FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 31, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Herd fans can meet new athletic director during Paint the Capital City Green event

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Thundering Herd fans will have an opportunity to meet Mike Hamrick, Marshall University's newly named director of athletics, during the 12th annual Paint the Capital City Green event in Charleston Wednesday, Aug. 19.

Paint The Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. The event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by mascot Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7 p.m.

Advance only tickets are on sale now and must be purchased by close of business on Monday, Aug. 17. Tickets are $40 per person and will not be sold at the door. All tickets will be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win two game tickets to the Sept. 12 Marshall vs. Virginia Tech football game in Blacksburg, Va., along with complimentary hotel accommodations.

Mike Hamrick will share the stage with President Stephen J. Kopp and Thundering Herd Football Coach Mark Snyder, as well as members of the football team as they discuss the future of Marshall University athletics. Hamrick, former director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, was named director of athletics at MU earlier this month replacing Bob Marcum, who retired this summer. Hamrick is a 1980 graduate of Marshall University. 

"I hope all of our Kanawha Valley fans come out to meet members of the Thundering Herd football family, including our newest, Mike Hamrick, and see why everyone should be getting excited about the upcoming season," Coach Snyder said. "I always look forward to Paint the Capital City Green and hope our Herd fans come out and support this great event!"

For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 30, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Painter named director of communications for Marshall University Research Corporation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ginny Painter has been selected to serve as director of communications for the Marshall University Research Corporation.

Painter assumed her duties July 27. She will operate from both Marshall University's South Charleston and Huntington Campuses.


Direct Link to This Release



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 30, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Massey Energy Scholarship for Engineering Established by Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Massey Energy Scholarship for Engineering has been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and the first award is planned for the 2009-2010 academic year.

Massey Energy Company (NYSE: MEE), the fourth-largest coal company in the United States, based on produced coal revenue, will contribute $20,000 a year for five years, for a total of $100,000. Massey has operations in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia.

The scholarship recipients will be West Virginia residents who are full-time Marshall University sophomores with engineering majors in the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) and minimum grade point averages (GPA) of 2.5.

"It is my hope that these scholarships give some of our best and brightest young people the opportunity to gain the skills and education they need to help all of West Virginia grow economically," said Don Blankenship, Chairman and CEO of Massey Energy.   "To ensure that our state has a bright future, we need to do our part to keep and grow high-skill and high-wage jobs.  These scholarships are a part of making that larger goal a reality."

First preference will be given to students who are from the southern West Virginia counties of Boone, Fayette, Kanawha, Logan, Mingo, Nicholas, Raleigh and Wyoming.  Marshall University engineering students who are from eastern Kentucky, other counties in West Virginia, or other areas of the United States, are also encouraged to apply for the scholarship. Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of CITE, will select the recipients and renew the awards for up to three years (six semesters) if full-time status and a minimum GPA of 2.5 are maintained.

"Our students and faculty greatly appreciate Massey's support of Marshall's growing engineering program," Dulin said. "Massey's generous gift increases the pipeline of engineers in our region at a time when that profession will play an especially significant role in our economic growth."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 29, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps to perform at convention in New York City

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps will travel to New York City for a performance at the National Flute Association convention's closing ceremonies Aug. 16. The convention begins Aug. 13 at the Marriott Marquis Hotel at Times Square.

"This is an extraordinary honor to be selected to perform before the largest congregation of flutists in the world," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall and leader of the corps. "We are very pleased the university and its supporters have made this opportunity possible for our students. The convention features back-to-back events on every sort of musical topic. In addition to performing, this is a wonderful occasion for our students to experience a much larger world."

The National Flute Association has more than 6,000 members worldwide and hosts an annual convention each August in a different American city. Organizers believe this year's convention will be one of the best attended, due to the location and the honoring of Sir James Galway with the association's lifetime achievement award.

At the closing ceremonies the corps will perform a suite of tunes historical in significance to New York City. "Lafayette's Grand March and Quick Step" was written in 1824 by New York publisher and flutist Edward Riley in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette's triumphal return to America. Arriving first in New York City in August, this hero of the American Revolution visited all 24 states during the course of the following year. More than 60 towns and counties in the eastern United States were named in his honor after the visit.

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps at Marshall University was formed in August 2007 as an initiative of the John Deaver Drinko Academy and the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University. The group specializes in music from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall and wears uniforms styled after those of the era of the American Revolution.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 29, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Alumni Association, Travel Doctors sponsoring bus trip to Memphis for Herd's C-USA game with Tigers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association is teaming with Travel Doctors to sponsor a deluxe motorcoach trip Sept. 25-26 to Memphis, Tenn., for the Thundering Herd's football game with the Memphis Tigers.

The Conference USA game kicks off at 1 p.m. (ET) Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Liberty Bowl.

The trip includes:

  • Round-trip deluxe motorcoach transportation
  • One night's lodging in a superior hotel in the Beale Street entertainment district
  • One continental breakfast and one buffet breakfast
  • One lunch and one dinner meal voucher
  • Optional transportation to Graceland ($15)
  • Admission to Marshall University's pre-game tailgate party
  • Game ticket to the Marshall-Memphis football game
  • Bus trip home after the game

The total cost per person varies depending on the number of hotel room occupants: Prices are $529 per person (single occupancy), $399 per person (double), $369 per person (triple) and $339 per person (quad).

A $150 per person deposit is required at booking by Aug. 7 and the final payment is due by Sept. 4. Checks may be made payable and mailed to: Travel Doctors Travel Agency, 3554 Teays Valley Road, Suite 112, Hurricane, WV 25526.

For more information, contact the Marshall University Alumni Association at 304-696-2901 or Travel Doctors at 1-888-562-0881.

 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, 304-691-1713

State's biomedical researchers meet Thursday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Approximately 170 researchers and students from throughout West Virginia will gather at Marshall University Thursday for the 8th Annual Summer Research Symposium of a statewide research network known as WV-INBRE.
 
The West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence event will run from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center. Oral presentations are scheduled for the morning, with a poster session in the afternoon.

In addition to a keynote speaker and presentations from faculty researchers, the event showcases the research findings of 29 undergraduates from colleges and smaller universities around the state who have spent the summer working on cutting-edge biomedical research projects with mentors at Marshall and West Virginia University.

The keynote speaker is Darryle Schoepp, Ph.D., a former Marshall faculty member who now leads research at pharmaceutical giant Merck and Company as senior vice president and neuroscience franchise head. Schoepp will speak on new drug therapies on the horizon for treating diseases of the central nervous system.

WV-INBRE, which is designed to support biomedical research in the state, is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to Marshall University, in cooperation with West Virginia University and several of the state's colleges and smaller universities.

Summer research program students presenting at the conference represent the University of Charleston, West Virginia State University, Bluefield State College, West Virginia Wesleyan University, West Liberty State University, Concord University, Alderson-Broaddus College, Shepherd University, Bethany College and Wheeling Jesuit University. Faculty from West Virginia State and West Virginia Wesleyan also will present.

 Symposium coordinator Dr. Elsa Mangiarua of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine said WV-INBRE's goals include promoting education and research training in the biomedical sciences, providing mentored research opportunities for undergraduate students, promoting awareness of graduate degree programs and careers in biomedical research, and providing support for collaborative research for faculty.

The lead investigator for the WV-INBRE project is Dr. Gary O. Rankin of Marshall's medical school.

 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

MU's chapter of Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity receives highest award from parent organization

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's chapter of Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity has received the highest collegiate award from its parent organization. The award was announced July 17 at Delta Omicron's triennial conference in the Cincinnati metropolitan area.

The chapter received the chapter "Award of Excellence," which includes the categories of music service, outstanding music programs, campus/community service and efficiency..

"I am extremely proud of the chapter's achievements this year as represented by the Award of Excellence," said Dr. Vicki P. Stroeher, associate professor of music at Marshall, who is the chapter's advisor. "The members have worked hard to bring this recognition to Marshall."

In addition, three members of the chapter, who are students at Marshall, performed on the conference's collegiate recital, also on July 17. Angela Crum, trumpet, and Nicole McComas, piano, played "Rustiques" by Eugene Bozza. Austin Seybert, trombone, played "Parable for Solo Trombone" by Vincent Persichetti. All three played "Fandango" by Joseph Turrin.

Delta Omicron is a professional fraternity in the field of music with collegiate chapters established throughout the United States and abroad. The conference marked the organization's centennial in 2009.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 28, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM to broadcast all 32 Southeast Regional games

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's national-award winning student radio station, will broadcast all 32 Little League Baseball and Softball Southeast Regional Tournament games at Mitch Stadium in Kenova.

Coverage on 88.1 WMUL-FM and the station's Web site at www.marshall.edu/wmul will begin with the softball tournament Thursday through Monday, July 30 through Aug. 3. The baseball games will be played Aug. 8-14.

WMUL broadcast the 2008 Tournament of State Champions from C-K Little League.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 23, 2009
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall University to utilize Everbridge for emergency notification

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has announced a new partnership with Everbridge for emergency notifications of faculty, staff and students via text messages, e-mail and telephone.

 "With this service, we've acquired the ability to quickly communicate emergency and safety-related information through multiple channels with a single click," said Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for information technology/chief information officer for the university. "We believe that once this system is up and running, our Emergency Management Team will be able to communicate far more effectively in an emergency."

Persons who have already signed up for emergency text messages from Marshall will be automatically transferred to the new system, according to Jon B. Cutler, chief information security officer at Marshall. In addition, new and existing students will be invited to provide alternative means of contact, such as a secondary e-mail address or cell phone number, that can be added to the system.

"Our primary objective in implementing this new service is protecting the safety and health of university community members," said Bill Bissett, the university's chief of staff and senior vice president for communications. "The more easily we can communicate vital information, and the more ways we have to contact our community members, the better."

As the new system is phased in, Fox said, several test messages will be broadcast. Students, faculty and staff will be made aware of the testing dates in advance and should be sure that they receive the test messages.

Everbridge, formerly known as 3n Global, is a leading provider of emergency notification services to colleges and universities, health care systems, government agencies and municipalities.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 23, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Music program for young children registering for fall

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Fall registration for "Time For Music," a popular program formerly known as "Grow With Music," is underway. A discount applies to registrations that take place on or before Aug. 1, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University. Sessions begin the week of Aug. 24.

Pappas said that the name change came about due to the discovery of a similar program in Minneapolis, Minn., titled "Growing With Music" that has just started to offer franchises. She emphasized that the Marshall program's curriculum and philosophy will remain the same.

Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3 year olds, and 4 and 5 year olds. Parent participation is required for the classes, which take place in the daytime and early evenings on Mondays through Wednesdays. A maximum of nine children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

"[This program] has afforded our 21-month-old a fun and caring place to learn new communication skills through song, dance, musical instruments and even sign language," said Charlotte Hoffman Norris, a parent-participant. "It has also given me, a working mom, a great opportunity to watch and participate in my son's play and interaction with other children and their parents/grandparents."

Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

For information on "Time For Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at 304-697-0211.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 21, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program ranks number one in the nation on national assessment test scores

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program is ranked number one in the country for its students receiving the highest overall test scores on a national assessment test.

Five Marshall graduate students earned the Forensic Science Program highest honors on the Forensic Science Assessment Test, a qualifying test offered each year by the American Board of Criminalistics. One of Marshall's students ranked second in overall test results among students from nine other forensic science programs.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the program, said the test is useful for assessing the program's strengths and demonstrating to prospective students and the general public its ability to meet national standards.  "Support obtained by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd enabled the Marshall University Forensic Science Center to build its infrastructure and develop the academic program," he said.

Dr. Pamela Staton, program coordinator, said the test scores are evidence of the high quality education the program provides. "The quality of an academic program can be measured by a program's achievement of national accreditation and how well its students perform on national board examinations," she said. "The Forensic Science Program at Marshall University has achieved both of these honorable distinctions. This translates to high quality forensic science services to law enforcement, the legal profession, and the public as graduates of this program become forensic scientists in the field."

Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program is one of only a few such programs in the country that is Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC)-accredited by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

The students who participated in the test are now graduates of the nationally recognized Forensic Science Program. They demonstrated their knowledge in disciplines including forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent prints, questioned documents, fire debris, and firearms/tool marks.

The test is offered to students in their last semester of an academic forensic science program. While seeking their first job, recent college graduates may use their test results to demonstrate their knowledge across a broad range of forensic science disciplines.

The nine forensic science programs that participated in the exam included Marshall University, Arcadia University, Cedar Crest College, Duquesne University, Ohio University, Penn State University, Sam Houston University, University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of North  Texas.

The American Board of Criminalistics offers a wide array of testing and certification services that focus on the forensic sciences.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 20, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mike Hamrick named director of athletics at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mike Hamrick, director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas for the past six years and a 1980 graduate of Marshall University, has been named director of athletics at Marshall University, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. Hamrick replaces Bob Marcum, who retired.

Hamrick, 51, was introduced by Kopp at a news conference this afternoon in the Hartley Room at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. He will assume his duties in mid-August.

"In Mike Hamrick, we identified an outstanding leader for our athletic program, an individual of uncompromising integrity, experience and accomplishment," Kopp said. "He brings to Marshall University a vision for athletics that we can all embrace and support. His proven experience and accomplishments unequivocally demonstrate his ability to translate vision into action that leads to success. I cannot emphasize enough the value that this individual brings to our university and community.

"An added, but by no means less important quality of this individual is that he is a proud and successful Son of Marshall."

Kopp said a diverse group of approximately 30 individuals were considered for the position. Ten formal applications were invited and received.

"I want to thank the members of the search committee and our search consultant, Mr. Bob Beaudine, for their contributions and hard work," Kopp said.

Neal Smatresk, acting president at UNLV, said UNLV's loss is Marshall University's gain.

"Our program has thrived under Mike's leadership and I'm really proud of our scholar athletes and their success," Smatresk said. "Mike has had an impact on the success of our teams and he has a place in the heart of the community here in Las Vegas. We wish Mike and Soletta (his wife) the very best at Marshall."

Hamrick played football at Marshall University from 1976 to 1980, starting at linebacker and defensive end his last two years. After receiving his bachelor's degree in education from Marshall, he earned his master's in sports administration from Ohio University in 1981.

Prior to his current position at UNLV, Hamrick was director of athletics at East Carolina University from 1995 to 2003. He also has been AD at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, assistant AD at Illinois State in Normal, Ill., and assistant AD at Kansas University in Lawrence, Kansas.

"It's great to be back home," Hamrick said. "I am thrilled to be rejoining the Marshall University family and plan to work hard to help advance the success of Thundering Herd athletics in all facets. I thank President Kopp for giving me this opportunity."      

Hamrick is a native of Clendenin, W.Va., and a graduate of Herbert Hoover High School. He and Soletta are the parents of three children - twin sons, Brett and Justin (21), and daughter, Mollie Ann (18).


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 15, 2009
Contact: Don Van Horn, Dean, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-2964

Marshall to participate in MAGNETS program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts and Center for International Programs are participating in a new program designed to develop and implement a model international undergraduate program in music.

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) in the U.S. Department of Education has awarded $250,000 to Marshall University for the College of Fine Arts Music Department's Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students (MAGNETS) program. Ninety percent of the $277,587 project will be funded by FIPSE, with the remaining 10 percent funded by the Music Department and the Center for International Programs.

"We are indebted to Dr. Ben Miller, the principal investigator, and Mr. Julio Alves for their work on this project and to Dr. Clark Egnor for bringing it to our attention and his support in the grant-writing process," said Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of Marshall's Department of Music. "FIPSE grants are highly competitive and we should be proud that our department has been chosen to receive one.  It is another testament to the work our faculty does on a daily basis and the strong reputation they have established for this department.  All of us are winners, and our students will once again prosper and have a unique opportunity thanks to this program."

Marshall Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston said receiving the FIPSE grant is  quite an accomplishment for the university.

"We are extremely proud of our College of Fine Arts and its Department of Music for being one of eleven institutions in the nation to be awarded this FIPSE grant," Ormiston said. "These grants are highly competitive, and it is with great esteem that we announce our award. Of those eleven programs chosen, ours was the only arts initiative to be funded."

In the planning stage since July 15 of last year, the MAGNETS project includes Morehead State University in Kentucky and Goias Federal University and Santa Catarina State University in Brazil.

The objective of this project is to develop and implement a model international program in music, utilizing an integrated curriculum that will contribute to educational excellence and innovation in the field and better prepare students for the competence level required by the modern, global job market. The program of study will utilize the strengths of each partner university.

During the implementation phase of the project 18 students from the U.S. will study in Brazil for one semester or one academic year at one of the two Brazilian universities. During the same period, 18 students from Brazil will spend one semester or one academic year in the U.S. at either Marshall or Morehead State. Six faculty members from each of the U.S. institutions will participate in the project by carrying out lecturing and performance assignments at the partner institutions.

In addition to the knowledge and skills in music, during their study abroad experience, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of international, political and economic issues. They will gain transnational competencies, cross-cultural communication skills, understanding and familiarity with local customs and traditions, and an ability to adapt to new circumstances and deal constructively with difference.

According to Dr. Clark Egnor, Executive Director of Marshall University's Center for International Programs, the grant promotes international collaboration among universities. "This project, through the exchanges of faculty and students, will create long-lasting ties between Marshall University and institutions in Brazil," he said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 15, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to participate in MAGNETS program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts and Center for International Programs are participating in a new program designed to develop and implement a model international undergraduate program in music.

 

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) in the U.S. Department of Education has awarded $250,000 to Marshall University for the College of Fine Arts Music Department's Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students (MAGNETS) program. Ninety percent of the $277,587 project will be funded by FIPSE, with the remaining 10 percent funded by the Music Department and the Center for International Programs.

 

"We are indebted to Dr. Ben Miller, the principal investigator, and Mr. Julio Alves for their work on this project and to Dr. Clark Egnor for bringing it to our attention and his support in the grant-writing process," said Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of Marshall's Department of Music. "FIPSE grants are highly competitive and we should be proud that our department has been chosen to receive one.  It is another testament to the work our faculty does on a daily basis and the strong reputation they have established for this department.  All of us are winners, and our students will once again prosper and have a unique opportunity thanks to this program."

 

Marshall Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston said receiving the FIPSE grant is  quite an accomplishment for the university.

 

"We are extremely proud of our College of Fine Arts and its Department of Music for being one of eleven institutions in the nation to be awarded this FIPSE grant," Ormiston said.
"These grants are highly competitive, and it is with great esteem that we announce our award. Of those eleven programs chosen, ours was the only arts initiative to be funded."

  

In the planning stage since July 15 of last year, the MAGNETS project includes Morehead State University in Kentucky and Goias Federal University and Santa Catarina State University in Brazil.

 

The objective of this project is to develop and implement a model international program in music, utilizing an integrated curriculum that will contribute to educational excellence and innovation in the field and better prepare students for the competence level required by the modern, global job market. The program of study will utilize the strengths of each partner university.

 

During the implementation phase of the project 18 students from the U.S. will study in Brazil for one semester or one academic year at one of the two Brazilian universities. During the same period, 18 students from Brazil will spend one semester or one academic year in the U.S. at either Marshall or Morehead State. Six faculty members from each of the U.S. institutions will participate in the project by carrying out lecturing and performance assignments at the partner institutions.

 

In addition to the knowledge and skills in music, during their study abroad experience, students will deepen their knowledge and understanding of international, political and economic issues. They will gain transnational competencies, cross-cultural communication skills, understanding and familiarity with local customs and traditions, and an ability to adapt to new circumstances and deal constructively with difference.

 

According to Dr. Clark Egnor, Executive Director of Marshall University's Center for International Programs, the grant promotes international collaboration among universities. "This project, through the exchanges of faculty and students, will create long-lasting ties between Marshall University and institutions in Brazil," he said.

 

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 9, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

About 80 high school students to attend 'Fun With Science' at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 80 rising 9th grade students from southern West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 12-17 to participate in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for the participating students. It is offered in 26 West Virginia counties. The students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools.

The opening ceremony and kickoff dinner for the summer institute at Marshall, which is titled "Fun With Science," is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 12 in multipurpose room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center.

David Cartwright, program director for the event at Marshall, said a similar "Fun With Science" camp for rising 9th graders is taking place later this summer at Shepherd University.

"The 'Fun With Science' camp at Marshall University this year will expose the students to a style of learning that we find in college," Cartwright said. "It also will prepare the students for college life in some degree, and for classes similar to those they will take in their beginning years of high school."

Cartwright said "Fun With Science" will help students develop critical thinking skills and study skills that will help them as they advance through high school and college.

The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established in 1994 with 45 students from two counties.

The emphasis this year, Cartwright said, is on diabetes.

"West Virginia is the number three state for diabetes," he said. "Through 'Fun With Science,' we want to give these kids tools to not only help themselves, but their family members as well. They will learn what can be done to prevent diabetes and then have the knowledge to teach their family members what they have learned. 

For more information on the HSTA summer institute, contact Cartwright at 304-696-6024.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 8, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Monica Brooks appointed Assistant VP for Information Technology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monica Brooks, MUOnline Director of Instructional Design Skills and Assessment at Marshall University since March 2008, has been appointed Assistant Vice President for Information Technology: Online Learning and Libraries at MU.

In her new role, which took effect July 1, Brooks continues to head up the MUOnline e-course division and is adding several library departments to her new duties.

Brooks has held various positions at Marshall University with an emphasis in libraries and technology since 1995. She provides regular campus faculty training and development opportunities as the current director of MUOnline and member of the library faculty. Recent projects include the development of an award-winning online certificate program and associate degree for library paraprofessionals with an emphasis on public library training and development at the Marshall Community & Technical College.

"Dr. Brooks has an enormous amount of enthusiasm, a tremendous work ethic and is very innovative," said Dr. Jan Fox, Senior Vice President for Information Technology/CIO at Marshall. "Her professional background in libraries, online instruction and higher education gives her some unique qualifications for her new role."

Brooks' ongoing service initiatives include 2007-09 faculty representative for the Institutional Board of Governors, founding board member for the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia, member of the president's ad-hoc committee to recruit and retain diverse faculty, and ongoing participant in university-wide recruitment and retention efforts.

"It is truly a pleasure to work with some of the most accomplished librarians and staff in the profession," Brooks said. "Marshall University is poised to meet rapid technology changes and anticipate new trends.  There are also several aspects of the online learning environment and the library world that complement each other to provide our students and faculty with quality curriculum support. The IT faculty and staff have already hit the ground running with some new programs and services, and I am delighted to be a part of this team again!"

Brooks served as interim dean of libraries at Marshall University from January 1999 to August 2000, and was the associate dean from August 2000 to March 2008 when she became the director of MUOnline. Since 1997, she has taught at Marshall University as an adjunct professor in various units such as the Marshall Community & Technical College, the College of Education and Human Services, and the Department of English.

Brooks received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from West Virginia University in 1988, her Master of Science in Library Science from the University of Kentucky in 1990, her Education Specialist degree from Marshall University in 2004, and her Doctor of Education degree from Marshall in 2007.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 7, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars alumni announce $75,000 greatest needs campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars alumni are announcing a $75,000 campaign to ensure the present and future quality and excellence of one of the nation's premier honors scholarship programs in higher education.

The campaign will benefit the Society of Yeager Scholars program at Marshall University, which includes student scholarships, tuition, room and board, computers and study abroad.

The purpose of the "Now More Than Ever Campaign for Yeager Scholars" is illustrated by its title. The campaign will enable the program to build upon its reputation as a leading undergraduate university honors scholarship and continue to attract students who want to take full and creative advantage of the outstanding educational opportunities it offers.

A formal presentation and update is planned for Oct. 30 as part of the 24th annual Society of Yeager Scholars Symposium dinner, which will be held at Marshall University.  All Yeager Scholars alumni are invited to celebrate the campaign and articulate the long-range vision of educational distinction that the Yeager Scholars program offers.

"This campaign is about today. But it is even more so about tomorrow and the day after. We have to think long-term for the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall," said Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim director of the Yeager Scholars program at Marshall University.

To maintain and build the quality of the program, the comprehensive goal of the campaign is to broaden the quality and accessibility of the Society of Yeager Scholars experience with increases in the operating funds of $75,000.

"I am constantly impressed by the students who come to Marshall through the Society of Yeager Scholars," LoCascio said. "Their talent, their curiosity, their motivations, their sense of teamwork, leadership and community are humbling. We want to continue to attract the most talented students based on their ability to do the work, not their ability to pay."

A Society of Yeager Scholars education should be financially accessible to any qualified student, LoCascio said, adding that the campaign will strengthen the society's ability to recruit "only the best" and brightest students, regardless of their financial circumstances.

"This campaign is about our commitment to quality," said Sharron Shaffer, chairman of the development committee of the Yeager board, adding that a campaign involves more than fundraising. "It's a way to reconnect our alumni with our program and Marshall University."

The Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University was founded in 1987. Today there are more than 200 Yeager Scholars alumni living and working in more than 25 states and in foreign countries. A substantial majority have gone on to graduate studies.  They are leaders in many professional fields including medicine, law, business, finance and science, government, politics, military and religion and education.

For more information on the campaign, contact Bob Galardi, director of major gifts with the Society of Yeager Scholars, at 800-438-5395.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 6, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Castleberry appointed associate dean of College of Fine Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As of July 1, Dr. David Castleberry has begun serving as associate dean for the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University. He succeeds Michael Cornfeld, who retired after 42 years in the art department at Marshall.

Castleberry is also professor of music and director of choral activities at Marshall. Born and raised in Charleston, S.C., he received his Bachelor of Music degree from Furman University and his Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from The University of Texas at Austin. He has taught on the faculties of Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., and Wagner College on Staten Island, N.Y., during which time he directed the Riverside Choral Society and served as chorus master for the Piccolo Opera Company in Brooklyn.

Castleberry is a recipient of fellowships to the Aspen Choral Institute and the Chorus America Saranac Lake Conductors Workshop and participated in a residence at Les Academies Musicales de Saintes in France.

A recipient of the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award at Marshall, Castleberry has led choral performances throughout the United States and in Europe and has been featured in television and radio broadcasts, recordings, and appearances for the American Choral Directors Association and the West Virginia Music Educators Association, as well as 11 years of performances at Charleston, S.C.'s Piccolo Spoleto Festival. With the Marshall University Choral Union and Orchestra, he has led performances of more than 50 major choral-orchestral works.

He serves currently as Southern Division President of the American Choral Directors Association and chaired the 2008 convention in Louisville, Ky.

 "David Castleberry has been at Marshall for many years and he is highly regarded and respected as a faculty member and as an artist/performer by everyone associated with Marshall," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts. "David is a consummate faculty member and has distinguished himself as a teacher, mentor, scholar and artist, and constructive colleague. He has been a leader in the Department of Music for many years and people trust him."

"I feel fortunate to have worked with such talented and supportive colleagues and students at Marshall University," Castleberry said. "My work during the past 19 years has been a joy. The chance to continue these associations not only with music, but also with our programs in art and theatre, is truly exciting. I am grateful to Dean Van Horn for this chance and am humbled by the high standard that my predecessor, Michael Cornfeld, has set for this position."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 6, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Marshall University researcher receives grant to conduct pioneering research in developmental genetics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An associate professor of biological sciences at Marshall University has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the role of genes in controlling animal development.

Dr. Simon Collier's grant is from the NSF's Developmental Systems Program. He will use the $418,000 award to study the genetic control of the basic developmental processes of the fruit fly (Drosophila). Drosophila genetics has been studied for more than 100 years because the organism has many genes and genetic pathways similar to humans.

Collier's research, formally titled "Polarizing A Cell Layer Along Two Axes," has medical significance for the professor, who has a joint appointment in biochemistry and microbiology at the College of Science and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University. He will be studying the genetic control of planar cell polarity - the way cells face within a cell layer.

"Imagine a cell layer like a crowd of people. Usually the cells face in a common direction like a crowd at a concert. We study the genetic mechanisms that align cells in a common direction," Collier explained. "Recently some cases of familial spina bifida (a failure of neural tube closure) have been shown to be due to mutations in a gene first identified as a 'planar cell polarity gene' in the fruit fly. Neural tube closure requires the movement of a cell layer in a specific direction to cover the neural tube. It appears that cells need to be facing in a common direction for the cell layer to move in the right direction."

Collier's research was funded on first submission to the NSF. His lab is considered a pioneer in this research area.

"In previous studies, researchers have looked at how cells are aligned in a single direction, along one axis of the cell layer. My research is beginning to help us understand how cells can be aligned along two axes, in two dimensions," Collier said.

The correct control of planar cell polarity is also vital for many other developmental events in humans including formation of the gut, elongation of the body axis, axon guidance, neural crest migration, cardiovascular development, kidney development (loss of planar cell polarity produces polycystic kidneys), eye lens morphology and patterning of the inner ear and skin.

Collier came to Marshall University in 2003. He earned his Ph.D. in medical genetics from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, did postdoctoral research in developmental genetics at both the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and the University of Virginia, and served as a guest lecturer in biological sciences at the University of Manchester.

His research start-up at Marshall University was funded by West Virginia's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), a National Science Foundation program that coordinates scientific research grants to academic institutions from federal and state agencies.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 6, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Outreach and continuing studies focus of new position at Marshall University

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Dr. Rudy Pauley has been named Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies at Marshall University.

Pauley, formerly interim dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, is responsible for developing a strategic plan for outreach activities and extended education opportunities for the university, according to Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs.

"Though new in name, the responsibilities of the associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies are very much a normal part of Marshall University's daily function and educational mission," Ormiston said. "Dr. Pauley brings a broad array of experience in adult education, community outreach, and a special interest in distance learning and adult education."

The new position will be housed within the Office of Academic Affairs and replaces Marshall's long-standing position of dean of the School of Extended Education. Pauley will operate from both the Huntington and South Charleston campuses.

Pauley will oversee all aspects and activities of the university's extended educational opportunities and regional centers including the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, Teays Valley Regional Center, Marshall's activities at the Erma C. Byrd Higher Education Center in Raleigh County, and the South Charleston Campus. He also will handle the Regents Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Applied Science degree programs and all Marshall course offerings in high schools.

Pauley has served as a faculty member and administrator at Marshall University for 12 years. His doctorate is in Higher Education Administration and his special areas of interest and research include distance education, teacher certification and adult education.

"I am excited about the opportunity to move into the area of outreach and continuing studies for Marshall University," Pauley said. "I truly believe in providing exceptional educational opportunities for adult learners through a variety of venues across the state and region."


Direct Link to This Release