FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 25, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Houchin, Stringer to read from their work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poets Ron Houchin and A. E. Stringer will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3 in Room 2W16 of the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The reading marks the American release of Houchin's Museum Crows and Stringer's Human Costume, both recently published by Salmon Poetry of Ireland.  The event is also a celebration of the Marshall Visiting Writers Series' Twentieth Anniversary.

Stringer is professor of English at Marshall University and the author of two poetry collections.  His work has appeared in such journals as The Nation, Shenandoah, Poetry Northwest, Prairie Schooner, and Denver Quarterly, as well as in the anthology Backcountry: Contemporary Writing in West Virginia.

Stringer recently edited and introduced a new edition of Louise McNeill's classic Appalachian poetry book Paradox Hill (West Virginia University Press, 2009).  He has traveled to read his work in a wide range of American locales and also in Galway, Ireland.  For the past 20 years, Stringer has taught writing and literature at Marshall, where he coordinates the Visiting Writers Series.

A Huntington native, Houchin is the author of five books of poetry.  His work has appeared in Poetry Ireland Review, The Southwest Review, Poetry Northwest, Appalachian Heritage, The New Orleans Review, and many others. He has been awarded an Ohio Arts Council Grant for teachers of the arts, and his collection Among Wordless Things received the 2005 Book of the Year Award from the Appalachian Writers' Association.

Houchin was a featured writer at the Dublin Writers Festival in 2001 and has read his work internationally in locales as diverse as Key West and the Czech Republic.  He taught writing and literature at Fairland High School for 30 years.

Their appearance is sponsored by Salmon Poetry of Ireland and NSI Productions.

For more information, contact Stringer at 304-696-2403.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mary and Churchill Hodges to receive honorary doctoral degrees during Marshall University's 2009 Winter Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges, lifelong Huntington residents and long-standing supporters of Marshall University, will receive honorary doctoral degrees Saturday, Dec. 5 during Marshall's 2009 Winter Commencement.

Commencement begins at 1 p.m. at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Churchill Hodges will receive a Doctor of Science degree and Mary Hodges will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the Hodges are special friends of the university.

"Marshall University students have benefited for many years from the dedication, generosity and community leadership of Mary and Churchill Hodges," Kopp said. "Mention their first names and everyone at Marshall knows who you are talking about. They are a very special couple who have touched the lives and futures of many Marshall students over the years. Words cannot express how grateful we are to Mary and Churchill for the loyalty, benevolence and devotion they've shown to Marshall University." 

Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, said the Hodges were the first couple he met when he came to Marshall in 2007. That first impression, Area said, was a lasting one.

"Mary and Churchill are very significant donors to the university," he said. "They help out across the university - the library, fine arts, the College of Business, athletics ... they are everywhere. And they are always saying, 'How can we help more?' They epitomize what major donors can and should do for the university."

Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said the Hodges have a long-standing commitment to the College of Fine Arts and their generosity extends to programs throughout the university.

"The Hodges have spent their lives in Huntington making it a better community in which to live and helping position Marshall University as an institution ready to respond to the need of its students and faculty," Van Horn said. "Their collective vision for a better tomorrow guides their own lives and how they use their time and resources to benefit those around them."

Churchill Hodges is a two-time graduate of Marshall, earning an A.B. in chemistry in 1948 and a master's in geography in 1953. He also received a National Science Foundation Academic Year Institute Scholarship at The Ohio State University in 1957-58.

Mary Hodges started at Marshall in 1950 before leaving school in favor of a job. "Times were tough," she says today. "I couldn't finish and there were few scholarships. So, I went to work."

Both Churchill and Mary grew up in Huntington. He attended the Marshall Lab School before transferring to the Kentucky Military Institute (KMI) in the 10th grade, and she attended Cammack Junior High and graduated from Huntington High.

Churchill spent 35 years as an educator in Cabell County, teaching biology at Huntington East High School for five years before attending Ohio State for a year. He then began serving as Cabell County's first Supervisor of Science and Mathematics. Most of his career in Cabell County Schools was spent as Supervisor of Science and Director of Purchasing. He also coached tennis at Marshall from 1949 through 1953.

He grew to love Marshall University - then Marshall College - at a very young age. In fact, he remembers well a big football game in 1937 in which the Big Green won at Dayton, 7-0, to remain undefeated. Churchill was there.

"Bob Adkins from Point Pleasant ran the ball 70 yards and scored a touchdown on a soggy field," he said.

Churchill attended many athletic and theatre events at Marshall, even as a child. He recalls Marshall students living in his home often took him with them to events on campus.

"That made me love Marshall, even as a little boy," he said. "I developed a love for Marshall from the people that stayed with us."

One of his classmates in the first grade at the Marshall Lab School was Charlie Kautz, a lifelong friend who was Marshall's athletic director in 1970 and died in the Marshall plane crash on Nov. 14 of that year. Rick Tolley, head coach of the 1970 squad and one of the 75 plane crash victims, and his wife, Mary Jane, were next-door neighbors of Mary at the time of the crash. The Hodges endowed scholarships in honor of Rick Tolley and Charlie Kautz.

Mary worked for AAA Travel Services for 21 years, serving as director of domestic travel for many of those years. She has been active with the Huntington Museum of Art, the United Way of Huntington, the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Meriwether Society. She was president of the National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in West Virginia. 

Mary is a member of the Marshall Library Associates and the newly formed College of Fine Arts Dean's Council. 

Mary retired from AAA in 1975 when she and Churchill married.

"He told me, 'I don't want you to work. We're going to be too busy,' " Mary said.

Churchill is past president of the Huntington Museum of Art and the Huntington YMCA. He also serves on the board of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and the Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation. He received the Drinko Distinguished Service Award in 2004.

Mary and Churchill have traveled worldwide, visiting every continent. Through all of their activities, they have continued to support Marshall University in a major way.

"It's part of us," Churchill said. "It's an important part of our social life. We're fortunate to be in a university town; we appreciate all the things it offers us."

Mary concurred with her husband.

"We're lucky to have Marshall University in Huntington. It really has flourished," she said of the university. "We like the sports and the plays and the scholarships are special because they weren't available to me."

The Hodges' generosity has supported many areas, including athletic and academic scholarships, the J. Churchill Hodges Summer Science Scholars, Marshall Libraries, the Geography Department GIS Laboratory, the President's Home and the Erickson Alumni Center. Their contributions to science were honored with the naming of the Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges Biotechnology Capstone Research Laboratory in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

The Hodges also enjoy supporting the Marching Thunder. Churchill was the drum major at Kentucky Military Institute, where he spent three years before graduating. KMI campuses were located near Louisville, Ky., and in Venice, Fla.

"It's nice that we can give to things that we are particularly interested in," Churchill said.

Including the Hodges, the total number of honorary degree recipients at Marshall University is 165. The first two recipients were Dwight Whitney Morrow and Guy Fielding Yost, both of whom received the Doctor of Laws degrees in 1928.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nearly 1,200 students to graduate from Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 1,200 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, Dec. 5 when the university celebrates its 2009 Winter Commencement at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus. The ceremony begins at 1 p.m.

Among the 1,179 students receiving degrees are 665 undergraduates, 513 graduates and one from the School of Medicine.

The Winter Commencement will honor graduates from July and August 2009, and tentative December 2009 graduates. It will be Marshall's first Winter Commencement since 1945. Marshall conducted a December Convocation in 2008.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 159 students will graduate with honors. Eighteen will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 46 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 89 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and five associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

"Last year's convocation was a tremendous success, prompting us to take the event a step further this year with a full commencement ceremony for these deserving graduates," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We look forward to this special day and to celebrating with family and friends the impressive achievements of each of our graduates."

Graduates will be recognized individually at the Winter Commencement. They will walk to the area in front of the stage, where their names will be announced, and they will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during Winter Commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages, three students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are Bryon Douglas Collier of Huntington, Jared Michael Lawson of Scott Depot, W.Va., and Lyndsey June Roush of New Haven, W.Va.

Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges will receive honorary doctoral degrees during the ceremony. They are lifelong Huntington residents and longtime major supporters of Marshall University. Mary Hodges will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree while Churchill Hodges will receive an Honorary Doctor of Science degree.

Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science and member of Marshall University's faculty for 48 years, will deliver the keynote address.


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Wednesday November 25, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

H1N1 informational meeting set for Nov. 30 at Marshall University

The Cabell-Huntington Health Department will have an H1N1 informational meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus in preparation for H1N1 clinics scheduled Dec. 1-2 at MU.

The focus of the informational meeting will be on the distribution of the H1N1 vaccine. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask public health officials questions about the H1N1 flu and the H1N1 vaccine.

The Cabell-Huntington Health Department Panel will include Dr. Harry Tweel, physician director; Kathleen Napier, nursing director; and Elizabeth Ayers, public information officer. The meeting is open to anyone who would like more information about the H1N1 flu.

 

The health department will conduct H1N1 clinics for high-risk individuals who live or work in Cabell County or the City of Huntington Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University.

 

The clinics will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 1-2, at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. High-risk individuals for H1N1 include:

  • Pregnant women and nursing mothers
  • People who live with or care for children under 6 months of age
  • Children and adults, 6 months to 24 years of age
  • Adults 24 to 64 years of age who have chronic health conditions (Chronic heart or lung disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease, anemia, neurologic/neuromuscular, immunosuppression caused by  HIV or medication, cancer, leukemia or other blood disorders (not including high blood pressure)
  • Health care workers who provide direct patient care with acutely ill patients.

Adults must show proof of age.  Both mist and injectable forms of the vaccine are available.

 

For those taking an antibiotic, the health department asks that they wait until they have completed the antibiotic before getting the H1N1 vaccine.  They should not get an H1N1 vaccine if they have been on Tamiflu or other anti-viral in the 48 hours leading up to the clinic.

 

No appointment is necessary for these free clinics.  There is no fee for the H1N1 flu vaccine.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 20, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU History professor emeritus publishes World War I Almanac

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. David R. Woodward, History professor emeritus at Marshall University, has published World War I Almanac, a volume in Facts On File's Almanacs of American Wars series.

Facts On File asked Woodward, an international authority on WWI, to undertake this detailed, day-by-day chronology of the events and people involved in the war.  He examines all theaters in this global conflict, from the Middle East to the Balkans to German East Africa, paying particular attention to America's involvement in the war.

Unlike many accounts of WWI, the almanac does not end with the Armistice.  Rather it continues through July of 1923 with the Treaty of Lausanne, the last peace treaty of the Great War.  Also unlike other accounts, it sets the stage for the clash of nations beginning with the creation of Germany's Second Reich which destroyed the old European equilibrium in 1871.

The work includes maps, some 100 illustrations, a glossary, notes and an extensive bibliography so that it is useful and readable for the scholar and the armchair history enthusiast. The book has headings and dates that the reader can cross reference, making it possible to follow a particular topic whether it is the role of the U.S. military, intervention in Russia, the air war, the Italian front, the Paris Peace Conference, or some other aspect of the war and its immediate aftermath. 

Woodward, who gives credit to the staff at the Drinko and Morrow libraries for their assistance on this project, taught in the MU History Department from 1970 until his retirement in 2006. The book is his eighth on subjects pertaining to the political, diplomatic and military history of World War I.  Some titles include Hell in the Holy Land:  World War I in the Middle East, Lloyd George and the Generals and Trial by Friendship:  Anglo-American Relations 1917-1918.  He is currently working on several articles for The Encyclopedia of War, edited by Gordon Martel, which will be published by Blackwell Publishing, Ltd.

For more information, contact Woodward at 304-525-7404 or via e-mail at woodwadr@marshall.edu.


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Thursday November 19, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Simon Perry to deliver keynote address at Marshall University's 2009 Winter Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science and member of Marshall University's faculty for 48 years, will deliver the keynote address at Marshall's 2009 Winter Commencement.

Commencement is set to begin at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5 at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Perry, a native of Gilbert, W.Va., said he plans to speak on "Going Out Into The World."

"I am, of course, very honored to be speaking at Winter Commencement and I am looking forward to it," Perry said. "I've got to really try to develop some words of interest for the audience that will be there."

Perry is the longest serving member of the Marshall faculty. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Michigan State University in 1961 and came to Marshall from the University of Michigan in 1962. He currently is a full professor in the department after having been chair for many years.

Perry has received many awards in his long and distinguished career, beginning with the Leonard D. White Award for the Best Dissertation in Public Administration (presented by the American Political Science Association) in 1962.

He also has received the Marshall Distinguished Service Award (1989-90), was the first Drinko Fellow (1994-95) and was the John Deaver Drinko Distinguished Fellow (1998). He won the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher Award (2001, 2004) and was named a Distinguished West Virginian (presented by Gov. Arch Moore in 1988 and Gov.  Joe Manchin in 2007).

In spring 2007, Perry was selected as one of five "Living Legends" (by alumni, colleagues and current students) in Marshall Magazine.

Perry's interests lie at the intersection of theory, history, and the empirical in American politics. He is especially interested in pivotal moments in American history, such as the founding, the tenure of John Marshall, and the Civil War. His book, Morality, Self-Interest, and the Cities, was published in 1997 by the John Deaver Drinko Academy.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 19, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

H1N1 clinics scheduled Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Cabell-Huntington Health Department will conduct H1N1 clinics for high-risk individuals who live or work in Cabell County or the City of Huntington Dec. 1-2 at Marshall University.

The clinics will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 1-2, at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. High-risk individuals for N1N1 include:

  • Pregnant women and nursing mothers
  • People who live with or care for children under 6 months of age
  • Children and adults, 6 months to 24 years of age
  • Adults 24 to 64 years of age who have chronic health conditions (Chronic heart or lung disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease, anemia, neurologic/neuromuscular, immunosuppression caused by  HIV or medication, cancer, leukemia or other blood disorders (not including high blood pressure)
  • Health care workers who provide direct patient care with acutely ill patients.

Adults must show proof of age.  Both mist and injectable forms of the vaccine are available.

For those taking an antibiotic, the health department asks that they wait until they have completed the antibiotic before getting the H1N1 vaccine.  They should not get an H1N1 vaccine if they have been on Tamiflu or other anti-viral in the 48 hours leading up to the clinic.

Children who are brought to these clinics by someone other than their parent or legal guardian must have a signed permission statement from the parent or legal guardian allowing the children to be vaccinated.

No appointment is necessary for these free clinics.  There is NO fee for the H1N1 flu vaccine.

Future clinics will be planned as vaccine becomes available to include the general population.  For information about when clinics will be scheduled, continue to check the Flu Information Hotline at 304-526-3397 or visit the health department online at www.cabellhealth.org.


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Wednesday November 18, 2009
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall faculty awarded $3 million in federal stimulus funds for biomedical research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded five grants totaling $3 million to faculty members at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. The grants, awarded competitively through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, will support biomedical research and workforce development programs.

Four of the funded projects are associated with the West Virginia-IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE).

According to Dr. Gary Rankin, chairman of the university's Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology and WV-INBRE principal investigator, the awards will further the network's efforts to build biomedical research infrastructure, develop research programs at the state's undergraduate institutions, provide student research opportunities and train the state's high-tech work force.

"These awards will allow more students and faculty members from the state's undergraduate institutions, as well as high school science educators, to participate in biomedical research projects and gain valuable skills and experience," Rankin said. "In addition, two new research projects have been funded that will tackle problems in cancer and cardiovascular disease that could benefit West Virginians and all individuals. We are excited about the opportunities these awards have created and are grateful to our congressional delegation for their continuing support of research at Marshall."

The WV-INBRE projects include:

Identification of Potential Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease

A grant of $529,000 will fund a project led by Dr. Nalini Santanam, associate professor of pharmacology, to discover biomarkers that could help identify people predisposed to heart disease.

If the research is successful, it could lead to non-invasive testing to predict who might be at risk of having a heart attack and allow for preventive treatment.

Dr. Ken Cushman of West Liberty University is a collaborator on the project. 

Prevention of Kidney Damage Caused By Anticancer Drug

Dr. Monica Valentovic, professor of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology, will use a $651,000 award to further her lab's efforts to evaluate methods for reducing the side effects of the widely used cancer chemotherapy drug cisplatin.

Dr. Elaine Hardman, associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology, and Dr. Tim Troyer of West Virginia Wesleyan College are collaborators on the project.

Summer Research Experiences for Students and Science Educators

A two-year $751,000 grant is supporting summer research interns at Marshall, West Virginia University (WVU) and the state's undergraduate institutions. In addition, faculty from the undergraduate institutions and high school science teachers are involved in biomedical research projects, including cardiovascular disease and cancer summer research programs, on the Marshall and WVU campuses.

Research Workforce Development and Dissemination

In a complementary effort to encourage students to choose a career in biomedical research, a $590,000 grant will fund a two-year program to pay undergraduate students and high school science teachers to work on WV-INBRE-funded projects in campus labs. The students will be graduates of the Health Science Technology Academy (HSTA) program funded by NIH for minority and other underserved high school students, while the teachers will work with HSTA students at their local high schools

The funds will support students working on research projects in undergraduate institution labs during the academic year and high school science teachers working in Marshall, WVU and undergraduate labs during the summer.

The fifth grant, for a project called "Transcription Factors in Cancer," supplements existing funding for Marshall's NIH-funded Center of Biomedical Research Excellence, which emphasizes research related to melanoma, reproductive/endocrine cancers and the role of nutrition in cancer.

The $490,000 award will be used to help set up a network between Marshall and West Virginia University's Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center to help researchers study the genetic makeup of donated tumor material. Researchers hope to use the information collected through the network to create more customized prognoses and cancer treatments.

Dr. Richard Niles, chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, is the principal investigator. 

"The goal of the cancer genomics network is to use the power of new sequencing technology to uncover changes in the composition or expression of genes that might predict the future behavior of a particular tumor, or predict the tumor's susceptibility to specific types of therapy," Niles said. "These technologies are part of the development of personalized medicine and I am excited that we will be able to contribute to these advancements here in the state of West Virginia."


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Tuesday November 17, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Adopt a Jesus' documentary to be shown at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local filmmaker Bob Wilkinson and producer Charessa Wilkinson, a 2001 graduate of Marshall University, will bring their documentary film, "Adopt a Jesus," to Marshall's Huntington campus for a special showing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 1, in Smith Hall 154.

The film focuses on Brandt Russo, a young minister from Louisiana who quit his job, sold all his earthly goods and dedicated his life to helping the homeless and ministering to the poor.  Russo travels the country in a bus powered by cooking oil and emblazoned with the slogan, "Can't Ignore the Poor."  He gathers food, advocates for the homeless and hungry and often irritates local church authorities and law enforcement in his efforts to follow the path of the apostles. 

"Adopt a Jesus" raises challenging questions about the place of the homeless and disadvantaged in society and about the Christian response to their plight. Bob Wilkinson traveled with Russo for 14 days on his bus, following his journey, interviewing the people he encountered, learning about his philosophy and documenting his message, his unorthodox ministry and the mixed reactions of locals to Russo's presence in their communities.

Bob Wilkinson is a producer and editor at West Virginia Public Broadcasting.  He has produced several previous documentaries including, "Rounding Third," a history of minor league ballpark Watt Powell Park; "John Brown's Body," a look at the lasting legacy of John Brown's raid in Harpers Ferry; and "hom'sted," a history of the homestead movement in West Virginia and those left out of the New Deal initiative.  Charessa Wilkinson earned an M.A. in Communication Studies in 2001 and has since worked as a producer, promoter, and event coordinator.

Bob Wilkinson, Charessa Wilkinson and Russo will attend the screening on campus and discuss their work with the audience following the screening.  Attendance is free and open to the public.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Communication Studies.  For further information, contact Dr. Robert Bookwalter at 304-696-2815 or bookwalt@marshall.edu.


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Monday November 16, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bottoms' scheduled appearance at Museum of Art postponed

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The scheduled appearance Tuesday, Nov. 17 of Georgia Poet Laureate David Bottoms at the Huntington Museum of Art has been postponed.

 

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, said hopefully Bottoms' visit will be rescheduled during the spring semester. His appearance at the Museum of Art is a featured presentation of the Visiting Writers Series, which is sponsored by Marshall University's English Department and College of Liberal Arts.

 

For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday November 13, 2009
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Marshall cafeterias going without trays for a few days

Experiment expected to lessen university's environmental impact on community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's cafeterias are going trayless for a few days to promote more environmentally responsible choices for students, faculty and staff during mealtimes.

Margie Phillips, sustainability manager for the university, is asking students to not use trays from Nov. 15 through 17 in Twin Towers Cafeteria and Harless Dining Hall in recognition of West Virginia Recycles Day. Diners will be asked to make their food choices without trays as an experiment to reduce food waste, lower energy costs, and make the Huntington campus more environmentally sustainable. 

"The reasoning behind going trayless is that when a student uses a tray, he or she walks around the cafeteria, putting food on the tray until space runs out," Phillips explained. "If they don't use trays, they make their selections more carefully and are generally more satisfied with their choices, which results in less food waste. No trays mean dishwashers have fewer dishes to wash, and that saves on water and energy."

Many colleges and universities across the country have actually eliminated the cafeteria tray from their food service offerings. The University of California at Santa Cruz and Virginia Tech are examples of two that don't offer a tray at the entrance of their cafeterias and the move is greatly reducing their environmental impact, Phillips explained.

"Dining facilities are one area in which we can work to lessen our environmental impact at Marshall," Phillips said. "Generally speaking, cafeterias use five times more water, five times more energy and produce five times more waste than residence halls alone. Our students can give up the cafeteria tray and make a huge difference in the impact it has on our community."

The idea to go trayless stems from the work of Residence Services, Sodexo and Marshall University's new Sustainability Department.


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Thursday November 12, 2009
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dot Hicks makes gift to create faculty award endowment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Retired Marshall University professor Dr. Dorothy E. "Dot" Hicks has made a gift to create a faculty award endowment in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS), the college announced today.

The fund will support the renamed Dr. Dorothy "Dot" Hicks Annual Award for Teaching Excellence. Current, full time, tenured faculty in the COEHS are eligible to apply for this yearly recognition and $500 award stipend.

The award originally was established in 2006 by Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, dean of the College of Education and Human Services. Templeton also established awards in the areas of research and service.

Hicks retired as a faculty member from the Division of Exercise Science Sports and Recreation, formerly Health, Physical Education and Recreation (currently School of Kinesiology), after 30 years of service (1969-1999). Her academic service included being a professor of education and coordinator of clinical supervision of teachers.

While at Marshall she also coached women's golf, tennis, badminton and volleyball. Hicks also served as chairperson of the women's physical education department. She helped develop the women's intercollegiate athletic program and served as an associate athletic director. She also was faculty representative for the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and for the Southern Conference, of which Marshall University is a former member.

Hicks also has received the alumni association's honorary alumnus award, the university's Distinguished Service Award and the COEHS Distinguished Education and Human Service Award.  She is a member of the Marshall University Athletic Hall of Fame

Before coming to Marshall University, Hicks taught at DuPont High School, Central Middle School, and East Tennessee State University. She holds B.S. and M.A. degrees from Peabody College and a Doctor of Education from the University of Tennessee, and has done other advanced work at the University of Pittsburgh.

Hicks is recognized as a benefactor to Marshall University as a member of the President's Circle, the John Marshall Society and the Heritage Society. She established the Dorothy Hicks Physical Education Scholarship, the Dorothy Hicks Athletic Graduate Scholarship and the Dorothy Hicks Lady Herd Athlete of the Year Award.

"Dr. Hicks is definitely a role model for the College, Marshall University, and its faculty," Templeton said. "Her teaching expertise, commitment to students, and generous giving of her time to help individuals succeed shows that she is truly deserving of the award for teacher excellence to be named in her honor." 

Anyone wishing to contribute to COEHS endowments, programs and services is encouraged to contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development for the College of Education and Human Services, at 304-696-7081 or via e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday November 10, 2009
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Dean of College of Fine Arts recognized by regional academic art group

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University since 1995, received the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) Presidential Award for Exemplary Achievement at the organization's annual conference Oct. 24.

"I am humbled by the President's Award from SECAC," Van Horn said. "When I served as president, I was privileged to make a number of those awards myself, and I am not sure I belong in the same league as those I was fortunate enough to be able to recognize.  Nonetheless, it is an honor to have been presented the award and it comes from an organization that serves the visual arts in higher education, which is an important cause."

The award, considered the organization's most prestigious, reflects Van Horn's personal and professional development, his contributions to his university and local communities as well as long-standing service to SECAC. According to officials of the organization, Van Horn's many contributions include his tenure as editor of the SECAC Review, his role as conference chair in 2007, editing an issue of the Southeastern College Art Conference Review, his service as the chair of the artist fellowship committee, his commitment to moving SECAC to a year-round organization, and his service as first vice president and president from 2004 to 2008.

Van Horn's commitment to the arts is well known in West Virginia and particularly Huntington, where he was named the recipient of The Herald-Dispatch Award for the Arts in 2006 for his "steady vision and vibrant outreach with the community." Van Horn was nominated for that award by a wide breadth of community members thanking him for his tireless work on campus and with the Huntington Museum of Art, the Snowshoe Institute for the Arts, the Governor's School for the Arts, the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center and other endeavors.

SECAC facilitates cooperation and fosters ongoing dialogue about pertinent creative, scholarly and educational issues between teacher and administrators in universities, colleges, community colleges, professional art schools, and museums. Although the organization represents the 12 states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia, members are located across the United States and abroad.

SECAC fulfills its purpose in part by sponsoring an annual fall conference, hosted by an institution of higher learning. The conference provides members with a forum for the exchange of ideas and concerns relevant to the practice and study of art. The organization also publishes a newsletter and the scholarly, peer-reviewed journal, The Southeastern College Art Conference Review.


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WMUL-FM receives first-place Podcast Best of Show award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received a first-place Podcast Best of Show award at the 88th Annual National College Media Convention/2009 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) Annual College Competition ceremony.

The ceremony took place Sunday, Nov. 1 in the Austin Grand Ballroom, Austin Hilton Hotel and Convention Center in Austin, Texas.

The award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was a regular 30-minute edition of a sports program that airs Friday and Saturday during Marshall University football weekends. The winning entry was "Herd Roundup," broadcast the first time Friday, Oct. 23, 2009.

The students who participated in this edition of "Herd Roundup" were: host Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery, W. Va.; host Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans, W.Va.; reporter Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, W.Va.; and reporter Dave Traube, a senior from Beckley, W.Va.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the campus radio station competed with other media outlets with online Web sites from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the 88th Annual National College Media Convention.       

The Best of Show competition is open only to publications and media outlets that send student delegates to the national convention.

"This is an honor for WMUL-FM and all the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications students featured on the Best of Show winning entry," Bailey said. "Winning first place for the third time in this relatively new realm of media speaks well for Marshall University as it demonstrates that its students are working with new technologies which will help prepare them for the changing digital media landscape."


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75 crash victims to be remembered on 39th anniversary of tragedy



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Student Government Association will conduct the annual memorial service honoring the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash at noon Saturday, Nov. 14 on the Huntington campus.

This year's service, on the 39th anniversary of the crash, will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Marshall's next football game, a home encounter with Southern Mississippi, kicks off at 4:30 p.m. that same day.

The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970 occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five.

"Even though it has been 39 years since the tragic crash, the students at Marshall University are well aware of what a tremendous loss the university and the community suffered on November 14th, 1970," said Sean Hornbuckle, president of Marshall's student body. "It is our duty and our honor to remember the victims each year on November 14th and we are proud to do so again this year. Once again, the memories of those who died will resurface and the sad story of their loss retold as we conduct this important memorial service."

Joe Gillette, a 1973 Marshall graduate now living in Atlanta, will be the keynote speaker. Gillette was a freshman in 1969 and would have been a member of the 1970 team had he not suffered a severe shoulder injury in the summer of '69. He tried to rehabilitate the shoulder during winter conditioning, but later realized during spring practice in 1970 that he could not take the contact.

"I found out pretty quick during spring ball that I could not take a sustained hit on that shoulder," Gillette said. "So, I quit the team in March or April, then in November just a few months later the plane crashed."

Gillette said it took him many years to be able to talk about the crash, even to his own family.

"The movie, 'We Are Marshall,' and the time since the movie has allowed me to heal and to be able to talk about my experience on the team and staying at Marshall after the crash," he said. "It is a distinct honor for me to be able to finally speak openly about how I feel about all the kids and coaches that perished."

Gillette and his wife, Pam, have supported Marshall for many years. In addition to generous financial support, Joe Gillette has provided dedicated leadership by serving on many boards of directors, including the Society of Yeager Scholars, the MU Alumni Association, and the Marshall Foundation and as president of the Thunder Club. He currently is president of the Society of Yeager Scholars board of directors and vice president of the Foundation board of directors.

Last spring, Gillette received the Distinguished Alumni Award during the Marshall University Alumni Weekend 2009 activities.

In addition to Hornbuckle and Gillette, other speakers at the memorial service include Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall Athletic Director Mike Hamrick, Marshall Alumni Association President Nancy Campbell, Student Body Vice President Lashawna Sampson and Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs.

The service will conclude with the traditional placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.


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MU Chamber Choir to present concert Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will appear in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov.15, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

The Chamber Choir is a select, thirty-two voice touring ensemble, performing works that span the past five centuries. Last spring, the choir gave nine concerts in six days as part of a tour to the Washington, D.C., area and was received with standing ovations at each stop. This fall's performance will feature a cappella works by Palestrina, Purcell, Bruckner and Stanford, in addition to selections from J.S. Bach's Magnificat and Ralph Vaughan Williams' "Lord, Thou Hast Been Our Refuge." 

"I'm very excited about this concert," Castleberry said. "The singers are enthused about the music we are performing and they have done wonderful work preparing some very challenging selections."

For further information about concerts presented by the Department of Music at Marshall University, contact the music office at 304-696-3117 or visit the Web site at www.marshall.edu/cofa/music .


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Friday November 6, 2009
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'Up Late' host learns to cook from famous star chef

Jamie Oliver shares secrets to healthy food on Marshall University student show

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Television food star Jamie Oliver challenged host Jamie LoFiego to make a healthy stir fry as part of this week's "Up Late" show.

Oliver's next prime time series for ABC, "Jamie Oliver Project," is being taped in Huntington. Oliver hopes to teach residents in Huntington and viewers of his show a healthier way to prepare food and how to cook with fresh ingredients. Lofiego prepares the dish during "Up Late" with only a few mishaps and minor injuries.

"If I can do it, anyone can," LoFiego said about his adventures in cooking. At the end of the segment, LoFiego had his photo made with the dish to help Oliver win a bet with area radio DJ Rod from the Dawg Radio Station that he could get 1,000 people to try this meal and e-mail him a picture of it.

The recipe can be found at www.jamieoliver.com/news/jamie-s-huntington-1000.

"Up Late" will air at 1 a.m. Sunday following "Saturday Night Live" on WSAZ-3 and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The award-winning show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.

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Photo: TV chef Jamie Oliver (left) shows "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego how to make a stir fry.


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WMUL students receive five CBI awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received one first-place award and four finalist awards in the 88th Annual National College Media Convention/2009 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony.

The event took place Friday, Oct. 30 at the Hilton Austin Hotel and Convention Center in Austin, Texas.

Marshall's students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States, according to Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

He said the contest, in its eighth year, is sponsored by the CBI, which administers the contest in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

"I am proud of our broadcasting students who continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be outstanding representatives for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities," Bailey said.

WMUL's first-place award winning entry was:

Best Radio News Reporting 

"Whitewater Release," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery. It was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2008.
 

WMUL's finalist award-winning entries were:

Best Documentary

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009. 
 

Best Radio Promo

"Cutting Stuff," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008 through the present time, written and produced by Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.
 

Best Radio Technical Production

"Marshall vs. UCF Homecoming Game Tease and Intro," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. It was broadcast Saturday, Nov. 10, 2008.
 

Best Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Houston football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2008.  The students calling the game were play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; color commentator Adam Cavalier; sideline reporter Deven Swartz; and engineer Tony Viola, a sophomore from Follansbee.
 

A total of 443 entries were submitted for judging in the 2009 CBI National Student Production Awards.


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Marshall University faculty jazz ensemble to perform at Culture Center Tuesday

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Division of Culture and History will kick off this season's Collegiate Series with a concert by Bluetrane, Marshall University's faculty jazz ensemble, at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10. The program, which will take place in the Norman L. Fagan West Virginia State Theater at the Culture Center in the State Capitol Complex in Charleston, is free and open to the public.

Bluetrane features Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies, on saxophone; Steve Hall, professor of percussion and director of the Percussion Ensemble and the African Drumming and Dance ensemble, on drums; Dr. Sean Parsons, assistant professor of jazz piano and instructor of improvisation, history and theory, on piano; Dr. Martin Saunders, director of combos, on trumpet; Dr. Mike Stroeher, professor of trombone and music education, on trombone; and Dr. Mark Zanter, head of theory and composition, on bass/guitar.

"It's a delight to be a part of the Collegiate Series at the Culture Center. The College of Fine Arts at Marshall University is composed of many talented faculty and students, and to represent such these artists is an honor," Parsons said.

The Tuesday performance will feature compositions from the group's namesake album, "Blue Trane," recorded by John Coltrane in 1957.

Bluetrane was created to provide a professional model for students at Marshall and to establish a musical ensemble devoted to the performance of what has been termed "America's National Treasure." The jazz faculty members at MU continue a tradition of presenting America's best-recognized musical art form, jazz, to the people of West Virginia.

The ensemble is central to the jazz studies program at MU, according to Bingham. Housed in the Jomie Jazz Center, the jazz program enjoys a state-of-the-art rehearsal, performance and recording facility. Members of Bluetrane teach classes in performance, jazz history and improvisation and prepare the next generation of musicians and educators for the challenges of preserving the past and energizing the future of jazz.

The Collegiate Series consists of performances and lectures by students and faculty from West Virginia's colleges and universities. First Lady Gayle Manchin is the host of the program.

The West Virginia Division of Culture and History, an agency of the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts, brings together the state's past, present and future through programs and services in the areas of archives and history, the arts, historic preservation and museums. Its administrative offices are located at the Culture Center in the State Capitol Complex in Charleston, which also houses the state archives and state museum. The Culture Center is West Virginia's official showcase for the arts. The agency also operates a network of museums and historic sites across the state. For more information about the Division's programs, visit www.wvculture.org. The Division of Culture and History is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

For more information about the Collegiate Series or the Bluetrane concert performance, contact Jacqueline Proctor, deputy commissioner for the Division, at 304-558-0220.


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Debate tournament at Marshall University 'a huge success'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first collegiate speech and debate tournament at Marshall University in several years was "a huge success,'' the coach of the Thundering Word said today.

Coach Danny Ray said eight teams participated in the Chief Justice/Alumni Swing Tournament last Friday and Saturday, Oct. 30-31, on Marshall's Huntington campus. Ohio University finished first in the tournament, followed by Western Kentucky University and Bowling Green State University.

As the host school, Marshall was not eligible to win the tournament, although some of its team members did participate and perform well, according to Ray.

"The tournament was a huge success," Ray said. "As I started the awards ceremony, I mentioned that this was the first time in years that Marshall had hosted a collegiate speech tournament on campus and everyone cheered, happy to see Marshall's Thundering Word on the circuit once again."

Marshall students received the following awards:

After-Dinner Speaking

Third place - Kayla Johnson, Gallipolis sophomore, French/English education major and John Marshall Scholar

Duo Interpretation

Second place - Kayla Johnson and Ryan Jackson, Huntington sophomore, political science major
Top novice - Shayne Gue, Barboursville junior, biomedical science major and John Marshall Scholar, and Mark Radford, Huntington freshman, theatre major

Informative Speaking

Third place - Ryan Jackson; fifth place - Shayne Gue; Top novice - Kendrick Vonderschmitt, Louisville sophomore and John Marshall Scholar

Dramatic Interpretation

Top novice - Shayne Gue

Poetry

Third place - Zack Frame, St. Albans senior, oral communications education major

Programmed Oral Interpretation

First place - Ryan Jackson; second place - Kayla Johnson; third place - Kegan Angel, Gallipolis sophomore, biomedical science major

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Semifinalist and third-best debater - Kendrick Vonderschmitt. He was 6-0 in preliminary rounds and the top seed going into the semifinals

Quadrathon

            The best four events per contestant or the individual sweepstakes - Ryan Jackson, fifth place with 50 points. Kayla Johnson finished in ninth place

Marshall has qualified 20 slots for the national tournament in April. Considering the team has only nine members, that number is "an extremely good thing unheard of," Ray said.

For more information, contact Ray at 304-696-2807.


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Financial aid training for high school counselors to take place Nov. 13 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be a host site for financial aid training for high school counselors on Friday, Nov. 13.

Kathy J. Bialk, director of student financial assistance, said Marshall is one of 11 schools throughout West Virginia serving as a host site for the Financial Aid Workshops for Counselors and Mentors, coordinated by the West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (WVASFAA).

Bialk said the workshop at MU will provide information, tools and resources necessary to counsel students and their families about preparing for college and the financial aid process. Although the workshop is sponsored by the WVASFAA, Bialk said counselors from Ohio and Kentucky also are invited to attend.

"I look forward to having the opportunity to provide important information and training materials that will help our area high school counselors advise students and parents about the financial aid application process and the financial aid opportunities available to students," Bialk said. "Students and families need to know that financial barriers should never be a reason not to consider college. It is imperative that financial aid awareness occur during students' middle school and high school years so that they can see early on that attending college is a reality."

The training begins at 9 a.m. in Room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Bialk is hoping 40-50 counselors take part in the training.

Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment, will speak to the group of participants during lunch about the university's academic programs. Denise Hogsett, Marshall's director of career services, will also speak to the group about the top 10 reasons first-year college students should connect with the Office of Career Services. Also, Michelle Wicks, from the Office of Financial Aid and Outreach Services, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (WVHEPC), will assist Bialk with training on WVHEPC financial aid program opportunities.

For more information or to register for the workshop, contact Bialk by calling 304-696-2281 or via e-mail at bialkk@marshall.edu. Or, visit the West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators' Web site at http://www.wvasfaa.org/docs/toc_training.html for more information.


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More than 300 students expected for open house Saturday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 300 students, most of them high school seniors, have registered to participate in an open house Saturday, Nov. 7 at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment at Marshall, said check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center, and the program begins at 9 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's playhouse and Booth Experimental Theatre.

Wolfe said students are coming from 16 states, including New Mexico.

"Open House allows us to showcase the best part of Marshall University, our people," Wolfe said. "Prospective students will meet our students, staff, faculty, even our president. It's a great way for them to see if Marshall is the place where they want to live and learn for the next four years."

For more information, contact Wolfe at 304-696-6007.


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Larsen serving as Drinko Academy Fellow at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eldon Larsen, professor of engineering at Marshall University, is serving as the 2009-2010 Drinko Academy Fellow.

Drinko Fellows receive reduced teaching loads to undertake research or curriculum development. Larsen will be completing work on a textbook on project management.

The Drinko Academy was founded in 1985 by John Deaver Drinko, a Marshall alumnus and noted attorney, when he and his wife, Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, established a million dollar chair, the university's first, in the College of Liberal Arts. The initial program proved so successful that in the spring of 1994, the Drinko Chair was redesigned, enlarged and renamed to encompass revised objectives.

The academy is devoted to enhancing public understanding of American institutions and the responsibilities of citizens to their society and particularly the public's sense of shared values and common purposes.

Larsen has three degrees in chemical engineering, a B.S. and an M.S. from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a development and project scientist and senior engineer for Union Carbide Corporation before becoming a full-time faculty member at Marshall University in 1999. Widely published, he has received numerous awards, including the Ashland Outstanding Graduate Advisor of the Year Award in 2004 and the Union Carbide Corporation Chairman's Award, the corporation's highest recognition award for individual achievement, in 1996.

He is the first faculty member from the College of Information Technology and Engineering to be named a Drinko Fellow.

"It is a big honor to be given this award and I'm grateful to the university for the opportunity to serve as a Drinko Fellow," Larsen said. "I appreciate everyone's support."

He will present his research to the university community at a symposium next spring during Marshall's annual Celebration of Academics. The symposium is presented in tandem with the other centerpiece, the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation. Established in 1994, it is the time the university collectively acknowledges its honor students.


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Marshall welcomes Festival Chorus participants this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will welcome 130 high school students from across West Virginia and Ohio to the Huntington campus for the 2009 MU Festival Chorus Nov. 6 and 7.

Students attending will have the opportunity to participate in rehearsals alongside members of Marshall's University Chorus and Chamber Choir, according to Robert Wray, Assistant Professor of Choral Music Education and organizer of the event. They will also participate in workshops presented by Marshall faculty members in the vocal/choral area.

"This festival is not only a great opportunity to bring high school students interested in music to our campus, but is a wonderful chance to highlight the students involved with the MU Department of Music," Wray said.

The first of two concerts connected with the event is at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 6 in Smith Recital Hall, which will showcase the two student-only choral ensembles at Marshall in addition to solo performances by other MU music faculty.  

The second concert, at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 7 in Smith Recital Hall, is the finale of the two-day festival. Those in attendance will see and hear the attending high school students along with the participating MU students perform the music selections rehearsed over the course of the festival.

Music for the festival was selected from both the West Virginia Music Educators Association (WVMEA) and West Virginia American Choral Directors Association (WVACDA) All-State ensemble repertoire lists.

Both concerts associated with this event are free and open to the public.  Any questions should be directed to Wray at wrayr@marshall.edu.


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Marshall percussion ensemble to perform Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Percussion Ensemble will perform in concert at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 5, in Smith Recital Hall on the university's Huntington campus. The group, which is under the direction of Steven Hall, coordinator of percussion at Marshall, will perform selections ranging in style from ragtime to the Puerto Rican plena.

"This performance is a wonderful opportunity to hear a wide variety of interesting and exotic percussion music played by a talented and dedicated group of university students," said Hall.  The repertoire includes a wide variety of ethnic music, including "Leyenda," an arrangement by Spanish composer Isaac Albeniz of a piece originally written for piano; "Highlife," an African-inspired selection, and several ragtime pieces featuring xylophone soloists Levi Billiter and Mike Cochran.

Members of the ensemble are primarily music education and performance students specializing in percussion at Marshall.  However, the ensemble is open to any MU student with percussion experience, according to Hall.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Appalachian memoirist to read from her work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Linda Tate will read from her work at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Tate is the author of two books: A Southern Weave of Women: Fiction of the Contemporary South, and, most recently, Power in the Blood: A Family Narrative.

Author Lee Smith has called Power in the Blood "a remarkable memoir, honestly and beautifully written."  A dramatic family history that reads like a novel, it traces Tate's investigation of the Cherokee-Appalachian branch of her family and explores the poverty, discrimination, and violence that marked their lives. In a journey through her own past, Tate visited archives, libraries, and courthouses throughout Appalachia, the deep South, and the Midwest.  She toured cemeteries and combed through court records, local histories, maps, and photographs, eventually locating distant relatives, all linked to her great-great grandmother. In kitchens and living-room reunions, the family's buried past slowly emerged, as each relative shared with Tate another memorable part of the tale.

Tate taught at Shepherd University in West Virginia for 15 years. She now lives in Boulder, Colo., and teaches at the University of Denver.

Her appearance is a part of the Visiting Writers Series sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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