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Thursday April 30, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nearly 2,600 students to graduate from Marshall University


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Nearly 2,600 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 9 when the university celebrates its 172nd commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

Among the 2,592 students receiving degrees are 1,457 undergraduates, 970 graduates, 52 from the School of Medicine and 113 who will receive associate degrees.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 535 students will graduate with honors. Eighty-three will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 169 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 270 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and 12 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2008 may participate in commencement.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, nine students have completed or will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. One already is assured of a 4.0, while the other eight - all May graduates - will learn their final GPAs after commencement.

The one student already assured of a 4.0 is Lauren Elizabeth Myers of Glen Dale, W.Va., who graduated in December 2008.

The eight with tentative 4.0s are Lindsay Nicole Abshire of Scott Depot; Adam David Cavalier of Montgomery; Brian Evan Dalek of McMechen; Daniel Brian Hager of Hurricane; Blake Tyler Isenberg of Madison; Jacob T. Kilgore of Kenova; Kathryn Lane Nicely of Ona; and Nicklaus Aaron Presley of Princeton, W.Va.

Former Marshall football and academic All-American Chad Pennington will deliver the commencement address and receive a Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degree. Pennington, well known for his charity work, leadership, community service and philanthropy, currently is the starting quarterback for the NFL's Miami Dolphins.

Here is a list of commencement-related events scheduled next week:

Wednesday, May 6

  • 10 a.m., graduation brunch for student athletes, Joan C. Edwards Stadium Big Green Room

  • 11 a.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications awards ceremony, Smith Hall 154

Thursday, May 7

  • 7 p.m., College of Health Professions' nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Friday, May 8

  • 11 a.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, 2W16

  • 11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

  • 3 p.m., International students graduation picnic, Buskirk Field

  •  4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Marco's

  •  5 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, 520 18th St.

  •  <5 p.m., Forensic Science commencement reception, Memorial Student Center, 2W16

  •  5 p.m., Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

  •  6 p.m., PsyD Doctoral graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

  •  6 p.m., College of Liberal Arts reception and hooding ceremony, Memorial Student Center BE5

  •  6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, MOVC

  •  7 p.m., School of Medicine Investiture, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, followed by reception in Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room
     

Saturday, May 9

  • 9 a.m., Marshall University's 172nd commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • 1 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

  •  1 p.m., Forensic Science commencement reception, Forensic Science Center

  •  1 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

  •  1:30 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications graduation ceremony, Smith Recital Hall

  •  1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.
  • 2 p.m., Communication Disorders graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, BE5

  • Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms (Century Building), 314 9th St. Plaza.

The Tri-State Transit Authority will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests from campus to the arena and back for the main commencement ceremony.

The pick-up process is as follows:

Three buses will provide shuttle service from three campus locations - the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, located across 5th Avenue from the Memorial Student Center; the 20th Street entrance of Joan C. Edwards Stadium; and F-Lot, located on 3rd Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard, across from Smith Hall.

These buses will begin at 7:45 a.m. from each campus location and serve as a shuttle to the arena and back to campus for the next pick-up. The shuttle will continue pick-ups, making the last one at approximately 9:15 a.m. After all pick-ups, the buses will remain at the arena on the corner of 8th Street and 3rd Avenue until commencement is over.

The return process is as follows:

At approximately 1 p.m., the three buses will begin shuttle service from the arena to all campus locations. They will continue until about 2 p.m., or as needed.

The main commencement ceremony will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu and it will be televised live on Marshall University's Channel 25 on the Comcast cable system.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 28, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Champion Industries, Inc., honored for Jenkins Hall classroom sponsorship at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Champion Industries, Inc., of Huntington recently made an in-kind donation of the resources needed for a total remodeling of Jenkins Hall Room 233, a heavily used classroom on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The renovations included new flooring, painting, ceiling tiles, classroom desks, chairs, audiovisual equipment, computer storage stations and instruction podiums. The classroom was transformed to an eco-friendly, more functional and aesthetically pleasing environment for 21st century learning to take place.  Capitol Business Interiors, a division of Champion Industries, provided the design work and equipment for the makeover.

The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) at Marshall University held a reception earlier this month to honor Champion for its support.

The idea of asking local businesses to support this "adopt a classroom" type project resulted from conversations between COEHS Dean Rosalyn Templeton and Associate Dean Stan Maynard.

"Champion Industries has always been a huge supporter of Marshall University with a strong belief in education," said Kelli Bragg, senior account executive with Capitol Business Interiors. "What better way to encourage excitement for education than to create an innovative and motivating atmosphere so that learning can develop. By having an up-to-date facility that meets the needs of students, faculty and the ever-advancing technologies in the classroom, we are generating an enthusiasm for knowledge."

"Champion wanted to be the leader and really generate some momentum for this project," Bragg said. "We hope more companies will see what an opportunity Champion has created by laying the groundwork for a truly modern learning facility.  Each room will focus on a different premise, with Champion choosing the 'green room.' All the products in the space, from floor to ceiling, have been selected with sustainability and environmental impact in mind. The environment is such an important factor, not only for our future, but also the future of the minds we are trying to reach."

Officials of Marshall's College of Education and Human Services say they hope to be able to partner with other area corporations that are interested in supporting education by sponsoring other classrooms or learning environment improvement projects. 

For more information, contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, via e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Monday April 27, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Donning of Kente celebration is Thursday, April 30, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs has invited African and African American graduates to the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement. 

This traditional and historically significant event takes place at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 30, on Buskirk Field on Marshall's Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will commence with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans and MU President Stephen J. Kopp. 

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 60 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

"The Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events that our African and African American students can participate in," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs. "The custom and celebration of presenting the Kente cloth as recognition for only extraordinary achievement, originating over 700 years ago in west Africa,  remains intact at Marshall. I can think of no greater joy than to celebrate the acquisition of a college degree for our future leaders."

The following woven cloths will be awarded: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center plaza for all participants and those in attendance.

In the event of rain, the ceremony will take place in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center.


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Monday April 27, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Fife and Drum Corps to appear at Heritage Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps from Marshall University will perform several times during Heritage Day at Heritage Farm and Museum between 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 2.

The group's performance will feature the music of Edward Riley, a New York-based publisher who composed this set of tunes in 1824 to celebrate Lafayette's heroic return to America.

"The corps is devoted to researching and performing the music from our nation's early years," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall and director of the group. "The Marquis de Lafayette was enormously helpful during the American Revolution, contributing both his leadership and his wealth to the cause. This is music that resounds with the nation's respect and thankfulness for one of the last heroes of our struggle for independence."

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps was created in the fall of 2007 as an initiative of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall University. In its brief history, the corps has performed in colonial Williamsburg, at the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and at the John Marshall House in Richmond, Va.

For admission information on Heritage Day, persons may contact the Heritage Farm and Museum at 304-522-1244. For further information on the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, persons may contact the Department of Music at Marshall University at 304-696-3117 or e-mail Dobbs at dobbs@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 24, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Fourth Annual Pullman Jazz Festival set for Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Pullman Square, in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution, will host the 4th annual Pullman Jazz Festival from 2 to 10 p.m Saturday, April 25. The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place on the Pullman Square "greenspace" and coincides with the celebration of National Jazz Appreciation Month.

Featured artists will include local/regional jazz artists such as the Marshall University Faculty Jazz Ensemble Bluetrane, the MU 12 O'clock Big Band, MU jazz combos, a rock band and guest artist Lou Fischer, bass

For further information, contact Dr. Mark Zanter at 304-638-3481 or by e-mail at zanter@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 24, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

General faculty meeting set for April 28 at MU; awards of distinction to be presented, retiring faculty to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and all faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

The agenda will consist of welcoming remarks by the Faculty Senate Chair, Dr. Camilla Brammer; singing of the Star-Spangled Banner by Dr. Larry Stickler; remarks from President Stephen J. Kopp; remarks from Brammer; call by Brammer for nominations from the floor for the positions of faculty representation on the Marshall University Board of Governors and the West Virginia Advisory Council of Faculty; recognition of retiring faculty by Dr. Dale Shao and Brammer; and presentation of faculty awards.

Five people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

  • Dr. Leonard Deutsch, English professor and Graduate College dean

  • Dr. Violette Eash, Counseling professor

  • Dr. Don Hall, Counseling professor

  • Dr. Shirley Lumpkin, English professor

  • Dr. Joseph Stone, Accountancy and Legal Environment professor

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Dr. Eldon Larson, Engineering professor

  • Dr. James Sottile, Jr., School of Education professor

  • Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, Pharmacology assistant professor

Marshall also is recognizing 10 retiring faculty who have a combined 325 years of service. They are:

  • Dr. Bruce S. Chertow, Internal Medicine, 30 years of service

  • Prof. Michael Cornfeld, Art and Design, 42 years of service

  • Dr. Daniel Cowell, Psychiatry and Behavorial Medicine, 15 years of service

  • Dr. Leonard Deutsch, English, and dean, Graduate College, 39 years of service

  • Dr. Alan Gould, Drinko Academy, 40 years of service

  • Dr. William A. McDowell, Human Development and Allied Technology, 34 years of service

  • Dr. William Ramsey, English, 39 years of service

  • Dr. Clara Reese, Human Development and Allied Technology, 30 years of service

  • Dr. H. Keith Spears, Journalism and Mass Communications, 27 years of service

  • Dr. Robert B. Walker, Family and Community Healthy, 29 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting are:

  • Dr. Tina Cartwright, Sarah Denman Faces of Appalachia Award

  • Dr. Hyo-Chang (Bob) Hong and Dr. Tracy M. Christofero, John & Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year Award

The following previously announced faculty award winners also will be honored:

  • Dr. Bonita Lawrence, Dr. Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Dr. Kateryna Schray, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Dr. Natsuki Anderson, Dr. George Davis and Dr. Wendy Williams, Pickens-Queen Teaching Award

For more information on the meeting, call Bernice Bullock at 304-696-4376.


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Friday April 24, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Celebration of Academics features Maria Carmen Riddel, Brad Smith

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Maria Carmen Riddel, this year's Drinko fellow, and Brad Smith, a Marshall University alumnus and president/CEO of Intuit, Inc., will be featured in MU's Celebration of Academics Thursday, April 30 and Friday, May 1 on the Huntington campus.

Riddel will discuss the research on which she worked during the Drinko fellowship in the John Deaver Drinko Symposium at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Her topic is "Cuban-American Literature after Exile: Dreaming in Spanish/Writing in English."

Smith will present "Authentic Leadership in a Changing World" as part of the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation at 7 p.m. Friday in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The convocation also will include recognition of students participating in Marshall's honors program.

Each program is free and open to the public. In addition, public receptions will follow each of the programs in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

"This year is the 15th annual Celebration of Academics," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of Marshall's Drinko Academy. "We are indeed fortunate to have as our Drinko Fellow Dr. Maria Carmen Riddel, who has been a member of our faculty for 26 years, and to have one of our most illustrious alums as keynote speaker at our Drinko Honors Convocation. We are indebted to Mr. Brad Smith for his generosity of time and talent in returning to his alma mater to salute our honor students."

Riddel, a professor of Spanish, has worked in the Department of Modern Languages since 1983 teaching everything from introductory language classes to Spanish culture, literature, history and honors courses. She has served as chair of the department since 2002. A native of Spain, she earned her doctorate from The Ohio State University in 1988, her master's degree from Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain, in 1977, and her bachelor's degree from Marshall in 1975.

In January 2008, Smith, a Kenova, W.Va., native, became CEO of Intuit, the company that developed Quicken, QuickBooks and Turbo Tax. Previously, he was senior vice president and general manager of Intuit's Small Business Division from May 2006 to December 2007. In this position, Smith was responsible for the company's portfolio of QuickBooks, Quicken and payroll products, serving seven million small businesses and producing $1.1 billion in revenue.

Recently, Intuit, in collaboration with Marshall University, began offering a new, simple option for families who need to complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).  The new online service, TurboTax FAFSA, automatically transfers information from TurboTax software directly onto the FAFSA form, making it easier for students and parents to get money for college.

The idea of producing TurboTax FAFSA was initiated through a conversation last fall between Smith and Kopp.

Smith, who joined Intuit in February 2003, earned his master's degree in management from Aquinas College in Michigan and his bachelor's degree in business administration from Marshall.

Last year Smith was the keynote speaker at the Charleston Area Alliance Annual Celebration. At that event, Kopp presented Smith with the Expect the Best from West Virginia Award.


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Thursday April 23, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi finishes second in competition at fraternity's national meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi, an honorary organization for Financial Information students and professionals, recently took second place in the Best Practices category in competition at the fraternity's national meeting in Boston, Mass.

Ten schools made presentations on the sustainability of a professional chapter. New York University won first place while Virginia Commonwealth University finished third. 

Marshall's finish is remarkable because its chapter is one of the smaller ones and relatively new, according to Dr. Loren Wenzel, professor of Accounting and Legal Environment.  Students Jon Gable, Kristina Hatfield, and chapter president Tyler Rowland made the presentations.  They were accompanied by the group's faculty sponsor, Amanda Thompson-Abbott.

In their presentation, the Marshall students outlined what they did for recruiting, financial strategy, succession planning and keeping alumni informed and active.

The primary objective of Beta Alpha Psi is to encourage and give recognition to scholastic and professional excellence in the business information field.  It recognizes students in the fields of accounting, finance and information systems.

Membership requirements for the honorary are rigorous, according to Wenzel.  "Students must have a high GPA to get in and they must continue to be good students.  In addition, they do 40 hours of professional development and 40 hours of community service each year to remain members in good standing. Only schools which are accredited by the AACSB are eligible to have chapters."          

Rowland, a junior finance major from Ashland, Ky., said placing so high in the competition was a thrill for the participants.  "This is a solid foundation for us to build on in the future," he said.  "I'm glad we finished as well as we did, especially considering how close the competition was.  Out of all ten schools, there was a very small margin between first and last place." 

Hatfield, a senior from Gilbert, W.Va., who is the chapter's officer of professional development, said, "I feel very privileged to have been a part of this win and I am proud to be graduating having accomplished this goal."

"Our motto is, as a fraternity we strive to leave our chapter in a better financial position than in previous years," Gable, vice president for finance, said.

"We're very proud that this chapter has been winning awards since it was chartered five years ago," Wenzel said.  "Kappa Phi really is a superior chapter."


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Thursday April 23, 2009
Contact: Emily Bennington, Director of Marketing & Development, Dixon Hughes, 304-414-2675

Dixon Hughes celebrates Marshall's LCOB anniversary with check presentation Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In appreciation of and support for the Accounting Department of Marshall University, Dixon Hughes Managing Member Rick Slater will present a check for $12,500 at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 24 in the Alumni Lounge, which is located on the second floor of the Marshall Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The presentation is part of a reception to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

"It is our pleasure that even in these challenging economic times, we can continue to provide support for programs, accreditation and development at Marshall University," said Slater. "We are committed to helping Marshall achieve success on many fronts, and tomorrow's presentation is a small token of how highly we think of their program."

Slater, a Marshall graduate, and Dixon Hughes partners and staff regularly donate time and resources to mentoring and the professional development of the university's accounting students. In 2008, this support helped Marshall's Accounting Department become one of only 169 programs in the world to be accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

"The generosity of Dixon Hughes and Rick Slater helped us reach our accreditation milestone and helped provide our students with the research databases and software they need to be prepared to enter the profession of public accounting," said Loren Wenzel, Division Head for the Department of Accountancy. "Without the support of Dixon Hughes, we never would have made it this far."


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Wednesday April 22, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship made possible by gift from Pilot Club of Huntington



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student Molly Elizabeth Grove of Bunker Hill, W.Va., was the first recipient of the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship, a fund made possible by a $10,000 gift from the Pilot Club of Huntington.

The Pilot Club is a service organization that focuses on brain-related disorders. Its major focus is Project Lifesaver, a program aiding the victims and families suffering from Alzheimer's Disease and related disorders.

Grove, an advertising major and a member of the Marshall track and field team, was able to use her award of $1,000 during the current academic year. The scholarship was established last year by the Marshall University Foundation Inc., according to Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the foundation.

"Receiving this scholarship has been a great benefit to my education," Grove said. "It has made me more driven to receive more awards like this one." 

The Pilot Club had received a bequest of $10,000 from Mrs. Dorothy Goodman, who received her Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Marshall College in 1940. She was a reporter for the Huntington Advertiser from 1942 to 1961 and then director of information for the Cabell County Board of Education from 1961 to 1978. She also was very active in the community, including service to the Pilot Club of Huntington.

According to the guidelines of the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship established by the bequest, two awards of $1,000 are to be given annually for a period of five years beginning with the current (2008-2009) academic year.

The recipients are West Virginia residents who are full-time sophomores majoring in journalism,  who are in good academic standing and have demonstrated financial need, as determined by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

The award is renewable for up to four years if the recipients maintain good academic standing, full-time status and active participation in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

 

Photo:  Marshall University student Molly Elizabeth Grove, left, and Josephine Fidler, president-elect of the Pilot Club of Huntington, look over the guidelines for the Dorothy Goodman Memorial Scholarship. Grove was the first recipient of the scholarship. (Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.)

 


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Tuesday April 21, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Bonita Lawrence named Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, a professor of mathematics at Marshall University, is MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2008-09.

Lawrence will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Marshall's Office of Academic Affairs announced the Hedrick Award winner and two other awards honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Kateryna Schray, professor, English
  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Natsuki Anderson, assistant professor, Modern Languages; Dr. George Davis, assistant professor, Political Science; Dr. Wendy Williams, assistant professor, Psychology

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:
 

Hedrick Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence has been at Marshall since August 2001 when she was hired as an assistant professor of mathematics. She was promoted to associate professor in 2003, granted tenure in 2005 and promoted to professor in 2007. She received the Marshall University Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award for 2001 and 2006, and received the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award for 2004.

Lawrence received her Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in 1979 from Cameron University in Lawton, Okla., her Master of Science in Mathematics in 1990 from Auburn University in Auburn, Ala., and her Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences in 1994 from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Regarding her teaching philosophy, she says she is a firm believer that understanding conceptual ideas and the relationships that link these ideas together is the key to understanding and practical application of ideas.

"A well-known Chinese proverb says, 'Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.' If we offer a collection of seemingly unrelated ideas, it is as if we are giving our students a fish. If we offer conceptual ideas that are bound together by logic and reason developed through critical thinking activities, we indeed feed them for a lifetime,' " Lawrence said.

Dr. Ralph W. Oberste-Vorth, chairman of the Department of Mathematics, nominated Lawrence for the Hedrick Award. He said she keeps her students engrossed in the classroom "by the sheer force of her personality."

"She shows remarkable enthusiasm for mathematics and for her students," Oberste-Vorth said.

Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs, said Lawrence's most distinguishing characteristic is enthusiasm for her students and for her great love: math.

"Bonnie takes it for granted that everyone loves math," Hensley said. "Some of us have just not discovered its beauty! In her classes, this translates into an expectation that everyone is capable of learning even the most difficult mathematical material."

Dr. David A. Cusick, a professor of mathematics at Marshall, described Lawrence simply as "one of Marshall's very best teachers - highly informed and infectiously enthusiastic."

"She is able to intrigue and captivate the interests of students at all course levels," he said.

 

Reynolds Award

The Reynolds award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Kateryna Schray has been at Marshall since 1996 when she was hired as an assistant professor. She previously received the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award and the College of Liberal Arts Teaching Award, both in 2001, and the Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award in 2006.

Dr. Donna Spindel, interim chair in the Department of English, nominated Schray for the Reynolds Award.

"I do not know another faculty member who loves teaching more than she does and who shows it," Spindel said. "I have had the opportunity to work closely with her on course development and am truly astonished by the level of care and 'perfection' that she applies to course creation."

Schray said one of four concepts woven into the fabric of every teaching moment is that "learning is a joy."

"We share a natural desire to learn," Schray said. "Learning is both an act of receiving and giving, searching and finding, growing and melting, climbing and falling. It is a communal act, which elevates and humbles us at the same time, whether we are toddlers examining a remote control or astronauts exploring space. In its purest form, learning is at the heart of what we do, and it is an act of joy."
 

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Natsuki Anderson has been at Marshall University since August 2006. Dr. Christopher L. Dolmetsch, interim chair of Modern Languages at MU, said that since her arrival Anderson has developed an entire academic degree program in Japanese mirroring those already existing for German, French and Spanish.

"Along with full elementary through intermediate-level classes, this program already has attracted approximately 57 majors, which is extraordinary for such a new program," Dolmetsch said.

Dolmetsch said Anderson also has promoted the teaching of Japanese successfully throughout the Tri-State region. She said she believes that "teaching is learning."

"As a language learner, I always like the excitement of learning a different language and culture, and I am happy to be able to share the joy of learning with my students," Anderson said. "At the same time, I am aware of the positive and negative impact that teachers have on students. Therefore, I strive to create an engaging classroom with a sense of community."

She said she hopes more students consider studying Japanese throughout their lives rather than just as a foreign language requirement for a college degree.

Dr. George Davis has been a member of Marshall's Political Science Department for five years. Dr. Marybeth Beller, associate dean and associate professor in the department, nominated Davis for the Pickens-Queen Award.

"This award is for teaching, and George's performance in the classroom underscores his commitment to our students," Beller said. "When George Davis walks into the classroom, he rolls up his sleeves. The symbolism is bold; he is getting to work, and so do the students. George's lectures are riveting; they are fast-paced, well organized, full of information, and better still, full of humor."

Davis said one of his main goals is to invoke student interest in politics, not only as an academic discipline, but as an important component of concerned citizenship. With that in mind, he usually begins his course materials as an attorney would an oral argument.

He said he has learned in his short time teaching that "the clearer we, as faculty, articulate our expectations, the more likely students are to live up to what we expect."

Political Science graduate student Nora Ankrom said Davis is interested in his students' success beyond their academic years at Marshall.

"He is genuinely invested in his students and I believe he views his students' success as his success," Ankrom said.

Dr. Wendy Williams has been at Marshall since fall 2005. She said she uses a variety of techniques to facilitate student learning, including: 1, presenting material in interactive formats; 2, encouraging and expecting group discussion; 3, engaging students in critical thinking and writing.

"Through those techniques, I provide students with a learning experience that is both personal and challenging," she said.

Dr. Christopher LeGrow, an associate professor in psychology, said Williams' teaching efforts have been well received by both students and peers.

"She has developed new courses, incorporated service-learning into her courses, and provided excellent advising to her students," LeGrow said. "Dr. Williams has also served as the undergraduate program coordinator and worked hard to remodel our department advising materials and process."

Psychology Professor Dr. Steven P. Mewaldt said Williams is highly committed to excellence in teaching.

"She quickly gained a reputation for being popular and rigorous, but fair," Mewaldt said. He described her as "the most organized teacher I have ever met."

The award winners will be recognized at the spring General Faculty Meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.


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Tuesday April 21, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Communications, 304-746-2038

Cello and Guitar ensembles to be featured Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Department of Music will present a Cello and Guitar Ensemble Day at 4 p.m., Saturday, April 25  at Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"The day will focus on the art of ensemble playing," said Cynthia Puls, who is teaching cello this semester while Dr. Solen Dikener is on sabbatical.  "Exploring the importance of truly listening to musical lines and how the counterpoint unfolds, while supporting each other as musicians, is the goal of the day."

The guitarists, from the studio of Dr. Julio Alves, will perform "Danza del Viento," by J. Corodoba and "Milonga Triste" by E. Marchelie. Both works were recently performed on their Baltimore tour.

Many of the cellists are students of Puls, either from Marshall or her private studio, which includes students as young as 6. Cellists from Charleston and the surrounding area also have been invited to attend.

"The melodic capabilities of the cello, combined with the rasgado technique of the guitar is a sound to be experienced," Puls said. "Don't miss this Saturday afternoon performance!"

For further information, persons may contact Puls by e-mail at puls@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday April 21, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Gallery 842 to open Friday, April 24

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gallery 842, a community art project begun by the Huntington Art Collective in affiliation with Create Huntington, will open Friday, April 24, with a reception from 7 p.m. to midnight.

The gallery, located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington (formerly Bliss Boutique), will be open Thursdays through Saturdays from 4 to 9 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.

The exhibition, juried and curated by local artists Seth Cyfers and John Farley and organized by a volunteer group of citizens, will feature a wide variety of artwork from the Tri-state area. The concept was initiated by Lynn Clercx, a realtor and Huntington resident.

Farley, who serves as the director for the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University, noted that Gallery 842 is an illustration of the talent in this area. "Visitors to Gallery 842 will be presented with a diverse range of fine art in many media - both two- and three-dimensional," he said. "This exhibition is representative of the quality and breadth of work being produced by artists in the region."

Thomas McChesney, a Create Huntington volunteer, echoed Farley's sentiments.

"Gallery 842 is a prime example of what can be accomplished when engaged citizens from the community and faculty, students and staff from Marshall work together," McChesney, Director of Marketing and Business Development for Huddleston Bolen, LLP, said. "In just a few months, they've taken an idea from concept to reality and will transform an empty store into a vibrant gallery," he added. "It is going to be a great venue for artists, one that will help local artists and artisans see that there is a welcoming, local art scene. It is also going to be a cool venue for the community that, I believe, will draw people to downtown Huntington. More than all of this, though, I believe they have demonstrated that dedicated citizens can accomplish a great deal if they are freed to be creative and empowered to make a difference. By doing this, they may very well be another step in a process that is transforming our city."

Farley and Cyfers are both Marshall University graduates.

"As graduates of the Department of Art and Design at Marshall University both Farley and Cyfers are creative, civic-minded and collaborative," said Byron Clercx, chair of MU's Department of Art and Design. "They are part of a growing number of people invested in making Huntington a better place to live, work and play. The Huntington Arts Collective's community gallery adds an exciting new facet to the fine and performing arts culture in Huntington the arts can play a vital role in the cultural/economic revitalization of downtown Huntington by stimulating pedestrian activity, encouraging civic and private investment and by rebranding the city in a positive light to its residents, guests and elected officials."

Several local establishments are sponsoring this initiative by donating funds, including Mac-Reedo's Bar & Grill, Colonial Lanes Bowling Alley, Hank's Wall-Street Tavern & Piano-Bar, Giovanni's Pizzeria, Stonewall and Musicplex Recording Studio. Those who attend the opening reception may also make donations there.

Also, many area businesses are offering discounts to patrons who visit Gallery 842 and get a bracelet. Those venues include Rebels & Redcoats Tap Room, Hank's Wall-Street Tavern & Piano-Bar, St. Mark's, Shaker's Bar & Grill, V-Club, and Mac-Reedo's Bar & Grill.

The space for Gallery 842 has been donated by Liza Caldwell of Huntington.

For further information, persons may contact Farley by phone at 304-412-3778 or by e-mail at farley53@marshall.edu.

###


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Friday April 17, 2009
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Awards Banquet, Green and White spring football game among the highlights of Alumni Weekend at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alumni Weekend 2009, highlighted by the 72nd annual Awards Banquet and the annual Green and White Spring Football Game, takes place April 24-25 at Marshall University. The theme of this year's weekend is "Bridging the Past with the Future."

Alumni Weekend is sponsored by Bank of America and Sodexo.

The Green and White game starts at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 25 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Tickets, which are $5, may be purchased in advance by calling 304-696-HERD or 800-THE HERD. The Young Alumni Committee of the Alumni Association will host a tailgate party on the West Lot prior to the game. To find the party, just look for the alumni banners.

The awards banquet, which honors distinguished alumni and friends, also takes place on Saturday, April 25 in the Memorial Student Center. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. with the President's Social on the Memorial Student plaza, which is followed by the banquet in the center's Don Morris Room at 7 p.m. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. To RSVP or ask questions about the awards banquet, call the Alumni Office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

The distinguished alumni award winners for 2009 are:

         Distinguished Alumni Award - Joe Gillette

         Community Achievement Award - Robert (Bob) N. Melott

         Distinguished Service to Marshall Award - John Curtis McHaffie and Dr. Robert B. Walker

         Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award - Barbara Winters

         Distinguished Education and Human Service Award - Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks

         Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship - Aril Bennett and Candice Michael

         Cam Henderson Scholarship Award - Tyler J. Gatrell

         Nate Ruffin Scholarship - John Alexander Inman

         Alumni Association Club of the Year - the Atlanta, Ga., Alumni Club

         Young Alumni Award - Doug Martin

         MUAA Board Member of the Year - will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the banquet.

Here is the schedule of the other Alumni Weekend events, including those planned throughout the week:

Tuesday, April 21

Marshall University ROTC's "Dining Out" event takes place in the student center's Don Morris Room. The cost is $40 per person and $75 per couple. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. with arrival and cocktails, with the ceremony and dinner following at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey D. Stephens at 304-696-6450 or 304-617-2636, or by e-mail at stephenj@marshall.edu.

Wednesday, April 22

"The 5 Browns," classical music's first family of piano virtuosos, will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Tickets, which cost $35 and $45, are available by calling 304-696-6656. Visit http://www.marshall.edu/muartser//shows/the_5_browns/ for more information on this Marshall Artists Series event.

Thursday, April 23

The College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) Award Ceremony and Reception is scheduled at 5 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

Friday, April 24

The Lewis College of Business is hosting the following activities in recognition of its 40th anniversary:

        10 to 10:20 a.m. - Golden Wall and Lounge dedication

         10:20 to 10:50 a.m. - "History of the LCOB," by Dr. Robert Alexander

        11 to 11:50 a.m. - Lecture, "The Financial Crisis in the U.S.," with Phyllis Arnold, in Smith Hall 154

        10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Food, beverages, games and gifts

The board of directors of the Marshall University Alumni Association meets from noon to 4 p.m. at the Erickson Alumni Center.

Dr. Leonard J. Deutsch, dean of Marshall's Graduate College, will be honored for his 39 years of distinguished service at a retirement reception in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center's atrium from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

A Welcome Champagne Reception to celebrate the 50th reunion class takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Culinary Institute in downtown Huntington. The cost is $15 person. Call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869 with questions or to RSVP.

Following the champagne reception, Marshall's Young Alumni are sponsoring a show at the Funny Bone Comedy Club at Pullman Square featuring comedian Kenny Smith. The entire balcony's 70 seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are $10 - buy one, get one free - if purchased through the MU Alumni Office by calling 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

For those people who prefer theater, the Marshall University production of "Epic Proportions" takes place at 8 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus. Anyone who calls 304-696-6395 and uses the code MU2009 can purchase tickets to the show for $7 (half price). "Epic Proportions," set in the 1930s, is a comedy by Larry Coen and David Crane.

Saturday, April 25

The President's Coffee, hosted by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., begins at 9:30 a.m. in the John Deaver Dinko Library atrium. President Stephen J. Kopp will make brief remarks. The coffee is in recognition of members of The Heritage Society. Call 304-696-6214.

The Class Luncheon, planned from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Dining Room, honors the 50th reunion class (1959) and the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1959. Cost to attend is $15 per person. Call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869 with questions or to RSVP. A trolley tour of campus, with limited seating, follows the luncheon.


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Friday April 17, 2009
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Nevelson Duo presents the letter 'E' in concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Nevelson Duo, consisting of Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, violin, and Dr. Leslie Petteys, piano, continues its Alphabet Series with recitals on April 24 and April 26 featuring the letter "E" - music by composers whose surnames begin with the letter "E." They will be joined by guest artist Blake Racer, baritone.

On Friday, April 24, the duo will give a noon performance in the chapel at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. The performance is part of the MUsic Alive series, a joint venture of the First Presbyterian Church and the Department of Music at Marshall. Concertgoers should enter the church by the rear door. The concert will last no more than an hour, and lunch will be available afterwards for a donation.

At 8 p.m. Sunday, April 26, the duo will present an expanded version of the "E" program in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. It will be followed by a reception featuring foods beginning with the letter "E."

Smith and Petteys are both faculty members in the Department of Music at Marshall. As the Nevelson Duo they have toured extensively together and have recorded a CD of American music for violin and piano on Albany Records. Racer is a senior voice major at Marshall.

Both performances are free and open to the public. For further information call the Marshall University Department of Music at 304-696-3117 or First Presbyterian Church at 304-523-6476.


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Thursday April 16, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Byrd dedicates medical teaching and clinical center at Marshall University

Huntington, WV - Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., was joined today by Congressman Nick Rahall, W.Va.-3, and others in dedicating the newest teaching and clinical center of Marshall University's medical school.  Named after his beloved wife, the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center is home to the busy departments of Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Medicine, as well as the primary teaching site for medical students. Byrd, in his capacity as the senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, was responsible for obtaining more than $22 million in federal funding for the construction of the building.

            The new facility has enabled the medical school to increase its class size by 50 percent and to date Marshall University has educated 130 students at the new center.  It has provided the students with more opportunity to practice, as well as giving them ready access to medical simulators. The facility as serves as the hub for the Virtual Colonoscopy outreach program to southern West Virginia and its mobile medical unit.

            The Clinical Center has also resulted in a significant increase in the number of visits to University Cardiovascular Services and University Physicians in Internal Medicine.  It addition, it has provided for the expansion of the Diabetes Center and the state's only endocrinology training program with the recruitment of four fellowship trained endocrinologists.  In addition, the gastroenterology section has also been expanded, allowing for the development of a specialized Digestive Diseases Center. 

            Senator Byrd's remarks at the dedication ceremony follow:

"Thank you, Nick, for your gracious remarks. You are my congressman!

"I am so very proud to be your partner in bringing new opportunities to the 3rd congressional district of West Virginia. Thank you, President Kopp, and thank you my dear friend, Dr. Charlie McKown, for inviting me to join you today to dedicate the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center.

"I am very moved by your gesture in naming this magnificent new center after my beloved wife, Erma. Your tribute to her on the program, noting that "her concern for the education and well-being of others was central to her life," was right on target. Erma was a compassionate soul, and she devoted her entire life to caring for others. That was my Erma.

"Compassion is what this facility is all about. George Eliot once asked, "What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?" Within this center, you are teaching more medical students, training more residents, and providing expanded health care services, all with the goal of making life less difficult for the injured and ailing.

"We all know too well that our fellow West Virginians have tremendous needs when it comes to health care.  Our state's residents consistently rank high in incidences of disease, injury, and poor health behaviors. Our mountains are majestic, but they have also been a major impediment to those needing health care. Helping West Virginians to better access and receive quality health care services has been central to my efforts throughout my public service.

"In this work, Marshall University has been at my side for more than 30 years.  We began efforts to create the university's medical school with my sponsorship of an amendment to the Second Supplemental Appropriations bill in 1973. This measure provided $20 million to implement the VA Health Manpower Training Act and another $25 million to help create the new state medical schools, including one for Marshall University.

"Since that time, we have successfully pursued the construction, and later the expansion, of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health; the establishment of a Rural Health Residence Center in Logan County; the implementation of the Virtual Colonoscopy Program; the launching of mobile medical units in Southern West Virginia; and health-related facilities such as the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

"Most recently, I included funding in an appropriations bill that will allow Marshall to continue to lead the charge with new cutting-edge medical technologies and services. The new Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems will focus on the development of new non-invasive nanotechnologies to detect and diagnose disease and illnesses at very early stages. I also added nearly $4 million for Marshall University to initiate the Genomic Research Institute. The aim of the center is to utilize new gene-based diagnostic tools to better predict, reduce the risks of, and identify the most responsive treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's, autism, Parkinson's, diabetes, and numerous forms of cancer. These two new advanced medical programs hold great promise.

"Good health is the greatest of all God's blessings. It is my hope that this new $23 million clinical center and the facilities and programs that I have established at Marshall University over the years will provide the tools needed to make a significant difference in improving the quality of life for all West Virginians. Perhaps the elusive cure for cancer or the common cold, or other medical miracles not even conceived at this time will be discovered right here at Marshall.

"One of my most cherished possessions is my set of McGuffey readers.  They are the books from which I learned as a boy growing up in the Mountain State.  They are filled with poems and stories that teach good morals, proper action, and how to be good citizens. I close with a poem from McGuffey's second reader. I believe it embodies the spirit of compassion that lives on in Erma's spirit and here at Marshall University:

"Beautiful faces are they that wear
The light of a pleasant spirit there;
Beautiful hands are they that do
Deeds that are noble, good and true;
Beautiful feet are they that go
Swiftly to lighten another's woe.

"I thank you for inviting me to be here with you today, and I thank you for honoring Erma by dedicating this beautiful facility to her memory.

"May God bless you all."

###


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Thursday April 16, 2009
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Marshall scientist receives national award for lung cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, a medical researcher at Marshall University, is one of just three scientists nationwide to be honored Saturday for cancer research the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics believes "may offer significant advances in clinical medicine in the future."

Dasgupta will receive the ASPET-Astellas Award in Translational Pharmacology at the society's annual meeting, which is part of the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting in New Orleans. The award provides $30,000 to continue research that could help both smokers and people exposed to nicotine through second-hand smoke or products such as nicotine patches and gums.

"Dr. Dasgupta's work reflects our school's cutting-edge contributions to the accelerated pace of biomedical discovery," said Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "She is very deserving of the recognition that she has brought to herself and Marshall by virtue of her scientific efforts."

Dasgupta's team studies how components of tobacco facilitate the growth of small cell lung cancer cells. She said that although nicotine doesn't cause cancer, her studies show it can promote the ability of lung cancer cells to grow, arrange blood supply for themselves, and spread to other parts of the body. Nicotine also can protect the cancer cells from chemotherapy drugs.

Nicotine binds to specific receptors on the lung cancer cells, and Dasgupta's research tries to decipher the signaling pathways that allow nicotine to promote the growth and survival of the tumors. She also is trying to identify and test novel small molecules that could disrupt those pathways.

 Dasgupta is an assistant professor of pharmacology. Originally from India, she came to Marshall after completing postdoctoral fellowships at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University and the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla.

The ASPET-Astellas Awards in Translational Pharmacology are intended to recognize pharmacological research accomplishments that seek to extend fundamental research closer to applications directed toward improving human health. The awards are given to 1) recognize those individuals whose research has the potential to lead to the introduction of novel pharmacologic approaches or technologies that may offer significant advances in clinical medicine in the future, and 2) to facilitate that translational process.


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Wednesday April 15, 2009
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West Virginia is looking for volunteer rainfall observers

 

   

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia will become the latest state to join the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS).  Effective May 1, 2009, West Virginia will join 42 other states that now include approximately 13,000 volunteers nationwide.  The goal of the program, which is now in its 12th year, is to provide a more dense precipitation network that will supplement existing observations.

Henry Reges, national CoCoRaHS coordinator from Colorado State University, says that this program will act as the "farm team" for the more established Cooperative Observer Program run by the National Weather Service.  The National Weather Service also sponsors CoCoRaHS.  Reges also says, "Volunteers can include anyone who can devote five minutes a day to take rain gauge measurements and then post their readings online."

Volunteers must purchase a standard rain gauge, which costs about $25.  The rain gauge can be purchased from distributors online, which are posted on the CoCoRaHS Web site.  This type of rain gauge must be used so that the readings are uniform and standardized across the country.  Volunteers are welcome to use their own rain gauges for verification purposes.  However, the readings and reports should come from the standard rain gauges. 

"This is a perfect opportunity for weather enthusiasts to help collect weather and climate data across the state," says Dr. Kevin Law, assistant professor of meteorology at Marshall University and state climatologist of West Virginia.  "West Virginia has highly variable precipitation patterns and a sparse observation network, particularly in our mountainous counties.  We have a largely rural state where little data are available.  CoCoRaHS will greatly enhance our existing network of precipitation observations."

Participants can include individuals or organizations. However, the data should be ideally collected everyday between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.  Law enforcement, emergency management officials, hospitals and utility companies are good candidates for organizational volunteers.  Schools are often interested in volunteering, but the data also have to be recorded on weekends and holidays, and during the summer.  It can somewhat be problematic finding volunteers to help during these time periods. 

"CoCoRaHS will be especially useful during winter when we observe snowfall amounts," Law said.  "Snowfall patterns vary greatly across West Virginia, especially in the mountains.  The National Weather Service is particularly interested in these data as it will help them better forecast snowfall totals in those counties."

The program can also be used a learning tool.  "I plan on using the precipitation data in my meteorology classes," Law said.  He is developing a 4-year meteorology program at Marshall. 

CoCoRaHS aims to have 20,000 observers by 2010.  For more information about how to join CoCoRaHS, log on to www.cocorahs.org.  The West Virginia site can then be found by clicking the state on the homepage.  Online tutorials explaining where to properly place your rain gauge and how to precisely read your gauge can also be found on this Web site.      

Contact Info:                         

                       

 

Northern Panhandle Region

John Darnley

Pittsburgh Weather Forecast Office

John.darnley@noaa.gov

 

Eastern Panhandle Region

Christopher Strong

Baltimore/Washington Weather Forecast Office

Christopher.Strong@noaa.gov

 

State Coordinator

Kevin Law

Marshall University

Law14@marshall.edu

 

Central West Virginia Region

John Sikora

Eric Seymour

Charleston Weather Forecast Office

John.Sikora@noaa.gov

Eric.Seymour@noaa.gov

 

Southeastern West Virginia Region

Dennis Sleighter

Anita Silverman

Blacksburg Weather Forecast Office

Dennis.Sleighter@noaa.gov

Anita.Silverman@noaa.gov

 


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Wednesday April 15, 2009
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WMUL-FM 88.1 and Huntington School of Beauty Culture hosting second Hair from the Herd event



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- WMUL-FM 88.1 , the student broadcast service of Marshall University, and the Huntington School of Beauty Culture are teaming up to host the second Hair from the Herd event  Thursday, April 23 on the Marshall Memorial Student Center plaza.

The four-hour event starts at 11 a.m. and is scheduled to finish at 3 p.m.

WMUL-FM's first Hair from the Herd event collected nearly 400 inches of hair that was donated to Locks of Love.

"The first Hair from the Herd event was so successful that it motivated our staff to continue it for another year," Jason Van Meter, WMUL-FM promotions director, said. "We want this event to be bigger and better than the 2008 campaign. We also want to collect more hair for this great organization."

For the second year, haircuts and styles will be provided free of charge by the Huntington School of Beauty Culture to any student, faculty or community member who supplies 10 inches or more of his/her hair.

Tena Kimball, Huntington School of Beauty Culture admissions director, said the school is willing to lend its support for the second year.

"This was such a successful event this past year that we were excited to be asked to return this year to give back to our community and show our support," Kimball said.

The partnership between the two organizations has been beneficial to this event.

"WMUL-FM can do what it does best which is to promote the event by letting the public know, but the radio station staff cannot provide the haircuts and styles," Van Meter said. "We are thankful the Huntington School of Beauty Culture is willing to help us out with this vital portion of the Hair from the Herd event."

In addition to a free haircut and style, donors will receive a WMUL-FM mesh bag containing a t-shirt, coupons to local restaurants and shampoo and conditioner sets.

Locks of Love  is a not-for-profit organization that provides recipients with a custom, vacuum-fitted hairpiece made entirely from donated human hair.  The vacuum fit is designed for children who have experienced a total loss of scalp hair, and it does not require the use of tape or glue.  Most of the wig applicants suffer from an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata for which there unfortunately is no known cause or cure.

Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that resulted in permanent hair loss.

Founded in 1998, The Locks of Love organization has helped more than 2,000 children since its first year of operation. Thousands of bundles of donated hair are received as a result of the national publicity that Locks of Love has received from newspapers, magazines, radio and television programs.  More than 80 percent of the donors are children, making this a charity where children have an opportunity to help other children.

Donated hair is evaluated for its usefulness according to the following guidelines:

  • It must be at least 10 inches in length.

  • It must be bundled in a pony-tail or braid.

  • Bleached hair cannot be used, but hair that has been dyed or permed can be used.

For more information about Hair from the Herd, contact WMUL-FM Station Manager Meagan Sellards at 304-696-2295.


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Wednesday April 15, 2009
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"25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee" Comes to Keith-Albee April 28

Can you spell (K-E-I-T-H  A-L-B-E-E)?

 

BROADWAY'S TONY AWARD-WINNING
MUSICAL COMEDY

8 PM Tuesday, April 28th

 

"The Sweet Spell of Success" The New York Times

The Marshall Artists Series closes their 72nd season with the Tony Award-winning musical comedy THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE, at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center, 8PM Tuesday, April 28th

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE centers around six young people in the throes of puberty, who are overseen by grown-ups who barely managed to escape childhood themselves, learn that winning isn't everything and that losing doesn't necessarily make you a loser. This tuneful, offbeat and at times heartwarming show offers audience members the opportunity (strictly voluntary) to become part of the action as on-stage spellers.  "Can you spell i-r-r-e-s-i-s-t-i-b-l-e? 

SPELLING BEE is riotously funny and remarkably ingenious. "Gold stars all around," says the New York Times.  In the Wall Street Journal, SPELLING BEE was called, "perfect in every possible way - that rarity of rarities, a super-smart musical that is also a bona fide crowd-pleaser. An ingenious blend of simplicity and sophistication, it's not merely funny, it's wise.

THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE is based on C-R-E-P-U-S-C-U-L-E, an original play by The Farm improv group in New York City.  SPELLING BEE had its world premiere production in July 2004 at Barrington Stage Company, Sheffield, MA.  Under the direction of James Lapine, SPELLING BEE officially opened Off-Broadway on February 7, 2005 at Second Stage Theatre, where it ran from January 11 through March 20, 2005.  The show then moved to Broadway's Circle in the Square Theatre, with previews beginning on April 15, 2005 and an official opening on May 2, 2005.  The Broadway production closed January 20, 2008.  SPELLING BEE is

Tickets for The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee are on sale NOW, and may be purchased at The Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, open Monday Friday, noon 5 P.M.  Patrons my also call the Box Office at (304)-696-6656, or (304)-523-5757. Adult ticket prices are $55/$50/$45. Youth Ticket prices are $27.50/$25/$22.50. Tickets may also be purchased on-line at www.marshallartistsseries.org, or www.ticketmaster.com

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is sponsored by:  Steve & Mary Williams, Boggs Roofing, Neighborgall Construction, Huntington Testing & Technology, Verizon, Air Systems Inc. WKEE, B97, WTCR, The Herald Dispatch, WSAZ, Marshall University, The College of Fine Arts, & The Marshall Artists Series.

# # #

 

For more information about THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE,

please visit www.spellingbeethemusical.com.


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Tuesday April 14, 2009
Contact: Adam Russell, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-521-3754

Empty Bowls event sees biggest turnout yet


Huntington Area Food Bank thankful for community support

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - With nearly $18,000 dollars raised and close to 800 attendees, event organizers are calling the sixth annual Empty Bowls event an overwhelming success.

Empty Bowls, which took place on April 7, is an event that is organized and executed by the Marshall University Department of Art and Design's Keramos Student Pottery Guild, in association with public relations students from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. The goal is to raise awareness of the hunger problem that is present in the Tri-State area.

Event organizers were pleased with this year's turnout.

"I've never seen so many people at this event," John Rickey, director of the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB), said. "It's so great to see members of the community willing to help us out in such a big way."

According to Rickey, each dollar raised will provide seven pounds of food for the food bank to give to needy families. With the money this year's event raised, the HAFB will be able to get nearly 126,000 pounds of food.

Each of the $12 donations at the event will help provide eight meals to eight hungry families in the Tri-State area.

"I am really thankful for everyone who came out to this event and to everyone who donated their time," Rickey remarked.

The HAFB has seen an increase in need for supplies in the past few months, so the amount raised will better prepare it to meet that need.

Even with all of the hard work that both student groups put into making the event this success, they couldn't have done it without the help from volunteers in the area.

Members from the Marshall Community and Technical College Cooking and Culinary Institute prepared nearly 125 gallons of soup, which was donated by area restaurants. Heiner's donated loaves of bread for guests to enjoy. Pepsi donated beverages for the event, totaling more than 1,000 cans and bottles, while Starbucks donated coffee for the patrons.

"It was great to see the church packed with so many people eager to support the cause," Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, said.

In addition to donations received for the soup lunch portion of the event, a silent auction featuring autographed memorabilia and ceramic gifts raised $2,373. Items, such as a Randy Moss-signed jersey, were donated by Celebrity Auctions in association with Stadium Frame and Art. Area artists donated handblown glass and other ceramic items that were also featured in the silent auction.

The event raised almost $18,000, which was double the amount raised last year and was more than the $12,000 goal set for this year's event.

"I'm extremely proud of the Marshall University students who worked very hard to make this year's event a total success," Terry Hapney, professor of public relations at MU, said. "Through the students' hard work, thousands of Tri-State area residents who are hungry will get the meals they need to survive. Above all else, that's what counts most."

For more information about the HAFB, contact Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information regarding the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.


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Tuesday April 14, 2009
Contact: Leah Edwards, University Communications, 304-696-6397

Two Marshall students to compete in national forensics tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two members of Marshall University's forensics team are heading to the National Forensics Association (NFA) tournament in Missouri for a competition beginning later this week.

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a freshman from Louisville, Ky., and Zechariah Frame, a junior from St. Albans, both qualified for the tournament based on their performances last month at an Ohio State University competition.

Vonderschmitt took second place in the Lincoln-Douglas debate event at Ohio State.   The one-on-one debate is between competitors who lay out their arguments in a short speech before questioning their opponents in a cross-examination round.

Winning a third-place prize in Prose Interpretation at Ohio State's competition, Frame qualified for the national tournament with a reading from "Adam and Eve."    The reading is from a short story which takes a humorous look at the world's most famous couple.

"I am extremely proud of our team," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "They started with little more than their talents, their determination, and the enthusiastic support of their coach. Now they will compete with students who are some of the nation's best competitors from well-funded and mature forensics teams. As the only academic competitive activity, participation in forensics provides for students the same types of character-building experiences provided for student-athletes."

This year's NFA is scheduled for April 16-20 at Drury University in Springfield, Mo.   The Marshall forensics team is coached by Communication Studies graduate students Sarah Craiger and Danny Ray.

For more information, contact Dr. Robert Bookwalter, chairman of Communication Studies, at 304-696-2815 or via e-mail at bookwalt@marshall.edu.


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Monday April 13, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall journalism students take top honors in regional competition



COLUMBUS, Ohio
- Students from Marshall University's radio station and newspaper picked up eight first-place awards at the Society of Professional Journalists Region 4 conference Saturday, April 4.

Region 4 includes West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan and western Pennsylvania. The awards include 38 categories in online, broadcast and print entries from students at private and public universities. Judges reviewed more than 550 entries from across the region.

WMUL-FM picked up five first-place awards, two second-place awards and two third-place awards.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL.

"WMUL-FM student broadcasters won all five first-place awards and nine of the 10 radio awards presented in the five radio categories. This solid performance in SPJ's Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of journalism and Mass Communications."

Senior Adam Cavalier from Montgomery, W.Va., picked up three first-place awards and one third-place award. He received first place for best news reporting - "Big Dips for 50 Years;" best feature - "The Toastman;" radio sports reporting - "Metal versus Wood;" and third place for radio sports reporting - "Byron is Back."

Sophomore Leannda Carey from Wellsburg, W.Va., earned second place in best news reporting with "Marshall in the Dark."

Junior Andrew Ramspacher from Dublin, Ohio, earned second place in radio sports reporting for "From Futbol to Football:  Craig Ratanamorn."

Recent graduate Brandon Woolum from Huntington took third place in radio in-depth reporting with his documentary "Marshall is Doomed."

Station staff earned two first-place awards.

"The 2008 Marshall Football Season Preview" took top honors for radio in-depth reporting, written and produced by Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, W.Va., and Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen, W.Va.  Reporters were Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, W.Va.; Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans, W.Va.

The station also took top honors in radio newscast for its 5 p.m. edition of "Newscenter 88." Staff members included: Mark Swinkels, international student, Nieuwleoop, Holland; Whitney Thomas, senior, Wheeling, W.Va.; Leannda Carey, sophomore, Wellsburg, W.Va.; Boom Madison, sophomore, Olympia, Wash.; Robert Iddings, junior, St. Albans, W.Va.; Adam Cavalier, senior, Montgomery, W.Va.; Andrew Ramspacher, junior from Dublin, Ohio; Kasha Shull, freshman, Ona, W.Va.; Meagan Sellards, graduate student, Chapmanville, W.Va.; and Ryan Epling, graduate student, Wayne, W.Va.

Staffers at The Parthenon earned three first-place awards and one third-place award.

Senior print journalism major Tom Bragg from Cross Lanes, W.Va., won first place in sports column writing. Bragg is a former executive editor and sports editor.

Graduate student Erin Felton from St. Albans, W.Va., won first place in editorial cartooning. Felton is a master's degree student in teaching and has contributed cartoons this academic year.

Matthew Sowards, a senior political science major from Salt Rock, W.Va., won first place in general column writing. Sowards writes a weekly column for The Parthenon.

The Parthenon received third place for best all-around daily student newspaper.

"The Parthenon is a public forum, and its strength is its diversity," said adviser Nerissa Young, who teaches print journalism and film documentary. "It provides an outlet for talented people on campus regardless of their majors. However, credit is certainly due to the reporters, editors, photographers and designers from 2008 who made the newspaper one of the best in the region."

First-place winners will compete against winners in 11 other regions across the country. SPJ will announce those winners at its national convention in Indianapolis in August.

The Society of Professional Journalists is the nation's most broad-based journalism organization, dedicated to encouraging the free practice of journalism and stimulating high standards of ethical behavior. SPJ was founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi.


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Friday April 10, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Choral Union to present 'King David'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present Arthur Honegger's choral work "King David" at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 18, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The Choral Union will be joined by the MU Chamber Choir and orchestra for the presentation of this choral masterpiece.

" 'King David'  is a dazzling dramatic work for chorus, orchestra, soloists, and narrator, who together tell the story of the Old Testament King David," Castleberry said. He added that the work was composed in 1921 by Honegger, a young, then-unknown composer, at the request of Swiss playwright Rene Morax, who sought incidental music for his play 'Le Roi David.' Honegger crafted a work in 27 musical episodes and completed the project in just two months. The instrumental parts for chamber orchestra feature prominent solo lines and many colorful effects.

Solos for soprano, alto and tenor will be sung by members of the Choral Union and Chamber Choir and Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the department of music, will serve as narrator.
 
There will be one performance only, on April 18. Tickets will be available at the door for $10 for adults, $5 for students and seniors, and free to those with Marshall IDs. In addition, on Friday, April 17, the choirs and orchestra will present a rehearsal open to the public. For further information, contact the MU Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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MU Theatre's Watkins bids Huntington farewell with 'Broadway and Beyond'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University theatre student Sean Watkins will present 'Broadway and Beyond' this month as a farewell to West Virginia before leaving to work on a tryout of a Broadway show.

The performance will debut at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 18, in St. Albans, W.Va., at the Alban Theater, 65 Olde Main Plaza. A second performance will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in Huntington at the Jeslyn Performing Arts Center, 1040 4th Ave. 

In October 2008, Watkins decided he had to go to New York to audition for a workshop for an upcoming Broadway show titled "Bruce Lee: Journey to the West." He had to miss a rehearsal for a show in which he was portraying the title character to attend the audition, but it turns out he made the right decision. 

Watkins leaves for New York at the end of this month to begin work on "Bruce Lee." It is tentatively scheduled to land on the "Great White Way" in the winter of 2010 after an out-of-town tryout in Los Angeles and a possible engagement in Shanghai, China. 

Before he leaves Huntington, Watkins wants to go out in style. He has put together a one-man show called 'Broadway and Beyond' along with his music director Melody Bias. "It covers a wide variety of music - from jazz to contemporary Broadway to opera.  You might even see a tap dance or two!" says Watkins.

Watkins will be accompanied by Bias in the St. Albans performance while Bruce Rous will be playing at the Huntington performance.

Admission is free, but donations will be appreciated, according to Watkins. A portion of the proceeds will go to a children's charity. 

For further information, contact Sean Watkins via e-mail at SeanAWatkins@gmail.com.


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Lewis College of Business to celebrate 40th anniversary

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business will celebrate its 40th anniversary during Alumni Weekend with a series of events from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 24 at Corbly Hall on the Huntington campus.

Numerous activities and giveaways are planned throughout the day, including an unveiling/ribbon cutting of the new LCOB student lounge in the lobby of Corbly Hall at 10 a.m. Other special events include:

  • 10:20 a.m., Dr. Robert Alexander, former dean of the College of Business, will give a lecture in the Corbly Hall lobby on the history of the LCOB.

  • 11 a.m., MU baseball Coach Jeff Waggoner and LCOB faculty will be in a dunk tank, with LCOB students and MU baseball players trying to dunk them. It will be set up outside between Corbly Hall and the Drinko Library.

  • 11 a.m., Guest lecture from BB&T West Virginia President Phyllis Arnold will take place in Smith Hall Room 154.

  • 1:30 p.m., a reception will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Dining Room.

Hot dogs, popcorn and birthday cake will be provided throughout the day to students, staff, faculty and alumni, and the DAWG radio station will be broadcasting live outside between Corbly and Drinko, where other games/activities such as an obstacle course and guitar hero will be available.

The design of the student lounge that will be unveiled is the result of a contest in Dr. Deanna Mader's marketing class. Two teams of LCOB students presented their designs for a student lounge to a judging panel that included Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Chong Kim, dean of the LCOB. The design of the lounge was based on the winning team's design.


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Thursday April 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students win 25 awards, including seven grand prizes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received seven grand prize awards and 18 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 18th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 46th annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony.

The event took place Saturday, March 28 at the LaGuardia Crowne Plaza Hotel in New York, N.Y.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"No other school won more grand prizes or overall awards than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters in the NBS scriptwriting, audio and online categories," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 88 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media.  Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000.  Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) Chapters.

WMUL's grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88:  Chelsea Clinton Comes to Huntington," with producer Ryan Vance, a senior from Culloden; news anchors Kimberly Burcham, a recent graduate from Huntington; Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; sports anchor Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and "live drop" reporters Meagan Sellards, a graduate student from Chapmanville; and Neera Doss, a junior from Milton; broadcast Friday, April 4, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

Audio Feature Segment

"Big Dips for 50 Years," written and produced by Adam Cavalier,  a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, July 17, 2008.

Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program

"The Sowards Report:  Election Night Special," a public affairs talk program, with hosts Matt Sowards, a junior from Salt Rock; Jay Roudebush, a junior from Winfield; and producer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi; broadcast Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2008.

Audio Sports Package

"Byron is Back," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall - Illinois State football game Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"A Glimpse at Herd Heaven: The 2007-2008 Marshall Men's Basketball Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast  prior to the Marshall - Wheeling Jesuit exhibition basketball home opener Saturday, Nov. 1, 2008.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus University of Memphis men's basketball game played at the Cam Henderson Center in Huntington, West Virginia, Saturday, Jan. 12, 2008. The students calling the men's basketball game broadcast over FM 88.1 were: Basketball play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; and engineer Justin Prince, a freshman from Kenova.

The honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; news anchors Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi; Brenna Slavens, a senior from Jackson, Ohio; and sports anchor Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; broadcast Friday, Nov. 14, 2008.

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Mark Swinkels, international student from Nieuwleoop, Holland; news anchors Whitney Thomas, a senior from Wheeling; Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; and sports anchor Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin; broadcast Thursday, April 24, 2008.

Audio News Package

"Professors Deal with Power Outage," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"Pattie's Pies," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2008.

Audio Feature Package

"The Toastman," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, Aug. 4, 2008.

Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program

"A Conversation with Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's new Provost," by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall - Cincinnati football game Friday, Oct. 3, 2008.

Audio Promos

"The Awards Keep on Coming," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Friday, Aug. 22, 2008 through the present time, written and produced by Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

Audio Sports Package

"The Jump Around," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the Marshall - Wisconsin football game, Saturday, Sept. 6, 2008.

Audio Sports Segment

"Metal versus Wood," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, March 13, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup:  Spring Season Finale," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, and Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio, broadcast Friday, April 24, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Ye Olde C-USA Report," with host Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; reporters Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro; Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; Dave Traube, a junior from Beckley; James Roach, a junior from Richwood; and Tony Viola, a freshman from Follansbee; broadcast Friday, Oct. 17, 2008.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, and Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio, broadcast Friday, Nov. 7, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"The WMUL-FM Pregame Show: The Friends of Coal Bowl," with hosts Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen;  Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro;  reporters Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne;  Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; Andrew Ramspacher, a junior from Dublin, Ohio; and Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; broadcast  prior to the Marshall - West Virginia football game Saturday, Sept. 27, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"Trash Talk Sports:  The Friends of Coal Bowl Edition," with hosts Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; and Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro; broadcast Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008.

Audio Sports Program

"Yearning for Experience:  The 2007 Marshall Football Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, broadcast  prior to the Marshall vs. Illinois State football home opener Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Memphis football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; sideline reporter Leannda Carey, a sophomore from Wellsburg; and engineer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus West Virginia University football game played at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, W.Va., Saturday, Sept. 27, 2008.  The students calling the football game broadcast over FM 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer - Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery; color commentator Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; spotter Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen; and engineer Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Stephens City, Va.

Overall Web Site

WMUL-FM's Web site is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2008 Web Master for WMUL-FM Online is Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.


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Wednesday April 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Honors Student Association sponsoring 5K run/walk

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Marshall University Honors Student Association 5K Run/Walk will take place at 8 a.m. Saturday, April 25 in downtown Huntington.

Proceeds from the event will be used to fund a continual scholarship in remembrance of a Marshall University honors student who died last fall, and allow for growth of the MU honors program.

The flat, 3.1-mile course starts and ends at or near the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Age divisions include 19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60 and up. Awards will be presented to the top male and female overall finishers, and the top male and female finisher in each age group.

Entry fee is $15. Checks should be made payable to the Marshall University Honors Student Association or MUHSA and returned to Katrina Harper at the Center for Academic Excellence, Marshall University, Old Main 230, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

Entry forms are available on the event calendar under April 25th at www.tristateracer.com, at the Marshall Recreation Center, the Huntington YMCA and by request at harper109@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday April 8, 2009
Contact: Katherine Reasons,, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-521-9841

Empty Bowls fundraiser a success

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - First Presbyterian Church in Huntington doesn't normally experience hundreds of people walking through its doors with handmade pottery and gallons of soup. But this Tuesday was very different.

Students from the College of Fine Arts and W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University hosted the sixth annual Empty Bowls event at the church on Tuesday. The event raised nearly $18,000 for the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB), a nonprofit food distribution center that provides food to soup kitchens, emergency relief shelters and other hunger programs throughout the Tri-State.

This year's event nearly doubled the amount raised last year, according to campaign organizers, and surpassed the students' goal of $12,000.

"Each dollar that was donated at Empty Bowls will allow us to distribute seven pounds of food to the hungry in our region," said Jon Rickey, director of the HAFB. "Everyone who provided us with a $12 donation will feed an entire family for three weeks."

Every guest who donated $12 received a soup lunch donated by area restaurants and a ceramic bowl, handmade by students in the Keramos Student Pottery Guild at Marshall University. The bowls serve as a lasting reminder of the ongoing hunger problem in our region.

"When you see one of these bowls, you're reminded that there are hungry people in our region," said Tommy Warf, a Marshall ceramics student.

"The bowl is the universal symbol for hospitality and giving, and what more appropriate form could we use to help others?" said Earline Allen, ceramics professor.

In addition to receiving lunch, the nearly 800 people in attendance at Empty Bowls had the opportunity to bid on dozens of items at a silent auction. Some of the items included gift baskets from local businesses, sports memorabilia autographed by former Marshall athletes, coaches and even signed photographs of Brad Paisley and Taylor Swift.

"We always hear that it's better to give than to receive, and everyone who participated in our silent auction had the fantastic opportunity to do both," said Meagan Sellards, Empty Bowls campaign director. "Several of our guests won really great prizes, but at the same time, they contributed to a wonderful and important cause."

Campaign Representative Erin Thompson said it was amazing to see how much the community supported the campaign.

"Before the actual event, we coordinated food drives at local businesses, awareness events at campus activities and a penny drive among some of Marshall's fraternities and sororities," she said. "The entire community has really pulled together for this campaign, and it's exciting to see how much of a difference it has made."

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org.  For more information about the Empty Bowls campaign, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.


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72nd annual Awards Banquet highlights Alumni Weekend; distinguished alumni, friends and students to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 72nd annual Alumni Awards Banquet highlights Marshall University's 2009 Alumni Weekend, which takes place April 24-25.

The awards banquet on Saturday, April 25, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus honors distinguished alumni, friends and students. It starts at 6 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza with the President's Social, which is followed at 7 p.m. by the banquet in the center's Don Morris Room. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. Tables for eight people are available for $400.

To RSVP or ask questions about the banquet, persons may call 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

The theme of this year's Alumni Weekend, which is sponsored by Bank of America and Sodexo, is "Bridging the Past with the Future."  

Here is a complete list of the distinguished alumni award winners for 2009:

Distinguished Alumni Award

Joe Gillette (BBA '73) of Marietta, Ga., owns Wen-Four Foods Inc., and 16 Wendy's restaurants. He dedicates a great deal of his time to Marshall University, including membership on the board of directors of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.; vice president of the Society of Yeager Scholars board; president of the Thunder Club; and member of the Big Green Coaches Circle. This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.

Community Achievement Award

Robert (Bob) N. Melott (MA '62) of Tulsa, Okla., is co-founder and retired vice president for information systems, admissions and records at Tulsa Community College, formerly Tulsa Junior College. When he joined Tulsa Junior College as vice president in 1969, he helped establish the first new public institution of higher education in the state in 50 years. During his tenure, more than 400,000 people attended the college. He also was active in Rotary, moving through the ranks to governor of his district, which included four states. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

Distinguished Service to Marshall Award (two recipients)

John Curtis McHaffie (BSE '59) of Oro Valley, Ariz., has worked diligently over the years to restore the four-year engineering program to Marshall University, resulting in its reinstatement. This award coincides with the 50-year anniversary of McHaffie receiving his Bachelor of  Engineering degree from Marshall. After an illustrious career with the U.S. Air Force and in the private sector as an aerospace engineer, he retired as principal, consultant and president of Support Systems Inc. in 1994.

Robert B. Walker, M.D., of Barboursville, W.Va., joined the Marshall University faculty in 1979 and became chairman of the Department of Family and Community Health in 1986, associate dean of Clinical Affairs in 1991, and vice executive dean in 2001. He was named Professor of the Year in West Virginia in 1989; a Distinguished West Virginian, the state's highest honor, in 1996; and Rural Health Educator of the Year by the National Rural Health Association in 2000. Walker currently serves as vice chancellor of West Virginia's three Health Science Centers and has served as an advisor to Congress. Walker has maintained a family practice in Lincoln County for 33 years and is the medical director of Hospice of Lincoln County.

Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Barbara Winters has worked in libraries in four states during a career of more than 32 years, and has been dean of libraries at Marshall University since August 2000. She graduated from The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago, Virginia Commonwealth University and Catholic University of America. She most recently completed work as executive producer on a two-hour documentary film about Ken Hechler's life, called "In Pursuit of Justice." This award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees are evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

Distinguished Education and Human Service Award

Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks is a retired longtime faculty member and coach of women's golf, tennis, badminton and volleyball. She also taught teacher education courses and coordinated teaching clinical supervision. She served as an associate athletic director and faculty rep for the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and the Southern Conference, NCAA.

Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship (two students)

April Bennett, a freshman music education major, is a member of the Marching Thunder. Candice Michael, a junior political science major, is a cheerleader. This scholarship was established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds for the scholarship come from Herd Village proceeds.

Cam Henderson Scholarship Award

Tyler J. Gatrell of Boyd County, Ky., won the MU Baseball Leadership Award and made the dean's list in both 2007 and 2008. This scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

Nate Ruffin Scholarship

John Alexander Inman, a former Thundering Herd football player, graduated with a bachelor's degree in business management in 2008 and currently is working on a second degree in culinary arts and hospitality management at the Marshall Community and Technical College. This scholarship is awarded to a graduate or undergraduate Marshall University student with priority given to an African American full-time student with a 2.5 GPA or better as an undergraduate or 3.0 GPA or better as a graduate.

Alumni Association Club of the Year

The Atlanta, Ga., Alumni Club, under the leadership of President John Gilmore (BA '95, MA '98), hosted numerous game-watching parties, receptions and other social functions throughout the year for the purpose of attracting new members and recruiting potential Marshall students. The club members have been particularly dedicated to fundraising efforts for the new Erickson Alumni Center and Foundation Building. The Atlanta Club has been active since October 1984.

Young Alumni Award

Doug Martin (MS '06) of Delbarton, W.Va., a graphic design teacher at Mingo Career and Technical Center, has helped his students to win more than $1 million in scholarship money over the past three years. Martin has been a finalist for West Virginia Teacher of the Year and Technology and Learning Magazine's Leader of the Year. Most recently he has been invited to sit on the National Advisory Committee of the George Lucas (Star Wars) Educational Foundation where he will be a voice of change for education on a national level. The criteria for this award are that the person must be 35 years old or younger, an active member of the Alumni Association, show outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor, have a personal commitment to his or her community, and demonstrate service to Marshall University and its students.

MUAA Board Member of the Year

The recipient of this honor will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the awards banquet. The candidate must be successful in promoting the association's vision statement among students, alumni and friends, promote the association's core values, and work to move the association to the next level by bringing in new ideas.

Photos of the 2009 distinguished alumni award winners are available at http://www.marshall.edu/alumni/AlumniWeekend2009Awards.asp.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU professor to deliver Babcock Lecture in History at University of Maine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. William Palmer, professor of history at Marshall University, will give the 2009 Babcock Lecture in History at the University of Maine on Monday, April 27.

The Babcock Lectureship was created in honor of Prof. Robert H. Babcock, a longtime member of the University of Maine history department, to bring distinguished historians to campus.

Palmer, who has taught at Marshall since 1984, is the author of five books, including, most recently, From Gentleman's Club to Professional Body: The Evolution of the History Department in the United States, 1940-1980. He also received a Ph.D. in history from the University of Maine in 1981.  His lecture will discuss the difficulties faced by African Americans, Jews and women in trying to enter the history profession, and their contribution to the creation of the contemporary history department.

"We are exceptionally proud of Dr. Palmer's reputation as a productive and insightful scholar, and as a superior teacher," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "An invited lecture of this type is a clear affirmation of Dr. Palmer's good works. His recent research on the transformation of departments of history at American colleges and universities is a provocative and insightful analysis of higher education."

For more information, call Palmer at 304-696-2720.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU alum Dangerfield awarded prestigious Fulbright Fellowship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joseph Dangerfield, Marshall University alumnus and assistant professor of music at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has been awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to teach and compose in the Russian Federation during the 2009-2010 school year. Specifically, Dangerfield will serve as composer-in-residence for the Studio New Music Ensemble at the Moscow Conservatory.

Dangerfield began his composition studies at Marshall and received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1999. At Marshall, he studied with Michael Golden and John Allemeier. He then completed his master's degree at Bowling Green State University in Ohio, working with Marilyn Shrude and Mikel Kuehn, and received a doctorate in 2005 from the University of Iowa, studying under David Gompper.

Reflecting on his studies at Marshall, Dangerfield said, "Michael Golden, my first composition professor, really opened my eyes to new music, and John Allemeier helped me to hone my craft.  .[he also] introduced me to the music of David Gompper (University of Iowa).  As a result, I came to Iowa to work with Gompper and complete my Ph.D."

Dangerfield has had a lifelong fascination with traditional Russian music, which led him to pursue the Fulbright Scholarship opportunity.

"My parents are musicians and exposed me to Russian music beginning at a very young age," said Dangerfield.  "For some reason, this music has always spoken to me.  I am grateful for the opportunity to continue my lifelong journey with Russian music at the Moscow Conservatory during the next school year."

While at the Moscow Conservatory, Dangerfield will be teaching composition, presenting lectures and papers about the history of American music, and helping Russian students learn about the American educational system. In addition, the music professor will be guest conducting and expects to write a new composition to be premiered in Russia.

"I often use the folk and liturgical music of Russia as a source of creative inspiration," noted Dangerfield. "I am also enamored with the music of Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Schnittke, Tarnopolski  [as well as] composers now living in Russia."

At Coe, Dangerfield teaches music composition and theory, and serves as the director of the Coe College Symphony Orchestra. Over the past several years, Dangerfield has garnered much attention as a composer, with performances of his works throughout the United States and abroad. American presentations include the Society of Composers Inc., the MusicX Festival at the College Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati, the San Francisco New Music Festival, and the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music. His instrumental and chamber compositions have also been performed at such international venues as the Moscow Conservatory, the Frankfurter Kuenstler Klub and the Conservatorio di Giuseppe Tartini (Trieste, Italy), as well as in Cairo, Egypt.

Originally trained as a pianist, Dangerfield is active as a performer and conductor throughout the United States.  Recently, he conducted a performance of his Piano Quintet in New York City.

He is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including The Young and Emerging Composers Award (2002), ASCAP Standard Awards, and the Henry and Parker Pelzer Prize for Excellence in Composition (2005). Dangerfield was selected for a three-week independent residency in the Leighton Studios of the prestigious Banff Centre in Alberta, Canada, which was completed in January 2008. Recordings of his works are available on the Albany Records label, and many are published by European American Music and PIP Press Music Publications.

Dangerfield's award is part of the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program, which sends approximately 1,100 American scholars and professionals per year to approximately 130 countries, where they lecture and/or conduct research in a wide variety of academic and professional fields.  He joins several other Coe faculty members who have received Fulbright Awards during their careers.

Established in 1946 and sponsored by the United States Department of State, the Fulbright Program aims to increase mutual understanding between Americans and the peoples of other countries, through the exchange of persons, knowledge and skills.  The Fulbright Program provides funding for students, scholars and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research and teaching. 

Dangerfield met his wife, Ami Gray Dangerfield, who also earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at Marshall in 1999, in the music library at Marshall. They have two children, Conner, 5, and Piper, 3, who will accompany them to Russia.

For more information, contact Joe Dangerfield via email at jdangerf@coe.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 6, 2009
Contact: Sarah O'Connell, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-654-0928

Sixth Empty Bowls event takes place Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The countdown to the sixth annual Empty Bowls event is coming to a close as Marshall University students and the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) continue to collect donations and handcrafted bowls in preparation for the event.

Students from the Department of Art and Design's Keramos Student Pottery Guild continue to work toward reaching their goal of handcrafting 1,000 ceramic bowls, and public relations students in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications have been preparing for the event for months. The students are confident that they will reach their goal of raising money for the HAFB as well as raising awareness about hunger in the Tri-State area

"We are getting to the end and everything is starting to fall into place," said Meagan Sellards, Empty Bowls campaign director. "Everyone has worked together in order to ensure that this is a successful event."

Empty Bowls is from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. For a $12 donation, guests will receive a handcrafted ceramic bowl of their choice and a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi. Proceeds benefit the HAFB.

"We have to make sure that every small detail is in order before the day of the event to make sure it runs smoothly," said Adam Russell, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative. "Everyone involved has a common goal of raising money for the food bank. We want to make sure that guests can come out and have a good time, and also understand that there are some people in the community who go hungry every day. Their donation is going toward helping one of those people."

A silent auction will be held at the event. Participants can bid on additional bowls signed by Gov. Joe Manchin, Marshall University President Stephen Kopp and Coach Mark Snyder; Marshall memorabilia including an authentic cheerleading uniform and items signed by Chad Pennington, Bobby Pruett, Red Dawson, Randy Moss and Marshall athletic teams; gift cards from Sculptures Salon, Wal-Mart and local area restaurants; memorabilia signed by famous musicians and athletes; a gift package from Pullman Plaza and two end zone tickets for the 2009 Marshall football season donated by the Marshall Athletics Department are just a few of the gifts that are being offered.

Additional artwork to be auctioned off has been donated by three local high schools. Art teachers Lois Mack from Cabell Midland, Phoebe Carry from Fairland and Karen Alexander from Spring Valley all have students who are contributing something to the auction.

"We are very happy to have several area high schools participating in Empty Bowls," said Earline Allen, ceramics professor. "These students are learning how to make a positive impact on their communities."

"None of this would be possible without the help of local businesses and members of the community," said Will Selbee, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative. "Local restaurants have been very generous with donating soup and businesses are eager to help by donating items for the silent auction. We have a total of 124 gallons of soup and many great gifts for the auction."

Guests going through the soup line will also get the chance to meet local celebrities who are volunteering at the event. Celebrity servers include WOWK's Sandra Cole, WSAZ's Paul Gessler, Magic 97.9's J.B. Miller, former Marshall Student Body President Matt James and current Student Body President Sean Hornbuckle, The Herald Dispatch's Dave Lavender, Miss West Virginia International Misty McMinn and Marshall mascot Marco, along with others who will be volunteering throughout the day.

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls event, call Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the media representative, can be reached at 304-360-3394. Those interested in the event may also e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org.

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This information is being released as a courtesy to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 3, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Chad Pennington to deliver keynote address at Marshall University's 172nd Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Chad Pennington's on-the-field accomplishments, both at Marshall University and in the National Football League, are well documented. However, it is his contributions to society, not only in the Marshall community but nationally, that many believe will be his legacy long after his playing days are over.

Because of his contributions as an outstanding honors student while at Marshall, his tremendous success as a student and professional athlete, and his loyalty to his alma mater, Pennington will return to Marshall this spring to deliver the keynote address during the University's 172nd Commencement, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

"Chad Pennington embodies the essence of what it means to be a 'Son of Marshall,' " Kopp said. "He is as committed today as he was as a student at Marshall University to excelling in all that he does. The personal and professional standards he lives by serve as a model for all of us. His achievements in every facet of his life, whether as a father or as a professional athlete, have been remarkable.

"Chad has overcome significant personal hardships along the way but has never lost sight of his commitment to helping others. He takes great pride in making the world a better place through his volunteer and charitable works and the way he lives his life. We at Marshall University are very proud of Chad and we are truly honored to have him address the 2009 graduates of Marshall University at our 172nd Commencement."

Commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 9 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Pennington graduated with high honors from Marshall in December 1999 with a degree in journalism. He also was a finalist for the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship, was a two-time first-team Academic All-American, and received an award as the top scholar athlete in college football.

"My experience as a student-athlete at Marshall University was simply amazing! Ten years later, I still look back on my collegiate years with a great sense of pride and accomplishment," Pennington said. "I am honored to have the opportunity to be the commencement speaker and hope to share my experiences with the future leaders of tomorrow."

Pennington has been honored many times during his NFL career. Most of the recognition has nothing to do with touchdown passes or winning games. To name a few, he:

  • received the 2006 and 2007 Dennis Byrd Award for most inspirational player, as selected by his teammates;

  • was given the Achievement in Sports Award by the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of New York City in 2007;

  • was named the Jets' 2006 Walter Payton Man of the Year for his positive impact on people's lives;

  • received the sixth annual Call to Courage Award from the Western New York chapter of Athletes in Action, given to the NFL player or coach who exemplifies character and leadership on and off the field, at home and in his community;

  • was named the Jets' Ed Block Courage Award winner in 2004;

  • was selected as one of nine NFL players featured in the annual United Way commercials.

In 2003, Pennington and his wife, Robin, established the 1st and 10 Foundation with the mission of building stronger communities by funding programs and institutions that seek to improve the quality of life throughout West Virginia, Tennessee and the New York metropolitan area.

The foundation helped Starlight Starbright place Fun Centers (mobile entertainment units for pediatric patients) in hospitals in New York, Knoxville, Tenn., and Huntington. The 1st and 10 Foundation's fifth annual Celebrity Bowl will take place at Colonial Lanes in Huntington the evening of May 9.

Throughout his career Pennington has been a frequent visitor to area hospitals and schools, and he remains a popular banquet speaker.

During his four-year career at Marshall that began in 1995, he played in a Division I-AA championship game his freshman season, then - after sitting out the 1996 season - played in three consecutive Motor City Bowl games his final three years. During that time, Pennington guided the Thundering Herd to an overall record of 35-4 and bowl victories over Louisville and Brigham Young. His senior season, Marshall finished 13-0 and ranked No. 10 in the country.

Pennington, a nine-year veteran of the National Football League, is the Miami Dolphins' starting quarterback. He spent his first eight years in the NFL with the New York Jets. During his career, he has passed for more than 17,000 yards and twice - including last season - has been named the league's Comeback Player of the Year.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 3, 2009
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late,", 304-696-2967

This week's 'Up Late' is all about comedy!

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The guy named Marshall University's funniest student two years ago joins the cast of "Up Late" this week to talk about his life as a stand-up comedian.

Host Jamie LoFiego talks with Mike Jones about a life in comedy.

Also this week, director Morgan Shillingburgh and the crew of "Up Late" have a bone to pick with LoFiego. Executive producer Aaron Varble gets lessons on how to be funny from Jones and Aaron-Michael Fox. And, warning: This episode also features a pancake and sausage eating contest.

The Browning Automatics play their song, "Stop and Stay," and this week's doorkeeper is junior journalism major Jordan Sharp from Wayne, W.Va.

This episode of "Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, April 4 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

SCORES competition attracts more than 1,700 students to Marshall



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- More than 1,700 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, April 4 to participate in the 31st annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

"We are very excited about the SCORES competition," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES Coordinator with Marshall's office of recruitment. "The SCORES Academic Festival is our unique way of showcasing Marshall, while entertaining the brightest students from our area. In addition to the competition, this year we will be providing tours of the campus, and offering students the option to pay $5 and use the Marshall Recreation Center while they are here."

The event, which runs from 8 a.m. to about 3 p.m., is open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, journalism and mass communications, and science.

Awards will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place awards will be given for each division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

The SCORES awards ceremony takes place at 1:30 p.m. at the Cam Henderson Center. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will welcome the students at the ceremony.

For more information, contact the SCORES offices at (304) 696-2246.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

WalkItUp! Campaign at Marshall University features one-mile walk

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is putting its best foot forward for the second annual WalkItUp! Campaign organized by the Cabell-Huntington Health Department.   The community-wide program is an effort to encourage residents to begin walking 30 minutes a day and to continue the activity for a lifetime.

The Student Health Education office at Marshall University and the Marshall Recreation Center are co-sponsoring the event, which kicks off at noon Tuesday, April 7, at the recreation center. The approximately one-mile walk begins and ends at the recreation center and organizers say water and physical activity brochures will be available on site.

"I think that hosting a WalkItUp! event on campus is a great way to show the community that we are striving to become a healthier Marshall University," said Heather Smith, assistant director for fitness, Campus Recreation. "I've witnessed many faculty, staff and students recently choosing to be more active and take charge of their health. It is great to help provide more opportunities for fitness and recreation at Marshall."

Smith said the first 50 walkers to register on the day of the event will receive a free t-shirt.

Special guest walkers include Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marco and Marshall Men's Basketball Coach Donnie Jones.

In the event of rain, the walk will be inside the Marshall Recreation Center.

For more information on the walk, visit: www.walkitup.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 2, 2009
Contact: Jodee Hammond, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative, 304-639-6126

Sixth Annual Empty Bowls only days away

University students and HAFB count down to Empty Bowls

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five, four, three, two, one.

The sixth annual Empty Bowls event is only five days away, and the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) and Marshall University (MU) students are counting down.

The event is from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at the First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington.  Each person who donates $12 receives a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi and a handcrafted ceramic bowl to serve as a constant reminder of the empty bowls in our community and the ongoing hunger problem all over the world.

"Any time you raise some funds to feed someone who's hungry, it's a success," said Don Van Horn, dean of the MU College of Fine Arts.

After weeks of planning, students from the Keramos Student Pottery Guild and public relations students in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications are making the final touches to ensure everything is in order for the long-awaited fundraiser.

"We have to double-check everything from sponsorships to volunteers to how many forks we have," said Megan Schubert, public relations student and Empty Bowls campaign representative.  "We want to complete our plans and get the final word out about the good that people can bring to their community by contributing to such a worthy cause. Everything we do is for the food bank, and we don't want to let them down."

Event participants can expect to spot some local celebrities as they make their way through the soup line. Celebrity servers include: WOWK's Sandra Cole, WSAZ's Paul Gessler, former Marshall University Student Body President Matt James, current Marshall University Student Body President Sean Hornbuckle, Magic 97.9's JB Miller and many more.

"My hope is for so many people to show up that nothing is left," said Tommy Warf, a ceramics graduate student from Huntington. 

A silent auction will also take place at the event. Participants will have a chance to bid on additional bowls signed by Gov. Joe Manchin and Coach Mark Snyder; hand-blown glass; an authentic Marshall University cheerleading uniform; signed memorabilia from Chad Pennington, Red Dawson, Bobby Pruett and Marshall athletic teams; two Wal-Mart gift cards; gift cards for Sculptures Salon; memorabilia signed by famous musicians and athletes and other gifts. All proceeds from the event benefit the HAFB.

"I have high hopes for this year's turnout," said Erica Rife, Empty Bowls campaign representative. "We've had a lot of great coverage and a lot of support from the community thus far, so there is no reason why Empty Bowls won't be successful."

For more information about the HAFB, call Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls event, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Jaye Ike at (304) 696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Rife can be reached by phone at 304-360-3394. Those interested in the event may also e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org

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This information is being released as a courtesy to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 1, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall evaluates its progress on 4th annual Assessment Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's fourth annual Assessment Day, which is designed to determine how well the university is meeting its goals overall and by academic and service units, will take place Wednesday, April 8.

"Assessment is really at the heart of the teaching and learning process," said Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs. "Marshall has made it a priority by dedicating a day to the process."

"We're depending on students, faculty, and staff to participate in the Assessment Day activities and survey instruments," said Dr. Mary Beth Reynolds, Director of Assessment, who is heading up the Assessment Day activities once again this year. "Every year, our information becomes more detailed and useful."

Classes will not meet as scheduled most of that day, which allows students, faculty, and staff to participate in Assessment Day activities. The normal class schedule resumes at 4 p.m. for late afternoon and evening classes.

Members of the Marshall community participating in Assessment Day activities will receive a free lunch catered by Buddy's BBQ, Sodexo and Pepsi. Lunchtime entertainment will include the MU Rock Ensemble "Looking Glass," under the direction of Dr. Martin Saunders, and the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, under the direction of Dr. Wendell Dobbs. They will give special performances beginning at 11:30 a.m. Also, students and faculty will be eligible to win prizes, including laptop computers and gift cards, donated by area businesses and other groups.

Reynolds said that, among the activities planned, some are university wide and some are departmental. University-wide activities include, among others, student satisfaction surveys by the admissions office, financial aid office, residence services, career services department, student health services, the women's center, and the registrar's office; an SGA survey; and surveys from Sodexo and the MU Bookstore. The Office of Career Services will host a presentation by Sheetz and will conduct job search sessions for students. Information and Computer Literacy (iSkills) testing will be conducted throughout the day. Students may contact Dr. Monica Brooks at brooks@marshall.edu about this opportunity.

Many departments will be offering electronic surveys, which are available now and will continue to be available through April 10. A list and instructions for accessing both the university-wide and departmental surveys are available online at  http://www.marshall.edu/assessment/AssessmentDay_2009/Survey_Info09.asp.

Other departmental activities, which vary by unit, include "town hall" meetings for majors, portfolio presentations and exit interviews for seniors. 

Reynolds said she encourages everyone who participates Wednesday to complete an Assessment Day evaluation form, which will be available on the MyMU portal beginning April 13, the Monday after the event. This will be used as a guide in planning future Assessment Days.

"Assessment Day is an opportunity for faculty and students to evaluate the things they care about most: teaching and learning and the services that support those two," Hensley said. "I can't imagine that a student has no interest in providing feedback to his or her institution. Here is the chance."

"The Assessment Day Committee has worked hard to put this event together and we welcome everyone's input to help us build a better Marshall through assessment," Reynolds said.

In addition to Reynolds and Hensley, committee members include faculty members Dr. Marie Archambault, Dr. Michael Castellani, Dr. Darlene Daneker, Dr. Susan Gilpin, Dr. Marjorie Keatley, Dr. Cal Meyer, and Dr. Caroline Perkins; student Matt James; and staff members Karen Barker, Roberta Ferguson, Patricia Gallagher, Pat Gebhart, Dr. Karen Kirtley, Carla Lapelle, Jenny Lauhon, Homer Preece, Susan Tams and Terri Tomblin-Byrd.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/assessment/AssessmentDay_2009/default09.asp.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 1, 2009
Contact: Jodee Hammond,, Empty Bowls Campaign Representative,, 304-639-6126

Two Marshall University departments work together


College of Fine Arts and School of Journalism join to help the food bank

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Six years ago the first collaboration between the College of Fine Arts and W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications began with the idea for the Empty Bowls event.

"Ceramics students were trying to come up a charity idea that included some community involvement," said Mindy Bruce, former ceramics and public relations graduate student. "When I took a tour of Transylvania University in 1998 I heard their ceramics professor talking about Empty Bowls. I suggested it to our club, and everybody liked it really well."

Bruce said the problem they encountered was trying to get the first one ready. They could not decide when to do it, so it kept getting put off. She did not think it was ever going to happen and put it out of her mind.

Bruce finished her ceramics degree and moved on to acquire a public relations degree when the idea for Empty Bowls resurfaced.

"The Keramos Pottery Guild wanted some help with the publicity of the Empty Bowls event, so they asked the J-school students to add their expertise," said Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts. "The partnership was formed, and the two departments have been working together ever since." 

"Getting the journalism department behind it was the last little oomph they needed to set a deadline and stick to it," Bruce said. "Everything just fell into place from there."

The first Empty Bowls in 2004 was a big hit.

"It took off like a house on fire, especially with the help of the entertainment and auction," Bruce said. "Even though they had a huge crowd, I still wasn't sure if they would do it again. I was really pleased about it still going on when I heard about this year's campaign."

The 2009 Empty Bowls event will be from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 7 at the First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. Each person donating $12 receives a lunch of soup, bread and Pepsi, and a handcrafted ceramic bowl to serve as a constant reminder of the empty bowls in our community and the ongoing hunger problem all over the world. All proceeds benefit the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB).

"This collaboration between art and public relations students replicates the kind of challenge students will face when they move out of the academy and into the world," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts. "Helping prepare them through experiences like this is an important part of the education process."

"Leading and participating in these creative, collaborative and community service activities are part of our mission in the College of Fine Arts," said Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts. "It also illustrates why the bond between Marshall University and Huntington is so special."

Terry Hapney, assistant professor of public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications at MU, said that while the campaign  is focused primarily on feeding hungry people in the region, it also is a great hands-on, collaborative project for his students and ceramics students.

"Seeing my public relations students create an actual PR agency in January and work through the research, planning, communication, and evaluation stages of a PR campaign in February, March, and April has been a great experience," he said. "Many hours have also gone into producing the ceramic bowls. To witness these two groups of students coming together to give of their time, energy, and talents to help those in need is quite rewarding."

Hapney said much has gone into this year's Empty Bowls event.

"From the 1,000 beautiful bowls the ceramics students are providing to the 100 gallons of soup secured by public relations students, in addition to over 1,000 cans of Pepsi, many loaves of bread, thousands of dollars worth of silent auction items, t-shirts, banners, table tents, fact sheets, media kits, news releases, PSA's, a Web site, billboards, radio advertising, music, and plans for the actual Empty Bowls event this year's event should prove to be one to remember," Hapney said. "All of the students are hopeful they exceed their goal to ensure the Huntington Area Food Bank receives the funding to help even more people in the Tri-State area."

Brooke Ash, director of public relations for the HAFB, said food bank representatives are grateful for the hard work and dedication the Keramos Student Pottery Guild and the PR Campaigns class has put forth.

"It's great to see the students come together with the Empty Bowls event to help the food bank in more ways than one," Ash said. "It raises money for the cause, helps to raise awareness of the hunger issues in our community and offers people a way to give back." 

For more information about the HAFB, call Ash at 304-523-6029 or e-mail hafbmail@hafb.org. For more information about the Empty Bowls campaign, call Campaign Director Meagan Sellards at 304-412-5900 or e-mail emptybowls@marshall.edu. Erica Rife, the Empty Bowls media representative, can be reached at by phone at 304-360-3394, by e-mail at emptybowls@marshall.edu or by visiting www.marshall.edu/SOJMC.

For more information about the College of Fine Arts, contact Ike at 304-696-3296 or e-mail jaye.ike@marshall.edu

The Huntington Area Food Bank Inc. is a private, nonprofit, charitable organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio.

The HAFB assists food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, youth programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of the hungry. The HAFB member agencies are located in 17 counties throughout the Tri-State area. All member agencies served by the HAFB are private and nonprofit. For more information, visit www.hafb.org


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