanism that, among other responsibilities, balances power between the executive and legislative branches of government."

"This competition also celebrates the spirit of civic engagement evident in one of our local judicial leaders, O'Hanlon, whose professional and private work is a model for our students," Pittenger said.

Marshall University honors "Constitution Day" (Sept. 17, 1787) through a series of public events that celebrate the historic document. The winners of the essay competition will be announced Sept. 17 as a part of the University's Constitution Week activities. The grand prize winner will receive $1,500. The runner-up will receive $750.

The topic for the 2009 essay is as follows:  "Free speech in the 'marketplace of ideas' is a cherished but much-debated right in this society.  Nowhere is it deemed more valuable, constructive and necessary than on a university campus.  Should colleges and universities be allowed to place restrictions on what is reasonable speech for faculty?"

Pittenger said all essays should be approximately 10 pages in length using double spacing, one-inch margins and an easy-to-read 12-point font. Students are free to use a popular style guide (e.g., MLA, Chicago Manual of Style, American Psychological Association, or other guide) for the presentation of quotations and reference sources. All submissions must present a complete reference section and provide appropriate reference to the ideas and words of other writers.

Essays will be evaluated on the following criteria: scope of essay, completeness of research, clarity of expression, and originality of thought. For more information on the contest, go to http://www.marshall.edu/cola/Events/The%20JohnMarshallEssayCompetitionCallForEssays.pdf.

The essay should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document file to Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, at pittengerd@marshall.edu, no later than Aug. 24.

--------------------------------

Photo: Judge Dan O'Hanlon speaks during a reception June 10 at Marshall University in which a new essay competition that pays tribute to O'Hanlon and former Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall was announced. The Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition was created with a $50,000 anonymous donation.

Photo by Patrick Stanley/Marshall University.

 


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Marshall University announces members of search committee established to select new athletic director

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today announced that he has chosen 10 men and women to serve on the search committee that will select the university's next athletic director.

The search committee will be chaired by John Hess, who is a member of the MU Board of Governors. The other committee members include:

         A. Michael Perry, Marshall University Board of Governors

         Robert Bookwalter, Ph.D., faculty athletic representative

         Camilla Brammer, Ph.D., faculty senate representative

         Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs

         Robert Plymale, Executive Director, Rahall Transportation Institute

         Larry Tweel, MU Foundation representative

         Sean Hornbuckle, Student Government Association president

         Mark George, Big Green Foundation representative

         Steve Ellis, Charleston Quarterback Club representative

"We appreciate the service of these committee members as we conduct this national search for the next athletic director at Marshall University," Kopp said. "I especially want to thank John Hess for his leadership in chairing the committee. The committee will be working with our search firm, Eastman & Beaudine Inc., to select the best candidate possible."

An interim athletic director will be announced in the near future.


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Longtime administrator, professor Dr. Donna J. Spindel named dean of Graduate College at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Donna J. Spindel, who has spent the past 33 years as a faculty member and an administrator at Marshall University, has been named dean of the university's Graduate College.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said Spindel will begin her duties on July 1. She replaces Dr. Leonard Deutsch, who is retiring after 39 years of service to MU.

Spindel's administrative background at Marshall includes service as a chair in two different departments, as associate dean and interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, as faculty coordinator for online instruction and as director of University Honors. She came to Marshall in 1976 as an assistant professor of history.

Most recently, Spindel served as interim chair of the department of English from 2008 to 2009.

"I am very pleased that Dr. Spindel has accepted the position of dean of the Graduate College," Ormiston said. "Her extensive administrative experience will be a great benefit as she facilitates planning and development of graduate programming. Her understanding of the demands placed on graduate programs at this time presents considerable opportunities for review and development."

Spindel said she is honored to have been selected to serve as the dean of the Marshall University Graduate College.

"I was attracted to this position because it is one of the few at Marshall which offers such a broad view of academic units across the university," she said. "I am also excited by the prospect of working closely with Marshall University's nearly 50 MA and doctoral degree programs, of serving as a central advocate for graduate education at Marshall, and of providing leadership in our ongoing efforts to shape graduate education in the 21st century world."

Spindel graduated in 1971 from Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts with a B.A. in History, with distinction, received her master's in 1972 from Duke University, and received her Ph.D. in Early American History in 1995, also from Duke.


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Herd fans invited to ThunderFest in Cincinnati; Chris Crocker to throw out first pitch

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association, the MU Alumni Club of Cincinnati and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation are sponsoring the 2009 Great American ThunderFest and Big Green Coaches' Tour golf outing Sunday, June 7 and Monday, June 8 in Cincinnati.

Many special events are planned over the two days, including Sunday's 1:10 p.m. baseball game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Chicago Cubs at Great American Ballpark. Former Marshall football standout Chris Crocker, a safety with the Cincinnati Bengals and six-year veteran of the National Football League, will throw out the ceremonial first pitch.

On Monday, the Big Green Coaches' Tour rolls into Cincinnati with a golf scramble and a reception/dinner at the Legendary Run Golf Course. Marshall coaches and former Marshall athletes will be on hand for the golf scramble and dinner.

Special events and activities at Sunday's baseball game include a pre-game reception inside Great American Ballpark that will include guests from Marshall University and the Reds' organization, special Marshall University recognition during the game, and the singing of the National Anthem and "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" by Huntington vocal ensemble the Thunder Tones.

Crocker, former Marshall assistant football Coach Red Dawson, MU President Stephen J. Kopp, Thundering Herd offensive coordinator John Shannon and other Marshall celebrities will attend pre-game festivities in the stadium's Fan Zone. ThunderFest participants can enter the stadium at 11:10 a.m. and watch the game together from the sun deck in right field.

Several packages at different price levels are available for the weekend. Go to http://store.muclubcincy.com/home.php or www.greatamericanthunderfest.com for details.

Individuals may purchase a baseball bat autographed by Marty Brennaman, the Hall of Fame broadcaster for the Reds. The bat features the saying "And this one belongs to the Herd!" and the Marshall logo. The Great American ThunderFest offers hotel and shuttle services for the event. Participants can purchase discounted Reds Hall of Fame tickets, and also may purchase T-shirts for the event.

John Chafin, MU Cincinnati Club secretary and a former Marshall baseball player, said that although the game officially is a sellout, tickets still may be purchased for those wanting to attend ThunderFest. He also said Dawson and former Young Thundering Herd football player Tom Smythe will be at home plate before the game with one of the two catching Crocker's first pitch.

For more information on the entire weekend, contact Chafin at 513-404-8484 or by e-mail at jchafin7@hotmail.com; Rex Johnson at 513-659-6948; Tish Littlehales at 304-416-2028; or, the Marshall University Alumni Association at 304-696-2901.


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Monday June 1, 2009
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Keramos potters to exhibit at Renaissance Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Keramos and Friends, a group of present and former members of Keramos Student Pottery Guild at Marshall University, will present an art exhibition consisting of ceramic vessels, wall tiles and paintings. The exhibition will begin with an opening reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, June 7 at the Renaissance Gallery, 900 8th St., Suite 20, in Huntington, and will continue through June 28.

"This exhibition provides an opportunity to showcase the work of a dozen ceramics students," Earline Allen, ceramics professor, said. "It also allows the community to come out and view the work of these very talented artists. Exhibiting work is an important part of earning a degree in art."

"Showing our work with former Keramos members is a way for us to form a lasting art network," Allen added. "As an extended group we have many more opportunities than we would otherwise.  It is also a way in which alumni can continue to be a part of the Marshall art community."

Pieces of art from Keramos will also be available for sale.


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Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute Offers Scholarship for Off-Highway Vehicle Course

 

HUNTINGTON. W.Va.
- The Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute, along with the National Off-Highway Vehicle Conservation Council (NOHVCC), is offering a scholarship for the fall 2009 semester off-highway vehicle (OHV) recreation management course.  Scholarship applications are due June 15.

Persons may request an application or more information on the scholarship by contacting the NOHVCC staff at trailhead@nohvcc.org.

For further information regarding the course and scholarship, contact Dr. Raymond Busbee at Busbee@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University doctoral student's award-winning research explores 'college-to-university' name changes

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Award-winning research by a Marshall University doctoral student shows that from 1996 to 2005, West Virginia had the largest percentage of "college-to-university" rebrandings of any state or U.S. territory.

"Survival of the Fittest? The Rebranding of Higher Education in West Virginia" explores the name-change phenomenon in the Mountain State. The findings, by Dr. James M. Owston, a 2007 graduate of Marshall University's Leadership Studies program, have garnered both national and international praise.

"A recurring reason for the name-change phenomenon was to gain notoriety and prestige and to increase the number of students in attendance as well as to raise money more easily," said Owston. "What I discovered is that although some schools did have terrific growth after changing their brands, most did not. In most cases, enrollment slowed and, while the schools still experienced a yearly growth in enrollment, the rate of growth that they experienced was certainly not as great as they had before the name change."

"By and far, changing names was not the panacea the institutions thought it was going to be," said Owston, who is Senior Academic Officer for Instructional Technology for Mountain State University in Beckley, W.Va. MSU was formerly The College of West Virginia. It underwent a name change in 2001.

His adviser at Marshall, Dr. Barbara Nicholson, nominated Owston's work for the 2009 Alice L. Beeman Dissertation Award for Outstanding Research in Communications and Marketing for Educational Advancement from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education as well as the 2008 Leo and Margaret Goodman-Malamuth Outstanding Dissertation Award for Research in Higher Education Administration from the American Association of University Administrators. "Survival of the Fittest" came away with top honors both times.

"I've worked with doctoral students for 18 years now, but have never nominated a dissertation for national consideration," Nicholson said. "Jim's work was different though, primarily because of its unique format. It also focused on a subject that's both contemporary and relevant in higher education, so I thought it had an excellent chance of being recognized."

Owston's research is nationwide in scope, but the focus is on West Virginia, including those institutions that have undergone names changes including:

  • Morris Harvey College to The University of Charleston in 1979
  • Salem College to Salem Teikyo University in 1989 (rebranded as Salem International University in 2000)
  • Wheeling Jesuit College to Wheeling Jesuit University in 1996
  • West Virginia Institute of Technology to West Virginia University Institute of Technology in 1996
  • The College of West Virginia to Mountain State University in 2001
  • Concord College to Concord University in 2004
  • Fairmont State College to Fairmont State University in 2004
  • Shepherd College to Shepherd University in 2004
  • West Virginia State College to West Virginia State University in 2004
  • Ohio Valley College to Ohio Valley University in 2005
  • West Liberty State College's recent transition to West Liberty University in 2009

For more information or to read the dissertation in its entirety, go to http://www.newriver.net/.

The Marshall University Leadership Studies program is offered on the South Charleston campus.


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Friday May 29, 2009
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Marshall University retains firm for athletic director search

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The services of Eastman & Beaudine Inc. have been retained to conduct a national search for the next athletic director of Marshall University. Private funds will be used for this process.

"We are very pleased to be working with a firm that has strong record of success with searches of this kind," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp.

For more information about Eastman & Beaudine, please contact Katy Young at 972-312-1012 or katy@eastman-beaudine.com.


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Marshall University selects newest members of Society of Yeager Scholars

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced the six newest members of its Society of Yeager Scholars. Five students are from West Virginia and one is from Florida.

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, Interim Executive Director of the MU's Center for Academic Excellence, said the students were chosen after a stringent selection process that involved three levels of review: examination of their applications and two interviews - one by local interviewers near their homes and one by a panel of interviewers on the Marshall University Huntington Campus.

"These incoming scholars are outstanding," LoCascio said. "They all have exemplary academic records and show very strong indicators of leadership potential. Their talents are varied and we are excited for them to join us at Marshall University."

In previous years, there have been as many as 12 Yeager Scholars selected for a class of scholars. This year, the competition was perhaps even tougher than in the past because the recent economic downturn reduced the number of scholars allowed for the class of 2013, LoCascio said.

"This year, the applicant pool was exceptional and the competition keen. The selection committee is extremely pleased with the Class of 2013 and what its members bring to us in terms of academics, leadership potential and talent," LoCascio said.

The final selection came at the culmination of hundreds of hours of work by many different people - university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars board members and community members.

As Yeager Scholars, the students are required to maintain a rigorous course load with a 3.5 GPA and participate in campus and community activities. They also will have the opportunity to study literature, political science, or history at Oxford University in England in the summer after their sophomore year, and they will have another opportunity for study abroad in a program related to their major and/or their foreign language minor.

LoCascio said the newest group of scholars has a variety of academic interests, as does each year's entering scholars. During Finalist Weekend, which took place in Huntington in early March, they talked with professors about possible majors, such as chemistry, education, engineering, political science, English and molecular biology. They will join 34 other Yeager Scholars already on campus.

The Class of 2013 also will participate in special interdisciplinary seminars and extracurricular activities designed to promote intellectual development and foster emerging leadership skills.

The Society of Yeager Scholars is named for West Virginia native Ret. Brigadier General Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who piloted the first plane to break the sound barrier.

The following students have been selected as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2013:

Kayla Dene Chappelle of Huntington, W.Va. - Chappelle will graduate from Huntington High School. She plans to major in either chemistry or education. In high school she was accepted to the Governor's Honors Academy, received the National Achievement Scholarship for outstanding black American students, was a semi-finalist for the National Achievement Scholarship, participated in West Virginia State Science and Engineering Fair, Maier Latin Cup, was named an Outstanding Chemistry Student for SCORES, and is active in many school clubs and honoraries, and community volunteering. Alexander Reben Edelmann of Arcadia, Fla. -- Edelmann will graduate from DeSoto County High School. He intends to major in engineering. He is a two-time first place winner in his regional State Science and Engineering Fair and was twice a finalist in Florida's State Science and Engineering Fair. In 2007 he received the Thomas A. Edison Award and the U.S. Air Force Achievement Award. He served as team captain for the DeSoto County High School basketball team, the DeSoto County High School tennis team, and was a varsity player for his high school's golf team. His volunteer activities include teaching basketball fundamentals to middle and elementary school students and working at a football camp for at-risk youths. Rikki Nicole Miller of Ripley, W.Va. -- Miller will graduate from Ripley High School. She plans to major in science and pursue a career in medicine. She received an AP Scholar Award, many leadership awards from her county 4-H and from Rotary Club, the Carlos Hilado Award for Science and for Math, and is a Jackson County Junior Fair Grand Champion for leadership. She is president of her local 4-H club, co-captain of Ripley High School Varsity Cheerleading squad, President of Jackson County Teen Leaders, vice president of Take It From Us, a member of the Ripley High School Band, was involved in Student Council, clubs, and is an active community volunteer. Richard Isaac McKown, III of Ravenswood, W.Va. -- McKown will graduate from Ravenswood High School. He intends to major in molecular biology. He received a perfect score on the West Virginia State Writing assessment, is an Honors AP Scholar, a member of the National Honor Society, the Tri-M music honorary, All-State Chamber Choir and placed second at Jackson County Math Field Day. He is dance captain and co-president of his school's Show Choir, involved in student council, and president of school Christians in Action Club. Isaac volunteers for concert, jazz and gospel choirs that perform musical benefits for his community. John Randal Price of Williamson, W.Va. - Price will graduate from Burch High School. He plans to major in political science. He participated in the Academic Games Leagues of America national games as an individual and as a member of the first place team, West Virginia Governor's Honors Academy, Hugh O'Brien Youth Leadership Conference, National Beta Club English contest winner, Mingo County Math Field Day winner, County Spelling Bee Champion, and took first place at his high school's Social Studies Fair in Economics. At Burch High School, he was Green Team President, on the Yearbook staff, involved in Beta Club, National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, RAZE-WV, and C-World. He volunteers for Special Olympics and Vacation Bible School. Shaina Danielle Wichael of Petersburg, W.Va. - Wichael will graduate from Petersburg High School. She intends to major in English and would like to eventually attend law school. She attended Governor's School for the Arts, Governor's Honors Academy, Governor's School for Math and Science, and Rhododendron Girls State. She received the Golden Horseshoe award, first place in the county level Voice of Democracy Contest, and Honorable Mention for Political Science category in West Virginia State Social Studies Fair. At her high school she was vice president of the National Honor Society, a member of student council, and co-captain of the girl's varsity soccer team. Her community activities include being an intern at Petersburg Elementary School and the Maysville Bible Brethren Youth Group.


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Friday May 22, 2009
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Service Awards Luncheon celebrates Marshall University employees



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's 25th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 26 in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

In addition to the service awards, the Employee of the Year will be named during the event.

The following is a list of university staff members who will receive awards.

For 10 years of service: Marlene Alley, Teresa Bolt, Brenda Crawford, Loan Cummings, Marcus Danner, Wanda Dyke, Debra Elliotte, Sheila Fields, Eric Himes, Danny Holland, Camella Holley, Annalisha Johnson, Angela Jones, Darrell Kendrick, Patricia Martin, Kevin Maynard, Linda Mollohan, James Morris, Nada Prickett, Kelli Raines, Billy Shockley, James Sinnette, Kelley Smith, Amanda Standifur, Debra Templeton and Irvin Watts.

For 15 years of service: James Atkinson, Muhammad Chaudhry, Vicki Cole, Darlene Cordle, Phillip Haye, Anita Hill, Joseph Justice, Calvin Kent, Joyce Maynard, Michael McCarthy, Terri Moran, Gregory Pickens, Calvin Rowlings, Rebecca Sloan and Beverly Surratt.

For 20 years of service: Raddar Atchley, Paula Beasley, Lorna Browning, Dana Edmonds, Jerry Gray, Flo Harshbarger, Teresa Holschuh, Judy Little, Leslie Lucas, Raleigh McSweeney, Tammy Moore, James Napier, Stephanie Smith, Tony Waugh, Sandra White, Phyllis White-Sellards  and Nancy Wooten.

For 25 years of service: Sherry Adkins, Tammy Aliff, Gregory Beach, Paul Benford, Karen Bledsoe, Mary Bowsher, Thomas Dorsey, Elizabeth Graybeal, Jacquelyn Hersman, Carol Hoover, Sandra Lloyd, William Lucas, David McKenzie, Marty Newman, Terrence Olson, Margaret Putt, Chrystal Rowe, Sherry Salyers, Phillip Sergent, Johnny Walker and Jacqueline Woolfolk.

For 30 years of service: David Fenney, Rick Haye, JoAnn Jordan, Adrian Lawson, Arissa Prichard, Barbara Roberts, Faye Ronk and Allen Taylor.

For 35 years of service: Patricia Gebhart, Charlene Hawkins, Lynn Mayfield, Vickie Navy and Karl Shanholtzer.

Retirees: Nancy Baumgarner, Margaret Blankenship, Janet Bricker, Brenda Carrico, James Faulkner, Donna Ferrell, Richard Ford, Connie Gray, Juanita Harold, Roberta Holbrook, Carol Hoover, Adrian Lawson, Ted Massey, Linda Mills, Mark Mills, Linda McComas, Raleigh McSweeney, James Myers, Gretchen Oley, Linda Rhodes, Chrystal Rowe, Linda Wallace, Lahoma Weekley and Sandra Winters.

To be eligible for awards, employees must have completed 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 or 35 years of service to Marshall University by May 1, 2009.


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Thursday May 21, 2009
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Dr. Mary Todd named Founding Dean of Marshall University Honors College

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mary Todd, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty for the past five years at Ohio Dominican University in Columbus, Ohio, has been named Founding Dean of the Marshall University Honors College.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Marshall, said Todd will start her new job Aug. 1, 2009. She also will hold a faculty appointment as full professor in Marshall's Department of Religious Studies.

"Dr. Mary Todd is an experienced faculty member and university administrator who has significant background in honors programming," Ormiston said. "I am very excited about the possibilities the creation of the Honors College presents to the University and I am very pleased that Dr. Todd will join Marshall to help us navigate the process of building the Honors College as its Founding Dean.  She will be a great addition to the University community."

Marshall's Center for Academic Excellence will be changed to the Honors College, which will house all honors programs, including the Society of Yeager Scholars. Ormiston said changing the status of the Center for Academic Excellence to an Honors College will bring more visibility of Marshall University to a segment of prospective students whose high school records and test scores place them within the category of honors students.

Todd will collaborate with the provost office, the college deans, department chairs and faculty to design the Honors College.  This design effort should result in a strategic plan for the Honors College that will guide its development for at least three years.

The plan is to have the Honors College in place for opening in fall 2010. Honors students will be admitted as usual but they will be in the Honors College, not the Center for Academic Excellence. The administrative structure of the college will be determined through the strategic planning process.

"I was attracted to Marshall by the commitment of President Stephen Kopp and Provost Ormiston to establish an Honors College to build on the already strong reputation of the Center for Academic Excellence and the Yeager Scholars Program," Todd said. "Honors education serves the entire university as a laboratory for teaching and learning through its model of excellence and innovation.

"I am delighted to have been invited to serve as Founding Dean of the Honors College and I look forward to working together with faculty, staff and students as the college takes its place in the Marshall community."

Before going to Ohio Dominican in 2004, Todd served for two years as Assistant Vice President for Academics at Concordia University-Chicago, where she was responsible for all mission-specific and interdisciplinary curricula and programs while serving as Director of the Honors Program (from 1998 to 2004) and a member of the faculty.

Todd received her bachelor of arts in history in 1969 from Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Ind., and her master of general studies in 1990 from Roosevelt University in Chicago. She earned her Ph.D. in American history in 1996 from the University of Illinois at Chicago.


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Wednesday May 20, 2009
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Marshall University's Equestrian Team looking for a few good riders



Fledgling team qualified for regional competition its first year out

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - After its first year being recognized by the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association, the fledgling Marshall University Equestrian Team is riding off into the summer having earned an invitation to compete regionally.

Team coach Billie Rae Graham said she is proud of her small team and is looking forward to signing up new students for the 2009-2010 academic year. All enrolled undergraduate students are eligible to join the team. There are divisions for beginners, intermediate and advanced riders.

Marshall's team focuses on hunt seat riding. Tryouts for the 2009-2010 academic year will be the second week of classes during the fall semester.

"I couldn't be happier with our showing this year. With just two students, we hit every recognized competition in our region and fared very well against larger, more established teams," Graham said. "I am looking forward to more students learning about the riding opportunity here. We have something for every level."

The IHSA promotes competition for riders of all skill levels that compete individually and as teams at regional, zone and national levels. The association was founded on the principle that any college student should be able to participate in horse shows regardless of his or her financial status or riding level. Emphasis is on learning, sportsmanship, and fun.

"We compete and we do very well, but more importantly, our students learn and grow as equestrians and build relationships with their teammates that will stay with them a lifetime," Graham said. "I think when a lot of young riders realize they can pack their riding boots and their helmets along with their laptops when they head to Marshall University, they will be thrilled!"

To prepare for competitions, team riders are required by IHSA to take one weekly lesson with Graham at Royal Winds Farm in Ona, W.Va., and pay membership fees and team dues for the club sport. Riders do not have to bring their own horses to participate. The IHSA attempts to eliminate the expense of students owning horses, so team members ride horses that are furnished by a host college and choose their mounts by drawing lots. The use of personal equipment is not allowed and practicing is not permitted. The theory behind this structure is to equalize variables of the competition and test the horsemanship of the contestants. Classes range from walk/trot for first-year students to the Open Division for the more experienced riders.

"We raised enough money to show at all the required shows, but not enough to go to Regionals this year, but we do have some sponsors and I think the team will only get bigger, so I'm optimistic that Marshall will represent well next year," Graham said.

This year, Lindsey Jordan Strain, a senior from Hurricane, and Claire Curtis, a junior from Huntington, represented Marshall at horse shows in the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana region and as a team ranked fifth out of seven its first year out. Other colleges in Zone 6 Region 2 are Midway College, Morehead State University, Northern Kentucky University, Ohio University Southern, University of Cincinnati, University of Kentucky, University of Louisville and Xavier University.

To learn more about the MUET or to try out for the team, contact Billie Rae Graham at 304-208-3130 or raverajax@aol.com.

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Photos

Left: Equestrians Claire Curtis, left, and Lindsey Jordan Strain, right, competed for the first Marshall University Equestrian Team this past academic year. Coach Billie Rae Graham will be holding tryouts the second week of classes in the Fall 2009 semester. Right: Lindsey Jordan Strain competes for Marshall University at an Intercollegiate Horse Show Association Show.


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Monday May 18, 2009
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Hollis, Epling take first place in professional competition at NBS convention

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dan Hollis, an associate professor of journalism at Marshall University, and MU graduate student Ryan Epling received first-place awards in professional competition at the National Broadcasting Society (NBS) 2009 National Convention earlier this spring.

The event took place at the LaGuardia Crowne Plaza Hotel in New York, N.Y.

Hollis took first place in the News/Sports/Public Affairs category of the professional electronic media competition for his television news feature about high school wrestling. It marked the fourth consecutive year Hollis has won first place in that category and the fifth time in the past six years.

"I really like doing these kinds of features, combining great video with writing, natural sound and interviews," Hollis said. "It keeps my skill set current. Plus, winning the recognition gives me a little extra credibility in the classroom."

Epling's award was in the professional audio competition category. He took first place for News/Sports/Public Affairs for the Houston-Marshall football game, which aired Oct. 28, 2008. He, Dr. Joseph Blaney from Illinois State University and Dr. Pamela Doyle Tran from the University of Alabama presented a session at the convention.

Epling also was awarded honorable mention for News/Sports/Public Affairs in the professional audio competition for the 2007-2008 Marshall Women's Basketball Season in Review, which originally aired Nov. 2, 2008.   

Epling, who is from Wayne, W.Va., was the only non-faculty member to present his work in the professional portion of the event, and was the first graduate student from Marshall ever to be selected to do so in any competition.


Photos: Dan Hollis (left) and Ryan Epling.

 


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Monday May 18, 2009
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Marshall receives national "Top Ten Award" for family practice

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine ranks third in the nation in the percentage of graduates entering family practice programs and has received a "Top Ten Award" from the American Academy of Family Physicians as a result.

The awards were presented during the 2009 Society of Teachers of Family Medicine spring conference April 30-May 3 in Denver.

"It is a testament to the outstanding role-modeling of the faculty in the Department of Family and Community Health at Marshall, and the unwavering support from the administration of this medical school in promoting primary care, that for 20 years in a row we have placed in the top tier of schools across the nation in the percentage of graduates entering family medicine residency programs," said Dr. John B. Walden, who is both an associate dean at the medical school and chair of its Department of Family and Community Health.

"We are especially proud that 90 graduates of this residency program now provide care in more than 25 mostly rural communities throughout the state, including a significant number who have chosen to provide care to patients in the immediate Tri-State region," he said.

Walden noted that national surveys consistently show that the demand for primary care physicians continues to skyrocket, and also warn about a looming shortage of residency-trained family doctors across America. "Clearly, Marshall is doing its share to address these critical primary care physician training issues," he said.

The AAFP describes the award as recognizing the schools' "exemplary performance in matching graduating medical school seniors into family medicine residency programs from 2005 to 2008."

Marshall tied with two other schools for the third-highest percentage, with 16.8 percent of its graduates entering family practice over the three-year period.


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Friday May 15, 2009
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New Residence Services Director Named at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John F. Yaun has been named the new Director of Residence Services at Marshall University.

Originally from Baton Rouge, La., he brings 15 years of experience in student housing and residential life to Marshall. Just prior to coming here, he was the Senior Associate Director for Residence Life and Staff Development at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. From 2005 to 2007 he served as the Assistant Director for Living-Learning Programs at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, La. In addition, he was a Resident Director at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., for several years.

"We are so pleased to have someone with John's expertise in Housing and Residential Life," said Dr. Karen Kirtley, Assistant Vice President for Administration at Marshall. "He brings with him experience in special interest housing and living-learning programs. John is ready and willing to move our Residential Life programs and environment to another level."

Yaun received a B.A in political science and sociology and a master's degree in the Arts-in-Humanities from Louisiana State University. He is currently pursuing a doctoral degree at Marshall.

Yaun says plans are underway to continue the First Year Experience program at Marshall with the incoming freshman class. "We're collaborating with the First Year Freshman Residence Halls, the First Year Committee, and other Marshall offices in order to create a purposeful experience that meets the needs of our first-year students, which will assist in the overall retention and graduation rates of the university. Down the road we're looking at creating a Sophomore Year Experience, which is something a number of universities around the country have initiated, focusing on the specific academic, developmental, and personal needs of our sophomore students."

Learning assessment activities are being planned as well. "Universities are leaning toward creating more assessment initiatives, since they are being asked to show that the monies they are spending are creating learning and developing student skills," Yaun said. "Residence Services will be conducting some assessment activities over the next year to see what students are really learning in our residence halls and how we, as a department, are contributing to those efforts."

Yaun also has done extensive research and taught courses at the University of Massachusetts, Louisiana State University, and Texas State Univiersity on Holocaust and Genocide Studies. His latest article, "Into the FYRE: The First Year Residential Experience at the University of Miami," will be published in November of this year.


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Thursday May 14, 2009
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Marshall Undergraduate Students Awarded Summer Research Funds

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Ten Marshall University undergraduate students will conduct original scientific research by participating in the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) fellowship beginning May 18 and continuing through July 31.

"We want students to know how strongly Marshall supports undergraduate research," said Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry at Marshall and director of the program. "This is the time when these young minds start utilizing their research skills in preparation for graduate school."

Students will receive stipends totaling $4,000 each and supplies for their research for a period of ten weeks uninterrupted by classes during the summer.

Marshall has received funds for SURE, now in its 4th year, from West Virginia's Research Challenge Fund to advance research in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics through the support of undergraduate research. This year, SURE will fund ten research projects that have been selected for support by the proposal evaluation committee.

This year, the awardees and their projects are:

  • Amber Inman from Princeton, W.Va. Biology, Functional Distribution of Dopamine and Serotonin in the Crayfish CNS. Mentor: Dr. Brian Antonsen.
  • Hannah Mick from Ripley, W.Va. Biology, Identification and Enrichment of Cancer Stem Cells. Mentor: Dr. Jagan Valluri.
  • Hayden Hedrick from Huntington. Biology, Water Quality Analysis Based on Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Found in Local Lakes. Mentor: Dr. Charles Somerville.
  • Mallory Douthitt from Cumberland, Md. Biology, Investigation of Acanthamoeba Diversity. Mentor: Dr. Wendy Trzyna.
  • Natalie Elkins from Huntington. Chemistry, Ab initio investigation of pre-reactive complexes of hydroxyl radical. Mentor: Dr. Rudolf Burcl.
  • Nicholas Gardner from Keyser, W.Va. Biology, Digital Morphology of the skull of the basal diapsid reptile Youngina capensis: an anatomical foundation for the study of the reptilian head. Mentor: Dr. F.  Robin O'Keefe.
  • Robert Demuth from Pamplin, Va.; Anthropology, The efficacy of controlled surface collection in archaeological research. Mentor: Dr. Nicholas Freidin.
  • Samantha Fox from Elkins, W.Va. Psychology, Encoding of Location Information: Automatic or Effortful? Mentor: Dr. Steven Mewaldt.
  • Stephen Pennington from Charleston, W.Va.; Biology, The functional distribution of dopamine in the crayfish CNS. Mentor: Dr. Brian Antonsen.
  • Tiffany Bell from Wake Forest, N.C. Biochemistry, Examination of Upregulation of Cytoplasmic Prohibitin in Cancerous Cells. Mentor: Dr. Leslie Frost.

For more information, persons may visit the SURE program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/sure, or contact Norton at Norton@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday May 13, 2009
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Marshall University sponsors Women's Wellness Fair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Department of Psychology is partnering with local area businesses and vendors for the 3rd annual Huntington Area Women's Wellness Fair scheduled for Saturday, May 16 at Pullman Square in Huntington.

The event is set to begin at 11 a.m. and concludes at 3 p.m. Dozens of activities, from cancer screenings to free breast pumps, are scheduled.

"Women's Health Week is important for this area," said Sarah Setran, psychology trainee in Marshall University's clinical doctoral program. "Women should have the opportunity to become acquainted with the local organizations that provide support for both their mental and physical needs. There are many organizations in the area that provide free or reduced rates for women to receive health care and psychological servicesthe information is not all that easy for everyone to access."

The event is part of National Women's Health Week, which is coordinated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health. Organizers seek to heighten awareness of women's health issues.

"Events like the Women's Wellness Fair can help educate the community as a whole," Setran said. "We encourage women to participate in this event, with hopes that it will grow every year, ensuring awareness for years to come."

Other activities include live music, a cooking class sponsored by Le Cook, skin cancer screenings by the American Cancer Society, chiropractic screenings and drawings for prizes and gift certificates donated by area businesses.

For more information contact Setran at (304)526-2636 or e-mail her at warren15@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday May 13, 2009
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Two Wayne County physicians honored by Marshall's medical school

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has presented its 2009 Outstanding Rural Clinician and Medical Educator Award to two Wayne County physicians, Dr. Gary D. Cremeans and Dr. Glenn A. Harper.

The awards were presented May 7 by Jo Ann Raines, senior program coordinator and assistant dean for rural programs. She quoted graduating medical students who described the pair as "awesome faculty members" and "very attentive to the learning of students."

The annual award recognizes the teaching contributions of outlying physicians who allow medical students to do a block of their training in the physicians' offices. Raines said this allows students both to further refine their skills and experience the rewards and challenges of rural practice. Last year, Harper and Cremeans hosted 18 Marshall medical students for rotations of four to six weeks.

The doctors practice in Kenova at the Cabell Huntington Hospital Family Medical Center. Both graduated from Marshall's medical school, completed residencies there, and now serve on its faculty.

 

Photos: Dr. Gary D. Cremeans (top) and Dr. Glenn A. Harper.


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Monday May 11, 2009
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6th annual Marshall University Marathon set for Nov. 1

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The sixth annual Marshall University Marathon, featuring a USA Track & Field-certified 26.2-mile marathon, half-marathon run or walk, half-marathon relay and 5-mile noncompetitive walk, will take place this fall in Huntington.

The event starts at 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 1 on 3rd Avenue near Cam Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The last mile takes runners and walkers through Marshall's campus for a goal-line finish at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The flat marathon course extends to west Huntington and back, passing Pullman Square, the Ohio River and Ritter Park.

Participants should register online at www.active.com or www.healthyhuntington.org. The only in-person registration available will be Saturday, Oct. 31 at the race expo at the Marshall Recreation Center. Online registration ends at 11:59 p.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 26.

Entry fees are as follows:

Marathon - $60 by Aug. 15 and $80 after that. Those who pay the $60 entry fee by Aug. 15 will receive a full-zip fleece.

Half-marathon - $35 by Aug. 15 and $50 after that. The amount is the same for those who want to run or walk this event.

Half-marathon relay - $60 per team by Aug. 15 and $75 after that. 

All 5-mile walkers - $20 regardless of sign-up date.

For more information, visit www.healthyhuntington.org.


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Monday May 11, 2009
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Marshall University names new Controller

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Mary Ellen Heuton has been named Controller of Marshall University.

Heuton was most recently Director of Advancement Services and Controller of the supporting organizations at Columbus State University in Columbus, Ga. The organizations included the CSU Foundation Inc., which handles private support for the University as well as Foundation Properties Inc., which managed more than $100 million in real estate including student housing, commercial property and academic facilities.

"My goal was to work for a university that has strong community support, excellent people and a bright future and I found just that here at Marshall University," Heuton said. "I am very excited to become a part of the Marshall team and I look forward to the opportunity to contribute to its continued success."

Heuton, a native of Atlanta, Ga., is a certified public accountant with a bachelor of science in management and minors in accounting as well as industrial and organizational psychology from Georgia Institute of Technology. She is currently working on her MBA from Auburn University.

Marshall University's senior vice president of finance and administration said Heuton brings a wealth of experience to the University.

"Mary Ellen brings to Marshall University great leadership abilities and vast technical experience specific to accounting and higher education," said Anita Lockridge. "We are thrilled that she has joined the Marshall family and we look forward to the many contributions she will make as we continue to move forward with the University's mission and strategic plan."


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Friday May 8, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

School of Journalism earns national re-accreditation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications undergraduate program has received full accreditation for another six-year term by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.

Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the school, said he is pleased that Marshall University's program continues to evolve and adapt to meet the needs of its students as well as the stringent standards of the accrediting council. The school has been accredited since 1975 and this re-accreditation was unanimously approved by the council, which is the agency responsible for the evaluation of professional journalism and mass communications programs in colleges and universities.

"Full reaccreditation for the undergraduate program is a compliment to the hard work of the faculty in the school," Dennison said. "Our students played an important role in the process as well by demonstrating their competency and enthusiasm to the site visit team."

The rigorous accreditation process takes about a year and includes an intense review of the program to see if it meets the accrediting council's nine standards, which include everything from governance to curriculum and from diversity to program assessment. The accreditation process has four phases including a comprehensive self study, a visit by a site team of faculty from other colleges and universities, a committee vote during the annual meeting in Chicago and a vote before the council, a 25-member board made up of representatives from various professional organizations and faculty members. 

The summary report by the site visit team noted the following strengths: "A talented and dedicated faculty, enthusiastic and engaged students, an effective administrative leadership team, a comprehensive advising system and an entrepreneurial spirit."  Furthermore, the site team went on to praise the school's internship program, noting "it is well respected by area professionals and energetically managed." 

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost, said he is very pleased with the findings of the accreditation council.

"Our journalism and mass communications faculty and staff work hard to maintain the momentum required to keep our program not only current, but ahead of the curve," Ormiston said. "Earning national accreditation with a unanimous vote and full compliance is an accomplishment in which the Marshall University community takes great pride. Our school provides a meaningful and quality education for future journalists and media practitioners."

Of the more than 1,000 schools in North America that offer some type of degree in journalism or mass communications, only 114 are fully accredited, according to the council. Marshall University's program will undergo the accrediting review again in 2014.


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Tuesday May 5, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Goodwill bins, truck on Huntington campus to collect unwanted items from students as they leave residence halls

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students who live in Marshall University's residence halls on the Huntington campus have the opportunity to make donations to Goodwill Industries Inc. without ever leaving campus.

Donation bins have been located in the lobbies of Haymaker and Gibson halls, Twin Towers West, Twin Towers East, Holderby and Buskirk halls and the First Year North and South halls for the convenience of students who want to donate items they might typically discard as they pack to leave for the summer.

Also, a Goodwill truck will be located between Holderby Hall and Twin Towers West today and Thursday afternoon, and all day Wednesday and Friday. Goodwill accepts goods for resale and it also recycles electronic equipment like computers and components.

Goodwill was brought to campus by a joint effort of the Department of Residence Services, the Student Government Association, ISP Sports Network and the Greening Marshall Committee.

"Making Goodwill so accessible to our students as they pack to leave will decrease the amount of trash we send to the landfill and it will benefit a very good organization that does a great service for our community," said Sean Hornbuckle, student body president. "The collective effort from everyone involved to make it easy and convenient for our students to donate will stimulate maximum participation on campus. Plus, it will help students to have one fewer thing to worry about this week. Everyone wins, even the environment."

Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA is a nonprofit organization whose mission is helping people define and reach their goals, overcome barriers to employment and strengthen families and children. Goodwill returns millions of dollars to local communities by putting people to work and through its recycling efforts.


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Tuesday May 5, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Order forms for Marshall University DVD of commencement will be available Saturday at Big Sandy Superstore Arena

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Order forms for the official Marshall University DVD of the 172nd Commencement will be available in the lobby of the Big Sandy Superstore Arena from 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 9.

Marshall University's commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday at the arena.

Nancy Pelphrey, Marshall University's coordinator of alumni programs, said a table with order forms will be set up in the lobby throughout the morning. DVDs cost $10 each, and payment can be made by using Visa, MasterCard, Discover or cash, or by check made payable to the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Order forms also are available online at www.marshall.edu/alumni. Order forms with payment must be received by the Alumni Association no later than May 16. DVDs will then be mailed to purchasers, who are asked to allow 4-6 weeks for delivery.

The DVDs will be produced by Marshall University Instructional Television Services. For more information, contact Pelphrey at 304-696-2901.


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'Grow With Music' registering for summer; early registration continues until May 8

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Summer registration for "Grow With Music," a popular program for children ages birth to 5 and their parents, is underway. A discount applies to registrations that take place on or before May 8, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University.

" 'Grow With Music' has afforded our 21-month-old a fun and caring place to learn new communication skills through song, dance, musical instruments and even sign language," said Charlotte Hoffman Norris, a parent-participant. "It has also given me, a working mom, a great opportunity to watch and participate in my son's play and interaction with other children and their parents/grandparents."

Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3-year olds, and 4- and 5-year olds. Parent participation is required for all age groups. Classes take place in the daytime and early evenings on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. A maximum of eight children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Iowa. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

For information on "Grow with Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu or call her at 304-697-0211.


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SGA presents 'Make A Dream Happen'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association is sponsoring a program Tuesday, May 5 to raise awareness for the Give a Little, Save a Lot nonprofit organization.

Highlighting the program will be showings of a documentary film by former Marshall University basketball player Jean Francois Bro Grebe, who founded the organization in the United States. The film, titled "Make A Dream Happen," was featured in the Appalachian Film Festival last month. Each film viewing will be followed by a discussion about how to raise more awareness for the organization's cause and how to make donations.

The documentary is showing at 3 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 4 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Tuesday in the new Multipurpose Room (BE 5) downstairs in the Memorial Student Center. The event is open to students, faculty and the public.

Student Body President Sean Hornbuckle said he believes that the organization in which Bro Grebe is involved provides people with the opportunity to contribute to a good cause, as well as providing positive exposure of Marshall University in other countries.


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Math machine unveiled at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - It is not a computer or a calculator in the modern sense, but a mathematical machine known as the differential analyzer (DA) does help students understand and solve certain types of mathematical equations known as differential equations.

Marshall University's differential analyzer model was unveiled during a public demonstration Saturday, May 2 at the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on the Huntington campus.

Marshall's model, nicknamed Art, is one of only a handful of DAs in the country and is the only one available for public inspection, according to Dr. Bonita Lawrence, a professor with Marshall's Department of Math.

"When I saw the static display of the Manchester Differential Analyzer at the London Science Museum, I stood and looked through the glass and wondered where I could see one of these machines in action and what an exciting experience it would be for our students to study this early technology," Lawrence said. "When I discovered that the only working machine in the U.S. was in a private home I thought, 'perhaps we should build our own!' "

Research on using mechanical machines to figure differential equations started as early as the mid 1800's, but the first practical differential analyzer was built in the United States in the 1930's at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  A few other machines have been constructed over the years at military bases and universities.

The development of high-tech calculators and digital computers has nearly rendered the DA obsolete, although Lawrence says there is still an advantage to using it for instruction.

"There is a wonderful quote from Dr. Vannevar Bush (the first to build such a machine at M.I.T.), 'Experience is necessary, of course, in order to use the device effectively. This is actually one of the most attractive aspects of the machine; one acquires an entirely new appreciation of the innate nature of a differential equation as that experience is gained,' " Lawrence said.   "Although his purpose for building the machine was to find solutions for physical models of interest  to him at the time, Dr. Bush also could see the educational value  of the  wonderful visual interpretation of a differential equation (an equation involving rates of change) that the machine offers."

Work on the four-integrator differential analyzer began in 2007 for Lawrence and her team of students after they had successfully built a smaller two-integrator machine.   Team members include Richard Merritt, Anthony Justice, Aaron Bevins, George Chappel, William Morrison, Stacy Scudder, Saeed Keshavarzian, Rebecca Klug, Tom Cuchta, John Fishman, Lin Yuan, Tue Ly, Michael Lake, Devon Tivener and Kelsey Herholdt.

Marshall University's differential analyzer is constructed of Meccano, which is material used for working models and mechanical devices.

For more information contact Lawrence at 304-696-3040 or via e-mail at lawrence@marshall.edu.

Photo: Marshall University Professor Dr. Bonita Lawrence poses with the differential analyzer before the model was unveiled during a public demonstration Saturday, May 2, at Marshall.


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Marshall University names Somerville dean of College of Science

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A microbiologist with expertise in microbial ecology, microbial genetics and bioterrorism has been chosen to lead the Marshall University College of Science.

Dr. Charles Somerville, professor of biological sciences at Marshall University, has accepted an appointment as the next dean of the College of Science.

Somerville has taught at Marshall University for 12 years. He said he is grateful for the support of both the search committee and the administration.

"This is a time when separations between traditional scientific disciplines are diminishing and new interdisciplinary teaching and research programs are emerging.  I am excited by that change," Somerville said. "I will encourage the growth of cross-disciplinary interactions within the College of Science, and will look for opportunities to establish novel interdisciplinary initiatives across campus."

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs for Marshall, said Somerville was selected from an impressive panel of candidates after a nationwide search.

"The University is fortunate to have the quality of candidate for such an important decanal appointment already on staff," Ormiston said.  "I and the other deans look forward to working with Dr. Somerville as we collaborate to improve upon and expand Marshall's programmatic offerings in the College of Science."

Somerville will begin his appointment July 1 replacing interim dean, Dr. Wayne Elmore.

"We appreciate the integrity and grace with which Dr. Elmore represented the interests of the College of Science during this academic year as our search committee worked to select our new dean," Ormiston said.


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Nearly 2,600 students to graduate from Marshall University


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Nearly 2,600 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 9 when the university celebrates its 172nd commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

Among the 2,592 students receiving degrees are 1,457 undergraduates, 970 graduates, 52 from the School of Medicine and 113 who will receive associate degrees.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 535 students will graduate with honors. Eighty-three will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 169 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 270 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and 12 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2008 may participate in commencement.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, nine students have completed or will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. One already is assured of a 4.0, while the other eight - all May graduates - will learn their final GPAs after commencement.

The one student already assured of a 4.0 is Lauren Elizabeth Myers of Glen Dale, W.Va., who graduated in December 2008.

The eight with tentative 4.0s are Lindsay Nicole Abshire of Scott Depot; Adam David Cavalier of Montgomery; Brian Evan Dalek of McMechen; Daniel Brian Hager of Hurricane; Blake Tyler Isenberg of Madison; Jacob T. Kilgore of Kenova; Kathryn Lane Nicely of Ona; and Nicklaus Aaron Presley of Princeton, W.Va.

Former Marshall football and academic All-American Chad Pennington will deliver the commencement address and receive a Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degree. Pennington, well known for his charity work, leadership, community service and philanthropy, currently is the starting quarterback for the NFL's Miami Dolphins.

Here is a list of commencement-related events scheduled next week:

Wednesday, May 6

  • 10 a.m., graduation brunch for student athletes, Joan C. Edwards Stadium Big Green Room

  • 11 a.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications awards ceremony, Smith Hall 154

Thursday, May 7

  • 7 p.m., College of Health Professions' nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Friday, May 8

  • 11 a.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, 2W16

  • 11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

  • 3 p.m., International students graduation picnic, Buskirk Field

  •  4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Marco's

  •  5 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, 520 18th St.

  •  <5 p.m., Forensic Science commencement reception, Memorial Student Center, 2W16

  •  5 p.m., Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

  •  6 p.m., PsyD Doctoral graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

  •  6 p.m., College of Liberal Arts reception and hooding ceremony, Memorial Student Center BE5

  •  6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, MOVC

  •  7 p.m., School of Medicine Investiture, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, followed by reception in Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room
     

Saturday, May 9

  • 9 a.m., Marshall University's 172nd commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • 1 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

  •  1 p.m., Forensic Science commencement reception, Forensic Science Center

  •  1 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

  •  1:30 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications graduation ceremony, Smith Recital Hall

  •  1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.
  • 2 p.m., Communication Disorders graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, BE5

  • Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms (Century Building), 314 9th St. Plaza.

The Tri-State Transit Authority will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests from campus to the arena and back for the main commencement ceremony.

The pick-up process is as follows:

Three buses will provide shuttle service from three campus locations - the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, located across 5th Avenue from the Memorial Student Center; the 20th Street entrance of Joan C. Edwards Stadium; and F-Lot, located on 3rd Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard, across from Smith Hall.

These buses will begin at 7:45 a.m. from each campus location and serve as a shuttle to the arena and back to campus for the next pick-up. The shuttle will continue pick-ups, making the last one at approximately 9:15 a.m. After all pick-ups, the buses will remain at the arena on the corner of 8th Street and 3rd Avenue until commencement is over.

The return process is as follows:

At approximately 1 p.m., the three buses will begin shuttle service from the arena to all campus locations. They will continue until about 2 p.m., or as needed.

The main commencement ceremony will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu and it will be televised live on Marshall University's Channel 25 on the Comcast cable system.


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Champion Industries, Inc., honored for Jenkins Hall classroom sponsorship at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Champion Industries, Inc., of Huntington recently made an in-kind donation of the resources needed for a total remodeling of Jenkins Hall Room 233, a heavily used classroom on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The renovations included new flooring, painting, ceiling tiles, classroom desks, chairs, audiovisual equipment, computer storage stations and instruction podiums. The classroom was transformed to an eco-friendly, more functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for 21st century learning to take place.  Capitol Business Interiors, a division of Champion Industries, provided the design work and equipment for the makeover.

The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) at Marshall University held a reception earlier this month to honor Champion for its support.

The idea of asking local businesses to support this "adopt a classroom" type project resulted from conversations between COEHS Dean Rosalyn Templeton and Associate Dean Stan Maynard.

"Champion Industries has always been a huge supporter of Marshall University with a strong belief in education," said Kelli Bragg, senior account executive with Capitol Business Interiors. "What better way to encourage excitement for education than to create an innovative and motivating atmosphere so that learning can develop. By having an up-to-date facility that meets the needs of students, faculty and the ever-advancing technologies in the classroom, we are generating an enthusiasm for knowledge."

"Champion wanted to be the leader and really generate some momentum for this project," Bragg said. "We hope more companies will see what an opportunity Champion has created by laying the groundwork for a truly modern learning facility.  Each room will focus on a different premise, with Champion choosing the 'green room.' All the products in the space, from floor to ceiling, have been selected with sustainability and environmental impact in mind. The environment is such an important factor, not only for our future, but also the future of the minds we are trying to reach."

Officials of Marshall's College of Education and Human Services say they hope to be able to partner with other area corporations that are interested in supporting education by sponsoring other classrooms or learning environment improvement projects. 

For more information, contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, via e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Donning of Kente celebration is Thursday, April 30, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs has invited African and African American graduates to the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement. 

This traditional and historically significant event takes place at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 30, on Buskirk Field on Marshall's Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will commence with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans and MU President Stephen J. Kopp. 

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 60 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

"The Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events that our African and African American students can participate in," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs. "The custom and celebration of presenting the Kente cloth as recognition for only extraordinary achievement, originating over 700 years ago in west Africa,  remains intact at Marshall. I can think of no greater joy than to celebrate the acquisition of a college degree for our future leaders."

The following woven cloths will be awarded: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center plaza for all participants and those in attendance.

In the event of rain, the ceremony will take place in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center.


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Fife and Drum Corps to appear at Heritage Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps from Marshall University will perform several times during Heritage Day at Heritage Farm and Museum between 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 2.

The group's performance will feature the music of Edward Riley, a New York-based publisher who composed this set of tunes in 1824 to celebrate Lafayette's heroic return to America.

"The corps is devoted to researching and performing the music from our nation's early years," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall and director of the group. "The Marquis de Lafayette was enormously helpful during the American Revolution, contributing both his leadership and his wealth to the cause. This is music that resounds with the nation's respect and thankfulness for one of the last heroes of our struggle for independence."

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps was created in the fall of 2007 as an initiative of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall University. In its brief history, the corps has performed in colonial Williamsburg, at the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and at the John Marshall House in Richmond, Va.

For admission information on Heritage Day, persons may contact the Heritage Farm and Museum at 304-522-1244. For further information on the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, persons may contact the Department of Music at Marshall University at 304-696-3117 or e-mail Dobbs at dobbs@marshall.edu.


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Fourth Annual Pullman Jazz Festival set for Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Pullman Square, in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution, will host the 4th annual Pullman Jazz Festival from 2 to 10 p.m Saturday, April 25. The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place on the Pullman Square "greenspace" and coincides with the celebration of National Jazz Appreciation Month.

Featured artists will include local/regional jazz artists such as the Marshall University Faculty Jazz Ensemble Bluetrane, the MU 12 O'clock Big Band, MU jazz combos, a rock band and guest artist Lou Fischer, bass

For further information, contact Dr. Mark Zanter at 304-638-3481 or by e-mail at zanter@marshall.edu.


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General faculty meeting set for April 28 at MU; awards of distinction to be presented, retiring faculty to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and all faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

The agenda will consist of welcoming remarks by the Faculty Senate Chair, Dr. Camilla Brammer; singing of the Star-Spangled Banner by Dr. Larry Stickler; remarks from President Stephen J. Kopp; remarks from Brammer; call by Brammer for nominations from the floor for the positions of faculty representation on the Marshall University Board of Governors and the West Virginia Advisory Council of Faculty; recognition of retiring faculty by Dr. Dale Shao and Brammer; and presentation of faculty awards.

Five people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

  • Dr. Leonard Deutsch, English professor and Graduate College dean

  • Dr. Violette Eash, Counseling professor

  • Dr. Don Hall, Counseling professor

  • Dr. Shirley Lumpkin, English professor

  • Dr. Joseph Stone, Accountancy and Legal Environment professor

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Dr. Eldon Larson, Engineering professor

  • Dr. James Sottile, Jr., School of Education professor

  • Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, Pharmacology assistant professor

Marshall also is recognizing 10 retiring faculty who have a combined 325 years of service. They are:

  • Dr. Bruce S. Chertow, Internal Medicine, 30 years of service

  • Prof. Michael Cornfeld, Art and Design, 42 years of service

  • Dr. Daniel Cowell, Psychiatry and Behavorial Medicine, 15 years of service

  • Dr. Leonard Deutsch, English, and dean, Graduate College, 39 years of service

  • Dr. Alan Gould, Drinko Academy, 40 years of service

  • Dr. William A. McDowell, Human Development and Allied Technology, 34 years of service

  • Dr. William Ramsey, English, 39 years of service

  • Dr. Clara Reese, Human Development and Allied Technology, 30 years of service

  • Dr. H. Keith Spears, Journalism and Mass Communications, 27 years of service

  • Dr. Robert B. Walker, Family and Community Healthy, 29 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting are:

  • Dr. Tina Cartwright, Sarah Denman Faces of Appalachia Award

  • Dr. Hyo-Chang (Bob) Hong and Dr. Tracy M. Christofero, John & Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year Award

The following previously announced faculty award winners also will be honored:

  • Dr. Bonita Lawrence, Dr. Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Dr. Kateryna Schray, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Dr. Natsuki Anderson, Dr. George Davis and Dr. Wendy Williams, Pickens-Queen Teaching Award

For more information on the meeting, call Bernice Bullock at 304-696-4376.


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Celebration of Academics features Maria Carmen Riddel, Brad Smith

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Maria Carmen Riddel, this year's Drinko fellow, and Brad Smith, a Marshall University alumnus and president/CEO of Intuit, Inc., will be featured in MU's Celebration of Academics Thursday, April 30 and Friday, May 1 on the Huntington campus.

Riddel will discuss the research on which she worked during the Drinko fellowship in the John Deaver Drinko Symposium at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Her topic is "Cuban-American Literature after Exile: Dreaming in Spanish/Writing in English."

Smith will present "Authentic Leadership in a Changing World" as part of the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation at 7 p.m. Friday in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The convocation also will include recognition of students participating in Marshall's honors program.

Each program is free and open to the public. In addition, public receptions will follow each of the programs in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

"This year is the 15th annual Celebration of Academics," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of Marshall's Drinko Academy. "We are indeed fortunate to have as our Drinko Fellow Dr. Maria Carmen Riddel, who has been a member of our faculty for 26 years, and to have one of our most illustrious alums as keynote speaker at our Drinko Honors Convocation. We are indebted to Mr. Brad Smith for his generosity of time and talent in returning to his alma mater to salute our honor students."

Riddel, a professor of Spanish, has worked in the Department of Modern Languages since 1983 teaching everything from introductory language classes to Spanish culture, literature, history and honors courses. She has served as chair of the department since 2002. A native of Spain, she earned her doctorate from The Ohio State University in 1988, her master's degree from Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain, in 1977, and her bachelor's degree from Marshall in 1975.

In January 2008, Smith, a Kenova, W.Va., native, became CEO of Intuit, the company that developed Quicken, QuickBooks and Turbo Tax. Previously, he was senior vice president and general manager of Intuit's Small Business Division from May 2006 to December 2007. In this position, Smith was responsible for the company's portfolio of QuickBooks, Quicken and payroll products, serving seven million small businesses and producing $1.1 billion in revenue.

Recently, Intuit, in collaboration with Marshall University, began offering a new, simple option for families who need to complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).  The new online service, TurboTax FAFSA, automatically transfers information from TurboTax software directly onto the FAFSA form, making it easier for students and parents to get money for college.

The idea of producing TurboTax FAFSA was initiated through a conversation last fall between Smith and Kopp.

Smith, who joined Intuit in February 2003, earned his master's degree in management from Aquinas College in Michigan and his bachelor's degree in business administration from Marshall.

Last year Smith was the keynote speaker at the Charleston Area Alliance Annual Celebration. At that event, Kopp presented Smith with the Expect the Best from West Virginia Award.


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Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi finishes second in competition at fraternity's national meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi, an honorary organization for Financial Information students and professionals, recently took second place in the Best Practices category in competition at the fraternity's national meeting in Boston, Mass.

Ten schools made presentations on the sustainability of a professional chapter. New York University won first place while Virginia Commonwealth University finished third. 

Marshall's finish is remarkable because its chapter is one of the smaller ones and relatively new, according to Dr. Loren Wenzel, professor of Accounting and Legal Environment.  Students Jon Gable, Kristina Hatfield, and chapter president Tyler Rowland made the presentations.  They were accompanied by the group's faculty sponsor, Amanda Thompson-Abbott.

In their presentation, the Marshall students outlined what they did for recruiting, financial strategy, succession planning and keeping alumni informed and active.

The primary objective of Beta Alpha Psi is to encourage and give recognition to scholastic and professional excellence in the business information field.  It recognizes students in the fields of accounting, finance and information systems.

Membership requirements for the honorary are rigorous, according to Wenzel.  "Students must have a high GPA to get in and they must continue to be good students.  In addition, they do 40 hours of professional development and 40 hours of community service each year to remain members in good standing. Only schools which are accredited by the AACSB are eligible to have chapters."          

Rowland, a junior finance major from Ashland, Ky., said placing so high in the competition was a thrill for the participants.  "This is a solid foundation for us to build on in the future," he said.  "I'm glad we finished as well as we did, especially considering how close the competition was.  Out of all ten schools, there was a very small margin between first and last place." 

Hatfield, a senior from Gilbert, W.Va., who is the chapter's officer of professional development, said, "I feel very privileged to have been a part of this win and I am proud to be graduating having accomplished this goal."

"Our motto is, as a fraternity we strive to leave our chapter in a better financial position than in previous years," Gable, vice president for finance, said.

"We're very proud that this chapter has been winning awards since it was chartered five years ago," Wenzel said.  "Kappa Phi really is a superior chapter."


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Dixon Hughes celebrates Marshall's LCOB anniversary with check presentation Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In appreciation of and support for the Accounting Department of Marshall University, Dixon Hughes Managing Member Rick Slater will present a check for $12,500 at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 24 in the Alumni Lounge, which is located on the second floor of the Marshall Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The presentation is part of a reception to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

"It is our pleasure that even in these challenging economic times, we can continue to provide support for programs, accreditation and development at Marshall University," said Slater. "We are committed to helping Marshall achieve success on many fronts, and tomorrow's presentation is a small token of how highly we think of their program."

Slater, a Marshall graduate, and Dixon Hughes partners and staff regularly donate time and resources to mentoring and the professional development of the university's accounting students. In 2008, this support helped Marshall's Accounting Department become one of only 169 programs in the world to be accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

"The generosity of Dixon Hughes and Rick Slater helped us reach our accreditation milestone and helped provide our students with the research databases and software they need to be prepared to enter the profession of public accounting," said Loren Wenzel, Division Head for the Department of Accountancy. "Without the support of Dixon Hughes, we never would have made it this far."


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Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship made possible by gift from Pilot Club of Huntington



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student Molly Elizabeth Grove of Bunker Hill, W.Va., was the first recipient of the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship, a fund made possible by a $10,000 gift from the Pilot Club of Huntington.

The Pilot Club is a service organization that focuses on brain-related disorders. Its major focus is Project Lifesaver, a program aiding the victims and families suffering from Alzheimer's Disease and related disorders.

Grove, an advertising major and a member of the Marshall track and field team, was able to use her award of $1,000 during the current academic year. The scholarship was established last year by the Marshall University Foundation Inc., according to Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the foundation.

"Receiving this scholarship has been a great benefit to my education," Grove said. "It has made me more driven to receive more awards like this one." 

The Pilot Club had received a bequest of $10,000 from Mrs. Dorothy Goodman, who received her Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Marshall College in 1940. She was a reporter for the Huntington Advertiser from 1942 to 1961 and then director of information for the Cabell County Board of Education from 1961 to 1978. She also was very active in the community, including service to the Pilot Club of Huntington.

According to the guidelines of the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship established by the bequest, two awards of $1,000 are to be given annually for a period of five years beginning with the current (2008-2009) academic year.

The recipients are West Virginia residents who are full-time sophomores majoring in journalism,  who are in good academic standing and have demonstrated financial need, as determined by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

The award is renewable for up to four years if the recipients maintain good academic standing, full-time status and active participation in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

 

Photo:  Marshall University student Molly Elizabeth Grove, left, and Josephine Fidler, president-elect of the Pilot Club of Huntington, look over the guidelines for the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship. Grove was the first recipient of the scholarship. (Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.)

 


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Dr. Bonita Lawrence named Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, a professor of mathematics at Marshall University, is MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2008-09.

Lawrence will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Marshall's Office of Academic Affairs announced the Hedrick Award winner and two other awards honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Kateryna Schray, professor, English
  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Natsuki Anderson, assistant professor, Modern Languages; Dr. George Davis, assistant professor, Political Science; Dr. Wendy Williams, assistant professor, Psychology

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:
 

Hedrick Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence has been at Marshall since August 2001 when she was hired as an assistant professor of mathematics. She was promoted to associate professor in 2003, granted tenure in 2005 and promoted to professor in 2007. She received the Marshall University Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award for 2001 and 2006, and received the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award for 2004.

Lawrence received her Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in 1979 from Cameron University in Lawton, Okla., her Master of Science in Mathematics in 1990 from Auburn University in Auburn, Ala., and her Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences in 1994 from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Regarding her teaching philosophy, she says she is a firm believer that understanding conceptual ideas and the relationships that link these ideas together is the key to understanding and practical application of ideas.

"A well-known Chinese proverb says, 'Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.' If we offer a collection of seemingly unrelated ideas, it is as if we are giving our students a fish. If we offer conceptual ideas that are bound together by logic and reason developed through critical thinking activities, we indeed feed them for a lifetime,' " Lawrence said.

Dr. Ralph W. Oberste-Vorth, chairman of the Department of Mathematics, nominated Lawrence for the Hedrick Award. He said she keeps her students engrossed in the classroom "by the sheer force of her personality."

"She shows remarkable enthusiasm for mathematics and for her students," Oberste-Vorth said.

Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs, said Lawrence's most distinguishing characteristic is enthusiasm for her students and for her great love: math.

"Bonnie takes it for granted that everyone loves math," Hensley said. "Some of us have just not discovered its beauty! In her classes, this translates into an expectation that everyone is capable of learning even the most difficult mathematical material."

Dr. David A. Cusick, a professor of mathematics at Marshall, described Lawrence simply as "one of Marshall's very best teachers - highly informed and infectiously enthusiastic."

"She is able to intrigue and captivate the interests of students at all course levels," he said.

 

Reynolds Award

The Reynolds award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Kateryna Schray has been at Marshall since 1996 when she was hired as an assistant professor. She previously received the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award and the College of Liberal Arts Teaching Award, both in 2001, and the Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award in 2006.

Dr. Donna Spindel, interim chair in the Department of English, nominated Schray for the Reynolds Award.

"I do not know another faculty member who loves teaching more than she does and who shows it," Spindel said. "I have had the opportunity to work closely with her on course development and am truly astonished by the level of care and 'perfection' that she applies to course creation."

Schray said one of four concepts woven into the fabric of every teaching moment is that "learning is a joy."

"We share a natural desire to learn," Schray said. "Learning is both an act of receiving and giving, searching and finding, growing and melting, climbing and falling. It is a communal act, which elevates and humbles us at the same time, whether we are toddlers examining a remote control or astronauts exploring space. In its purest form, learning is at the heart of what we do, and it is an act of joy."
 

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Natsuki Anderson has been at Marshall University since August 2006. Dr. Christopher L. Dolmetsch, interim chair of Modern Languages at MU, said that since her arrival Anderson has developed an entire academic degree program in Japanese mirroring those already existing for German, French and Spanish.

"Along with full elementary through intermediate-level classes, this program already has attracted approximately 57 majors, which is extraordinary for such a new program," Dolmetsch said.

Dolmetsch said Anderson also has promoted the teaching of Japanese successfully throughout the Tri-State region. She said she believes that "teaching is learning."

"As a language learner, I always like the excitement of learning a different language and culture, and I am happy to be able to share the joy of learning with my students," Anderson said. "At the same time, I am aware of the positive and negative impact that teachers have on students. Therefore, I strive to create an engaging classroom with a sense of community."

She said she hopes more students consider studying Japanese throughout their lives rather than just as a foreign language requirement for a college degree.

Dr. George Davis has been a member of Marshall's Political Science Department for five years. Dr. Marybeth Beller, associate dean and associate professor in the department, nominated Davis for the Pickens-Queen Award.

"This award is for teaching, and George's performance in the classroom underscores his commitment to our students," Beller said. "When George Davis walks into the classroom, he rolls up his sleeves. The symbolism is bold; he is getting to work, and so do the students. George's lectures are riveting; they are fast-paced, well organized, full of information, and better still, full of humor."

Davis said one of his main goals is to invoke student interest in politics, not only as an academic discipline, but as an important component of concerned citizenship. With that in mind, he usually begins his course materials as an attorney would an oral argument.

He said he has learned in his short time teaching that "the clearer we, as faculty, articulate our expectations, the more likely students are to live up to what we expect."

Political Science graduate student Nora Ankrom said Davis is interested in his students' success beyond their academic years at Marshall.

"He is genuinely invested in his students and I believe he views his students' success as his success," Ankrom said.

Dr. Wendy Williams has been at Marshall since fall 2005. She said she uses a variety of techniques to facilitate student learning, including: 1, presenting material in interactive formats; 2, encouraging and expecting group discussion; 3, engaging students in critical thinking and writing.

"Through those techniques, I provide students with a learning experience that is both personal and challenging," she said.

Dr. Christopher LeGrow, an associate professor in psychology, said Williams' teaching efforts have been well received by both students and peers.

"She has developed new courses, incorporated service-learning into her courses, and provided excellent advising to her students," LeGrow said. "Dr. Williams has also served as the undergraduate program coordinator and worked hard to remodel our department advising materials and process."

Psychology Professor Dr. Steven P. Mewaldt said Williams is highly committed to excellence in teaching.

"She quickly gained a reputation for being popular and rigorous, but fair," Mewaldt said. He described her as "the most organized teacher I have ever met."

The award winners will be recognized at the spring General Faculty Meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.


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Cello and Guitar ensembles to be featured Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Department of Music will present a Cello and Guitar Ensemble Day at 4 p.m., Saturday, April 25  at Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"The day will focus on the art of ensemble playing," said Cynthia Puls, who is teaching cello this semester while Dr. Solen Dikener is on sabbatical.  "Exploring the importance of truly listening to musical lines and how the counterpoint unfolds, while supporting each other as musicians, is the goal of the day."

The guitarists, from the studio of Dr. Julio Alves, will perform "Danza del Viento," by J. Corodoba and "Milonga Triste" by E. Marchelie. Both works were recently performed on their Baltimore tour.

Many of the cellists are students of Puls, either from Marshall or her private studio, which includes students as young as 6. Cellists from Charleston and the surrounding area also have been invited to attend.

"The melodic capabilities of the cello, combined with the rasgado technique of the guitar is a sound to be experienced," Puls said. "Don't miss this Saturday afternoon performance!"

For further information, persons may contact Puls by e-mail at puls@marshall.edu.


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Gallery 842 to open Friday, April 24

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gallery 842, a community art project begun by the Huntington Art Collective in affiliation with Create Huntington, will open Friday, April 24, with a reception from 7 p.m. to midnight.

The gallery, located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington (formerly Bliss Boutique), will be open Thursdays through Saturdays from 4 to 9 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.

The exhibition, juried and curated by local artists Seth Cyfers and John Farley and organized by a volunteer group of citizens, will feature a wide variety of artwork from the Tri-state area. The concept was initiated by Lynn Clercx, a realtor and Huntington resident.

Farley, who serves as the director for the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University, noted that Gallery 842 is an illustration of the talent in this area. "Visitors to Gallery 842 will be presented with a diverse range of fine art in many media - both two- and three-dimensional," he said. "This exhibition is representative of the quality and breadth of work being produced by artists in the region."

Thomas McChesney, a Create Huntington volunteer, echoed Farley's sentiments.

"Gallery 842 is a prime example of what can be accomplished when engaged citizens from the community and faculty, students and staff from Marshall work together," McChesney, Director of Marketing and Business Development for Huddleston Bolen, LLP, said. "In just a few months, they've taken an idea from concept to reality and will transform an empty store into a vibrant gallery," he added. "It is going to be a great venue for artists, one that will help local artists and artisans see that there is a welcoming, local art scene. It is also going to be a cool venue for the community that, I believe, will draw people to downtown Huntington. More than all of this, though, I believe they have demonstrated that dedicated citizens can accomplish a great deal if they are freed to be creative and empowered to make a difference. By doing this, they may very well be another step in a process that is transforming our city."

Farley and Cyfers are both Marshall University graduates.

"As graduates of the Department of Art and Design at Marshall University both Farley and Cyfers are creative, civic-minded and collaborative," said Byron Clercx, chair of MU's Department of Art and Design. "They are part of a growing number of people invested in making Huntington a better place to live, work and play. The Huntington Arts Collective's community gallery adds an exciting new facet to the fine and performing arts culture in Huntington the arts can play a vital role in the cultural/economic revitalization of downtown Huntington by stimulating pedestrian activity, encouraging civic and private investment and by rebranding the city in a positive light to its residents, guests and elected officials."

Several local establishments are sponsoring this initiative by donating funds, including Mac-Reedo's Bar & Grill, Colonial Lanes Bowling Alley, Hank's Wall-Street Tavern & Piano-Bar, Giovanni's Pizzeria, Stonewall and Musicplex Recording Studio. Those who attend the opening reception may also make donations there.

Also, many area businesses are offering discounts to patrons who visit Gallery 842 and get a bracelet. Those venues include Rebels & Redcoats Tap Room, Hank's Wall-Street Tavern & Piano-Bar, St. Mark's, Shaker's Bar & Grill, V-Club, and Mac-Reedo's Bar & Grill.

The space for Gallery 842 has been donated by Liza Caldwell of Huntington.

For further information, persons may contact Farley by phone at 304-412-3778 or by e-mail at farley53@marshall.edu.

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Awards Banquet, Green and White spring football game among the highlights of Alumni Weekend at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alumni Weekend 2009, highlighted by the 72nd annual Awards Banquet and the annual Green and White Spring Football Game, takes place April 24-25 at Marshall University. The theme of this year's weekend is "Bridging the Past with the Future."

Alumni Weekend is sponsored by Bank of America and Sodexo.

The Green and White game starts at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 25 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Tickets, which are $5, may be purchased in advance by calling 304-696-HERD or 800-THE HERD. The Young Alumni Committee of the Alumni Association will host a tailgate party on the West Lot prior to the game. To find the party, just look for the alumni banners.

The awards banquet, which honors distinguished alumni and friends, also takes place on Saturday, April 25 in the Memorial Student Center. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. with the President's Social on the Memorial Student plaza, which is followed by the banquet in the center's Don Morris Room at 7 p.m. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. To RSVP or ask questions about the awards banquet, call the Alumni Office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

The distinguished alumni award winners for 2009 are:

         Distinguished Alumni Award - Joe Gillette

         Community Achievement Award - Robert (Bob) N. Melott

         Distinguished Service to Marshall Award - John Curtis McHaffie and Dr. Robert B. Walker

         Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award - Barbara Winters

         Distinguished Education and Human Service Award - Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks

         Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship - Aril Bennett and Candice Michael

         Cam Henderson Scholarship Award - Tyler J. Gatrell

         Nate Ruffin Scholarship - John Alexander Inman

         Alumni Association Club of the Year - the Atlanta, Ga., Alumni Club

         Young Alumni Award - Doug Martin

         MUAA Board Member of the Year - will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the banquet.

Here is the schedule of the other Alumni Weekend events, including those planned throughout the week:

Tuesday, April 21

Marshall University ROTC's "Dining Out" event takes place in the student center's Don Morris Room. The cost is $40 per person and $75 per couple. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. with arrival and cocktails, with the ceremony and dinner following at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey D. Stephens at 304-696-6450 or 304-617-2636, or by e-mail at stephenj@marshall.edu.

Wednesday, April 22

"The 5 Browns," classical music's first family of piano virtuosos, will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Tickets, which cost $35 and $45, are available by calling 304-696-6656. Visit http://www.marshall.edu/muartser//shows/the_5_browns/ for more information on this Marshall Artists Series event.

Thursday, April 23

The College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) Award Ceremony and Reception is scheduled at 5 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

Friday, April 24

The Lewis College of Business is hosting the following activities in recognition of its 40th anniversary:

        10 to 10:20 a.m. - Golden Wall and Lounge dedication

         10:20 to 10:50 a.m. - "History of the LCOB," by Dr. Robert Alexander

        11 to 11:50 a.m. - Lecture, "The Financial Crisis in the U.S.," with Phyllis Arnold, in Smith Hall 154

        10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Food, beverages, games and gifts

The board of directors of the Marshall University Alumni Association meets from noon to 4 p.m. at the Erickson Alumni Center.

Dr. Leonard J. Deutsch, dean of Marshall's Graduate College, will be honored for his 39 years of distinguished service at a retirement reception in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center's atrium from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

A Welcome Champagne Reception to celebrate the 50th reunion class takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Culinary Institute in downtown Huntington. The cost is $15 person. Call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869 with questions or to RSVP.

Following the champagne reception, Marshall's Young Alumni are sponsoring a show at the Funny Bone Comedy Club at Pullman Square featuring comedian Kenny Smith. The entire balcony's 70 seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are $10 - buy one, get one free - if purchased through the MU Alumni Office by calling 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

For those people who prefer theater, the Marshall University production of "Epic Proportions" takes place at 8 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus. Anyone who calls 304-696-6395 and uses the code MU2009 can purchase tickets to the show for $7 (half price). "Epic Proportions," set in the 1930s, is a comedy by Larry Coen and David Crane.

Saturday, April 25

The President's Coffee, hosted by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., begins at 9:30 a.m. in the John Deaver Dinko Library atrium. President Stephen J. Kopp will make brief remarks. The coffee is in recognition of members of The Heritage Society. Call 304-696-6214.

The Class Luncheon, planned from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Dining Room, honors the 50th reunion class (1959) and the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1959. Cost to attend is $15 per person. Call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869 with questions or to RSVP. A trolley tour of campus, with limited seating, follows the luncheon.


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Nevelson Duo presents the letter 'E' in concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Nevelson Duo, consisting of Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, violin, and Dr. Leslie Petteys, piano, continues its Alphabet Series with recitals on April 24 and April 26 featuring the letter "E" - music by composers whose surnames begin with the letter "E." They will be joined by guest artist Blake Racer, baritone.

On Friday, April 24, the duo will give a noon performance in the chapel at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. The performance is part of the MUsic Alive series, a joint venture of the First Presbyterian Church and the Department of Music at Marshall. Concertgoers should enter the church by the rear door. The concert will last no more than an hour, and lunch will be available afterwards for a donation.

At 8 p.m. Sunday, April 26, the duo will present an expanded version of the "E" program in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. It will be followed by a reception featuring foods beginning with the letter "E."

Smith and Petteys are both faculty members in the Department of Music at Marshall. As the Nevelson Duo they have toured extensively together and have recorded a CD of American music for violin and piano on Albany Records. Racer is a senior voice major at Marshall.

Both performances are free and open to the public. For further information call the Marshall University Department of Music at 304-696-3117 or First Presbyterian Church at 304-523-6476.


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Byrd dedicates medical teaching and clinical center at Marshall University

Huntington, WV - Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., was joined today by Congressman Nick Rahall, W.Va.-3, and others in dedicating the newest teaching and clinical center of Marshall University's medical school.  Named after his beloved wife, the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center is home to the busy departments of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Medicine, as well as the primary teaching site for medical students. Byrd, in his capacity as the senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, was responsible for obtaining more than $22 million in federal funding for the construction of the building.

            The new facility has enabled the medical school to increase its class size by 50 percent and to date Marshall University has educated 130 students at the new center.  It has provided the students with more opportunity to practice, as well as giving them ready access to medical simulators. The facility as serves as the hub for the Virtual Colonoscopy outreach program to southern West Virginia and its mobile medical unit.

            The Clinical Center has also resulted in a significant increase in the number of visits to University Cardiovascular Services and University Physicians in Internal Medicine.  It addition, it has provided for the expansion of the Diabetes Center and the state's only endocrinology training program with the recruitment of four fellowship trained endocrinologists.  In addition, the gastroenterology section has also been expanded, allowing for the development of a specialized Digestive Diseases Center. 

            Senator Byrd's remarks at the dedication ceremony follow:

"Thank you, Nick, for your gracious remarks. You are my congressman!

"I am so very proud to be your partner in bringing new opportunities to the 3rd congressional district of West Virginia. Thank you, President Kopp, and thank you my dear friend, Dr. Charlie McKown, for inviting me to join you today to dedicate the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center.

"I am very moved by your gesture in naming this magnificent new center after my beloved wife, Erma. Your tribute to her on the program, noting that "her concern for the education and well-being of others was central to her life," was right on target. Erma was a compassionate soul, and she devoted her entire life to caring for others. That was my Erma.

"Compassion is what this facility is all about. George Eliot once asked, "What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?" Within this center, you are teaching more medical students, training more residents, and providing expanded health care services, all with the goal of making life less difficult for the injured and ailing.

"We all know too well that our fellow West Virginians have tremendous needs when it comes to health care.  Our state's residents consistently rank high in incidences of disease, injury, and poor health behaviors. Our mountains are majestic, but they have also been a major impediment to those needing health care. Helping West Virginians to better access and receive quality health care services has been central to my efforts throughout my public service.

"In this work, Marshall University has been at my side for more than 30 years.  We began efforts to create the university's medical school with my sponsorship of an amendment to the Second Supplemental Appropriations bill in 1973. This measure provided $20 million to implement the VA Health Manpower Training Act and another $25 million to help create the new state medical schools, including one for Marshall University.

"Since that time, we have successfully pursued the construction, and later the expansion, of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health; the establishment of a Rural Health Residence Center in Logan County; the implementation of the Virtual Colonoscopy Program; the launching of mobile medical units in Southern West Virginia; and health-related facilities such as the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

"Most recently, I included funding in an appropriations bill that will allow Marshall to continue to lead the charge with new cutting-edge medical technologies and services. The new Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems will focus on the development of new non-invasive nanotechnologies to detect and diagnose disease and illnesses at very early stages. I also added nearly $4 million for Marshall University to initiate the Genomic Research Institute. The aim of the center is to utilize new gene-based diagnostic tools to better predict, reduce the risks of, and identify the most responsive treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's, autism, Parkinson's, diabetes, and numerous forms of cancer. These two new advanced medical programs hold great promise.

"Good health is the greatest of all God's blessings. It is my hope that this new $23 million clinical center and the facilities and programs that I have established at Marshall University over the years will provide the tools needed to make a significant difference in improving the quality of life for all West Virginians. Perhaps the elusive cure for cancer or the common cold, or other medical miracles not even conceived at this time will be discovered right here at Marshall.

"One of my most cherished possessions is my set of McGuffey readers.  They are the books from which I learned as a boy growing up in the Mountain State.  They are filled with poems and stories that teach good morals, proper action, and how to be good citizens. I close with a poem from McGuffey's second reader. I believe it embodies the spirit of compassion that lives on in Erma's spirit and here at Marshall University:

"Beautiful faces are they that wear
The light of a pleasant spirit there;
Beautiful hands are they that do
Deeds that are noble, good and true;
Beautiful feet are they that go
Swiftly to lighten another's woe.

"I thank you for inviting me to be here with you today, and I thank you for honoring Erma by dedicating this beautiful facility to her memory.

"May God bless you all."

###


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Marshall scientist receives national award for lung cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, a medical researcher at Marshall University, is one of just three scientists nationwide to be honored Saturday for cancer research the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics believes "may offer significant advances in clinical medicine in the future."

Dasgupta will receive the ASPET-Astellas Award in Translational Pharmacology at the society's annual meeting, which is part of the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting in New Orleans. The award provides $30,000 to continue research that could help both smokers and people exposed to nicotine through second-hand smoke or products such as nicotine patches and gums.

"Dr. Dasgupta's work reflects our school's cutting-edge contributions to the accelerated pace of biomedical discovery," said Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "She is very deserving of the recognition that she has brought to herself and Marshall by virtue of her scientific efforts."

Dasgupta's team studies how components of tobacco facilitate the growth of small cell lung cancer cells. She said that although nicotine doesn't cause cancer, her studies show it can promote the ability of lung cancer cells to grow, arrange blood supply for themselves, and spread to other parts of the body. Nicotine also can protect the cancer cells from chemotherapy drugs.

Nicotine binds to specific receptors on the lung cancer cells, and Dasgupta's research tries to decipher the signaling pathways that allow nicotine to promote the growth and survival of the tumors. She also is trying to identify and test novel small molecules that could disrupt those pathways.

 Dasgupta is an assistant professor of pharmacology. Originally from India, she came to Marshall after completing postdoctoral fellowships at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla.

The ASPET-Astellas Awards in Translational Pharmacology are intended to recognize pharmacological research accomplishments that seek to extend fundamental research closer to applications directed toward improving human health. The awards are given to 1) recognize those individuals whose research has the potential to lead to the introduction of novel pharmacologic approaches or technologies that may offer significant advances in clinical medicine in the future, and 2) to facilitate that translational process.


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West Virginia is looking for volunteer rainfall observers

 

   

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia will become the latest state to join the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS).  Effective May 1, 2009, West Virginia will join 42 other states that now include approximately 13,000 volunteers nationwide.  The goal of the program, which is now in its 12th year, is to provide a more dense precipitation network that will supplement existing observations.

Henry Reges, national CoCoRaHS coordinator from Colorado State University, says that this program will act as the "farm team" for the more established Cooperative Observer Program run by the National Weather Service.  The National Weather Service also sponsors CoCoRaHS.  Reges also says, "Volunteers can include anyone who can devote five minutes a day to take rain gauge measurements and then post their readings online."

Volunteers must purchase a standard rain gauge, which costs about $25.  The rain gauge can be purchased from distributors online, which are posted on the CoCoRaHS Web site.  This type of rain gauge must be used so that the readings are uniform and standardized across the country.  Volunteers are welcome to use their own rain gauges for verification purposes.  However, the readings and reports should come from the standard rain gauges. 

"This is a perfect opportunity for weather enthusiasts to help collect weather and climate data across the state," says Dr. Kevin Law, assistant professor of meteorology at Marshall University and state climatologist of West Virginia.  "West Virginia has highly variable precipitation patterns and a sparse observation network, particularly in our mountainous counties.  We have a largely rural state where little data are available.  CoCoRaHS will greatly enhance our existing network of precipitation observations."

Participants can include individuals or organizations. However, the data should be ideally collected everyday between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.  Law enforcement, emergency management officials, hospitals and utility companies are good candidates for organizational volunteers.  Schools are often interested in volunteering, but the data also have to be recorded on weekends and holidays, and during the summer.  It can somewhat be problematic finding volunteers to help during these time periods. 

"CoCoRaHS will be especially useful during winter when we observe snowfall amounts," Law said.  "Snowfall patterns vary greatly across West Virginia, especially in the mountains.  The National Weather Service is particularly interested in these data as it will help them better forecast snowfall totals in those counties."

The program can also be used a learning tool.  "I plan on using the precipitation data in my meteorology classes," Law said.  He is developing a 4-year meteorology program at Marshall. 

CoCoRaHS aims to have 20,000 observers by 2010.  For more information about how to join CoCoRaHS, log on to www.cocorahs.org.  The West Virginia site can then be found by clicking the state on the homepage.  Online tutorials explaining where to properly place your rain gauge and how to precisely read your gauge can also be found on this Web site.      

Contact Info:                         

                       

 

Northern Panhandle Region

John Darnley

Pittsburgh Weather Forecast Office

John.darnley@noaa.gov

 

Eastern Panhandle Region

Christopher Strong

Baltimore/Washington Weather Forecast Office

Christopher.Strong@noaa.gov

 

State Coordinator

Kevin Law

Marshall University

Law14@marshall.edu

 

Central West Virginia Region

John Sikora

Eric Seymour

Charleston Weather Forecast Office

John.Sikora@noaa.gov

Eric.Seymour@noaa.gov

 

Southeastern West Virginia Region

Dennis Sleighter

Anita Silverman

Blacksburg Weather Forecast Office

Dennis.Sleighter@noaa.gov

Anita.Silverman@noaa.gov

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 15, 2009
Contact: Meagan Sellards , WMUL-FM Station Manager, 304-696-2295

WMUL-FM 88.1 and Huntington School of Beauty Culture hosting second Hair from the Herd event



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- WMUL-FM 88.1 , the student broadcast service of Marshall University, and the Huntington School of Beauty Culture are teaming up to host the second Hair from the Herd event  Thursday, April 23 on the Marshall Memorial Student Center plaza.

The four-hour event starts at 11 a.m. and is scheduled to finish at 3 p.m.

WMUL-FM's first Hair from the Herd event collected nearly 400 inches of hair that was donated to Locks of Love.

"The first Hair from the Herd event was so successful that it motivated our staff to continue it for another year," Jason Van Meter, WMUL-FM promotions director, said. "We want this event to be bigger and better than the 2008 campaign. We also want to collect more hair for this great organization."

For the second year, haircuts and styles will be provided free of charge by the Huntington School of Beauty Culture to any student, faculty or community member who supplies 10 inches or more of his/her hair.

Tena Kimball, Huntington School of Beauty Culture admissions director, said the school is willing to lend its support for the second year.

"This was such a successful event this past year that we were excited to be asked to return this year to give back to our community and show our support," Kimball said.

The partnership between the two organizations has been beneficial to this event.

"WMUL-FM can do what it does best which is to promote the event by letting the public know, but the radio station staff cannot provide the haircuts and styles," Van Meter said. "We are thankful the Huntington School of Beauty Culture is willing to help us out with this vital portion of the Hair from the Herd event."

In addition to a free haircut and style, donors will receive a WMUL-FM mesh bag containing a t-shirt, coupons to local restaurants and shampoo and conditioner sets.

Locks of Love  is a not-for-profit organization that provides recipients with a custom, vacuum-fitted hairpiece made entirely from donated human hair.  The vacuum fit is designed for children who have experienced a total loss of scalp hair, and it does not require the use of tape or glue.  Most of the wig applicants suffer from an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata for which there unfortunately is no known cause or cure.

Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that resulted in permanent hair loss.

Founded in 1998, The Locks of Love organization has helped more than 2,000 children since its first year of operation. Thousands of bundles of donated hair are received as a result of the national publicity that Locks of Love has received from newspapers, magazines, radio and television programs.  More than 80 percent of the donors are children, making this a charity where children have an opportunity to help other children.

Donated hair is evaluated for its usefulness according to the following guidelines:

  • It must be at least 10 inches in length.

  • It must be bundled in a pony-tail or braid.

  • Bleached hair cannot be used, but hair that has been dyed or permed can be used.

For more information about Hair from the Herd, contact WMUL-FM Station Manager Meagan Sellards at 304-696-2295.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 15, 2009
Contact: Angela Jones, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

"25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee" Comes to Keith-Albee April 28

Can you spell (K-E-I-T-H  A-L-B-E-E)?

 

BROADWAY'S TONY AWARD-WINNING
MUSICAL COMEDY

8 PM Tuesday, April 28th

 

"The Sweet Spell of Success" The New York Times

The Marshall Artists Series closes their 72nd season with the Tony Award-winning musical comedy THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE, at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center, 8PM Tuesday, April 28th

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE centers around six young people in the throes of puberty, who are overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn't everything and that losing doesn't necessarily make you a loser. This tuneful, offbeat and at times heartwarming show offers audience members the opportunity (strictly voluntary) to become part of the action as on-stage spellers.  "Can you spell i-r-r-e-s-i-s-t-i-b-l-e? 

SPELLING BEE is riotously funny and remarkably ingenious. "Gold stars all around," says the New York Times.  In the Wall Street Journal, SPELLING BEE was called, "perfect in every possible way - that rarity of rarities, a super-smart musical that is also a bona fide crowd-pleaser. An ingenious blend of simplicity and sophistication, it's not merely funny, it's wise.

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE is based on C-R-E-P-U-S-C-U-L-E, an original play by The Farm improv group in New York City.  SPELLING BEE had its world premiere production in July 2004 at Barrington Stage Company, Sheffield, MA.  Under the direction of James Lapine, SPELLING BEE officially opened Off-Broadway on February 7, 2005 at Second Stage Theatre, where it ran from January 11 through March 20, 2005.  The show then moved to Broadway's Circle in the Square Theatre, with previews beginning on April 15, 2005 and an official opening on May 2, 2005.  The Broadway production closed January 20, 2008.  SPELLING BEE is

Tickets for The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee are on sale NOW, and may be purchased at The Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, open Monday Friday, noon 5 P.M.  Patrons my also call the Box Office at (304)-696-6656, or (304)-523-5757. Adult ticket prices are $55/$50/$45. Youth Ticket prices are $27.50/$25/$22.50. Tickets may also be purchased on-line at www.marshallartistsseries.org, or www.ticketmaster.com

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is sponsored by:  Steve & Mary Williams, Boggs Roofing, Neighborgall Construction, Huntington Testing & Technology, Verizon, Air Systems Inc. WKEE, B97, WTCR, The Herald Dispatch, WSAZ, Marshall University, The College of Fine Arts, & The Marshall Artists Series.

# # #

 

For more information about THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE,

please visit www.spellingbeethemusical.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 14, 2009
Contact: Adam Russell, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-521-3754

Empty Bowls event sees biggest turnout yet


Huntington Area Food Bank thankful for community support

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - With nearly $18,000 dollars raised and close to 800 attendees, event organizers are calling the sixth annual Empty Bowls event an overwhelming success.

Empty Bowls, which took place on April 7, is an event that is organized and executed by the Marshall University Department of Art and Design's Keramos Student Pottery Guild, in association with public relations students from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. The goal is to raise awareness of the hunger problem that is present in the Tri-State area.

Event organizers were pleased with this year's turnout.

"I've never seen so many people at this event," John Rickey, director of the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB), said. "It's so great to see members of the community willing to help us out in such a big way."

According to Rickey, each dollar raised will provide seven pounds of food for the food bank to give to needy families. With the money this year's event raised, the HAFB will be able to get nearly 126,000 pounds of food.

Each of the $12 donations at the event will help provide eight meals to eight hungry families in the Tri-State area.

"I am really thankful for everyone who came out to this event and to everyone who donated their time," Rickey remarked.

The HAFB has seen an increase in need for supplies in the past few months, so the amount raised will better prepare it to meet that need.

Even with all of the hard work that both student groups put into making the event this success, they couldn't have done it without the help from volunteers in the area.

Members from the Marshall Community and Technical College Cooking and Culinary Institute prepared nearly 125 gallons of soup, which was donated by area restaurants. Heiner's donated loaves of bread for guests to enjoy. Pepsi donated beverages for the event, totaling more than 1,000 cans and bottles, while Starbucks donated coffee for the patrons.

"It was great to see the church packed with so many people eager to support the cause," Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, said.

In addition to donations received for the soup lunch portion of the event, a silent auction featuring autographed memorabilia and ceramic gifts raised $2,373. Items, such as a Randy Moss-signed jersey, were donated by Celebrity Auctions in association with Stadium Frame and Art. Area artists donated handblown glass and other ceramic items that were also featured in the silent auction.

The event raised almost $18,000, which was double the amount raised last year and was more than the $12,000 goal set for this year's event.

"I'm extremely proud of the Marshall University students who worked very hard to make this year's event a total success," Terry Hapney, professor of public relations at MU, said. "Through the students' hard work, thousands of Tri-State area residents who are hungry will get the meals they need to survive. Above all else, that's what counts most."

For more information about the HAFB, contact Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information regarding the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 14, 2009
Contact: Leah Edwards, University Communications, 304-696-6397

Two Marshall students to compete in national forensics tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two members of Marshall University's forensics team are heading to the National Forensics Association (NFA) tournament in Missouri for a competition beginning later this week.

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a freshman from Louisville, Ky., and Zechariah Frame, a junior from St. Albans, both qualified for the tournament based on their performances last month at an Ohio State University competition.

Vonderschmitt took second place in the Lincoln-Douglas debate event at Ohio State.   The one-on-one debate is between competitors who lay out their arguments in a short speech before questioning their opponents in a cross-examination round.

Winning a third-place prize in Prose Interpretation at Ohio State's competition, Frame qualified for the national tournament with a reading from "Adam and Eve."    The reading is from a short story which takes a humorous look at the world's most famous couple.

"I am extremely proud of our team," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "They started with little more than their talents, their determination, and the enthusiastic support of their coach. Now they will compete with students who are some of the nation's best competitors from well-funded and mature forensics teams. As the only academic competitive activity, participation in forensics provides for students the same types of character-building experiences provided for student-athletes."

This year's NFA is scheduled for April 16-20 at Drury University in Springfield, Mo.   The Marshall forensics team is coached by Communication Studies graduate students Sarah Craiger and Danny Ray.

For more information, contact Dr. Robert Bookwalter, chairman of Communication Studies, at 304-696-2815 or via e-mail at bookwalt@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 13, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall journalism students take top honors in regional competition



COLUMBUS, Ohio
- Students from Marshall University's radio station and newspaper picked up eight first-place awards at the Society of Professional Journalists Region 4 conference Saturday, April 4.

Region 4 includes West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan and western Pennsylvania. The awards include 38 categories in online, broadcast and print entries from students at private and public universities. Judges reviewed more than 550 entries from across the region.

WMUL-FM picked up five first-place awards, two second-place awards and two third-place awards.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL.

"WMUL-FM student broadcasters won all five first-place awards and nine of the 10 radio awards presented in the five radio categories. This solid performance in SPJ's Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of journalism and Mass Communications."

Senior Adam Cavalier from Montgomery, W.Va., picked up three first-place awards and one third-place award. He received first place for best news reporting - "Big Dips for 50 Years;" best feature - "The Toastman;" radio sports reporting - "Metal versus Wood;" and third place for radio sports reporting - "Byron is Back."

Sophomore Leannda Carey from Wellsburg, W.Va., earned second place in best news reporting with "Marshall in the Dark."

Junior Andrew Ramspacher from Dublin, Ohio, earned second place in radio sports reporting for "From Futbol to Football:  Craig Ratanamorn."

Recent graduate Brandon Woolum from Huntington took third place in radio in-depth reporting with his documentary "Marshall is Doomed."

Station staff earned two first-place awards.

"The 2008 Marshall Football Season Preview" took top honors for radio in-depth reporting, written and produced by Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, W.Va., and Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen, W.Va.  Reporters were Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, W.Va.; Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans, W.Va.

The station also took top honors in radio newscast for its 5 p.m. edition of "Newscenter 88." Staff members included: Mark Swinkels, international student, Nieuwleoop, Holland; Whitney Thomas, senior, Wheeling, W.Va.; Leannda Carey, sophomore, Wellsburg, W.Va.; Boom Madison, sophomore, Olympia, Wash.; Robert Iddings, junior, St. Albans, W.Va.; Adam Cavalier, senior, Montgomery, W.Va.; Andrew Ramspacher, junior from Dublin, Ohio; Kasha Shull, freshman, Ona, W.Va.; Meagan Sellards, graduate student, Chapmanville, W.Va.; and Ryan Epling, graduate student, Wayne, W.Va.

Staffers at The Parthenon earned three first-place awards and one third-place award.

Senior print journalism major Tom Bragg from Cross Lanes, W.Va., won first place in sports column writing. Bragg is a former executive editor and sports editor.

Graduate student Erin Felton from St. Albans, W.Va., won first place in editorial cartooning. Felton is a master's degree student in teaching and has contributed cartoons this academic year.

Matthew Sowards, a senior political science major from Salt Rock, W.Va., won first place in general column writing. Sowards writes a weekly column for The Parthenon.

The Parthenon received third place for best all-around daily student newspaper.

"The Parthenon is a public forum, and its strength is its diversity," said adviser Nerissa Young, who teaches print journalism and film documentary. "It provides an outlet for talented people on campus regardless of their majors. However, credit is certainly due to the reporters, editors, photographers and designers from 2008 who made the newspaper one of the best in the region."

First-place winners will compete against winners in 11 other regions across the country. SPJ will announce those winners at its national convention in Indianapolis in August.

The Society of Professional Journalists is the nation's most broad-based journalism organization, dedicated to encouraging the free practice of journalism and stimulating high standards of ethical behavior. SPJ was founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 10, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Choral Union to present 'King David'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present Arthur Honegger's choral work "King David" at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 18, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The Choral Union will be joined by the MU Chamber Choir and orchestra for the presentation of this choral masterpiece.

" 'King David'  is a dazzling dramatic work for chorus, orchestra, soloists, and narrator, who together tell the story of the Old Testament King David," Castleberry said. He added that the work was composed in 1921 by Honegger, a young, then-unknown composer, at the request of Swiss playwright Rene Morax, who sought incidental music for his play 'Le Roi David.' Honegger crafted a work in 27 musical episodes and completed the project in just two months. The instrumental parts for chamber orchestra feature prominent solo lines and many colorful effects.

Solos for soprano, alto and tenor will be sung by members of the Choral Union and Chamber Choir and Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the department of music, will serve as narrator.
 
There will be one performance only, on April 18. Tickets will be available at the door for $10 for adults, $5 for students and seniors, and free to those with Marshall IDs. In addition, on Friday, April 17, the choirs and orchestra will present a rehearsal open to the public. For further information, contact the MU Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 10, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU Theatre's Watkins bids Huntington farewell with 'Broadway and Beyond'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University theatre student Sean Watkins will present 'Broadway and Beyond' this month as a farewell to West Virginia before leaving to work on a tryout of a Broadway show.

The performance will debut at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 18, in St. Albans, W.Va., at the Alban Theater, 65 Olde Main Plaza. A second performance will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in Huntington at the Jeslyn Performing Arts Center, 1040 4th Ave. 

In October 2008, Watkins decided he had to go to New York to audition for a workshop for an upcoming Broadway show titled "Bruce Lee: Journey to the West." He had to miss a rehearsal for a show in which he was portraying the title character to attend the audition, but it turns out he made the right decision. 

Watkins leaves for New York at the end of this month to begin work on "Bruce Lee." It is tentatively scheduled to land on the "Great White Way" in the winter of 2010 after an out-of-town tryout in Los Angeles and a possible engagement in Shanghai, China. 

Before he leaves Huntington, Watkins wants to go out in style. He has put together a one-man show called 'Broadway and Beyond' along with his music director Melody Bias. "It covers a wide variety of music - from jazz to contemporary Broadway to opera.  You might even see a tap dance or two!" says Watkins.

Watkins will be accompanied by Bias in the St. Albans performance while Bruce Rous will be playing at the Huntington performance.

Admission is free, but donations will be appreciated, according to Watkins. A portion of the proceeds will go to a children's charity. 

For further information, contact Sean Watkins via e-mail at SeanAWatkins@gmail.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 10, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lewis College of Business to celebrate 40th anniversary

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business will celebrate its 40th anniversary during Alumni Weekend with a series of events from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 24 at Corbly Hall on the Huntington campus.

Numerous activities and giveaways are planned throughout the day, including an unveiling/ribbon cutting of the new LCOB student lounge in the lobby of Corbly Hall at 10 a.m. Other special events include:

  • 10:20 a.m., Dr. Robert Alexander, former dean of the College of Business, will give a lecture in the Corbly Hall lobby on the history of the LCOB.

  • 11 a.m., MU baseball Coach Jeff Waggoner and LCOB faculty will be in a dunk tank, with LCOB students and MU baseball players trying to dunk them. It will be set up outside between Corbly Hall and the Drinko Library.

  • 11 a.m., Guest lecture from BB&T West Virginia President Phyllis Arnold will take place in Smith Hall Room 154.

  • 1:30 p.m., a reception will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Dining Room.

Hot dogs, popcorn and birthday cake will be provided throughout the day to students, staff, faculty and alumni, and the DAWG radio station will be broadcasting live outside between Corbly and Drinko, where other games/activities such as an obstacle course and guitar hero will be available.

The design of the student lounge that will be unveiled is the result of a contest in Dr. Deanna Mader's marketing class. Two teams of LCOB students presented their designs for a student lounge to a judging panel that included Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Chong Kim, dean of the LCOB. The design of the lounge was based on the winning team's design.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students win 25 awards, including seven grand prizes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received seven grand prize awards and 18 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 18th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 46th annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony.

The event took place Saturday, March 28 at the LaGuardia Crowne Plaza Hotel in New York, N.Y.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"No other school won more grand prizes or overall awards than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters in the NBS scriptwriting, audio and online categories," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 88 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media.  Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000.  Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) Chapters.

WMUL's grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88:  Chelsea Clinton Comes to Huntington," with producer Ryan Vance, a senior from Culloden; news anchors Kimberly Burcham, a recent graduate from Huntington; Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; sports anchor Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and "live drop" reporters Meagan Sellards, a graduate student from Chapmanville; and Neera Doss, a junior from Milton; broadcast Friday, April 4, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

Audio Feature Segment

"Big Dips for 50 Years," written and produced by Adam Cavalier,  a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, July 17, 2008.

Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program

"The Sowards Report:  Election Night Special," a public affairs talk program, with hosts Matt Sowards, a junior from Salt Rock; Jay Roudebush, a junior from Winfield; and producer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi; broadcast Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008.

Audio Sports Package

"Byron is Back," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall - Illinois State football game Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"A Glimpse at Herd Heaven: The 2007-2008 Marshall Men's Basketball Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast  prior to the Marshall - Wheeling Jesuit exhibition basketball home opener Saturday, Nov. 1, 2008.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus University of Memphis men's basketball game played at the Cam Henderson Center in Huntington, West Virginia, Saturday, Jan. 12, 2008. The students calling the men's basketball game broadcast over FM 88.1 were: Basketball play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; and engineer Justin Prince, a freshman from Kenova.

The honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; news anchors Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi; Brenna Slavens, a senior from Jackson, Ohio; and sports anchor Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; broadcast Friday, Nov. 14, 2008.

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Mark Swinkels, international student from Nieuwleoop, Holland; news anchors Whitney Thomas, a senior from Wheeling; Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; and sports anchor Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin; broadcast Thursday, April 24, 2008.

Audio News Package

"Professors Deal with Power Outage," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"Pattie's Pies," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"The Toastman," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, Aug. 4, 2008.

Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program

"A Conversation with Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's new Provost," by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall - Cincinnati football game Friday, Oct. 3, 2008.

Audio Promos

"The Awards Keep on Coming," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Friday, Aug. 22, 2008 through the present time, written and produced by Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

Audio Sports Package

"The Jump Around," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the Marshall - Wisconsin football game, Saturday, Sept. 6, 2008.

Audio Sports Segment

"Metal versus Wood," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, March 13, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup:  Spring Season Finale," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, and Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio, broadcast Friday, April 24, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Ye Olde C-USA Report," with host Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; reporters Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro; Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; Dave Traube, a junior from Beckley; James Roach, a junior from Richwood; and Tony Viola, a freshman from Follansbee; broadcast Friday, Oct. 17, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, and Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio, broadcast Friday, Nov. 7, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"The WMUL-FM Pregame Show: The Friends of Coal Bowl," with hosts Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen;  Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro;  reporters Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne;  Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; broadcast  prior to the Marshall - West Virginia football game Saturday, Sept. 27, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"Trash Talk Sports:  The Friends of Coal Bowl Edition," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; and Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro; broadcast Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"Yearning for Experience:  The 2007 Marshall Football Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast  prior to the Marshall vs. Illinois State football home opener Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Memphis football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; sideline reporter Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; and engineer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus West Virginia University football game played at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, W.Va., Saturday, Sept. 27, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer - Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; spotter Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; and engineer Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Stephens City, Va.

Overall Web Site

WMUL-FM's Web site is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2008 Web Master for WMUL-FM Online is Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Honors Student Association sponsoring 5K run/walk

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Marshall University Honors Student Association 5K Run/Walk will take place at 8 a.m. Saturday, April 25 in downtown Huntington.

Proceeds from the event will be used to fund a continual scholarship in remembrance of a Marshall University honors student who died last fall, and allow for growth of the MU honors program.

The flat, 3.1-mile course starts and ends at or near the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Age divisions include 19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60 and up. Awards will be presented to the top male and female overall finishers, and the top male and female finisher in each age group.

Entry fee is $15. Checks should be made payable to the Marshall University Honors Student Association or MUHSA and returned to Katrina Harper at the Center for Academic Excellence, Marshall University, Old Main 230, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

Entry forms are available on the event calendar under April 25th at www.tristateracer.com, at the Marshall Recreation Center, the Huntington YMCA and by request at harper109@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 8, 2009
Contact: Katherine Reasons,, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-521-9841

Empty Bowls fundraiser a success

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - First Presbyterian Church in Huntington doesn't normally experience hundreds of people walking through its doors with handmade pottery and gallons of soup. But this Tuesday was very different.

Students from the College of Fine Arts and W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University hosted the sixth annual Empty Bowls event at the church on Tuesday. The event raised nearly $18,000 for the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB), a nonprofit food distribution center that provides food to soup kitchens, emergency relief shelters and other hunger programs throughout the Tri-State.

This year's event nearly doubled the amount raised last year, according to campaign organizers, and surpassed the students' goal of $12,000.

"Each dollar that was donated at Empty Bowls will allow us to distribute seven pounds of food to the hungry in our region," said Jon Rickey, director of the HAFB. "Everyone who provided us with a $12 donation will feed an entire family for three weeks."

Every guest who donated $12 received a soup lunch donated by area restaurants and a ceramic bowl, handmade by students in the Keramos Student Pottery Guild at Marshall University. The bowls serve as a lasting reminder of the ongoing hunger problem in our region.

"When you see one of these bowls, you're reminded that there are hungry people in our region," said Tommy Warf, a Marshall ceramics student.

"The bowl is the universal symbol for hospitality and giving, and what more appropriate form could we use to help others?" said Earline Allen, ceramics professor.

In addition to receiving lunch, the nearly 800 people in attendance at Empty Bowls had the opportunity to bid on dozens of items at a silent auction. Some of the items included gift baskets from local businesses, sports memorabilia autographed by former Marshall athletes, coaches and even signed photographs of Brad Paisley and Taylor Swift.

"We always hear that it's better to give than to receive, and everyone who participated in our silent auction had the fantastic opportunity to do both," said Meagan Sellards, Empty Bowls campaign director. "Several of our guests won really great prizes, but at the same time, they contributed to a wonderful and important cause."

Campaign Representative Erin Thompson said it was amazing to see how much the community supported the campaign.

"Before the actual event, we coordinated food drives at local businesses, awareness events at campus activities and a penny drive among some of Marshall's fraternities and sororities," she said. "The entire community has really pulled together for this campaign, and it's exciting to see how much of a difference it has made."

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org.  For more information about the Empty Bowls campaign, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

72nd annual Awards Banquet highlights Alumni Weekend; distinguished alumni, friends and students to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 72nd annual Alumni Awards Banquet highlights Marshall University's 2009 Alumni Weekend, which takes place April 24-25.

The awards banquet on Saturday, April 25, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus honors distinguished alumni, friends and students. It starts at 6 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza with the President's Social, which is followed at 7 p.m. by the banquet in the center's Don Morris Room. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. Tables for eight people are available for $400.

To RSVP or ask questions about the banquet, persons may call 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

The theme of this year's Alumni Weekend, which is sponsored by Bank of America and Sodexo, is "Bridging the Past with the Future."  

Here is a complete list of the distinguished alumni award winners for 2009:

Distinguished Alumni Award

Joe Gillette (BBA '73) of Marietta, Ga., owns Wen-Four Foods Inc., and 16 Wendy's restaurants. He dedicates a great deal of his time to Marshall University, including membership on the board of directors of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.; vice president of the Society of Yeager Scholars board; president of the Thunder Club; and member of the Big Green Coaches Circle. This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.

Community Achievement Award

Robert (Bob) N. Melott (MA '62) of Tulsa, Okla., is co-founder and retired vice president for information systems, admissions and records at Tulsa Community College, formerly Tulsa Junior College. When he joined Tulsa Junior College as vice president in 1969, he helped establish the first new public institution of higher education in the state in 50 years. During his tenure, more than 400,000 people attended the college. He also was active in Rotary, moving through the ranks to governor of his district, which included four states. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

Distinguished Service to Marshall Award (two recipients)

John Curtis McHaffie (BSE '59) of Oro Valley, Ariz., has worked diligently over the years to restore the four-year engineering program to Marshall University, resulting in its reinstatement. This award coincides with the 50-year anniversary of McHaffie receiving his Bachelor of  Engineering degree from Marshall. After an illustrious career with the U.S. Air Force and in the private sector as an aerospace engineer, he retired as principal, consultant and president of Support Systems Inc. in 1994.

Robert B. Walker, M.D., of Barboursville, W.Va., joined the Marshall University faculty in 1979 and became chairman of the Department of Family and Community Health in 1986, associate dean of Clinical Affairs in 1991, and vice executive dean in 2001. He was named Professor of the Year in West Virginia in 1989; a Distinguished West Virginian, the state's highest honor, in 1996; and Rural Health Educator of the Year by the National Rural Health Association in 2000. Walker currently serves as vice chancellor of West Virginia's three Health Science Centers and has served as an advisor to Congress. Walker has maintained a family practice in Lincoln County for 33 years and is the medical director of Hospice of Lincoln County.

Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Barbara Winters has worked in libraries in four states during a career of more than 32 years, and has been dean of libraries at Marshall University since August 2000. She graduated from The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Virginia Commonwealth University and Catholic University of America. She most recently completed work as executive producer on a two-hour documentary film about Ken Hechler's life, called "In Pursuit of Justice." This award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees are evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

Distinguished Education and Human Service Award

Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks is a retired longtime faculty member and coach of women's golf, tennis, badminton and volleyball. She also taught teacher education courses and coordinated teaching clinical supervision. She served as an associate athletic director and faculty rep for the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and the Southern Conference, NCAA.

Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship (two students)

April Bennett, a freshman music education major, is a member of the Marching Thunder. Candice Michael, a junior political science major, is a cheerleader. This scholarship was established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds for the scholarship come from Herd Village proceeds.

Cam Henderson Scholarship Award

Tyler J. Gatrell of Boyd County, Ky., won the MU Baseball Leadership Award and made the dean's list in both 2007 and 2008. This scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

Nate Ruffin Scholarship

John Alexander Inman, a former Thundering Herd football player, graduated with a bachelor's degree in business management in 2008 and currently is working on a second degree in culinary arts and hospitality management at the Marshall Community and Technical College. This scholarship is awarded to a graduate or undergraduate Marshall University student with priority given to an African American full-time student with a 2.5 GPA or better as an undergraduate or 3.0 GPA or better as a graduate.

Alumni Association Club of the Year

The Atlanta, Ga., Alumni Club, under the leadership of President John Gilmore (BA '95, MA '98), hosted numerous game-watching parties, receptions and other social functions throughout the year for the purpose of attracting new members and recruiting potential Marshall students. The club members have been particularly dedicated to fundraising efforts for the new Erickson Alumni Center and Foundation Building. The Atlanta Club has been active since October 1984.

Young Alumni Award

Doug Martin (MS '06) of Delbarton, W.Va., a graphic design teacher at Mingo Career and Technical Center, has helped his students to win more than $1 million in scholarship money over the past three years. Martin has been a finalist for West Virginia Teacher of the Year and Technology and Learning Magazine's Leader of the Year. Most recently he has been invited to sit on the National Advisory Committee of the George Lucas (Star Wars) Educational Foundation where he will be a voice of change for education on a national level. The criteria for this award are that the person must be 35 years old or younger, an active member of the Alumni Association, show outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor, have a personal commitment to his or her community, and demonstrate service to Marshall University and its students.

MUAA Board Member of the Year

The recipient of this honor will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the awards banquet. The candidate must be successful in promoting the association's vision statement among students, alumni and friends, promote the association's core values, and work to move the association to the next level by bringing in new ideas.

Photos of the 2009 distinguished alumni award winners are available at http://www.marshall.edu/alumni/AlumniWeekend2009Awards.asp.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU professor to deliver Babcock Lecture in History at University of Maine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. William Palmer, professor of history at Marshall University, will give the 2009 Babcock Lecture in History at the University of Maine on Monday, April 27.

The Babcock Lectureship was created in honor of Prof. Robert H. Babcock, a longtime member of the University of Maine history department, to bring distinguished historians to campus.

Palmer, who has taught at Marshall since 1984, is the author of five books, including, most recently, From Gentleman's Club to Professional Body: The Evolution of the History Department in the United States, 1940-1980. He also received a Ph.D. in history from the University of Maine in 1981.  His lecture will discuss the difficulties faced by African Americans, Jews and women in trying to enter the history profession, and their contribution to the creation of the contemporary history department.

"We are exceptionally proud of Dr. Palmer's reputation as a productive and insightful scholar, and as a superior teacher," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "An invited lecture of this type is a clear affirmation of Dr. Palmer's good works. His recent research on the transformation of departments of history at American colleges and universities is a provocative and insightful analysis of higher education."

For more information, call Palmer at 304-696-2720.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU alum Dangerfield awarded prestigious Fulbright Fellowship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joseph Dangerfield, Marshall University alumnus and assistant professor of music at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to teach and compose in the Russian Federation during the 2009-2010 school year. Specifically, Dangerfield will serve as composer-in-residence for the Studio New Music Ensemble at the Moscow Conservatory.

Dangerfield began his composition studies at Marshall and received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1999. At Marshall, he studied with Michael Golden and John Allemeier. He then completed his master's degree at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, working with Marilyn Shrude and Mikel Kuehn, and received a doctorate in 2005 from the University of Iowa, studying under David Gompper.

Reflecting on his studies at Marshall, Dangerfield said, "Michael Golden, my first composition professor, really opened my eyes to new music, and John Allemeier helped me to hone my craft.  .[he also] introduced me to the music of David Gompper (University of Iowa).  As a result, I came to Iowa to work with Gompper and complete my Ph.D."

Dangerfield has had a lifelong fascination with traditional Russian music, which led him to pursue the Fulbright Scholarship opportunity.

"My parents are musicians and exposed me to Russian music beginning at a very young age," said Dangerfield.  "For some reason, this music has always spoken to me.  I am grateful for the opportunity to continue my lifelong journey with Russian music at the Moscow Conservatory during the next school year."

While at the Moscow Conservatory, Dangerfield will be teaching composition, presenting lectures and papers about the history of American music, and helping Russian students learn about the American educational system. In addition, the music professor will be guest conducting and expects to write a new composition to be premiered in Russia.

"I often use the folk and liturgical music of Russia as a source of creative inspiration," noted Dangerfield. "I am also enamored with the music of Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Schnittke, Tarnopolski  [as well as] composers now living in Russia."

At Coe, Dangerfield teaches music composition and theory, and serves as the director of the Coe College Symphony Orchestra. Over the past several years, Dangerfield has garnered much attention as a composer, with performances of his works throughout the United States and abroad. American presentations include the Society of Composers Inc., the MusicX Festival at the College Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati, the San Francisco New Music Festival, and the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music. His instrumental and chamber compositions have also been performed at such international venues as the Moscow Conservatory, the Frankfurter Kuenstler Klub and the Conservatorio di Giuseppe Tartini (Trieste, Italy), as well as in Cairo, Egypt.

Originally trained as a pianist, Dangerfield is active as a performer and conductor throughout the United States.  Recently, he conducted a performance of his Piano Quintet in New York City.

He is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including The Young and Emerging Composers Award (2002), ASCAP Standard Awards, and the Henry and Parker Pelzer Prize for Excellence in Composition (2005). Dangerfield was selected for a three-week independent residency in the Leighton Studios of the prestigious Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada, which was completed in January 2008. Recordings of his works are available on the Albany Records label, and many are published by European American Music and PIP Press Music Publications.

Dangerfield's award is part of the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program, which sends approximately 1,100 American scholars and professionals per year to approximately 130 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields.  He joins several other Coe faculty members who have received Fulbright Awards during their careers.

Established in 1946 and sponsored by the United States Department of State, the Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding between Americans and the peoples of other countries, through the exchange of persons, knowledge and skills.  The Fulbright Program provides funding for students, scholars and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research and teaching. 

Dangerfield met his wife, Ami Gray Dangerfield, who also earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at Marshall in 1999, in the music library at Marshall. They have two children, Conner, 5, and Piper, 3, who will accompany them to Russia.

For more information, contact Joe Dangerfield via email at jdangerf@coe.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Sarah O'Connell, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-654-0928

Sixth Empty Bowls event takes place Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The countdown to the sixth annual Empty Bowls event is coming to a close as Marshall University students and the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) continue to collect donations and handcrafted bowls in preparation for the event.

Students from the Department of Art and Design's Keramos Student Pottery Guild continue to work toward reaching their goal of handcrafting 1,000 ceramic bowls, and public relations students in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications have been preparing for the event for months. The students are confident that they will reach their goal of raising money for the HAFB as well as raising awareness about hunger in the Tri-State area

"We are getting to the end and everything is starting to fall into place," said Meagan Sellards, Empty Bowls campaign director. "Everyone has worked together in order to ensure that this is a successful event."

Empty Bowls is from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. For a $12 donation, guests will receive a handcrafted ceramic bowl of their choice and a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi. Proceeds benefit the HAFB.

"We have to make sure that every small detail is in order before the day of the event to make sure it runs smoothly," said Adam Russell, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative. "Everyone involved has a common goal of raising money for the food bank. We want to make sure that guests can come out and have a good time, and also understand that there are some people in the community who go hungry every day. Their donation is going toward helping one of those people."

A silent auction will be held at the event. Participants can bid on additional bowls signed by Gov. Joe Manchin, Marshall University President Stephen Kopp and Coach Mark Snyder; Marshall memorabilia including an authentic cheerleading uniform and items signed by Chad Pennington, Bobby Pruett, Red Dawson, Randy Moss and Marshall athletic teams; gift cards from Sculptures Salon, Wal-Mart and local area restaurants; memorabilia signed by famous musicians and athletes; a gift package from Pullman Plaza and two end zone tickets for the 2009 Marshall football season donated by the Marshall Athletics Department are just a few of the gifts that are being offered.

Additional artwork to be auctioned off has been donated by three local high schools. Art teachers Lois Mack from Cabell Midland, Phoebe Carry from Fairland and Karen Alexander from Spring Valley all have students who are contributing something to the auction.

"We are very happy to have several area high schools participating in Empty Bowls," said Earline Allen, ceramics professor. "These students are learning how to make a positive impact on their communities."

"None of this would be possible without the help of local businesses and members of the community," said Will Selbee, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative. "Local restaurants have been very generous with donating soup and businesses are eager to help by donating items for the silent auction. We have a total of 124 gallons of soup and many great gifts for the auction."

Guests going through the soup line will also get the chance to meet local celebrities who are volunteering at the event. Celebrity servers include WOWK's Sandra Cole, WSAZ's Paul Gessler, Magic 97.9's J.B. Miller, former Marshall Student Body President Matt James and current Student Body President Sean Hornbuckle, The Herald Dispatch's Dave Lavender, Miss West Virginia International Misty McMinn and Marshall mascot Marco, along with others who will be volunteering throughout the day.

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls event, call Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394. Those interested in the event may also e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.

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This information is being released as a courtesy to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications.


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Friday April 3, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Chad Pennington to deliver keynote address at Marshall University's 172nd Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Chad Pennington's on-the-field accomplishments, both at Marshall University and in the National Football League, are well documented. However, it is his contributions to society, not only in the Marshall community but nationally, that many believe will be his legacy long after his playing days are over.

Because of his contributions as an outstanding honors student while at Marshall, his tremendous success as a student and professional athlete, and his loyalty to his alma mater, Pennington will return to Marshall this spring to deliver the keynote address during the University's 172nd Commencement, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

"Chad Pennington embodies the essence of what it means to be a 'Son of Marshall,' " Kopp said. "He is as committed today as he was as a student at Marshall University to excelling in all that he does. The personal and professional standards he lives by serve as a model for all of us. His achievements in every facet of his life, whether as a father or as a professional athlete, have been remarkable.

"Chad has overcome significant personal hardships along the way but has never lost sight of his commitment to helping others. He takes great pride in making the world a better place through his volunteer and charitable works and the way he lives his life. We at Marshall University are very proud of Chad and we are truly honored to have him address the 2009 graduates of Marshall University at our 172nd Commencement."

Commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 9 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Pennington graduated with high honors from Marshall in December 1999 with a degree in journalism. He also was a finalist for the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship, was a two-time first-team Academic All-American, and received an award as the top scholar athlete in college football.

"My experience as a student-athlete at Marshall University was simply amazing! Ten years later, I still look back on my collegiate years with a great sense of pride and accomplishment," Pennington said. "I am honored to have the opportunity to be the commencement speaker and hope to share my experiences with the future leaders of tomorrow."

Pennington has been honored many times during his NFL career. Most of the recognition has nothing to do with touchdown passes or winning games. To name a few, he:

  • received the 2006 and 2007 Dennis Byrd Award for most inspirational player, as selected by his teammates;

  • was given the Achievement in Sports Award by the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of New York City in 2007;

  • was named the Jets' 2006 Walter Payton Man of the Year for his positive impact on people's lives;

  • received the sixth annual Call to Courage Award from the Western New York chapter of Athletes in Action, given to the NFL player or coach who exemplifies character and leadership on and off the field, at home and in his community;

  • was named the Jets' Ed Block Courage Award winner in 2004;

  • was selected as one of nine NFL players featured in the annual United Way commercials.

In 2003, Pennington and his wife, Robin, established the 1st and 10 Foundation with the mission of building stronger communities by funding programs and institutions that seek to improve the quality of life throughout West Virginia, Tennessee and the New York metropolitan area.

The foundation helped Starlight Starbright place Fun Centers (mobile entertainment units for pediatric patients) in hospitals in New York, Knoxville, Tenn., and Huntington. The 1st and 10 Foundation's fifth annual Celebrity Bowl will take place at Colonial Lanes in Huntington the evening of May 9.

Throughout his career Pennington has been a frequent visitor to area hospitals and schools, and he remains a popular banquet speaker.

During his four-year career at Marshall that began in 1995, he played in a Division I-AA championship game his freshman season, then - after sitting out the 1996 season - played in three consecutive Motor City Bowl games his final three years. During that time, Pennington guided the Thundering Herd to an overall record of 35-4 and bowl victories over Louisville and Brigham Young. His senior season, Marshall finished 13-0 and ranked No. 10 in the country.

Pennington, a nine-year veteran of the National Football League, is the Miami Dolphins' starting quarterback. He spent his first eight years in the NFL with the New York Jets. During his career, he has passed for more than 17,000 yards and twice - including last season - has been named the league's Comeback Player of the Year.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 3, 2009
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late,", 304-696-2967

This week's 'Up Late' is all about comedy!

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The guy named Marshall University's funniest student two years ago joins the cast of "Up Late" this week to talk about his life as a stand-up comedian.

Host Jamie LoFiego talks with Mike Jones about a life in comedy.

Also this week, director Morgan Shillingburgh and the crew of "Up Late" have a bone to pick with LoFiego. Executive producer Aaron Varble gets lessons on how to be funny from Jones and Aaron-Michael Fox. And, warning: This episode also features a pancake and sausage eating contest.

The Browning Automatics play their song, "Stop and Stay," and this week's doorkeeper is junior journalism major Jordan Sharp from Wayne, W.Va.

This episode of "Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, April 4 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

SCORES competition attracts more than 1,700 students to Marshall



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- More than 1,700 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, April 4 to participate in the 31st annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

"We are very excited about the SCORES competition," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES Coordinator with Marshall's office of recruitment. "The SCORES Academic Festival is our unique way of showcasing Marshall, while entertaining the brightest students from our area. In addition to the competition, this year we will be providing tours of the campus, and offering students the option to pay $5 and use the Marshall Recreation Center while they are here."

The event, which runs from 8 a.m. to about 3 p.m., is open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, journalism and mass communications, and science.

Awards will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place awards will be given for each division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

The SCORES awards ceremony takes place at 1:30 p.m. at the Cam Henderson Center. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will welcome the students at the ceremony.

For more information, contact the SCORES offices at (304) 696-2246.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

WalkItUp! Campaign at Marshall University features one-mile walk

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is putting its best foot forward for the second annual WalkItUp! Campaign organized by the Cabell-Huntington Health Department.   The community-wide program is an effort to encourage residents to begin walking 30 minutes a day and to continue the activity for a lifetime.

The Student Health Education office at Marshall University and the Marshall Recreation Center are co-sponsoring the event, which kicks off at noon Tuesday, April 7, at the recreation center. The approximately one-mile walk begins and ends at the recreation center and organizers say water and physical activity brochures will be available on site.

"I think that hosting a WalkItUp! event on campus is a great way to show the community that we are striving to become a healthier Marshall University," said Heather Smith, assistant director for fitness, Campus Recreation. "I've witnessed many faculty, staff and students recently choosing to be more active and take charge of their health. It is great to help provide more opportunities for fitness and recreation at Marshall."

Smith said the first 50 walkers to register on the day of the event will receive a free t-shirt.

Special guest walkers include Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marco and Marshall Men's Basketball Coach Donnie Jones.

In the event of rain, the walk will be inside the Marshall Recreation Center.

For more information on the walk, visit: www.walkitup.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Jodee Hammond, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-639-6126

Sixth Annual Empty Bowls only days away

University students and HAFB count down to Empty Bowls

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five, four, three, two, one.

The sixth annual Empty Bowls event is only five days away, and the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) and Marshall University (MU) students are counting down.

The event is from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at the First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington.  Each person who donates $12 receives a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi and a handcrafted ceramic bowl to serve as a constant reminder of the empty bowls in our community and the ongoing hunger problem all over the world.

"Any time you raise some funds to feed someone who's hungry, it's a success," said Don Van Horn, dean of the MU College of Fine Arts.

After weeks of planning, students from the Keramos Student Pottery Guild and public relations students in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications are making the final touches to ensure everything is in order for the long-awaited fundraiser.

"We have to double-check everything from sponsorships to volunteers to how many forks we have," said Megan Schubert, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative.  "We want to complete our plans and get the final word out about the good that people can bring to their community by contributing to such a worthy cause. Everything we do is for the food bank, and we don't want to let them down."

Event participants can expect to spot some local celebrities as they make their way through the soup line. Celebrity servers include: WOWK's Sandra Cole, WSAZ's Paul Gessler, former Marshall University Student Body President Matt James, current Marshall University Student Body President Sean Hornbuckle, Magic 97.9's JB Miller and many more.

"My hope is for so many people to show up that nothing is left," said Tommy Warf, a ceramics graduate student from Huntington. 

A silent auction will also take place at the event. Participants will have a chance to bid on additional bowls signed by Gov. Joe Manchin and Coach Mark Snyder; hand-blown glass; an authentic Marshall University cheerleading uniform; signed memorabilia from Chad Pennington, Red Dawson, Bobby Pruett and Marshall athletic teams; two Wal-Mart gift cards; gift cards for Sculptures Salon; memorabilia signed by famous musicians and athletes and other gifts. All proceeds from the event benefit the HAFB.

"I have high hopes for this year's turnout," said Erica Rife, Empty Bowls campaign representative. "We've had a lot of great coverage and a lot of support from the community thus far, so there is no reason why Empty Bowls won't be successful."

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at (304) 696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Rife can be reached by phone at 304-360-3394. Those interested in the event may also e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org

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This information is being released as a courtesy to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 1, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall evaluates its progress on 4th annual Assessment Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's fourth annual Assessment Day, which is designed to determine how well the university is meeting its goals overall and by academic and service units, will take place Wednesday, April 8.

"Assessment is really at the heart of the teaching and learning process," said Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs. "Marshall has made it a priority by dedicating a day to the process."

"We're depending on students, faculty, and staff to participate in the Assessment Day activities and survey instruments," said Dr. Mary Beth Reynolds, Director of Assessment, who is heading up the Assessment Day activities once again this year. "Every year, our information becomes more detailed and useful."

Classes will not meet as scheduled most of that day, which allows students, faculty, and staff to participate in Assessment Day activities. The normal class schedule resumes at 4 p.m. for late afternoon and evening classes.

Members of the Marshall community participating in Assessment Day activities will receive a free lunch catered by Buddy's BBQ, Sodexo and Pepsi. Lunchtime entertainment will include the MU Rock Ensemble "Looking Glass," under the direction of Dr. Martin Saunders, and the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, under the direction of Dr. Wendell Dobbs. They will give special performances beginning at 11:30 a.m. Also, students and faculty will be eligible to win prizes, including laptop computers and gift cards, donated by area businesses and other groups.

Reynolds said that, among the activities planned, some are university wide and some are departmental. University-wide activities include, among others, student satisfaction surveys by the admissions office, financial aid office, residence services, career services department, student health services, the women's center, and the registrar's office; an SGA survey; and surveys from Sodexo and the MU Bookstore. The Office of Career Services will host a presentation by Sheetz and will conduct job search sessions for students. Information and Computer Literacy (iSkills) testing will be conducted throughout the day. Students may contact Dr. Monica Brooks at brooks@marshall.edu about this opportunity.

Many departments will be offering electronic surveys, which are available now and will continue to be available through April 10. A list and instructions for accessing both the university-wide and departmental surveys are available online at  http://www.marshall.edu/assessment/AssessmentDay_2009/Survey_Info09.asp.

Other departmental activities, which vary by unit, include "town hall" meetings for majors, portfolio presentations and exit interviews for seniors. 

Reynolds said she encourages everyone who participates Wednesday to complete an Assessment Day evaluation form, which will be available on the MyMU portal beginning April 13, the Monday after the event. This will be used as a guide in planning future Assessment Days.

"Assessment Day is an opportunity for faculty and students to evaluate the things they care about most: teaching and learning and the services that support those two," Hensley said. "I can't imagine that a student has no interest in providing feedback to his or her institution. Here is the chance."

"The Assessment Day Committee has worked hard to put this event together and we welcome everyone's input to help us build a better Marshall through assessment," Reynolds said.

In addition to Reynolds and Hensley, committee members include faculty members Dr. Marie Archambault, Dr. Michael Castellani, Dr. Darlene Daneker, Dr. Susan Gilpin, Dr. Marjorie Keatley, Dr. Cal Meyer, and Dr. Caroline Perkins; student Matt James; and staff members Karen Barker, Roberta Ferguson, Patricia Gallagher, Pat Gebhart, Dr. Karen Kirtley, Carla Lapelle, Jenny Lauhon, Homer Preece, Susan Tams and Terri Tomblin-Byrd.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/assessment/AssessmentDay_2009/default09.asp.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 1, 2009
Contact: Jodee Hammond,, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative,, 304-639-6126

Two Marshall University departments work together


College of Fine Arts and School of Journalism join to help the food bank

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Six years ago the first collaboration between the College of Fine Arts and W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications began with the idea for the Empty Bowls event.

"Ceramics students were trying to come up a charity idea that included some community involvement," said Mindy Bruce, former ceramics and public relations graduate student. "When I took a tour of Transylvania University in 1998 I heard their ceramics professor talking about Empty Bowls. I suggested it to our club, and everybody liked it really well."

Bruce said the problem they encountered was trying to get the first one ready. They could not decide when to do it, so it kept getting put off. She did not think it was ever going to happen and put it out of her mind.

Bruce finished her ceramics degree and moved on to acquire a public relations degree when the idea for Empty Bowls resurfaced.

"The Keramos Pottery Guild wanted some help with the publicity of the Empty Bowls event, so they asked the J-school students to add their expertise," said Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts. "The partnership was formed, and the two departments have been working together ever since." 

"Getting the journalism department behind it was the last little oomph they needed to set a deadline and stick to it," Bruce said. "Everything just fell into place from there."

The first Empty Bowls in 2004 was a big hit.

"It took off like a house on fire, especially with the help of the entertainment and auction," Bruce said. "Even though they had a huge crowd, I still wasn't sure if they would do it again. I was really pleased about it still going on when I heard about this year's campaign."

The 2009 Empty Bowls event will be from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at the First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. Each person donating $12 receives a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi, and a handcrafted ceramic bowl to serve as a constant reminder of the empty bowls in our community and the ongoing hunger problem all over the world. All proceeds benefit the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB).

"This collaboration between art and public relations students replicates the kind of challenge students will face when they move out of the academy and into the world," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts. "Helping prepare them through experiences like this is an important part of the education process."

"Leading and participating in these creative, collaborative and community service activities are part of our mission in the College of Fine Arts," said Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts. "It also illustrates why the bond between Marshall University and Huntington is so special."

Terry Hapney, assistant professor of public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at MU, said that while the campaign  is focused primarily on feeding hungry people in the region, it also is a great hands-on, collaborative project for his students and ceramics students.

"Seeing my public relations students create an actual PR agency in January and work through the research, planning, communication, and evaluation stages of a PR campaign in February, March, and April has been a great experience," he said. "Many hours have also gone into producing the ceramic bowls. To witness these two groups of students coming together to give of their time, energy, and talents to help those in need is quite rewarding."

Hapney said much has gone into this year's Empty Bowls event.

"From the 1,000 beautiful bowls the ceramics students are providing to the 100 gallons of soup secured by public relations students, in addition to over 1,000 cans of Pepsi, many loaves of bread, thousands of dollars worth of silent auction items, t-shirts, banners, table tents, fact sheets, media kits, news releases, PSA's, a Web site, billboards, radio advertising, music, and plans for the actual Empty Bowls event this year's event should prove to be one to remember," Hapney said. "All of the students are hopeful they exceed their goal to ensure the Huntington Area Food Bank receives the funding to help even more people in the Tri-State area."

Brooke Ash, director of public relations for the HAFB, said food bank representatives are grateful for the hard work and dedication the Keramos Student Pottery Guild and the PR Campaigns class has put forth.

"It's great to see the students come together with the Empty Bowls event to help the food bank in more ways than one," Ash said. "It raises money for the cause, helps to raise awareness of the hunger issues in our community and offers people a way to give back." 

For more information about the HAFB, call Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls campaign, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the Empty Bowls media representative, can be reached at by phone at 304-360-3394, by e-mail at emptybowls@marshall.edu or by visiting www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 31, 2009
Contact: Leah Tolliver, MU Women's Center Coordinator, 304-696-3112

Women veterans turned peace activists to speak at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three female former and current U.S. military personnel who now participate in peace activism will speak on Marshall University's Huntington campus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 1, in the Shawkey Dining Room, which is on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center.

The event will include speakers Ann Wright, a retired Army colonel; Ellen Barfield, a former Army member; and Chantelle Bateman, an active Marine. They will speak to students, faculty, staff, and community members about their perspectives on serving in the U.S. military.

Ann Wright is a 29-year U.S. Army/Army Reserve veteran who served primarily in Special Operations units and retired as a colonel.  She was also a 16-year U.S. diplomat and served in Nicaragua, Grenada, Somalia, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Sierra Leone, Micronesia, Afghanistan and Mongolia. She resigned from the diplomatic corps in March, 2003 in opposition to the Iraq war.  She is the co-author of "Dissent: Voices of Conscience."

Full-time peace and justice activist Ellen Barfield served in the U.S. Army from 1977 to 1981, stationed in Kitzingen, Germany; Ft Hood, Texas; Pyong Taek, South Korea; and Ft Riley, Kansas. Barfield has participated nationally as a board member of the War Resisters League, as an immediate past board member of Veterans for Peace, as a member of the Legislative Working Group of School of the Americas Watch, and as a member of the Disarmament Committee of the  Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She also heads the local chapter of Veterans for Peace in her home of Baltimore, Md., and works with several other Baltimore peace and social justice organizations. She has traveled as a peace delegate to Iraq four times with the Voices in the Wilderness Iraq Peace Team and to Palestine five times, most recently to attend the first public event of Combatants for Peace, the Palestinian and Israeli former fighters who have renounced violence.

Corporal Chantelle Bateman, a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, was deployed to Al Asad, Iraq, from August 2004 through March 2005.  She currently serves as the secretary of Iraq Veterans Against the War-DC Chapter. She remains under an active contract and is stationed at Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Willow Grove in Willow Grove, Pa.  She is still eligible for redeployment.

The event is sponsored by the Marshall University Women's Center, the Marshall Women's Studies program and the Marshall history department.

For more information, contact Leah Tolliver, MU Women's Center Coordinator, at 304-696-3112.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 30, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Two films with divergent viewpoints of Israeli-Palestinian conflict to be shown

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - To facilitate a discussion of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the Middle East, two films presenting divergent viewpoints will be screened on the Huntington campus of Marshall University.

The film series, titled "Israel and Palestine: Is Peace Possible?", will begin with a screening of each documentary followed by a panel discussion and a question-and-answer session led by three Marshall University faculty members with specializations in this area.

"Occupation 101," which presents a viewpoint supporting the Palestinian perspective, will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 2. The second film, "The Case for Israel: Democracy's Outpost," an Israeli documentary that portrays the Israeli perspective, will be shown at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 7. Both presentations will be in the new multipurpose room in the lower level of the Memorial Student Center (MSC BE5) on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The members of the panel are:  Dr. David Mills, Department of History; Dr. Richard Garnett, Department of Sociology; and Dr. Stephen Cooper, Communication Studies.  Mills is a historian who specializes in the Middle East. Garnett teaches a course on the Holocaust and researches territorial conflicts giving consideration to resource allocation. Cooper researches media criticism.

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will make welcoming remarks at both events and Dr. Marybeth Beller, associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will serve as moderator.

The presentation of the film series is not an endorsement of either perspective by Marshall University or the College of Liberal Arts.

"The two films present pointedly different perspectives of the history and current conditions related to Israel and Palestine, and represent one of the more politically charged debates of our time," acknowledged Pittenger.  "As an institution of higher education, we are the open marketplace of ideas that provides a forum for the forthright and respectful discussion of divergent viewpoints. This freedom of expression is an essential protection of the engaged citizen living in a contemporary democracy."

The Marshall University community and the public are invited to attend.

For more information, contact Dr. Marybeth Beller at 304-696-2763.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 27, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Thundering Word' forensics and debate team performs well at Ohio State

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Forensics and Debate team, also known as "The Thundering Word," capped a year-long effort to rebuild its program with a successful performance on March 7 in the Ohio State University Forensics and Debate Tournament in Columbus.

Financial support from Marshall's Office of Academic Affairs and the College of Liberal Arts enabled the squad to participate in one tournament this year. The support was rewarded as the team performed well at Ohio State in its only competition of the year.

Two "Thundering Word" squad members performed so well that they qualified for the national tournament in April in Springfield, Mo. Kendrick Vondershmitt, a freshman from Louisville, was a finalist in the Lincoln-Douglas debate. He is a John Marshall Scholar double-majoring in history and political science. Zach Frame, a junior from St. Albans, placed third in Prose Interpretation, thus qualifying him for the national tournament. He is an oral communications major.

Coach Danny Ray said it is unusual for a freshman to place in debate, especially this late in the competition season. But Vondershmitt, competing against debaters from around the region who have honed their arguments in several tournaments since the beginning of the school year, did just that.

Two other competitors from Marshall reached the final round in their respective events. Kayla Johnson, a Gallipolis, Ohio freshman, placed fourth in Poetry. Johnson is a John Marshall Scholar majoring in French Education with a Communication Studies minor. Kegan Angel, a freshman from Gallipolis, took sixth place in Informative Speaking. He is a chemistry major.

Sarah Ison of Rusell, Ky., a Yeager Scholar and sophomore double-major in biology and humanities, and Kelsey McCallister of Huntington, a freshman Japanese major, also competed at Ohio State.

"We could not be more proud of the performance of our coaches and competitors," said Dr. Robert Bookwalter, chair of the Department of Communication Studies.

Ray and Sarah Craiger, both graduate students in Communication Studies, coach the squad. Robert Heath, a former Marshall debater, coaches the young debaters on the squad. He is a senior double-majoring in political science and music. The coaches were accompanied and advised by former Marshall debate coach Dr. Kristine Greenwood.

The squad is seeking financial help to revive the program and take part in future tournaments. For information on how to contribute, call Cory Dennison, Director of Development with the College of Liberal Arts, at 304-696-2435.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 27, 2009
Contact: Adam Russell, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-521-3754

Sixth annual Empty Bowls event helps those in need


Two student groups at Marshall University join to raise hunger awareness

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University students are helping the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) in its efforts to raise awareness of the hunger problem in the Tri-State Area.

The Marshall University Keramos Student Pottery Guild and public relations students from the MU W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications are involved in the planning and execution of the event.

Empty Bowls is a national campaign that raises awareness of the hunger issue. Empty Bowls has been successful in the Tri-State Area, with last year's event raising more than $9,000 for the HAFB.

"This event helps the Food Bank tremendously year after year," Brooke Ash, director of public relations for the HAFB, said. "It's great to see the students come together for this cause."

The event will feature live entertainment and a silent auction featuring items donated by local celebrities. A person donating $12 receives a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi as well as a bowl handcrafted by members of the MU Keramos Student Pottery Guild.

This year, some of the silent auction items include signed memorabilia from former Marshall football star Chad Pennington, an autographed bowl from Gov. Joe Manchin III and an assortment of local gifts that were donated by area businesses, including a $250 Pullman Plaza Hotel package.

Each year Empty Bowls continues to expand and this year is no different. Students from the Keramos Student Pottery Guild have pledged to donate 1,000 bowls for this year's event. In addition, approximately 60 gallons of soup has been donated by local restaurants, which will be used for the soup lunch.

"I'd really like to see this event continue to grow," Ash said. "It has really started to become a tradition in our city."

Along with the various auction items for sale, local celebrities will be on hand to serve soup and mingle with those in attendance.

Empty Bowls is from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. For more information about the HAFB, contact Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information regarding the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394,or by e-mail at emptybowls@marshall.edu.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.

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This information is being released as a courtesy to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 27, 2009
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

This week's 'Up Late' is a 'hand' full of fun

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This week's "Up Late" episode starts out in its typical format with host Jamie LoFiego, who lets things get out of hand on the Marshall University late night show. 

LoFiego is asked to wait in his office by his student-led production crew. Unbeknownst to the host, the show's format of comedy, guest interviews and live music is replaced by a full episode of the kitschy soap opera, "The Hand You Were Given," which was created and produced by the "Up Late" crew.

During this episode of "The Hand," a little boy, Mickey, still in a coma, undergoes an intensive surgery by Dr. Jeremy Wayne and special guest, Dr. Gale Gratt. An epic fight to the death ensues between a famous astronaut, Randolph, and his wife's not-so-secret lover, James. Covering all of the action are award-winning journalist Han Dollis and anchor Biff Smartly.

This special episode of "Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, March 28 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 26, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

COLA Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference is April 16-17 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Approximately 50 students will take part in Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts 2009 Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference scheduled Thursday and Friday, April 16-17, in the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus. 

The conference is designed to showcase the best intellectual work being done in the 13 departments of the college.  The event offers students an opportunity to display the quality work they have produced as part of their coursework, senior capstone projects and other educational experiences.

Presentations will examine varied topics such as "Convenience Store Ethnography," "Shifting Behaviors in Appalachia," "American Foreign Policy and the Consequences for Coca Farmers" and "Biodiversity's Effects on Inhabitants of St. Lucia."

To qualify to present their work at the conference, students were required to submit their work to a committee of COLA faculty for evaluation after receiving a recommendation from a sponsoring faculty member. 

Dr. Christopher White, assistant professor of history at Marshall, will give the keynote speech from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Friday, April 17 in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Marshall Memorial Student Center.  White's most recent book, The History of El Salvador, looks at the political, economic and social variables through the eyes of that country's people. 

Fifteen panel presentations will be given throughout Thursday and on Friday until 12:15 p.m.  Topics on Thursday, April 16 include:

Section A:  Panel 1, Better Off Dead:  Voices Beyond the Grave; Panel 2, Topics in Deviance and Subcultures;

Section B:  Panel 3, Topics in Political Science; Panel 4, The Classical World:  Inspiration, Power, Danger and the Devine;

Section C:  Panel 5, Criminological Theory and Research Approaches; Panel 6, Language, Culture and Diversity in Latin American Societies;

Section D:  Panel 7, Oppressed Groups in Latin America; Panel 8, Roundtable, Beliefs about Economic Opportunities:  Is the "American Dream" Still Alive and Well?;

Section E:  Panel 9, Gender Studies; Panel 10, Culture:  Events and Identity.

Topics on Friday, April 17 include:

Section F:  Panel 11, Psychology Poster Session and Panel 12, Geography Poster Session, both to take place on the third floor of the Drinko Library Atrium; Panel 13, Social Control and Civil Disobedience;

Section G:  Panel 14, Philosophical Inquiries; Panel 15, Eyes on Humanity:  Classical Giants, Convenience Stores, and Hitchhiking.

The conference is open to the public.

For additional information on the conference and its events, contact Dr. Kimberly DeTardo-Bora at 304-696-3084 or via e-mail at detardobora@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 24, 2009
Contact: Dr. Nadja Spitzer, Dept. of Biological Sciences and Cell Differentiation/Development Center, 304 696 3778

International brain awareness campaign coming to Marshall University

'Brain Expo' features hands-on science stations about the brain and more

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Children and adults are invited to a Brain Expo Friday, April 3 at the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus for fun, exploration, education and prizes. The expo will take place from 2 to 7 p.m.

"Be prepared to have your mind boggled at Brain Expo on Friday, April 3," said Dr. Nadja Spitzer, a research neuroscientist at Marshall and director of the event. "Brain Expo will feature a collection of fun and intriguing exhibits, with hands-on activities and games."

The interactive stations at Brain Expo address topics ranging from brain anatomy to reflexes. After exploring unbelievable optical illusions and losing their own hand, a visitor can explore other exciting hands-on activities such as:

        Amazing Memories: play memory games and see how your memory can be fooled

        Eating Pizza is NOT a No-Brainer: explore all the parts of the brain involved in a simple activity such as eating pizza

        The Electrical Cell: build your own neuron keychain

        Do Bugs (and other creepy-crawly critters) Have Brains?: explore the simplest of nervous systems

        Color Your Own Brain Hat: you'll be the smartest kid in class sporting your color-coded brain on the outside of your head

        Get Conditioned: can you be trained to scratch your ear at the sound of a bell?

A complete listing of all the stations is available on the Web at www.marshall.edu/baw. After participating in the activities at eight stations at the expo, children may enter to win door prizes.

In addition to a collection of interactive learning stations, Marshall University and Marshall Community and Technical College will be offering information about professional and academic career opportunities in neuroscience. St. Mary's Medical Center will present an interactive station about brain and spinal cord safety and Latta's School Supplies will exhibit a collection of educational resources related to neuroscience.

"Events such as Brain Expo are important and effective ways to work with local schools and the community to address the challenge of science literacy," Spitzer said. "Studies at similar events around the country have demonstrated that students find neuroscience more 'fun' and more 'interesting' after participating. This gets them more excited about science at a younger age and makes them more likely to consider neuroscience as a potential career choice."

Brain Expo is a part of an International Brain Awareness Campaign founded by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives. "Dozens of faculty and students from diverse departments and institutions have come together to conceptualize, build and present these interactive stations. It is a fantastic effort of collaboration in reaching out to kids and the public to motivate interest in the brain and science," Spitzer said.

The event brings scientists and students from Marshall University, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall Community and Technical College and St. Mary's Medical Center together with children and the general public in a "reverse science fair format." This event is an excellent opportunity for kids to talk with real scientists and take part in fun activities that demonstrate how the brain and nervous system work, according to Spitzer.

Brain Expo is sponsored by the Cell Differentiation and Development Center, the College of Science, the Biomedical Science program, the Department of Biological Sciences and the College of Liberal Arts at Marshall University, as well as St. Mary's Medical Center, Marshall Community and Technical College, and Latta's School Supplies of Huntington, W.Va.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 24, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia Poet Laureate Irene McKinney to read from her work at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia Poet Laureate Irene McKinney will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 2 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

McKinney is the author of six books.  A collection of her selected poems, Unthinkable, was published recently by Red Hen Press.  Other poetry collections include Vivid Companion (WVU Press, 2006) and Six O'clock Mine Report

Her poems have appeared in many leading publications, including The Georgia Review, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, American Voice, and Arts & Letters. She is the recipient of fellowships in poetry from both the National Endowment for the Arts and the West Virginia Commission on the Arts. 

McKinney has taught at Western Washington University, the University of New Mexico and other institutions.  She was appointed Poet Laureate of West Virginia in 1994 and is Professor Emeritus of English at West Virginia Wesleyan College.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 24, 2009
Contact: Katherine Reasons,, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-621-9841

Ashland agency to benefit from Huntington event


Ashland Community Kitchen receives assistance from Empty Bowls fundraiser

ASHLAND, Ky. - The struggling economy has made it difficult for one Ashland soup kitchen to meet the growing needs of its community.

"Donations are down, and the need is up," said Alfreda Moore, director of Ashland Community Kitchen.  "We have noticed an increase in the number of people that we serve, and economically, we're upside-down."

The Ashland Community Kitchen serves an average of 91 people every day, even in the midst of its economic hardship.  The kitchen offers more than just soup - it provides entrees, vegetables and even dessert when it's available.  The kitchen is open for lunch Monday through Friday and for dinner on Tuesday and Thursday.  It also provides food to Ashland's "Meals on Wheels" program.  But Moore said fewer donations have forced the kitchen to cut back on what it can provide.

The kitchen receives some of its food from the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB), a nonprofit distribution center in Huntington, W.Va., that provides food to 290 hunger programs throughout the Tri-State.  In an effort to raise money for the HAFB and help agencies like Ashland Community Kitchen, two student groups at Marshall University have joined together for the sixth annual Empty Bowls event.

The Marshall University Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts, Keramos Student Pottery Guild and public relations students from the MU W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications have joined to host an event in Huntington on April 7 to increase awareness of the hunger program in the Tri-State.  Their goal is to raise money for the HAFB and its member agencies.

The event, called Empty Bowls, will be Tuesday, April 7, at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave., in Huntington. At Empty Bowls, guests have the opportunity to donate $12 to receive a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi as well as a bowl handcrafted by members of the Marshall University Keramos Pottery Guild. The guild has produced 1,000 bowls for the event. The lunch resembles the kind of meal served at Ashland Community Kitchen, and the ceramic bowl serves as a reminder of those who go hungry in our region.

"This fundraiser gives people the opportunity to help alleviate hunger in our area," Moore said.  "I believe it's a great thing."

For more information about the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about Ashland Community Kitchen, call Alfreda Moore at 606-325-8144.  Visit www.hafb.org for additional information about the programs and services provided by the Huntington Area Food Bank. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the Empty Bowls media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394, by e-mail at emptybowls@marshall.edu or by visiting www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

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