FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 22, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Choral Union to resume rehearsals Jan. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union will welcome back Dr. David Castleberry as its director for the Spring 2011 season, with rehearsals now taking place on Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. beginning Jan. 11, in Smith Music Hall, Room 150. Formerly, the choir rehearsed on Monday evenings.

Castleberry, who directed the ensemble from 1990-2009, said he is excited to be returning to the choir. "The chance to assemble all our choral ensembles for Carl Orff's 'Carmina Burana' this spring, together with the Huntington Symphony, will be a thrilling opportunity for our singers and the community. Orff's choral masterpiece has been heard in motion pictures, commercials, and in countless performances throughout the world."

Castleberry said "Carmina Burana" is one of the most exciting and recognizable pieces of choral music in existence.

The performance will take place on Saturday, March 12. After the completion of the "Carmina Burana" project, the Choral Union will prepare a collage concert, together with the Marshall University Chorus.

New singers are invited join the Choral Union for the spring semester. Some previous choral experience is helpful. For further information, call 304-696-2963.


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Wednesday December 22, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Annual Holiday Design Winners Named

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The winners of Marshall University's annual holiday design contest for students were announced earlier this month. The competition, which is sponsored by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, included categories for a commemorative plate, a holiday card and a digital greeting.

"Working with the Kopps each year to gather and identify winners has been both enlightening and fulfilling," said Byron Clercx, chair of the department of art and design. "Together they select superb examples from a pool of increasingly inventive and inspired submissions from art and design students, and I am proud they choose to share them with the university and extended Marshall family."

David Kendall received first place honors for both the holiday greeting card and the digital greeting. His greeting card design was mailed to those on the president's list and the digital greeting was distributed to alumni. He received a prize of $700 in each category.

Elizabeth (Betsy) Martin was named the first place winner in the commemorative plate category. She also received a prize of $700.

Others who received recognition and prizes were as follows:

  • Jillian Smallwood, second place in the commemorative plate category, who received $350;
  • Kaitlynn Smith, second place in the holiday greeting card category, who received $350;
  • Brandon Vernatter, second place in the digital greeting category, who received $350;
  • Matthew Levi Brumbaugh, third place in the commemorative plate category, who received $150;
  • Juyeon Lee, third place in the holiday greeting card category, who received $150;
  • Matthew Crutchfield, third place in the digital greeting category, who received $150.


Honorable mentions were given to Cyndee Adkins in the commemorative plate category; Crutchfield in the holiday greeting card category; and Andrew Burgess, Adam Hopkins and the team of Marta Molina Gomez and Carlos Aledo in the digital greeting category.

President and Mrs. Kopp began the card design and plate design competition in 2007 as a way of recognizing the talent of Marshall's students. The digital greeting category was added last year.

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Photo: Marshall President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp (seated) pose with the winning holiday card design by David Kendall. Standing are (from left) graphic design faculty members Hayson Harrison and Brent Patterson, Kendall, Juyeon Lee, Matthew Crutchfield and graphic design faculty member Mary Grassell. Photo by Jaye Ike/Marshall University.


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Monday December 20, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall research institute adds expert in bone growth and development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jingwei Xie has been named senior scientist at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), effective Jan. 3.

He is the third senior scientist to join the institute, which was created in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund. Scientists at MIIR are conducting vital biotechnology research designed to improve the lives of people everywhere who suffer from Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, juvenile macular degeneration and other diseases.  The institute has experienced steady growth since its inception, and recently signed its second co-development agreement with a major biotechnology company.

Xie has more than 10 years experience in biomaterials, tissue engineering, micro-/nanofabrication, biosurfaces, formulations, drug delivery, biotechnology and nanotechnology. In his most recent appointment as a post-doctoral research associate at Washington University in St. Louis, he developed a number of projects related to biomedical applications, including neural tissue engineering, tendon-to-bone insertion site repair and drug delivery.

The goal of MIIR is to develop a focused program of pioneering research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new high-tech businesses based on those discoveries. The institute is building on existing areas of research strength at Marshall and providing opportunities for collaborations with scientists already working at the university.  Xie's group at the institute will focus on bionanotechnology and will collaborate with researchers at Marshall's new Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, where scientists are working to apply advances in nanosensor technology to improve the accessibility and capabilities of rural health care resources.

"I am most pleased to welcome Dr. Xie to MIIR," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "He is an extraordinarily creative scientist with a strong background in one of today's fastest-growing scientific disciplines. With his addition to the team at MIIR - along with a growing portfolio of contracts with biotechnology companies - we are rapidly approaching critical mass.

"Our strategic commitment to hiring the brightest, most talented researchers we can find is paying off. I am confident in our vision for the institute as an economic development engine and remain energized about the possibilities ahead of us."

Dr. Eric Kmiec, director of MIIR and the institute's lead research scientist, added, "Dr. Xie is truly a transformative hire for us. Not only does he come from one of the most respected nanotechnology labs in the country, but his work to develop devices to aid in bone growth and development will complement the genetics work currently under way at the institute and allow us to move into exciting new areas of discovery."

Kmiec said that in addition to working with colleagues at the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, Xie also will collaborate with researchers in the university's College of Science and College of Information Technology and Engineering.

Xie said, "My specialty, tissue engineering, is a multidisciplinary field that combines biological sciences, materials sciences, pharmacology, engineering principles and surgery to develop constructs for restoring, replacing or regenerating defective tissues or organs. It is a good fit with the interdisciplinary research focus at MIIR, and I look forward to collaborating with faculty members in all departments at Marshall.

"I am also enthusiastic about the opportunity to build relationships with biomedical and pharmaceutical companies to develop commercial products."

Prior to joining Washington University in 2007, Xie was a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Washington in Seattle and a research fellow at the National University of Singapore. He is the co-inventor on two patents, was co-investigator of a National Institutes of Health-funded pilot project and has co-authored more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles.

Xie has bachelor's and master's degrees from Nanjing University of Technology in China. He earned his doctorate in chemical and biomolecular engineering from the National University of Singapore.

The West Virginia Research Trust Fund was created two years ago to stimulate and accelerate world-class research at the state's two research universities, with the goal of advancing new enterprise development in the high-technology sector. For a limited time, Marshall University can tap into the fund to double private gifts that support research initiatives - like MIIR - that are linked to economic development, health care and job growth. For more information about how to support research at Marshall and automatically double your gift through the trust fund, visit www.marshall.edu/b4b or call toll-free 1-866-632-5386.

For more information about MIIR, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.


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Monday December 20, 2010
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department awards the Marshall University Forensic Science Center with commendation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Center was awarded a commendation from the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department in appreciation of providing intensive DNA training to its forensic analysts.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of Marshall's Forensic Science Center, said it is an honor to receive recognition from Metropolitan Police Department Chief of Police Cathy Lanier for the collaborative effort between the agencies to develop and implement a customized DNA analysis training program conducted at the center.

The purpose of the "DNA boot camp" training program was to prepare four forensic examiners to become qualified to perform DNA analysis on evidence.

Fenger said the Forensic Science Center considered it a privilege to further develop the capabilities of the crime laboratory's excellent staff. "The forensic scientists from the Metropolitan Police Department were enthusiastic and energetic about their training, and they showed dedication to providing essential forensic services they perform for the justice system," he said.

Peter Newsham, Assistant Chief of Police of the Metropolitan Police Department, said the department was very excited to be given the opportunity to have its DNA examiners trained at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center. 

"Marshall University is recognized for its world-class DNA training program, and the training our examiners have received will give the Metropolitan Police Department's fledgling laboratory a great start," he said. "The courts, prosecutors and the law enforcement community will know that our examiners have completed the best training program that is available."

The Metropolitan Police Department requested assistance from Marshall's Forensic Science Center because it is in the process of expanding its capabilities. Training new analysts is labor-intensive, and laboratory staff who provide training are also tasked with processing cases. The training program alleviated time constraints at the crime laboratory so that experienced analysts could concentrate on forensic laboratory work to solve crimes while the Forensic Science Center provided training to advance the skills of the four forensic scientists.

In addition, the District of Columbia is building a state-of-the-art Consolidated Forensic Laboratory to be completed in 2012 that will house the public health lab, the chief medical examiner's office and the police department's crime lab. Training the forensic examiners helped with preparation for a seamless transition into the new facility.

The Metropolitan Police Department's Crime Laboratory is accredited by the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory accreditation board-International (ASCLD/LAB-International). It currently consists of a Forensic Biology Unit and a Trace Evidence Unit.

In April, Fenger kicked off the first phase of the training program at the current Washington, D.C., lab facility by providing a week of instruction for four hours daily on molecular biology, focusing on DNA.

Subsequently, the four examiners came to the Marshall University Forensic Science Center to attend training sessions covering DNA analysis on state-of the art instrumentation, forensic Y-STR analysis for identification of male DNA, and relationship testing from April through June 2010.  Three examiners completed five weeks of training.

Krystyna H. Hopkinson, a forensic scientist who has worked at the Metropolitan Police Department Crime Laboratory for six years, is one of the four forensic examiners who attended the DNA boot camp.  Over a span of six months, she trained at Marshall's Forensic Science Center for 11 weeks to gain additional practical experience.

Hopkinson spent an additional six weeks at Marshall throughout July to September, alternating two weeks at the Forensic Science Center doing practical exercises and two weeks at the Washington, D.C., Crime Laboratory working and completing additional training assignments.

A serologist, Hopkinson examines evidence for the presence of blood or other biological fluids and takes a cutting from it in preparation for DNA analysis by a qualified examiner. Successful completion of the training program will qualify her as a DNA analyst so she can perform the DNA lab work herself.

She presented letters of commendation to the following Marshall University Forensic Science Center DNA analysts for their roles in providing training to the crime lab staff: Jason Chute, DNA technical leader of the forensic DNA laboratory; Justin Godby, DNA training coordinator; and Josh Stewart, training officer. These DNA analysts also work on forensic cases for state and local crime laboratories in West Virginia and across the nation.

Hopkinson said she was thankful for the opportunity. "I had a wonderful and rewarding experience at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center and during my stay in Huntington," she said.  "It was a unique experience to see the difference between the variations in lifestyle of a big city, and the people of Huntington were very warm and friendly."

At the Metropolitan Police Department, the forensic examiners are continuing their DNA analyst training, which includes competency testing, oral boards and moot court testimony.

The training was made possible by National Institute of Justice cooperative agreements in support of training forensic analysts and assisting the state and local crime laboratories with critical needs.

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Photo: Dr. Terry Fenger, director of Marshall's Forensic Science Center. Photo by David Fatalleh.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 16, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Huntington campus to observe holiday hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities on Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open at various times during the holiday break, which takes place from Thursday, Dec. 23 through Sunday, Jan. 2.

The holiday hours are listed in the online chart.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 16, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Visiting Marshall University professor edits book on 19th century sermons and religion

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert H. Ellison has edited a collection of innovative studies of sacred rhetoric in the 19th century. Ellison, a visiting professor of English at Marshall University, edited "A New History of the Sermon: The Nineteenth Century" for Brill Academic Publishers.

The book's three sections - Theory and Theology, Sermon and Society in the British Empire, and Sermon and Society in America - contain a total of 16 essays on such topics as biblical criticism, Charles Darwin, the Oxford Movement, the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, English Catholicism, sermon-novels and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic.

The compilation is expected to have a broad appeal for historians, scholars and students, as well as preachers and scholars of religion. It includes representations of a multitude of traditions including the Anglican and Presbyterian churches, English nonconformity and Judaism, as well as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Ellison received his Ph.D. in English from the University of North Texas and taught in Texas for many years. His family came to West Virginia in 2009 when his wife, Dr. Lori Ellison, joined the Counseling Department at Marshall. During their first year, he was an adjunct in the English Department and now serves as a visiting assistant professor, teaching primarily freshman composition and British literature.

Ellison said the goal of "A New History of the Sermon" was to publish interesting essays on preaching in Britain and America during the 19th century.

"I had the great pleasure of collaborating with new and established scholars working on a tremendous variety of topics," he said. "This broad scope means that the collection should appeal to students and professors across the academic spectrum; it is my hope that it will help to generate interest in sermon studies, a field that has seen a significant amount of growth in recent years," Ellison added.

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, said he is pleased with Ellison's efforts.

"We are extremely fortunate to have the depth of talent that Dr. Ellison brings to our college and the classroom," Pittenger said. "His new book is a representation not only of the department's commitment to faculty scholarship, but of the broad, varied, and interdisciplinary nature of contemporary literary scholarship. I am proud to have Dr. Ellison contribute to the intellectual well being of our students."

Other contributors to "A New History of the Sermon" include Miriam Elizabeth Burstein, Thomas J. Carmody, Dawn Coleman, Joseph Evans, Keith A. Francis, Brian Jackson, Dorothy Lander, Thomas H. Olbricht, Carol Poster, Mirela Saim, Jessica Sheetz-Nguyen, Bob Tennant, David M. Timmerman, Tamara S. Wagner and John Wolffe.

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Photos: Dr. Robert Ellison (above) and the book he edited, "A New History of the Sermon: The Nineteenth Century."


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Friday December 10, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Marshall faculty, students to participate in holiday jazz concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of  Marshall University's Department of Music and the American Federation Of Musicians, Local 362-691, will participate in "The Sounds Of The Big Bands and Holiday Classics plus a Special Salute to Our Armed Forces," featuring the River Cities Jazz Ensemble.  The concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 14, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus and is free and open to the public.

"This is our holiday concert," said Dr. Martin Saunders, associate professor of trumpet and jazz studies at Marshall. "Basically the group was formed to continue to preserve big band music and all of our guys volunteer to make these things happen. This is a labor of love sort of thing."

In addition to Saunders, faculty members from Marshall's music department who will be taking part include Jeff Wolfe and Dr. Mike Stroeher. Marshall music students Austin Seybert and Pat Billups also will be performing with the ensemble. 

For more information, contact Saunders by phone at 304-696-4316 or by e-mail at saunders35@marshall.edu.


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Friday December 10, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students continue award-winning tradition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, have continued a tradition of competing successfully at the national level with other student journalists by winning 20 awards this fall. WMUL has won 1,025 awards since 1985.

This fall's honors began Oct. 4 when graduate student broadcaster Adam Cavalier of Montgomery, W.Va., was named a finalist in the 2009 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the Radio News Reporting category.

Most recently, WMUL students won 10 awards in the MarCom Creative Awards 2010 competition. The winners were named Nov. 22.

Also this fall, WMUL students:

  • Received four finalist awards in the 89th annual National College Media Convention/2010 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony Oct. 29 in Louisville, Ky.;
  • Received a first-place Podcast Best of Show award at the 89th annual National College Media Convention/2010 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) annual College Competition Oct. 31 in Louisville, Ky.;
  • Received four Silver Awards in the Sixth annual International Davey Awards Competition for 2010 announced Oct. 31.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists," said Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

"The recognition of our students this fall, from Adam's award-winning entry in the SPJ contest to the 10 MarCom awards, is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students."

Cavalier's finalist award-winning entry in the SPJ contest was "Salvation for the Powerless," which was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, Feb. 2, 2009. Cavalier is from Montgomery, W.Va.

Bailey said there were more than 3,600 entries from schools across SPJ's 12 regions in the Mark of Excellence contest.

Here is a look at each of WMUL's other award-winning entries thus far this fall:

89th annual National College Media Convention/
2010 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production
Finalist Awards

Best Radio News Reporting: "Coping with Disaster: Montcoal, West Virginia," written and produced by Leannda Carey, senior from Wellsburg, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9, 2010.

Best Station Promotion: "Herd Bash 2009" was a homecoming week promotion conducted by the WMUL-FM promotions staff from noon to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2, 2009.

Best Radio Promo: "Moviephone," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Patrick Webb, a senior from Huntington.

Best Radio Public Service Announcement: "26.5 Hours," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, a senior from Charleston.

 

89th annual National College Media Convention/
2010 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) annual College Competition

Podcast Best of Show: "Herd Roundup," a regular 30-minute edition of a sports program that airs Friday and Saturday during Marshall football weekends. The program was broadcast the first time Friday, Oct. 15, 2010. The students who participated were Cavalier and Dave Traube, a senior from Beckley.

The podcasting category was offered for only the fifth time in 2010 to recognize excellence among attendees whose media outlets have an online presence with podcasts to download. WMUL's win was its fourth in five years.

"Winning first place for the fourth time in this relatively new realm of media speaks well for Marshall University as it demonstrates that its students are working with new technologies which will help prepare them for the changing digital media landscape," Bailey said.

 

Sixth annual International Davey Awards Competition

Silver Awards

Radio News Feature Package: "J.R. VanHoose: From the Herd to the Hornets," written and produced by Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Friday, Dec. 4, 2009.

Radio News Feature Package: "Model Trains: A Family Affair," written and produced by Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Monday, April 12, 2010.

Radio Sports Package: "Enter Sandman," written and produced by Carey, broadcast during the pregame program before the Marshall at Virginia Tech football game Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

Radio Public Service Announcement: "Brush Your Teeth," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Webb.

Bailey said the Davey Awards are creative awards focused exclusively on honoring outstanding creative work from the best small firms worldwide. He said there were more than 4,000 entries in the awards competition for 2010.
 

MarCom Creative Awards
Platinum Awards

Sports Package: "The Mitch Express," written and produced by Cavalier, broadcast during the "Tournament of State Champions" from Mitch Stadium in Kenova, Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010.

Promo: "Moviephone."

Sports Play By Play: The broadcast of the Marshall-UAB women's basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The students calling the game were Cavalier, play by play; Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Stephens City, Va., color; and Carey, engineer.

Bailey said Platinum-award winners are recognized for their excellence interms of quality, creativity and resourcefulness.

Gold Awards

Newscast:  "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, April 29. The students who participated in the newscast that also was made available online were Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans, W.Va., producer; Cavalier, news anchor; Carey, news anchor; and Traube, sports anchor.

News Package: "Coping With Disaster: Montcoal, West Virginia."

Podcast: "Marshall Football 2009: The End of the Line," written and produced by Cavalier, broadcast and made available online before Marshall's season opener at Ohio State Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.

Overall Web Site: WMUL's Web site (www.marshall.edu/wmul). The 2010 web masters are Deven Swartz, a recent graduate from Philippi, W.Va., and Tyler Kes, a sophomore from Lavalette. 

 

Honorable Mention Awards

News Feature Package: "J. R. VanHoose: From the Herd to the Hornets."

Sports Package: "Enter Sandman."

Podcast: "Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday, Oct. 23, 2009. The students who participated were Cavalier and Iddings.


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Tuesday December 7, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's speech and debate team excels in Ohio State tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Thundering Word, Marshall University's speech and debate team, finished in third place this past weekend in the Holiday Frolic Tournament at Ohio State University.

Danny Ray, Director of Forensics at Marshall, said 26 colleges and universities participated, making the tournament one of the largest in the nation. In addition to host Ohio State, Marshall and defending nation champion Western Kentucky, some of the schools participating included Ohio University, Cincinnati, Wayne State, Carson-Newman, Hillsdale, Creighton, Otterbein, West Florida, St. Anselm, Truman State, Nebraska-Lincoln and Purdue.

Western Kentucky won the tournament and Carson-Newman was second.

Marshall students who won or placed high included:

  • Elaine Adkins, a Huntington freshman majoring in oral communication, first place in Poetry Interpretation  and third in Prose Interpretation
  • Tyler Rice, a Huntington freshman majoring in journalism, first in Prose Interpretation, fifth in Poetry Interpretation
  • Derek Collins, a Fort Gay sophomore majoring in chemistry, sixth in Prose Interpretation
  • Jasmine Lewis, a Huntington freshman majoring in political science, fourth in Programmed Oral Interpretation, top novice in Persuasion.
  • Kai Stewart, a Parkersburg freshman majoring in oral communication, second, Novice Debate Speaker and semifinalist in Lincoln-Douglas Debate
  • Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a Louisville, Ky., junior majoring in political science, third in Rhetorical Criticism
  • Ryan Jackson, a Huntington junior majoring in political science, third in Informative Speaking.

Ray said Marshall has qualified 24 slots for the national tournament in April.

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Friday December 3, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Commencement Video to be streamed online

Sunday's graduation ceremony will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu/itvs/stream/gradfa10.asp beginning at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 5.

 

More information on Commencement is available at  http://www.marshall.edu/pressrelease.asp?ID=2217.

 

 

 

  


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Friday December 3, 2010
Contact: Dr. Mary Todd, Dean, Honors College, , 304-696-2475

Marshall University installs Phi Kappa Phi chapter

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, which was approved by the organization's board of directors last spring, was formally installed this week. Announcement of the installation was made by Dr. Mary Todd, dean of the Marshall University Honors College.

Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest, largest and most selective all-discipline honor society. Each year, approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni are initiated into the society. Its chapters are on more than 300 campuses in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines.

"This chapter of Phi Kappa Phi is a welcome and prestigious addition to the academic life of our university not only for its celebration of our best academic efforts but also through its service of scholarship," Todd said.

Society President Dr. William A. Bloodworth, Jr. noted, "The commitment to excellence at Marshall University is evident in the number of scholarships available to students, in the presence of a strong honors college, and in the amount and types of faculty scholarship. All of us at Phi Kappa Phi are excited about the addition of the new Marshall chapter and look forward to developing a strong working relationship with the chapter."

Todd said that the installation ceremony for the Marshall chapter took place on Nov. 30 at Marshall University.  Students will be initiated each spring.  Members of the chartering group have elected the following officers:

President:  Dr. Gordon Arthur Crews 

President Elect:  Dr. Todd L. Green

Vice President:  Dr. Dallas Brozik

Treasurer:  Dr. Jeffrey Jay Archambault

Secretary:  Dr. Susan Brooke Gilpin

Public Relations Officer: Dr. Marcia Harrison

Since its founding, more than one million members have been initiated. Some of the organization's more notable members include former President Jimmy Carter, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, NASA Astronaut Wendy Lawrence, writer John Grisham, opera singer Renee Fleming, journalist and broadcaster Deborah Norville and Netscape founder James Barksdale.

The society has awarded approximately $12.7 million since the inception of its awards program in 1932. Today, more than $800,000 is awarded annually to qualifying members and non-members through graduate fellowships, undergraduate study abroad scholarships, member and chapter awards and grants for local and national literacy initiatives. The society's mission is "to recognize and promote academic excellence in all fields of higher education and to engage the community of scholars in service to others."

For more information on Phi Kappa Phi, call 1-800-804-9880 or visit www.PhiKappaPhi.org. For information on the chapter at Marshall, write to honorscollege@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/phikappaphi.

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Photo: Dr. Curtis Black, left, national board member of Phi Kappa Phi, and Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp display the new charter for the Marshall University Chapter 313 of Phi Kappa Phi. MU's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi was formally installed this week. Marshall University photo by Daniel Holloway.


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Friday December 3, 2010
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late,", 304-696-2967

Marshall's 'Up Late' show celebrates 100 episodes of hilarity, hijinks and higher learning. Really.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The cast and crew of "Up Late," Marshall University's student-produced late show, celebrates its 100th episode this week.

As he was helping edit a montage of clips for this week's special show, host Jamie LoFiego recalled that "Up Late" grew out of an assignment he and fellow instructor Eric Himes gave to their students in an Introduction to Video Production class in Spring 2007.

"We intended to have them produce three shows during the spring semester and air them on our Instructional Television channel," LoFiego said. "We weren't thinking: 'Hey, on our 100th show, we should have a montage of clips or invite a big-name guest.' We weren't thinking: 'Hey, let's get this before a bigger audience.' It was simply an assignment to give students hands-on experience producing a show."

That initial class decided the show would have a late-night show quality and feature interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, local musical acts and, of course, comedy. LoFiego said that group is also to blame for asking him to host the show for consistency purposes, and because, he added, "They knew I'm seeking fame and fortune."

Based on the three early episodes, Don Ray, general manager of WSAZ, took a chance on the show and began airing the program on Saturday nights on My Z TV. At the time, he said that it was a great opportunity to partner with Marshall University to provide cutting-edge programming for the station's My Z TV audiences.

"We are very proud of the students and crew of 'Up Late,' " Ray said. "It's amazing they have sustained the show since 2007 and it continues to get better and better."

LoFiego and Himes, who also work for Marshall's Digital Media Services, have helped students master the art of production and exposed them to working with guests like then-governor Joe Manchin, who rode a motorcycle down the hallway of Smith Hall and onto the set of "Up Late." Other guests have included head coaches, nationally recognized comedians, actors, reality TV personalities, NFL stars, local musical acts and a variety of Marshall students. LoFiego said it's not the lecture or course work students are likely to remember as much as their studio time running cameras, sound, lighting and editing equipment for the class

"Looking back at all of the shows we've done made me realize that we've given more than 80 students the opportunity to actually crew a late-night show that airs before a large audience on commercial television," LoFiego said. "They don't just learn theory; they put their hands on the cameras and computers. It's been a fantastic experience."

"Up Late's" very special guest for its 100th episode is NFL football star and Thundering Herd great Troy Brown. He dishes on what it's like to be a radio analyst for Marshall Football and how he misses playing the game, but not the recovery process. Brown also shares insight on his family life and the privilege of being a dad.

Also featured is regular guest Tim Irr of WSAZ fame. The oddly dressed news anchor stops by the set to bring a special gift to mark the special day.

In other features, the student crew sends special Christmas greetings to viewers and Patrick Webb, a junior, makes a surprise return to the show after a semester in Australia. The crew also airs the montage of "Up Late" clips to the musical stylings of the Rev. Jimmy Nash, a senior audio technician, and amateur lyricist, Kyle Hobstetter, a graduate student and the show's co-host.

The 100th episode of "Up Late" will air on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

Photos:

(Above) Tim Irr presents "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego a gift to commemorate the show's 100th episode - 100 acorns from Irr's yard.

(Below) Jamie Lofiego talks with "Up Late's" very special guest for its 100th episode, NFL football star and Thundering Herd great Troy Brown.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Free seminar to focus on visualization and geospatial tools for economic development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - On Wednesday, Dec. 15, Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences will host a free, three-hour seminar, "Taking Advantage of Visualization and Geospatial Tools for Economic Development."

The session is intended to help local policymakers learn to use geographical information systems (GIS) and visualization tools for better planned and more sustainable economic development. 

Decision-makers are increasingly challenged by the absence of effective tools to both synthesize the large volume of available data and to frame policy options in a straightforward manner. The advent of integrated visualization tools has greatly expanded the capabilities of GIS for these purposes.

The seminar will include an explanation and demonstration of visualization and geospatial technology available at Marshall University. There also will be a discussion about how best to use the 2010 census data, how to compare it to previous census data, how to use it with other datasets and how to find economic datasets.

The program will begin at 9 a.m. in the visualization laboratory in the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories, 1628 3rd Ave., Huntington.

Registration is requested by Dec. 10. To register or for more information, e-mail Randy Rutledge at rutledge6@marshall.edu or call 304-696-3506.


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Wednesday December 1, 2010
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Marshall theatre grad appears Off-Broadway

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University graduate was in an Off-Broadway show that ran last month in New York.

Nick Reynolds was cast as Pincer, the Superintendent of Police, in the musical comedy "Drat!  The Cat!"  Reynolds said the show is about a young detective and a young heiress, who has been stealing diamonds all over town.

After getting his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at Marshall, Reynolds was accepted for Penn State's graduate acting program, where he taught two theatre classes for undergraduates. He also became a member of Actors' Equity while working for Pennsylvania Centre Stage in "The Apple Tree" and "Ctrl+Alt+Delete."  In addition to Pennsylvania Centre Stage, he worked for the Greenbrier Valley Theatre and the outdoor drama "Tecumseh" during that time.  

Reynolds said during his time at Marshall he learned a lot of different acting techniques and is thankful for the knowledge and experience of the professors at Marshall.

"Gene Anthony was definitely a father figure for me," Reynolds said, "and Jack [Cirillo] became like my older brother.  I'm still close with both of them and I wouldn't be where I am today without them."

Cirillo, associate professor in the Department of Theatre, said Reynolds was an ideal student.

"It is little wonder that already he's finding success in NYC," Cirillo said. "In a matter of months he's secured an agent and some off-Broadway work. This is unique and typically takes a lot longer to obtain."

Cirillo said Reynolds has a real love for theatre and is a prime example of the preparedness of Marshall's theatre students.

"He loves the theatre and carries an attitude of childlike fascination for it - a real theatre geek," Cirillo said. "He's an excellent example of the kind of student we're developing in MU Theatre."

Reynolds noted that he learned much more than just being a performer as a Marshall University theatre student.

"The biggest mistake someone can make in acting is to think that the only tool an actor has is his or her talent," Reynolds said.  "Marshall taught me about the business world of acting. When I left, I knew how to light a stage, take down a set, build a costume piece and act."   

Reynolds said he is still making adjustments when it comes to the acting world and preparing for auditions.

"The challenge is to keep telling myself that I'm not really auditioning for shows right now, I'm auditioning for people," Reynolds said.  "I'm still brand new here and I need to get my face out, both on my own and through my agent, and I have to put my best foot forward every day.  I might not get that part, but I have to make that person remember me down the line."

Next, Reynolds will portray the role of Little Bob in a reading of the musical "Smile."  The reading will be for a private audience of Broadway and Off-Broadway producers with the hope of taking the show to the next level.

And as for missing Huntington, Reynolds says he does.

"I miss the food in Huntington," Reynolds said. "I know New York is supposed to have the best food, and a lot of it is good, but when I'm in the mood for a Tudor's biscuit, I'm out of luck.  The pizza here is amazing, but I'm a Giovanni's man all the way.  I also miss my family - and why I listed them after food is for my therapist and me to discuss," he joked.


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Choral Union concert takes place this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Choral Union will present two performances of its fall concert this weekend at 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 5. Both performances will take place in the Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus.

The program will include Choral Union singing Alan Hovhaness' Glory to God and Antonio Vivaldi's Gloria.

Vivaldi composed this Gloria in Venice, in 1715, for the choir of the Ospedale della Piete, an orphanage for girls. This, his most famous choral piece, presents the traditional Gloria from the Latin mass.

"I think the audiences of today walk away from this music humming the melodies presented in this work," said Mark Smith, director of the Choral Union. "It has a very sunny disposition throughout much of the work."  The Choral Union will be joined by a small instrumental group from the Marshall University Department of Music led by Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, professor of music at Marshall.

Also on the program will be a performance of Dan Forest's Three Nocturnes by the Marshall University Chamber Choir, directed by Dr. David Castleberry.


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Tuesday November 23, 2010
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Area writers launch new books with reading at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Marie Manilla and poet Chris Green will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 2, in the Shawkey Room of the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.  The reading marks the release of Manilla's short story collection Still Life with Plums, just out from the West Virginia University Press, and Green's new collection of poems, Rushlight.

Manilla, a fiction writer and Huntington native, is also the author of Shrapnel, a novel, which won the Fred Bonnie Award sponsored by River City Publishing. Her work has appeared in Mississippi Review, Calyx Journal, Kestrel, GSU Review, Portland Review, VitNow, The Long Story, Writers' Dojo, Carve, Timber Creek Review, and other literary journals.

Manilla's work has been recognized by The Chicago Tribune as a Nelson Algren finalist, and she has also received the Lawrence Foundation Award for best story published in Prairie Schooner. A graduate of Marshall University and the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she teaches writing and lives in Huntington with her husband Don Primerano.

Green, a poet, scholar and Lexington, Ky., native, co-edited Coal: A Poetry Anthology and was also editor of Wind - Kentucky's oldest and longest running literary journal - from 1999 to 2003.  His work has appeared in Another Chicago Magazine and Artful Dodge, among other literary magazines.

Green's historical study of race and social justice in Appalachian writing, The Social Life of Poetry (Palgrave Macmillan), has established him as a major voice in the region. He has taught poetry writing to community roundtables, rural special-education students, third graders and convicts, as well as at Kentucky's Governor's School for the Arts. He teaches writing and literature in Marshall University's English department.

Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall Visiting Writers Series with support from the English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the Marshall English department at 304-696-2403.


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Tuesday November 23, 2010
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Nearly 1,100 students to graduate from Marshall in December



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Nearly 1,100 students will graduate from Marshall University on Sunday, Dec. 5, when the university celebrates its 2010 Winter Commencement at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus. The ceremony begins at 2 p.m.

Among the 1,069 students receiving degrees are 650 undergraduates, 414 with graduate degrees and five from the School of Medicine. The Winter Commencement will honor graduates from July and August 2010, and tentative December 2010 graduates.

Graduates will be recognized individually at the Winter Commencement. They will walk to the area in front of the stage, where their names will be announced, and they will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 159 students will graduate with honors. Fifteen will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 46 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 90 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Two students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and six associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Based on tentative grade point averages, three students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are April Ann Crouse of Culloden, West Virginia, Truc Thai Thanh Pham of Huntington, and Arianna Cathena Price of Gerrardstown, West Virginia.

Dr. Bonita Lawrence, the Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia's 2009 Professor of the Year, will deliver the keynote address.

Lawrence has been at Marshall since August 2001 when she was hired as an assistant professor of mathematics. She was promoted to associate professor in 2003, granted tenure in 2005 and promoted to professor in 2007. She received the Marshall University Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award for 2001 and 2006, the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award for 2004 and the Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award in 2009.

She received her Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in 1979 from Cameron University in Lawton, Okla., her Master of Science in Mathematics in 1990 from Auburn University in Auburn, Ala., and her Ph.D. in Mathematical Sciences in 1994 from the University of Texas at Arlington.

DVDs available

Marshall University will make available DVDs of 2010 Winter Commencement. Nancy Pelphrey, Marshall University's coordinator of alumni programs, said a table with order forms will be set up in the upstairs lobby of Henderson Center from 1 p.m. until commencement is over. DVDs cost $15 each, and payment can be made by using Visa, MasterCard, Discover or cash, or by check made payable to the Marshall University Alumni Association.

The DVDs will be produced by Marshall University Instructional Television Services. For more information, contact Pelphrey at 304-696-3134.

Parking

Free parking for commencement will be available in the garage across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center, or on any university parking lot. The garage and the Joan C. Edwards Stadium West Lot provide the most convenient parking.


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Friday November 19, 2010
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Toys for Tots campaign continues at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Many toys have been collected but many more are needed three weeks into the 2010 Toys for Tots regional campaign staged by the United States Marine Corps Reserves and supported by Marshall University.

The drive to collect toys this holiday season for needy children in 14 West Virginia counties and four counties in Ohio began Nov. 1 and continues through Dec. 17. Collection boxes have been placed in the Memorial Student Center and other buildings on MU's Huntington campus.

New, unwrapped toys valued at no more than $30 each may be dropped off at the Memorial Student Center throughout the campaign. They also may be dropped off at various locations in all 18 counties - just look for the Toys for Tots posters.

The student center will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 22 through Wednesday, Nov. 24, for those who would like to drop off toys there next week. The student center will be closed Thanksgiving Day through Sunday, Nov. 28.

Toy distribution is planned for Dec. 18-20.

For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Don Snyder, who is heading the campaign, at 304-776-4806, ext. 302, e-mail him at Toys@CHWVT4T.com, or visit the Toys for Tots web site at http://charleston-wv.toysfortots.org.

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Photo: Tommy Reynolds, wearing the hat, and Tim Crowder sort through the toys collected so far during the 2010 Toys for Tots regional campaign. Reynolds and Crowder are military veterans and Marshall University students. Three weeks into the campaign, 225 toys have been collected, but many more are needed as the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves has received thousands of requests for toys. Marshall University photo by Rick Haye.


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Tuesday November 16, 2010
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Marshall Theatre Alliance to present 'A Christmas Carol'


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Theatre Alliance will present a one-man play based on Charles Dickens' novella A Christmas Carol, featuring theatre faculty member Jack Cirillo. The performances will take place at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 2; Friday, Dec. 3; and Saturday, Dec. 4, in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse on the Huntington campus.

Set in 1867, the play is based on the condensed version Dickens himself used on his reading tours of the United States in the 19th Century. Portraying Dickens, Cirillo performs from memory the magical story of Ebenezer Scrooge's journey from miserliness to redemption with warmth and humor.

Ticket prices are $12 for adults and $5 for children and seniors.  Admission is free to Marshall students with valid IDs. For tickets and information, call the box office at 304-696-2787.


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Tuesday November 16, 2010
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Huntington Federal Savings adds to Kermit McGinnis professorship fund

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington Federal Savings has added $50,000 in 2009 and 2010 to the principal of the fund that honors its chairman of the board, Kermit McGinnis, with distinguished professorships in Marshall University's Lewis College of Business.

Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean of the college, said the principal of the endowed fund has reached more than $300,000 with these latest gifts.

Dr. Deanna Mader, professor of marketing, and Dr. Harlan Smith, professor of economics, are the current recipients of the Kermit McGinnis Endowed Professorships.

McGinnis is the chairman of the board of Huntington Federal Savings Bank and an alumnus of Marshall. He is member of the John Marshall Society and served as president of the Marshall University Foundation in 1982-1983. He was selected for the Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame in 2000.

Kim expressed his appreciation for Huntington Federal's contribution. "The maintenance of the high quality of professors is the most important element in providing an excellent business program for Marshall University," he said, adding that this quality will lead to maintaining accreditation by AACSB, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International, which is considered the premier accreditation body for business schools.

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Photo: Kermit McGinnis, left, chairman of the board of Huntington Federal Savings Bank, and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp display an oversized check for $50,000 presented today to the Marshall University Foundation for the Lewis College of Business/Kermit McGinnis Endowed Professorship. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Tuesday November 16, 2010
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Memorial service available on YouTube

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sunday's memorial service for the 75 persons who lost their lives in the 1970 plane crash may be viewed on Marshall University's HerdVideo site on YouTube. The video may be accessed by clicking on "Videos" on www.marshall.edu, or directly at  www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ErucbwUBh4.

The ceremony included remarks by Marshall Head Football Coach John "Doc" Holliday, Marshall Director of Athletics Mike Hamrick, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and acting West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. The keynote address was given by William "Mickey" Jackson, president of the Marshall University Alumni Association. Jackson was a coach of the 1970 football team, most of whom perished in the crash along with coaches, staff members, supporters and flight crew. He was not on the plane because of a scouting trip.

In addition, a still photo gallery may be viewed by clicking "Photos" on www.marshall.edu or directly at http://muphotos.marshall.edu/Events/haye/40-Year-Anniversary-Memorial/14668209_LPHPC.


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Monday November 15, 2010
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Marshall to kick off United Way campaign on Nov. 16

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will begin its 2010 United Way campaign Tuesday, Nov. 16 with a kickoff celebration from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus.

The campaign, which is part of the West Virginia State Employee Combined Campaign (WVSECC), runs through Friday, Dec. 17.

Marshall faculty, staff and administrators will be serving cake throughout the event, and hot dogs, pop corn and drinks will be served as well. Donations will be accepted.

Lisa Martin is chairperson of the President's Blue Ribbon committee, which represents different departments and campuses. She said Marshall's campaign, conducted in conjunction with the United Way of the River Cities, is called "Change for Change."

The goal at Marshall, she said, is to increase participation by signing up 155 new donors, and for current donors to continue to participate.

"The United Way partners across the tri-state do a good service for the community," Martin said. "They need support from everyone. We realize these are tough times for a lot of people, but these service organizations, charities and agencies do benefit a lot of people who use their services."

Those who choose to donate may target their contribution to a specific agency listed in the WVSECC brochure. The United Way of the River Cities, Inc., has 28 partner agencies.

In addition to annual pledges and payroll deductions, Marshall University employees may contribute by participating in numerous fund-raising activities planned during the campaign. An updated schedule of campaign activities is expected to be available at www.marshall.edu/unitedway beginning the day of the kickoff.

One of the most popular special activities is the opportunity for Marshall employees to wear jeans to work. Participants will be "permitted" to wear jeans to work on selected days, depending on which day they choose and how much they donate to the campaign. Jeans days are Nov. 16, 18, 23 and 30, and Dec. 2, 7, 9, 14 and 16.

"I'm Wearing Jeans for United Way" stickers may be purchased in the following locations:

         Old Main basement, mailroom (Leonard Lovely, 696-6644)

         Old Main 207, Human Resources (Stephanie Gray, 696-2593)

         Memorial Student Center 2W6 (Eleanore Beckett, 696-6472)

         Holderby Hall 109 (Sharon Booth, 696-2569)

         Gullickson Hall 112 (Cammy Holley, 696-5459)

         Sorrell Bulding, Physical Plant (Anita Hill, 696-2989)

         Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center 301Q (Anita Mathis, 696-7322)

         MU Medical Center, dean's office 3408 (Wanda Webb, 691-1700)

Cost to purchase stickers is $3 for one day, $5 for two days or $20 for all nine days.

For more information on Marshall's United Way campaign, call Martin at 304-696-2495.


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Thursday November 11, 2010
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Organization of African Students presents 'An African Wedding'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Organization of African Students will present an original play, "An African Wedding," at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov.12, in Smith Hall Auditorium 154 on the Huntington campus.

The play is entirely student produced and is an original work written and directed by Marshall University graduate student Luwin Witherspoon, who is from Liberia, and co-written by Joyce Ishola, a senior from Nigeria.

"In addition to the intriguing story of love and marriage, this play showcases the unique culture, rituals, and traditions of pre-marriage and the marital ceremony of a young couple in Africa," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, which is sponsoring the performance. "It's strikingly different from our Western culture and ceremony.  This is a grand opportunity to experience the creativity of our students, while exploring the similarities and differences in cultures."

The play is free and open to the public.   Light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Cooley by phone at 304-696-5430.


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Thursday November 11, 2010
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Lajterman family to present check to MU Foundation to endow Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marcelo Lajterman family will present the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., with a check for $23,000 to endow the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship during the Thundering Herd's football game Saturday with Memphis at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Lajterman, a native of Lyndhurst, N.J., was a placekicker for Marshall and was just 19 years old when he died in the 1970 plane crash. The amount of the scholarship represents the No. 23 Lajterman wore when he played for Marshall.

The presentation will take place during the first timeout of the opening quarter. The game begins at 3 p.m.

Joining Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the foundation, in the presentation will be Marcelo Lajterman's mother, Mrs. Emily Lajterman; his brothers, Mo and Tito, and their spouses, Karen and Linda; another brother, Abe; Marcelo's niece and nephew, Julie and Josh Lajterman; and his cousin, Adrian Steingart.

The foundation announced establishment of the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship in 2008.

Kristi Arrowood, director of Foundation Development and Strategic Programs, said the Lajterman family has worked hard to raise enough money to endow the scholarship. A minimum of $15,000 was needed, but the Lajtermans set and reached a goal of $23,000 to match Marcelo's number.

"They are passionate about making sure Marcelo's name lives on," Arrowood said. "Their family has worked endless hours with golf tournaments, auctions and fund raisers to make this happen. We are humbled by the Lajterman family's commitment to not only give back to Marshall University through this scholarship, but to honor the life of number 23 - Marcelo Lajterman."

To learn more about Marcelo Lajterman or to contribute to the scholarship, persons may visit www.marcelo23.com. They also may contribute to the scholarship by contacting the Marshall University Foundation at 304-696-6781. Arrowood may be reached by calling 304-696-3505.


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Wednesday November 10, 2010
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Marshall Criminal Justice students do well in competition at conferences

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Graduate and undergraduate students from Marshall University's Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology received awards in their field at two recent conferences.

Two students who took part in the West Virginia Criminal Justice Educators' Association's annual conference Nov. 4-5 won two of the four awards for the student paper competition.

Andrew Walker of Philippi, W.Va., took first place in the graduate student competition, and Angie Taylor of Williamstown, W.Va., took first place in the undergraduate competition. Each received a $100 award.

Two Marshall graduate students, along with three undergraduates, presented papers during the conference, which took place at West Virginia University-Parkersburg. Graduate papers included Walker's "Honk if You're Mad!: Examining Aggressive Driving Through Displaced Aggression Theory," and Amy Sadler's "Female Domestic Serial Killers."

Undergraduate papers included Taylor's "A Perspective of Child Abuse;" Adam Slone's "Merton's Anomie Theory and Organized Crime;" and Kyle McCallister's "School Shootings."

In October, the Marshall University Alpha Omega Chapter of the American Criminal Justice Association-Lambda Alpha Epsilon was in Institute, W.Va., for the association's Region IV Conference.

Members of the chapter participated in written criminal justice knowledge exams and competed in the investigation of a mock crime scene. The conference ran Oct. 21-23.

Alpha Omega members took home several awards. Michael Ellis was first in police management and third in juvenile justice, and Samantha Miller won first place on the corrections knowledge exam. Both Ellis and Miller competed on the lower collegiate level.

In the upper collegiate division, Andrew Walker placed second in juvenile justice knowledge. In the crime scene competition, Matthew Johnson, Danielle Ocheltree and Samantha Miller took third place at the professional level.

For more information, contact Dr. Kimberly A. DeTardo-Bora, associate professor in the Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, at 304-696-3084.


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Wednesday November 10, 2010
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Brazilian music professors to perform at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Brazilian music faculty members, guitarist Dr. Werner Aguiar and cellist Dr. Hans Twitchell, will present a free public recital at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The two will be visiting Marshall University as part of a faculty exchange program beginning Monday, Nov. 15, and continuing through Friday, Nov. 19.

Aguiar is from the Federal University of Gois (UFG) in Goiania and Twitchell is from the State University of Santa Catarina (UDESC) in Florianupolis.

In addition to their recital, the artists will give master classes to MU guitar and cello students, observe classes, meet with the students from their schools who are presently studying at Marshall, meet the Marshall students who will be studying at their schools next semester and meet with Marshall  administrators.

This faculty exchange is one element of an agreement the Brazilian schools have with Marshall and Morehead State University in Kentucky. It is part of a four-year grant from the U.S. Department of Education and the Brazilian Ministry of Education.  The first year of the grant, 2009-10, was dedicated to planning the specifics of the program and securing agreements among the four universities. Faculty and administrators from the four schools visited each other's campuses and discussed curriculum and procedures for the exchange program.

In addition to the faculty exchange, this semester two music students from UFG and one from UDESC are studying at Marshall.  Next semester three Marshall students will be studying in Brazil, two at UFG and one at UDESC.

Each year of the grant, three Marshall and three Morehead students will spend one semester studying in Brazil, and three students from UFG and three from UDESC will spend a semester at Marshall and Morehead State.  In addition, two faculty members from each U.S. university and two from each Brazilian university will travel to the partner universities to teach and perform.


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Tuesday November 9, 2010
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Marshall Theatre Alliance to present evening of 10-minute plays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Theatre Alliance will present an evening of 10-minute plays and a staged reading of Bert V. Royal's Dog Sees God - Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on the Huntington campus.

One-act works include Welcome to the Moon by John Patrick Shanley, That Midnight Rodeo by Mary Sue Price, A Sermon by David Mamet, The Hardy Boys and the Mystery of Where Babies Come From by Christopher Durang and Time Trap by Marshall theatre student Erik Woods, as well as several other comedic pieces.

The critic in CurtainUp Reviews, an online theatre magazine, called Dog Sees God  "...easily identifiable with the Peanuts crowd yet with a distinctly 'Royal' touchThe way Royal builds on the foundation of Charles Schulz's iconic comic strip actually results in a parody that's also a stand-alone play apt to resonate even with anyone belonging to that small population segment unfamiliar with Peanuts."

This production is for mature audiences and not appropriate for children.

For more information call 304-696-6395 or 304-696-2787.


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Monday November 8, 2010
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Distinguished writer Dinty Moore to read from his work at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Dinty Moore will read from his work at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. 

Moore is the author of five books of prose.  His memoir, Between Panic and Desire (University of Nebraska), was winner of the 2009 Grub Street Nonfiction Book Prize. 
His other books include The Accidental Buddhist, Toothpick Men, The Emperor's Virtual Clothes, and the writing guide, The Truth of the Matter: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction.

Donna Seaman at Booklist says of his new memoir: "Moore forges a brisk, incisive, funny, sometimes silly, yet stealthily affecting memoir in essays and skits, a generational autobiography."

Moore has published essays and stories in The Southern Review, The Georgia Review, Harper's, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Gettysburg Review, Utne Reader, and Crazyhorse, among many others. 

His awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction.  His work has also been honored as a "notable" in Best American Essays 2010.  He directs the Creative Writing program at Ohio University.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Office of the Provost.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, call Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday November 5, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU Chamber Choir to present fall Concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, a select thirty-four-voice ensemble, will present a fall concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Selections to be performed range from sixteenth-century masterpieces by Palestrina and Gabrieli to a set of newly composed pieces by Dan Forrest, titled "Nocturnes." The latter work includes settings of poetry by Sara Teasdale, Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman for choir and percussion. Other selections include folk songs and spirituals.

Dr. David Castleberry, director of choral activities and conductor of the Chamber Choir, is particularly excited about the music included in this performance. "For a young choir to accept the challenge of such a difficult program, and to sing beautifully and with conviction, is a remarkable accomplishment," Castleberry said. "This music covers an amazing spectrum of emotions, musical styles and technical demands, and the singers have risen to the challenge."

Castleberry speaks with particular emotion about Heinrich Schutz's "Musikalische Exequien" as one of the most profound and moving pieces he has ever encountered. "For a composer to have lived the life Schutz lived, surrounded by war that took from him the musicians with whom he worked, and plagues that claimed nearly a third of his town, including his wife and two daughters, is extraordinary. For him to then set words such as 'The Lord gives, the Lord takes away. Blessed be the name of the Lord,' is even more remarkable. His music communicates hopefulness and joy, even in the most dire of circumstances - making him as relevant today as he was four hundred years ago."

The concert is free, open to the public and will last about an hour.

The Chamber Choir is a touring ensemble which has been heard on National Public Radio and seen on public television. The group has also given performances for the American Choral Directors Association and the West Virginia Music Educators Association.

For further information about concerts at Marshall University, contact the music office at 304-696-3117.

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Photo: Marshall University's Chamber Choir, conducted by Dr. David Castleberry and accompanied by Mark Smith, will perform in concert Sunday, Nov. 14.


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Victims to be honored on 40-year anniversary of plane crash



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash will be honored at the annual memorial service conducted by MU's Student Government Association at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14 on the Huntington campus.

The service will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the 40-year anniversary of the crash, which occurred at about 7:47 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970. A DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five.

Patrick Murphy, a New York native and president of Marshall's student body, said he knows how important the annual memorial service is to the surviving family members and the entire MU community.

"I have tried to plan the ceremony with the utmost sincerity and empathy for what I hope will be a memorial service that properly honors the victims and their families," Murphy said. "I have met so many people that have been affected by the events of November 14th and feel extremely honored to be given the opportunity and privilege to be a part of something that means so much to so many people."

Mickey Jackson, president of the Marshall University Alumni Association and a former running back and assistant coach for the Thundering Herd, will be the keynote speaker at the service. He was an assistant coach for the 1970 Thundering Herd and missed the flight from Greenville because he, along with assistant coach Carl Kokor, was scouting future Marshall opponent Ohio University in its game with Penn State.

"I am very proud and honored to have been asked to deliver the message - a very important message that needs to be repeated every year," Jackson said. "And that message is that we should never, ever forget those who lost their lives while contributing to the Marshall University football program."

Jackson said he always has mixed emotions when attending the memorial service.

"It is very inspirational to remember those folks and the relationships," he said. "But, it is very, very sad at the same time. When they place the wreath at the fountain and the water stops, my heart just stops beating."

Jackson, a 1968 Marshall graduate, played football for the Thundering Herd from 1964 through 1966. He gained 1,231 yards rushing for his career and scored 24 touchdowns. He lives in Columbus, Ohio, and formerly was backfield coach for legendary Coach Woody Hayes at Ohio State University.

Joining Murphy and Jackson as speakers will be Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Director of Athletics Mike Hamrick, and head football Coach Doc Holliday.

The service will conclude with the traditional placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.

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Photo: Mickey Jackson, president of the Marshall University Alumni Association and a former running back and assistant coach for the Thundering Herd, will be the keynote speaker at the plane crash memorial service Nov. 14.
 


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Guest artist series to present bassist Volkan Orhon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's MUsic Alive concert series will host double bassist Volkan Orhon on Friday, Nov. 12. The concert will take place at noon at First Presbyterian Church in Huntington, which is located at 1015 5th Ave.

The guest artist will be joined by cellist Dr. Şőlen Dikener, a member of the Marshall music faculty, and another bassist, Jason McNeal.

The double bass is a relatively rare solo instrument, Dikener said. A native of Turkey, Orhon has established himself as one of the top double bassists in the world today. He was a finalist and prize winner in the Concert Artists Guild Solo Competition in New York City, and was the co-first place winner of the International Society of Bassists Solo Competition. Additionally, he distinguished himself as the first double bass player ever to win the grand prize overall and first prize for double bass at the American String Teachers Association Solo Competition.

Orhon has performed with internationally recognized musicians including Gary Karr, Fazil Say and the Emerson String Quartet, and has been a soloist with many symphony orchestras. As a pedagogue, Orhon has been an invited clinician to workshops across the U.S. and abroad, including the Ouro Branco Festival in Brazil, the World Bass Festival in Paris, the Suzuki Association of the Americas and the International Society of Bassists. He currently is the associate professor of double bass at the University of Iowa and principal double bass in the Orchestra Iowa. He is a D'Addario Diamond Performing Artist.

In a collaborative effort with the First Presbyterian Church of Huntington, Marshall's Department of Music has been offering the MUsic Alive series since 2006. The concerts take place at noon on Fridays for an hour, followed by a luncheon prepared by the church members. This gives the opportunity for the audience to meet the artists and ask them any questions they may have.


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Training for W.Va. Sheriffs' Association to take place at Marshall University



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Geography Department is hosting aerial imagery and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) training for the West Virginia Sheriffs' Association on Wednesday, Nov. 3 and Thursday, Nov. 4.

"Marshall University welcomes the Sheriffs' Association to campus and is happy to provide the use of our GIS computer lab for the professional community," said Dr. James Leonard, associate professor of geography.

The training will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day in computer labs in Harris Hall and Smith Hall on the Huntington campus.

The West Virginia Sheriffs' Association (WVSA) is a nonprofit organization composed of the 55 sheriffs that serve each county in West Virginia and honorary members statewide. WVSA works with the West Virginia Legislature to improve conditions for law enforcement officers and make the state safer.  The Sheriffs' Association offers annual scholarships and hosts a camp for teenagers interested in law enforcement at the West Virginia Sheriffs' Youth Leadership Academy.

The West Virginia Sheriffs' Association has invited deputies and IT workers from all over the state to attend this pilot training session for Pictometry's Electronic Field Study (EFS) software.  The training is designed to familiarize end users with EFS software including the general layout of the screen, menus, functions, and tools. This class is designed as a "hands-on" class.

The software, data, and training will be provided by Pictometry International Corporation, headquartered in Rochester, N.Y.  Pictometry is a leading provider of geo-referenced aerial, oblique image libraries and related software.  Pictometry technologies are widely used by county GIS, planning and assessing professionals around the country and a growing number of commercial businesses including those in insurance, utilities, real estate, construction, and more.

WVSA has contracted with Pictometry to provide aerial imagery covering the entire state of West Virginia, EFS software, and training for law enforcement officers, administrators, and IT support staff.  The imagery and software will be used in both routine and emergency public safety conditions and eventually will be available for every sheriff's office in West Virginia.

For more information, contact Dr. James Leonard at 304-696-4626.


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Marshall students get a chance to start their own fraternity

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity is being welcomed back to campus this week as it begins its two-week recruiting process to re-colonize the chapter at Marshall University.

Two members of Pi Kappa Phi's national staff, Curt Herzog and Tyler Johansson, are on campus through Nov. 14 looking for men who are interested in stepping up and becoming founding members of a new and unique fraternity on campus.

Pi Kappa Phi fraternity was founded in December of 1904 and since has established itself as a distinctive organization within the fraternity world. Pi Kappa Phi officials say it was the second fraternity to outlaw hazing, the first to establish a student leadership program, and the only fraternity to found, own, and operate its own non-profit philanthropic organization. For more information, visit www.pikapp.org

Founding members of the new chapter at Marshall will have an opportunity to leave their legacy at MU and influence the lives of men who will follow in their footsteps. They will also be able to take advantage of leadership conferences, apply for more than $80,000 worth of scholarships, or even ride a bicycle across America for Pi Kappa Phi's Philanthropy, Push America. To see what Pi Kappa Phi is about, watch this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Et8QKnz_C1g.

According to Herzog, the ability to create your own rules and traditions is the most enjoyable experience of starting your organization.

"Starting a chapter of Pi Kappa Phi is an amazing opportunity for students to discover and develop their leadership abilities, and to make a positive change in not only their Greek and campus community, but also in their own lives," said Herzog, a founding father of Pi Kappa Phi at Missouri State University.

"Anyone can join a fraternity, but building your own fraternity is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. From budgets to brotherhood, you make the decisions; you set the rules; you start the traditions. And along the way, you'll also build lifelong friendships."

Any men interested in hearing more about the opportunity to become a founding member may contact Johansson by phone at 704-359-7832 or by e-mail at marshall@pikapp.org.


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Record turnout expected for 7th annual Marshall Marathon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,400 people from about 40 states have signed up to run or walk in the 7th annual Marshall University Marathon Sunday, Nov. 7, race director Tom Dannals said today.

The number of pre-race entrants is a record for the event, what starts at 7 a.m. on 3rd Avenue near Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Along with the USA Track & Field-certified 26.2-mile marathon, other events include The Herald-Dispatch half-marathon and the half-marathon relay, and the 5-mile walk. The previous most pre-race entrants was 800 and the highest final count was 1,100 in 2009.

This year's total includes 75 in the new armed forces division. Military personnel received special entry prices in honor of their service to the country.

"We've grown to this number despite being in a small city due to the incredible contribution of our volunteers in all aspects of the race - at the intersections, at the expo and the dinner the day before, and at the finish line," Dannals said. "Also, people love the goal-line finish carrying the football at a major university."

The last mile of the marathon takes runners and walkers through Marshall's campus for a goal-line finish at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The flat, fast course extends to west Huntington and back, passing Pullman Square and the Ohio River, and going through Ritter Park. Footballs are available for runners to carry the final 100 yards if desired.

Although the cutoff date to register online has passed, participants may still register on Saturday, Nov. 6, at the Marshall Recreation Center. There will be no race-day registration for any event.

Entry fees are as follows: marathon, $80; The Herald-Dispatch half-marathon, $50, and half-marathon relay, $75 per team; 5-mile walk, $20.

For more information, visit www.healthyhuntington.org.


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Marshall University celebrates sealing of time capsule

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrated the sealing of the time capsule for the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center in a ceremony today on the Huntington campus.

Items symbolic of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., Marshall alumni and the university were placed in the time capsule that was displayed during a ceremony on the Foundation Hall courtyard. They will be sealed at a later date, and the time capsule will be opened in 2060. 

 

 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp wrote a note to the MU community of 2060 to be placed in the time capsule.

"I trust that you will, with the gift of hindsight, see what we have worked hard to accomplish and take immense pride in the vision we had for Marshall University," Kopp wrote. "Everything we have accomplished has been oriented toward actualizing the vast potential we have discovered within Marshall University."

 

 

After Huntington Mayor Kim Wolfe proclaimed today Bridge to the Future Time Capsule Day in Huntington, Kopp spoke about the importance of leaving a legacy.

"It is all about leaving a permanent and lasting imprint on the future we all want to see at Marshall University," Kopp said. "It is vital to take very seriously the importance of leaving a legacy. Whatever it is you can do, commit to doing it. This is an illustrious university of which we are all proud and we are absolutely committed to being the best we can be. When we say, 'We Are Marshall,' we are talking about all of us - and we all care deeply about the future of this university."

Patrick Murphy, a senior from New York and president of Marshall's student body, noted the university's many changes on the Huntington campus since his arrival. Much of what lies ahead foarshall in the next 50 years is debatable, he said.

"However, there is one thing that I am certain that is not up for debate," Murphy said. "The community at Marshall, the family that we as Marshall students, alumni, faculty and staff belong to, is resistant to the passing fads and trends of a generation of time. The common bond between us can only be strengthened; the shared experiences and common brotherhood only reinforced. This is one outcome not up for debate."

In his note to "future friends" of Marshall to be placed in the time capsule, Dr. Ron Area wrote of the joy and excitement many experienced when the building opened in February, 2010.

"We are proud to be the first occupants of this fabulous new facility," said Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. "It is my hope that, as we oversee the university advancement division of the university, we build upon the legacy of Marshall University and add value to the foundation for generations to come."

Mickey Jackson, president of the Marshall University Alumni Association, said his heart was filled with joy and pride when the Foundation Hall opened this year. He described today's ceremony as "a unique and personal event," and said he hopes 50 years from now those who open the time capsule will say "job well done."

In addition to several letters, examples of items placed in the time capsule include the We Are Marshall DVD, a copy of Marshall Magazine, student and alumni predictions for 2060, a cell phone, a Marshall newsletter, a student ID card, an undergraduate catalogue, a campus map and photos of Marshall's campus and the surrounding area.

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Photos:

Mayor Kim Wolfe, second from right, proclaims today Bridge to the Future Time Capsule Day in Huntington as, from left, Patrick Murphy, Dr. Ron Area, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Mickey Jackson look on.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp addresses the crowd during the Bridge to the Future Time Capsule Ceremony today at Marshall University.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp speaks on the importance of leaving our legacy during the Bridge to the Future Time Capsule Ceremony today at Marshall University.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Marshall teams with Marine Corps to help kids during holiday season

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will join forces this holiday season with the United States Marine Corps Reserves in supporting a drive to collect toys for needy children in 14 West Virginia counties and four counties in Ohio in the 2010 Toys for Tots regional campaign.

Staff Sgt. Don Snyder, who is heading the campaign, said the need for toys for children ranging in age from toddlers to early teens in the 18 counties is enormous.

"We already have more than 1,300 children signed up, and I've been getting 20 e-mails a day from people who need toys," Snyder said. "We'd like to give every child who signed up three toys. Our goal is to exceed what we did last year. That's why we are enlisting the help of Marshall University."

Kelly Sweetman, director of military and veterans affairs at Marshall, said collection boxes will be placed in the Memorial Student Center throughout the campaign, which runs Monday, Nov. 1, through Friday, Dec. 17. New, unwrapped toys, valued at no more than $30 each, will be collected.

Money will also be accepted, although toys are preferred. Anyone wanting to donate money - which would be used to purchase toys - may call Sweetman at 304-696-5278.

"This campaign is a good example of the relationship Marshall has with the military and how we can work together for our community," Sweetman said. "I think our students are socially conscious and want to make a difference in the lives of our children. This is an excellent opportunity for us to do that this holiday season.

"We want to reach as many families as we can. The thought of a child going without is really quite sad. We need to dig deep within ourselves as a community and make sure that doesn't happen."

Volunteers will be needed throughout the campaign to sort, collect and distribute the toys. Anyone wanting to volunteer may call Sweetman or e-mail her at Sweetman@marshall.edu. She said MU students may ask their professors if volunteering in the Toys for Tots campaign can contribute towards their community service requirements.

The plan, Sweetman said, is to stop collecting names on Dec. 8. Sorting will take place Dec. 9-14, with toy distribution planned for Dec. 18-20.

Snyder said the children who receive the toys hopefully will receive a message of hope as well.

"The primary goal of Toys for Tots is to deliver, through a shiny new toy at Christmas, a message of hope to needy youngsters that will motivate them to grow into responsible, productive, patriotic citizens and community leaders," Snyder said. "A new toy, something that many take for granted, can make a tremendous difference in the life of a child."

The community, he said, also benefits from the campaign.

"One of the objectives of Toys for Tots is go unite all members of local communities in a common cause for three months each year during the annual toy collection and distribution campaign, and to contribute to better communities in the future," he said.

Toys may be dropped off at the Memorial Student Center throughout the campaign. They also may be dropped off at various locations in all 18 counties - just look for the Toys for Tots posters.

For more information, contact Snyder at 304-776-4806, ext. 302, e-mail him at Toys@CHWVT4T.com, or visit the Toys for Tots web site at http://charleston-wv.toysfortots.org.

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Photo: Marshall University mascot Marco presents a toy to Staff Sgt. Don Snyder for the 2010 Toys for Tots regional campaign, which begins Monday, Nov. 1. Marshall University is joining forces this holiday season with the United States Marine Corps Reserves in supporting the drive to collect toys for needy children in 14 West Virginia counties and four counties in Ohio. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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Marshall University homecoming parade set for Saturday in Huntington



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University will conduct its 2010 homecoming parade at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, in downtown Huntington.

The parade lineup is expected to be one of the largest in MU homecoming history with 77 units confirmed and more likely to sign up, according to student Matt Goddard, one of the event organizers. The parade is sponsored by the Student Government Association.

This year's homecoming theme is "It's A Thundering Herd Round-Up" and parade participants include Marshall University student organizations, community organizations and political candidates. The parade also will feature float and marching band competitions, with the winners to be announced at halftime of the homecoming football game between Marshall and UTEP. Kickoff is at 3 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Starting at 8 a.m. Saturday, 8th and 9th Streets between Veterans Memorial Boulevard and 5th Avenue will be closed. Veterans Memorial Boulevard, though, will remain open throughout the parade.

The lineup for the parade will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the parade starting at 11 a.m. at 4th Avenue and 8th Street. It will head east on 4th Avenue to 12th Street, where it will turn right (south) and proceed to 5th Avenue. It will then turn left (east) on 5th Avenue, proceeding to 20th Street where it will end at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

For more information, contact Goddard by phone at 304-222-5523 or by e-mail at goddard24@marshall.edu.

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Music exchange students to perform Friday, Oct. 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's MAGNETS exchange students from Brazil will perform a concert showcasing their talents at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 29, in the Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

Guitarists Pedro Rogrio and Andrei Uller and pianist Elider DiPaula are all part of the MAGNETS program sponsored by Marshall University and Morehead State University in the United States and Federal University of Goias and Santa Catarina State Unviersity in Brazil. MAGNETS stands for Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students.

Julio Alves, associate professor of music at Marshall who teaches guitar, said the exchange program will be in effect for the next three years, allowing students and faculty to study and perform in different cultures.

Rogerio, Uller, and DiPaula are the first students to come to Marshall as part of the program. Next semester three Marshall music students will study at one of the Brazilian universities.

Rogerio said coming to an American school to study was very beneficial for him.

"Marshall University is amazing, people are friendly, you can see many people from a lot of countries on campus," Rogerio said. "The music department is very good. We have excellent professors, they work hard all the time, and the students are also great."

DiPaula said there are a lot of differences between the two cultures, but his experience at Marshall has been postitive.

"Something I consider very good about the teaching here is the discipline of study and the support that the students have about the professors' ideas; we have large opportunities to get in touch with renowned artists and the exchange of knowledge," DiPaula said.

Alves said it was privilege to have the chance to work with the students.

"They are very positive people, very educated, very polite and very cordial to all the students and to us," Alves said. "They have been working very hard since they got here. They always show up for their lessons very well prepared."

Alves also said the program is very beneficial for the whole Huntington community.

"I think it is important because it shows the kind of work we have been doing in the department," Alves said. "It enhances the musical experiences of our students here and also all of the community. It's not every day we get people from different areas at a certain level of aptitude that are ready to come here and share their talents for us. That is a very rich opportunity."

The students will play music they have worked on in Brazil as well as pieces they have learned here.


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Annual Butler Executive in Residence Lecture canceled



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- The annual Ruth E. Butler Executive in Residence Lecture scheduled for 11 a.m.  Friday, Oct. 29, on Marshall University's Huntington campus has been canceled.   Plans to reschedule are incomplete at this time.
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'Graduation Celebration' for summer, December 2010 graduates set for Nov. 2-3

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - All summer 2010 and tentative December 2010 graduates of Marshall University are invited to attend a "Graduation Celebration" next week in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The purpose of the event is to give students the opportunity to purchase caps and gowns, class rings, announcements and other items to commemorate their graduation. They also will be able to meet with representatives from the Office of the Registrar, the Marshall Bookstore, Jostens, Alumni Relations, the MU Graduate College, Career Services, the Office of the Bursar, the Campus ID office and Financial Aid.

The celebration will take place from 1 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 2, and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3. The Don Morris Room is located on the second floor of the student center.

The following services will be available at this event:

Registrar's Office - Students may verify their graduation status, degree record, name format and mailing address for their 2010 diploma. They also will receive information related to Marshall's 2010 Winter Commencement, which will take place Sunday, Dec. 5 at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Marshall University Bookstore - Students may purchase or pre-order their "official" Marshall University gown, cap and tassel and purchase a custom diploma frame. They also may order personalized graduation announcements.

Jostens - Students may purchase their MU Class of 2010 rings. Custom Marshall University graduation announcements can be ordered at the event or online at www.college.jostens.com.

Classic Photography - Cap and gown portraits will be taken during the Graduation Celebration.

Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

Graduate College - Students will be able to meet with a Graduate Admission Counselor to discuss graduate programs and the admission process.

Career Services - Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance and interview skills.

Office of the Bursar - Students can discuss account holds and account balances and take part in loan counseling sessions. To complete a loan counseling session, a student needs to bring his or her student ID and the addresses and phone numbers of two references.

Financial Aid - Personnel will answer questions and provide procedures regarding consolidation of student loans.

Campus ID office - Students can resolve any outstanding issues with their HigherOne or Points accounts.

Alumni Relations - Students will have the opportunity to learn about the benefits of joining the Marshall University Alumni Association.

For more information, call the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Author Heather Hartley to read from her work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Author Heather Hartley will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Hartley is a poet, a professor of writing, and an international literary magazine editor. She grew up in West Virginia and is the author of Knock Knock, a new poetry collection from Carnegie Mellon University Press.  Publisher's Weekly, praising Hartley's sonorous language and humor, remarks that the book is "full of appetite and culture - it will make you want to book a one-way ticket to Paris."

Her poems, essays and interviews have appeared in Tin House, Mississippi Review, Post Road and other magazines, and numerous anthologies, including Food and Booze: A Tin House Literary Feast and Satellite Convulsions: Poems from Tin House.

She is Paris Editor for Tin House magazine, curates Shakespeare & Company Bookshop's weekly reading series, and teaches creative writing and poetry at the American University of Paris.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Office of the Provost.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Marshall University sculpture students to host exhibition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sculpture students in the Department of Art and Design at Marshall University will host an exhibition of 3-dimensional art at Gallery 842 in Huntington, opening Friday, Oct. 29.

An opening reception for the exhibition, titled Welcome to my Studio, will be Friday from 6 to 9 p.m.

"We are exhibiting student work that shows the variety and depth of contemporary sculpture," Jonathan Cox, professor of art and design, said. "The work is a reflection of individual student identity and perspective."

The sculpture students are eager for the opportunity to exhibit their work in Gallery 842 for the first time.

"This show is a great opportunity for us to exhibit our 3-dimensional work in an exhibition that is strictly 3-dimensional art," Ellen Fure, one of the sculpture students, said.

Gallery 842 is both a community- and Marshall University-held space to promote local talent and initiative. The gallery is a free cultural experience for any artist or art enthusiast. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays.

For more information or to ask questions about the exhibition or Gallery 842, contact Jaye Ike, by phone at 304-696-3296, or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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National report shows Marshall University graduates same percentage of African-American and white students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A recent national report released by The Education Trust indicates that Marshall University is successful in graduating African-American students at the same rate as white students.

The report, "Big Gaps, Small Gaps: Some Colleges and Universities Do Better Than Others in Graduating African-American Students," digs beneath national college-graduation averages and examines disaggregated six-year graduation rates at hundreds of the nation's public and private institutions, according to The Education Trust, a Washington, D.C. advocacy group. The group works to promote  high academic achievement among blacks, Latinos and American Indians, with the goal of closing the gaps in opportunity and achievement.

Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall University's Center for African-American Students' Programs, said he is not surprised that MU's white-black gap is 0.0, as reflected by this study, which means that the university graduates the same percentage of black students as it does white students.

"I'm elated that a neutral national organization has found us to be performing among the most successful universities in the country from this perspective," Cooley said. "As a whole, study after study shows that nationally, African-American students graduate at a rate 20 percent below that of white students. At Marshall, we are committed to providing a supportive environment that continually results in our students excelling in their studies and becoming wholly involved in the university community."

According to The Education Trust, which used data from 2006-2008, even though 57 percent of all students who enroll earn diplomas within six years, the graduation rates for different groups of students are vastly different. Nationally, 60 percent of whites but only 49 percent of Latinos and 40 percent of African-Americans who start college hold bachelor's degrees six years later. The August 2010 report was presented by Mamie Lynch, higher education research and policy analyst, and Jennifer Engle, assistant director of higher education, at The Education Trust.

Cooley, who came to Marshall University in 2003, said that there are more than 800 African-American students on the Huntington campus in a variety of degree programs from the arts to sciences and business. Many of these students learned about MU through a program for high school students that exposes them to college life. The annual Outstanding Black High School Students initiative brings high school juniors and seniors with 3.0 or higher grade point averages to Marshall for a weekend in November for programs, fellowship and that all-important exposure to college life.

"Once they have arrived as students, we don't expect them to just meet expectations; we expect them to truly excel and will make every effort to provide the critical resources and attention to achieving these outcomes," Cooley said.

High-achieving African-American students are invited to apply and interview for membership in the Society of Outstanding Black Scholars. Students are expected to maintain high grade point averages, participate fully in a mentoring program for four years and actively participate in a number of planned enrichment, academic and personal development activities, Cooley said.

Other organizations help students feel at home and give them encouragement while on campus including the Black United Students Organization and several Greek sororities and fraternities, as well as a Multicultural Leadership Ambassadors Program that is open to a highly diverse cross section of the student population at Marshall. The Office of Multicultural Affairs, under the leadership of Dr. Shari Clarke, works to enhance the overall university environment through direct student support services and creating a continuum of growth oriented opportunities for students of all colors and backgrounds.

Cooley said that the entire university, from the Office of the President to Academic Affairs and others are genuinely committed to the highest academic outcomes, irrespective of race, religion, or other differences. "Our students are soundly aware of this," he added.

"What we're doing is working because our African-American students become actively involved and hold numerous leadership positions in student life at MU. For example during recent years African American students have held recognition as both Mr. and Ms. Marshall during Homecoming, and recently as president of the Student Government Association. These positions are secured through the votes of the entire student body. All of these opportunities and many others have contributed to a successful college experience that I've seen propel students onto medical school and law school.

"Our ultimate goal is that our graduation rate for our African-American students will eventually exceed all others," Cooley said. "Why not? Marshall University is a place where all students can excel, irrespective of our differences. Our differences are what bring us together."


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Friday October 22, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Brownfields Assistance Center announces financing workshops

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University has announced workshops to be held next month in partnership with the National Development Council, BB&T and the Brownfields Assistance Center at West Virginia University (WVU).

Two one-day "Brownfields Redevelopment:  Environmental and Economic Viability" workshops are planned. The first workshop is scheduled for Nov. 16 at the Waterfront Place Hotel in Morgantown. The second workshop will be held Nov. 17 at Tamarack in Beckley.

The workshops are intended for bankers, real estate developers, environmental regulatory entities and economic development groups. The sessions will provide participants with information and resources to help them deal with the unique financial considerations that must be considered when working with brownfields properties.

Brownfields are abandoned or underutilized contaminated land with prospects for business, housing or recreational redevelopment. The Brownfields Assistance Centers at Marshall and WVU were created in 2005 to secure and administer federal brownfields funding and assistance programs, and to provide training and technical assistance, and grant writing, site assessment and remediation services. The West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University is housed in the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS).

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, said, "Our Brownfields Assistance Center continues to expand outreach efforts and partnerships, and this workshop is another example of our efforts. We are pleased to continue our leadership role in assisting entities across the state with brownfields redevelopment and associated community revitalization."

Each workshop is limited to a maximum of 50 participants. Sessions will be fast-paced, hands-on events with extensive attendee participation.

Workshop and registration information is available at www.bbttraining.com.


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Friday October 22, 2010
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Media Communications Specialist, (304) 696-7153

Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University Announces 24th Annual Lecture Series

Theme is Sustainable Agriculture in West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars begins its 24th Annual Symposium Lecture Series, "Sustainable Agriculture in West Virginia," at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26 in Smith Hall 154 on the Huntington campus. Additional lectures are scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 2, and 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9, in Smith Hall 154.

 "The issue of sustainability is making headlines daily," said Henry Heisey, Yeager student co-chair for the series. "Our lecture series applies the term to food and farming. Speakers will describe how farming practices can be made more sustainable, as well as highlight what is happening currently in this field and what changes local experts foresee in the field."

The first lecture, Tuesday, Oct. 26, features Marshall University ecology professor Dr. Frank Gilliam, whose comments will focus on nitrogen dynamics and its effect on farming and sustainability.  

Tuesday, Nov.2. the lecture series welcomes Thomas McConnell, who is the director of the West Virginia Small Farms Center and serves as West Virginia University's Sustainable Agriculture Resources and Education Coordinator. McConnell will address current and future sustainability efforts in West Virginia.

The series concludes Tuesday, Nov. 9, with a panel discussion featuring Dr. James Farmer, who teaches in Marshall's Natural Resources and Recreation Management program, and Dr. Chuck Talbott, who is the Putnam County extension agent and also owns a farm that produces free-range pork.

Each lecture will conclude with a question-and-answer session, followed by a reception.  The events are open to the public.

For more information please contact Sharlee Henry, Honors College, at 304-696-6763.


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Thursday October 21, 2010
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University offers Campus Conversation on Digital Instruction

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A series of discussions geared toward fostering the implementation of the Marshall University Academic Master Plan continues with an event scheduled for 3 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 27, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Campus Conversations, which are open to all Marshall faculty, students and staff, will take place throughout the 2010-11 academic year in an effort to gather input on several significant issues associated with the Academic Master Plan. 

The topic for the Oct. 27 discussion is "Mobile Technologies: The New Chalk!"  Conversation will be facilitated by Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs; Dr. Mike Little, Chair of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology; and Brian Morgan, Associate Professor in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology.

The discussions are sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs and MU-ADVANCE.  Light refreshments will be provided. 

Questions and requests for additional information should be directed to the Office of Academic Affairs by e-mail at academic-affairs@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 20, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Huntington 'Street Newspaper' Debuts Oct. 21

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first edition of The Huntington Pulse, a "street newspaper" started by Marshall University students, will be introduced Thursday, Oct. 21, at a release party in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Copies of the paper will be available for purchase there for $1 each and will be available at Empire Books in Huntington the following day.

Marshall student Eric Falquero invited the public to attend a release party, which will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in room 2W37 of the Memorial Student Center and will feature live music and refreshments. He said that the paper's staff members will be available to receive feedback and suggestions from those attending.

Falquero established the paper, with a starting staff of 18 other students, to help homeless people around the Huntington area. A planned vendor program will allow homeless individuals to sell the paper in order to help them save money, find work and find support from fellow community members, Falquero said.

"We are applying for many grants that could bring new money to the area through us, and ending homelessness is a value we support and promote 100 percent, as well as hope to be an agent of," Falquero said.

The first issue will showcase the Cabell-Huntington Coalition for the Homeless' services at Harmony House to highlight what they do.

Falquero said he was inspired by a similar nonprofit paper, Street Sense, with which he interned in Washington, D.C., last summer. He started The Huntington Pulse as the capstone project for his degree program in the College of Fine Arts and began to organize by creating a student organization known as the Marshall Street Newspaper Association. The group is  approved to offer internships to journalism and design students.


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Tuesday October 19, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, Director of Communications, 304-696-3296

MU alumna Lisa Hindmarsh returns to sing jazz cabaret at Homecoming

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumna Lisa Hindmarsh, a jazz singer, and faculty member Dr. Sean Parsons, a jazz pianist, will present a program of favorite jazz standards in the 2010 Homecoming Cabaret at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, in the Jomie Jazz Forum on the Huntington campus.

Since receiving her Master of Arts degree in vocal performance from Marshall in 1989, where she was a student of Linda Dobbs and featured with the MU Opera Theatre, Pittsburgh native Lisa Hindmarsh has crafted a critically acclaimed career as a singer whose range spans a wide variety of genres.  She has been a professional church and synagogue musician for nearly 30 years, including six years with the renowned Choir of the Church of St. Luke in the Fields and with St. Bartholomew's in New York City, and with the Pittsburgh Camerata and Mendelssohn Choir in Pittsburgh.

While living in Pittsburgh, she was the alto of the popular, highly regarded jazz/pop a cappella quintet, InVoice. During its seven-year tenure, the group released a critically acclaimed recording, Out of Nowhere, and performed extensively throughout western Pennsylvania.

Hindmarsh currently lives in Charleston, S.C., where she is a soloist at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and a member of the acclaimed 12-voice, a cappella Charleston Renaissance Ensemble in addition to her work with local jazz musicians throughout the city.

Parsons is as at home in modern jazz as he is with The Great American Songbook.  He is nearing completion of his first CD as a leader, titled "When I See Her Again," which is expected to be released later in 2010.

Hindmarsh will also conduct a master class for singers at 2 p.m. Thursday in the Jomie Jazz Forum. The class is free and open to the public.


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Tuesday October 19, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0 in Concert Oct. 21

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The year's first concert by the Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0, the university's premier jazz ensemble, will take place at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Student vocalist Jen Billups will be the featured artist. Billups is a vocal performance major and a second-year member of the ensemble. She is also a member of Marshall's rock ensemble, Looking Glass, and the MU Chamber Choir. Her singing has attracted the notice of some of the premier vocal jazz educators in the nation, said Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall.

Other notable students to be heard in the ensemble include Austin Seybert and Luke Miller. Seybert was selected to participate in the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra that will perform at the Jazz Education Network conference in New Orleans in January. Miller was selected as an alternate and will attend the conference.

The concert will include jazz standards such as "Blue Skies," "The Lady is a Tramp," "When Sunny Gets Blue," "A Tisket, A Tasket" (made famous by Ella Fitzgerald) and Maynard Ferguson's version of "Brazil."

For further information, contact Bingham at 304-696-3147.


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Tuesday October 19, 2010
Contact: Dr. Chuck Bailey, WMUL-FM, , 304-696-2294

Marshall graduate student a finalist in national broadcast competition

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - A student broadcaster from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, was a national finalist in the 2009 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the category Radio News Reporting.

Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery, W.Va., received the award for "Salvation for the Powerless," which he wrote and produced for "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, February 2, 2009.

The award was presented at the SPJ Convention and National Journalism Conference earlier this month in Las Vegas.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said that Cavalier competed with other broadcasting students who won regional first-place awards for radio news reporting. 

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists," Bailey said. "This recognition, for the third straight year, for WMUL-FM's Adam Cavalier in SPJ's National Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications,"

Overall there are 39 categories for print, radio, television and online journalism in the SPJ National Mark of Excellence contest and there were more than 3,600 entries from schools across SPJ's 12 regions in the contest. SPJ has been presenting the Mark of Excellence Awards since 1972.

Founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi, SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and to educate the next generation of journalists; and protects the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press.


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Friday October 15, 2010
Contact: Dr. Corley Dennison, Dean, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, 304-696-2809

Manchin holds double-digit lead over Raese for U.S. Senate seat in W.Va., according to new MU School of Journalism poll

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Gov. Joe Manchin, III leads businessman John Raese by 10 percentage points in the November West Virginia election to fill the unexpired term of late Sen. Robert C. Byrd, according to a new poll conducted on behalf of  Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. The Manchin campaign has emerged with a substantial lead, despite the unpopularity of President Barack Obama and his policies in the Mountain State.

In the poll of 450 likely voters conducted Oct. 11-12, Manchin, a Democrat, holds a 48-38 advantage over Raese, his Republican opponent. The governor's lead in the poll exceeds the margin of error of 4.6 percent. 

The election will be held on Nov. 2 to replace Byrd, the longest-serving member of Congress who died June 28 after more than 50 years serving the people of West Virginia in that office.

The new poll suggests an improvement in Manchin's campaign impact and confirms a general rise noted in other recent polls. Manchin had trailed by as many as six points in one poll but other more recent polls since early October have pegged the contest a dead heat. This is the first poll in recent days to show a substantial lead by Manchin.

The Marshall Poll also finds strong approval of Manchin's performance as governor of West Virginia - 65 percent evaluating his job performance as good or excellent. However, there is a 23 percentage-point difference between those supporting his candidacy for the United States Senate and those favorably evaluating his performance in the governor's office.

Manchin's lead in the poll contrasts strong opposition to President Obama in West Virginia. In the poll, half of the voters expressed "very much worry" about Obama's health-care bill and indicated similar concern about the future of the coal industry in their state. When asked if the policies of Obama and Manchin were similar, 35 percent said "somewhat similar" and 27 percent said "very much the same."

In recent days, the governor has tried to distance himself from President Obama's administration with a suit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and campaign ads emphasizing Manchin's NRA endorsement and his differences with Obama over the budget and energy policies.

Concerning the economy, respondents said Democrats (33 percent) are in the best position to improve the economy, versus 26 percent for Republicans and 12 percent for the tea party. Other poll results involving issues of concern to the electorate, however, underscore the challenges Manchin confronts in winning the U.S. Senate seat he was favored to win at the start of the campaign. Nearly half (47 percent) said they are "very much" worried about the health-care bill passed by Congress in the spring, half (51 percent) said they are "very much" worried about the future of the coal industry and nearly half (48 percent) said they are worried "very much" about job security.

Dr. Robert Rupp, a poll adviser and West Virginia Wesleyan professor, said "The concern about job security was reflected in another economic question on the improvement of the economy. Almost half of the survey voters (45 percent) strongly disagree with the assessment that 'our economy is improving.'"

However, voters expressing such views do not necessarily indicate they will vote for one candidate over another because of those positions.

Another adviser on the poll, Dr. Marybeth Beller, chair and professor of political science at Marshall, made the following observations in her analysis:

  • Respondents who said the tea party represents their views (very much 23 percent, somewhat 23 percent) are more likely to support Raese.
  • People who say Manchin shares Obama's policies (62 percent) are very likely to support Raese.
  • People who disagreed with the statement that "our economy is improving" (52 percent) are more likely to vote for Raese.
  • However, concern over the future of the coal industry is not a statistically significant indicator of whether voters will support Manchin or Raese even though 67 percent worried about it.
  • Concern over job security (62 percent) is not a statistically significant indicator of whether a voter will support Manchin or Raese.

Poll analysts suggest part of Manchin's rise possibly was caused a by a major news event that took place during the polling period: Former Democratic President Bill Clinton campaigned Oct. 11 with Manchin in Morgantown. Clinton carried West Virginia during his election campaigns in 1992 and 1996, before the state tilted Republican during the past two presidential elections. 

Rupp said "The poll may have been impacted by the Clinton factor because some poll results were taken on Monday when the former president campaigned with the governor (in Morgantown). But his campaign visit could result in a false positive of no more than 2 percent, which still puts Manchin ahead by 8 percent (46 percent-38 percent) exceeding the margin of error of +/- 4.6 percent, and placing him in the lead in five of the past six public polls taken on the race since September."

How the Marshall University School of Journalism
 and Mass Communications poll was conducted

The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, commissioned a poll on the U.S. Senate race between Democrat Joe Manchin and Republican John Raese. Orion Strategies conducted the poll October 11-12, 2010. The poll also tested voter attitudes in the Mountain State.  The poll used a sample of likely voters representative of the West Virginia's voting electorate and proportional to its three congressional districts. A total of 450 respondents completed the survey in its entirety.   Names were rotated in questions dealing with campaigns to reduce bias.  The margin of error is +-4.6 percent with a confidence rate of 95 percent. The survey was conducted by live interviewers only, and no automated response system was used.

Orion Strategies, with locations in Charleston and Buckhannon, conducts public opinion polling in West Virginia for political campaigns, media outlets and institutions of higher education.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communications is an accredited program and offers programs of study for undergraduate and graduate students. The school offers majors in broadcast, print, sports and online journalism, advertising, public relations and radio-television production and management.

###

Marshall University Questionnaire
 

 

Now, I'd like to ask you to evaluate Joe Manchin's performance as governor. Would you say it is:

5 Excellent 37%
4 Good 38%
3 Don't know/recognize 6%
2 Fair 12%
1 Poor 7%
Total 100%


 

If the November Election for United States Senate were being held today, would you vote for Republican Nominee John Raese or Democratic Nominee Joe Manchin:

John Raese 38%
Neither 2%
Not sure 12%
Jesse Johnson 0%
Joe Manchin 48%
Total 100%


 

Please listen to the following the statement: Our economy has been improving. Do you

Very much agree 10%
Somewhat agree 22%
Not sure 6%
Somewhat disagree 17%
Strongly disagree 45%
Total 100%


 

Please tell us how worried you are about the following individual topics as issues in your OWN household:

a. The Heath Care bill passed by Congress

5 Very much 48%
4 Somewhat 19%
3 Not Very Much 8%
2 Don't Know/Not Sure 9%
1 Not at all 16%
Total 100%

b. Coal Industry

5 Very much 51%
4 Somewhat 16%
3 Not Very Much 8%
2 Don't Know/Not Sure 8%
1 Not at all 16%
Total 100%

c. Job Security

5 Very much 47%
4 Somewhat 15%
3 Not Very Much 8%
2 Don't Know/Not Sure 5%
1 Not at all 25%
Total 100%

 

Which political affiliation is in the best position to help improve the economy?

1 Democrats 33%
4 Republicans 26%
5 TEA Party 12%
2 Unsure 16%
3 None of the Above 13%
Total 100%

 

How strongly do you believe the TEA Party represents your views?

5 Very much 23%
4 Somewhat 23%
3 Not Very Much 22%
2 Don't Know/Not Sure 8%
1 Not at all 23%
Total 100%

 

To what degree do you believe Joe Manchin and President Obama share the same policy positions?

They differ greatly 8%
Very little 9%
Not sure 21%
Somewhat similar 35%
Very much the same 27%
Total 100%

 

Please tell me which of the following best describes your marital status.

Married 74%
Single 5%
Divorced/separated 4%
Widowed 14%
Refused 2%
Total 100%

 

Are you, or is anyone in this household, a member of a labor union?

Non-union household 76%
Not sure 4%
Labor union household 20%
Total 100%

 

Do you consider yourself a "fundamentalist" or "evangelical" Christian?

Yes 68%
Not sure 10%
No 22%
Total 100%

 

How would you describe your point of view in terms of the political parties? Would you say you are mostly Democratic, leaning Democratic, completely Independent, leaning Republican, or mostly Republican?

7 Mostly Democratic 32%
6 Leaning Democratic 10%
5 Completely Independent 15%
4 None (VOL) 2%
3 Not sure 3%
2 Leaning Republican 16%
1 Mostly Republican 22%
Total 100%

 

For statistical purposes only, we need to know your total family income range for 2010. I'm going to read you a list of categories.

Under $40,000 39%
Over $40,000 42%
Not sure (VOL) 7%
Refused 12%
Total 100%

 

How regularly do you attend religious services?

Never 12%
Rarely 14%
Once or twice a year 10%
Once a month 9%
Weekly 36%
More than Once a Week 19%
Total 100%

 

In what age group are you?

18-24 7%
25-34 3%
35-49 11%
50-64 32%
65 and over 47%
Total 100%
 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 15, 2010
Contact: Keely Martin, Executive Assistant, Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, , 304-696-3830

MIIR seminar series to host MU Alumnus and former Merck & Co. Executive Director



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- The focus of an upcoming program presented by Blair Gibson, former executive director for Portfolio Strategy and Strategic Planning at Merck & Co., will be research and development productivity and opportunities for academic collaboration in the pharmaceutical industry.

The event is to be hosted by the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), and will take place Wednesday, Oct. 27, at Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center at 519 John Marshall Dr. in Huntington. A reception will be held from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The program will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Gibson, a Marshall University alumnus, has worked for some of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world such as Merck & Co., Sanofi Aventis and Pharmacia (now Pfizer Inc.), and has more than 25 years of experience in the industry in both commercial and strategic planning roles.

He headed the global launch of JANUVIA, a blockbuster drug for the treatment of type-2 diabetes. The launch of this drug was praised by the pharmaceutical industry as one of the best launches ever of a primary-care drug. Gibson's work experience has been largely global in scope and he has even served expatriate assignments in Europe and Latin America. 

"We are very excited about having Blair present the lecture this fall.  He has unique insight into areas of health and technology that affect our daily lives.  Considering the changes ahead of us in health care, the timing of this lecture could not be better," said Dr. Eric Kmiec, director of MIIR and the institute's lead research scientist.

Gibson has in-depth experience in the area of tradeoff-decision analysis for portfolios of marketed brands and late-stage clinical studies.  He has published two papers on strategic resources allocation and four portfolios of marketed products on tradeoff-decision analysis in phase IIb-IV.

He currently advises pharmaceutical companies and financial institutions on mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries.

Co-sponsors of the event include Huddleston Bolen LLP and the Marshall University Foundation.

The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are requested.

For more information or to make reservations, contact Keely Martin at martin192@marshall.edu or 304-696-3830.

MIIR was created through the state's "Bucks for Brains" research trust fund. The institute's goal is to become a self-sustaining enterprise through entrepreneurship and commercialization of scientific discoveries, while enhancing economic development, advancing intellectual infrastructure and increasing employment opportunities in the state and region.


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Friday October 15, 2010
Contact: Michelle Muth, Marshall Recreation Center, , 304-696-2943

Marshall Recreation Center to conduct used shoe drive as part of nationwide sustainability day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of the 8th annual NIRSA (National Intramural and Recreational Sports Association) Campus Rec Sustainability Day, the Marshall Recreation Center will conduct a used shoe donation drive on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

The recreation center is located at 402 Thundering Herd Dr., across from Joan C. Edwards Stadium, on the Huntington campus. The center will accept any type of shoe, either new or gently used, at the recreation center's main entrance from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Shoes also can be dropped off quickly to staff members from 4 to 6 p.m. at the recreation center's 5th Avenue loading dock.

Shoe donations will be given to Sports Gift, a charitable organization associated with NIRSA. Shoes not accepted by Sports Gift will be given to local organizations.

For those unable to donate shoes, sports equipment such as old baseball, football, soccer or other gear will be accepted. All equipment collected will be used to help impoverished children all over the world - including those in communities in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia and Pacific, Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East - play sports. For a complete list of acceptable equipment and additional information about Sports Gift, visit SportsGift.org.

Shoe and equipment collections will be accepted at the recreation center after Oct. 20 during regular hours until Nov. 12. Regular hours are Monday to Thursday, 6 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday, 1 to 10 p.m.

The Marshall student organization, MU-P.R.O.S., also will participate in the nationwide sustainability day by holding an electronics recycling drive from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the recreation center's 5th Avenue loading dock.

MU-P.R.O.S. will accept any old electronics, including computers, printers, televisions, and microwave ovens. Potential private information will be removed from all equipment received. Funds raised by the electronics drive will be used to help student members attend educational seminars and conferences, and to participate in student activities. MU-P.R.O.S., a student organization for Parks and Recreation majors or other students interested in parks and recreation, raised more than $150 during last year's drives.

The Marshall Recreation Center, which opened in 2009, is a member of NIRSA.

For more information on the shoe drive or the recreation center, call 304-696-4REC or visit www.Marshallcampusrec.com. Information concerning P.R.O.S. and the recycling drive can be directed to the organization's faculty representative, Richard Abel, at 304-696-2931. For information concerning NIRSA or Campus Rec Sustainability Day, visit www.nirsa.com.        

###


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Friday October 15, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall musicians to present 'Octubafest!'



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Members of the Marshall University Tuba and Euphonium Studio will present their annual celebration of "Octubafest!" later this month.

A concert of solo performances will be given at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 25, in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The university's tuba/euphonium ensemble, "Tubonium," will perform a concert with an array of Halloween-themed compositions to celebrate "TUBAWEEN" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 27, also in Smith Music Hall.

"Come enjoy the festive costumes, decorations, and free candy," said Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba at Marshall.  "There will be 'kid-friendly' activities and costumes are welcome."

Admission is free and open to the public for both events. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, persons may call the Department of Music at  304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 14, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall University Sustainability Department launches Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University family will soon be able to borrow some wheels to cruise around town and never have to worry about filling up the tank.

The Marshall Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program is now accepting membership applications from students, faculty and staff.  Bike checkouts will begin Monday, Oct. 18, according to Margie Phillips, manager of the Sustainability Department.

A limited number of bikes will be available for daily use Monday through Friday between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. as well as on weekends between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. The service is free, but is available only to those with a valid Marshall University ID. Applicants can register, agree to terms of use and safety, and sign liability forms either in person at the Outdoor Recreation Area of the Marshall Recreation Center or online at www.marshall.edu/sustainability.

Phillips said the concept for the program grew out of Greening Marshall Committee meetings where students, faculty and staff gather regularly to discuss ideas to lighten the environmental footprint of the university.

"We really want the Marshall family to take advantage of this program both to reduce carbon emissions from motor vehicles and to have a no-cost option for exercise, adventure and campus commuting," Phillips said. "Riding a bicycle promotes a healthy body and helps the environment as alternative transportation. We are sure people will have fun with Marshall Eco Cycle."

The Sustainability Department purchased a fleet of six Trek and Globe Carmel Cruisers with funds from the student-initiated Green Fee to launch the program. Additionally, two mountain bikes have been donated by Sam Colvin, a faculty member in the Integrated Science and Technology Department and member of the Greening Marshall Committee.

Eco Cyclists will receive safety training upon checkout and will be provided with a bike lock and helmet. The bikes are to be ridden within the city limits of Huntington. Eco Cyclists will find plenty of parking for their bikes on the Huntington campus where new bike racks are available, compliments of the Physical Plant as well as Green Fee funds.

The first 50 students to register for membership in the Eco Cycle Program will get a complimentary backpack from the Sustainability Department. The first 50 to actually check out a bike will receive a free water bottle.

The Sustainability Department has partnered with the Recreation Center, the Marshall University Student ID Office and Jeff's Bike Shop in Huntington to make the program possible.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 14, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Marshall student reaches national pageant finals



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- A theatre major at Marshall will travel to New Orleans next year representing West Virginia in a national pageant.

Rachel Stefursky, a theatre major from Charleston, W.Va., first competed in the Planet Beach Internationals series in a local contest in August. Stefursky and two others were chosen as winners and split a prize of $1000. From there they went on to compete in the regionals pageant in Canton, Ohio.

In Ohio, Stefursky competed against 35 young women from eight different states. Fifty percent of the competition was based on personality and fifty percent was based on dress and swimwear. Each woman was interviewed, asked to express personal experiences, and to "sell" a product that was given to them on the spot. 

Stefursky said class, intellect, and personality were all part of the requirements of the competition. The first four finishers were all from West Virginia and will move on to the finals in January.

"I'm so proud of the four of us for representing West Virginia in a positive light and myself for even participating in the event itself," Stefursky said. "I thought how wonderful was it that I was involved in competing in an organization that was for sending a positive message to young women. The director was very inspirational in explaining that we needed to represent females by showing forth our strong intellectual and personable selves." 

Stefursky said even though she would be acting as a positive role model, the whole pageant experience was different for her.

"I'm used to being judged on a talent, not on a look that someone may just not like," Stefursky said. "I just went in accepting the fact that other people's opinions of me or my physical appearance do not define who I am."

She added she went into the competition in hopes of winning some money but never thought she would place.

"I have struggled with insecurities about my body and self-esteem but I have developed confidence within myself since this winning," Stefursky said.

Stefursky and the three other West Virginia finalists will compete for $150,000 cash and a modeling contract this coming January.


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Wednesday October 13, 2010
Contact: Mike Campbell, Marshall University Bookstore, , 304-696-2456

Wrestler Mick Foley to sign latest book at Marshall University Bookstore

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - World-famous professional wrestler and best-selling author Mick Foley will be on hand at the Marshall University Bookstore on Monday, Oct. 18, to talk with fans and sign his latest work, "Countdown to Lockdown: A Hard Core Journal."

Foley, also author of the number-one New York Times best-seller "Have a Nice Day! A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks," will be at the bookstore, which is located in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus, beginning at 6 p.m.

In his latest book, Foley recounts the days leading up to his emergence from retirement and debut with a new wrestling organization. "Countdown to Lockdown" chronicles the tough process he endured to come back against archrival Sting and includes a collection of anecdotes about the wild, wild world of professional wrestling.

Foley has wrestled professionally for more than 15 years and is a multiple champion and title holder. Foley also penned the #1 New York Times hit: "Foley Is Good: And the Real World Is Faker than Wrestling." He currently wrestles on TNA Wrestling and resides with his wife and four children on Long Island, N.Y., where he grew up.


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Wednesday October 13, 2010
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Marshall University Honors College seminar class to host senatorial health care discussion panel

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Honors College seminar on U.S. health care is hosting a health care discussion panel among West Virginia candidates for the U.S. Senate on Thursday, Oct. 14 on the Huntington campus.

The event, which is open to the public, will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, Located across 5th Avenue from the Marshall Memorial Student Center.  A small meet-and-greet will precede the discussion at 6 p.m.

Tickets are limited and may be picked up before the event at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse box office.

"Health care is important for all West Virginians as it affects us daily," said MU student Matt Goddard, a class member and one of the event organizers. "With the proposed changes to the American health care system, our class feels that the public needs to be educated on where each candidate stands.  This is why we decided to have an interactive forum, where questions will be posed to the senatorial candidates from the class as well as audience members."

Republican candidate John Raese and Mountain Party candidate Jesse Johnson have confirmed that they will attend, and Constitution Party candidate Jeff Becker will take part via videoconference. Gov. Joe Manchin, the Democratic candidate, will not be able to attend, but plans to send a message to those attending.

The seminar focuses on the importance of knowledge of health care and health care policy. Because health care is a hot topic in this election, members of the class thought it would be interesting to hear the opinions of senatorial candidates who will have a key role in the future of health care in this nation, Goddard said.

Although health care legislation passed last spring, discussion and policy on the topic are not finished, Goddard said. The class's goal is to investigate all health care options and discover the methods that will work best for the United States for the future.

For more information, contact Erin Shaver at shaver29@live.marshall.edu or 304-544-7002 with any questions or requests for more information. E-mail is preferable.


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Wednesday October 13, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Trip to Charlotte business headquarters eye opening for Marshall Executive MBA students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students in Marshall University's Executive MBA program ventured out of the classroom and into three high-profile boardrooms as part of their recent domestic residency in Charlotte, N.C.

The trip included exclusive site visits to the Carolina Panthers, Bank of America and Duke Energy. The excursion was planned and executed by three students in the cohort: Troy Andes of Hurricane, Gordon Waters of Proctorville, Ohio, and Shad West of South Charleston.

"Takeaways from any learning experience are what everyone who thirsts for knowledge hopes for. We got it in spades in Charlotte," West said. "It is clear what each person took away was very rich and diversified. I learned the importance of loving what you do and how much easier it is to work hard when you do. I learned that while simulations are great for theorizing, nothing beats throwing people together from different aspects of a business to come up with real solutions for some of today's toughest decisions. And finally, I learned the importance of being flexible in any situation as long as you maintain focus on what your overall mission is and the way in which your organization has chosen to achieve it. This domestic residency was the experience of a lifetime." 

Each business tailored a presentation specifically to Marshall's Executive MBA program.

While meeting with executives of the Carolina Panthers, students heard from President Danny Morrison as well as members of his marketing team about the power of the NFL brand and the importance of protecting their own Panthers image. On a tour through the Panthers' 73,778-seat, privately-financed, open-air, natural grass stadium, students saw evidence of brand development and attention to detail from the field to its posh suites.

Bank of America Corporation, perhaps most recognized as the largest bank holding company in the United States by assets, is also listed by Forbes as the third-largest company in the world. Bank of America serves clients in more than 150 countries and has 300,000 employees, according to human resources executives who addressed the class. Presenters emphasized the importance of talent retention and shared how the company manages its international workforce at all levels and in all branches of the company reaching well beyond its Charlotte headquarters.

Duke Energy, a Fortune 500 company, is one of the largest electric power companies in the United States, supplying and delivering energy to approximately 4 million U.S. customers. Executives at Duke Energy's headquarters, including Shawn Heath, vice president for planning and support, showed students the trading floor and invited them to participate in two panel discussions with Duke Energy executives, one titled Carbon Policy and Renewable Energy and another titled Wholesale, Port Optimization, Fuels and Transportation.

Kathy Rittenhouse, an accountant and Executive MBA student, found the residency to be eye-opening in terms of current, real-world business practices.

"The overall experience in Charlotte provided us with a priceless example of how corporations are adapting to the current economic situation whether dealing with marketing, human resources or environmental issues," Rittenhouse said. "While classroom experiences are great, the opportunity to witness how challenging business situations are being handled through strategic planning and rebranding was fantastic." 

Dr. Uday Tate, director of the program, said it is vital that executive-level students take their education outside of the classroom to enrich what they are learning from professors as well as each other.

"Our program has many value-added features, including two residencies: international and domestic," Tate said. "Our EMBA students experience not only the way corporate America functions, but also receive valuable lessons in global markets.  In addition, domestic and international residencies enhance teamwork and provide opportunities to apply leadership and organizational skills."

The domestic residency was funded by the Marshall Executive MBA program. Students were accompanied by Steve Shumlas, assistant director and MBA advisor, and Dr. Shane Tomblin, faculty member from Marshall University's Lewis College of Business.

---

Photos:

(Top) Carolina Panthers President Danny Morrison talks to Marshall University Executive MBA students about the power of branding. (Bottom) Marshall University Executive MBA students learn how the Carolina Panthers employ social networking to help build the company's brand.

Photos courtesy of Marshall University.


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Monday October 11, 2010
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Music fraternity conducting apple butter sale

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The annual apple butter sale by the members of Marshall University's chapter of Phi Mu Alpha, a social music fraternity, is under way and will continue until Monday, Oct. 18.

Cost is $6 per pint and $10 per quart. Orders may be placed by e-mailing Michael Rose at rose83@live.marshall.edu and providing the following information: name of person ordering, contact information (e-mail, office number, and/or address), and sizes and quantities being ordered. Checks may be made payable to Phi Mu Alpha Zeta-Eta, and all monies must be received by Monday, Oct. 18. 

Phi Mu Alpha is a social music fraternity, open to all male students university wide who have a love and great respect for music. Phi Mu Alpha serves the music department and the surrounding community with multiple service projects. All proceeds from this fundraiser will be used toward the chapter's departmental and community service projects.

For more information, persons may contact Rose.


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Monday October 11, 2010
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Normal parking procedures at MU altered because of UCF game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will alter normal parking procedures in and around the Huntington campus on Wednesday, Oct. 13 because of the Thundering Herd's 8 p.m. home football game with the University of Central Florida.

Beginning at 1 p.m. Wednesday, the following athletic permit lots will be closed to staff and student parking: the Joan C. Edwards Stadium west lot, Annex lots 1 and 2, Maple St. North / South lots, the softball lot, and the 20th Street and 3rd Avenue lot.

All vehicles must be removed from these lots by 4:30 pm Wednesday. Vehicles on lots after 4:30 p.m. will be towed at the owner's expense.  Alternate parking will be available on 6th Avenue lots or the parking garage, which is located across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center.


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Monday October 11, 2010
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Marshall University artists join ceramics exhibition at Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Keramos Potters Guild at Marshall University and potters from the community will participate in a ceramics exhibition at the Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau Oct. 22 and 23.

The exhibition will showcase various kinds of ceramic works, including functional pieces and sculptural works.

The exhibition opening will take place Friday, Oct. 22, from 4 to 8 p.m. The show will also be open on Saturday, Oct. 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

"This show will be an exciting look at ceramics that Marshall University potters and our alumni are creating," said Tommy Warf, president of Keramos Potters Guild and a graduate art education student. "You'll see everything from functional dinnerware to ceramic sculpture.

"I'm very thankful to the CVB for the opportunity to showcase our student works. Making work and showing in an exhibition is not only a way to inform the public about what we do, but also to prepare ceramics students for careers in the ceramics field."

The Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau is located at 210 11th St. near Harris River Front Park, in Heritage Station.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike, Special Projects Coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Friday October 8, 2010
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CMT star Miranda Lambert headlines Marshall University's Homecoming 2010 concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Country music singer-songwriter Miranda Lambert is bringing her Revolution 2010 tour to Huntington as the featured artist in Marshall University's homecoming concert on Friday, Oct. 29.

The concert, which is a part of CMT on Tour, will kick off at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena at 7:30 p.m. and will feature special guests Eric Church and Josh Kelley, both singer-songwriters.

Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.com or by calling 800-745-3000.

Marshall University alumni and students may purchase best available tickets, with exception of the Pit (general admission-standing) area, for a discounted ticket price, while supplies last.

The MUAA has negotiated a discounted rate for MU alumni, who may contact the alumni relations office at 304-696-2901 to order discounted tickets. Marshall University students may purchase discounted tickets at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena box office.

There is a limit of four tickets per purchase for the student and alumni tickets and a current Marshall University student I.D. or alumni card must be presented at the time of purchase. There are a limited number of discounted tickets available.

Lambert gained fame as a finalist for the 2003 season of USA Network's talent competition "Nashville Star." The Texas native made her debut with the release of "Me and Charlie Talking," the first single from her debut album Kerosene, which was certified platinum in the United States.

Other singles "Bring Me Down," "Kerosene," and "New Strings" were Top 40 hits on Billboard's Hot Country Songs charts. Her second album, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, produced Top 20 hits "Famous in a Small Town," "Gunpowder & Lead," and "More Like Her," which were all in the Top 20 with "Gunpowder & Lead" hitting the Top 10.

Revolution, her third album, boasts her Number One hit, "The House That Built Me," which spent four weeks at the top of the charts.

Church is known for his chart-topping singles "Love Your Love the Most" and "Hell on the Heart," which are both Top 10 hits.

Kelley's songs, including "Amazing," have been featured in major motion pictures and television shows. He is the brother of Lady Antebellum's Charles Kelley and is married to actress Katherine Heigl.


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Thursday October 7, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Classes Cancelled for Rest of the Day (except for Corbly and Biotechnology Science Center)



Beginning at 3:15 p.m. today, Thursday, Oct. 7, classes on the Huntington campus are cancelled (except those in Corbly Hall or the Biotechnology Science Center) for the rest of the day and evening due to the power outage on campus. Classes will be held as scheduled Friday, Oct. 8.
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Wednesday October 6, 2010
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Debra Hart named Director of Equity Programs at Marshall University



 HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Debra Hart is the new Marshall University Director of Equity Programs. 

Hart's duties include working toward diversifying the student body, staff and faculty and the educational programs of the university; providing public services and expanding the  body of knowledge about Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action; and promoting equitable and fair treatment in every aspect of university life, including education and employment.  

Hart previously served as the executive director of the Mental Health Association in the Greater Kanawha Valley, Inc.  Prior to that she was she was employed with the Management and Training Corporation in Charleston, W.Va., as the Center's first business and community liaison.

She was appointed to the position of Director of Equal Employment Opportunity for West Virginia during Gov. Cecil H. Underwood's administration.  Through her leadership, the  Governor's Minority Business Task Force was formed and she served on the Equal Pay Commission, where she worked to review the salaries of women and minorities in state government. 

In addition, Hart worked for 14 years in the utility industry as a human resources generalist and affirmative action officer for Allegheny Energy in Fairmont, W.Va. She is a certified diversity trainer and serves as a frequent presenter at EEO group and training seminars, for businesses and non-profit corporations. 

Hart received a bachelor's degree from West Virginia State University and is a graduate of the American Institute for Managing Diversity.  She has received numerous awards for her work with youth in the community. 

Dedicated to community service, she serves on the executive board of First Family Foundation and is an active member of Ferguson Memorial Baptist Church in Dunbar, W.Va.  She also is a member of numerous associations, including the United States Commission on Civil Rights, League of Women Voters, Charleston Women's Club and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. 

Hart resides in Cross Lanes, W.Va., with her husband, Dana.  They are the parents of one grown daughter, Terri.


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Tuesday October 5, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College Fair expected to attract about 2,500 high school juniors and seniors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College Fair for high school juniors and seniors in Cabell, Wayne and Lincoln counties takes place Wednesday, Oct. 6, at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Ella Kuratomi, assistant director of recruitment at Marshall, said about 2,500 students are expected to attend. In addition to Marshall, about 70 colleges and universities will be represented at the fair, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon in the concourse area of Henderson Center, Kuratomi said.

She said the purpose of the fair is to expose area students to different universities and colleges, thus helping them make a decision when it comes time to choosing one to attend.

For more information, contact Kuratomi at 304-696-3508.


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Tuesday October 5, 2010
Contact: Michelle Muth,, Marshall Recreation Center, , 304-696-2943

15th annual MU Alum Run 5k to be held Oct. 30

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center Alum Run 5k Run/Walk will be held in conjunction with Marshall University's homecoming weekend on Saturday, Oct. 30, beginning at 8 a.m.

The 15th annual event starts and finishes on 3rd Avenue near Marshall's Cam Henderson Center. Participants will run and walk through the streets of Huntington, then be treated to a post-race ceremony inside the Marshall Recreation Center. Complimentary snacks and beverages will be available at the post-race event.

The Alum Run, which has attracted more than 400 participants in the past, has become a staple during Marshall University's homecoming weekend celebration, said event director Matt Weber.

"The Alum Run does its best to promote an active, healthy lifestyle," Weber said. "Participating in this annual race is a good way to get started in that lifestyle or to continue your already active and healthy ways."

This year's race is partnering with Camp NEW You to provide volunteers and a portion of the race proceeds will go toward the camp.

Interested participants can sign up in advance until race day for $20 per person by visiting Marshallcampusrec.com and printing off the form or by picking up a copy at the Marshall Recreation Center during regular operating hours. The first 400 people to sign up will receive a long-sleeved shirt. All participants will receive items from the recreation center and other businesses.

Pre-race packet pick-up will be held from 2 to 7 p.m. the day before the race, Friday, Oct.  29, inside the Marshall Recreation Center. Participants also will have the option of signing up from 6:30 to 7:45 a.m. on race day in front of Henderson Center. Cost at that time will be $25.

Payment is required in advance and only in the form of cash or check payable to MU Campus Rec Club. Payment may be dropped off at the recreation center or mailed to the Marshall Recreation Center at 402 Thundering Herd Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

Participants may choose to participate in the community division, stroller division, or wheelchair division. Awards will be presented to the male and female overall top finishers and the top three finishers in the following age groups: 9 & under, 10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, and 70 & up. The top three male and female finishers in the stroller and wheelchair divisions will receive awards as well.

The Marshall Recreation Center, which opened in 2009 on Marshall's Huntington campus, organizes and directs the race in collaboration with multiple organizations who volunteer their time on race day. The Alum Run is also seeking sponsors for the race. Interested sponsors or those looking for additional race information may call Weber at 304-696-4REC. Also, visit MarshallCampusRec.com for additional race information, including a course map, and information about the Marshall Recreation Center.


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Tuesday October 5, 2010
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Marshall's Thundering Word finishes fifth at George Mason tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Thundering Word, Marshall University's speech and debate team, had a successful performance this past weekend in Fairfax, Va., where it finished fifth in Team Sweepstakes at The Virginia is for Lovers Speech Tournament at George Mason University.

The top finishers in the team category were Seton Hall, St. Joseph, Bowling Green and McNeese State.

Finishing in the top 10 in their individual events for Marshall were Kayla Johnson, a junior from Gallipolis, Ohio, fourth in Informative Speaking and fifth in Rhetorical Criticism; Ryan Jackson, a junior from Huntington, seventh in Prose, seventh in Poetry and seventh in Dramatic Interpretation; and Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a junior from Louisville, Ky., eighth in Rhetorical Criticism and 10th in Impromptu Speaking.

Coach Danny Ray said Marshall took only those three varsity competitors to the tournament. "We are very proud of our accomplishment this weekend," Ray said.

The team travels this upcoming weekend to West Chester University in Pennsylvania.


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Tuesday October 5, 2010
Contact: Demetrius Doss, 3Fingers Music Group , (304) 617-9504

3Fingers Music Group releases song to mark new era of Marshall University football

MANASSAS, Va. - 3Fingers Music Group has announced the release of a new single that it hopes will become a theme song for the Marshall University Thundering Herd football team this season. The song, "Chorus of Victoria (Marshall Version)," features current urban music artist and former Thundering Herd football player Demetrius "El Prezidino" Doss and his band M:O.R. (Music Over Recognition).

Doss said he hopes the catchy tune will motivate players and fans alike, and he has pledged to donate half of the proceeds from its iTunes sales to benefit Marshall's Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

Doss (El Prezidino), who played wide receiver at Marshall from 1998 to 2002, says the song is now available for download on iTunes.

"This song was birthed out of my desire to give back to my alma mater," says El Prezidino, who also serves as President of 3FMG.  "I not only wanted to galvanize and excite the Thundering Herd nation for this new era of Marshall Football, but I've always wanted to give a substantial donation to The Big Green.  This song will hopefully facilitate those two things."

Doss presented the "Chorus of Victoria (Marshall Version)" in August to Marshall administration and athletics officials, who agreed to play the song during Marshall football games at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The song will also be promoted heavily to commercial radio throughout West Virginia.  The song is a fusion of rock and urban/pop, and features Marshall specific lyrics.  "The song took roughly three months to write, record, and mix," says Vice-President of 3FMG, Eliezer "the EARchitect" Lee.  "That is not typical for songs in this industry.El Prezidino and his band definitely made sure the song was going to be special, and once released, it would make the entire Marshall University community proud."

3Fingers Music Group is a multi-cultural independent record label based out of the Washington, D.C. metro area of Northern Virginia.  El Prezidino is an urban music artist signed to 3FMG, and he is the label's flagship artist.  El Prezidino has released two albums on 3FMG; the 2009 released The Illness (EP), and the June 2010 digital promo album ALMOST GENIUS ALMOST CRAZYThe Illness (EP) charted at #3 on the College Music Journal (CMJ) Hip-Hop ADDS chart for college radio in 2009.

###

If you'd like more info about this story/topic, or to schedule an interview with Demetrius Doss, please call Demetrius at 304-617-9504 or email him at prezidino@3fingersglobal.com.


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Monday October 4, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, , 304-746-1964

Marshall University receives NSF grant for Undergraduate Mathematical Biology Research program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The National Science Foundation has awarded a group of Marshall University faculty members funding to develop a program that will encourage undergraduate research and participation in biology and mathematics.

The grant was announced by U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, who congratulated Dr. Marcia Harrison, Dr. Simon Collier and Dr. Jeffrey Kovatch from the Department of Biological Sciences, and Dr. Anna Mummert and Dr. Scott Sarra from the Department of Mathematics for the $236,659 award to establish an Undergraduate Mathematical Biology Research (UBM) program.

The UBM program will include a number of initiatives designed to prepare math and biological sciences undergraduate students for graduate study and future careers that combine the two fields. Teams of students will participate in a summer research program and will continue their projects into the following academic year. The students also will participate in a seminar, where they will present their work and prepare for presentations at local and national symposia and conferences. Students can apply for a second year of support to continue their research projects.

Harrison, who will serve as the UBM program coordinator, said students will work with faculty to conduct research in topics like genetics, plant and animal physiology and environmental sciences. She added that the program is geared for freshman and sophomore students, with a particular focus on attracting female, minority and Appalachian, first-generation college students.

"The intense involvement with the research will enhance the students' skills in problem solving, experimentation and communication," she said. "Students involved with these long-term projects will also benefit from the mentoring, which has been proven to be a successful mechanism for guiding students to graduate programs."

Rahall said, "Hats off to the team that put this proposal together. Marshall University attracts top students and faculty to the Huntington area, helping to grow our community, and produce exciting new research and top-notch professionals. The UBM program is one more tool Marshall University now has in its belt to help students to reach their goals and achieve their dreams."

Dr. John Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, added his congratulations for the faculty members who received the grant.

"This grant is outstanding news," he said. "I'm particularly pleased that the proposed research projects and other enhancements will complement Marshall's new critical thinking curriculum. By increasing collaboration among undergraduate students and faculty in mathematics and biological sciences, the grant activities also will encourage interdisciplinary research and help strengthen the university's overall research enterprise."

Harrison said applications for Marshall's 2011 UBM summer research program will be available next spring. For more information, contact her at 304-696-4867 or harrison@marshall.edu.


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Monday October 4, 2010
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250 volunteers make Week of Service at Marshall University a big success

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's recent Week of Service was a big success with 250 volunteers putting in more than 700 hours of service throughout the community and the campus, according to Lisa Martin, director of Judicial Services and Volunteer Services at Marshall.

Volunteers participated in a large variety of projects in the Huntington area, including painting a house, planting flowers in the community and on the Huntington campus, eradicating graffiti, helping out with the Greek Fest sponsored by Saint George Greek Orthodox Church, tutoring children after school at the Ebenezer Outreach Center, and performing general clean-up chores at several locations throughout the area.

"There was something for everyone," Martin said.  "The idea is to get students involved in the community and to provide needed services.  Volunteering gives students a chance to do that.  They want to give back to the community that is helping them get an education."

Martin was pleased that in addition to individuals, several groups made volunteering a priority. Marshall's Office of Human Resources and occupants of several floors in Twin Towers West residence hall collected paper goods that will go to the Jeffrey E. George Comfort Hospitality House in Huntington. The hospitality house provides housing for individuals whose family members are in various hospitals through the city.

The women's basketball team worked with the local Boys and Girls Clubs in an after-school program, and occupants of a floor in a residence hall took on the task of painting a house. 

In the past, Marshall students participated in a single day of service but this year it was expanded to a full week. Martin said everyone was pleased with the results.

"We were impressed with our students stepping up to the plate and getting out at 8 a.m. on a Saturday when they could have been doing something else," Martin said. "It's actually been a great educational experience for them to meet people in the community.  You never know, you might find a career choice while volunteering."


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Friday October 1, 2010
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Nebraska poet to read from her work Oct. 7 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nebraska poet Grace Bauer will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 in room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. 

Bauer is an award-winning author of six collections of poems, including Beholding Eye and Retreats and Recognitions, which won the Lost Horse Prize from the University of Idaho Press.  Writer Jesse Lee Kercheval has praised Bauer's poems for demonstrating "how often the real mimics the surreal" in a world such as ours.

Bauer's work has been published in a variety of literary journals, including DoubleTake, Poetry, South Dakota Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, Southern Poetry Review, New Orleans Review, and elsewhere. 

Her work also has been recognized by many awards, including an Individual Artist's Grant from the Virginia Commission for the Arts, a Nebraska Arts Council Award, and fellowships from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

Bauer grew up in Pennsylvania and also has lived in Virginia and Massachusetts.  She has taught since 1994 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she serves as Coordinator of Creative Writing and as a reader for Prairie Schooner

Her appearance at Marshall is sponsored by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, and the Office of the Provost.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday October 1, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of FIne Arts, , 304-696-3296

Marshall student leads development of 'street newspaper'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eric Falquero, a senior graphic design student in Marshall University's College of Fine Arts, is starting an alternative community publication in Huntington.

The publication will be a "street newspaper," which Falquero says is a volunteer-produced newspaper that is sold to the general public through homeless individuals working as vendors. This income-generation model, which Falquero learned about during his summer internship with a similar program in Washington, D.C., is an opportunity for self-empowerment for those who choose to work as vendors.

"I had never heard of such an approach to homelessness; it is very unique and inspiring," Falquero said. "What really struck me was the story of how one vendor related a common story of the paper's impact on her life, saying that prior to working as a vendor, passersby would look right through her or not make eye contact and move on quickly. Once she was wearing a bright vest and badge with the organization's name on it and greeting people while selling the paper, that recognition as a person, as part of the community, started to come about."

Vendors for the Huntington paper will be recognizable in similar brightly colored vests. There will also be a photo directory on the paper's website so that customers can easily identify a vendor if there are any problems.

Street newspapers traditionally publish about issues that affect the homeless community, but that concept is being adapted to the Huntington area, Falquero said. This publication will contain community-specific news, inexpensive entertainment events, job and community services directories and other items.

"Since my first year at Marshall, I've wanted to be able to do something to give back to a community that has been so good to me," Falquero said." This paper is my chance - a visually attractive outlet to start many a discussion." He added that there are many street newspapers in cities around the world, including one titled Street Vibes in Cincinnati, which is running rather successfully.

"We are looking for anyone interested in volunteering: writing submissions, helping with paper sales to vendors, donating to benefit events," Falquero said. A group called the Marshall University Street Newspaper Association is being organized and a website,  www.marshall.edu/streetpaper, has more details. The first printing is expected to begin distribution Oct. 21.

Falquero can be reached at 304-881-3699 or falquero@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University's Fall Career Expo is Wednesday, Oct. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and alumni can discover new career opportunities at the annual MU Career Services Fall Career Expo on Wednesday, Oct. 6.

The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Don Morris Room, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Career Services expects more than 60 employers representing the corporate, government and nonprofit sectors to attend, seeking to network and hire students and alumni. 

Denise Hogsett, director of MU Career Services, encourages students and alumni to bring copies of their resumes and to be dressed professionally. She also advises students to have their "elevator speech" or 30-second commercial ready when introducing themselves to employers.

Students may visit the Career Services Center at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street to print their resumes or business cards before the Career Expo.  They also may call 304-696-2370 to schedule a mock interview or practice their 30-second commercial before talking with employers. 

Employers and organizations attending this year's job fair include:

ABC Supply Company; Abt SRBI, Inc.; Advanced Technical Solutions, LLC; AFLAC; Amazon.com; American General Life; Autism Services Center; BrickStreet Insurance; Cabell Huntington Hospital, CGI; Charleston Area Medical Center; Cintas Corp. - Ashland; Dress for Success; Enterprise Rent-A-Car;

Federal Bureau of Investigation; Federal Bureau of Prisons; Federated Insurance; Gibbons & Kawash, CPAs;  Hayflich & Steinberg, CPA's; Huntington Federal Savings Bank; Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center; Internal Revenue Service; ION Media Networks, Inc.; Josten's, Kelly Services; Macy's Department Store; McSweeney's Inc.; MeadWestvaco (MWV);

Methodist Theological School in Ohio; Midway College School of Pharmacy; MU College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE); MU Graduate College; MOVC Campus (Point Pleasant); MU TVRC (Teays Valley Regional Center); Nebraska Book Company (Retail Store division); Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law; Nestle-Purina; Northwestern Mutual Financial Network;

Ohio Department of Youth Services; Panhandle Support Services; Papa John's Pizza; Qdoba Mexican Grill; Reliable Staffing Services; Rite Aid; Sears Holdings Co.; Sherwin Williams Company-WV; Southern Highland Community Mental Health Center; St. Mary's Medical Center; Target Corporation; The Early Construction Corporation; Thomas Memorial Hospital;  Total Quality Logistics, Inc.;

United Way; University of Tennessee Math Graduate Studies Program; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Verizon Wireless; Walmart Stores; WCHS/WVAH-TV; ABC/FOX Charleston/Huntington; Wendy's International, Inc.; West Virginia State Police; West Virginia University College of Law;

WorkForce WV; WV Department of Revenue/Field Auditing Division; WV Division of Rehabilitation Services; WV Electric; WV Governor's Internship Program; WV Power Baseball; WV State Tax Department, and more. Visit the website listed below for a complete up-to-date list of employers.

Employers may visit www.marshall.edu/career-services to log on to their JobTrax account to register for the event.  Employers may register until Tuesday, Oct. 5.  If employers have questions about registration they may contact Debby Stoler, Assistant Director for Development and Outreach, by calling 304-696-2370 or e-mailing stolerd@marshall.edu.

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Marshall trombonist selected for Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra performance

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Austin Seybert, a music major in trombone and jazz studies at Marshall University, has been selected to perform with the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra this year. Marshall student Luke Miller, a saxophonist in jazz studies, was chosen as an alternate.

After only two years of existence, the 2011 edition of the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra has been accepted to perform at the Jazz Education Network Conference in New Orleans during the first week of January 2011 along with their regular performance as part of the Weekend of Jazz in Downtown Cumberland, Md., in April.

Alan Baylock, chief arranger for the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note and the leader of the Alan Baylock Jazz Orchestra, will be the group's guest conductor.

In addition to Baylock, the band will be joined by a special guest soloist, trombonist John Fedchock, for their New Orleans performance.

"The group has been tremendous the past two years," said event organizer David Kauffman.  "We have had some of the best musicians in the East Coast in the band, and I'm confident that this year's group will be incredible.  To have Alan (Baylock) and John (Fedchock) as part of the experience should be an amazing experience for these young musicians."

"I am very pleased that Austin Seybert has been chosen to participate in this year's Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra," Dr. Ed Bingham, jazz studies director at Marshall, said. "His participation will not only allow him to play in a terrific ensemble, but will allow him to meet and perform with other outstanding student musicians. Austin is a deserving performer who will be a great representative for Marshall University."

Seybert says he is excited for the opportunity.

"It is an honor to be selected to play with this group," Seybert said. "I'm really looking forward to meeting more trombonists that share my love for jazz, and hopefully we can all help each other grow musically while we are together."

For more information, contact Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, at 304-696-3296. For more information about the 2011 MACJO, contact macjo@cumberlandjazz.com.


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Friday October 1, 2010
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Human Research Protection Program awarded reaccreditation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today announced that the university's Human Research Protection Program has been awarded a five-year reaccreditation by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP).

"I could not be more pleased to announce this reaccreditation," said Kopp. "AAHRPP is the gold standard in human subject protection, so this determination of our program is indeed a significant milestone. I salute all our faculty members and staff who have worked so diligently to ensure that we meet the rigorous standards and processes established by this accrediting agency."

According to Bruce Day, director of the university's Office of Research Integrity, the designation means Marshall's program continues to meet or exceed all federal regulations regarding human subject research.

He added that Marshall University was the first institution in the state to receive this prestigious accreditation and is the first to receive a full five-year reaccreditation.

"AAHRPP reaccreditation is a reflection of the importance placed on ethical human subject research here at Marshall," said Day. "It signals to everyone, including potential research sponsors and investigators, that we put safety first and voluntarily embrace standards higher than those required by law to ensure integrity in our research programs."

Day acknowledged the members of the university's Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), particularly the chairmen, Dr. Henry K. Driscoll and Dr. Stephen D. Cooper, for their roles in ensuring comprehensive protections for research participants. All human subject research is subject to review by the university's IRB members, who represent a broad range of expertise.

Day added, "Reaccreditation was made possible primarily through the hard work and dedication of the members of our IRBs, led by Drs. Driscoll and Cooper, and our entire research faculty. It is because of them Marshall University has a stronger, more-cohesive research program committed to continuous improvement."

He also credited the university's research affiliates, including Cabell Huntington Hospital, St. Mary's Medical Center and the Huntington VA Medical Center, with much of the program's success.

Dr. John Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, said, "I applaud the Office of Research Integrity, the IRB members and our research faculty for this accomplishment. It reflects the fact that we have maintained the structure put into place to achieve accreditation initially and that we have made further significant progress to satisfy the even higher reaccreditation standards."

AAHRPP is an independent, non-profit accrediting body that works to protect the rights and welfare of research participants and promotes scientifically meritorious and ethically sound research. Accreditation means that Marshall University is part of an elite group of institutions internationally renowned as promoting exceptional ethical and professional standards in the conduct of human subject research.

For more information, contact Day at 304-696-4303 or day50@marshall.edu.


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Marshall student researchers win top prizes in statewide competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student researchers captured first place in both categories of a competition held earlier this week in Huntington in conjunction with the third statewide STaR (Science, Technology and Research) Symposium.

Melinda E. Varney, a biomedical sciences Ph.D. student from Huntington, was recognized as the "Graduate Researcher of the Year" for her work suggesting that genes involved in engineering bone and processing of fatty acids have a significant influence on bone marrow cells. She received a check for $1,000 and an iPad as her prize.

William A. Kelly, who conducted his research as an undergraduate biology major, was named "Undergraduate Researcher of the Year." Kelly, who is also from Huntington, received $700 and an iPad for his project focused on strategies for increasing biofuel production from microalgae.

Varney and Kelly were among more than 100 undergraduate and graduate researchers who entered the competition this summer by submitting abstracts describing their work. Entries were received from students at nine colleges and universities in West Virginia. From those entries, 24 finalists were selected to display posters featuring their research findings at the symposium, which was held Sept. 26-28 on Marshall's Huntington campus. The finalists also gave a short presentation to a panel of judges. All the students are conducting their research under the mentorship of a faculty member.

Varney's mentor, Dr. Vincent Sollars, an assistant professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular biology, said, "The project Mindy has devoted her graduate research to has been a particularly long and involved genetic study that has focused our increasing understanding of leukemia. I was heartened to see her hard work received well at the symposium."

Varney attributed her successful entry in large part to the support of Marshall faculty and staff, as well as that of her fellow students. She expressed particular appreciation to Sollars and her sponsors.

She added, "I feel extremely honored and grateful. I have tremendous gratitude for those who have guided and supported me along the way. The NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium has sponsored my work with multiple fellowships. Their investment has provided me with abundant opportunities to succeed."

Dr. Jagan Valluri, Marshall professor of biological sciences and Kelly's faculty mentor, says undergraduate research is invaluable for students.

"From my experience, involving undergraduates in original research allows them to gain important lab skills, along with knowledge of research design and making presentations at scientific meetings," he said. "Over the years, I have mentored dozens of students who went to graduate school and to work for biotechnology companies because of the research experience and skills they gained as undergraduates."

Kelly agreed, saying, "The symposium was an amazing opportunity to network with student and faculty researchers from other universities in West Virginia. I look forward to attending the event again in the future."

Kelly thanked Valluri and his co-investigators, fellow students Jacob Eller, Evan Riley and Jacob Miller, for their support of his research.

"Without Dr. Valluri's excellent assistance throughout my undergraduate experience, I would never have taken the path into research," he added.

Runners-up in the student research competition were Heaven Oliver-Kozup of West Virginia University in the graduate student category and Kiril Tuntevski of the University of Charleston in the undergraduate student category. They received prizes of $750 and $600, respectively.

The biennial StaR Symposium is hosted by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. This year's program focused on the national and state outlooks for science, technology and research; technology-based economic development; cutting-edge research and infrastructure; and commercialization of intellectual property. The symposium's theme, "Sustainability: How Science, Technology and Research Can Sustain Our Future," was carried throughout panel discussions on energy, the environment, cyberinfrastructure and the economy.

For more information about the STaR Symposium or the student poster competition, contact Jessica Tice at 304-558-4128, ext. 6, or jessica.tice@wvresearch.org.

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Photos: Marshall University student researchers Melinda E. Varney (top) and William A. Kelly pose for photos with Dr. Paul Hill (left), vice chancellor for science and research with the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, and (right) Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. Varney was recognized as the "Graduate Researcher of the Year" and Kelly was named "Undergraduate Researcher of the Year." Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Marshall University South Charleston campus faculty invites potential graduate/RBA students to open house

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University invites potential students to learn about the variety of degrees conveniently offered at the South Charleston campus during an open house event on Thursday, Oct. 7.

Doors will be open from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Robert C. Byrd Academic Center, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., just off the Kanawha Turnpike in South Charleston.

Dr. Rudy Pauley, Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies, hopes to see a solid turnout for the event, particularly in times when many find themselves facing career changes. 

"The South Charleston campus provides a multitude of opportunities for people to enrich their education and advance their careers," Pauley said.  "If you have ever considered completing your bachelor's degree or earning a master's degree, I encourage you to come and meet our faculty to learn how we can help you meet your goals."

Several educational opportunities are accessible at the South Charleston campus. Depending on career goals and experience, people can apply to one of nearly 50 programs. Several programs will be represented during the open house including: 

  • Graduate School of Education and Professional Development - Special Education; Counseling; School Psychology; Elementary and Secondary Education; Reading Education; Leadership Studies; and the Doctor of Education program.
  • College of Business - MBA and Executive MBA; Health Care Administration; Doctorate in Management Practice in Nurse Anesthesia; Human Resources Management.
  • College of Information Technology and Engineering - Engineering with emphases in Engineering Management and Environmental Engineering; Environmental Science, Information Systems and Safety; Technology Management with emphases in Information Security; Information Technology; Environmental Management; Manufacturing Systems; and Transportation.
  • College of Liberal Arts - Graduate Humanities.
  • RBA program - The Marshall University Reagents Bachelor of Arts degree program allows students who started college, but never finished, to complete their degrees. RBA Today is a unique way to earn a bachelor's degree through flexibility in class scheduling, potential credit for work experience and the option of taking online, evening or weekend classes.

Admissions personnel, financial aid counselors, veterans' affairs experts and bookstore staff will be on hand to answer questions. Visitors may also view the After-Hours Artists Exhibit in the Marshall University Library located on the South Charleston campus. The show, sponsored by the MU Graduate Humanities program, features the artistry of people in professions other than art. Charleston psychologist Frank Grant's work focuses on the beauty of found or discarded objects and is currently on display.

To access information about the campus online, go to www.marshall.edu/schas/. For more information, e-mail or call Dr. Teresa Eagle, 304-746-8924, t.eagle@marshall.edu.


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Autism Training Center at Marshall University welcomes national expert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University is sponsoring the first in a series of guest lecture workshops featuring nationally known speakers in the field of autism spectrum disorders.

Dr. Valerie Paradiz is scheduled to speak at the first workshop, which runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 5 in the Marshall University Memorial Student Center, room BE 5, on the Huntington campus.

Paradiz is the developer of the Integrated Self Advocacy ISA, a curriculum and certification training series for educators and therapists. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Redbook Magazine, The Guardian and on National Public Radio.  

"Dr. Paradiz has developed a state-of-the-art curriculum to teach individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other related disabilities to understand their own sensory and learning needs and become their own advocates," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Executive Director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center.   "She truly understands the great need for this type of curriculum as she received an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis as an adult and has a teenage son who also has the diagnosis."

Families registered with the West Virginia Autism Training Center and Marshall University students and employees may attend the day-long seminar for free.  The cost for others is $20 and may be paid at the door.   Pre-registration is available by calling 1-800-344-5115.

For more information, contact Karen Midkiff with the West Virginia Autism Training Center at 1-800-344-5115.


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Wednesday September 29, 2010
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'Thundering Word' performs well in tournament at Western Kentucky

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University "Thundering Word" Speech and Debate team finished sixth out of 24 teams last weekend at a tournament hosted by the defending national champion, Western Kentucky University, in Bowling Green, Ky.

The tournament was won by Ohio University with the University of Alabama finishing second.

Individual highlights for Marshall were Kayla Johnson, a Gallipolis, Ohio, junior, fifth in Informative Speaking; Ryan Jackson, a Huntington junior, seventh in Informative Speaking; Johnson and Jackson, eighth in Dramatic Duo; and Tyler Rice, a Huntington freshman, top novice in After Dinner Speaking.

The Thundering Word travels this weekend to George Mason University and the following weekend to West Chester University.


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Monday September 27, 2010
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Colleges Against Cancer to host Breast Cancer Walk at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Colleges Against Cancer of Marshall University will host its first Breast Cancer Walk on Saturday, Oct. 23.

The walk, scheduled from 4 to 6 p.m., will take place on Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus. Registration fee is $20, and each walker registered by Monday, Oct. 11, will receive a t-shirt.

Various fundraising booths will be located along the walking path for walkers to visit. Proceeds from the walk benefit the American Cancer Society.

Registration forms may be obtained by e-mailing Kristina Isaacs at isaacs17@live.marshall.edu. Once completed, they may be returned to the American Cancer Society, 611 7th Ave., Huntington, WV 25701.

For more information, e-mail Isaacs or call her at 304-419-2810.


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Monday September 27, 2010
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MU assistant professor receives poetry award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Rachael Peckham, an assistant professor of English at Marshall University, has won the 2010 Robert Watson Poetry Award sponsored by Spring Garden Press, located in Greensboro, N.C., and storySouth.

Her winning manuscript - Muck Fire - will be published as limited-edition, letter-pressed chapbook in fall 2011. In addition, Peckham will receive a cash award of $500.

A recipient of the M.F.A. in creative writing from Georgia College and State University and the Ph.D. in creative nonfiction from Ohio University, Peckham joined Marshall's faculty in 2009. She currently serves as advisor to Et Cetera, the university's literary and arts journal for students, and as a writing mentor for Yeager Scholars.

In addition to creative writing classes, including a creative nonfiction workshop, Peckham teaches courses in memoir and autobiography and contemporary literature. She lives in Huntington with her husband, Joel, also a poet and creative writing teacher at the University of Cincinnati's Clermont College, and their son, Darius.


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Marshall to host Chopin concerts in observance of 200th birth anniversary



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Department of Music will join celebrations around the world this year of the 200th anniversary of the birth of composer Frdric Chopin (1810-49). 

Two all-Chopin piano recital programs are planned for the fall semester. The first, at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 3, will  feature former Marshall faculty member Dr. Harsha Abeyaratne. The second, at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19, will be played by Dr. Claudio Barros from Brazil. 

Both concerts are free and open to the public and will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"Chopin is one of the most influential composers of piano music in both content and technique," said Dr. Leslie Petteys, professor of piano at Marshall. "Every student of the piano must study Chopin. However, his music is so popular that we all have heard some of his works in the soundtracks to movies and television shows. These are wonderful opportunities for Marshall students, because they get to hear two very fine concert pianists play some of the works of Chopin that they have worked on in lessons." 

In addition, the guest pianists will conduct master classes for Marshall students, in essence giving them a lesson "on stage" before an audience. Abeyaratne's master class will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, and Barros will work with three different Marshall students at 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 18.  Both classes are also in Smith Recital Hall and are free and open to the public.


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Friday September 24, 2010
Contact: Jamie LoFiego , "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

'Up Late' features local southern rocker

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local southern rocker Bud Carroll of "The Southern Souls" fame joins the cast of "Up Late" this week.

Carroll, a native of Ona, W.Va., promotes the Huntington Music and Arts Festival coming up Oct. 2 at Ritter Park. The popular local musician will be going back to his roots as he rejoins his former band, "American Minor," after a five-year hiatus.

LoFiego also talks about an infomercial that stars "Up Late" co-host Kyle Hobstetter, who took the acting job to make some extra money. And after three years of waiting, the crew airs a music video shot in Ashland, Ky., detailing the legendary Duct Tape Bandit.

Guitarist and singer Drew Blake of "The Star Line Drive" from Lynchburg, Va., visits the set as musical guest.

This episode of "Up Late" will air on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Thursday September 23, 2010
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Approximately 200 high school students to visit Marshall University on Green & White Day



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Approximately 200 high school students are expected to participate in Marshall University's Green & White Day on Saturday, Sept. 25.  The event is an open house that will take place on Marshall's Huntington campus.   

Students from 14 states have registered to attend, according to Beth Wolfe, Marshall's Director of Recruitment.

"We are excited they are coming; we love meeting new people," Wolfe said. "And, we love showing off Marshall University. Green & White Day is the perfect opportunity for the students to tour the campus and ask questions not only of faculty and staff, but current students."

Check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center followed by a program - which includes remarks from President Stephen J. Kopp - in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Green & White Day concludes at about 2 p.m.

The Marshall Maniacs will be providing students attending Green & White Day with free tickets to MU's football game with Ohio University, which will be played at 7 p.m. Saturday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

For more information, contact Wolfe at 304-696-6007.


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Wednesday September 22, 2010
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Marshall University Visiting Writers Series announces fall readings

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Visiting Writers Series has announced its fall schedule of author appearances on the Huntington campus.  Noted poets and prose-writers from around the nation and West Virginia will be reading from exciting new work.

Marshall Professor Art Stringer, coordinator of the series, calls this fall's calendar "a fresh collaboration" between the College of Liberal Arts and local patrons.

Poet Grace Bauer will appear at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 in room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center.  She is the author of six poetry collections, including Beholding Eye and Retreats and Recognitions, which won the Lost Horse Prize from the University of Idaho Press.  Widely recognized with awards from Arts Councils in Virginia and Nebraska, she has taught at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln since 1994, where she serves as Coordinator of Creative Writing and as a guest editor for Prairie Schooner.

Poet Heather Hartley, who grew up in West Virginia, will read at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28, in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room.  She is the author of Knock Knock, a new poetry collection from Carnegie Mellon University Press.  Her poems, essays and interviews have appeared in Tin House, Mississippi Review, Post Road and other magazines.  She is currently Paris Editor for Tin House magazine, curates Shakespeare & Company Bookshop's weekly reading series, and teaches creative writing and poetry at the American University of Paris.

Writer Dinty Moore will read from his work at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15, in the Shawkey Room. He is the author of five books of prose.  His memoir, Between Panic and Desire, was winner of the 2009 Grub Street Nonfiction Book Prize. Moore has published essays and stories in The Southern Review, Harpers, and The New York Times Sunday Magazine, among many others.  Writers Digest Books has just released his new book, Crafting the Personal Essay: A Guide for Writing and Publishing Creative Non-Fiction.  His awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction. He teaches at Ohio University and directs the Creative Writing program. 


Area writers Chris Green and Marie Manilla will read from their newly published work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 2, also in the Shawkey Room. Green is the author of the poetry collection Rush Light and teaches writing and Appalachian literature at Marshall. Manilla is a graduate of Marshall and author of two books: Shrapnel, a novel, and Still Life with Plums, a collection of short stories from West Virginia University Press.

All readings are free to the public.  The Visiting Writers Series is supported by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, the Office of the Provost, and the law firm of Jenkins-Fenstermaker.

For more information, contact Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Wednesday September 22, 2010
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MU students can seek guidance for career paths on Sept. 30



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students seeking guidance about their potential careers are invited to attend the Marshall Mentoring Network meeting, "Network and Nibble," from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30, at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

Participants in the event will first hear about the new Marshall Mentoring Network. Alumni mentors will then share their individual career stories, how they chose career paths and decided majors, and the steps they took to get where they are today. Immediately following, students will have the opportunity to ask questions. The evening will close with an opportunity for the students and alumni to meet and talk with one another.

MU Alumni Affairs and Career Services are sponsoring the event. Light refreshments will be provided.

For more information, contact Debby Stoler at Career Services by phone at 304-696-6679, or by e-mail at stolerd@marshall.edu, or Tish Littlehales, director of Alumni Affairs, by phone at 304-696-2523 or by e-mail at littlehales2@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 22, 2010
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Local military leaders visit Marshall University



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Kelly Sweetman, Marshall University's new director of military and veterans affairs, recently invited local leaders to visit the Huntington campus and learn how the university is ensuring that veterans and current military personnel are successful students.

Representatives from the Marine Corps, Reserve Officers Training Corps, Air Force, Army and Army National Guard participated in a roundtable discussion and toured the campus.

"I chose to take an approach that involved asking our military to have input into what we were doing here at Marshall," Sweetman said, "because I felt for the university to have an excellent program, we needed to have our local commands involved in building it. We wanted to hear their voices and listen to their experiences. I am really impressed with how they came on board.

"Marshall is their local university and they were excited to be asked to participate in building our military programs. We have great local commanders and service members and I think uniting the group brought so much diversity and experience to the table."

The group also met with Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston, as well as Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs, Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies, and Nick Blankenship, president of Marshall University Vets4Vets.

Vets4Vets is a new student support organization whose members work to provide a supportive atmosphere to help ease the transition for veterans from the military way of life to student life.

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Photo: Local officers from the Marine Corps, Reserve Officers Training Corps, the Air Force, Army and Army National Guard recently participated in a roundtable discussion and toured Marshall University's Huntington campus. Front row, left to right, are 1st Lt. Charles Hansen, USMC; Kelly Sweetman, MU Director of Military and Veterans Affairs; and 1st Sgt. Nathaniel Glover, USMC. In the back line, left to right, are Andre Gamble, an assistant with MU Military and Veterans Affairs; Kim White, a counselor at Marshall; Major Michael Stinnett, MU ROTC; Master Sgt. Frank Wilson, USAF; Tech. Sgt. Nathan Shaw, USAF; Sgt. Eric Carico, U.S. Army; Sgt. Kevin Fry, Army; and Sgt. 1st Class John Valdez, Army National Guard. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 21, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall announces top 10 scoring seniors on Collegiate Learning Assessment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last spring, 90 Marshall University seniors voluntarily took the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a test that measures students' critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving and written communication skills.

Dr. Mary Reynolds, director of assessment at Marshall, said the CLA is an open-ended test in which the students do a lot of writing and solve real-world problems.

"As a group, Marshall's seniors' performance on the CLA last spring was outstanding, with the majority of students performing at or above expected levels," Reynolds said.  "We are very proud of the accomplishments of our students and their professors!"

The following 10 students scored the highest on the test. They are listed in alphabetical order with their hometowns, majors and colleges:

  • Laurel C. Ackison, Fayetteville, W.Va.; Microbiology, Ecology-Evolutionary Biology and Spanish; College of Science and College of Liberal Arts
  • Halima Al-Qawasmi, Huntington, W.Va.; Cellular-Molecular Biology; College of Science
  • Lesley R. Bailey, Dunbar, W.Va.; Marketing; Lewis College of Business
  • Tara L. Ballard, Bradley, W.Va.; Accounting and Finance; Lewis College of Business
  • Paul D. Cook, Huntington, W.Va.; Education, History and Psychology; College of Education and Human Services and College of Liberal Arts
  • Mark A. Faltaous, Huntington, W.Va.; Biomedical Science; College of Science
  • Rachel C. Kenaston, Lewisburg, W.Va.; Theatre; College of Fine Arts
  • Rebecca L. Mazzone, South Point, Ohio; Secondary Education and English; College of Education and Human Services and College of Liberal Arts
  • Darcie Owens, Winter Haven, Fla.; History and Japanese; College of Liberal Arts
  • Keith E. Peck, Leon, W.Va.; English; College of Liberal Arts


For more information, contact Reynolds at 304-696-2987.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 21, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fall General Faculty Meeting set for Sept. 29 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The fall General Faculty Meeting of Marshall University's 2010-11 academic year will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The agenda will consist of welcoming remarks by the Faculty Senate Chair, Dr. Cam Brammer; singing of the Star Spangled Banner by Dr. Larry Stickler; introduction of new administrators by Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston; introduction of 70 new faculty by Brammer and School of Medicine Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs Dr. Joseph Werthammer; a State of the Faculty Address by Brammer; and a State of the University Address by University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.

All faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the new university personnel will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

New administrative positions to be introduced are:

Dr. Robert Bookwalter, interim dean, College of Education & Human Services; Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean, College of Health Professions; Dr. Kellie Bean, associate dean, College of Liberal Arts; Dr. Susan Gilpin, associate dean, Honors College; Dr. Thelma "Sissy" Isaacs, associate dean, College of Education & Human Services; and Dr. Nicki Locascio, associate dean, Honors College.

New faculty to be introduced are:

College of Fine Arts - Ian Hagarty, Nicole Perrone and Margaret Richardson

College of Health Professions - Won-Youl Bay, Nancy Dunn, Jana Hovland, Vickie Justus, Susan Konz, Penny Kroll, Bane McCracken, Tammy Minor and Jeanne Widener

College of Liberal Arts - Estee Beck, Jody Bishop, Allison Carey, Linda Cole, Molly Daniel, Robert Deal, Godwin Djietror, Benjamin Egea, Robert Ellison, Kristi Fondren, Anna Harris, Michael Householder, Ikuyo Kawada, Mallory Legg, Tracie McKinney, Jonathan Platte, W. Daniel Ray, II, Shawn Schulenberg, James Smith, Laura Sonderman, Walter Squire and Benjamin White

College of Science - Paul Constantino, Mary Crytzer, Xiaojuan Fan, Tracy Marsh, Shannon Miller, Patrick Riley, Stacy Scudder, Laura Stapleton, Devon Tivener and John Winfrey

Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - William Canterbury, Paul Drass, Anil Gurung, Nancy Lankton, Robin McCutcheon, Ivan Muslin, Anushri Rawat and David Spudich

Graduate School of Education & Professional Development - Amy Cottle, Cynthia Kolsun and Louis Watts

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Wesam Bolkhir, Kristina Bryant-Melvin, Samantha Cook, Susan Flesher, Guillermo Madero Garza, John Jasko, April Kilgore, William Nitardy, Julie Phenco, Audra Pritt, Frankie Puckett, Yaser Rayyan and Elias Shattahi

University Libraries - Kelli Johnson and Eryn Roles.

For more information, contact Bernice Bullock with Marshall's faculty senate at 304-696-4376.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 20, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Successful young entrepreneurs will share their stories, secrets as Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour visits Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Entrepreneurs in their 20s will share stories and secrets of their incredible success when the Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour (EET) visits Marshall University's Huntington campus on Thursday, Sept. 23.

The tour is a high-energy, half-day event that takes place from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Workshops, speed networking and a panel discussion are scheduled, along with the two keynote speakers - Michael Simmons, 28, and Brian Ruby, 26.

Simmons, one of the three creators of the Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour, co-founded his first business, Princeton WebSolutions (PWS), when he was 16 years old. PWS was later rated the number one youth-run web development company in the nation by Youngbiz Magazine. In 2006, Simmons was named by Business Week as one of the Top 25 entrepreneurs under 25.

Ruby founded molecular imaging equipment maker Carbon Nanoprobes in 2003 in his Columbia University dorm room and has since raised about $4 million from institutional and private investors. After six years doing research, Carbon Nanoprobes is now transitioning to equipment sales, and Ruby expects about $1 million in revenue this year.

The moderator for the tour's visit to Marshall will be Bert Gervais, a.k.a. "The Mentor Guy," who is one of America's most in-demand professional speakers. He is an author, speaker and award-winning entrepreneur. His first company, an Internet startup which sold in 2009, garnered many awards including the Entrepreneurs Organization's "East Coast Student Entrepreneur of the Year" award for 2006 and 2007.

The purpose of having the tour at Marshall University is three-fold:

  • To provide a positive outreach event to increase K-12 exposure and recruitment to the Marshall campus;
  • To encourage campus students  to participate in entrepreneurship behavior and provide a venue and contacts for innovative students;
  • To empower an interdisciplinary campus team to coordinate the many campus resources that will serve our graduates who will pursue creating their own business.

"The Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour is a wonderful opportunity for our students and high school students from the community to learn firsthand from successful entrepreneurs who have used their extraordinary talents to achieve business success at a very young age," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "Those attending are certain to gain important insights about entrepreneurialism and how they, too, can translate their ideas and interests into successful business start-ups of their own. They can dream big and, most importantly, make those dreams come true."   

The event is sponsored by Marshall University's Office of the President, MU Online College in the High School, the Center for Business and Economic Research, the Marshall University Research Corp. and Huntington Area Development Council (HADCO).

The Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour is the first and only nationwide entrepreneurship tour. Created in 2006, the tour features many of California's top young entrepreneurs who have made, or sold companies for, millions of dollars and/or made a huge impact before the age of 30.

The panel discussion features Gervais as the moderator, and local panelists Derek Gregg, Justin Swick and Nathan Myers, all of whom are Marshall University graduates. Other highlights include local K-12 students, including award-winning students from Cabell Midland High School.

Gregg is a founder and Chief Operating Officer of Vandalia Research, Inc. Vandalia Research is a biotechnology custom manufacturing organization specializing in the large-scale production of DNA sequences. It is the first company to successfully scale-up the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from an analytical tool to a viable large-scale manufacturing process, enabling DNA sequences to be made more efficiently and cost-effectively. Gregg  has a BS in Integrated Science & Technology from Marshall University.

Swick has been involved in the biomanufacturing industry for six years and is currently head of the engineering department at Vandalia Research.  Prior to this he developed process automation instrumentation for research projects at Marshall University.  His experience is chiefly in control systems design, mechanical design, and fabrication. Swick holds a bachelor's degree in Integrated Science and Technology from Marshall.

Myers graduated from the Marshall University Lewis College of Business in 2004 with a Bachelor's degree in Marketing. He and his family decided to start a family owned and operated restaurant franchise, The Pita Pit. In March of 2007, they opened the doors for business after months of back-breaking labor and sleepless nights. Soon after the opening, he understood how much the preparation, planning, and hard work paid off. The Pita Pit is successful and well-received by the Huntington community.

 

Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour
Marshall Foundation Hall/Erickson Alumni Center
Thursday, Sept. 23
Schedule of events
 

2 to 3 p.m.: Onsite registration and displays

3 to 3:30 p.m.: Event introduction, featuring Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Keri Fridley from the West Virginia Business Plan Competition and EET representatives 

3:30 to 4 p.m.: first keynote speaker, Michael Simmons. "How he did it story" with lessons learned

4 to 4:45 p.m.: workshop - customized idea/creation and business startup with action plan and accountability

4:45 to 5 p.m.: Speed Networking, EET. They will interact with the audience on idea creation.

5 to 5:30 p.m.: K-12 team, displays available until 5:30 p.m. and break. Cabell Midland team will be introduced.

5:30 to 6 p.m.: second keynote speaker, Brian Ruby. "How he did it story" with lessons learned

6 to 6:50 p.m.: Extreme Entrepreneurship Panel, EET Moderator Bert Gervais and student entrepreneurs Derek Gregg, Justin Swick and Nathan Myers. Panelists choose 1-2 questions to answer and open up for questions.

6:50 to 7 p.m.: Event wrap-up with EET Moderator Bert Gervais, final reminders

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Photos: Michael Simmons (top), Brian Ruby (middle) and Bert Gervais will participate in the Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour Thursday, Sept. 23 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 20, 2010
Contact: Donna Heron, United States EPZ, Region III-Office of Public Affairs, 215-814-5113

Marshall University expands sustainability partnership with EPA, raises bar on environmental goals

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's mid-Atlantic region joined with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection in recognizing Marshall University for expanding its environmental goals under EPA's Sustainability Partnership Program.

EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin and WVDEP Cabinet Secretary Randy Huffman met with Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today to sign the agreement, which formalizes the working partnership.       

"Today, Marshall is stepping forward as a leader among universities in promoting sustainability," said U.S. EPA's mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. "By joining with EPA, Marshall is not only working to reduce its own carbon footprint but also helping to create the next generation of environmental leadership."

Marshall University is no stranger to environmental activities that protect the planet and conserve resources. Currently, the school serves 22 counties in West Virginia through its Southern West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center. The brownfields program is a major vehicle for converting derelict or formerly contaminated land into useful and productive property.  The program includes grants for assessment and clean-up. 

On campus, Marshall University is implementing innovative programs to reduce waste streams and greenhouse gases through a bike loan program, providing refillable water-bottles and hydration stations, installing LED lights, using reusable bags made from recycled materials,  and creating, at students' request, a "green fee" which is being used to help fund the university's sustainability efforts.

But university officials believe there is more to be done, and they have joined EPA's Sustainability Partnerships Program (SPP) in part to further their efforts even more. Future goals include conducting a campus sustainability assessment, implementing comprehensive composting and biodiesel projects, developing and maintaining a rain garden.

In addition, Marshall is committed to increasing on-campus recycling and awareness through participation in the 2011 RecyleMania competition.  RecycleMania is a friendly competition that pits nearby colleges and universities, especially arch rivals, for the glory of being recycling champions.

"By their very design, universities can have a significant impact on the environment," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "That impact, however, does not have to be negative. Through mindful incorporation of sustainable practices, we are proving here that working toward a greener and healthier future for the entire Marshall University community is not only possible, but can be done with small steps, in manageable stages, realistically and affordably."

The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection has entered into an agreement with EPA and is helping to promote SPP throughout the state.

"I commend Marshall University for being the first school in West Virginia to sign the Sustainability Partnership Agreement," said WVDEP Cabinet Secretary Randy Huffman. "By reducing its operating costs through energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reduction and purchasing local products and using local services, Marshall University is heading in the right direction."

The Sustainability Partnership is an innovative program developed by EPA's mid-Atlantic region to create a one-stop shopping approach for organizations that use large quantities of energy, water, and natural resources and want to go green.  Instead of dealing with each of EPA's voluntary programs individually, EPA staff will work out a comprehensive "green" plan for organizations that often saves money and makes good business sense. The overall goal of the SPP is to minimize the use of energy, resources and waste generation in the mid-Atlantic states.

For information on the Sustainability Partnership, go to: http://www.epa.gov/reg3wcmd/spp/index.html or call, 800-438-2474.

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Photo:  Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, standing, watches as EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin signs an agreement, formalizing the working partnership  between the U.S. EPA and Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 17, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Researchers awarded more than $1 million for breast cancer studies

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two researchers at Marshall University have been awarded federal funds totaling more than $1 million to assess the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on breast cancer development.

The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program has awarded Dr. Elaine Hardman, associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and Dr. Philippe Georgel, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, competitive grants of $460,249 and $320,750, respectively. Hardman and Georgel received two of only 18 grants awarded nationwide through the program.

Over the next two years, Hardman and Georgel will use the funds to confirm earlier observations that consumption of canola oil, as a source of omega-3 fatty acid, in the maternal diet of mice could reduce risk for breast cancer in the offspring, and to identify the genetic changes associated with a maternal diet that contains omega-3 fatty acid. They hope to find out how canola oil is altering the expression of genes, with the goal of developing a panel of biomarkers to assess risk for breast cancer development in humans.

A third grant of $266,000 to Hardman from the National Institutes of Health will fund the final year of a related four-year study.

According to Hardman, the studies highlight the importance of diet in altering - either reducing or increasing - cancer risk and the importance of maternal diet in cancer risk of the offspring.

"Clinically, this is exciting! We know that maternal diet is important for the immediate health of the baby but are just beginning to learn of the importance for long-term health," she said. "If a woman can be very careful of her diet for the time of gestation and lactation, the baby may have reduced risk for not only cancer but also heart disease and diabetes."

Hardman said collaboration is the key to success in today's research environment.

She said, "At the conclusion of a previous study, I realized that the maternal diet containing a small amount of omega-3 fatty acids from canola oil was reducing breast cancer risk in the female offspring, even if the baby was weaned to a usual diet. This had to be an epigenetic influence - changes in gene expression not due to a mutation but due to markers placed on the chromatin. Dr. Georgel is an expert in changes in chromatin structure, so I needed his expertise to find out what was going on."

Hardman said their brief preliminary studies demonstrated a change in chromatin structure associated with changed gene expression that could reduce risk for breast cancer, and paved the way for the new DOD grants.

Hardman said, "This research illustrates the importance of collaboration in modern research. Dr. Georgel has important skills and knowledge that I do not have and vice versa. Together we can do far better than either alone."

Georgel added that the team's work also highlights the importance of studies of epigenetic events, or events that alter the activity of genes without changing their sequence.

"The generation of disease-specific epigenome maps will provide complementary and crucial information to the already well-established genome map," he said.

Hardman also said the grants will serve as a good foundation for the new Marshall University Nutrition and Cancer Center, which will support multiple researchers.

Dr. John Maher, vice president for research and executive director of the Marshall University Research Corporation, congratulated Hardman and Georgel, adding that these newest grants help build on the university's growing reputation for its outstanding biomedical research programs.

Maher said, "The fact that Dr. Hardman and Dr. Georgel's work was selected for funding by the Department of Defense from more than 100 proposals is further proof that Marshall's faculty and cancer research programs are top-notch. Their studies will lead to better prevention and treatment options for some of the most pressing health concerns of our time."

Hardman said once these studies are complete, she and Georgel may turn their attention to exploring whether or not diet changes later in life will also reduce cancer risk by the same or different mechanisms.

For more information about the Marshall University Nutrition and Cancer Center, visit www.marshall.edu/cncc.

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Photo:  Dr. Elaine Hardman, right, and Dr. Philippe Georgel of Marshall University are investigating the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on breast cancer development. They recently received two of only 18 grants awarded nationwide by the U.S. Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 16, 2010
Contact: GInny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-746-1964

Marshall University receives $4.7 million for Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has received $4.7 million in federal funding to support the new Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at the university's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

The funding, which was announced yesterday by U.S. Senators Jay Rockefeller and Carte Goodwin and U.S. Congressman Nick Rahall, was added to Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 Senate Appropriations bills at the request of the late Senator Robert C. Byrd. U.S. Department of Energy officials have formally released $2.9 million, with an additional $1.8 million expected soon.

Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp applauded the announcement and expressed appreciation to the Congressional delegation for their support of the new center and research at the university.

"Our Congressional delegation believes very strongly in the potential of the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, because advances in the center's labs can make a real difference in the health and welfare of our citizens," Kopp said. "Senator Rockefeller's leadership in helping to fulfill Senator Byrd's intentions regarding the center, along with the whole-hearted support of Senator Goodwin and Congressman Rahall, continue to be invaluable as we build our research programs. We salute them for their dedication to Marshall University and our entire region."

Researchers at the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems will focus on designing, developing and fabricating state-of-the-art diagnostic devices for cancer, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, dementia, infant care, and air and water quality.

Center Director Dr. Eric Blough said, "Work at the center will help scientists, physicians and the public better understand and integrate the implications and applications of nanotechnologies, particularly as they unfold over the next decade. The center also will play an important role in stimulating unprecedented interdisciplinary collaboration nationally among faculty members and students in the medical, biological, chemical, physical and life sciences, and engineering."

Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of the Marshall University College of Science, congratulated Blough and his colleagues, saying, "During the last seven years Dr. Blough's research program has benefited from significant investment from both federal and state sources, as well as local resources here at Marshall. That investment has paid tremendous dividends by allowing his team to move aggressively into an area that combines the power of nanotechnology with our growing understanding of cellular and molecular biology. The research made possible through this funding will further advance our understanding of basic biology, and will lead to revolutionary changes in how we detect and treat diseases."

An additional $2 million for the center recently was approved in the Senate Appropriations process. This legislation must be passed by the full Senate and House of Representatives in the coming months before becoming law.

For more information about the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, visit www.marshall.edu/cdn.

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Photo: Dr. Eric Blough, director of the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 15, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Week of Service and Volunteer Fair planned at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2010 Marshall University Week of Service and Volunteer Fair, sponsored by MU's Office of Volunteer Service, take place next week on the Huntington campus and throughout the community.

Lisa Martin, Marshall's director of volunteer services, said the Week of Service, scheduled for Sept. 20-25, is an expanded version of the Day of Service, previously conducted each fall at Marshall.

"Our committee just felt like we needed a change," Martin said. "This gives people the opportunity to volunteer at their leisure throughout the week."

A kickoff event for the Week of Service, which features the theme of Students Organizing for Service (SOS), is planned from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 20, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. T-shirts and snacks will be provided, and people can register for specific activities at that time.

Numerous projects are already planned. Among them are participation in Chili Fest, with proceeds going to the Ronald McDonald House; painting two houses; feeding the homeless; and collecting paper products for the St. George Hospitality House. The paper products will be collected throughout the week, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily in the Memorial Student Center lobby. The hospitality house needs napkins, paper towels, paper cups and non-perishables.

"We encourage everyone in the Marshall community to stop by our kickoff on Monday," Martin said. "We have plenty of service projects planned on campus and throughout the community."

The Volunteer Fair is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21, in the student center lobby. At that event, visitors can learn about organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, the Huntington City Mission, Cabell County Schools, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Faith in Action, Ebenezer Community Outreach Center, CONTACT of Huntington rape crisis center, Huntington Community Gardens, Junior Achievement, Tri-State Literacy Council, United Way and many more.

For more information, call 304-696-2495 or e-mail martil@marshall.edu or spurlock16@marshall.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 14, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

World renowned biologist Dr. Lynn Margulis to speak at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - World renowned biologist Dr. Lynn Margulis will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday, Sept. 24, to deliver a public lecture titled Gaia as Planetary Symbiogenesis? The Rediscovery of Kozo-Polyansky.

Margulis, a distinguished professor in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, will speak at 7 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The event, presented by Marshall's College of Science and the Drinko Academy, is free to the public.

She is speaking at Marshall to celebrate publication of a new book by Harvard University Press titled Symbiogenesis: A New Principle of Evolution by Boris M. Kozo-Polyansky. The book, originally published in Russian in 1924, was translated from Russian by Dr. Victor Fet, a biology professor at Marshall, and co-edited by Fet and Margulis.

A book signing will follow Margulis' lecture. The book will be available at the Marshall Bookstore.

"Lynn Margulis is one of the most interesting and provocative thinkers of our science," Fet said. "She is credited first of all with the modern concept of symbiotic origin of our cells, first rejected and now widely accepted by the scientific community. Her passionate life's work is devoted to the advancement of many facets of biological science with a great unifying theme: interconnection and interdependence of life on Earth in space and time.

"I have been lucky and honored to work with her for five years on translation and editing of a Russian classic book, Symbiogenesis, by Boris Kozo-Polyansky (1924), published in 2010 by Harvard University Press. I am very glad that Professor Margulis agreed to visit Marshall and Huntington on the occasion of this publication."

Known as one of the most original scientific thinkers of our era, Margulis has authored more than 130 scientific articles and 10 books. The most recent include Dazzle Gradually: Reflections on the Nature of Nature (2007), co-written with Dorion Sagan, and Mind, Life and Universe: Conversations with Great Scientists of Our Time (2007), co-written with Eduardo Punset.

Margulis was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1983. She received the National Medal of Science in 1999 from President Clinton. The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., announced in 1998 that it will permanently archive her papers. Margulis was president (2005-2006) of Sigma Xi, the scientific research society from which she received the Proctor Prize for scientific achievement in 1999. On her move to the Botany Department at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst in 1988, she had been a biology professor at Boston University for 22 years.

Her publications span a wide range of scientific topics, mainly in cell biology and microbial evolution. Probably best known for development of the theory of symbiogenesis, she challenges acentral tenet of neo-Darwinism: little significant inherited variation comes from random mutations in DNA. New organelles, tissues, organs, and even new species evolve primarily through the fusion of genomes in symbioses followed by natural selection. Symbiogenesis leads to increasingly complex levels of individuality.

Beyond contributions to evolution theory, Margulis is acknowledged for her microbiological work with James E. Lovelock on his Gaia concept. Gaia theory posits that the Earth's surface interactions among living beings in sediment, air, and water have created a vast self-regulating system. 

The address issued on the occasion of her recent award from the Leonardo da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking ( www.davincithinking.org), said: "Dr. Lynn Margulis is known for her revolutionary work in cell evolution. Dr. Margulis has earned her prestige in the field with her theory on the origin of eukaryotic organelles that are her contributions to endosymbiotic theory. She is a leading proponent of Gaia Theory, which states that all life, as well as the oceans, the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth itself are parts of a single, all-encompassing evolving system, illustrating Ian L. McHarg's statement: 'the Earth is indivisible.'"

Background:

In the 1920s, a young Russian botanist, Boris Mikhailovich Kozo-Polyansky (1890-1957), synthesized the experimental work of evolutionary biologists across the world in order to theorize that symbiogenesis the merging of separate organisms to form a single organism played a leading role in evolution.  Working from this fundamental idea, Kozo-Polyansky went on to broad-sweeping speculations, collecting examples of symbiogenetic systems from all groups of living organisms, and reconciling his new theory of symbiogenesis with the Darwinian evolutionary ideas of the early 1920s, well before the development of the neo-Darwinist New Synthesis theory that emerged in the 1930s and 1940s. Long forgotten and once ridiculed, the symbiogenesis theory was re-discovered by Margulis in the 1960s, and is now well accepted in all biology textbooks.

For more information, visit: 

http://www.geo.umass.edu/margulislab/Margulis_Lab_Site/Lynn_Margulis.html

http://harvardpress.typepad.com/hup_publicity/2010/07/rediscovering-symbiogenesis.html


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 13, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Marshall art faculty to open exhibit Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Art and Design Faculty Exhibition begins Friday, Sept. 17, at Gallery 842 with an opening reception from 6 to 9 p.m.

This exhibition profiles the art being produced by the faculty members of the Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University. Viewers can expect to see a variety of new work, never before publicly exhibited, from all the studio disciplines.

"It is an opportunity for the public to view the art work of the professors who are working to educate and shape the next generation of young art students at Marshall University," John Farley, director of Gallery 842, said. "Additionally, it is a chance for our students to experience the work of their professors in a gallery setting and to participate in the process. Faculty members are responsible for both academic instruction as well as maintaining a productive, exhibiting studio practice. They set the professional example for our students to follow."

New painting professor Ian Hagarty, who joined the Art and Design faculty this summer, agrees. This will be his first exhibition in Huntington.

"It is a valuable opportunity for the communities at Marshall and Huntington to experience the diverse approaches to artistic practice among the faculty," Hagarty said. "I am enthusiastic about the show, because it gives me the opportunity to introduce myself and my work to students and colleagues. As a student, I always looked forward to faculty exhibitions because the work often supported ideas presented by particular professors in class."

For recent graduate Miranda Fields, who earned a Master of Arts with an emphasis in photography, this is an entirely new experience. Fields will be showing work as a faculty member this time.

"The idea of showing work and being referred to as faculty instead of a student is simply surreal," Fields said. "It's an honor to be hanging work alongside the individuals that I credit for so much inspiration throughout my career."

Gallery 842 is both a community- and Marshall University-held space to promote local talent and initiative. The gallery is a free cultural experience for any artist or art enthusiast. Hours are from noon to 6 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays.

Artists participating include Earline Allen, Natalie Gibbs Burdette, Sarah Brinegar, Daniel Cook, Miyuki Cook, Jonathan Cox, John Farley, Miranda Fields, Mary Grassell, Ian Hagarty, Daniel Kaufmann, Jason Kiley, Natalie Larsen, Peter Massing, Brent Patterson and Kristen Zammiello.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 10, 2010
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

'Up Late' features music of Demetrius Doss

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Demetrius Doss, a former Thundering Herd wide receiver, joins the cast and crew of "Up Late" this weekend.

Doss, who caught passes from former Marshall University standouts Chad Pennington and Byron Leftwich, is a songwriter and gospel-oriented hip-hop artist. He shares the Chorus of Victoria (Marshall Version), which he co-produced while watching football highlight clips of his 1999-2003 days with the Herd. 

Host Jamie LoFiego also introduces musical guest from Charleston, W.Va., "Whoz Drivin." They play their song, "The Cat's Out of the Bag; It's About to Get Nasty," which becomes the unofficial theme song for the student-produced late-night show when Kyle Hobstetter and friends try to produce their own theme, which fails dismally.

The cast also shows Marshall's nearly 2,000 new students how to survive on campus with "Survival Girl."

This episode of "Up Late" will air on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Wednesday September 8, 2010
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

After-hours artists to exhibit at Marshall's South Charleston library

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - By day Sherry Zachwieja Powell works in her family's mechanical engineering firm while psychologist Frank Grant oversees the renovation of his house in Charleston's east end. But after working hours they're artists who are preparing for showings of their work in a new venue, the Marshall University Library on the South Charleston campus.

The shows are being sponsored by the Marshall Graduate Humanities Program in collaboration with Marshall's South Charleston Library. To introduce the artists a reception, which is open to the public, will take place in the library from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10.

This will be the first time the library has hosted an art show especially designed for its space, although various works of West Virginia artists are displayed throughout the building that the library shares with the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

The concept of the show is to give people who have professions other than art an opportunity to display their work, according to Mark Tobin Moore, a local artist and Graduate Humanities Program instructor, who planned and is mounting the show. Each artist will have a one-person show, which will be on display for six weeks.

"What makes this show different is that I am not looking for people who display their work all the time but rather to give artists an opportunity to share their work," said Moore. "It's sometimes difficult to get your own show but this is a good opportunity; it's a beautiful space with easy access. We also see this as a community outreach, a way for people to come to the campus and see what's here. We're actually looking at these exhibits from a humanities viewpoint, not so much as an art viewpoint."

Grant will be the first to exhibit. Growing up in New York City, he took full advantage of the abundant museums and galleries in the city and surrounding boroughs. As a graduate student pursuing a doctorate in psychology, he turned to art as an outlet for the intensity he felt during his doctoral studies.

His first sale came as a result of a happy accident, he says. Using some leftover oils someone had given him, he painted on a large piece of Masonite. He wasn't pleased with the result and in his haste to wipe it clean for a fresh start he noticed the smears had become an abstract wintery scene. The piece attracted a buyer and after the sale the abstract accident gave him confidence to continue his work. Grant has since exhibited in Syracuse, N.Y., Roanoke, Va., Washington, D.C., Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and in several places in West Virginia.

Grant says he has learned to see beauty in discarded and found things: a lone glove frozen in the snow, neckties from the 1970s, faded photographs and tattered papers, string and yard, fabric remnants, organic peelings, grasses and even unidentified objects.

"All of these have found a place in my mixed media works." Grant says. His art has evolved as a mirror of his philosophy of living, he believes. "In our current 'throw-away' age, nothing should be discarded or seen as trash. Everything has the potential to be reused or recycled."

Zachwieja Powell echoes Grant's penchant for using found and eclectic objects. Her show will include mixed media that will utilize digital, oils, charcoals, pastels and graphite pencils and will feature a favorite medium, collages.

The artist grew up in Putnam County and graduated from Marshall University where she majored in Art Education (K-12). In the summers she incorporated art instruction into her work at Camp Happy Valley through the Salvation Army. Following graduation she also taught at the Huntington Museum of Art.

She studied for six years with Putnam County artist and teacher Caryl Toth and credits her with having been a major influence on her work. Zachwieja Powell was one of the first students to participate in the "Museum in the Community" in Putnam County.

She worked at the Autism Services Center in Huntington for 15 years and made an effort to integrate art into her various duties there. She was gratified with the results. "In every situation people responded to it," she said.

Now working in her family's St. Albans mechanical engineering business, Zdesign Services, she also gives private art instruction. She's exhibited at several venues around the state, including the Clay Center and Charleston's FestivAll, and she continues to incorporate found objects in her artwork.

Acting as the curator for the upcoming shows, Moore currently is teaching classes at Concord University-Beckley and at the Erma C. Byrd Higher Education Center. He donates space in his downtown Charleston studio for the Marshall Graduate Humanities program and is currently offering his services to mount this exhibit.

"I'm doing this because I enjoy it and it gets more visibility for the arts. There's an element of that in the Humanities program." Moore said.


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Wednesday September 8, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Chesapeake Energy Corporation gives $200,000 to MU Foundation



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Chesapeake Energy Corporation today announced a gift of $200,000 to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., in support of scholarships for Marshall University business and engineering students, and a summer academy for high school students interested in pursuing a career in engineering.

The gift, to be distributed over a five-year period, was announced on the Huntington campus during a news conference at the MU Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

Maribeth Anderson, Director of Corporate Development with Chesapeake Energy, said $15,000 per year will go to scholarships - $7,500 each to students in Marshall's Lewis College of Business and the College of Information Technology and Engineering, and $25,000 per year for the annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE) held on the Huntington campus each summer.

"This latest generous gift from Chesapeake Energy is further evidence of their steadfast support for Marshall University students and high school students considering careers in engineering and business," said MU President Stephen J. Kopp. "We are grateful to Chesapeake Energy for their leadership and commitment to strengthening and expanding college education opportunities for students pursuing careers in these high demand fields."

Anderson stressed the importance of the company's support of Marshall University and higher education in general.

"The partnership with Marshall University is important as we continue to build a workforce prepared for the exploration and production of natural gas in West Virginia and throughout the Marcellus Shale," Anderson said. "Additionally, Chesapeake has a long tradition of philanthropic outreach in the communities in which we operate, and support of higher education is a key component of our culture."

Chesapeake Energy Corporation is the second-largest producer of natural gas and the most active driller of new wells in the U.S.  Headquartered in Oklahoma City, the company's operations are focused on discovering and developing unconventional natural gas and oil fields onshore in the U.S. Chesapeake owns leading positions in the Barnett, Fayetteville, Haynesville, Marcellus and Bossier natural gas shale plays and in the Eagle Ford, Granite Wash and various other unconventional oil plays. The company has also vertically integrated its operations and owns substantial midstream, compression, drilling and oilfield service assets.

For more information, please visit www.chk.com or www.marshall.edu.


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Tuesday September 7, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Saxophone seminar to take place Sept. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Douglas Masek, saxophone player and professor at the University of California Los Angeles, will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, Sept. 13, to conduct a seminar.

The seminar will take place at the Jomie Jazz Center at 5:30 p.m. No advance registration is required, according to Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of saxophone and director of jazz studies at Marshall, and the event is free and open to the public.

For Bingham, Masek's visit is more than just a learning experience for students of the instrument. Bingham studied under Masek as an undergraduate student at the University of Tennessee. 

"He's a good friend and was one of my first mentors as a saxophonist, and he's just a tremendous person and an astonishing player," Bingham said.

Masek received his Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music and his master's degree from Ohio State University. He completed his academic education with a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Southern California.

Masek is also a Vandoren Elite Artist, performing and lecturing internationally at schools, colleges, and universities. He has also performed as soloist at venues such as the Singapore Sun Festival; the American Music Festival in Cluj-Napoca, Romania; the China International Music Festival; the Aspen Music Festival; the Ojai Music Festival, the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, and the Idyllwild Arts Academy.

Having premiered dozens of compositions written exclusively for him, Masek's discography includes seven solo collections on CD. Three other CDs, which were produced by Centaur Records, feature compositions of Los Angeles composers.

Bingham said Masek will be able to present information to students in a different way than they may have been taught before and students will be able to exchange other information with Masek as well.

Bingham said he is eager to share this opportunity with his students.

"I try to be an example both professionally and musically to my students, just as Doug has been an example to me," Bingham said. "That's something that I'm excited to share with them, the opportunity to meet him and work with him."


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Tuesday September 7, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Women's Studies program to offer two speaker series in community service, academic research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's  Women's Studies program, in conjunction with the Women's Center,  will host Women Connect, a speaker series designed to  create stronger ties between the  Marshall  University's community (including faculty, staff, and students) and the greater Huntington community by featuring local organizations that aid women and girls.

The first organization, Ebenezer Community Outreach, will be featured Wednesday, Sept. 8 from 1 to 2 p.m. in room 2W37 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Ebenezer Community Outreach offers child care, parent education, and community programs to local low-income families.

Other programs in the series, which will continue on the second Wednesday of the month this fall, include:

Wednesday, Oct. 13, 1 to 2 p.m., room 2W37 of the Memorial Student Center, featuring the Golden Girl Group Home. Golden Girl serves dependent, neglected, and predelinquent girls, ages 12-21, who are unable to make successful adjustments in their  natural homes or foster care homes by providing educational, recreational, treatment and support services in a loving and  therapeutic environment.

Wednesday, Nov. 10, from 1 to 2 p.m. in room 2W37 of the Memorial Student Center, featuring Branches Domestic Violence Shelter.  Branches provides safe shelter, counseling, support groups, court advocacy, information,  referrals and transportation for  individuals and families seeking to leave abusive situations.

In addition, the Women's Studies program will sponsor a Women's Studies Colloquium Speaker Series, with support from MU-ADVANCE, this fall. This series will highlight  the academic research Marshall University faculty and students are  conducting on topics relevant to Women's Studies.  The speakers for this fall are: 

Dr. Paige Muellerleile, Psychology Department
"Crimes of sexual violence: Gender and risk perception"
Friday, Oct. 1, from noon to 1p.m.  in room 349, Drinko Library
Description: Television crime dramas have been part of American culture for a long time. Their content often includes sexual violence, which can influence how people think about their risk of victimization, but often in surprising ways.

Dr. Whitney Douglas, English Department
"Somebody Must Listen": Women's Activist Voices
Friday, Nov, 5 from noon to 1 p.m. in room 349 of the Drinko Library
Description:  This talk focuses on the work of women who advocate for sexual assault and domestic violence victims, and the importance they place on sharing their knowledge about the issues they advocate for as well as about the day-to-day work they are engaged in.

Dr. Nalini Santanam, Pharmacology Dept.
Subject to be announced
Friday, Dec. 3, from noon to 1 p.m. in room 349 of the Drinko Library

Dr. Wendy Williams, director of Women's Studies at Marshall, said that all who are interested in the topics are encouraged to attend. For further information, persons may e-mail Williams at williamw@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday September 7, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Three southern West Virginia students earn Friends of Coal scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University freshmen from southern West Virginia have been awarded the Friends of Coal scholarships for 2010.

The recipients are 2010 graduates Teseka Jowett, Destinee Vance, and Bethany Thomas. Jowett is a graduate of Scott High School in Boone County. Vance is a graduate of Chapmanville High School in Lincoln County.  Thomas is a graduate of Richwood High School in Nicholas County.

Each student will receive a $2,500 scholarship, which is the result of the sponsorship provided by the Friends of Coal for the Marshall University-West Virginia University football series. Marshall plays WVU at 7 p.m. Friday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington in the fifth game of the cross-state rival matchup.

Students eligible to receive the scholarship must have high GPAs in high school, live in southern West Virginia and demonstrate financial need.

Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association, said his association understands the impact these scholarships have on deserving students.

"As in the past four years, these scholarships are what the Friends of Coal Bowl is all about, assisting deserving students who are going to carry forward the strength, integrity and perseverance of the great people who make the West Virginia coal industry such a great part of America's independence," Raney said. "The achievements of these students will prove the future of our state and our country will be in good hands. Congratulations to each of them from Friends of Coal everywhere. You make us all proud."

Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs at Marshall University, said that regardless of which team wins the Friends of Coal Bowl, these students are true beneficiaries of the matchup.

"The Friends of Coal football game between Marshall and WVU brings our entire state together, and many West Virginians have a favorite on one side or the other.  However, all West Virginians can agree to celebrate the scholarship support that the contest on the football field brings to these students at Marshall and WVU," Hensley said.


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Sunday September 5, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Numerous activities planned in conjunction with Friends of Coal Bowl

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The talk surrounding the Friends of Coal Bowl this week will mostly be about the football game between Marshall University and West Virginia University to be played at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

But, there is a lot more to talk about than football when discussing the Friends of Coal Bowl. Activities planned in conjunction with the game run throughout the week.

Among the highlights are HerdFest, a street fair/free concert Thursday, Sept. 9 in downtown Huntington, and a Marshall Artists Series performance Sunday, Sept. 12 by Liza Minnelli at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. A Friends of Coal Bowl Brunch also is planned for Friday.

HerdFest features country, southern rock, and bluegrass fusion band, the Davisson Brothers Band, and multi-platinum-selling national recording artists, Little Texas. The event will begin at 5 p.m. with the street fair on 3rd Avenue in front of Pullman Square. The Davisson Brothers perform at 6:30 p.m., with Little Texas taking the stage at about 8:30 p.m.

Dignitaries, including Gov. Joe Manchin and First Lady Gayle Manchin, as well as Marshall University coaches and officials, have been invited to speak to the crowd between musical performances. Marshall's cheerleaders will be on hand and Marco will make a special appearance.

"It's going to be a great, fun time for everybody," Patrick Murphy, Marshall's student body president, said of the concert. "We're excited about showing the community how much we care, and we look forward to everyone coming out and supporting us at HerdFest. We also look forward to showing our friends from WVU that we can put on a great event. It's going to be a really good show, a fun time."

HerdFest is sponsored by Frontier Communications, in conjunction with Cabell Huntington Hospital, Chesapeake Energy, Community Trust Bank, the Cabell Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau, WOWK Channel 13, Marshall University Student Activities Programming Board and 93.7 The DAWG. WOWK will televise the event live from 6 to 8 p.m.

The weekend of special activities concludes on Sunday, Sept. 12 with St. Mary's Medical Center and HIMG presenting Minnelli at the Keith-Albee. A Tony, Oscar, Grammy and Emmy Award winner, Minnelli will take the stage at 7 p.m. Her performance also is sponsored by Verizon, Ransbottom Law Office, WKEE, WTCR, B-97, WSAZ, The Herald-Dispatch, Marshall University, and MU's College of Fine Arts.

Tickets are $85.25, $65 and $45, and may be purchased at the Marshall Artists Series box office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, or by calling 304-696-6656.

Someone will win a prize package of two tickets to the football game, two tickets to Minnelli's concert and a $100 gift certificate to the illustrious 21 at The Frederick. To register to win the prize package, visit www.marshallartistsseries.org and click on the "Click to Win" tab.

Here is a brief look at a couple of other events scheduled in conjunction with the Marshall-WVU game:
 

NCAA Football 2011

Marshall students will have a chance to win tickets to the MU-WVU game by competing in NCAA Football 2011 on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Competition is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 8-9. Twenty tickets will be available for the winners. For more information, contact the Student Activities Programming Board at 304-696-6770.   
 

Friends of Coal Bowl Brunch

This event is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10 at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, and is open to fans of both teams. Former Marshall Coach Bobby Pruett and former WVU Coach Don Nehlen will be featured speakers, along with athletic directors from both universities - Marshall's Mike Hamrick and WVU's Oliver Luck.  Cost is $25. Call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 for tickets and/or more information.


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Friday September 3, 2010
Contact: Nicholas Blankenship, MU Vets4Vets president, , 304-377-4635

MU Vets4Vets contributes a $1,600 donation to Wounded Warriors Project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Veterans for Veterans (MU Vets4Vets) student organization recently traveled to Columbus, Ohio, where its members participated in a benefit clay shoot competition and made a $1,600 donation to the Wounded Warriors Project (WWP), according to Nicholas Blankenship, president of the student organization.

"This may have been our first time participating, but it definitely will not be our last," Nicholas Blankenship said. "This event gives us the opportunity to show our gratitude to wounded veterans from Huntington and all over the country for their individual sacrifice."

The Wounded Warriors Project is a national organization that provides programs and services to severely injured service members during the time between active duty and transition to civilian life. The weekend benefit in Columbus is the third such fundraiser hosted by Central Ohio American Charities (COAC), an organization founded by United States Marine and Marshall University alumnus Steve Blankenship. It is the first time MU Vets4Vets has participated, an action prompted by Steve Blankenship.

"These wounded servicemen and women had sacrificed and endured while asking little in return," Steve Blankenship said. "They did their duty in a cause which many did not support. They persevered without question, while providing us with the freedom which many take for granted. These were truly honorable men and women. They are our country's future. It is easy to act so passionately about these individuals because they are so humble; satisfied with a simple handshake and a thank you."

During the past three years, more than $100,000 has been raised as a result of COAC's event, including the $1,600 contributed by the five Marshall students who attended. They also participated in the clay shoot competition, with team captain and vice president of MU Vets4Vets, Andrew Wendt, bringing home the runner-up trophy for hitting 87 of 100 clays.

"It was really rewarding being involved in an event like the one put on by COAC," Wendt said. "Getting a group of veterans and veteran supporters together in order to raise money for an organization like the WWP is truly rewarding. I am proud to have participated in it and looking forward to doing it again next year."

Dan Nevins, a double amputee who served in the Army, was the event's keynote speaker. He shared the story of how he and two other veterans climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro "with only one leg among the three of them."

MU Vets4Vets is one of the newest student organizations on the Huntington campus. At a few weeks shy of its year-old mark, it is 87 members strong. The group's goal is to provide a supportive atmosphere on campus that will help ease the transition for veterans from the military way of life to student life. For more information, go to www.muvets4vets.com.


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Friday September 3, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then please send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, email, voice)  did not work as expected.

"This test is part of our plan to test the system at least once per semester," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

The MU Alert system, which is operated through third-party vendor Everbridge, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls, and e-mail. Those who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the MyMU page at www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7.

Everbridge  is a leading provider of emergency notification services to colleges and universities, health care systems, government agencies and municipalities.


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Friday September 3, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

On-campus parking to be altered for Marshall-WVU game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning the evening of Thursday, Sept. 9, Marshall University will alter normal parking procedures in and around the Huntington campus because of the Thundering Herd's home football game with West Virginia University on Friday, Sept. 10. Game time is 7 p.m.

James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety, said the changes begin at 9 p.m. Thursday when all athletic permit lots will be closed. These include the Joan C. Edwards Stadium west lot, Annex 1, Annex 2, C lot and the Softball lot. Any automobile still on those lots at 10 a.m. Friday will be towed at the owner's expense, Terry said.

Employees and students who normally park in the athletic permit lots will be asked to park Friday in the garage on 3rd Avenue across from Cam Henderson Center or on surface lots on 6th Avenue. Beginning at 8 a.m. Friday, parking officers will staff those lots to control access to Marshall employees and student permit holders only.

Beginning at noon, all lots on campus - excluding the athletic permit lots and the pay-per-space lot east of Corbly Hall - will be open to the public for the game-day parking rate of $5 per space. The lot near Corbly will be closed for a university function.

Terry said that although tailgating may begin at noon, no alcohol is to be consumed on university owned or controlled property until 3 p.m. At that time, alcohol consumption is allowed only in tailgate-designated areas. No alcohol consumption is permitted within the main campus at any time.

"We appreciate the patience and cooperation of our students and employees," Terry said. "We understand that these changes, even if only for one day, might be inconvenient, but they are necessary to accommodate the thousands of visitors we will have on campus on September 10th. It is vital that everyone follow these directions."


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Friday September 3, 2010
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

Marshall's student-produced late show kicks off brand new season of college-age hijinks

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WSAZ newswoman Jessica Ralston brings her dogs to the set of the fall semester's debut of "Up Late," Marshall University's student-produced late-night show.

Host Jamie LoFiego, though fearful of the dogs, manages to pull himself together long enough to talk to Ralston about her last visit to the MU program and her video game addiction to "Cabela's Big Game Hunter" for Wii.

Also this week, LoFeigo welcomes what he calls "hands down, one of the best musical acts we've ever had on the show" - Jeff Ellis featuring Bud Carroll and the Southern Souls.

LoFiego and his college-aged cast is up to its usual style of humor as they introduce the season's new co-host, Kyle Hobstetter of Portsmouth, Ohio, check in with Cat Rayson, a foreign exchange student from Great Britain who doesn't appear to want to ever leave Huntington, and hear from Patrick Webb, who will be checking in from his study abroad program in Australia this season. Jessi Sission, a senior from Ripley, W.Va., ventures out of the studio to see what kind of action Marshall students got into over the summer.

This episode of "Up Late" will air on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Thursday September 2, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Constitution Week celebration continues



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University will celebrate Constitution Week 2010 Sept. 13-23 with a series of events on its Huntington campus.

Highlighting the events will be "A Tribute to John Marshall" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 15 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. It will be hosted by the Office of Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and is free to the public.

"President Kopp has long encouraged the development of a better understanding of our namesake, John Marshall," said Dr. Alan B. Gould, Executive Director of Marshall's John Deaver Drinko Academy. "We hope everyone will join President Kopp as he pays tribute to the Great Chief Justice."

Other events planned during Constitution Week include the annual quoits tournament Wednesday-Thursday, Sept. 15-16, a celebration of John Marshall's birthday Sept. 16, announcement of the winner of the Judge Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition Friday, Sept. 17, a panel discussion on "Politics, Political Parties and the Media in the 21st Century" Tuesday, Sept. 21 and the Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility Thursday, Sept. 23.

"This is the sixth year of our celebration of Constitution Week here at Marshall," Gould said. "It seems like every year it gets a little better. This year's events are varied, interesting and educational. It is our hope and expectation that everyone in the Marshall community will come and join in some or all of the events planned for this year's celebration."

"A Tribute to John Marshall" consists of music provided by John Marshall's Own Harmonie Musicale, an ensemble of Marshall music professors performing songs and music of John Marshall's era played on historically authentic instruments. It also includes a narrative titled "Meet John Marshall," given by the Honorable John Laidley, founder of Marshall Academy - and perhaps better known today as Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

Teams are forming now to play in the annual quoits tournament that begins with registration and practice Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 13-14. Greek and open tournaments are Wednesday, Sept. 15, and the tournament concludes Thursday, Sept. 16 with the President's Media Challenge. Quoits is an ancient and little-known sport related to horseshoe pitching that dates back to the early days of Olympic discus throwers. Gould said quoits was John Marshall's favorite game.

Teams of Marshall University faculty, staff, students, fraternities and sororities may participate, and the deadline for team registration is 5 p.m. Sept. 13. To register now, teams may call Renee Denney at 304-696-2300, or e-mail her at Denney@marshall.edu. Registration also will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 13 on the west end of Buskirk Field.

The President's Media Challenge at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 16 features Kopp and members of the media playing quoits on the west end of Buskirk Field. That event will be preceded at 11 a.m. by the cutting of the John Marshall Birthday Cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

The Judge Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition winner will be announced during a ceremony that begins at 5 p.m. Sept. 17 in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Room.

The panel discussion will take place at 11 a.m. Sept. 21 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Panelists include:

  • Al May, a professor in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

  • Bruce Hardy, a senior research analyst at the Annenberg Center for Public Policy at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He has coauthored books on the new media and Obama's presidential victory

  • Dr. Robert Rupp, a professor of political science at West Virginia Wesleyan in Buckhannon, W.Va. He is often used as an analyst for coverage of the Legislature and public events for West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Monitoring the discussion will be Beth Vorhees, host of West Virginia Today on West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

"They are going to talk about the changing nature of politics, the new politics of the 21st century," said Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. "I think it's going to be a great panel."

The Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility is scheduled for 12:30 p.m. Sept. 23 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Dr. Simon Perry, emeritus professor of political science, will speak on the topic: "The Constitutional Convention of 1787."

For more information on Constitution Week, contact Denney at 304-696-2300.


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Thursday September 2, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's School of Journalism and Mass Communications to host golf scramble fundraiser at Twin Silos


'J-School Golf Scramble' Sept. 23 will raise money for school's equipment needs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) will host a golf scramble at the Twin Silos Golf Course in Lavalette on Thursday, Sept. 23.

The purpose of the event is to raise money for equipment needs for the school's classrooms and teaching labs. It begins at 1 p.m., with late registration starting at noon. The scramble will conclude with a cookout and the announcement of winners and prizes.

 "The School of Journalism and Mass Communications is a very hands-on program and we try to maintain the most current equipment in our teaching environments," said Dr. Corley Dennison, SOJMC dean. "With recent budget cuts, we are left to raise much of the money for new equipment."

The schoolʼs student advertising/public relations agency, Out Loud, is organizing the event. Out Loud representatives are seeking players and sponsors to participate.

"Our group is working diligently to find participants," said Tess Moore, an Out Loud member. "We need to find more sponsors and golfers to help make the event a success."

For more information on the J-School Golf Scramble contact Sandy Savage-York, Out Loud adviser, at 304-696-2273 or sandy.york@marshall.edu.


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Thunder in the Shoe II tailgate party sold out

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thunder in the Shoe II, a tailgate party sponsored by Marshall University alumni and supporters Jim and Verna K. Gibson before the Thundering Herd's football game Thursday at Ohio State University, is sold out.

The event, also sponsored by Nationwide Insurance, will be at the Drake Performance and Event Center at 1849 Cannon Dr., located about 500 yards from the stadium. The game kicks off at 7:30 p.m. The tailgate party runs from 4 to 10 p.m.

Advance tickets to the tailgate are gone and no tickets will be sold at the door.

"We want to thank everyone for their enthusiasm and support of the Thundering Herd and this wonderful tailgate event," said Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations. "We are really looking forward to a fun tailgate party as our fans get fired up for the game. The fact that we are sold out shows just how excited Herd fans are for this game and the season."


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Faculty member's work on display in Switzerland

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A member of the faculty at Marshall University has art work on display in an exhibition overseas.

Daniel Kaufmann, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Design, was chosen to show his artwork in reGeneration2: Tomorrow's Photographers Today, which will continue until Sept. 26 at the Muse de l'Elyse, a museum for photography in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Kaufmann's work was selected from among 700 entries submitted by 120 of the world's top photography schools. According to the Muse de l'Elyse's website, the exhibition showcases 80 up-and-coming talents from 30 countries.

Kaufmann said his work in the exhibition is from his series House Home.  The photographs in House Home are digitally constructed from photographs of his home, his friends' homes and objects from many different home-furnishing stores. He said he does not photograph a room in its entirety, but rather in parts that he then uses to construct the images.  When constructing the final images, he uses the same types of compositional and photographic techniques used in commercial photography, advertising and marketing. In the title of the work, House refers to physical construction of the rooms while Home refers to the human imprint on the room.

"The photographs in House Home are inspired by a fantasy of aspirational living in which ideas of home and a person's lifestyle are constructed by purchasing slick, shiny and arguably unnecessary things," Kaufmann said. "I see a person's lifestyle as a  means of forging a sense of self and creating cultural symbols that resonate with personal identity."

Kaufmann said the exhibition will travel for the next five years throughout Europe and the United States with additional stops in China and South Africa. It is expected to make its United States debut at Art Basel Miami Beach in Miami, Fla.

This semester at Marshall, Kaufmann is teaching "Introduction to Photography," "Introduction to Design" and "Advanced Studio Sequence Photography - The Staged Photography Constructed Image."


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Hispanic Heritage Month at Marshall features four events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a series of special events on the Huntington campus beginning Wednesday, Sept. 15.

Hispanic Heritage Month, which celebrates the culture of Latin America and Latinos in the United States, is being presented by Marshall's Latin American Program, including the departments of history, geography, modern languages and political science.

As a national event, Hispanic Heritage Month begins in mid-September to commemorate the independence of many Latin American nations from Spain in the 1810s and 1820s, and ends in mid-October.

"The Latin American Program sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of Information Technology, the College of Liberal Arts, and several departments, has organized artistic performances and scholarly presentations to be enjoyed by Marshall students, faculty and the Huntington community," said Dr. Cristina Burgueno, professor of Spanish and Latin American Cultures, and a member of the Hispanic Heritage Month planning committee. "The program includes the Grammy-awarded Ziegler's Trio, folk music from Argentina by Marina Santillan and Samy Mielgo, and lectures on the Arizona Case and the New Tango. All of these events provide an outlook from the marvels of the cultural diversity in Latin America."

Here is a brief look at this year's Hispanic Heritage Month program of activities:
 

Wednesday, Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m.
Drinko Library 402
Lecture and Panel discussion

The Arizona Case: Disentangling Criminal Issues from Immigration Issues

Marco Balducci, lawyer
Andrea Arroyo, painter and political activist
Dr. Christopher White, discussant
 

Wednesday, Oct. 6, 6:30 p.m.
Drinko Library 402
Lecture by Dr. Oscar Ballester

Tango/New Tango: From Gardel to Piazzolla. Recommended before attending the Pablo Ziegler's Trio concert on Oct. 15. Tango is the Rio del Plata traditional music. Ballester will discuss its evolution over the past 100 years focusing in the revolution introduced by Astor Piazzolla. Piazzolla (Argentina, 1921-1992) was a tango composer and bandoneon player. His innovative oeuvre on the traditional tango led it into a new style termed Nuevo Tango, incorporating elements from jazz and classical music.
 

Friday, Oct. 15, 7:30 p.m.
Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
Marshall Artists Series event

Concert by Tango Trio directed by Pablo Ziegler.  Ziegler is a very well-known pianist and composer based in Buenos Aires and New York. He was Piazzolla's pianist for many years, and currently he is the leading exponent of "Nuevo Tango." Ziegler's 2005 album, Bajo Cero (Below Zero), earned a Latin Grammy award.

Tickets: $39.60 main floor, and $29 balcony. For more information, call 304-696-6658.
 

Tuesday, Oct. 26, 6:30 p.m.
Booth Experimental Theater

Concert by singer Marina Santillan and guitar player Samy Mielgo. Santillan is a young singer from Buenos Aires, Argentina. She is fourth generation in  a lineage of musicians, composers and singers. Her repertoire includes popular music from jazz to tango, as well as folk music from Argentina and Latin America. She was a member of several folk groups like "Antares" and "Mama Yungay" before starting her solo career in 2002. In 2009, she released her first album called "Mar Adentro," with the contribution of several notable musicians. The album also includes two songs composed by Santillan.

Mielgo is a well recognized guitar player, composer and chorus director who published two CD's: Pequeas Alegroas (Little Joys) and Otro Lugar (Other Place).
 

For more information on Hispanic Heritage Month activities at Marshall, contact Burgueno by phone at 304-696-2746 or by e-mail at burgueno@marshall.edu.

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MU Career Services offers resume workshop on Sept. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will present a free resume workshop for students and alumni at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8 at the Career Services Center on the Huntington campus.

Senior Career Advisor Mirek Bialk will present the Resume Basics 101 Workshop, which focuses on how to prepare a powerful, effective resume that gets attention - and interviews.

Participants will learn to:

       Format a resume to include all sections employers expect to see

      Transform a list of job duties into powerful success stories

      Utilize their education and internships to prove they have experience to do the job

     Create resume templates to help them stand out from other applicants

Students and alumni may call 304-696-2370 to reserve a seat or to obtain more information about this workshop.

The Career Services Center is located on the corner of 5th Ave. and 17th St.


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Ohio State police share game-day policies with Thundering Herd fans

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An estimated 3,000 to 4,000 Marshall University football fans will be traveling to Columbus Thursday for the Thundering Herd's football game with Ohio State. Kickoff is at 7:30 p.m.

Paul Denton, Chief of Police with The Ohio State University Police Division, shared some information with Marshall University that he thinks will be helpful to Herd fans.

General game-day and stadium information is available at:

http://www.ohiostatebuckeyes.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=17300&KEY=&ATCLID=1549294

Public Safety Highlights:

Alcohol Policy
Alcoholic beverages are NOT permitted in Ohio Stadium. Guests identified with alcohol inside the stadium may be ejected and will have the alcohol confiscated.

Possession and consumption of alcohol are subject to the laws and regulations of the State of Ohio and/or City of Columbus which state, among others: No person shall have in the person's possession an opened container of beer or intoxicating liquor in any public place.

Complete State of Ohio (http://ohiostatebuckeyes.com/fls/17300/pdf/facility/2010-container-policy.pdf?DB_OEM_ID=17300) and The Ohio State University Alcohol Policies (http://ohiostatebuckeyes.com/fls/17300/pdf/facility/2010-alcohol-policy.pdf?DB_OEM_ID=17300) can be found by clicking on the appropriate links.

As in past years, law enforcement agencies will continue to enforce state laws regarding the use and possession of alcohol.  A number of law enforcement authorities will issue citations or make arrests for violations of laws prohibiting open containers of alcohol in public areas, on or off campus, including university parking lots and garages.  Persons engaging in underage drinking, public indecency, disorderly conduct and other violations are subject to arrest.

In accordance with state and local fire codes, grilling is prohibited inside parking garages and garage rooftops. Grills (propane or charcoal) can be used on surface parking lots. 

Fire inspectors will inspect tents and enforce the law that requires a permit for tents larger than 200 square feet.  Cooking is not allowed inside or underneath a tent or awning. 

Parking information:

A color-coded parking map for the Marshall game is available at http://tp.osu.edu/Maps/footballmap_ThursdayMarshallGame.pdf.

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Marshall grad wins composition contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An alumnus of Marshall University's College of Fine Arts recently won a film scoring competition in Columbus, Ohio.

Mark Haas, a 2008 Bachelor of Fine Arts graduate from Nitro, W.Va., won the 2010 film scoring competition in the Indie Gathering's annual film festival.

In the competition, each composer downloaded the same short film clip and scored music to the video. The clip was then submitted and reviewed by a panel of judges.

Haas won first prize from among more than 500 entries. The award for first prize was a medal and a DVD of the winners, which is sent to directors around the world.

"Many composers are active in the industry," Haas said. "So it would have been an honor to even be in the top 10, let alone take first prize."

Haas said he entered the competition to assist his future career direction. He will be applying for graduate school this year and accomplishments like competitions are good to put on a record. He also needed a project to put on his demo reel.

"Directors, production companies and media groups want to see composers who are successful and active," Haas said.

The short clip was a movie trailer for an independent film called "Madness."

After graduating with his B.F.A. in Music Composition, Haas took a job as a full-time church music director at St. Vincent de Paul Church in Wheeling, W.Va., where he and his wife now live.

"My 'plan' is to be able to work at a college teaching anything music," Haas said, "and also to work as a freelance media composer."

Haas said all students can achieve what they set out to do.

"You will receive a great education to get you wherever you want to go," Haas said. "The tools you will receive at Marshall are more than enough, but there are no 'Immediate Success' classes. Take those tools and run with them on your own accord. For now, you are in great hands. For tomorrow, you take care of you. Don't wait."


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Thunder in the Shoe II tailgate party starts at 4 p.m. before Ohio State game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thunder in the Shoe II, a tailgate party sponsored by Marshall University alumni and supporters Jim and Verna K. Gibson, will take place at 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 2 in Columbus before the Thundering Herd's season-opening football game with Ohio State University.

The event, also sponsored by Nationwide Insurance, will be at the Drake Performance and Event Center at 1849 Cannon Dr., located about 500 yards from the stadium. The game kicks off at 7:30 p.m. The tailgate party continues until 10 p.m.

Marshall's cheerleaders, along with Marco, will be on hand, and there will be music, food, prizes and entertainment. Cost to attend is $35 and checks should be made payable to the Marshall University Alumni Association and mailed to Thunder in the Shoe II, Alumni Relations, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755-6200.

The menu for the event will be tailgate specialties along with beer and wine.

For more information, contact Jon Sutton at 304-696-2901 or Nancy Pelphrey at 304-696-3134.


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Date of Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit changed to April 2011



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University, in partnership with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, will present the 2010 Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit April 10-11, 2011.

The previously scheduled summit has been moved due to scheduling conflicts.

The free event is designed to bring together educational leaders in elementary, secondary and higher education - both public and private - to discuss the important roles schools, colleges and universities have in creating sustainable campuses across West Virginia.  The summit will take place on Marshall's Huntington campus and is open to public and private higher education, as well as public and private K-12 schools.

Online registration is available at http://apps.dep.wv.gov/registration. An agenda is also available at this site.

The summit is presented in concert and partnership with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, Marshall University's Sustainability Department, State Electric Supply Company, and ZMM, Inc.

For more information, contact MU Sustainability Manager Margie Phillips at philli10@marshall.edu or 304-696-2992.


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Marshall University students win awards at Summer Law Institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University students have been recognized for superior performance during the Summer Law Institute at West Virginia University aimed at developing future community leaders.

Jasmine Hairston, a political science and sociology major from La Plata, Md.; Erica Law, an English major from Eleanor, W.Va.; and Austin Smith, a psychology major from Charleston, W.Va., attended the two-week program in June in Morgantown. The three students won awards for competitions in areas associated with the practice of law, including writing, oral advocacy and grammar.  

"The summer institute gave these students a unique opportunity to learn about careers in law and their own talents," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "I am proud of our students' success."

Twenty students from colleges and universities around the state attended the institute, which organizers say was designed to encourage students from rural areas to consider law as a career and to develop future community leaders.  The students will be invited to return to the institute next summer for a second session.

For more information, contact Pittenger at 304-696-2731 or pittengerd@marshall.edu.


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Marching Thunder surpasses 300 members for first time in school history

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's marching band, the Marching Thunder, is more than 300 strong for the first time in the university's history.

"We have seen growth in almost every section of the band from last year's band, including about 120 new freshmen," said Steve Barnett, Marshall's Director of Bands and Professor of Music.

Barnett said he is excited about the growth of the band program, but he admits that numbers are not his top priority.

"I have always been more concerned about the character and quality of the students that we recruit to be in the band," Barnett said. "I am very proud of the reputation that the Marching Thunder has built on a national level in the last few years - both in the quality of performance and in the citizenship."

Last year, after the band left the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl game in Detroit, Barnett received comments from the manager of the hotel where the band stayed.

"The manager said that we were the best behaved group they had ever had there," Barnett said.  "Comments like that are what we strive for and make me very proud to be associated with these fine young ladies and gentlemen. I would take them anywhere without hesitation as ambassadors for Marshall University."

Barnett said he is looking forward to the upcoming season. "We have had a great band camp and are getting ready for our first performance at the first home game on Sept. 10 against West Virginia University," he said.  "We are excited about a great season and the opportunity to be the 'center of game-day spirit' at the home football games."

In addition to football game performances, the Marching Thunder will be the feature band and perform in exhibitions at the Black Walnut Festival in Spencer, W.Va.; the Spring Valley Marching Festival in Wayne County, W.Va.; and the Kanawha County Band and Majorette Festival in Charleston.  On the Huntington campus, they also will host Band Day on Sept. 25 and the annual Tri-State Marching Festival on Nov. 6, which is the largest marching festival in the state and in the region.


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7th annual Marshall University Marathon set for Nov. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 7th annual Marshall University Marathon will take place at 7 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 7, race director Tom Dannals said today. Events include the marathon, half-marathon run (or walk), half-marathon relay and 5-mile walk.

Registration is available at active.com or www.healthyhuntington.org and the cut-off date to sign up is Oct. 27.  After that day, participants must register on the Saturday (Nov. 6) before the race at the Marshall Recreation Center (5th Ave and 20th Street). There will be no race-day registration for any event.

The marathon starts on 3rd Avenue near Cam Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The last mile takes runners and walkers through Marshall's campus for a goal-line finish at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The flat marathon course extends to west Huntington and back, passing Pullman Square, the Ohio River and Ritter Park.

Entry fees are as follows:

Marathon - $60 by Aug. 29 and $80 after that

Half-marathon run or walk - $35 by Aug. 29 and $50 after that

Half-marathon relay - $60 per team by Aug. 29 and $75 after that

All 5-mile walkers - $20 regardless of sign-up date

For more information, visit www.healthyhuntington.org.


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Marine selection officer to be on campus Tuesday, Aug. 31

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Lt. Charles Hansen, selection officer with the Marine Corps Officer programs, will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus, Tuesday, Aug. 31.

Kelly Sweetman, Director of Military & Veterans Affairs at Marshall, said Hansen will be seeing students who wish to gather information about the Marine Corps Officer programs. He will be in the Student Resource Center, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center, from 2 to 4:30 p.m. 

More information is available by calling Sweetman at 304-696-5278 or by e-mailing her at Sweetman@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University's undergraduate engineering program attains ABET accreditation

Program enrollment has doubled since it was started in 2006

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall's University's bachelor of science degree program in engineering has been accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc., the recognized accreditor of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering, and technology.  ABET accreditation demonstrates a program's commitment to providing its students with a quality education.

"The action taken by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET to accredit Marshall University's bachelor of science in engineering program is a very important step in the continued evolution and expansion of engineering at Marshall," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "It is the standard by which engineering programs of quality are measured. One of the key outcome objectives of our program is to prepare students to become licensed professional engineers. In order to even be considered, applicants must have graduated from an ABET-accredited program. We are extremely pleased to have earned program accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET."

Accreditation is a voluntary, peer-review process that requires programs to undergo comprehensive, periodic evaluations.  The evaluations, conducted by teams of volunteer professionals working in industry, government, academe, and private practice within the ABET disciplines, focus on program curricula, faculty, facilities, institutional support, and other important areas. 

One of the key elements of ABET accreditation is the requirement that programs continuously improve the quality of education provided.  As part of this continuous improvement requirement, programs set specific, measurable goals for their students and graduates, assess their success at reaching those goals, and improve their programs based on the results of their assessment. 

In addition to providing colleges and universities a structured mechanism to assess, evaluate, and improve their programs, accreditation also helps students and their parents choose quality college programs, enables employers and graduate schools to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared, and is used by registration, licensure, and certification boards to screen applicants.

ABET is a not-for-profit organization, owned and operated by its more than 25 professional and technical member societies.  An internationally respected organization with some 1,500 volunteers, ABET has set the higher-educational standards in its fields for nearly 75 years.  More information about ABET, its member societies, and the evaluation criteria used to accredit programs can be found at www.abet.org.

In January 2006, Marshall's Board of Governors approved a bachelor of science degree in engineering, to be offered in the College of Information Technology and Engineering's  Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science.

Four students graduated in the first class from this new program in 2009. Marshall was then eligible to apply for accreditation, which it did in January 2009.

Currently, 163 students are enrolled in Marshall's undergraduate engineering program, a total that is nearly double the number of students in the program when it was started. The total undergraduate enrollment for the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science is 271.

Sen. Robert Plymale, chair of the Senate Education Committee, was the lead sponsor of legislation in 2004 that led to the start of Marshall's engineering program.

"This accreditation validates the collaborative and cooperative efforts among higher education, government and students to bring quality engineering education back to Marshall University," Plymale said. "I'm just glad, as an elected official, to have played a major part in expanding opportunities to educate the next generation of transportation professionals for our State and the Nation."

Betsy Dulin, dean of CITE, said she is elated with the accreditation.

"We've always been proud of our outstanding engineering faculty and students at Marshall," Dulin said. "This is a direct result of their hard work and dedication to the engineering profession."

For more information about Marshall's bachelor of science degree program in engineering, visit http://www.marshall.edu/cite/.

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Manchin reappoints Sellards, appoints Craigo and McDonie to Marshall University's Board of Governors



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Michael Sellards of Huntington has been reappointed and two others appointed for the first time by Gov. Joe Manchin III to Marshall University's Board of Governors.

New appointees include Oshel Craigo of Winfield and Joseph McDonie of Milton. Craigo succeeds Bob Shell and McDonie succeeds Gary White. The terms of Sellards, Craigo and McDonie end June 30, 2014.

All three were appointed in late July then sworn in today by West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Brent D. Benjamin during the regular board meeting in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Edward Pride, a senior from Morgantown, was elected as the student representative to the board and also sworn in today.

Sellards is President and Chief Executive Officer of St. Mary's Medical Center. He lives in Huntington.

Craigo, a former West Virginia State Senator, is owner and operator of Better Foods, Inc. He lives in Winfield.

McDonie is Chief Executive Officer of Rock Branch Community Bank, Inc., in Nitro, W.Va. He lives in Milton.

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Photo: West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Brent D. Benjamin swears in, from left, Edward Pride, Joseph McDonie, Michael Sellards and Oshel Craigo during today's Board of Governors meeting at Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Larsen shows new work in exhibitions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A member of the art and design faculty at Marshall University is exhibiting paintings in two art exhibitions this fall, following one in which she participated over the summer.

This summer, Natalie Larsen's work was featured in the 6th Annual National Self Portrait Exhibition at the 33 Collective Gallery in Chicago, Ill. It went up in July and ended the second week of August.

The first exhibition this fall is titled "Let's Eat" and it is at the Long Island Museum in Stony Brook, N.Y. It went up Aug. 14 and will run through mid-September. The third exhibition is called the KY7 Biennial, and it runs from Sept. 11 through Oct. 23, in Lexington, Ky.

Larsen earned her B.F.A. in painting at the Maine College of Art and her M.F.A. in studio art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She says her work in general is about her experience growing up Mormon, but she works hard to make the work accessible to people who didn't have the same experience. The pieces in these three exhibitions range from portraits to narrative pieces. All of them are paintings.

Larsen said painting and drawing is her passion and that it is very important to her to exhibit as much as possible.

 "I always want to be an active artist," Larsen said. "It's important for me personally, but also important for my students to see me actively engaged in my discipline outside of the classroom."


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Marshall to host TechConnect West Virginia forum in September

Presidents Kopp and Clements to headline program focused
on growing the state's technology economy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host a forum next month sponsored by TechConnect West Virginia and intended to bring together policy and opinion leaders, researchers and entrepreneurs, economic developers and others to discuss and develop strategies for growing West Virginia's technology economy.

The event will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 7, at Marshall University Foundation Hall, 519 John Marshall Dr., Huntington.

The program will feature presentations by the presidents of the state's two research universities. Dr. Stephen J. Kopp of Marshall University and Dr. James P. Clements of West Virginia University will talk about the role of universities as the foundation for technology growth in West Virginia.

Dr. Paul L. Hill, vice chancellor for science and research at the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, will give a presentation about plans for the West Virginia Education, Research and Technology Park in South Charleston. Additionally, panel discussions featuring experts and technology business owners from around the state will focus on access to capital, entrepreneurial assistance and entrepreneurial talent. The panels will be moderated by Kelley Goes, secretary of the West Virginia Division of Commerce, and John Golden, director of external affairs for Verizon West Virginia.

Co-sponsors of the event include Marshall University, West Virginia University and Verizon.

For more information, contact Kevin DiGregorio at 304-437-4295 or visit www.techconnectwv.org.


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'Sixteen hands' exhibition starts fall semester at Birke Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Work by a group called "16 Hands," made up of eight artists from southwest Virginia, will be on exhibit at the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall University's Huntington campus until Sept. 9.

"The work on display in this exhibition is made by the eight members of '16 Hands,' " said Ellen Shankin, one of the founding members of the group. "We are first a group of friends, craftsmen and neighbors, living in the mountains of southwest Virginia for the past 30 years."

Shankin also will present a workshop at the Marshall ceramics lab on Sept. 8 and 9. She will demonstrate throwing and glazing techniques and host a discussion on form. The workshop is free and open to the public. Reservations are not necessary, but helpful. For more information or to make a reservation, persons may contact Jaye Ike, Special Projects Coordinator for the College of Fine Arts at Marshall, at 304-696-3296 or jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

Marshall ceramics professor Earline Allen, a local artist, was instrumental in bringing the '16 Hands' exhibition to Huntington.

"We are expecting both an inspiring and exciting workshop," Allen said. "Ellen Shankin is a well-known and experienced potter who maintains a studio in Floyd, Va.  She is respected for her national and international workshop leadership. Ellen's work has been featured in publications such as Ceramics Monthly and Studio Potter magazine. She also has been a recipient of both a NAEA Visual Arts Fellowship and Virginia Museum Grant."

Graduate student and ceramic artist Tommy Warf emphasized the value this presents to the ceramic community of the Tri-state.

"This is an opportunity to see how another ceramic artist works - her methods and details - and you can take what she does and translate it into your own work," Warf said. "She is a nationally known artist, so I'm excited to see what she presents."

"I have been making pots for more than 30 years now... every day, steadfastly," Shankin said of her work. "They are pots for the table, cooking and serving, celebrating and sharing. They are objects I love to make. As I grow in this devotion, this work of my hands, my direction has changed. At one time, early on, I chased skill and competence ... later maybe, some notion of beauty. At this point in my life, both personally and artistically, I am striving for clarity. My aim is to make pots that sing of their nature in a total way. In rim, foot, surface and form ... a common language ... a single voice."

Shankin further describes the group as much like friends, as well as business partners.

"Through our long friendship we have shared so many life experiences: the raising of children, marriages, illnesses, pottery issues, technical support and an aesthetic context and texture that surrounds our bond," Shankin said. "Our group contains a broad diversity of ceramic styles as well: working in both porcelain and stoneware, firing in wood, gas reduction and electric kilns. '16 Hands' also has one woodworker among the potters. He makes fine furniture and turnings in mostly local hardwoods."

"The founding members, David Crane, Silvie Granatelli, Richard Hensley, Donna Polseno, Ellen Shankin and Brad Warstler all have more than 30 years of studio life behind them and the two newer, younger members, Stacy Snyder and Josh Copus, bring a different perspective and vitality to the mix," Shankin explained. "Function plays a central role in most of the work of our group, but sculptural vessels and sculpture are made as well."

A closing reception for the exhibition in the gallery will take place Tuesday, Sept. 7, from 5 to 8 p.m. with light refreshments.


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Monday August 23, 2010
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Statewide science and research symposium to be held at Marshall next month

Keynote speaker to provide counter-reaction to growing rejection of the benefits of modern science

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The biennial statewide science and research conference is scheduled for Sept. 27-28 on the campus of Marshall University. This will be the first time the event has been held in Huntington.

Intended for members of the state's business and research communities, the STaR (Science, Technology and Research) Symposium focuses on cutting-edge research being conducted in West Virginia, the national and state outlooks for scientific research, and the importance of technology-based economic development to the state's future. The sessions will be held in the new Marshall University Foundation Hall and the Memorial Student Center.

This year's symposium will feature headline speaker Michael Specter, author of "Denialism," an investigation of people's growing mistrust surrounding the world of science and its byproducts. A staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998, Specter argues that misplaced skepticism has undermined public acceptance of the scientific marvels of the present age and the benefits they provide humankind.

The theme of this year's program, "Sustainability: How Science, Technology and Research Can Sustain Our Future," will be carried throughout panel discussions on energy, the environment, cyberinfrastructure and the economy. The symposium also will offer breakout sessions highlighting the work of some of West Virginia's leading scientists, and a student poster competition that will feature the research of 26 outstanding undergraduate and graduate students from across the state, including 10 from Marshall.

The symposium early registration fee is $125 per person and includes all events, including Monday night's dinner and program featuring Specter. Single tickets for only Monday's dinner and Specter's presentation are available for $50. The program of events and online registration are available at www.wvresearch.org/starsymposium. Early registration ends Aug. 26. For more information, contact Jessica Tice at 304-558-4128 ext. 6 or jessica.tice@wvresearch.org.

The STaR Symposium is hosted by the Division of Science and Research, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, and sponsored by the National Science Foundation's West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR); the Marshall University Research Corporation; the West Virginia University Research Corporation; NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium/NASA West Virginia EPSCoR; the Mid-Atlantic Technology, Research & Innovation Center (MATRIC); Concord University; the West Virginia Department of Commerce; the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine; Bethany College; the Charleston Area Alliance; Shepherd University; and West Virginia Wesleyan College.


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Friday August 20, 2010
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Week of Welcome activities draw big numbers of freshmen



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Huntington campus was buzzing today with incoming freshmen exploring their home for the next four years as Week of Welcome (WOW) activities got into full swing.

An estimated 1,800 freshmen attended this morning's Freshman Academic Convocation at Cam Henderson Center, then later in the morning blanketed the Memorial Student Center plaza for a picnic lunch. Students in each college wore matching t-shirts that identified them with their academic program, resulting in a multicolored setting both in Henderson Center and on the plaza.

The students spent the day making friends, meeting their deans and getting started on the next chapter in their lives.

"It is a great day at Marshall University," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, as he scanned the big crowd on the plaza. "The Henderson Center was filled with a kaleidoscope of color as the students attended the academic convocation."

Early estimates indicate that a school record of approximately 2,000 freshmen will attend fall classes, which start on Monday, Aug. 23.

Week of Welcome activities began Wednesday and continue through Saturday.

At today's convocation, President Stephen J. Kopp addressed the students about a variety of topics, including attitude, preparation and keys to success. He encouraged them to stay in school and follow their dreams. The students also heard from head football Coach Doc Holliday, who invited them to today's 6 p.m. practice and encouraged them to support the Thundering Herd by attending games this fall.

Other speakers included Dr. Cam Brammer, president of the faculty senate, and Patrick Murphy, president of the student body. Robert Wray, assistant professor of music, and students from the choral area of Marshall's music department, taught the new students the alma mater. The students also repeated the "We Are Marshall" cheer.

"The purpose of the convocation is to have a first opportunity to speak with the students about expectations of them and the university," Ormiston said. "It went very well and the students were very impressive."

A video report on today's convocation is available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fO8PxcziNM.

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Photos (More at www.marshall.edu/feature/wow-highlights.asp):

(Top) Incoming freshmen sing the Marshall University alma mater during today's Freshman Academic Convocation at Cam Henderson Center.

(Middle) Incoming freshmen attending Week of Welcome activities today blanketed the Memorial Student Center plaza for a picnic lunch.

(Bottom) Incoming freshmen wore matching t-shirts that identified them with their academic programs during today's activities.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday August 20, 2010
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Marshall to receive more than $525,000 from NSF grant to state

Award to further expand cyberinfrastructure

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students and researchers across the region will benefit from a $1,176,470 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to West Virginia's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).

The award, which was announced earlier today by U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller and West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin, will enhance cyberinfrastructure across the state's higher education system over the next two years.

Marshall University will receive $525,874 from the grant to enable inter-campus Internet2 access for the state's predominantly undergraduate institutions, community and technical colleges, and the K-12 community.

Internet2 is an advanced networking consortium led by the research and education community. Marshall announced in January that it had joined the network, which connects nearly 70,000 research and educational institutions nationwide and interconnects with 80 international research networks. In addition to providing access to a number of significant emerging technologies not available within the limitations of previous networks, Internet2 links Marshall with people, equipment and information at partner institutions around the world.

This vital funding will allow Marshall University to establish the mechanisms that will help our partners and collaborators strategically position themselves to join us in cutting-edge opportunities not currently available on the commercial Internet," said Dr. Jan Fox, Marshall's senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer. "These enhanced capabilities will have particular significance not only for expanding science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs, research initiatives and clinical outreach, but also will bring significant economic development opportunities to the region."

Fox also acknowledged Marshall staff members who are working on the project, including Dr. Arnold R. Miller, assistant vice president for information technology; Allen Taylor, chief technology officer; and Michael Adkins, director of information technology infrastructure.

The grant was funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. West Virginia EPSCoR is directed by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC).

This award builds upon a three-year, $2.6 million grant HEPC received last year from the NSF to upgrade networks and enhance immersive visualization capabilities for researchers at Marshall, West Virginia University and West Virginia State University in collaboration with the University of Arkansas system. That grant is assisting the institutions with connection to high-performance computing networks and resources around the world, allowing researchers to collaborate in real time without geographic limitations.

Marshall received a little over $1 million from the 2009 award. Rockefeller saw a mine safety demonstration earlier this year at Marshall's Virtual Interactive Simulation Environment (VISE) Lab which received funding from this earlier grant.

For more information, contact Fox at 304-696-6706 or fox@marshall.edu.


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Summer projects keep workers busy on Marshall University's Huntington campus

Student Resource Center, upgraded food court among improvements

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Some are subtle and some are obvious, but one thing is certain - improvements on Marshall University's Huntington campus this summer are abundant.

From installing new dimmable lights in the hallways of Harris Hall to stripping wall paper and painting walls and jams in the Science Building to converting the former Alumni Lounge to a new Student Resource Center in the Memorial Student Center, workers have been busy the past three months completing one summer project after another.

Mark Cutlip, director of Marshall's physical plant, said workers have been focusing on building improvements and maintenance activities this summer. New, modern, efficient lighting has created brighter rooms throughout campus. In addition, more than 1,000 gallons of paint have been applied indoors and out this summer.

Work has occurred in many buildings. Examples include the Twin Towers West residence halls, which received new HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) in the lobby area, new carpet on floors one through nine and new air conditioning units in the rooms. A new kiln was installed in the art warehouse, concrete steps on the west end of Jenkins Hall were repaired and new LED spotlights were installed in Room 154 of Smith Hall.

"Work has been completed, or is still going on, in about 20 buildings on and off campus," Cutlip said. "It's been a very busy, productive, summer."

Week of Welcome (WOW) activities for incoming freshmen began Wednesday, Aug. 18. The first day of class is Monday, Aug. 23.

Here is a look at some of this summer's main projects on the Huntington campus:

Student Resource Center: The university has turned a meeting room into a Student Resource Center - a place where students have a one-stop-shop for various advising and counseling needs.

The center is located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center in the former Alumni Lounge. It is designed for students who need advising assistance in any area of study or for those who would like to explore academic major program options, said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.

"We have arranged for representatives of the most frequently accessed student service offices to be available at a single location," Ormiston said. "We hope to give students the information and services they need quickly and with less frustration on their part."

Ormiston said he is excited about the role the Student Resource Center will play in Marshall's student success and retention efforts. The center will have expanded hours and a central location. Student Resource Center Resource Specialists will be able to assist students with general advising questions, registration issues, student financial aid services, career services, military and veterans affairs questions.

Students can also receive general information on academic skill building, the e-Portfolio requirement, and other concerns, said Sherri Stepp, interim director of University College, who assisted in the development of the center.

"We will also offer academic skills workshops and seminars including time management, test-taking strategies, study skills, note-taking strategies and more," Stepp said.

For further information, persons may contact Stepp by phone at 304-696-7038 or by e-mail at goodall@marshall.edu.

Food Court: Students, faculty, staff and visitors have a bigger, brighter area in which to dine at the Memorial Student Center, with great new choices and free refills. The food court now has a modern, open look with lots of food and drink choices. 

Returning students will notice the wall separating the atrium and the dining room in the food court is gone, and Ultimate Baja and subconnection stations have been added. Drink machines have been moved into the dining area, allowing customers to have the free refills. Freshens, which features smoothies and yogurt, has expanded its menu.

"We're very excited about our changes and we invite everybody to come by and check us out," said Cheryl King, operations manager with Sodexo. "These new stations and the remodeled food court are a great addition to the Marshall University campus."

The food court has 270 seats, including 50 in Starbucks, which opened last spring. The food court was closed throughout the summer, but reopened on Monday, Aug. 16.

Athletics

Fans of Marshall athletics will enjoy a much greater experience in football, basketball, softball and soccer this year with interactive screens and scoreboards that are easier to read and offer huge video playback and greater sponsorship opportunities for area businesses.

Joan C. Edwards Stadium: Two large video displays are being installed at the stadium. The larger of the two will measure approximately 28 feet high by 49 feet wide and be located in the south end zone where the old video board stood. The second one, measuring about 22 feet high by 32 feet wide, has been installed on the Shewey Building and is flanked by two ribbon displays (message boards) each 82 feet in length. A custom sound system also is being installed at the stadium.

Daktronics Inc. of Brookings, S.D., was chosen by Marshall University and ISP Sports - the multimedia rightsholder for Marshall athletics - to do the upgrades. Athletic Director Mike Hamrick said the upgrades will enhance the game-day experience for Thundering Herd fans.

Cam Henderson Center: Daktronics will be providing a new ribbon display and two new courtside displays in the arena. The ribbon display will measure about 92 feet in length. The two courtside displays will measure about 20 feet in length.

The arena also has all new lighting and shutters, used to cover the lights for darkness and uncover them for light, have been installed. The shutters will allow for a light show before the games. New emergency lighting has been installed as well.

Sam Hood Field: The home of Marshall soccer will have two new scoreboards. One will measure eight feet high by 18 feet wide, and the other will measure three feet high by 19 feet wide.

Dot Hicks Field: Marshall's softball field will receive a new message display.

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Photos:

(Top) Freshman students dine in the remodeled Food Court Thursday at Marshall University's Memorial Student Center.

(Middle) Freshens, located in the Memorial Student Center Food Court, has expanded its menu.

(Bottom) Two new video displays are being installed at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The one above is located on the Shewey Building on the north end of the stadium and measures about 22 feet high by 32 feet wide.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Wednesday August 18, 2010
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Marshall Recreation Center to host second annual RecFest Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will open its doors to local businesses, vendors, campus groups and student organizations as a way to reach out to MU students on Saturday, Aug. 21 in the second annual RecFest.

RecFest 2010, which runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., is an integral part of Marshall's Week of Welcome, a program that began today and allows the university and community to greet the students as they start their college careers. The focus of RecFest is to provide the opportunity for incoming and returning students, faculty and staff to appreciate the options available to them both on campus and in the Huntington area.

RecFest will kick off with the first 500 participants receiving a reusable shopping bag, courtesy of Marshall Students Against Tobacco. Students will be able to sample products from local businesses, make a dash for the cash in a money machine, battle with new friends on an inflatable joust and get a tan without having to go outside in the spray tan booth.

Student Health Education will be sponsoring a health fair, with immunizations from the Cabell County Health Department, skin cancer testing courtesy of the American Cancer Society, and vision screenings. There also will be live music from local bands Gage and The Good Fight, free try climbs on the climbing wall, kayaking demonstrations in the pool, and prizes and giveaways throughout the day.

All students and their families are invited.


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Tuesday August 17, 2010
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Free concert highlights HerdFest 2010 on Thursday, Sept. 9

Multi-platinum artists Little Texas and West Virginia favorite
Davisson Brothers Band to perform

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A pair of rockin' country music bands, numerous vendors and thousands of football fans from across the state will converge on downtown Huntington on Thursday, Sept. 9, to celebrate HerdFest 2010, a concert and street festival preceding the Marshall-West Virginia University football game.

Marshall University and the MU Alumni Association are presenting HerdFest 2010, which is sponsored by Frontier Communications, Cabell Huntington Hospital, Marshall's Student Activities Programming Board, 93.7 "The DAWG," WOWK-TV, the Cabell Huntington Convention and Visitors Bureau and Community Trust Bank.

HerdFest begins with a street fair at 5 p.m. on 3rd Avenue in front of Pullman Square. Music will be provided by "The DAWG."

A free concert, featuring country, southern rock, and bluegrass fusion band, the Davisson Brothers Band, and multi-platinum-selling national recording artists, Little Texas, will take place from 6:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. The Davisson Brothers perform at 6:30 p.m., with Little Texas taking the stage at about 8:30 p.m. Dignitaries, including Gov. Joe Manchin and First Lady Gayle Manchin, as well as Marshall University coaches and officials, have been invited to speak to the crowd between musical performances. Marshall's cheerleaders and Marco will be on hand as well.

"We are really excited about HerdFest 2010 and we're expecting a great crowd of Marshall and WVU fans to come together and enjoy this free concert and the street fair, just as they did three years ago," said Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations. "The high-energy concert with Little Texas and the Davisson Brothers Band will just add to the excitement that is building for this year's Friends of Coal Bowl."

The game between the Thundering Herd and the Mountaineers kicks off at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Littlehales also is encouraging fans and supporters from both schools to attend the Friends of Coal Game Day Luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10 at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

Former Marshall Coach Bobby Pruett and former WVU Coach Don Nehlen will be featured speakers. Cost is $25. More information is available and tickets may be purchased by calling the Marshall alumni office at 304-696-2901.

Littlehales said proceeds from the luncheon will benefit the Marshall University Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association with a scholarship.

"Like the concert, the Friends of Coal Game Day Luncheon is open to everyone, no matter if they root for WVU or Marshall," she said. "It will be another opportunity for everyone to celebrate the Friends of Coal Bowl as the countdown to kickoff approaches."

The Davisson Brothers Band hails from Clarksburg, W.Va. Founded in the mid-1990s, the group has a unique style which infuses a remarkable blend of country, southern rock, and bluegrass to create a distinctive sound that was captured in their first single, "Big City Hillbilly."

This sound, combined with the band's talent and energy, has gained a loyal fan base all over the Eastern United States. Brothers Chris and Donnie Davisson and cousin Sammy Davisson, along with childhood friend Aaron Regester, are continuing musical pursuits started by the Davisson family long ago.

Little Texas is well known for its No. 1 singles "What Might Have Been," "God Blessed Texas" and "My Love." 

Little Texas' first radio release, "Some Guys Have All The Love," became a top-10 hit, as did its next single, "First Time For Everything." After the album, "First Time For Everything," was released, five singles reached the top of the charts.

The second album, "Big Time," sold more than three million copies. It included the three number one singles and led to the group's first Country Music Television (CMT) Award, a Billboard award, a Radio & Records award and a Grammy nod.


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Monday August 16, 2010
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Marshall University paleontologist to share species discovery at international symposium in China

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - A Marshall University professor, whose fossil research led to the discovery of a new species of marine animal, has accepted a prestigious invitation from the Chinese government to share his findings with its National Science Foundation of China.

Dr. Robin O'Keefe, an associate professor in MU's Department of Biological Sciences, will present his recent plesiosaur discoveries from the Jurassic Sundance Formation in Wyoming during the International Symposium on Triassic and later Marine Vertebrate Faunas at Peking University in Beijing. O'Keefe said that he was honored to be asked to present his research at this prestigious international symposium.

"The research I will discuss concerns a marine reptile, a plesiosaur we called Tatenectes laramiensis, discovered in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming several years ago. Laboratory work with my graduate students has just been completed, and we are publishing our results now," O'Keefe explained. "The symposium in China is an amazing opportunity, and I hope it will enrich the teaching and research experiences I can provide."

According to O'Keefe, Tatenectes laramiensis is a type of plesiosaur from the Jurassic Era, the period when large dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The marine animal had a long, wide, flat body, with four flippers, a tail and a long neck. O'Keefe's findings were made possible by a grant from National Geographic.

After the two-day symposium, Aug. 28-29 at Peking University's Geological Museum in the School of Earth and Space Sciences, O'Keefe will join colleagues from around the world to research fossil sites throughout China the following week.

"These areas are very hot for marine reptile fossil research right now, so this is a great opportunity for me to be exposed to, and perhaps participate in, cutting-edge research," O'Keefe said.

O'Keefe has taught biology and paleontology for Marshall University since 2006. He teaches human anatomy and comparative vertebrate anatomy and serves as a graduate adviser. He received his B.S. in Biology from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Chicago. O'Keefe has published numerous scientific publications, and also has served as a scientific adviser for National Geographic, IMAX and the Discovery Channel. 

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Photo: Dr. Robin O'Keefe, an associate professor in Marshall University's Department of Biological Sciences, will present his recent plesiosaur discoveries from the Jurassic Sundance Formation in Wyoming during the International Symposium on Triassic and later Marine Vertebrate Faunas at Peking University in Beijing. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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Friday August 13, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Commuter students invited to stay on campus during WOW

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Incoming freshmen who will be commuting to Marshall University's Huntington campus in the fall have the option of staying overnight on campus during the Week of Welcome (WOW) activities beginning Aug. 18.

"Commuter students are an important part of the class of 2014, and we expect that they will participate in the WOW activities," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. "Having a room on campus for the evenings of Aug. 18 and 19 will make it much more convenient for them."

For $15 per night (including linens and meals), commuter students may spend Wednesday, Aug. 18; Thursday, Aug. 19, or both nights in Twin Towers East. A limited number of rooms are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Interested students should contact Lekesha Glover by e-mail at glover11@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-6208 no later than Monday, Aug. 16.

For students with reservations, housing check-in will be at the front desk of Twin Towers East from noon to 4 p.m. both days. Check out is at 4 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 20.


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Friday August 13, 2010
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Marshall University names Kroll founding director of new Physical Therapy program



HUNTINGTON - Marshall University has named Dr. Penny Kroll founding director of its new Physical Therapy Department, according to Dr. Gretchen Oley, interim dean of the College of Health Professions.

Kroll comes to Marshall after serving for four years as head of the Physical Therapy Department at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center where she directed and taught in the physical therapy doctoral program as well as coordinated and directed clinical care aspects of LSU Health Care Services contracts in South Louisiana.

She begins her new duties at Marshall on Monday, Aug. 23. She will lead the new physical therapy doctoral program, which was approved by the Marshall University Board of Governors in 2009.  Students are expected to begin classes in the summer of 2012.

"I am honored to have been chosen as the founding director of the new Physical Therapy Department at such a prestigious educational institution as Marshall University," Kroll said. "I look forward to working with the faculty and administration to design a top-notch Doctor of Physical Therapy Program that will train professionals who exhibit the excellent skills, behaviors and attitudes necessary to meet the health care needs of the students of Marshall and the citizens of the City of Huntington, the State of West Virginia, as well as the entire region."

Kroll received her B.S. in Physical Therapy from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Physical Therapy from New York University.  She served several years in the United States Public Health Service as a 1st Lieutenant. After leaving the service, she held staff and supervisory positions in a number of orthopedic settings including Director of Rehabilitation at the NYU Hospital for Joint Disease. During that time, she was also an adjunct and/or full-time faculty member at NYU, Long Island University, Ithaca College-Bronx Campus and Hunter College. In 1991, she took a full-time faculty position at the University of Miami in Miami, Fla., and in 2003 she became chair of the Physical Therapy Department at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said he is pleased to see an experienced professional such as Kroll at the helm of the new doctoral program, one he says is much needed.

"Our region has been in need of an accredited, entry-level physical therapy program for a long time," Kopp said. "The quality professionals that Marshall University will graduate will most certainly fill that need not only locally, but throughout the entire tri-state region, the State of West Virginia and beyond. I believe Dr. Kroll is the right person to ignite a superb program and look forward to seeing the department evolve and advance under her leadership."

Kroll also has served in a variety of roles in the American Physical Therapy Association. Her research interests have been in measurement methods in physical therapy and she has a strong interest in interdisciplinary education and training. Throughout Kroll's career, her clinical focus has been on inpatient and outpatient orthopedics, and though she has taught in a number of subject areas, her teaching focus has been primarily in the movement sciences, specifically kinesiology and biomechanics.

Oley is excited about the level of leadership and experience Kroll will bring to the College of Health Professions.

"It has been truly rewarding to be able to recruit Dr. Kroll into the position as founding department director," Oley said. "She is a top-quality individual with all the best personal and professional qualifications to see this program through its inception, development and accreditation. Physical Therapy education at Marshall will be off to a sound beginning with such an experienced and well-qualified individual."

Kroll has held her position at LSU since 2007. She said she is extremely excited to make the transition to Marshall.

"I am thrilled to be joining the Marshall family and the Huntington community," Kroll added. "I look forward to rooting for The Herd!"


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Monday August 9, 2010
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The Parthenon earns nine awards in WVPA Better Newspaper Contest

THE RESORT AT GLADE SPRINGS, W.Va. - The Marshall University campus newspaper earned three first-place awards among its nine awards at the annual West Virginia Press Association Better Newspaper Contest on Saturday, Aug. 7.

The Parthenon won in categories for design, column, editorial, sports writing and news feature. It competes in Division 3, small dailies, against community newspapers in Fairmont, Elkins, Weirton and Keyser, among others.

"This is the most awards The Parthenon has won during my three-year tenure, which shows the Marshall community benefits from among the best journalism in the state," said Nerissa Young, Parthenon adviser and assistant professor in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. "The year 2009 was an important one with the grade change controversy, head coaching changes and the new core curriculum."

The editions on the Friends of Coal Bowl and the grade change controversy took first place in newspaper design. Former executive editor Kyle Hobstetter and former managing editor Kayla Queen led the design team. Hobstetter is a May print journalism graduate from Portsmouth, Ohio. Queen is an August print journalism graduate from Huntington. Former sports editor Andrew Ramspacher is a senior broadcast journalism major from Dublin, Ohio.

Coverage of the grade change controversy also won first place for best single issue. The lead reporter on that story was senior public relations major Staci Standiford from New Martinsville, W.Va.

Former photo editor Carrie Kirk added three awards to her previous year's recognition in state and regional contests. The May 2009 visual arts major from Charleston won first place for her photo illustration of Friday the 13th superstitions. She earned second place for her feature photo of a student catching a Frisbee while levitating. Kirk won third place in news photo for her shot of a student getting a full body splash while attempting to cross the street at the corner of Third Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard in Huntington.

A story about the Marshall track team's lack of a practice facility won second place in sports writing for Emily Ayres, an August online journalism graduate from Street, Md.

Senior public relations major Kerissa Bennett from Minford, Ohio, won second place for her news feature about new athletic director Mike Hamrick living in a freshman residence hall while he found permanent housing. That story was picked up by The Associated Press.

Letters From Afghanistan won second place in column writing for Sara Yoke, a junior public relations major from St. Albans, W.Va. Yoke returned stateside last month from a yearlong deployment with her Army National Guard unit.

A proposed bill to ban the Barbie doll in West Virginia yielded third place in best single editorial for Shea Anderson, a senior print journalism major from Lavalette, W.Va.

"Reporters and editors are carrying on the long, storied tradition of The Parthenon and W. Page Pitt, the man for whom the journalism school is named," Young said. "It is my honor to work with them."

The contest was judged by members of the North Carolina Press Association and had 2,000 entries.

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Photo: The Parthenon editors celebrate the newspaper's awards at the West Virginia Press Association Better Newspapers Contest. Left to right: former copy, news and executive editor Whitney Burdette; former copy and managing editor Emily Ayres; former news editor Staci Standiford; former news, sports and executive editor Kyle Hobstetter and news editor Kerissa Bennett. Photo courtesy of The Parthenon.


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Friday August 6, 2010
Contact: Sheena Lindahl, The Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour, 800-930-8021

MU spurs America's youngest workers to create their own jobs

Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour paves the way

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The power of the entrepreneurial spirit will take the Tri-State Area by storm this fall when The Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour visits Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The tour, a high-energy, half-day event, will take place from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 23, at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Those in attendance will hear the stories of and learn the secrets behind the success of the world's top entrepreneurs who are still in their 20s.

The event is sponsored by Marshall University's Office of the President, MU Online College in the High School, the Center for Business and Economic Research, the Marshall University Research Corp. and Huntington Area Development Council (HADCO).  

The Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour is the first and only nationwide entrepreneurship tour. It is run by three award-winning young entrepreneurs - Sheena Lindahl (27), Michael Simmons (28) and Arel Moodie (26).

Created in 2006 by Lindahl and Simmons, the tour features many of California's top young entrepreneurs who have made, or sold companies for, millions of dollars and/or made a huge impact before the age of 30.

One speaker, Cameron Johnson (24) from Los Angeles, started a dozen profitable businesses and became a self-made millionaire while he was still a teenager.  Another speaker, Rahim Fazal (27) from San Francisco, sold his first business for $1.5 million as he was graduating from high school.  Fazal is the co-founder and CEO of the venture-backed company, Involver.

"More than half the companies on the 2009 Fortune 500 list were launched during a recession or bear market," Simmons said. "Technology and globalization have made it very inexpensive to start a business. Now is the best time that there has ever been to become your own boss."

According to a 2007 Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation survey by Harris Interactive, four out of 10 young people would like to start their own businesses someday.

"However, when we talked with students, we realized that many of them needed inspiration and support to achieve this dream," Lindahl said. "That's why we started the tour."

The goal of the Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour is to have college students around the nation graduate with an entrepreneurial mindset.

The tour uses numerous themes and resources to reach and inspire those in attendance. Some are:

  • Focus - students are inspired and learn how to start and run their own businesses;
  • Keynote - this speaker is an extremely successful young entrepreneur who shares his or her story and business lessons;
  • Workshop - helps students come up with a viable business idea based on strengths and passions;
  • Speed networking - focuses on students connecting with each other based on their business ideas;
  • Panel - consists of the event speakers and local entrepreneurs with a focus on entrepreneurship. Local participants will include some who have created businesses and been successful  in commercializing products, including representatives from Vandalia Research Inc., which is the first biotechnology research company based upon Marshall University research. Other panelists include local K-12 students, including award-winning students from Cabell Midland High School.

Registration to the event is limited to Marshall University students, faculty and staff, and to K-12 students. To register, they may go to www.extremetour.org/marshall.


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Thursday August 5, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Artists with Marshall ties to exhibit in Nelson Gallery in Lexington, Va.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four artists associated with Marshall University's College of Fine Arts have been selected to exhibit artwork in the Nelson Gallery, located in Lexington, Va.

John Farley, Daniel Kaufmann, Andra Levy and Tommy Warf have been chosen to participate in the Nelson Gallery's 11th Annual Juried Show, which opens Aug. 6 and runs through Aug. 28.

Farley is an adjunct faculty member in Marshall's Department of Art and Design, and director of both the Birke Art Gallery and Gallery 842.  His piece, "A Meeting of the Minds," is a pen/ink drawing.

"My work is inspired by the innate principles and patterns, the dynamic formations, found throughout nature," Farley said. "It is a graphic expression of the delicate complexity, design, and aesthetic sensibility of the structures that define our world." 

Kaufmann, an assistant professor of photography at Marshall, had a photograph from his "House Home" series chosen. He describes the works as "digitally constructed from photographs of my home, my friends' homes and objects from many different home-furnishing stores."

Warf is a graduate ceramics and education student at Marshall.

"My work, 'Vase Head Samantha,' shows Samantha ready to be filled with the joy, love, grief, or unhappiness of others and carry that weight on her shoulders," Warf said.

Sculpture student Andra Levy's piece, "The Blue Deeley," is made of blue mist alabaster stone. Levy describes it as "mother nature vs. woman. It goes with my other art pieces of what a woman goes through from young to old and everything in between."

 

Fran Fevrier, coordinator of this show, calls the Nelson Gallery "an artist's cooperative in sweet little Lexington, Virginia. We put a lot of effort in to supporting other artists, and to inviting the community in to enjoying the visual art that goes on in our gallery."

The show was open to residents of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia, with a theme of  "OUTSIDE/INSIDE," which could be interpreted in any way the artist wished. It was juried by David Mickenberg, executive director of the Taubman Museum in Roanoke, Va.

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Photos: "A Meeting of the Minds" by John Farley (top) and "Vase Head Samantha" by Tommy Warf are two works with Marshall connections that will be shown at the Nelson Gallery in Lexington, Va., starting Aug. 6.
 


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Thursday August 5, 2010
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marketing and Branding Coordinator, , 304-696-3490

'Chance of Thunder' design is winner in contest sponsored by MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Chance of Thunder," a shirt design created by 2006 Marshall University graduate Michelle Southworth of Milford, Ohio, has been selected as the winner of a contest sponsored by Marshall seeking a new look in university apparel.

Southworth's winning design will be produced on shirts to be sold at the Marshall University Bookstore and she will receive a $500 prize. At Marshall, she earned a BFA degree in Visual Arts, with an emphasis in Graphic Design.

The contest allowed anyone wishing to design a new shirt for Marshall's 2010 football season to submit his or her design to be judged and voted on by the community. A selection committee chose the top 15 designs on which the community had the opportunity to vote. More than 80 designs were entered in the contest.

This contest was part of Vote for Art, which sponsors design contests across the country for universities and sports teams. It allows fans to become involved in creating new looks for their favorite teams. The prize also is sponsored through the Vote for Art contest.

For more information, visit www.voteforart.com or contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Thursday August 5, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Advance only tickets on sale now for MU's Paint the Capital City Green event

CHARLESTON - Advance only tickets are still on sale for Marshall University's Paint the Capital City Green during which fans can meet new head football coach and Hurricane native Doc Holliday to learn about the future of Thundering Herd football.

Paint The Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. The event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Individual tickets are $50 and a limited number of table sponsorships are still available. Tickets must be purchased by close of business on Monday, Aug. 16 to be entered into a drawing to win two tickets to the Herd's season opener against Ohio State Thursday, Sept. 2. The winner will also receive complimentary hotel accommodations in the Columbus area.

Festivities will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18, at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad and Dance Team, as well as music from members of the Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7 p.m. For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-4661.

Holliday will share the stage with Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick as well as key members of the squad as they discuss the future of Marshall football. Hamrick, the former director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, rounds out his first full year at Marshall. He also will introduce the Herd's new head basketball coach Tom Herrion.

Holliday, a native of Hurricane, W.Va., was named head football coach in December 2009. He is widely regarded as one of the top recruiters in the nation and he brings 31 years of collegiate coaching experience to Marshall that includes stops at Florida, North Carolina State and WVU.

Highlights of his career include coaching in 20 bowl games and three national championship games. He also has coached 11 players that have gone on to the National Football League. Holliday comes to Marshall after serving as associate head coach at West Virginia for the past two seasons.

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Photo: Marshall Head Football Coach Doc Holliday.


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Tuesday August 3, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

RCBI to celebrate 20th anniversary, MTP graduation in Bridgeport

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing will celebrate its 20th anniversary as West Virginia's advanced manufacturing technology center with an open house from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 10 at its Bridgeport, W.Va., location.

The RCBI Machinist Technology Program's Class of 2010 graduation ceremony will be staged in conjunction with the open house, beginning at 6 p.m. Twenty-one people will receive their National Certifications from the National Institute of Metalworking Skills.

For the first time since the inception of the program, a combined graduation ceremony for students who completed their training in Huntington, Wheeling, and Rocket Center (near Keyser in the eastern panhandle) will be conducted jointly with the students at Bridgeport.

Kelley Goes, West Virginia's Secretary of the Department of Commerce, will be the keynote speaker. Steve Mandes, President of the National Institute of Metalworking Skills, will attend, along with Industry Board of Advisors made up of manufacturers from throughout West Virginia, who advise RCBI's MTP Program.

The open house will feature manufacturing seminars, networking opportunities, machining demonstrations as well as seminars and technology displays by more than 45 representatives from machine tool vendors and equipment suppliers across the region.

"RCBI is pleased to mark this very important milestone by continuing to bring close to 50 high tech machine tool vendors and equipment suppliers to West Virginia to demonstrate the power of technology and its effects on our economy," said Charlotte Weber, director and CEO of RCBI.

"To date, because of introduction to and training offered at RCBI, nearly 200 pieces of high-end machines representing an investment of $26 million have been made in West Virginia. And, more than 280 individuals have graduated from RCBI's Machinist Technology Program. RCBI is West Virginia's and the region's source of the latest technologies and technical training."

The next round of RCBI's nationally-certified training classes at Huntington, Bridgeport, Rocket Center and Wheeling will begin Aug. 23. There are still openings at each location for those who are interested in a manufacturing career that pays well and offers benefits.

For further information or to enroll, contact Larry Cartmill, technical program recruiter, at 304-654-0424, or Kathryn Stanley, workforce development recruiter, at 304-641-8588. Or, call 800-469-RCBI (7224) or e-mail machinistprogam@rcbi.org.


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Tuesday August 3, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Fall Invitational at Gallery 842 opens Aug. 6



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gallery 842's next exhibition, a fall invitational, will open on Friday, Aug. 6, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m.

John Farley, gallery director and adjunct art and design faculty at Marshall University, is curating the show, and says he has enjoyed the process.


"From start to finish, I have had the opportunity to manage all aspects of this exhibition: from organizing and inviting the artists, selecting the art to be displayed, and finally installing the work itself," he said. "It has been a professional challenge and, watching it all come together, a source of great personal satisfaction. In one way or another, each of the participating artists has shaped and influenced my personal development and professional growth as an artist; I consider this my opportunity to give back. Viewers can expect to see a very eclectic show, with fine woodworking and furniture pieces, sculpture, ceramics, paintings, drawings, prints, and photography all sharing the same space."


Gallery 842 is both a community- and university-held space to promote local talent and initiative. The gallery, a free cultural experience for any artist or art enthusiast, is located at 842 4th Ave. in downtown Huntington,  and is open Wednesday through Sunday during the summer.


Marshall's chairman of the Department of Art and Design, Byron Clercx, will be participating in the exhibition.


"John selected dynamic and diverse works from Marshall University artists and key community artists that attest to the creative skills and spirit in the Tri-State region and embody the important shared mission Gallery 842 plays for Marshall University, the Department of Art and Design, and the community," Clercx said.


For some emerging artists, it's exciting to be showing work next to established key artists in the area.


"It's an honor to be invited to be in a show with artists whom I've looked up to as role models, teachers, and friends," said graduate education student Tommy Warf, who is also known for being instrumental in Marshall's Empty Bowls event each year. "I am very excited to see the show and to have my work next to some of Huntington's greatest artists."


For others, it's the unexpected opportunity to see the work of local artists who lead more administrative roles, including Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts.


"I am very excited to see this show at Gallery 842 as it will include a veritable 'Who's Who' of artists from our region," said Margaret Mary Layne, executive director of the Huntington Museum of Art. "We at the Museum are very proud that so many artists included hold leadership roles at HMA, including Don Van Horn, Mike Cornfeld, Katherine Cox and Kathleen Kneafsey."


Layne continued, "I am particularly interested in the inclusion of so many individuals who teach, or have taught, at Marshall University, many of whom were my teachers. These individuals have spent their lives not just influencing students but influencing the community in which they live, and we are all the better for it. Of particular interest to me is Dr. Clayton McNearney. He was my Religious Studies professor and it does not surprise me one bit to see him included in this show. Dr. McNearney taught me so much about how to live and and that is what art is really about life."


Though Farley invited artists to submit primarily new works of art, some exceptions were made. Van Horn, for one, will have one new piece - a large piece of furniture he hand-crafted. But he will also be showing some older pieces of work.


"Given the fact that I am no longer actively making sculpture or exhibiting, I am pleased to be invited," Van Horn said. "I am including four small sculptures that are shown as one piece. The boxes are made up of components of models and molds I used in a series of pieces using dead birds as images. I treat these pieces as specimens, hence the title "Specimen Boxes."


The list of participants in the show includes Nik Botkin, Natalie Gibbs Burdette, David Castleberry, Fern Christian, Byron Clercx, Michael Cornfeld, Katherine Cox, Eva Cox, Seth Cyfers, John Farley, Diana Frazier, Adam Hodges, Rebecca Holbrook, Kathleen Kneafsey, Staci Leech, Leona Mackey, Clay McNearney, Sholten Singer, Don Van Horn, Tommy Warf, Erin White, Ryan Worley, Chris Worth and Kristen Zammiello.

The show will run through Sept. 9.


For more information, contact Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday August 3, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

'Time for Music' registering for fall; advance discount ends Aug. 9

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Time is running out for parents who want to take advantage of the advance discount for "Time For Music," a popular program for babies and children up to age 5. The discount applies to registrations that take place on or before Aug. 9, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University. Sessions begin the week of Aug. 23.

Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3-year-olds, and 4- and 5-year-olds.  In the baby category, a "baby-and-sibling" registration is available so that parents may register two children at a combined rate.

Parent participation is required for the classes, which take place in the daytime and early evenings on Mondays through Wednesdays. A maximum of nine children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

"[This program] has afforded our 21-month-old a fun and caring place to learn new communication skills through song, dance, musical instruments and even sign language," said Charlotte Hoffman Norris, a parent-participant. "It has also given me, a working mom, a great opportunity to watch and participate in my son's play and interaction with other children and their parents/grandparents."

Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

For information on "Time For Music," persons may visit the program's website at www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at 304-697-0211.

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Monday August 2, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-552-1287

CSX presents $50,000 gift to Marshall University for research at the Rahall Transportation Institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - CSX Corporation today presented a gift of $50,000 to Marshall University for research at the university's Nick J. Rahall II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI).

U.S. Congressman Nick Rahall and Marshall officials accepted the check from J. Randolph Cheetham, CSX regional vice president for state relations, in a ceremony in conjunction with the National Rural Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference being held Aug. 1-4 at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington.

<>The donation will be matched through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund.

"CSX is pleased to work closely with Marshall University's Rahall Transportation Institute on a variety of important transportation research initiatives," said Cheetham. "Our contribution is meant to recognize that work and, with the matching grant from the research trust fund, position the institute for continued initiatives that will help the railroad industry continue its role as the safest, most efficient form of surface transportation." 

The contribution will be used to further transportation research conducted by RTI through its Railroad Safety and Operations Research Center of Excellence (Rail-SORCE). The center was formed to enhance the study of technologies that address railroad industry challenges nationwide. The Rail-SORCE at RTI provides an array of services including technology testing, research and development for asset mapping and inspections; train, car and mobile worker tracking; and intelligent grade crossings.

This was the second donation CSX has made to Marshall. The company made a $50,000 contribution last year for transportation research at RTI. That gift was also matched by the trust fund.

Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, also thanked the company for the donation, saying, "Once again, CSX has demonstrated their support for the Rahall Transportation Institute, Marshall University and our community. This latest gift complements the significant investments made in transportation research at Marshall over the past several years, and we thank CSX for their continuing commitment. We also salute Congressman Rahall for his unwavering dedication and support of our university and this entire region."

CSX Corporation, based in Jacksonville, Fla., is one of the nation's leading transportation companies, providing rail, intermodal and rail-to-truck transload services. The company's transportation network spans approximately 21,000 miles, with service to 23 eastern states and the District of Columbia, and connects to more than 70 ocean, river and lake ports.

A National University Transportation Center located at Marshall University, RTI is a multimodal institute with an emphasis on intelligent transportation systems, rail research and enhancements, and custom web-based Geographic Information Systems. RTI fosters strategic relationships with private industry and public agencies to leverage resources, technology and strategic thinking to improve mobility and stimulate economic development in West Virginia and throughout the 13-state Appalachian Region.

The West Virginia Research Trust Fund was established in 2008 to serve as a catalyst for economic development across the state. The trust fund program allows Marshall to double private gifts that support expansions to research faculty and infrastructure in key areas linked to economic development, health care and job growth. The West Virginia Legislature initially appropriated $15 million in the trust fund for Marshall. Qualifying private gifts to the university are matched dollar-for-dollar by the state's fund.

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Photo: From left, Lance West, vice president for development at Marshall University; Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University; J. Randolph Cheetham, CSX regional vice president for state relations; U.S. Congressman Nick J. Rahall II, and Bob Plymale, director and CEO of the Nick J. Rahall II Appalachian Transportation Institute, participate in a check presentation today at the Pullman Plaza Hotel.  CSX presented a gift of $50,000 to Marshall University for research at the Rahall Transportation Institute.

Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Thursday July 29, 2010
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, , 304-691-1713

Marshall's Dr. Robert Nerhood retiring; successors to his leadership posts named

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Dr. Robert C. Nerhood will retire July 31 as senior associate dean for clinical affairs and chair of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

 

"Bob Nerhood has provided outstanding service and leadership to the medical school in both roles, and his dedicated and effective leadership has built a strong foundation for those who will succeed him," said Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., Marshall's vice president for health sciences and dean of the medical school.

 

A member of the school's full-time faculty since 1992, Nerhood has been active in his specialty and in professional affairs generally. His leadership activities have included serving as chair of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology District IV Perinatal Committee, ACOG's West Virginia Section, the West Virginia Perinatal Task Force, and the Cabell Huntington Hospital Board of Directors.

 

McKown said Dr. Joseph Werthammer will assume the position and responsibilities of senior associate dean for clinical affairs, and Dr. David Jude will become interim chair of the Department of Ob/Gyn. "Dr. Werthammer brings to his new position extensive administrative experience in integrating clinical practice and successful medical education, and Dr. Jude has shown highly capable and dedicated performance as vice chair of ob/gyn," he said.

 

A member of the faculty since 1981, Werthammer is director of the pediatrics clerkship and medical director of the neonatal intensive care unit at Cabell Huntington Hospital.

 

Jude, who joined the faculty in 1993, is the Zacharias Professor for Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology, as well as director of the ob/gyn residency program.

 


 


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Tuesday July 27, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Freshman students to be "WOWed" this fall semester

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Incoming freshmen at Marshall University will participate in Week of Welcome (WOW) this year, a new program  that is designed to get their college careers off to the best possible start.
 
"We're calling it the Week of Welcome because we've packed a week's worth of activity and information into just four days," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.
 
Marshall's Week of Welcome will begin Wednesday, Aug. 18 with the move-in of students into their residence halls. Most will live in the First Year Residence Halls, either North or South. Family members may stay for a picnic beginning at 5:30 p.m., with entertainment by a live band, and an outdoor movie on Buskirk Field that evening at 9 p.m. Students will also receive assistance with their computer hookups and any information technology questions.
 
Thursday's schedule begins with the Freshman Academic Convocation, the first assembly of the Class of 2014 and the beginning of the credit course UNI 100, Freshman First Class, at 9 a.m. in the Cam Henderson Center. At the conclusion of the convocation, students will divide into groups based on their academic colleges for the first of two college sessions that day.
 
Later on Thursday, students will begin attending plenary sessions on topics such as diversity, career planning, student involvement and academics. Sessions will continue in rotation on Friday so that all students participate in all topic sessions.
 
Friday's activities will start with a class photo at 8:30 a.m. on Buskirk Field near Morrow Library. The picture will duplicate the scene in the movie "We Are Marshall" in which the students repeat the "We AreMarshall" cheer under the library window. That evening, a "Welcome Fest" will take place at Pullman Square in Huntington in order to introduce new students to the community beyond the Huntington campus.
 
Finally, on Saturday, students can participate in Rec Fest at the Marshall Recreation Center. The event showcases vendors and groups from throughout the Tri-State Area who will set up informational booths and displays on the center's four gym floors.
 
"We want our new students to connect to their colleges and their fellow students as soon as possible," said Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs. "All of the activities in Marshall's Week of Welcome are designed to do that."
 
For further information, persons may view the WOW schedule online at www.marshall.edu/wow or contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 304-696-6690.


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Monday July 26, 2010
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Digital evidence conference begins Tuesday at Marshall University Forensic Science Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence (AIDE), a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving professionals and students of the legal, technical and business communities that work with digital evidence, is sponsoring its first conference at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center. Each day will focus on one of the four sub-groups of digital evidence: digital forensics, electronic discovery, law enforcement and network security.

John Sammons, an assistant professor in Marshall's Integrated Science and Technology Department, helped found the AIDE to serve as a resource to help professionals better handle the intricacies of digital evidence in both civil and criminal litigation.

Tuition for the event is free, but registration is required. For more information, contact Sammons at 304-633-3411or visit http://aide.marshall.edu.

WHAT: Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference for lawyers, judges, digital forensic examiners, network security professionals and law enforcement personnel

WHERE: Marshall University Forensic Science Center

WHEN: Tuesday, July 27-Friday, July 30; Tuesday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

WHO: The Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to serving the professionals and students of the legal, technical and business communities that work with digital evidence.

SPONSORS: Sponsors for the event include Jackson Kelly Attorneys at Law, AccessData, Second Creek Technologies, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, Marshall University Department of Integrated Science & Technology and Marshall University Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology.


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Friday July 23, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Art and Design students return from trip to Florence, Italy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.- Ten Marshall University students, along with their professor, recently returned from a "life-changing" course in Florence, Italy.

The trip was a great educational experience for the students, said Mary Grassell, graphic design professor for Marshall's College of Fine Arts, as well as a privilege for her to teach the class.

For art students, so much of our art heritage is in Europe, and practically all of the Renaissance heritage is in Florence," Grassell said. "The art is tied into politics, business and history."

The trip changed the students' lives forever by extending their world and by discovering that people are essentially the same all over the world, she said.

The students learned to fit into a culture, rather than ignore it or try to cling to their own ways," Grassell said. "These particular students were really good at embracing a new culture with new foods and ways. They also built good and lasting relationships with each other."

The trip was arranged by the Center for International Programs at Marshall through an agency called CAPA International Education, she said. It offers study abroad facilities for American students.

The dean of the College of Fine Arts, Don Van Horn, was instrumental in getting this program going in hopes of creating an international studies program for COFA students," Grassell said. "Due to his support, this was the first time such an opportunity was offered to our students."

Kayla Queen, a 21-year-old from Huntington, is one of the students who took advantage of this opportunity. She said two of her most memorable experiences were the trip to Venice and the day they visited the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

"In Venice, I felt like I was Katharine Hepburn in 'Summertime' and everything was literally breathtaking," she said. "In the Uffizi I stood in front of some of the most famous paintings in the world and was so overwhelmed that I cried. These are things I will never forget."

Grassell said that, of course, she enjoyed the art and being totally immersed in the architecture, frescoes, sculpture, paintings and even graphic design of the area. Also, she enjoyed teaching about the art because the students were so receptive.

We would talk about the works of art in class, then we would go see them," Grassell said. "That is an experience and opportunity we do not have here. Looking at artwork in a book or a PowerPoint is no equal for seeing 'live' art. We even visited a design agency and saw contemporary work."

What she enjoyed most about the trip was seeing the students' reaction to it all, Grassell said.

"I enjoyed their companionship and openness about what they were experiencing," she said. "I would travel with them again any time."

The class trip to Italy was so successful the College of Fine Arts is planning to offer it again next summer, Grassell said. The class may have a different title, form and professor, but it will happen again.

Queen said she would recommend students study abroad if they can.

"It can teach you so much, but the real lessons come from the experiences," Queen said.  "Walking down the street, taking photos, seeing something new every day these were the things that really taught me about the world and about myself."

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Photo: Marshall University tour group at the Ufizzi Gallery in Florence, Italy.


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Friday July 23, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-2038

Registration portal open for Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit at Marshall University



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Educational leaders in elementary, secondary and higher education from across the Mountain State may now register online for the Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit hosted by Marshall University Sept. 19-20.

The Summit is designed to bring together leaders in education to discuss the important roles schools, colleges and universities have in creating sustainable campuses across West Virginia. The event will take place on Marshall's Huntington campus and is open to public and private higher education, as well as public and private K-12 schools.

To register online for the event, go to http://apps.dep.wv.gov/registration.

The Summit will offer sessions on sustainable flooring solutions, benchmarking, sustainable lighting solutions, and real-world examples of sustainability, as well as the importance of federal partners. State and federal officials have been invited including Gov. Joe Manchin III; Shawn M. Garvin, Regional Administrator, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 3; and a representative of the United States Department of Education.

Marshall University Sustainability Manager Margie Phillips said she believes the summit is a valuable tool for all campuses - K-12 or higher education, public or private.

"This event is an opportunity to lay the foundation for networking, and the sharing of ideas and resources and there is great power in that," she said. "At Marshall we understand what can happen when you put people who are committed to making a difference in the same room and ask them to seek solutions to problems.

"In fewer than three years after President Stephen Kopp gathered faculty, staff and students in a room to talk about sustainability, we developed a Greening Marshall Committee, a campus and stadium recycling program, and the students voted on their own to institute a Green Fee to support sustainability on our urban campus," Phillips said. "Change happens when people get together. We're hoping that the Summit sparks inspiration in educational institutions across the Mountain State."

Organizer Greg Adolfson of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection said that developing sustainable energy, water and waste conservation, pollution prevention, and other innovative practices in harmony with preserving our economy, environment and society for future generations are some of the biggest challenges our state faces.

"We believe that educators, school administrators, academia management and elected officials have an obligation to set a good example by acting as leaders on these issues," Adolfson said. "Marshall University, with its recent formation of a Sustainability Department and a student body so committed to sustainability, was a natural choice to host the second Summit."

The event is free and open to fiscal and financial officers; facilities, maintenance or operations professionals; and civic engagement and community volunteer coordinators. An agenda also will be available at that site. Registrants may sign up for a reception Sunday evening as well as the Summit and breakout sessions offered on Monday. Meals during the Monday session will be provided to participants. All activities will take place at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on Fifth Avenue. Lodging at a special discount rate will be available at the Holiday Inn Hotel and Suites on Third Avenue. Parking will be free for attendees and vendors. Details are available at the registration site.

The Summit is presented in concert and partnership with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, State Electric Supply Company, ZMM, Inc., and Architectural Interior Products.

For more information, contact MU Sustainability Manager Margie Phillips at philli10@marshall.edu or 304-696-2992.


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Friday July 23, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Early Education STEM Center enrolling children

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Early Education STEM Center, formerly Marshall University Early Education Center (MUEEC), is now enrolling children 3 and 4 years old for the 2010-2011 school year. Children must be 3 years old by Aug. 30, 2010 to qualify for enrollment.

This collaborative effort with the Cabell County pre-k program is under the direction of the June Harless Center at Marshall University. As a model program of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) preschool education, the heart of the center is developing 21st Century skills in children to prepare them for success and develop their potential to the fullest.

The center is open throughout the fall and spring semesters (August-June) and will follow the MU calendar with a few exceptions. It is open from 7:45 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. Monday-Thursday.

The STEM Center exists to promote a child-initiated, teacher-supported, negotiated curriculum in which children's curiosities about the environment are encouraged and rooted in problem solving.

For more information, contact Brea Wiles by phone at 304-696-3498 or by e-mailing wiles7@marshall.edu.

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Thursday July 22, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Herd fans can meet new head football coach during Paint the Capital City Green event

CHARLESTON - Thundering Herd fans will have an opportunity to meet Doc Holliday, Marshall University's new head football coach, during the 13th Annual Paint the Capital City Green in Charleston on Wednesday, Aug. 18.

Paint The Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. The event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Festivities will begin at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by mascot Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7 p.m.

Advance only tickets are on sale now and must be purchased by close of business on Monday, Aug. 16. Advance tickets are $50 per person and will not be sold at the door. All tickets will be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win two game tickets to the Herd's season opening game against Ohio State Thursday, Sept. 2, along with complimentary hotel accommodations.

Coach Holliday will share the stage with Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick as well as key members of the squad as they discuss the future of Marshall football. Hamrick, the former director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, rounds out his first full year at Marshall. He also will introduce the Herd's new head basketball coach Tom Herrion.

Holliday, a native of Hurricane, W.Va., was named head football coach in December 2009. He is widely regarded as one of the top recruiters in the nation and he brings 31 years of collegiate coaching experience to Marshall that includes stops at Florida, North Carolina State and WVU. Highlights of his career include coaching in 20 bowl games and three national championship games. He also has coached 11 players that have gone on to the National Football League.

Holliday comes to Marshall after serving as associate head coach at West Virginia for the past two seasons where he also served as the director of recruiting while coaching tight ends and fullbacks for the Mountaineers. Rivals.com has named him one of the Top 25 recruiters in the nation and he helped WVU amass a 2009 recruiting class that was nationally ranked No. 22 by Scout.com and No. 27 by Rivals.com.

Prior to that, he worked as the associate head coach and safeties coach at the University of Florida from 2005 to 2007 and as the associate head coach and wide receivers coach at North Carolina State University from 2000 to 2004. During his tenure at Florida, the Gators won the 2006 National Championship and the UF secondary led the SEC in interceptions in both 2005 and 2006.

Holliday said he is looking forward to Paint the Capital City Green.

"I can't wait to bring some of my players down to Charleston for all the fanfare," Holliday said. "I hope our Kanawha Valley fans come out to meet members of the Marshall University athletics family and see why everyone should be excited about our program. I'm looking forward to meeting our Kanawha Valley supporters!"

For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-4661.


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Thursday July 22, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp updates delegation with State of the University address in D.C.


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp delivered a State of the University address on Wednesday, July 21, at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

Kopp, who recently completed his fifth year at Marshall, highlighted the University's progress during the past five years, the economic impact of the University and many of Marshall's new programs and initiatives.

About 150 people, including four of the five members of West Virginia's Congressional delegation, attended the event. The Newseum is an interactive museum of news located at 555 Pennsylvania Ave.

 

Kopp's speech may be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=td33Dmeoc24.

West Virginia's Congressional delegation includes Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, Senator Carte Goodwin, Representative Nick Joe Rahall II, Representative Shelley Moore Capito and Representative Alan Mollohan. Rockefeller, Goodwin, Rahall and Capito attended Wednesday's event.

 

 

"This visit to the Nation's Capital is always an exceptional opportunity to thank the members of West Virginia's Congressional delegation and their many hard-working staff members, as well as our many friends and faithful alumni from the Washington, D.C., area and showcase the impressive progress and developments that underscore and affirm the benefits of our collective efforts," Kopp said. "It's a chance to talk in concrete terms about our exciting new programs and projects and share with our elected officials the positive and extensive economic and societal impact that Marshall University has on the City of Huntington and the region as well our beloved state and nation."

 

 

Some of the highlights from the past five years included more than $190 million in new capital projects; the founding of Marshall's Honors College; construction or completion of 12 new facilities; the doubling of research grant funding; significant increases in non-resident student enrollment and full-time freshman enrollment; 10 new, high-demand degree majors; and the implementation of the new core general education program.

 

Kopp said higher education is an economic multiplier and needs to be recognized as such. Marshall University is an enterprise that multiplies and returns to the State more than 20 times the State's investment each year in terms of economic impact. He cited Marshall's $1.5 billion total economic impact and noted that the university's annual economic impact has tripled since 2005. These developments are the product of fiscally responsible decision-making and priority initiatives that have placed Marshall University in a position to fulfill its mission worldwide. For every state dollar invested in Marshall, Kopp said, the University returned more than $20 to West Virginia's economy. He also said Marshall has a total employment impact of more than 6,000 jobs.

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Photos:

(Top) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp listens to Senator John D. Rockefeller IV July 21 at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

(Middle) Senator Carte Goodwin, right, accepts a gift of a pen and ink drawing of the John Marshall statue from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp July 21 at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

(Bottom) From left, Senator Carte Goodwin, Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, Representative Nick Joe Rahall II and Representative Shelley Moore Capito pose for a picture July 21 at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
 


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Thursday July 22, 2010
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marketing and Branding Coordinator, , 304-696-3490

Finalists chosen in Marshall's Vote for Art contest



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The contest being sponsored by Marshall University seeking a new look in university apparel is now in the voting phase.

The contest allowed anyone wishing to design a new shirt for Marshall's 2010 football season to submit his or her design to be judged and voted on by the community. A selection committee chose the top 15 designs on which the community may now vote. These designs will be available now through Aug. 1 for voting. More than 80 designs were entered in the contest.

The winning design will be produced on shirts to be sold at the Marshall University Bookstore and the winning designer will receive a $500 prize. 

This contest is part of Vote for Art, which sponsors design contests across the country for universities and sports teams. It allows fans to become involved in creating a new look for their favorite teams. The prize also is sponsored through the Vote for Art contest.

For more information or to vote for a design, visit www.voteforart.com and click on the small Marshall logo just above the shirt designs, or contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Thursday July 22, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU adjunct professor receives Lifetime Achievement Award in Georgia



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Dr. Robert W. Hill, an adjunct professor of English at Marshall University, recently was selected as this year's recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual Georgia Author of the Year Awards.

The 46th annual awards ceremony took place Saturday, June 19, at Kennesaw State University in Kennesaw, Ga.

Hill is the husband of Dr. Jane Hill, who is chair of Marshall's English Department. A professor emeritus from Kennesaw State University, he chaired the English Department there from 1985 to 1996 and retired in August 2007.

"We are quite fortunate to have the talents of Bob at hand," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "Although he may have retired from Kennesaw he now teaches for us on a part-time basis. Students in his courses are extremely fortunate to have a great teacher with a passion for our language."

Hill has published numerous reviews and short stories and has written roughly 150 published poems that have appeared in the Southern Poetry Review and other publications. Among Hill's most well-known works are "Riding" and "Human Factors and Other Poems."


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Wednesday July 21, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Huntington Steel and Supply supports public sculpture class with installation at Harris Riverfront Park

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Sarah "Sassa" Nibert, a Marshall University senior majoring in art and design, has won the Huntington Steel and Supply Inc. competition for students participating in a public sculpture class.

Nibert has been awarded materials, funds for fabrication and a stipend to complete her work, and  Huntington Steel and its employees are assisting her in fabricating her sculpture in their shop.  The finished design will then be moved to a site selected by the City of Huntington in Harris Riverfront Park.

"This competition offers our students invaluable experience," said Jonathan Cox, professor of sculpture at Marshall.  "Each student developed a design, a scale model and artist's statement to support his or her choices. They were then required to present their ideas and justify them to a panel of individuals from the university, the city, and the Huntington Museum of Art.  Just that process is an essential experience for a student hoping to make his or her living as an artist."

As the winner of the competition, Nibert will take that learning further.  "The winning designer must manage his or her own project from budget to construction to installation," Cox noted.  "Sassa is getting real-world experience in bringing a project to life."

Nibert's design is a simplistic, abstracted form, representing a child and an adult figure in a scene of playful interaction. It is bright, inviting, and gender-neutral so that viewers could potentially see themselves or loved ones when they see the sculpture.

"I want a mother to see herself and her child, but also want fathers, grandparents, babysitters or children to see themselves and their families in the art," Nibert said. "Public art absolutely has the power to inspire and influence people, and an issue that I feel is prominent in our area currently is overall health and activity level, especially for children.  As the parent of a six year old, I am aware of the increasingly sedentary lifestyles that our children are adopting, and can see days of fresh air and imaginative outdoor play disappearing.  Busy daily lives of parents can add to the problem, making healthy, interactive, health- and relationship-strengthening play time scarce." 

"We are gratified by this competition and the responses of the students," said Huntington Steel President Mike Emerson. "Our entire company is invested in this project with Sassa. Our employees take pride in knowing that Huntington Steel is involved in a project that means so much to students - but also a project that will mean so much to Huntington.  When the sculpture is installed, it means that Huntington Steel and its crew have dedicated themselves to our product, our craft and to our community.  We are very pleased to be able to make this possible."

The finished sculpture is scheduled to be installed and dedicated at Harris Riverfront Park on Sept. 11.


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Tuesday July 20, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sports Journalism major, African and African American Studies minor new this fall at Marshall University

Master of Science in Health Informatics to be implemented in spring

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Several new programs at various levels, including a Sports Journalism major, a minor in African and African American Studies and the first Master of Science in Health Informatics (MSHI) degree program in West Virginia, will be offered during the 2010-11 academic year at Marshall University.

Sports Journalism and African and African American Studies are available for enrollment this fall, while the Master of Science in Health Informatics will be available in the spring.

Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president of academic affairs, said Marshall is "very judicious" when adding new programs to the curriculum.

"We do so in response to market conditions or changes within the discipline, and we go through a very thorough review process, which includes approval from our board of governors," Hensley said.

Sports Journalism is the newest major offered through the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. The African and African American Studies minor is being offered through Marshall's College of Liberal Arts and the MSHI degree program, designed to train those who use health information data, will be administratively housed in the College of Health Professions.

Here is a brief look at these new offerings:

Sports journalism major (this fall)

Sports Journalism will ground students in classic news writing and focus on reporting tactics unique to the sports field.  Majors may concentrate in broadcast sports reporting, in print sports reporting or in the public relations aspects of the sports industry.

Students will have the opportunity to call live games on the campus radio station, WMUL FM; to write and photograph events for the campus newspaper, The Parthenon; to shoot video and report for television broadcasts; and to file stories for online coverage.

"We are pleased to offer the new major in sports journalism," said Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the school. "There is growing demand for this field and we plan to provide students plenty of practical experience to hone their skills in cross media platforms."

The faculty proposed the major last fall in response to expanding demand for specialized preparation in the field, and the major was approved this spring.

Sports Journalism is one of seven majors offered in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications including advertising, broadcast journalism, online journalism, print journalism, public relations and radio/television production and management.

For more information, contact Dennison by phone at 304-696-2360.

African and African American Studies minor (this fall)

The minor in African and African American Studies (AAAS) is designed to supplement a student's academic major with an interdisciplinary understanding of the history, social and political life, culture, and geography of the African Diaspora.

The program utilizes an interdisciplinary approach whereby students engage in critical thinking across the spectrum of various discipline such as geography, literature, history, social work, political science, fine arts, education and sociology.

The AAAS program serves students who are interested in understanding the cultural contributions and historical legacies of peoples of African ancestry in the United States and throughout Asia, Africa, South America and the Caribbean.

The program also serves Marshall University and the Huntington community through local research and programming within the field of African and African American Studies.

Dr. David J. Peavler, assistant professor of history and director of the program, said it will lead to a more diverse faculty, student body and staff, and create a better university and community.

"One of the major purposes of college is to challenge one's preconceived ideas and learn about people of diverse backgrounds," Peavler said. "Courses in African and African American studies meet this objective, while also providing a foundation for meaningful education and social change.

"West Virginia educators such as Carter Woodson and Booker T. Washington shared this belief, and an optimism that local people could work miracles if they were empowered by a knowledge of who they were. Huntington's own Carter Woodson spent every day of his life with a single-minded determination to promote the study of African American life and history because he understood its importance to Americans of all walks of life."

For more information about the program, e-mail peavlerd@marshall.edu.

Master of Science in Health Informatics (next spring)

The mission of this degree program is to provide students with high-quality education and training that will make them valuable employees in today's data- and information-driven health care enterprises.

The program will achieve this mission by providing multidisciplinary education and training in the organizational, technical and clinical/medical aspects of health care. Health informatics specialists work to optimize an individual's health through information storage, transmission and usage.

"People who earn this degree would have the background they need to be a CIO or work in public health," said Dr. Charles Hossler, associate dean in the College of Health Professions. "This is another way of improving health care services and the lives of people in West Virginia."

The purpose of the Master of Science in Health Informatics is to prepare information specialists who will serve the needs of the citizens of West Virginia and the region, and to expand the knowledge and scholarship of the health informatics profession.

For more information, contact Hossler at 304-696-3743.

Other new minors also have been added. Available this fall, they include:

         Communication Disorders

         Web Development

         Journalistic Writing

         Sport Management

         Geospatial Information Science

         Sexuality Studies

New areas of emphasis this year include Psychology, Religion Studies and Preschool Development in the Regents Bachelor of Arts Program, and Integrated Music Studies in Music.


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Friday July 16, 2010
Contact: Homer Preece, Marshall University Mid-Ohio Valley Center,, 304-674-7201

Marshall University Mid-Ohio Valley Center Open House to showcase MBA, RBA and education master's programs

POINT PLEASANT, W.Va. - Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center (MOVC) will open its doors to adult students who are interested in either finishing their undergraduate degree or earning an advanced degree.

The Open House is set for 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, July 29 at MOVC, 1 John Marshall Way, Point Pleasant, W.Va.

A variety of programs will be represented by faculty and staff including the Regents Bachelor of Arts (RBA), Graduate School of Education, College of Business, Office of Financial Aid, and Military and Veteran's Affairs.

RBA Today is a unique way to earn a bachelor's degree through flexibility in-class scheduling, potential credit for work experience and the option of taking online, evening or weekend classes.

At the graduate level, there will be a Master of Arts program in elementary and secondary education beginning this fall at MOVC. Faculty and staff from the Graduate School of Education will be on hand to talk with teaching professionals about this opportunity.

Refreshments will be served.


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Wednesday July 14, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Soccer association thanks Marshall for participation in Region One event

 HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Len Rogers (left), president of the West Virginia Soccer Association, presented Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp with a plaque thanking Marshall for its participation in the 2009 and 2010 U.S. Youth Soccer Region One Championships.

The presentation took place this morning in Kopp's office in Old Main on the Huntington campus. This year's championships took place locally July 1-6.

The opening ceremony of the championships was conducted at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium both years. Marshall also made available food and housing for participants and dozens of other services for thousands of visitors during the tournaments in both 2009 and 2010.

The 2011 Region One Championships will be played in Lancaster, Pa.


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Wednesday July 14, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Marshall University Research Corp., (304) 746-1964

Workshop to focus on commercializing scientific discoveries

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Technology Transfer Office and TechConnectWV will present a free workshop, "The Roadmap from Laboratory to Market:  Driving Scientific Discoveries to Commercialization," on Monday, July 26.

Intended for scientists and engineers, the workshop will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, 519 John Marshall Dr., Huntington.

The program will focus on helping participants identify their role in commercializing their discoveries and tapping into a network of people who can help them. Topics will include investment capital, development assistance and take-to-market management talent.

The workshop will be led by Ron Basini, a consultant to the West Virginia Angel Network.

Basini has held faculty positions at business schools in North Carolina, Kentucky, Romania and Switzerland, and has raised millions of dollars in angel and venture capital for the four technology-based companies he founded. He also conducts new venture strategy, business plan writing, new management team training and strategic planning seminars around the world.

The West Virginia Angel Network was formed in 2008 by a group of individuals who make high-risk, potentially high-yield investments in startup companies. The network encourages applications from startup and early stage companies headquartered in West Virginia.  Decisions on investing are made on an individual basis and are based on a wide range of criteria, including market growth potential, management team and customer base. For information about the West Virginia Angel Network, visit www.wvangel.net.

TechConnectWV is a coalition of professionals dedicated to growing and diversifying West Virginia's economy by advancing technology‐based economic development. The group's focus is the attraction and creation of innovation‐based companies and jobs, and advanced research and development in universities and the private sector. For more information about TechConnectWV, visit www.techconnectwv.org.

The workshop is being presented with financial assistance from Verizon. The program is free, but reservations are requested. Send reservations to tto@marshall.edu. For more information, contact Amy Melton at 304-696-4365.

 


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Tuesday July 13, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

What will health care reform mean for West Virginia?

Contact:

Elizabeth A. Ayers, MS

Public Health Educator/PIO

Cabell-Huntington Health Department     

Office - 304-523-6483 x 258

Fax - 304-523-6482

Elizabeth.a.ayers@wv.gov

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - How will the new health care reform affect you and your family?  Come learn from the experts on how the national health care reform will affect West Virginia and You at 7 p.m. today, Tuesday, July 13, at Marshall University's Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.  

The following 4 main topics will be presented:

How it will Affect: You & Your Family

Perry Bryant

Executive Director

West Virginians for Affordable Health Care

How it will Affect: Small Businesses

Luke A. Lafferre

Partner/Attorney

Huddleston Bolen LLP

How it will Affect: Physicians, Hospitals & Home Health

Dr. Hoyt Burdick, MD                    Laura McKeown

West Virginia AMA                        Executive Director/Chair, Partners in Community Outreach

                                                         TEAM for WV Children

How it will Affect: Legislative Considerations & State Challenges

Senator Evan Jenkins

5th Senatorial District (Cabell/Wayne)

Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and get answers from the experts.  The general public is encouraged to attend this event because the new health care bill will affect everyone!  This is the perfect occasion for individuals to understand how this new bill will work.  For more information about this event please contact the Cabell-Huntington Health Department, (304) 523-6483 x 258.

This event is sponsored by:  Cabell-Huntington Health Department, AARP West Virginia, Cabell Huntington Hospital, St. Mary's Medical Center, West Virginians for Affordable Health Care, HIMG, Huntington Chamber of Commerce, United Way, Valley Health, Ebenezer Medical Outreach, Herald Dispatch, TEAM for WV Children, Wayne County Health Department, WV State Medical Association, Cabell County Commission and Marshall University.

                                                       # # #

 


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Tuesday July 13, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College of Science sponsors riverboat tour for children who have completed library's summer reading program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Science is sponsoring a riverboat tour at 10 a.m. Friday, July 16 for children who have successfully completed Cabell County Public Library's summer reading program.

"We thought rewarding students with a ride on the Mark Twain Sternwheeler would be an exciting incentive for participants," said Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science. "This outdoor classroom experience should help the children as they learn about the world of water, plus it's just fun for them."

The riverboat tour is for children in grades 3 and up who completed the reading program.

Somerville, Marshall biology professor Jeff Kovatch and Steve Foster with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers will ride along with the children, answering their questions about the Ohio River, its rich history and how it affects the community.

"The partnership with Marshall has added a stimulating learning experience for the children involved with our summer reading program, Make a Splash-READ!," said Niza Uslan, Cabell County Public Library's Coordinator of Youth Services. "We're very appreciative Marshall has partnered with us on this initiative."

For more information on the riverboat tour, contact Somerville by phone at 304-696-2424 or by e-mailing somervil@marshall.edu, or contact Uslan by phone at 304-528-5700 or by e-mailing nuslan@cabell.lib.wv.us.

 

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Thursday July 8, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More than 100 students to take part in HSTA Summer Institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 100 rising 10th-grade students from throughout West Virginia will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus July 11-16 to have "Fun With Science" by participating in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

David Cartwright, the camp director, described HSTA as "an innovative and highly successful academic and enrichment initiative designed to encourage high school students to pursue college degrees in the health sciences."

"This statewide program is structured to enroll African American youth to offset the disparity of African Americans as professionals in related fields of study, while also targeting low-income and first-generation students," Cartwright said.

HSTA, which was started by West Virginia University in 1994 with 45 students from two counties, is now offered in 26 counties. The ninth- through 12th-grade students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools.

The kickoff dinner for the "Fun With Science" summer institute at Marshall is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 11 in multipurpose room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center. In addition to the students, many HSTA teachers, field site coordinators and some of Marshall's faculty and staff will attend the dinner.

The emphasis this year, Cartwright said, is on wellness. Last year the emphasis was on diabetes.

"This year encompasses diabetes as well," he said. "We will talk wellness and the skills they need to live a healthy life. We will teach our students this year about healthy eating, diabetes prevention and exercise techniques, like Zumba, and strength training."

Cartwright said "Fun With Science" will help students develop critical thinking skills and study skills that will help them as they advance through high school and college. He said 97 percent of students who complete four years of HSTA activities in high school later attend college.

"Many of these kids would not otherwise go to college," Cartwright said. "Just ask any of the parents - they really believe in HSTA."

For more information on the HSTA summer institute, contact Helen Bonham by phone at 304-696-4672 or by e-mail at Bonham@marshall.edu.


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Thursday July 8, 2010
Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Healthy lifestyles camp opens at Marshall University this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University opens its Huntington campus on Sunday, July 11 for a camp aimed at helping adolescents learn about healthy lifestyles.  Camp NEW You is aimed at promoting physical activity, decreasing sedentary behavior and improving dietary decision-making skills through an interdisciplinary approach.

"The primary goals of the program are to help families engage in regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in its various forms, to replace sedentary hobbies with more active ones, and to promote healthy decision-making during meal times," said Dr. Gina Sobrero Evans, assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology at Marshall.  "Parent involvement is a key component to this program."

 

Campers are chosen for the program based on several criteria including physician referral, a body mass index over the 85th percentile, and a commitment by a parent or guardian to be involved.  Evans says because the camp targets high-risk adolescents, many insurers have agreed to cover the cost of the camp.  For adolescents with no insurance, scholarships have been established through a series of fundraisers over the past year.

Campers will stay on campus for two-week periods, although there are three follow-up weekends over the course of the year.  Evans says there are still a few spots available for this upcoming session.

Camp NEW You is a collaborative effort among several institutions including Marshall University, West Virginia University and Concord University.  WVU has hosted it previously but this year is the inaugural camp at Marshall. Several departments at Marshall are involved with this year's camp including the School of Kinesiology, the School of Medicine, Campus Recreation and others.

For more information on Camp NEW You contact Evans by phone at 304-696-2924 or by e-mail at evansg@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 7, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

Marshall website features tribute to Sen. Byrd, memorial service highlights

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's video production staff has added ten minutes of highlights of the West Virginia memorial service for Sen. Robert C. Byrd to the materials posted on the Marshall website memorializing Byrd.

The video of the memorial service may be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKRVr8M_kSE. The entire tribute site may be accessed at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/byrdtribute.htm.


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Tuesday July 6, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Marshall students learn to craft jewelry items

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University College of Fine Arts students are getting "crafty" this summer in a jewelry-making class that currently is being offered in the Summer II session.

"This is an introduction to the technical skills necessary for the craft of jewelry making," said Daniel Cook, an adjunct instructor for the College of Fine Arts, "as well as an introduction to the aesthetic concerns of working in a small format and a discussion of the importance of body adornment to our society and individuality."

The class meets five days a week for two hours in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus and will eventually use the sculpture laboratory as the class moves forward, Cook said. There are 12 students enrolled in the class.

It has been a long time since Marshall has offered a jewelry-making class, Cook said.

"I am sure that I'm the first to teach jewelry at Marshall in the 21st century," he said. "So far the class is only available in the summer, but if students continue to be interested in the subject I will be thrilled to teach it more often."

Because the class is an introduction to jewelry, it is very technically based, he said. The students in the class are all making the same objects but with individual design concepts.

"The assignments are laid out to teach the student how to do something specific," he said. "The first assignment is to create a key fob, or key chain, and all the students are given the same amount of material while all the key fobs are the same size and material, the outcomes are radically different."

The jewelry being made in the class is in no way limited as to material, however. For this class students will be using traditional materials such as cooper for the key fobs and silver to create two rings and a pendant, Cook said. Students have the option to set whatever they would like in the silver rings and pendant. Some students are using stones, gems, river glass or bark, and one is using the rubber shock absorber from his tennis racket.

To create the jewelry, students have to learn how to use basic small hand tools such as the jeweler's saw, files, hammers, torches for soldering, polishing lathes and pliers, Cook said

Steven Romano, a senior sculpture major from Bluefield, W.Va., said he signed up for the class because he has never worked in such a small medium and likes to dabble in new areas.

"I am used to working with large scale in sculpture," Romano said. "Taking it down to a small scale, you have to be a lot more meticulous."

He said he would recommend this class to other students.

Cook said his favorite part about teaching this class is seeing what the students come up with and watching them as they figure out how to plan and achieve a design.

"Jewelry takes planning; it also requires an understanding of the order of operations," he said. "You can't always go back and fix something. You need to plan what is going to happen and in what order. It is thrilling to watch students learn how to organize their process to achieve their goals."

This is the first time Cook has taught jewelry making at Marshall, but he taught similar classes at the University of Massachusetts and Dartmouth University, as well as in workshops at Snowfarm, a craft school in western Massachusetts, he said.

"Jewelry is a great way to learn to work with your hands," he said.  "As our society advances technologically, sometimes we forget how to make things with our hands and the satisfaction this brings to us. Jewelry is great because we can make something, wear it, and eventually somebody will tell us that our jewelry is great and ask where we bought it. Telling them that you made it is very satisfying."

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Photo: Marshall University adjunct instructor Dan Cook demonstrates soldering techniques in the class he is teaching on jewelry making.


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WMUL students collect 16 WVAP Broadcasters Association awards

Total of 99 awards for academic year is a new school record

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Student broadcasters from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, established a school record by receiving 99 awards for the 2009-2010 academic year, including 16 during the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2009 broadcast journalism awards ceremony conducted June 19 in Charleston.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, also announced that student broadcasters have now won 1,005 scriptwriting and production awards since 1985.

"That is an amazing number and it may grow as long as the students are willing to do what it takes to continue WMUL-FM's tradition of success," Bailey said.

WMUL-FM received five first-place awards and 11 honorable mentions during the WVAPBA's 2009 broadcast journalism awards ceremony at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Charleston. The judges were members of the Arkansas Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

The five first-place individual award-winning entries were:

Best Enterprise Reporting

"Be Hope to Her," written and produced by Leannda Carey, a junior from Wellsburg, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, April 23, 2009.

Best Documentary

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009. 

Best Talk Show

"The Sowards-Roudebush Report" with hosts Matt Sowards, a recent graduate from Salt Rock, Jay Roudebush, a graduate student from Charleston, and Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi, is a political debate styled talk program.  The winning program focused on health care and featured special guest Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va. The program was broadcast Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2009.

Best Reporter

"A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" throughout 2009.

Best Sports Special 

"The Longest Yards: The 2008 Marshall Football Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall-Southern Illinois football game Saturday, Sept. 5, 2009.

The 11 honorable mention award-winning entries were:

Outstanding News Operation

The Newscenter 88 Team: news director for the spring semester and the fall semester 2009 was Leannda Carey. 

Best Continuing Coverage

"Marshall University Grade Change Scandal,"  the multitude of packages and sound bites recorded, written and produced by Leannda Carey, Adam Cavalier and Cicely Tutson, a graduate student from Louisville, Ky., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of  Newscenter 88," Friday, Oct. 23, 2009 through the Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009. The reporting on this topic continued on WMUL-FM through Friday, Jan. 29, 2010.

Best Enterprise Reporting

"Salvation for the Powerless," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Monday, Feb. 2, 2009.

Best Feature

"The Legend of Dr. Kim," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2009

Best Reporter

"A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" throughout 2009

Best Anchor or Anchor Team

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" with news anchor Leannda Carey, broadcast Friday, Oct. 23, 2009. 

Outstanding Sports Operation

The FM 88 Sports Team: sports director for the spring semester and the fall semester 2009 was Ryan Epling, a recent master's degree graduate from Wayne. The Outstanding Sports Operation entry was prepared and edited by Adam Cavalier.

Best Sportscaste

"A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2009

Best Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus University of Southern Mississippi football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium Saturday, Nov. 14, 2009. The students calling the game were play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier; color commentator Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans; sideline reporter Leannda Carey; and engineer Justin Tyree, a freshman from Nitro.

Best Sports Special

"The 2008-2009 Marshall Men's Basketball Season in Review," written and produced by Robert Iddings, broadcast  prior to the Marshall-West Virginia Wesleyan exhibition basketball home opener Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2009.

Best Host

"A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast for the FM 88 Sports Team throughout 2009.

Bailey said the university competed with commercial and noncommercial radio stations from throughout the state.

"Overall, this commendable effort helps to build upon another record-setting year by the volunteer student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications from state, regional and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations," he said.


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Marshall graphic design student lands meaningful internship in D.C.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University student in the College of Fine Arts is using his design skills for good causes after landing a summer internship with a newspaper focusing on the homeless in Washington, D.C.

Eric Falquero, a 21-year-old graphic design senior from Charleston W.Va., said he loves helping people and is happy he found a way to contribute to causes by doing what he loves - graphic design.

"Any good cause needs good design to make it stand out from everything else because we see all kinds of media every minute of every day," Falquero said.

The biweekly paper at which he is interning, Street Sense, is based out of Washington, D.C., and its mission is to raise public awareness on the issues of homelessness and poverty in the city and to create economic opportunities, according to the website. The paper is sold by vendors who are homeless or close to being homeless.

"Most of the content is written by the vendors that sell it and they write about issues that they face," Falquero said. "The vendors buy copies of the paper once it is printed for 35 cents a copy and they sell it for a minimum of $1. It provides them a creative outlet and a job where they are pretty much their own bosses because they choose when and where they want to go out."

He stumbled across the opportunity while searching on the Internet for internships in the D.C. area and it was the first one that caught his attention, Falquero said.

"The internship actually had just been posted two days before I found it," he said. "So I replied to it and I heard back from them the next day. The more I looked into it, the more interested I was, so I was very excited when they picked me."

Currently the executive director of Street Sense has been focusing on marketing the paper and  increasing the audience, Falquero said. A large part of that is establishing the brand and getting professional looking materials out, as well as a paper that is visually interesting so people want to read it.

"My long-term project for the summer is to redesign the paper, which is what I am the most excited about," he said. "It will be time intensive and the biggest challenge but I like a challenge. It will be the longest lasting impression that I can leave with the organization, as well."

Falquero also will be working closely with one of the vendors who puts together the layout for the creative section of the paper where vendors submit poems and photographs, he said

"Right now there is not much design to the creative section and the director feels that there should be more to go along with the rest of the paper and to really highlight a treasure of the paper," Falquero said. "They want me to get to know the guy and help him with his design skills so that he can do it rather than just handing it off to me." 

Street Sense has about 100 active vendors who sell about 16,000 papers every other week, with the average vendor earning $45 a day, according to the website.

This is not the first cause for which Falquero has contributed his design skill. He also was behind all the creative work for the Empty Bowls campaign this spring. The purpose of this yearly campaign is to raise money for the Huntington Area Food Bank to feed the hungry by selling lunch and bowls made by the ceramic students in the College of Fine Arts.

"The Empty Bowls project was probably the most fulfilling project I worked on as far as anything affiliated with college," Falquero said. "At first I designed a letterhead and made it on a word document so anyone who needed to use it for stuff affiliated with the campaign. Then from there I found out they wanted a website and I just kind of fell into working on the whole campaign."


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Marshall University to close Friday in honor of Sen. Robert C. Byrd

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be closed this Friday, July 2, in accordance with Governor Joe Manchin's executive order declaring a special day of honor and mourning for U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd.

"It is only fitting that we will take a brief pause from our daily activities in order to remember and commemorate the extraordinary life and service of one of Marshall University's most distinguished alumni, Senator Robert C. Byrd," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp.

Although the university will be closed and classes will be cancelled, camps and other special events, including accommodations for the U.S. Youth Soccer Region One Championship, will be held as scheduled. A moment of silence will be observed at these events.

The Marshall Recreation Center, residence halls, dining hall and bookstore will remain open as scheduled.

Marshall University employees in positions that are considered essential, including Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine faculty, residents, students and staff with specific clinical responsibilities, are asked to coordinate their work schedules with their supervisors. Employees previously scheduled for annual leave on Friday will not be charged for the time off.

West Virginians are invited to honor and celebrate the distinguished life of Sen. Byrd with a public procession through Charleston on Thursday evening. Sen. Byrd will lie in repose at the state Capitol's Lower Rotunda from 9 p.m. on Thursday to 9 a.m. on Friday, where the public is invited to pay their respects. A public, formal memorial service will take place at 11:30 a.m. on Friday at the state Capitol's North Plaza. 

For video and photographic tributes to Sen. Byrd, visit Marshall's website at www.marshall.edu.


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Statement from Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp regarding the death of Sen. Robert C. Byrd

Senator Robert C. Byrd now is a Man for the Ages. Let History write bold and defining strokes celebrating his extraordinary life, a life of incalculable achievement, service to our great state and nation and guardian of the U.S. Constitution. Today, we have lost a true Son of Marshall, a true Son of West Virginia and a true Son of our great nation. He was a man of humble beginnings who rose through more than 50 years of public service to become one of the most accomplished and legendary statesmen our nation has known, and we all mourn his passing with very heavy hearts. Thank you, Senator Byrd.


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MU public relations students win awards in three categories

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Public relations students in Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications have won awards from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) West Virginia Chapter.

Attending the group's Crystal Awards Gala in Charleston June 16 were Terry Hapney, assistant professor of public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) at MU; Jessica Wintz; Sandy York, MU SOJMC; Katie Harper; Tiffany Bajus; Angela Sundstrom; Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the SOJMC at MU; Whitney Parsley; and Jessi Weddington.

The awards, which were judged by the San Francisco chapter of PRSA, are in three separate categories.

The Marshall students were honored for their work in creating campaigns for Empty Bowls, a national campaign to end hunger in communities throughout the U.S.; Helping Hungry Hearts, a fundraising project for the Huntington Area Food Bank; and Cotton: From Blue to Green Denim, a campaign to collect denim to be recycled into insulation for homes, including some for Hurricane Katrina relief in the Gulf Coast.

"It is quite an honor to be recognized in this manner by PRSA," said Hapney, who is also adviser to Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) at Marshall.  "Several of my students were involved in all three campaigns.  Together the students played very important roles in raising well over $20,000 for the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) and (helping) insulate Habitat for Humanity homes."

The students won the Crystal Award for an Integrated Communications Campaign for the Empty Bowls Project, an Honorable Mention in Community Relations for their work on the Helping Hungry Hearts campaign, and an Honorable Mention, Special Events, for the denim drive. 

This year the School of Journalism's newly created public relations/advertising agency, OutLoud Creative, worked on the Empty Bowls campaign, which teams public relations students with students in the College of Fine Arts to promote the sale of handcrafted soup bowls created by members of the Keramos Student Potters' Guild.  

"Several MU public relations students were integral to the success of this campaign, which raised money to benefit the Huntington Area Food Bank,"  Hapney said. "Tens of thousands of people in the Tri-State area go hungry each month.  Through this campaign School of Journalism and College of Fine Arts students are able to help 91,000 of those in our area struggling to put food on their tables each month."

This Empty Bowls campaign was a finalist for the West Virginia campaign of the year, Hapney added. 

A public relations campaign management class at Marshall took on the task of creating a new fundraising project called Helping Hungry Hearts, working "from the ground up," according to Hapney.

Students researched, planned, communicated, and evaluated a new campaign for the client - the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB).  They created the Helping Hungry Hearts (HHH) agency composed of members of the class and set about organizing fundraising events.  They held the Outrunning Hunger 5K Run/Walk throughout downtown Huntington, a spaghetti dinner, a raffle and the Change-4-Change penny drive in local elementary schools and on Marshall's Huntington campus. 

"Over $10,000 was raised from this campaign, allowing the HAFB to purchase over 70,000 pounds of food to help feed the 91,000 people in the Tri-State area who look to the HAFB for help each month." Hapney said.

The Cotton: From Blue to Green Denim Drive was conducted by the Marshall chapter of PRSSA.  The project was part of a denim collection drive that was launched across eight college campuses in fall 2009.  The MU chapter teamed up with Cotton Incorporated and the Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity to promote the effort, which resulted in denim being recycled into insulation for homes.

Sundstrom, president of the Marshall Chapter of the PRSSA, said, "Working on these campaigns was not only a great opportunity to gain experience in the field of public relations but also an amazing way to give back to our communities.  The PR program at Marshall University has prepared me for so much more than simply starting a career.  Through the work I have done on these campaigns, I now have an appreciation for helping others and giving back, something that will stay with me for a lifetime."

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Photo: (Left to right) Terry Hapney, assistant professor of public relations in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) at MU; Jessica Wintz; Sandy York, MU SOJMC; Katie Harper; Tiffany Bajus; Angela Sundstrom; Corley Dennison, dean of the SOJMC at MU; Whitney Parsley; and Jessi Weddington attended the PRSA-W.Va. Crystal Awards Gala at the Charleston Civic Center June 16. Wintz, Harper, Bajus, and Sundstrom recently received their B.A. degrees in public relations from Marshall University. Parsley and Weddington recently received their M.A.J. degrees in public relations from MU.


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Engineering academy attracts 36 students from six states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-six students from 23 high schools in six states will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, June 27 through Thursday, July 1 to take part in the 10th annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE).

Dr. William Pierson, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science at Marshall, said the participants include 20 boys and 16 girls in the ninth through the 11th grades. Twenty-three students are from West Virginia, six from Ohio, four from Pennsylvania and one each from Kentucky, North Carolina and New Jersey.

Sponsors of the event include Chesapeake Energy, the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) and other local businesses and organizations.

"As always, teamwork is one of the themes of the engineering camp," Pierson said. "The students participating will see that teamwork is important in planning and working together to achieve a common goal. The camp is a great opportunity for the students to not only explore the field of engineering, but also to explore Marshall University and what we have to offer."

The camp gets under way at 3 p.m. Sunday in Room BE 5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center with a presentation titled "Building Strong" by Coy Miller, Professional Engineer, United States Army Corps of Engineers Deputy District Commander for Programs and Project Management.

Students are selected for the camp based upon their interest in and aptitude for engineering. Grades, courses taken and letters of recommendation are taken into consideration. The camp primarily tries to attract rising high school juniors.

The 2010 camp participants include:

Robert Agee of Huntington; Caleb Bailey of Huntington; Jessica Bailey of Nitro, W.Va.; David Bender of Cross Lanes, W.Va.; Nathan Betts of Mertztown, Pa.; Kyle Bryant of Vinton, Ohio; Molly Callaghan of Charleston; Matt Cardwell of Milton, W.Va.; Dakotah Copenhaver of Ona, W.Va.;

Grayson Davis of Huntington; Morgan France of Nitro, W.Va.; Paul Gemperlein of Tarentum, Pa.; Meredith Gillespie of Hurricane, W.Va.; Carly Gima of Follansbee, W.Va.; Cody Griffin of Huntington; Akhil Gudivada of Proctorville, Ohio; Kalene Hanson of Cary, N.C.; Saul Harlow of Nettie, W.Va.

Mary Hillwig of Pikeville, Ky.; James Horner of Wellsburg, W.Va.; Elizabeth Lawhon of Hurricane, W.Va.; James Long of New Martinsville, W.Va.; Kimberly Macenczak of Alliance, Ohio; Mark Malmquist of Natrona Heights, Pa. Andrew McLaughlin of Hurricane, W.Va.; Kelly O'Brien of Mertztown, Pa.; Kendra Pegg of New Martinsville, W.Va.

Keya Phillips of Hurricane, W.Va.; Dwight Rice of Oceana, W.Va.; Jordan Rothstein of Newton, N.J.; Anna Rubenstein of Cross Lanes, W.Va.; Paige Rutter of Oak Hill, W.Va.; Savana Schrader of Beaver, Ohio; Nathan Wang of Proctorville, Ohio; Katherine Warner of Morgantown, W.Va.; and Trenton Williams of Piketon, Ohio.

Here is the complete schedule of events for the 2010 academy:

Sunday, June 27

  • 2 to 3 p.m.: check-in, Haymaker Hall, Marshall Commons
  • 3 to 5 p.m.: welcome and presentation, "Building Strong," by Coy Miller, PE, USACE Deputy District Commander for Programs and Project Management, Memorial Student Center, Room BE
  • 5 to 6 p.m.: dinner, MSC John Marshall Roo
  • 6:30 to 9 p.m., icebreaker and team-building activities, Marshall Recreation Center

Monday, June 28

  • 8 to 9:45 a.m.: lecture time, Weisberg Engineering Lab classroom (WEL101)
  • 9:50 to 11:30 a.m.: introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing, and environmental sampling, Buskirk Field and Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 11:30 .m. to noon: lunch, Harless Dining Hall
  • 12:30 to 4 p.m.: introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing, and environmental sampling, Buskirk Field and Weisberg Engineering Lab
  • 4:30 to 5 p.m.: roller coaster design: introduction and planning
  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: dinner
  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: roller coaster design: construction, testing and competition

Tuesday, June 29

  • 8 to 9 a.m.: introduction to trebuchet design, WEL101

  • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.: trebuchet design and construction, Buskirk Field

  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: luncheon with Society of American Military Engineers
    members, Harless Dining Hall, Ed Grose Room

  • 12:30 to 2 p.m.: complete trebuchet construction

  • 2 to 3 p.m.: trebuchet competition

  • 3 to 4:30 p.m.: intelligent transportation systems presentation, WEL101, Andrew Nichols

  • 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.: Introduction to GPS, Jamie Wolfe, Weisberg Engineering Lab

  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: dinner

  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: team building exercise

Wednesday, June 30

  • 8 to 9:30 a.m.: introduction to robotics, WEL

  • 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.: work on robot design/construction, WEL

  • 10:30 to 11:30 p.m.: robotics competition, WEL

  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: lunch, Harless Dining Hall

  • 12:30 to 2 p.m.: Introduction to CS, GH 211

  • 2 to 3 p.m.: CS scavenger hunt

  • 3 to 4:30 p.m.: visualization lab presentation, WEL

  • 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.: concrete testing, WEL

  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.: dinner

  • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: GPS competition, MSC Fountain

Thursday, July 1

  • 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.: field trips

  • 8 to 9 a.m.: travel to Toyota plant in Buffalo, W.Va.

  • 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.: tour Toyota

  • 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.: lunch at Golden Corral in Cross Lanes, W.Va.

  • 1 to 1:30 p.m.: travel to DOH Bridge site in South Charleston, W.Va.

  • 1:30 to 3 p.m.: tour bridge site

  • 3:15 to 4 p.m.: travel to J.H. Fletcher in Huntington

  • 4 to 6 p.m.: tour J. H. Fletcher

  • 6 to 6:30 p.m.: travel to Waves of Fun

  • 6:30 to 9 p.m.: dinner and pool party, Waves of Fun, parents invited

  • 9 to 9:30 p.m.: students depart with parents

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Marshall music students selected to study in Brazil

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University music students have received fellowships to study in Brazil during the spring semester of 2011 as part of a grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The fellowship awards were sponsored by the Department of Education's Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) United States-Brazil Higher Education Consortia Program. Marshall's Department of Music was awarded $500,000 to implement this consortium. 

 The three FIPSE Fellows are Dylan Elder, a trumpet/music education major from Huntington, W.Va, and Brittany White, a flute/music performance major from Princeton, W.Va., both of whom will be studying at the Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG) in Goinia; and Michael Pitaniello, a guitar/music performance major from Barboursville, W.Va., who will be studying at the Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC).

The students were selected as a result of a competitive application process that included musical ability, academic achievement, a written essay and references from faculty members.

During the coming fall semester, the American students will be receiving Portuguese language instruction as well as classes in Brazilian culture. In January 2011, the students will travel to Brazil for an intensive, month-long cultural and language immersion to prepare them for classes, which begin in February.

The FIPSE Fellowships are one part of the MAGNETS (Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students) Exchange Program funded by the U.S. Department of Education and its counterpart in the Brazilian Ministry of Education. Marshall University's American partner in the program is Morehead State University. The four-year program includes Brazilian students from UFG and UDESC studying at Marshall and Morehead State as well as exchanges of music faculty from the American and Brazilian universities. 

In October 2009, Brazilian faculty visited Marshall and Morehead State and presented a series of concerts, as well as clinics and master classes, and gave private lessons. Brazilian students will be studying at Marshall and Morehead during the fall semester 2010 and music faculty from both American universities will be traveling to the two Brazilian universities during the 2010-11 academic year.

Elder says he is taking this opportunity as a great learning experience. He said there are several advantages to studying abroad and he hopes to get the most out of his experience.

"I hope to gain a better command of the Portuguese language, an understanding of the culture of Brazil, to grow as a musician, person, and well represent Marshall University," Elder said.

The three students will spend a little more than five months abroad.

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Photo: Marshall University faculty members Dr. Ben Miller (left) and Julio Alves; music students Brittany White, Dylan Elder, and Michael Pitaniello; and Dr. Jeff Pappas, chair of the music department, pause for a photo after the FIPSE fellows were named at the 2010 College of Fine Arts Award Convocation in April.


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Friday June 18, 2010
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Journalism workshop attracts students from six states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixteen high school students from six states will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus next week to take part in the 2010 High School Journalism Workshop sponsored by MU, the Marshall University Office of Multicultural Affairs and The Herald-Dispatch.

The students are from West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia and North Carolina. The workshop will help prepare them for media careers by introducing them to photography, editing, writing and reporting, according to Burnis R. Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor and director of the high school journalism workshop at Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Morris said the students, who also will create their own blogs, will spend a day at The Herald-Dispatch and receive air time on WMUL-FM, MU's public radio station.

"It is not enough for high school journalism students to regurgitate what Marshall professors and volunteers from The Herald-Dispatch tell them," Morris said. "Students will be encouraged to go beyond social-network sites and develop the ability to tell interesting stories and explain complex issues in contexts their audiences will comprehend."

The workshop, most of which will take place in Smith Hall, runs Monday, June 21 through Friday, June 25.


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Friday June 18, 2010
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Jazz-MU-Tazz update: Saturday concert to take place in Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Due to the extremely warm temperatures forecast for Saturday, June 19, organizers of Marshall University's annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival have adjusted the schedule and performance location for that date.

The Saturday, June 19, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. concerts will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The performances originally scheduled for 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. have been cancelled.

Here is the revised schedule for Saturday, June 19, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

o   5 p.m., Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band with Phil Thompson

o   6 p.m., Marshall University Jazz Ensemble with Phil Thompson

 

Admission is free and open to the public.

Questions may be directed to Dr. Ed Bingham, 304-696-2452.
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Marshall University fans can still buy special badges for PGA event at Greenbrier



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans and supporters still have the opportunity to purchase special weekly admission badges to the inaugural Greenbrier Classic and benefit the Marshall University Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association under the Greenbrier Classic's Badges for Charity program.

The Greenbrier Classic is an official PGA Tour event which takes place July 26-Aug. 1 at the Old White Course in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Special admission badges are available through July 14.

The Marshall University Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association will receive 30 percent of the proceeds of all badges purchased on their behalf. All badge levels are available for this program.

With the purchase of weekly badges from $147 to $5,000 each, persons are granted access to two exclusive concerts featuring award-winning artists Reba McEntire and Rascal Flatts performing Thursday, July 29, and Brad Paisley and Carrie Underwood performing Saturday, July 31.

Weekly grounds Badges for Charity priced at $69 include one ticket to the Thursday concert, while weekly grounds badges for charity costing $79 include one ticket to the Saturday concert.

To purchase badges, visit www.greenbrierclassic.com or The Greenbrier Classic Official Tournament Shop at the resort.

The other available badge levels, including the Alumni badge, are described below:

  • The Grounds badge provides tournament admittance for the entire week for $147.
  • The $275 Benefactor badge includes entry to select air-conditioned hospitality tents, as well as premium food and beverage options.
  • The Alumni badge is available for $495. Guests of this special alumni hospitality area will enjoy unlimited tailgate-style food and non-alcoholic beverages as well as guest appearances from celebrity alumni.
  • The Clubhouse badge at $5,000 provides a limited number of people with exclusive access to the event, including prime viewing areas on Old White #1 and #18, unlimited food and beverage at Sam Snead's at the Golf Club and access to all hospitality tents. In addition, Clubhouse badge holders also will receive one complimentary two-night stay at the Greenbrier, including one round of golf on the Old White Course for two and $1,000 in special amenity vouchers. For information on this VIP opportunity, persons should contact Rob Booth at 304-536-7758.

The Greenbrier Classic's Badges for Charity program recognizes the PGA Tour's commitment to charities by giving charitable organizations 30 percent of the proceeds of each weekly badge sold for their benefit. This year more than 100 organizations are participating in the program.

An open reception for Marshall alumni and fans will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 28 at the Quality Inn, 540 N. Jefferson St. in Lewisburg, W.Va. Those planning to attend are asked to RSVP to the Marshall University Alumni Association office at 304-696-2901. Admission is free and a cash bar will be available.

For more information on the tournament and the Badges for Charity program, call 866-534-4456.


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Thursday June 17, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More than 2,000 new students expected for Marshall University orientation beginning June 22

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An estimated 2,100 freshmen and transfer students will be attending orientation sessions on Marshall University's Huntington campus this summer, beginning Tuesday, June 22.

Orientation is a half-day program designed to acclimate new students to Marshall's Huntington campus. Participants receive valuable information from the offices on campus, get identification cards made, register for classes and tour the campus. Much of the focus this year will be on the transition to college and the new core curriculum.

Sessions for parents include time with financial aid advisors and student services staff, as well as discussions of campus safety issues and other academic and financial topics. Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment, said the financial portion of orientation will be available to both students and parents.

"We really look forward to meeting our new students as they go through orientation," Wolfe said. "We've worked really hard to put together a program that provides the students with the things they need to have a successful start as Marshall students. We hope that when the day is over, our students leave with a feeling of excitement and anticipation about rejoining their Marshall family when classes start in August."

A couple of new twists have been added to the orientation agenda for this year:

  • Students can make an appointment with the MU Help Desk (304-696-3200) to get their laptop computers set up for the school year.
  • Lunch for students attending orientation will be served in the seats of Joan C. Edwards Stadium, home of Marshall football.

Orientation sessions are scheduled June 22-26, July 20-23 and Aug. 5-6. The June 22 session is for honors students only, while the other dates are open to all new students.

Students who have been admitted to Marshall University are encouraged to register for an orientation session. This may be done either online at www.marshall.edu/orientation, or by calling 304-696-2354 or 800-438-5392.

Students may still register for orientation sessions on July 22 and 23, and Aug. 5 and 6. The other sessions are full, while the June 22 honors orientation is by invitation only.

All orientation sessions run from 8 a.m. to noon.

A new overnight program called "Up Late at Marshall" will precede the first two regular orientation sessions by one day. "Up Late," which will take place Monday, June 21, and Monday, July 19, is for incoming freshmen and their parents. Through this program, the freshmen are invited to experience an overnight stay in the residence halls and the parents are invited to meet with some members of the academic staff and take part in special sessions designed for them.

Also new this year in August is the Week of Welcome (WOW), which starts Wednesday, Aug. 18, and includes the new UNI 100 Freshman First Class in which students starts to earn one credit hour. Activities are planned Wednesday through Saturday, Aug. 21, with the regular fall semester beginning on Monday, Aug. 23.

Among the activities planned are the annual family picnic at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 18, the President's Convocation at 9 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 19, at Cam Henderson Center, and the Rec Fest at the Marshall Recreation Center on Saturday, Aug. 21. More details will be available soon.


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Tuesday June 15, 2010
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, 304-746-1989

Bookwalter to serve as interim dean of College of Education and Human Services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert Bookwalter has been named interim dean of the Marshall University College of Education and Human Services, according to Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost.

Bookwalter is a 23-year veteran faculty member of Marshall University currently serving as the chairman of the Department of Communication Studies in the College of Liberal Arts. He will begin his new duties as interim dean effective Wednesday, June 16. A nationwide search to fill the permanent position will begin during the fall semester.

Ormiston said he is very pleased Bookwalter agreed to accept this leadership role for the university as the college works to prepare for the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education accreditation process.

"Dr. Bookwalter is committed to supporting the mission of the college in preparing tomorrow's educators and education professionals," Ormiston said. "He will work to ensure that the programs in the college have the resources and support to accomplish their goals effectively and efficiently.  I look forward to his insights and leadership in the coming months."

Bookwalter joined the Department of Speech (now Communication Studies) in 1987.  His teaching and research interests are in the areas of peace and conflict studies, interpersonal communication, group dynamics, leadership and language.  While at Marshall he has served as chair of the College of Liberal Arts Academic Planning Committee and Curriculum Committee and served on the college's Promotion and Tenure Committee.  For 15 years he served as director of the Oral Communication component of the General Education program.  In 2009, he led the university's General Education Council that is overseeing the transition to the new Core Curriculum scheduled to begin this fall. He also has served as Faculty Athletics Representative to the NCAA since 2002. 

"I am honored to be asked to guide the college through this transition," Bookwalter said. "This is a critical time, with the college's accreditation process under way, budgetary challenges facing the university, and the search for a new dean upcoming. I look forward to working closely with faculty, students and staff of the college to successfully address these challenges."

A native of San Jose, Calif., Bookwalter received his B.A. in Speech Communication from Fresno State University in 1979, his M.A. in Interpersonal Communication from the University of Montana in 1982 and his Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Kansas in 1989.


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Tuesday June 15, 2010
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine,, 304-691-1713

Marshall's med school ranks in nation's top 20 on 'social mission' outcomes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A groundbreaking national study published today (June 15) in the Annals of Internal Medicine ranks Marshall University's medical school among the top 20 in the United States in fulfilling medical schools' fundamental mission: training physicians to care for the nation's population as a whole.

The George Washington University study breaks new ground by providing what the journal's news release called "a real-time and real-place report" on doctors who graduated between 1999 and 2001: what their backgrounds are, where they work, and what kind of medicine they practice.            

Led by Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, the researchers then calculated a "social mission score" for each medical school based on the percentage of graduates who practice primary care, who work in health professional shortage areas, or who are underrepresented minorities (since this group historically provides a disproportionate share of health care to the nation's minority and underserved populations).

Marshall's Dr. John Walden said the study offers a long-overdue look at how medical education performs in creating a physician workforce that effectively reaches the population to provide treatment and preventive care.

"It seems about time someone looked at these kinds of things," said Walden, an associate dean and chairman of the Department of Family and Community Health. "The study is a positive take on rethinking, in part, priorities in medical education, and recognizing that improving the nation's health is not necessarily so much about developing a new drug as about actually getting treatment to people."

He was matter-of-fact about Marshall's No. 16 rank. "Given where we are and the mission of our school, focusing on these delivery issues is second nature, not something we've had to be taught," he said. "We've done this all along without even knowing we were doing it."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, Ph.D., said the independent nature of the study is even stronger evidence that Marshall is a national leader in training physicians who meet the rural medicine mission of the university.

"This research independently confirms that Marshall's medical school is serving the people of rural and medically underserved areas of West Virginia and the region through the education and placement of skilled physicians in these areas. We truly are continuing to fulfill the mission set forth for Marshall's medical school when it was created," Kopp said.

The researchers noted that the study results differ greatly from rankings based on indirect factors such as research funding and reputation surveys.

"We have essentially inverted the U.S. News and World Report rankings, for those of you that follow them," Mullan told an audience at Dartmouth College in April, noting that those rankings are based heavily on research and reputation, rather than outcomes.

The dean of Marshall's medical school, Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., said the school's distinction is especially valued since it results from unsolicited analytical and objective analysis.

"Dr. Mullan is one of the nation's most experienced, insightful, authoritative physicians, and his expertise in this particular field is essentially unchallenged," he said, adding that the Annals of Internal Medicine ranks "at absolutely the top" of national and international medical journals.

"Providing well-trained and highly skilled primary care physicians to practice in West Virginia remains the solid foundation of our mission," he said. "We are very proud of our results, and also pleased with our contribution - with the state's other two medical schools - toward making primary care accessible to people across West Virginia."


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Monday June 14, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall invites incoming freshmen to stay 'Up Late'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's academic affairs staff has invited incoming freshmen and their parents to participate in a new overnight program, "Up Late at Marshall," prior to regular orientation activities. "Up Late" will take place Monday, June 21, and Monday, July 19.

"This is a great opportunity for students to experience an overnight stay in our residence halls, learn their way around the Huntington campus, interact with current student leaders and meet some of their new peers," said Sherri Stepp, interim director of University College, who is leading the program. "For the parents, we hope to give them an opportunity to meet a few members of the academic staff and give them some suggestions to help ease the college transition."

Special sessions for students include small-group discussions on what college is really like and a chance to "Get in the HERD Spirit" with the cheerleaders, Marco and some of the athletic coaches. Parents will participate in separate sessions designed for them.

Both students and parents will be able to choose from two options for after-dinner activities. They can attend a taping of  "Up Late with Jamie LoFiego," Marshall's student-produced late night talk show, or they can participate in activities  at the Marshall Recreation Center, including a "dive-in" movie, group exercise classes, climbing wall, and use of exercise equipment. The recreation center activities are free to the students and $6 per additional family member, and the rate includes an optional individual morning workout.

"We are trying this new format on a couple of nights this summer to see if students and parents find the additional time beneficial," said Dr. Frances S. Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs. "If the response is positive, we would like to expand this next summer to provide more such opportunities."

For further information on "Up Late at Marshall," persons may contact Stepp by phone at 304-696-7038 or by e-mail at goodall@marshall.edu.


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Monday June 14, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University announces newest class of Yeager Scholars

Three students are from West Virginia, two from Ohio and one from Michigan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six incoming freshmen are the newest members of the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University.

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, director of the Society of Yeager Scholars, said she looks forward to working with the incoming class.

"The Yeager Scholarship draws applications from all over the United States from students who are highly recruited by other institutions," LoCascio said. "Marshall University is fortunate to attract such talented students."

Of the six students, three are from West Virginia, two from Ohio and one is from Michigan.

The Class of 2014 will have an enhanced curriculum throughout their college careers. Some of the requirements include: maintaining a cumulative 3.5 grade point average, completing four interdisciplinary seminars, and involvement in campus and community activities.  They will also have the opportunity to study literature, political science or history abroad at Oxford University in England as well as study in a country of the scholar's chosen foreign language.  

Dr. Mary Todd, dean of the Marshall University Honors College, home of the Society of Yeager Scholars program, said the Honors College is delighted to welcome the latest class of Yeager Scholars.

"Their diverse interests and experience and their records of academic excellence all serve as evidence that they are the leader-scholars the Yeager program has always sought," Todd said.

The students had to submit an application followed by two interviews - one by telephone and one by a panel of interviewers on the Marshall University Huntington campus. The final selection was made by university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars board members and community members.  

The Society of Yeager Scholars is named for West Virginia native Ret. Brigadier General Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who piloted the first plane to break the sound barrier.

The following students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2014:

Sarah Jo Abbott of Charleston, W.Va. Abbott is a graduate of South Charleston High School and plans to major in English and international business. Abbott attended the West Virginia Governor's Honors Academy, has been selected as a teen scholar and has received numerous journalism awards.  She also was a member of her high school's show choir.

 

 

 

Kayla Danielle Boggs of Big Bend, W.Va. Boggs is a graduate of Calhoun County High School. She plans to major in cellular or molecular biology. Boggs was the student council president and the captain of her high school's academic team. She also is a member of Mu Alpha Theta, a national high school and two-year college mathematics honor society.

 

 

 

Leigh Elizabeth Hinkle of Canal Winchester, Ohio.  Hinkle is a graduate of Canal Winchester High School and plans to major in theatre and political science. She is a member of the National Honor Society and was elected twice as class president. Hinkle also was a member of her high school's band and theatre programs.

 

 

 

Savannah Lee Keller of Seville, Ohio. Keller is a graduate of Cloverleaf High School and is considering a career in environmental engineering. Keller was elected as vice president of her high school's National Honor Society and student council treasurer, and earned a varsity letter in cross-country.

 

 

 

Danielle Ranee McCallister of Barboursville, W.Va. McCallister is a graduate of Cabell Midland High School. She plans to pursue a career in veterinary medicine.  McCallister is a member of the National Honor Society and has been awarded "Student of the Month" from a local Rotary Club. She also participated in Marshall University's Scholastic Journalism Program. 

 

 

 

Stephen Andrew Sheler of Manchester, Mich. Sheler is a graduate of Manchester High School. He plans to major in physics and is considering a career in engineering. Sheler was the captain of his high school's football team and received the scholar athlete award. He also was vice president of the student council.


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Friday June 11, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

MU alumni designate scholarship and internship in visual arts at Marshall



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brothers John and Jeff McKenna, owners of HomeTown Sportswear in Barboursville, recently  committed to funding a scholarship and a paid internship for graphic design students in the College of Fine Arts at Marshall. Both are alumni of the university.

Jeff McKenna says he is happy to give back to his alma mater. "For John and me, the HomeTown Sportswear Scholarship and Internship are a way to support education and develop the talent of Marshall graphic design students," he said.

The annual $3,000 scholarship will be designated for a student who is a graphic design major. The internship position is paid for 194 hours through the summer.

"By funding one of the department's top scholarships," observed Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art and Design at Marshall, "the McKenna brothers are reinvesting in talented students who may also choose to live, work and contribute to the Tri-State regions growing creative economy. For the winner the funding reduces the pressure to work odd jobs and allows more time to develop a top-quality portfolio."

The 2010 scholarship was awarded to Huntington native Levi Brumbaugh.

"It came as a great shock to me that I was chosen for this scholarship," Brumbaugh said. "Our department has great graphic design work coming out of it all the time with this I expect a lot more from myself and my work."

Brumbaugh aspires to work in illustration or animation. "One day I hope to work as an illustrator or an animator," he said. "I'd like to find a balance in either a publishing company or a video game company."

Graphic Design student Jennings Estel  was chosen for the internship at HomeTown Sportswear on the basis of an interview.

"This gift is exceptional in that it benefits at least two students every year and has two areas of impact," said Melanie Griffis, College of Fine Arts Director of Development.  "First it offers financial assistance to a student who has excelled academically. In addition, it provides actual paid work experience for a student in the field, using the skills gained in the classroom!  That experience is invaluable.  By offering this scholarship and internship together, HomeTown Sportswear sets a meaningful example for businesses owned and operated by MU alumni. What better way to give back to the university than to assist students with their educational expenses and to offer them the opportunity to intern in their field?"

HomeTown Sportswear, located at 3692 U.S. 60 E. in Barboursville, opened in 1994. The family-owned and-operated business offers MU products, wholesale screen printing and embroidery. It serves a variety of clients, including schools, businesses, churches and sports teams.

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Photo: Levi Brumbaugh (left) accepted the HomeTown Sportswear Scholarship from Byron Clercx, chair of Marshall University's Department of Art and Design, at the College of Fine Arts annual awards convocation in April.


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Thursday June 10, 2010
Contact: Heather Smith, Assistant Director of Fitness, Marshall University Recreation Center, 304-696-3653

Marshall Recreation Center offers variety of summer classes

HUNTINGTON -- The Marshall University Recreation Center is offering a variety of summer fitness classes for nonmembers and members.

Classes include Hatha Yoga, Zumba, Belly Dance, Pre/Postnatal Strength and Stretch, Latin Cardio, Health Rx, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, C.U.T. (cross training under 30 minutes) and G.X.T. (group extreme training).

A complete listing of classes, times and fees can be found at www.marshallcampusrec.com.

To try the first class for free or for more information contact Heather Smith, Assistant Director of Fitness, at  wyatt6@marshall.edu or call 304-696-3653.


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Thursday June 10, 2010
Contact: Dr. Ed Bingham, Director of Jazz Studies, 304-696-3147

Marshall University's 11th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival to feature saxophonist Phil Thompson

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jazz-MU-Tazz, Marshall University's summer jazz festival, will feature guest artist Phil Thompson, the faculty combo Bluetrane, and the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band in concert at the Jomie Jazz Center and at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse beginning Wednesday, June 16.

"This year's Jazz-MU-Tazz festival continues the tradition of bringing Jazz to the Tri-State," said Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of music and Jazz Studies director at Marshall. "The final concert has been expanded to include more ensembles and a greater variety of musical styles."

In addition to the "Big Bands" that have been featured in previous years, this year's event will add Jazz-Rock fusion groups 'Looking Glass' and 'Marshall's Own Funk Orchestra.' In addition, the River Cities Jazz Ensemble has joined the festival lineup.

Thompson is professor of saxophone, flute and clarinet at Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C., where he also directs the Winthrop University Jazz Ensemble. He is very active both as a woodwind doubler in Charlotte, N.C., and as a clinician/adjudicator at schools and festivals throughout the Southeast. He is in demand as a performer and teacher of all instrumental styles - classic to jazz - and performs regularly with groups such as the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra and artists such as Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughn and Bernadette Peters.

A graduate of East Carolina University and the University of Michigan, Thompson completed the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Woodwind Performance at the University of North Texas in 1993.

Bluetrane was created to provide a professional model for the students at Marshall and to establish a musical ensemble devoted to the performance of what has been termed "America's National Treasure." Bluetrane's personnel include Ed Bingham, saxophone; Martin Saunders, trumpet; Mike Stroeher, trombone; Sean Parsons, piano; Mark Zanter, guitar; Steve Hall, percussion; and Jimmy Lykens, bass.

Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Bands are composed of high school students who are interested in jazz performance. During Jazz-MU-Tazz, they develop their skills in improvisation and learn about the history and theory of jazz. The high school participants represent many schools throughout the area including Spring Valley, Cabell Midland, Bridgeport and Summers County high schools in West Virginia, and Symmes Valley and St. Clairsville high schools in Ohio.

The MU Jazz Ensemble has been an important part of West Virginia's artistic community since its beginning in 1968. It has performed at jazz festivals in Montreux, Switzerland; Antibes, France; Chicago, Washington, D.C.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Orlando, Fla.; and  Dayton, Ohio, as well as the University of Notre Dame. The MUJE travels throughout the region to perform in schools and community centers. Recently, the ensemble was featured at the inaugural national conference of the Jazz Educators Network (JEN) in St. Louis, Mo.

The River Cities Jazz Ensemble was established in February 2008 by two former U.S. Air Force Band members, Carl Toler and Frank Hayes. The RCJE repertoire includes music made famous by such great bandleaders as Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, and Duke Ellington.

"One of the goals of the festival has been to create a way to showcase the talents of members of this community," Bingham said. "High school, university and professional musicians working together will produce a terrific show."

Following is a schedule of events. All events are free and open to the public.

         Wednesday, June 16, 8 p.m., Jomie Jazz Center: Phil Thompson and Friends.

         Thursday, June 17, 8 p.m., Jomie Jazz Center: Bluetrane

         Saturday, June 19, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

o   5 p.m., Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band with Phil Thompson

o   6 p.m., Marshall University Jazz Ensemble with Phil Thompson

o   7 p.m.,  Looking Glass (MU Classic Rock Band) and Marshall's Own Funk Orchestra

o   8 p.m. River Cities Jazz Ensemble


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Thursday June 10, 2010
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Gallery 842 to host Watercolor Society exhibition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gallery 842, located at 842 4th Ave. in downtown Huntington, will host the 2010 West Virginia Watercolor Society juried exhibition Festival of Colors from June 11 to July 30. The opening reception is from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 11.

WVWS President Jeannine Romano was pleased for the organization to be exhibited at Gallery 842.

"During the past two years as president of the West Virginia Watercolor Society, I have been continually amazed and inspired by the caliber of talented artists we have in our state," Romano said. "The motto 'to promote and ensure a high standard of watercolor painting' is demonstrated by many of our members, who mentor and teach watercolor painting throughout the region.  It is exciting for us  to bring our creative flair to the Huntington area."

The exhibit was juried by John Farley, gallery director and adjunct art faculty member at Marshall University. A graduate of Marshall University's Department of Art and Design, Farley's work has been chosen for display in the Huntington Museum of Art and the West Virginia Culture Center, among others.

Farley encouraged the public to view this exhibit, noting the diversity and talent represented in the show.

"There are a wide variety of examples of various watercolor techniques - despite the fact that they are all under the umbrella of watercolor paintings," Farley said. "Viewers will find everything from highly representational portraiture to gestural abstract paintings."

Gallery 842 is both a community- and Marshall University-held space to promote local talent and initiative. The gallery is a free cultural experience for any artist or art enthusiast. Summer hours are as follows: Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m.

For more information or questions about Gallery 842, or any College of Fine Arts events, contact Jaye Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

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Photo:  "MU Window Reflections" is the title of this work by Debbie Kalt Sisson, a bachelor's and master's alumna of Marshall University. The painting is included in the 2010 West Virginia Watercolor Society juried exhibition beginning Friday, June 11 at Gallery 842 in Huntington.
 


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Wednesday June 9, 2010
Contact: Heather Smith, Assistant Director of Fitness, Marshall University Recreation Center,, 304-696-3653

Kids can get triathlon training during Marshall Recreation Center camp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The Marshall Recreation Center continues its efforts to provide fitness opportunities for area children with two sessions of a Triathlon Camp 2010, which will be held June 14-18 and June 21-25 from 8 a.m. to noon, according to Heather Smith, Assistant Director of Fitness.

Children ages 8-14, of all fitness and experience levels, are invited to attend this camp that focuses on biking, swimming and running. For the biking, spinning bicycles in the recreation center will be used. 

One- or two-week sessions are available at a cost of $75 per week. All participants will receive a free camp T-shirt.

"The Marshall Recreation Center Kids Triathlon Camp is an exciting opportunity for local kids to get healthy, make new friends and have fun," Smith said.

For more information, visit www.marshallcampusrec.com, e-mail wyatt6@marshall.edu or call 304-696-3653.


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Wednesday June 9, 2010
Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist, , 304-696-6397

Marshall University partners with Regional Chamber of Commerce Saturday, June 12 for children's event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is providing assistance to the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce for its 3rd annual Children's Arts Festival Extravaganza (CAF).

The free event is scheduled from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, June 12 on 9th Street between Third and Fourth Avenues.  Activities are geared toward children 12 and under and feature print-making, stamp art and tie-dye.  Other activities include entertainment by various community groups, face-painting, visits from a clown, and sidewalk chalk drawing.

Marshall University's Department of Art & Design has been heavily involved with this year's event.  Professor Maribea Barnes and several art education majors have designed and prepared many of the art projects which are geared specifically toward elementary and pre-school age children.

"This is the second year Marshall University art education students have been involved with this wonderful community project," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts. "Allowing our students to interact with children is absolutely invaluable experience as they work toward their teaching degrees in art."

Nearly two dozen Marshall University students, staff and faculty are volunteering for the community event.

For more information on Marshall's involvement with the event contact Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist, at edwardl@marshall.edu or 304-696-6397.


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Tuesday June 8, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Marshall student places third in guitar competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University guitar performance major Danilo Moraes took third place in the Alhambra-USA International Guitar Competition, which took place in Dallas, Texas, in April.

Moraes said this was the first time he had participated in this type of competition.

"I always had it in my mind that competitions are something really bad because music is something to be appreciated, not judged," Moraes said.

For the qualifying round, the native of Brazil prepared three pieces and sent in a video performance.

During the semifinal round, Moraes performed three additional pieces. In the final round, he performed a 25-minute program composed of pieces from different periods and styles.

Placing third in the competition awarded Moraes more than just confirmation of his ability. He also won several guitar accessories and 10 sets of guitar strings. But most importantly, he was awarded the opportunity to pursue music study further with a scholarship.

"I made some good contacts, and I was offered a master's scholarship at Texas Christian University," Moraes said.

He gives a lot of credit to his teacher, Marshall guitar professor Julio Alves, who originally taught Moraes when they both lived in Brazil.

Alves said his student has reason to be proud because the Alhambra-USA International Guitar Competition has become one of the more reputable competitions. Competitions such as this help young players get moving on a career as performers.

"I'm very proud. It's quite an accomplishment," Alves said. "Danilo was the only undergraduate player among the three finalists and the other two players have participated on several other guitar competitions. It's nice to see him as part of this, in a competition featuring good players internationally."

 "This experience made me 'click,' " Moraes said. "Participating in this competition made me grow and change my perspective."

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Photo: Marshall guitar professor Julio Alves (left) works with his student, Danilo Moraes, who recently placed third in the Alhambra-USA International Guitar Competition in Dallas, Texas.


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Tuesday June 8, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers available for fall 2010

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are being accepted through Friday, July 23 for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver Program for fall 2010. The program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University faculty and staff employees.

To be eligible, applicants must currently be admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.

Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise. Preference may be given to students who have not recently been awarded a tuition waiver scholarship.

  • Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar site: http://www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition/dates.html

  • Applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Friday, Aug. 6 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at http://www.marshall.edu/graduate/tuitionwaivers.asp

Completed waiver applications must be submitted in person or by U.S. Mail. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted.


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Monday June 7, 2010
Contact: Sam Kincaid, Marshall University Theatre,, 304-696-6395

4th annual New Works Festival begins June 17 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five new plays and an original film short by local and national playwrights will premiere Thursday-Saturday, June 17-19 in The New Works Festival 2010 at Marshall University.

The festival, presented by Marshall University Theatre Alliance and the Marshall University College of Fine Arts, will include both staged and un-staged readings.

All readings will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.  Each evening's readings will be followed by a discussion/question-and-answer session with the playwright, director and cast.  Participation is both welcome and encouraged.

Admission to this year's festival is by donation on a nightly basis. All admission money goes towards the New Works Festival Fund in the Marshall University Foundation and is tax deductible. 

The schedule of events is as follows:

Thursday, June 17 - "Kiss Off" by Jonathan Joy is the third in a growing series of 10-minute plays that revolve around an argumentative husband and wife and various holiday/special events.

The first two plays in that series - "The War on Halloween" and "An Inappropriate Christmas Story" - have been performed on stages in three West Virginia cities (Huntington, Charleston and Wheeling) and at the Wings Theatre in Greenwich Village in New York City.

In the latest entry, "Kiss Off," Mark arrives home early to surprise his wife on their anniversary.  He could have never imagined how the tables would turn when he is the one left shocked at the end of evening.  It is a domestic comedy about love, marriage and irreconcilable differences.

"Coney" by David Johnston takes place on New York City's Coney Island, where people from all walks come together and break apart. "Coney" is a new play/work in progress from David Johnston, author of the award-winning "Candy & Dorothy" and "Conversations on Russian Literature."

Friday, June 18 - Marshall University Professor Kellie Bean's "Close to Mourning" tells the story of a mother and daughter who confront a shared and painful secret that has nearly cost them their relationship. A story of a mother visiting her widowed, middle-aged daughter after a long separation, this play explores the pain of family secrets.

Closing out the Friday night performances is something for audiences who love musicals. "Effie Jean in Tahiti" by David Johnston, music and lyrics by Stephen Speights, tells the story of Princess Effie Jean who has made a bargain with Proteus, the Old Man of the Sea, and is now stuck in Tahiti guarding his jewels.

Boring! Even worse, she's supposed to kill any strangers that land on the island, and the first one who shows up is her own brother. Can the wily brother-sister duo find a way to trick Proteus?

Saturday, June 19 - "The Date," an original comedic short film written and directed by Mike Murdock, asks the question, "Can you think of anyone better to prepare you for a blind date than your two best friends?"  Maybe you should start looking now. 

Closing out this year's festival is "War of the Welles," by Michael Weber, which takes place on Halloween Eve 1938.  A shaken America struggles to recover from economic collapse as Hitler threatens the future of the Free World.

At 8 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, our nation is attacked ... by the planet Mars. An audacious "boy wonder" named Orson Welles has envisioned the most terrifying hour of radio ever presented and what emerges from the CBS airwaves that night will send an anxious population to the streets in mass hysteria.

It was indeed a War of the Worlds, pitting a daring, modern medium against a stunning abandonment of common sense. This is the true story of the legendary event that forever changed the rules of broadcasting while igniting the meteoric rise of an unbridled superstar.

Call 304-696-6395 for tickets and information on The New Works Festival 2010 at Marshall University.


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Friday June 4, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Funds collected at Marshall University benefit families of miners involved in disaster

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students in Marshall University's residence halls recently raised $200.82 for families of the miners involved in the Upper Big Branch Mine tragedy. In support of the cause, Capstone - which manages the First Year Residence Halls at Marshall - contributed $2,000.

 

Checks were presented today during a ceremony at the First Year Residence Halls on MU's Huntington campus. The fundraising effort on campus took place during the final two weeks of the spring semester.

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Photo: Jeremy Thompson, left, First Year Residence Halls general manager at Marshall University, presents a checks from Capstone (top) and residence hall students to Waylon Bryant, middle, and Christin Williams, right, representing the West Virginia Council of Churches.

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Friday June 4, 2010
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MU dean receives Distinguished Global Leadership Award



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Dr. Chong Kim, dean of Marshall University's Lewis College of Business, received the 2010 Distinguished Global Leadership Award this week during the Pan Pacific Business Association's 27th annual conference.

The conference took place in Bali, Indonesia, May 30-June 2, and Kim received the award on Tuesday, June 1.

"It is my very humble honor to receive the award," Kim said. "It is the highest award given by the Pan Pacific Conference.  Among the so many distinguished scholars in the association, I was very happy to be chosen as this year's recipient.  As a member of the Marshall family, I want to share this honor together."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp was pleased to learn of Kim's award.

"On behalf of the entire Marshall University Community, I congratulate Dean Chong Kim on this distinguished award," Kopp said. "The Pan Pacific Business Association 2010 Distinguished Global Leadership Award brings great honor to Dr. Kim, the Lewis College of Business and Marshall University."

D. Clay Whybark is academic advisor with the Institute for Defense and Business, founding director of the Global Manufacturing Research Group and a fellow of the Pan Pacific Business Association. He presented the award to Kim.

"As the dean, Dr. Kim has put a high priority on the internationalization of the curriculum and faculty research," Whybark said in paying tribute to Kim. "In addition to his professional work in the field of management, Dr. Kim has been a global leader in promoting physical and spiritual aspects of Taekwondo throughout the world."

Kim received the award, Whybark said, "for his outstanding global contribution." Kim also is one of only a handful of Pan Pacific Business Association members who have attended every annual conference since the first one in Hawaii.

The Pan Pacific Business Association emerged from two US.-Japan business conferences held at the University of Nebraska in 1981 and in Tokyo in 1983. These conferences led to the formation of the association in 1984.

The basic goal of the association is to provide a forum for scholars, executives, and government officials from Pacific Rim countries to discuss important issues relating to a better quality of life in this region. Emphasis has been placed on more effective utilization of human resources, technology, and multilateral economic activities across borders.

The primary focus of the association has been the annual international conference which usually attracts 500 participants from more than 30 countries. The conferences have been held in such locations as Hawaii, Malaysia, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Australia, China, Malaysia, Canada, Thailand, New Zealand, Japan, Fiji and Chile.

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Friday June 4, 2010
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 203-746-1964

Brownfields Assistance Centers receive Environmental Partnership Award



HUNTINGTON, W.Va
. - The Brownfields Assistance Centers at Marshall University and West Virginia University (WVU) have been awarded the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) Environmental Partnership Award for 2010.

The award recognizes the collaborative approach the centers use to help communities across the state identify, clean up and redevelop brownfields sites, and the centers' positive working relationships with state and federal agencies.

The award was presented by West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin and WVDEP Cabinet Secretary Randy Huffman at the department's 10th Environmental Awards Ceremony on May 24 in Charleston.

The Brownfields Assistance Centers help empower communities to plan and implement redevelopment projects in "brownfields," or abandoned and underutilized contaminated lands. The Southern Brownfields Assistance Center is housed in Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), while the Northern Brownfields Assistance Center is located within the West Virginia Water Research Institute at WVU's National Research Center for Coal and Energy.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director, said, "We're extremely pleased the Brownfields Assistance Centers have been recognized for their collaborative and proactive approach to brownfields and economic development in West Virginia. George Carico, who coordinates the center at Marshall, deserves a great deal of credit for his hard work and contributions to the brownfields program.

In 2005, the West Virginia Legislature recognized the lost economic and social value in the state's brownfields. As a result, the Brownfields Assistance Centers at Marshall and WVU were created to support community efforts and work with the WVDEP and the West Virginia Development Office to turn these brownfields into productive land again.

In addition to securing and administering federal brownfields funding and assistance programs, the centers provide training and technical assistance, grant writing, site assessment and remediation services.

For more information, visit: www.wvbrownfields.com.


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Thursday June 3, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia GIS Conference next week at Marshall University



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) professionals from across West Virginia and nearby states will gather June 7-10 at the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus for the biennial 2010 West Virginia GIS Conference.

The statewide conference features scholarly presentations, agency reports, student posters, workshops, demonstrations and vendor displays.  Organizers, sponsors and participants promote and share geographic information and mapping technologies for users and stakeholders in the Mountain State.  The conference will address geospatial issues as they relate to a broad range of topics including transportation, natural resources, education, economic development, GIS software, data collection and sharing.  For more information, visit http://www.wvagp.org.

Tony Simental, West Virginia State GIS Coordinator, said more than 200 people are expected to attend the conference. GIS is a collection of tools that represent and analyze geographical data, helping to reveal relationships, patterns and trends through maps, globes, reports and charts. GIS is used for a variety of purposes, including emergency management, urban planning, environmental impact studies, navigation, natural resource management and scientific investigation.

"This conference brings together geospatial professionals from state, private and local entities," Simental said. "It helps in development, planning and resource management in the state of West Virginia. During this meeting we will exchange ideas and encourage government and private entities to partner together because we think this is the best and most economical solution in these trying times."

The most recent conferences took place in 2008 in Charleston and in 2006 in Morgantown. Simental said Dr. James Leonard, an associate professor in geography at Marshall, was instrumental in securing MU as this year's host.

"Most of us organizers have connections to Marshall University," said Simental, who has a master's degree from MU. "We wanted to showcase Marshall University."

The conference's theme, "Partnering Together, a Strategy for GIS in the Mountain State," refers to the implementation of new GIS strategic and business plans for GIS firms and agencies. The conference agenda includes reports of geospatial activities and notable speakers, such as Gov. Joe Manchin (Tuesday, June 8), paper/poster presentations and awards (Wednesday, June 9), and seminars and workshops on Monday (June 7) and Thursday (June 10).

The 2010 conference is hosted by the state GIS coordinator, Marshall University's Geography Department, and the West Virginia Association of Geospatial Professionals.

Representatives from a spectrum of GIS users will participate, including:

         Universities such as Marshall and West Virginia University

         K-12 teachers

         Federal agencies such as NOAA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, Forest Service, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency

         West Virginia state agencies such as the Department of Transportation, Department of Environmental Protection, and the Geological and Economic Survey

         Local and regional governments from as far away as Jefferson County

         Private industry

         Non-profit groups and organizations such as The Nature Conservancy and the West Virginia Society of Professional Surveyors

Manchin is scheduled to speak at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 8. He will be followed by other state officials.

The keynote on Tuesday will be given by Jeff Lovin, CP, who is Vice President of the Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Division of Woolpert, Inc., in Dayton, Ohio. Lovin has spent his entire 23-year career in the geospatial profession at Woolpert where he has developed a varied technical background in flight operations, surveying, and photogrammetry. He served as a project manager for many local, state, and federal clients before assuming his current role within the firm in 2001.

Lovin will speak sometime between noon and 1:30 p.m. during lunch in the Don Morris Room, according to Simental.


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Wednesday June 2, 2010
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Two Marshall University business students to present ideas to top U.S. economists and policy makers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two students taking an economics class in the Marshall University Lewis College of Business have been selected to be among 12 finalists who will present their ideas to a panel of top U.S. economists and policy makers during the National Economics Insider Symposium this summer.

While taking Principles of Microeconomics, Natalie J. Faulk, a senior education student from Hartford, W.Va., and Jerica D. Hall, a sophomore management major from Hurricane, W.Va., wrote winning papers for the competition. They will travel to Washington, D.C., June 11-12 to make their presentations to a Nobel Prize winner in economics, a White House economic adviser, and a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, among others

Economics and finance adjunct professor Ralph E. McKinney Jr., nominated the students.

"Marshall University is fortunate to have two of 12 finalists for this honor. This speaks highly of our commitment to research and education," McKinney said.

Contestants could submit essays on one of the following economic issues: health care; the environment; education; housing; technology; or other economic issues needing to be addressed. Faulk wrote about Cap and Trade. Hall wrote about the effect of oil and gas costs on shipping costs. They will be competing for a top prize at the event.

While in Washington, finalists will present to Ben Bernanke, chairmen and member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; Paul R. Krugman, winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics; Olivier Blanchard, Economic Counselor and Director of Research Department of the International Monetary Fund; R. Glenn Hubbard, former Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors; Karl E. Case, the Katherine Coman and A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Economics at Wellesley College; Frederic S. Mishkin, former Board of Governors member of the Federal Reserve; as well as the following research associates from the National Bureau of Economic Research: Daron Acemoglu (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); David I. Laibson (Harvard University); and John List (University of Chicago).

Students will also tour the Federal Reserve and the White House.

The National Economics Insider Symposium is an exclusive event sponsored by Pearson Higher Education, a publishing company that offers textbooks under the brands Addison-Wesley, Allyn & Bacon, Benjamin Cummings, Longman, Merrill and Prentice Hall.

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Photos: Marshall students Natalie Faulk (top) and Jerica Hall (middle) will present their winning essays at the National Economic Insider Forum beginning June 10. They were nominated by adjunct professor Ralph E. McKinney (bottom).

 


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Wednesday June 2, 2010
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marketing and Branding Coordinator,, 304-696-3490

MU sponsoring contest for new look in university apparel

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In conjunction with the fast-approaching 2010 college football season, Marshall University is sponsoring a contest for a new look in university apparel.

The contest allows anyone who would like to design a new shirt for Marshall's 2010 football season to submit his or her design from now through July 10 to be judged and voted on by the community. The winning design will be produced on shirts to be sold at the Marshall University Bookstore and the winning designer will receive a $500 prize for his or her design.

This contest is part of Vote for Art, which sponsors design contests across the country for universities and sports teams. It allows fans to become involved in creating a new look for their favorite team. The prize is also sponsored through the Vote for Art contest.

All submissions will be judged by the university and the top designs will move to the voting phase of the contest. These designs will be available on www.voteforart.com for the community to vote on their favorite design. All contest guidelines are available on www.voteforart.com for anyone interested in submitting a design.

For more information or to submit a design, visit www.voteforart.com or contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, by phone at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Thursday May 27, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Luncheon honors staff members for years of service at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 26th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 2 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. In addition to the service awards, the Employee of the Year will be named.   

The following is a list of university staff members who will receive awards:

For 10 years of service: Robert Bailey, Scott Ballou, Tara Hensley, Carol Hurula, William James, Anita Mathis, Cyndi Miller, James Morris, Cynthia Obregon, Rudy Pauley, Tamara Reynolds, Carolyn Schwarz, Stephen Shumlas, Sherri Smith, Jonathan Thompson, Mary Waller, and Philann White.

For 15 years of service: Mary Adkins, Kevin Bannon, Eleanore Beckett, Jean Bevans, Roy Bias, Bernice Bullock, C. Jill Burcham, Ernest Cartwright, Joann Haley, Gary Hall, Elizabeth Hanrahan, Susan Luther, Juanita Marley, Molly McClennen, Garnet McKinley, Martha Mozingo, Rhonda Mullins, Babette Napier, Jan Parker, Alice Roberts, John Smith, Denise Smith, Jason Sturgill, Bethsaida Thacker, Jeffrey Tomblin, Leonard Varney, Donald Vaughn, Robert Walker, Patricia Webb, and Lance West.

For 20 years of service: Lisa Allen, Teresa Bailey, Karen Beach, Richard Begley, Frances Browning, Debra Chapman, Sandra Clements, Robert Collier, F. Layton Cottrill, Brenda Flemings, Mark Gale, Melissa Gebhardt, Barbara Hicks, Thomas Jessup, Terry Kates, Anna Lawhon, Robbie Layne, James Parker, Carolyn Plybon, Ann Pofahl, Bonnie Ross, Sabrina Simpson, Olive Smith, John Stepp, Sandra Toppings, William Thornhill, Meena Wadhwa, Susan Weinstein, Vickie White, Suzann Workman, and Katherine Zimmerman.

For 25 years of service: Betty Adkins, John Bailey, Linda Beaver, Merry Brown, William Burdette, Edna Cole, James Eans, Jan Fox, Patricia Gallagher, Karen Haney, Ronnie Hicks, Randy Layne, Charles Newton, Richard Petit Jr., Victoria Seguin, and Evelyn Tooley.

For 30 years of service: Carla Adkins, Timothy Calvert, Dennis Casey, Jerri Clagg, Russell Dobbins, Deborah Dorsey, Bernie Elliott, Frances Hensley, James Jones, Edna Justice, Karen Kirtley, Sharon Lake, Thomas Laney, William Lewis, Sherri Noble, Dale Osburn, Wanda Peters, Jacqueline Smith, and Jack Wilson.

For 35 years of service: Patsy Dickson, Jeffery Edwards, Nadine Hamrick, and Cynthia Warren.

Retirees: Jack Blake, Frances Browning, Deirdre Carrico, Woodrow Edmonds, Jerry Gray, David Greene, Charlotte Hardin, Charlene Hawkins, Linda Javins, Darrell Kendrick, Carl Knopp, Patricia Lee, Robert Marcum, Chris McGuffin, Garnet McKinley, Michael Meadows, Linda Mollohan, Shirley Oden, Barbara Roberts, Carol Skaggs, Olive Smith, James Stephens, Bethsaida Thacker, Evelyn Tooley, Willanna Wales, Kemp Winfree, Barbara Winters, and Jacqueline Woolfolk.

To be eligible for awards employees must have completed 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 years of service to Marshall University by May 1, 2010.


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Thursday May 27, 2010
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Dr. Vicki Stroeher to present session at conference in UK

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Vicki Stroeher, musicologist and associate professor of music at Marshall University, will present a session at "Benjamin Britten in Context," a two-day international conference at Liverpool Hope University in the United Kingdom. The conference will take place from June 10 to 12.

"I am honored to have my presentation chosen for this conference, as my primary research focuses on Benjamin Britten's songs and song cycles," Stroeher said.  "It's going to be a great couple of days exchanging ideas and research with other Britten scholars."

Britten (1913-1976) is considered one of the most important 20th century English composers. He put English opera back onto the world-wide operatic stage with "Peter Grimes" (1945), as well as "Billy Budd" (1951) and "Death in Venice" (1973). He also wrote choral works, including the "War Requiem" (1962),  "A Ceremony of Carols" (1942) and "Rejoice in the Lamb" (1943), and orchestral pieces. Early in his career, Britten collaborated with the premier English poet, W. H. Auden.

Stroeher's presentation will examine two existing versions of a song Britten composed to text by Auden and discuss his struggle with the setting in the light of his changing relationship with Auden.

Prior to attending the conference, Stroeher will be conducting research in the Britten-Pears Library in Aldeburgh, U.K., which is Britten's private library.


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Wednesday May 26, 2010
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Marshall sponsoring two-man fly fishing team in national event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Science and Career Services office are endorsing a team of participants in the first national fly fishing competition held in West Virginia.

The team, called "Team Marshall Fly Fishing," consists of Greg Hall, a 1973 Marshall graduate currently living in Teays Valley, W.Va., and Brady Hanson. Hall is on the pro staff of "Fly Rod Chronicles with Curtis Fleming," (http://www.flyrodchronicles.tv) an award-winning fly fishing television show broadcast nationally. He was one of the founders of the show. Hanson has been a fly fishing guide in Colorado and now resides in the Washington, D.C., area.

The 2010 Harman's North Fork Invitational takes place Thursday-Saturday, June 3-5 at Harman's Cabins on the north fork of the south branch of the Potomac River in Cabins, W.Va.

Fleming has agreed to film Hanson and Hall throughout the tournament for a segment to be shown on "Fly Rod Chronicles with Curtis Fleming." The show airs each week on the Sportsman Channel at 1 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays, 11:30 a.m. Fridays, 1:30 p.m. Saturdays and 3:30 a.m. Sundays.

The show recently won two Bugle Awards, which recognize all national and local networks for the Best of the Best. It was chosen for "Best Fishing Show" and Fleming was chosen for "Best Humor" in outdoor TV.

Hall majored in medical technology at Marshall and today is a medical technologist and registered nurse. In obtaining sponsorship from Marshall, Hall's goal is to bring national exposure to the university.

"This is about bringing exposure to Marshall University," Hall said. "We have about 890,000 viewers per episode. My partner and I will do our best to represent Marshall University and everyone associated with it. I personally can't wait to get started."

Hall is confident of a victory for the Marshall team, which will display Marshall logos on a banner and their fly fishing apparel throughout the tournament. "My partner has the secret fly to win the tournament," Hall said, laughing.

Hall said fly fishing is the fastest growing sport for middle and upper executives and professionals, and the fastest growing outdoor sport for women.

"We want to let people know that they can get a great education at Marshall University and enjoy some great fly fishing just a few hours away," Hall said.


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Tuesday May 25, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Healthy Herd Youth Camps planned at Marshall Recreation Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center, located on Marshall University's Huntington campus, will host the 2010 Healthy Herd Youth Camps this summer for area youth ages 5-13.

The Healthy Herd Youth Camps consist of eight one-week sessions running June 14 through August 6. Each week will have a specific theme and includes a camper t-shirt and bracelet. The Healthy Herd Youth Camps provide all-day sessions from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Before care and after care are available beginning at 7:30 a.m. and ending at 5:30 p.m.

Daily activities include learning to climb the 35-foot recreation center wall, playing camp games and physical activities, swimming in the 100,000-gallon pool complete with vortex and basketball hoop, and learning about fitness and healthy lifestyles.

The cost for one week of camp is $100 for members of the Marshall Recreation Center and $125 for non-members. The Healthy Herd Youth Camps emphasize the development of healthy lifestyles through participation in physical and educational activities. The staff is committed to an emphasis on self-esteem, self-responsibility and self-worth for all campers.

Anyone with questions about the camps may contact Matt Campbell at 304-696-4101 or via e-mail at campbellm@marshall.edu. For more information or to fill out the enrollment form, visit www.marshallcampusrec.com.


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Monday May 24, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University student selected for CLS Scholarship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University student has been selected for a U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) to study Arabic in Tunisia this summer.

Megan Ross, a junior from Quick, W.Va., was among 575 students selected from nearly 5,300 applicants in a range of academic disciplines from colleges and universities throughout the 50 states.

U.S. students will spend seven to 10 weeks in intensive language institutes this summer in 15 countries where these languages are spoken.  They will support their studies through cultural immersion activities in their host countries.

Ross is a biomedical student who hopes to attend medical school and eventually work with public health in the area of infectious diseases.

"I love languages," Ross said.  "I took French at Capital High School and I wanted to learn something different, so when I found out that Arabic was being taught at Marshall, I took the classes.  I had a lot of fun learning it. Actually, I found studying it was relaxing."

Ross said she also got tutoring in Arabic from a friend's mother. 

The seven to 10 weeks of study this summer will actually be equivalent to a year's worth of language study.   Students will receive four to five hours of instruction per day five days a week. 

The daughter of Sharon and Brad Ross of Quick, Ross said she is looking forward to spending time in Tunisia.  "Since I come from a rural area, I'm eager to experience the Middle East and I would like to give it a positive spin," she said.

The CLS for Intensive Summer Institutes was launched in 2006 to increase opportunities for American students to study critical-need languages overseas and is a part of a wider U.S. government effort to dramatically expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical-need languages.


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Monday May 24, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU Jazz Ensemble performs at JEN Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Jazz Ensemble has returned from an appearance at the Jazz Education Network's inaugural conference in St. Louis May 20-22.

 JEN is a newly formed organization whose purpose is to provide students, teachers and professional jazz musicians an opportunity to share knowledge and enjoy each other's performances, said Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of music and director of the jazz ensemble.

"We are proud to have been selected to participate in St. Louis," Bingham said. "JEN's choice reflects favorably on our students' artistic achievement and will provide an opportunity for them to learn more about their art."

In addition to Bingham, music faculty members Dr. Martin Saunders, Dr. Sean Parsons and Dr. Michael Stroeher performed in the ensemble with the students.

The conference took place on the St. Louis campus of the University of Missouri. Participants represented 45 states and 18 countries.

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Photo: Vocalist Jen Billups and the Marshall University Jazz Ensemble performing at the Jazz Education Network conference.


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Friday May 21, 2010
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Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars program receives third $15,000 grant from Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A grant of $15,000 from the Board of Trustees of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., will help support Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars.

The donation, which Marshall received on May 18, is the third such gift from the California-based Hilton Foundation over the past few years.  The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation was established in 1944 by hotel entrepreneur Conrad N. Hilton. Offices are located in Los Angeles, Calif., and Reno, Nev.

"This gift will be deposited into the Society of Yeager Scholars greatest needs fund to support our current and incoming Yeager Scholars," said Bob Galardi, Director of Development for Marshall University's Honors College, home of the Society of Yeager Scholars program. "The grant will assist us to meet the rising costs of Yeager Scholars' studies at Marshall.

"The continued kindness of the Hilton Foundation demonstrates the importance of securing new funding sources needed to grow our programs, colleges and our university into the 21st century," Galardi said. "Both the Honors College and its endowed scholarships depend on the generosity of donors and foundation support."

For more information or to contribute to the Society of Yeager Scholars, contact Galardi at 304-696-3336 or e-mail him at galardi@marshall.edu.


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Thursday May 20, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Pilgrim Glass collection given by Drs. Joseph and Omayma Touma to be dedicated May 30

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dedication of "The Magic of the Pilgrim Cameo Glass: The Touma Collection," a gift from Drs. Joseph and Omayma Touma to Marshall University, will take place Sunday, May 30 on MU's Huntington campus.

The dedication is from 2 to 5 p.m. in the second-floor reading room of the Drinko Library and is by invitation only.

The program features remarks from Dr. Joseph Touma, a brief history and description of artistic techniques by Kelsey Murphy, and dedication of the collection and recognition of the Pilgrim Glass artisans. A reception will follow.

This gift of the Toumas was donated to honor the work of the Pilgrim Glass Corporation, including Alfred E. Knobler, a ceramic engineer who established the company in 1949, Robert Bomkamp, Murphy and their team of artisans.  It is the most comprehensive collection of Pilgrim Cameo that chronicles many of the developments in creating this exciting and exceptional art glass.

"We are truly blessed that Drs. Joseph and Omayma Touma are so generous to the university and the library," said Dr. Monica Garcia Brooks, assistant vice president for information technology: online learning and libraries. "Their commitment to the students is sincere and appreciated by all.  We have already seen many students take time out of their busy schedules to enjoy the collection and our visitors have commented on the artistic abilities and amazing skill each piece demonstrates." 

The Pilgrim Glass Corporation was established in Ceredo, W.Va., by Knobler, who developed many rare colors of glass.  In 1987, Murphy and Bomkamp joined the company.  Combining their knowledge of sand-carving with Pilgrim's beautiful colors, Murphy, Bomkamp and their team of skilled glass artisans took a bold step and began to create Cameo Glass, often referred to as "The King of Glass."

The technical aspects of casing one color over another, then carving through the layers to expose the color beneath, proved to be an enormous challenge. Although there were literately thousands of technical hurdles to surmount, controlling the rate of expansion in the glass to make the layers compatible was the most difficult, resulting in more than a 90 percent loss during the first five years.

However, with the support of collectors and the backing of Knobler, the team solved the problems inherent with such a rare and difficult glass, resulting in a new era of glassmaking and pioneering American Super Cameo.

By the time Pilgrim Glass Corporation retired in 2001, it surpassed all other manufacturers by casing and carving cameo glass with more layers than had ever been accomplished before, assuring itself a place in the history of glass.

For more information on the dedication, call Brooks at 304-696-6474.

.


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Thursday May 20, 2010
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall professor to participate in Timber Flute Festival this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flutist and professor of music at Marshall University, will serve as musical director and one of the instructors at the 4th annual Timber Flute Festival this year. The festival will take place at the Randolph County Community Arts Center in Elkins, W.Va., from June 20 to 25.

"It's a weeklong series of workshops, concerts and social events, all associated with the traditions surrounding the wooden flute," Dobbs said.

Dobbs will teach fife and keyed flutes. Other instructors at the festival will include Grey Larsen, who will teach Irish traditional flute; Ron Warren, teaching Native-American flute; and Colin St. Martin, teaching 18th century flute. Flutemaker John Gallagher also will be on hand to demonstrate the craft of wooden flutemaking.

More information on the festival is available on the Web, both on the Randolph County Community Arts Center site at http://www.randolpharts.org and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Timber-Flute-Festival/29497409686?ref=sgm.


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Wednesday May 19, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students receive nine awards in Hermes Competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received four Platinum Awards, three Gold Awards and two Honorable Mention Awards in The Hermes Creative Awards 2010 Competition.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said, "This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best documentaries in the country as well as a highly regarded women's basketball play-by-play, a quality Marshall sports week in review program and the best overall website.

"I am proud and grateful for the honor these Hermes Creative Platinum Awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University," Bailey said. "The Gold Awards are tributes to the full-length program scriptwriting, the daily thirty-minute newscast announcing and sports play-by-play announcing skills of our broadcast students in competition with professional practitioners."  

With the addition of these nine awards, the student broadcasters have won a grand total of 76 awards for the 2009-2010 academic year with three contests still remaining - the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association Awards, the Communicator Awards, and the  Jim Nantz College Sportscaster of the Year Award.

The 76 awards include 24 first-place awards, 20 second-place awards, six third-place awards and  26 honorable mention awards.

The Platinum Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM in the Hermes Competition were in the Radio Documentary Program, Radio Program, Radio Sports Play-By-Play and Web Site Overall categories.

Radio Documentary Program

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009. 

Radio Program

"Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday, Oct. 23, 2009. The students who participated in "Herd Roundup" were Adam Cavalier, co-host and producer, and Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans, co-host and producer.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus University of Alabama-Birmingham women's basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The students calling the game were basketball play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier; color commentator Scott Hall, a graduate from Stevens City, Va.; and engineer Leannda Carey, a junior from Wellsburg.

Overall Web Site

WMUL-FM's website is www. marshall.edu/wmul. The 2009-2010 Web Master for WMUL-FM Online was Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi.

The Gold Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the Radio Script, Radio Newscast and Radio Sports Play-By-Play categories.

Radio Documentary Script

The script for the documentary program "Failing Infrastructure: Saving Huntington's Sewage System" was written by Adam Cavalier. The documentary script was completed Monday, May 4, 2009. 

Radio Newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" was broadcast Friday, Oct. 23, 2009. Delaney McLemore, a sophomore from Philomath, Ore., was the producer, Adam Cavalier and Leannda Carey were news anchors, and Kenneth Cox, a senior from Glen White, was sports anchor.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Southern Methodist University football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Nov. 21, 2009. Students calling the game were football play-by-play announcer Robert Iddings; color commentator Dave Traube, a senior from Beckley; and engineer Scott Hall.

The Honorable Mention Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the category Audio Podcast Category and Radio Sports Play-By-Play.

Audio Podcast

"J. R. VanHoose: From the Herd to the Hornets," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Friday, Dec. 4, 2009.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Bowling Green State University football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington, Saturday, Nov. 21, 2009. The students calling the game were football play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier; color commentator Ryan Epling, a recent master's degree graduate from Wayne; sideline reporter Andrew Ramspacher, a senior from Dublin, Ohio; and engineer Scott Hall.

The Hermes Creative Awards, administered and evaluated by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals, are an international competition created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media.  All entries are judged on a point system in areas including creativity, design, innovation, presentation and technical merit while at the same time promoting the philanthropic nature of marketing and communication professionals.  There were approximately 3,600 entries in The Hermes Creative Awards 2010 Competition from throughout the United States and several other countries. 


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Tuesday May 18, 2010
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Perry to be honored at retirement/fundraising dinner Thursday at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Simon Perry, who retired this spring after 48 years in Marshall University's Department of Political Science, will be honored Thursday, May 20 at a retirement/fundraising dinner on MU's Huntington campus.

The event will take place in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, beginning with a cocktail hour from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Dinner will follow at 6:30 p.m.

Tickets are $35 per person and may be reserved by calling Gina Kates in the College of Liberal Arts at 304-696-2350.

In addition to honoring Perry for his many years of service at Marshall, the event also will mark the beginning of the public phase of a fundraising campaign for the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.

The center's mission is to support an interdisciplinary program that focuses on the American judicial system and how it has been shaped by individuals in American history, especially John Marshall. In addition, the center addresses social, economic and cultural forces and the implications of artistic representation for political culture and identity.

The center also introduces students to the most basic elements of American society - who we are as a people, what we believe and what we collectively value. Through this study, students may learn of the need in American society for a shared frame of reference within which to engage both diversity and debate about the common good.

Perry was born and raised in Gilbert, W.Va. He began his higher education at Berea College in Kentucky where he graduated in 1954 with a double major in political science and history, and a minor in philosophy. He next earned a Master of Science degree in political science from the University of Tennessee, and then a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1962.


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Tuesday May 18, 2010
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Marshall University institute partners with biotechnology leader IDT

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) has announced it has entered into an applied research and product development partnership with leading biotechnology company Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT).

According to the terms of the agreement, scientists at MIIR will be developing optimized biomolecular analyses or "assays" to be used by IDT for the detection and quantification of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The goal of the co-development project is to significantly improve the specificity of IDT's current assay methods without substantially increasing the cost.

IDT's custom synthesized DNA and RNA products are used by researchers around the world to help develop diagnostic tests for diseases like breast cancer and AIDS, to conduct research to discover new drugs or treatments for a variety of diseases, and to produce safer and more plentiful agricultural products.

Dr. Mark Behlke, IDT's chief scientific officer, said, "IDT is very excited to be working with a world-class organization like MIIR.  This collaboration will allow us to decrease the time required to commercialize an exciting new platform technology developed at IDT for use in quantitative nucleic acid detection."

Dr. Eric Kmiec, director of MIIR and the institute's lead research scientist, said, "We are honored an industry leader like IDT has selected us to develop and test a product for them. In effect, the agreement endorses our institute's innovative platform technology approach. There is definitely a niche out there for what we do."

Dr. Joan Wilson, who joined MIIR last summer as a senior scientist, will be responsible for executing the IDT project. Her research group at MIIR focuses on identifying non-coding RNA disease biomarkers and developing non-coding RNA-based tools for gene regulation and genome manipulation.

Kmiec said Wilson's experience in the fast-growing field of non-coding RNA biology was what attracted IDT.

"It's really a perfect fit," he said. "IDT recognized the market potential for these optimized assays but did not have the resources to pursue the technology on its own. We have the facilities, and in Dr. Wilson we recruited the type of scientist who does cutting-edge research coupled with platform-based technology development. She's only been here at Marshall for a few months and already our focus and investment in this emerging area of science are beginning to pay off."

Wilson said, "Creative opportunities like this are one of the reasons I chose to join MIIR. It is incredibly exciting to be associated with IDT. Their commitment to quality and innovation is unrivaled. I look forward to working with them to help develop critical RNA-focused research tools and to further MIIR's involvement in this high-impact field."

Kmiec said the agreement with IDT further validates the vision Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp had when he formed the institute to promote regional biotechnology entrepreneurship, adding that the project will become the basis for expanding MIIR's relationship with IDT and other high-tech companies. He said that eventually the entire region will see economic development benefits from spinouts and other businesses formed as a direct result of research done at the institute.

As part of MIIR's workforce training emphasis, summer internships are available for students who want to gain hands-on biotechnology skills. Interested students should call the institute at 304-696-3830.

###

About MIIR

The Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) enables commercially relevant bioscience activity by affording companies the opportunity to develop and mature promising new technologies and products in the university environment. Research at the institute is directed with licensable endpoints in mind and corporate partners play important roles in selecting and developing projects that have commercial potential. The mission of the institute, which was created through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, is to advance regional economic development, student education and workforce training. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.

About IDT

Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT) is the largest supplier of custom nucleic acids in the United States, serving academic, government and commercial researchers in biotechnology, clinical diagnostics and pharmaceutical development. IDT's primary business is the manufacture of custom, synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides. Today, IDT synthesizes and ships an average of 36,000 custom oligos per day to more than 86,000 customers worldwide. IDT manufacturing locations include facilities in Coralville, Iowa, San Diego, California, and Leuven, Belgium. For more information, visit www.idtdna.com.

Photo: Through an agreement with biotechnology leader IDT, Dr. Joan Wilson, senior scientist at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, left, and Mindy Applegate, research associate, will be optimizing biomolecular assays for the company's line of custom synthesized DNA and RNA products. Photo by Steve Shaluta.
 


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Friday May 14, 2010
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Marshall students receive College of Fine Arts Community Service Awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University College of Fine Arts students Lindsay DiFatta, Alli Forlines, Nikki Gilliam and Tommy Warf have been named the college's Community Service Award recipients for 2009-2010.

DiFatta, of Lusby, Md.; Forlines, of Bluefield, W.Va.; and Gilliam, of Ashland, Ky., were part of the Baskets for Branches campaign to raise awareness and collect donated items for Branches Domestic Violence Shelter in Huntington. Warf, of Huntington, has been a part of the Empty Bowls event, supporting the Huntington Area Food Bank, since its inception at Marshall University.

As part of the 2010 Marshall University Birke Fine Arts Symposium: Giving Voice: Social Justice and the Arts, students from the College of Fine Arts organized a university-wide drive asking the Marshall University community to prepare baskets full of essentials to be given to Branches residents. The collection of baskets occurred Wednesday, March 17, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. 

Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, explained that this initiative came from the students brainstorming in committee meetings.

"We had this hope that we might collect 50 baskets full of essentials - toothbrush, pillow, hairbrush, those kinds of things - and we would have been thrilled," Ike said. "So you can imagine our amazement when we needed to rent a U-Haul to take the baskets to Branches!"

Trudie Stiltner of Branches was moved to tears when the U-Haul arrived. She recounted the event in thanking the students who managed the project.

 "The thoughtful donations of various items have been very rewarding, bringing tears and amazement to our residents, as well as an understanding that no matter their location in life, they are always thought about and appreciated," Stiltner said. "Above all, we admire the thoughtfulness of community members such as you who take part in making a difference in people's lives."

Branches Domestic Violence Shelter is a nonprofit organization serving the West Virginia counties of Cabell, Wayne, Lincoln, Mason and Putnam. In addition to providing counseling, linkage to social services and court advocacy for victims of domestic violence, the organization provides free, safe temporary shelter, food and clothing to anyone - male or female, young or old -who needs assistance in vacating a dangerous and abusive situation. Each person who comes to the shelter is given a laundry basket with the essential and personal items he or she may need to make a clean start in life. Quite often, victims of domestic violence have had little time to pack even the most vital items for their survival and this is one way to help.

The Empty Bowls project is a national event. Since 2004, students in Keramos, the student potters' guild at Marshall, have produced an Empty Bowls event in Huntington.  Handcrafted ceramic bowls are sold for a modest price and the purchaser is entitled to a small bowl of soup, a piece of bread, and a drink.  All the proceeds from the local event are donated to the Huntington Area Food Bank.

Empty Bowls has grown over the years.  From 500 hand-crafted bowls offered in 2004, the number has grown to well over 1,400 bowls offered in 2010.  Approximately 700 people were served that modest lunch--food that was all donated by local restaurants, food suppliers, places of worship and individuals--and more than 900 bowls were purchased. 

 "Each year, for the past 7 years, l have said to myself this year's Empty Bowls event was great and cannot get any better, and this year was no different," Jon Rickey, executive director of the HAFB said. "My sincere thanks to each of you. With the community obviously becoming more and more involved, along with the incredibly fantastic efforts of Marshall University, everyone comes out a winner. Tommy has been a huge player in each of the seven annual Empty Bowls fundraisers and he truly deserves this award."   

Warf shared the praise with the whole Empty Bowls committee.

"It is an honor to receive this award, but without the whole Empty Bowls community it would not work," Warf said. "Empty Bowls itself is the reward for the hard work that each person involved in the event puts into it."

The Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) is a non-profit organization affiliated with America's Second Harvest, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. With their help, the HAFB has access to thousands of pounds of food and non-food items. The HAFB serves as a catalyst to get nutritious food to people in need of food assistance by centralizing the solicitation and collection of food and then redistributing it. The HAFB is the hub in a network of food donors and more than 290 agencies that serve hungry people in 17 counties in West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. The HAFB provides products to member agencies that feed the needy. 

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Photos:

Top: Don Van Horn, dean of the Marshall University College of Fine Arts (left), presents the college's Community Service Award to students Lindsay DiFatta, Nikki Gilliam, and Alli Forlines for their work on the "Baskets for Branches" project, a part of this year's Birke Fine Arts Symposium. At right is Dr. Vicki Stroeher, associate professor of music and chair of the 2010 symposium committee.

Bottom: Tommy Warf, winner of a Marshall University College of Fine Arts Community Service Award this year, demonstrates how a ceramic bowl is thrown in the university's Art Warehouse.


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Friday May 14, 2010
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Brownfields Assistance Center helps secure $600,000 in EPA grants



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
The Southern West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University, a program of the university's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), has helped three state entities secure $600,000 in grant funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The funds will be used to assess brownfields, which are abandoned or vacant properties that have potential environmental impairments but have been determined to have significant prospects for business, housing or recreational redevelopment.

Marshall's Brownfields Assistance Center partnered with each of the following successful applicants to write and submit the grant applications, and will be working closely with each entity during the assessments:

  • The Fayette County Commission has been awarded $200,000 to assess and prioritize brownfields properties throughout the county. There are an estimated 400 brownfields properties in Fayette County, many of which are located along main thoroughfares used extensively by tourists and recreationalists.
     
  • The City of Nitro received $200,000 to continue assessing and updating the city's brownfields sites. More than 50 underused and vacant brownfields sites already have been identified in Nitro with current EPA funding. The additional assessment activities will provide the city a more thorough inventory of contaminated sites that have potential for reuse as commercial properties, greenspace or recreational facilities.
     
  • The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Land Restoration, was awarded $200,000 to assess properties along the historic U.S. Route 60 Midland Trail, which is a national scenic byway. The brownfields assessments will clarify environmental conditions and help facilitate reuse of selected locations for historical interpretive stops along the trail, with the goal of attracting tourists and tourism-related jobs to the area.

 

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS and the Brownfields Assistance Center, said the center continues to increase its role in assisting communities and counties across the state as they tackle the challenges of re-using brownfields properties for positive redevelopment.

"Since our inception in 2005, we've helped communities obtain close to $3 million in EPA brownfields and related funding," he said. "These funds are making a significant difference in community revitalization by promoting economic development across central and southern West Virginia."

A total of $800,000 was awarded statewide this year for EPA brownfields assessment grants.

More information is available online at www.wvbrownfields.com.


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Wednesday May 12, 2010
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Saturday event is fundraiser for Marshall University's healthy kids camp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - It's a challenging workout and a chance to contribute to a healthy cause. CrossFit Thunder, located at 2516A 5th Ave. in Huntington, is offering a one-day exercise event from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 15. The minimum donation is $25 and all proceeds will benefit Marshall University's Camp NEW You.

Camp NEW You is an innovative program designed to help youth and their parents identify and practice lifestyle changes that will assist in reducing unhealthy body weight through increased physical activity and proper nutrition.  Entering its third year of programming, Camp NEW You will enroll Tri-State families looking to establish a healthier home environment.

"The primary goals of the program are to help families engage in regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in its various forms, to replace sedentary hobbies with more active ones, and to promote healthy decision-making during meal times," said Dr. Gina Sobrero Evans, assistant professor with the School of Kinesiology at Marshall University. "Parent education and involvement are also signature features of the program."

Evans says because the camp targets high-risk children, many health insurance providers such as PEIA, Mountain State Blue Cross Blue Shield, Health Plan, and WV CHIP have approved most program costs, but fundraisers like the one at CrossFit Thunder will go to establish scholarships  for children who are not enrolled in participating insurance.

Saturday's program is the last in a series of fundraisers planned for Camp NEW You. Camp signups are currently underway, and potential campers can download registration forms and physician referral forms at marshall.campnewyou.org.Camp NEW You is a collaborative effort among Marshall University, West Virginia University and Concord University.

For more information, contact Evans at 304-696-2924 or evansg@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday May 11, 2010
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Harless Center to sponsor summer camps for grades 3-9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's June Harless Center for Rural Education and Research and Development will hold six summer camps designed to encourage curiosity and to promote 21st century learning in a fun STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology and Math) environment.

Titled "A Series of Unusual Camps," the camps are geared for students ranging in grades from three through nine and will take place at Kellogg Elementary School at 4415 Piedmont Road in Huntington. Morning camps will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. while afternoon camps run from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Participants will be taken on a series of learning adventures that will include, among others,  becoming CSI detectives using forensic skills to solve a weeklong mystery; playing the role of an engineer programming LEGO robots to complete missions; helping NASA to return to the moon and prepare for a voyage to Mars; and racing to save the island of Montserrat from a volcanic eruption and approaching Category 3 hurricane.

Other camps will take students on a race around the world while challenging them to complete tasks and overcome roadblocks, or allow them to go "techie" to learn the ins and outs of popular technology including Windows Movie Maker, Microsoft Office and the Internet.

Dates and times of the camps are as follows:

July 12-15
CSI, 9-11 a.m., grades 3-5; Going Techie, 11:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m., grades 3-5

July 19-23
Going Techie, 9-11 a.m., grades 3-5; Let's Build with LEGO, 11:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m., grades 6-9

July 26-30
Let's Build with LEGO, 9-11 a.m., grades 3-5; The Amazing Race, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., grades 3-5

August 2-5
9-11 a.m., XplorStation Harless, grades 3-6; Island Rescue, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., grades 6-9 

The fee for each camp is $60 with lunch being served for both camps from 11 to 11:30 a.m.  They will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis and a camp must be at 50 percent capacity to be conducted. Registration deadline is June 15, 2010.  Parents will be responsible for transportation to and from the camps. 

For additional information, contact Debbie Workman at 304-417-1804.


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Tuesday May 11, 2010
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Graduate College announces thesis awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2010 recipients of the Marshall University Graduate College's Summer Thesis Awards have been announced, according to Dr. Donna J. Spindel, dean of Marshall's Graduate College.

Recipients were selected based on the quality and significance of their thesis research, the likelihood that the research will result in a completed thesis, and on the need for financial support.

The $500 that went with each award was provided in part by the Marshall University Research Corporation and the Graduate College Advisory Board.

Those receiving awards are:

  • Christopher Atkins, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, M.A.J., News Organizations' Perceptions of Viewer Generated Content. Advisor: Dr. Christopher Swindell.
     
  • Tyler Hern, Biological Sciences, M.S., Rediscovering the Maryland Darter, Etheostoma sellare. Advisor: Dr. Thomas Jones
     
  • Waymon Holloway, Biological Sciences, M.S., Virtual endocasts of phytosaurs and their implications for the behavior and evolution of archosaurs. Advisor: Dr. Robin O'Keefe
     
  • Paul Hughes, Biology, M.S., Status and distribution of Cambarus veteranus in WV. Advisor: Dr. Thomas Jones
     
  • Jennifer Mills, Psychology, Psy.D., Does the Theory of Planned Behavior Predict Intentions to Seek Help for Suicidality? Advisor: Dr. Martin Amerikaner
     
  • Courtney Richards, Biological Sciences, M.S., Plesiosaur Body Shape and Its Impact on Hydrodynamic Properties. Advisor: Dr. Robin O'Keefe
     
  • Shelia Robinett, Psychology, Psy.D., Correlates of Early Overt and Covert Sexual Behaviors in Men and Women: Predictors of Adult Sexual Behaviors and Sexual Orientation. Advisor: Dr. Keith Beard
     
  • Emily Selby, Psychology, Psy.D., The application of the Lamaze method in the treatment of acute pain: a comparison of alternative pain management techniques. Advisor: Dr. Marc Lindberg
     
  • Josh Titlow, Biological Sciences, M.S., Combined Modulatory Effects of Dopamine and Serotonin in a Reflex Circuit. Advisor: Dr. Brian Antonsen
     
  • Stephanie Wemm, Psychology, M.A., A multidimensional approach to assessing risk for problematic drinking among undergraduate college students. Advisor: Dr. Massimo Bardi
     
  • Nathaniel Williamson, Geography, M.S., Landslide Susceptibility and Database Management of Cabell County, WV. Advisor: Dr. Anita Walz

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Friday May 7, 2010
Contact: Anna Swift, service project coordinator, 304-690-1483

Beverly Hills Middle School wins local food drive competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beverly Hills Middle School won a local food drive sponsored by Marshall University's Honors Society (MUHSA) with 170 percent of its population bringing in a can of food. Collectively, all of the participating schools brought in more than 2,220 cans for the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB)

In addition to Beverly Hills, schools competing included Enslow, Huntington, Milton and Vinson middle schools. The intent of the drive, conducted April 12-16, was to fight local and global hunger.

Students and faculty at Beverly Hills Middle School ended the drive with 827 cans of food. Vinson was second and Huntington Middle third.

"Every time I walked past the foyer on my way to the band room, if I would just see that the pile of cans got a foot higher, I would just bubble over with excitement," said Cassie Hall, a seventh-grader at Beverly Hills Middle School. "I'd think: Oh yeah, we're going to flood the foyer."

James Wagner, a school counselor at Beverly Hills Middle School, said he is proud the students realized the need and put it upon themselves to help those less fortunate in the area.

"I'm so impressed by the motivation of our students," Wagner said.  "They really took the initiative to bring in food, so much that even students who did not have much to give still gave."

Aside from winning the competition, Beverly Hills Middle School students had the honor of choosing animals at a total cost of $500 from Heifer International's animal gift catalog to be sent to a needy family in places like Haiti and Chile. The animals decided on and announced at the award celebration Thursday, May 6 were two goats, two sheep and one flock of chicks. Money for this purchase was raised by MUHSA within the community.

"I was very happy with the choice of animals because those selected by the students can provide necessities such as milk, wool and eggs to needy families - a source of not only nutrition and food but also income," said Anna Swift, MUHSA's service project coordinator. "I was equally happy with the amount of involvement and personal interest shown by students at all of the participating middle schools; the project started out as MUHSA's but then really grew into a community project."

Wagner said students took charge of the project by counting cans of food, loading them into trucks to be transported to the HAFB and helping to raffle off prizes.

His hope for participating in and winning the food drive, he said, was that students would "learn the value and importance of helping others."

Olivia Maynard, another seventh-grader from Beverly Hills Middle School, said this project showed her just how much she has in comparison to others.

"We want this and we want that, and you think and realize that others don't have what we have," Maynard said.

Hall also concluded, "It makes you think of what you have."


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Applications being accepted for MU's Summer Enrichment Program


CHARLESTON, W.Va.
- Applications are now being accepted for Marshall University's Summer Enrichment Program for students K-12 at Stonewall Jackson Middle School in Charleston, June 22-July 22.  Sessions will run from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

The program is designed to provide children with an activity-based, hands-on learning experience in reading, writing and math.  Counseling and individual assessment services will also be available.  The cost of the program is $100 which includes breakfast and lunch.  A limited number of scholarships are available.

While offering extra learning opportunities for children, the program is designed to provide clinical experiences for Marshall graduate students who are working towards certification or licensure in the areas of special education, school counseling, school psychology and literacy education.

Inquires about the program and requests for applications should be directed to Dr. Joyce Meikamp, Professor of Special Education at Marshall, at 1-800-642-9842, ext. 1983, or locally at 304-746-1983.


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Link to Streaming Video of Commencement


The Webcast of the Marshall commencement ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 8, may be accessed at http://www.marshall.edu/itvs/graduation.asp.


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Marshall University to conduct wind analysis on surface-mined lands

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) and the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall are partnering with the West Virginia Division of Energy (WVDOE) Office of Coalfield Community Development to perform research and provide project administration for wind analysis on surface-mined properties in West Virginia.

Scientists at CEGAS, with assistance from the university's Center for Business and Economic Research, will be performing wind analysis at selected surface-mined lands to evaluate wind resources for energy development. Funding for the project is being provided by the WVDOE and the Appalachian Regional Commission.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, said the goal of the project is to encourage the reuse of West Virginia's surface-mined lands through the direct development of renewable energy projects.

"West Virginia has a mandate to significantly increase the production of renewable energy in the state," he said. "With this project, Marshall University is taking a leading role in assessing wind resource potential on surface-mined lands."

For the analysis, CEGAS will use state-of-the-art Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) equipment. SODAR performs wind profiling up to approximately 200 meters above the earth's surface, recording wind speed, wind direction, wind sheer and wind veer. The SODAR unit CEGAS will use is a self-contained system that uses solar and battery power to operate, and applies satellite data transmission and telemetry for quick, 24/7 data retrieval and review.

The CEGAS researchers will be comparing wind data from the SODAR to existing datasets and industry requirements. The results will be useful in determining future alternative energy development across West Virginia.

Results will be made available on the websites of the West Virginia Division of Energy (www.energywv.org) and the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center (www.wvbrownfields.com).


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Thursday April 29, 2010
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WMUL students win five awards at BEA competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received two first-place awards, one third-place award and two honorable mention awards during the Seventh Annual Broadcast Education Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony Friday, April 16 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said that the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"Adam Cavalier has received high compliments for his work on an entertainment program, a sports package and a documentary at WMUL-FM by being presented three awards from BEA," Bailey said. "Adam's two individual first-place awards were for his on-air musical countdown special about sports anthems and his sports reporting on one of Marshall basketball's former stars."

Cavalier also was recognized for his investigative reporting in a documentary about Huntington's sewage system with a third-place award.  Other WMUL-FM student sportscasters received honorable mention awards for their sports reporting and football play-by-play announcing.  

"Winning never comes easy," Bailey said, "but for Marshall University, the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities. These acknowledgements at the BEA's Festival of Media Arts are validations of the quality broadcasting program available through the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.  These radio awards are in addition to the two Broadcast Education Association scholarships won by Adam Cavalier and Leannda Carey." 

Broadcast Education Association (BEA) has more than 1,400 academic and professional members and 250 academic institutional members.  BEA was founded in 1955, and its mission is to prepare college students to enter the radio and television business.  Its members share a diversity of interests involving all aspects of telecommunication and electronic media. 

Thirteen students from 11 different campuses were awarded scholarships in the Broadcast Education Association's 2010-2011 competition.  The winners were selected by the BEA Scholarship Committee at its fall meeting in Washington, D.C., and presented at the spring convention in Las Vegas.       

The scholarship winners from Marshall are:    

Abe Voron Scholarship, sponsored by the Abe Voron Committee: Adam Cavalier, $5,000.     

Walter Patterson Scholarship, sponsored by the National Association of Broadcasters: Leannda Carey, $2,250.

WMUL's first-place award winning entries in radio were:

Radio Air Personality

"The Greatest Sports Anthems Countdown," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery, that was broadcast as a special musical entertainment program Friday, Sept. 18, 2009.

Radio Sports Reporting

"J. R. VanHoose: From the Herd to the Hornets," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Dec. 4, 2009.

The third-place award winning entry in radio was:

Radio Educational Program

"Failing Infrastructure:  Saving Huntington's Sewage System," written and produced by Adam Cavalier. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, May 7, 2009. 

The honorable mention award winning entries in radio were:

Radio Sports Reporting

"Enter Sandman," written and produced by Leannda Carey, a junior from Wellsburg, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall at Virginia Tech football game Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009.

Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Southern Methodist University football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Nov. 21, 2009. The students calling the game were football play-by-play announcer Robert Iddings, a senior, St. Albans; color commentator Dave Traube, a senior, Beckley; sideline reporter Deven Swartz, a senior, Philippi; and engineer Scott Hall, a graduate from Stevens City, Va.


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Marshall class to present 'A Chorus Line' April 30 and May 1

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from a new musical theatre class at Marshall University will present "A Chorus Line" at 7 p.m. Friday, April 30 and Saturday, May 1 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The class, "Musical Theatre Workshop," was open to music or theatre majors and non-majors. It was taught by Bruce Rous, who divides his time at Marshall as adjunct professor for the departments of music and theatre and also serves as Director of Musical Theatre.

 

The performances are free and open to the public, but since this is a studio production in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, seating is limited and tickets are required. To reserve tickets, please call Sam Kincaid at 304-696-6395.

Rous said the numbers of students who enrolled in the course proves the demand for musical theatre at Marshall.

"There are students from theatre, from music and a host of other departments," Rous said. "There are about 28 registered for the two sections of the class. It's a lot of people, but I didn't want to exclude anyone."

In the workshop, students work on acting, singing, performance technique, character work and other aspects of performing.

"Although the culmination of the class is a performance, that is not the main goal," Rous said. "The work, the process - these are more important to me than the performance."

Rous' career includes work for ABC television, as well as on- and off-Broadway, regionally and on national tours. Past schools at which he has taught include Sarah Lawrence College, New York University and Manhattan College. Rous is a member of BMI, the American Federation of Musicians, and the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers (now SDC).

For more information on the class or this weekend's performances, contact Rous by e-mail at rous1@marshall.edu.

--------------

Photo: Marshall University director of musical theatre Bruce Rous (standing) works with his "Musical Theatre Workshop" class in preparation for their performance of "A Chorus Line" April 30 and May 1.


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173rd Marshall University commencement set for May 8

About 700 graduates to take part in ceremony at Big Sandy Superstore Arena

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 1,400 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 8 when the university celebrates its 173rd commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

Among the 1,389 students receiving degrees are 818 undergraduates and 468 graduate students, 62 from the School of Medicine and 41 who will receive associate degrees.

The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2010 graduates only. Past spring commencements included summer and December graduates from the previous year, but Marshall University conducted a winter commencement for those graduates in December 2009.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said about 700 students have indicated they plan to participate in the commencement ceremony.

Ferguson said 355 students will graduate with honors. Seventy will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 120 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 158 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Two students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and five associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, 15 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs.

The 15 with tentative 4.0s are Kathleen Correll Brown of Huntington, W.Va.; Maggie Elizabeth Chenoweth of Barboursville, W.Va.; Sarah Marie Clemins of Oak Hill, W.Va.; Kayla Mae Davis of Oak Hill, Ohio; Sarah Elizabeth DeYoung of Martinsburg, W.Va.; Alicia Kathleen Hess of Hedgesville, W.Va.; Sammy Samir Hodroge of Charleston, W.Va.; Ashley Brianne Litchfield of Point Pleasant, W.Va.; Sarah Katherine Moore of Akron, Ohio; Khoa Dang Nguyen of Huntington, W.Va.; Sean Gregory Pauley of Barboursville, W.Va.; Kelcey Elaine Perkins of South Point, Ohio; Rebecca Marie Ragland of Georgetown, Ky.; Elizabeth Diane Truex of Tallmadge, Ohio; and Mark Andrew Upton of Ballard, W.Va.

CNN News Correspondent Sean Callebs, a 1983 Marshall graduate, will deliver the commencement address and receive the John Marshall Medal For Civic Responsibility.

Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events: 

Today, Wednesday, April 28

6:30 p.m., second annual College of Information Technology and Engineering senior recognition ceremony and reception, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room 

Thursday, April 29

4 p.m., Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement, Buskirk Field

Wednesday, May 5

7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture (30th graduating class), Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

Thursday, May 6

6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, American Legion Post 23, 100 2nd Street in Point Pleasant

Friday, May 7

11 a.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

3 p.m., International students graduation celebration, Memorial Student Center plaza

4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Marco's

5 p.m., Honors College's Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

5 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, 520 18th St

5:30 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications banquet for seniors and graduates, Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center

6 p.m., PsyD Doctoral graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

7 p.m., College of Health Professions' nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church  

7 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

Saturday, May 8

9 a.m., Marshall University's 173rd commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, an invitation event at The Palms (Century Building), 314 9th St. Plaza

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, Communication Disorders graduation reception, Smith Hall 143

1 p.m., College of Science Convocation, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

1 p.m., Forensic Science graduate program reception, Forensic Science Center

1 p.m., College of Health Professions Department of Social Work recognition ceremony, Prichard Hall 324

1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation celebration, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

4 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, South Charleston High School, 1 Eagle Way, South Charleston
 

Main commencement notes:

  • The commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web beginning at 8:30 a.m. To access the stream, visit www.marshall.edu.
  • Marshall University will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena from campus. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.
  • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremony for purchase at $15 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office Web site (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Additionally, orders will be accepted at the arena May 8. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.
  • A professional photographer (Legacy Photographics) will take two photographs of each graduate after the graduate has received his or her representative scroll. The photographer will send proof information to graduates using MU e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.

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Tuesday April 27, 2010
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Board of Governors approves salary increases in FY 2010-2011 budget

President commends Marshall employees for their contributions to enrollment growth

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Board of Governors last week approved a budget containing funding for one-time salary increments for faculty and non-classified staff, and permanent pay raises for classified staff.

The board set aside $1.5 million in the institution's Fiscal Year 2010-2011 budget for the salary enhancements, which officials say were made possible by a combination of steady increases in enrollment and strategic measures to gain efficiencies, including campus-wide energy-saving initiatives and restructuring of graduate fee waivers. Marshall employees last received pay raises in October 2008.

"Our people are Marshall University's greatest strength," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "Their dedication and commitment to serving students have led directly to our recent successes with enrollment growth. We are pleased to be able to reward them for their efforts, particularly in these difficult economic times."

Based on applications and admissions to-date, Marshall officials are expecting record freshman enrollment this fall. Overall enrollment is also expected to reach an all-time high. It will be the third straight year of enrollment growth at Marshall.

According to Kopp, a little over $1 million of the amount allotted in the budget for salary increases will be used to give one-time increments to faculty members and non-classified staff.

The remaining $450,000 will be applied toward full funding of the classified staff schedule. The increase for classified staff members will be permanent.

The state's current classified staff salary schedule was adopted in 2001 by the West Virginia Legislature, and higher education institutions have been moving toward full funding of it since that time.

Immediately following enactment of the salary schedule, state funding for public higher education institutions declined for three consecutive years due to an economic downturn in fiscal years 2003-2005. Public higher education is once again experiencing the negative consequences of declining state revenues. The effects of the ongoing recession were felt this year with a mid-year reduction in state appropriations, followed by more than a five percent reduction in state appropriations for the upcoming year. In addition, a reduction in state appropriations of more than 10 percent has been forecast for higher education in Fiscal Year 2011-2012.

Despite these financial challenges, Marshall University has been steadily closing the gap on funding the salary schedule, providing raises to classified staff members in seven of the last nine fiscal years, 2001 through 2009.

Kopp said he hopes economic conditions improve and that the upward trend in enrollment continues, which would allow the one-time salary adjustments for faculty and non-classified staff members to be rolled into permanent raises.


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Monday April 26, 2010
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Ice cream social on plaza to be accompanied by MU wind symphony

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Wind Symphony will perform at this year's Ice Cream Social at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 27 on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

Ice cream will be served on the plaza, and is free to students, faculty and staff. The event is sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association and Student Affairs. 

"It's a fun way both to enjoy the musicianship of our students, and to end our class semester - not to mention, it's ice cream!" said Steve Hensley, dean of Student Affairs.

Each year the Marshall University Ice Cream Social is held as a way to honor the current graduates. Others enjoy the event as a way to blow off some steam before finals or to mingle in the plaza with friends and colleagues.

The event is free and open to the public. Thursday, April 29 is the rain date.

The wind symphony, led by Steve Barnett, plans to play the following selections:

  • The Sinfonians by Clifton Williams - a concert march featuring Callie Huff on piccolo solo
  • Angels in the Architecture by Frank Ticheli
  • Walking into History - The Clinton 12 - by Richard Saucedo, in conjunction with the Birke Symposium-Social Justice theme
  • Sara's Soul by Hardy Mertens
  • Velocity by Robert Sheldon
  • Ride by Samuel Hazo
  • Americans We - march by Henry Fillmore
  • Sons of Marshall

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Art exhibition 'Herding Cats' opens April 30

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Herding Cats," an exhibition of work by Marshall University College of Fine Arts students Mark Earnhart and Jason Kiley, will open Friday, April 30 in Gallery 842 and run through May 27. The exhibit and its opening reception, which will take place Friday from 6 to 9 p.m., are free and open to the public.

 Earnhart's and Kiley's show consists primarily of sculpture, including installations and freestanding forms. Most are new works, but some are collaborative pieces. According to the artists, the work engages the viewer beyond the visual and uses space to create irreverence. 

Kiley and Earnhart met in 2009 when Kiley started as the studio technician in ceramics at Marshall. Earnhart was the sculpture technician in the same building. Earnhart saw Kiley's work and thought that it would fit in well with the Buswater group, with which he had started exhibiting work in Charleston. Earnhart arranged for Kiley to join the group also and start showing in West Virginia.

Kiley describes his work as having more than just surface value.

"I try to build rewards into my work for the viewer who takes the time to investigate," Kiley said. "Mark and I decided to try and get a show set up together in not so much that our work is similar, but that we think about and approach art in the same way."

That similarity in philosophy is apparent when the two speak about their work.

"The work that I am currently producing is rooted within my observational self," Earnhart said. "I have found that by looking at the physical details of my own space and place I am able to create work that narrates subjectivity.  My work is fundamentally based on my own circumstance but the resulting outcome in sculpture takes on an autonomous narrative.  My philosophy is not to take on individuality in a heavy-handed way but rather look at the physical and conceptual details and play with expected outcomes."

Earnhart earned a B.F.A. in sculpture from Ohio University. He came to Marshall in 2007 as an academic lab manager. Kiley came to West Virginia when his wife accepted a position as a federal park ranger with the Army Corps of Engineers.

Gallery 842 is both a community and university held space to promote local talent and initiative. The gallery is a free cultural experience for any artist or art enthusiast and is located at 842 4th Ave. in downtown Huntington.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at  jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

--------------

Photo: Mark Earnhart and Jason Kiley will open their exhibition at Gallery 842 Friday, April 30.


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Retired J.C. Penney executive Edward Howard to deliver keynote speech at Marshall's Donning of Kente

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumnus Edward Howard, retired Senior Vice President and Regional Manager of J.C. Penney Company, Inc.'s West Region, will be the keynote speaker at the annual Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement Thursday, April 29 at Marshall University.

The traditional and historical event, presented by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, begins at 4 p.m. on Buskirk Field on MU's Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will commence with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

The ceremony takes place each spring for African and African American students who graduated from Marshall University during the winter and those slated for graduation in May or during the coming summer school term.  

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 60 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said the Donning of the Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events in which Marshall's African and African American students can participate. Having Howard as this year's featured speaker, he said, highlights even more an already special ceremony.

"Since graduating from Marshall University in 1965, Mr. Howard has climbed the ladder of success in the corporate world," Cooley said of the Beckley, W.Va., native. "It has been an incredible journey for this son of a coal miner, who started his professional career in 1965 as a trainee at J.C. Penney in Huntington and in 1990, became the first African-American to enter the company's officer ranks when he was elected Vice President and Director of Investor Relations. I am certain Mr. Howard will deliver an inspirational message that our graduates will remember the rest of their lives."

Howard currently lives in Scottsdale, Ariz. He is a member of the Marshall University Board of Governors and is former president of Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars Board of Directors. He received an honorary doctoral degree from Marshall in 2002 and is a member of the Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame. Howard also was a founding member and president of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity at Marshall.

The following woven cloths will be awarded during the Donning of Kente celebration: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center plaza for all participants and those in attendance.

In the event of rain, the ceremony will take place in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center.


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Thursday April 22, 2010
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Tuition for undergraduate resident students to remain unchanged

Board approves increases for non-residents, including metro students, and School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors today approved no tuition increases for West Virginia undergraduate students and non-School of Medicine graduate students for fiscal year 2010-2011.

Tuition increases of $149 per semester for full-time undergraduate metro students and $160 for full-time graduate metro students were approved. Other non-resident students will see tuition increases of $207 per semester for undergraduates and $227 for graduate students.

Tuition and fees for students in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine also will increase for 2010-2011. Resident students in the Forensic Science graduate program will pay $49 more per semester, metro students will pay $99 more and other non-resident students will pay $159 more. All students in the Biomedical Sciences and Professional (M.D.) programs will pay $194 more and $424 more per semester, respectively.

All students on the Huntington campus will see a small increase in required fees.

The funds from the tuition increases are necessary to offset modest inflationary cost increases in the university's operating budget.

"Marshall University has taken a very responsible approach to preparing a Fiscal Year 2010-2011 budget plan that ensures continued affordable access for students, while also maintaining our commitment to quality. Our anticipation four years ago of the financial challenges confronting almost every other higher education institution in the country has been of immense help to us in making the necessary adjustments so we are not forced, like universities in many other states, to unduly increase the financial burden on our students," said Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall University president. "We still have work to do but we thank Governor Joe Manchin and the West Virginia Legislature for their vision and leadership during these trying financial times. Their responsible fiscal management has helped prevent the disastrous economic consequences experienced by other states.

"Those of us monitoring the effects of the recession, however, remain realistic about the nature of the budget challenges we will face over the coming years. With the anticipated decreases in state funding due to the recession and following careful reviews of our other sources of revenue, we had no choice but to raise some of our tuition and fees. We are pleased that we were able, for this year, to freeze tuition for resident students. We are convinced that Marshall University remains an excellent value for students and our community."

NOTE:  "Resident" refers to West Virginia students; "metro" refers to students who reside in Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Pike or Scioto counties in Ohio, or in Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Floyd, Greenup, Johnson, Lawrence, Martin or Pike counties in Kentucky; and "other non-resident" refers to all other non-West Virginia students.


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Thursday April 22, 2010
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Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 27 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Camilla Brammer.

Four people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

  • Dr. Michael Brookshire, Finance/Economics, Lewis College of Business, 23 years of service

  • Dr. H. Wayne Elmore, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 34 years of service

  • Dr. Thomas Hankins, Information Systems, College of Information Technology and Engineering, 37 years of service

  • Dr. Michael Little, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 36 years of service

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Dr. Eric Blough (Biological Sciences), senior recipient in the field of Sciences and Technology

  • A.E. Stringer (English), senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business

  • Dr. Gregg Twietmeyer (School of Kinesiology), junior recipient among all faculty

Two people will receive the John & Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year Award. They are:

  • Dr. Eric Blough, associate professor, Biological Sciences

  • Dr. Eric Lassiter, professor, Graduate Humanities

Marshall is recognizing 16 retiring faculty who have a combined 396 years of service. They are:

  • Eugene Anthony, professor, Theater, 17 years of service

  • Dr. Robert Bickel, professor, School of Education, 23 years of service

  • Dr. Madonna Combs, professor, Nursing, 26 years of service

  • Dr. Violette Eash, professor, Human Development & Allied Technology, 33 years of service

  • Dr. Thomas Hankins, professor, Engineering & Computer Science, 37 years of service

  • Larry Jarrett, professor, Geography, 16 years of service

  • Dr. Jerry Jones, professor, GSEPD, 8 years of service

  • Wendy Moorhead, associate professor, Library, 14 years of service

  • Dr. Robert Nerhood, professor, Chair, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 17 years of service

  • Dr. Kurt Olmosk, professor, Management, Marketing & MIS, 27 years of service

  • Dr. Simon Perry, professor, Political Science, 48 years of service

  • Dr. Vernon Reichenbecher, professor, Biochemistry, 29 years of service

  • Dr. Karen Stanley, professor, Nursing, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Powell Toth, professor, Leadership Studies, 42 years of service

  • Dr. Omayma Touma, associate professor, Family & Community Health, 3 years of service

  • Kay Wildman, professor, Music Library, 35 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as previously announced, are:

  • Dr. Maria Carmen Riddel, professor, Modern Languages, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Dr. David Mallory, professor, Biological Sciences, Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Julio Alves, assistant professor, Music; Dr. Christina Franzen, assistant professor, Classics; and Dr. Jason Morrissette, assistant professor, Political Science, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

  • Bonita Lawrence, professor, Mathematics, Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia Professor of the Year.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby will follow the meeting.


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Wednesday April 21, 2010
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Work of Marshall students to be celebrated in academic festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Minds of Marshall, a celebration of Marshall University students, will take place Friday-Saturday, April 23-24, on MU's Huntington campus.

Dr. Karen Mitchell, a mathematics professor at Marshall and chairman of The Minds of Marshall Festival, said the event is MU's first university-wide celebration of student learning.

"I think our students are extraordinary and need to be acknowledged for the high quality of their work," Mitchell said. "Our students are winning state, regional and national awards without people outside their department being aware of it.  A festival provides a way for the university to recognize and celebrate our students' accomplishments." 

The festival events will occur on Friday, April 23, and on Saturday, April 24 at various locations throughout the Huntington campus. A developing schedule of activities is available at http://isat-cit.marshall.edu/academicfestival/. The public is invited to attend.

Students from all departments, divisions and colleges will be sharing their work through presentations, demonstrations and performances. The timing of the festival was designed to coincide with Alumni Weekend, an open house for prospective students (Green-White Day), and the College of Science and the College of Liberal Arts research conferences.

Mitchell said she is uncertain how many students will participate, but hopes for a good turnout from both graduates and undergraduates.

"We are trying to capture the heart of the university community by including all types of student learning in the festival," she said. "Ideally the festival will move from a first-time event to an annual event."

Originally called the Academic Festival, The Minds of Marshall Festival was renamed through a student competition. Robert G. Adkins III submitted the winning name.

For more information, contact Mitchell at 304-696-3042.


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Wednesday April 21, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More than 325 high school students to visit Marshall on Green & White Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 325 high school students are expected to participate in Marshall University's Green & White Day on Saturday, April 24.  The event is an open house that will take place on Marshall's Huntington campus.   

Students from 15 states, including California and Missouri, have registered, according to Sarah Kemp, coordinator of the event.

"The Green & White Day is an excellent way for prospective students to build relationships with future professors, classmates and even potential roommates," Kemp said. 

Check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center followed by a program in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.  Prospective students will get the chance to ask questions of faculty, staff and current students.  They will receive information about financial aid, admission requirements and residence services.  They will conclude the day with a campus tour.

"I think students will enjoy this opportunity to truly picture themselves at Marshall, and hopefully they will see that we're the right fit," Kemp said.

For more information, contact Kemp at 304-696-3527.


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Tuesday April 20, 2010
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall University psychology students win 'Jeopardy' competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of six Marshall University students won the annual "Psychology Jeopardy" competition at the Tri-State Psychology Conference April 10 in Marietta, Ohio, according to Dr. Pamela Mulder, professor of psychology at Marshall.

The team included the four undergraduates who actually competed (Michal Zuczkowski, Tyler Ross Burns, JB Justice and Marta Josza) and two graduate students who have served as coaches for several weeks (Jillian Keener and Christina Knopp). They competed against other colleges and universities in the region.

"Our students brought home the trophy and their performance was outstanding--they earned more than double the score of the competitors in second place," Mulder said. "The students and their coaches worked very hard and used many of their 'free' hours to study for this event."

For further information, contact Mulder by phone at 304-696-2770 or by e-mail at mulder@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday April 20, 2010
Contact: Maurice Cooley, Director, Director, Center for African American Students' Programs,, 304-696-5430

Marshall University to present 'An African Wedding' April 23

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Organization of African Students will present a play, "An African Wedding," at 7:45 p.m. Friday, April 23. The performance will take place in 154 Smith Hall on the Huntington campus and is free and open to the public.

 

"In addition to the intriguing story of love and marriage, this play will showcase the unique culture, rituals and traditions of pre-marriage and the marital ceremony of a young couple in Africa, strikingly different from our western culture and ceremony," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs.

 

During the one intermission, members of the Organization of African Students will entertain the audience with a brief dance concert with African musical rhythms. A light reception, to include African hors d'oeuvres, will follow.

 

"An African Wedding" was written and directed by Luwin Witherspoon, a Marshall graduate student from Liberia, and co-written by Joyce Ishola, a junior at Marshall from Nigeria. The cast will total 11.

 

"This is a grand opportunity to experience the creativity of our students, while learning about the similarities and unique differences in our cultures as it pertains to the dynamics of love and marriage," Cooley said.


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Tuesday April 20, 2010
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Underage drinking focus of town hall meeting at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A town hall meeting to discuss prevention of underage drinking will take place Monday, April 26 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The meeting will be hosted by the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership (CCSAPP), in collaboration with the Federal Government's Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking. It will run from 6 to 7 p.m. in Room 2w16 of the Memorial Student Center.

The meeting, like many in communities nationwide, is in response to the Surgeon General's Call to Action to discuss and raise awareness about the issue of underage drinking. It will focus on underage alcohol use in the community and include a presentation by Huntington Middle School student members of CCSAPP.

A public discussion regarding policies and practices in the community that contributed to underage drinking and prevention strategies will be included. Sponsors of the event include CCSAPP, Marshall University and the West Virginia Governor's Highway Safety Program, Huntington region.

Students, parents, teachers and all community members are encouraged to attend. There will be refreshments and door prizes, and no prior registration is necessary.

About CCSAPP: The Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership is a coalition of various agencies, organizations and individuals working together to reduce local substance abuse with strong collaborative partnerships and community ownership, using awareness, education, and community-wide solutions. It is an initiative of the United Way of the River Cities. CCSAPP holds monthly public meetings on the third Wednesday of every month at noon at the United Way of the River Cities. For more information about the Underage Drinking Town Hall Meeting or CCSAPP, contact Anne McGee at anne.mcgee@unitedwayrivercities.org or 304-523-8929 ext. 5.

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Tuesday April 20, 2010
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Marshall students, Sustainability Department plan many Earth Day activities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Sustainability Department, along with several active student groups, announces a daylong celebration of Earth Day 2010 on Thursday April 22.

"This year marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, which brings people around the world together to celebrate the planet," said Margie Phillips, sustainability manager. "This is the first year the Sustainability Department has existed, so we are quite pleased to partner with students to make this day an eye-opener for our Marshall University community."

The University will sponsor a bulb exchange program that will give students, staff and faculty a CFL (compact fluorescent) light bulb in exchange for a regular incandescent bulb.  All incandescent bulbs collected will be donated to the Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity Restore.

Student organizers are planning several activities including using a stationary bike to power a sound system and planting a Red Oak tree and flowers on campus. There will be activities at the Memorial Student Center, Gullickson Hall, Buskirk Field and the Recreation Center.

Matt Weber, a member of the Parks and Recreational Organization for Students, organized the event with help from other students, staff and faculty adviser to PROS, Dr. Richard Able. 

"I wanted to bring everyone together to create one large Earth Day event because I felt the day was of enough importance that a lot of attention was needed," Weber said. "I believe we have created a tremendous event that will help provide awareness and information on ways we can all improve, maintain and help the Earth.

"This event is of great importance to Marshall because it is an urban campus. I believe students will gain a lot of information and will have a lot of fun participating." 

The Earth Day at Marshall University schedule is as follows:

Education Session
Science Building 347, 8:30 a.m.
Speaker: Sam Colvin
Topic: "Get involved with local environmental issues"

Colvin is a faculty member in the College of Science at Marshall University. He has worked on environmental issues since the first Earth Day in 1970. He served as Executive Director of the West Virginia Resource Recovery-Solid Waste Disposal Authority for 11 years and has operated an environmental consulting business since 1990. He has also served as a member of both the state Solid Waste Management Board and the Water Quality Advisory Committee.

Information and Education Fair
Memorial Student Center, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Information and education on topics related to our Earth. Scheduled to participate are Toyota Hybrid Vehicles, Goodwill Industries, West Virginia American Water, Mountaineer Gas, and Huntington Museum of Art.  There will be live music, free food and giveaways including a bicycle.

Interactive Session
Buskirk Field, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Activity: See how a bike can power a sound system!
Sponsor: Sierra Student Coalition

Look for students, faculty, staff and administrators to pedal away on a special stationary bike as the energy it produces powers a sound system!

Education Session
Student Center 2W22, 10 a.m.
Speaker: Margie Phillips
Topic: "Ways to Save Energy and Water"
Info: Presentation will include an interactive game and giveaway of 'Be Marshall Green' water bottles.

Phillips is the manager of the Marshall University Sustainability Department, which was launched on Sept. 1, 2009. Goals of the Sustainability Department include education, communication, and participation of students, staff, and faculty concerning environmental issues affecting the campus. By protecting the Earth's natural resources the University will become sustainable for future generations. The department also consists of nine student recyclers, one student assistant and a recycling coordinator.

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, 10:30 a.m.
Speaker: Mark Adams
Topic: "A Major Player in our Community Recycling Efforts"
Info: Recycling efforts in Huntington

Adams is the director of industrial contracts at Goodwill Industries of KYOWVA, where he has worked for 11 years in a variety of positions in the areas of rehabilitation, employment and training, contracts, and management. His department provides document destruction and recycling of paper, cardboard and newsprint, and has partnered with Dell to recycle electronic equipment. He also oversees a custodial department that provides custodial service to numerous commercial customers and contracts with the state through the West Virginia Association of Rehabilitation Facilities.

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, 11:30 a.m.
Speaker: Nick Rupert
Topic: "How the recycling process works"
Info: What happens to the material once it hits the floor, how it's sorted, where it goes, and what manufacturers use it for?

Rupert has been with the waste management company Rumpke for four years and has set up recycling programs in cities, schools and businesses throughout Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. 

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, 1 p.m.
Speaker: Phil Gregory
Topic: Natural Gas Safety
Info: The properties of natural gas and propane.  He will discuss the flammability level and safety of both products.                    

Gregory works for Mountaineer Gas as the Safety Training Coordinator.

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, Noon
Speaker: Dave Peters
Topic: "Our Water, Our Future"
Info: Discussing water quality and wise water use

Peters, West Virginia American Water's water quality supervisor for the Central Operating Area, has more than three decades of experience in the water industry. He spent most of his 33-year career with West Virginia American Water at the company's Huntington Water Treatment Plant but currently works at the Charleston plant. This plant supplies water to 98,000 customers, roughly 250,000 people. Peters is responsible for ensuring that all the water treated at the plant and pumped throughout the distribution system meets safe drinking water requirements.

Interactive Session
Student Center 2W22, Noon-1 p.m.
Come speak your mind! Give your suggestions, comments, concerns, etc., to members of the Earth Day planning committee on topics related to improving, helping, and maintaining the Earth.

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, 12:30 p.m.
Speaker: Jon Akers
Topic: "Sustainable Lighting Solutions"

Akers is the Energy Solutions and Sustainability Manager at State Electric Supply Company where he leads an initiative that helps customers become more energy efficient and reduce maintenance costs through the incorporation of sustainable lighting solutions. He also leads State Electric's efforts to become a more sustainable organization. Akers is a Six Sigma Black Belt and Master Black Belt and was the Director of Six Sigma for Textron.

Interactive Session -- Tree Planting
Harris Hall, 1 p.m.
Help plant a Red Oak tree in remembrance of Earth Day thanks to the MU Physical Plant.           

Education Session
Student Center 2W16, 1:30 p.m.
Speaker: Rick Able
Topic: "Practical Recycling"
Info: Things even YOU can do!

Able is an assistant professor in Marshall University's Parks and Recreation program.  He has spent 31 years working in public recreation for the state of West Virginia in a variety of positions from programmer to administrator.

Interactive Session -- Flower Planting
Physical Plant, 2:30 p.m.
Come plant some flowers next to the physical plant in remembrance of Earth Day 2010.

Interactive Session -- Flower Planting
Recreation Center, 3 p.m.
Join MU-PROS and Recreation Center staff to plant flowers in front of the Recreation Center to give it some color.

Interactive Session -- Spinning Class          
Recreation Center, Studio C, 3:30 p.m.
Come join this special 45-minute Earth Day Spinning Class. The class is meant to be super green and have you dump that car and pick up your bike!

Education Session
Gullickson Hall 120, 4 p.m.
Speaker: James Farmer
Topic: "Environmental behavior and long-term impact"
Info: Will discuss the impact of significant life experiences in nature with later life pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors as adults.

Farmer is an assistant professor in the Recreation and Park Resources program. This is his first year at Marshall University. He teaches courses in recreation and park management, natural history and environmental interpretation. His research focuses on human-environmental interaction.

Interactive Session -- Free Try Climbs!
Recreation Center, 5-7 p.m.
Come to Outdoor Pursuits at the Recreation Center and try out the Rock Wall for FREE! Make sure to pick up a free try climb card from the Outdoor Pursuits table at the fair.

Interactive Session -- Kayak & Canoe Demo
Recreation Center, 8-9 p.m.
Ever thought of going out on the river and going kayaking or canoeing? Come by the Recreation Center's aquatic center and get a demo and then try yourself for free.

Interactive Session -- Electronics Recycling
Memorial Student Center, all day          
Bring your old electronics and place them in one of the multiple bins located around the Student Center.

Interactive Session -- Bulb Exchange                     
Memorial Student Center, 10 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. 
Bring a regular incandescent bulb to the sustainability department table in exchange for a CFL bulb.

Interactive Session -- Cell Phone Recycling
Memorial Student Center, all day
Bring your old cell phones even if they don't have the batteries.

For more information, contact Matt Weber, Parks and Recreational Organization for Students, at weber15@marshall.edu or (304) 634-9852.


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Monday April 19, 2010
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Designs for two Marshall University building projects recognized by AIA

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The designs for two recent building projects at Marshall University have been recognized by the West Virginia chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

 At the chapter's Design Awards banquet on Saturday, Huntington firm Edward Tucker Architects Inc. received a Merit Award for Design Excellence for its work on the university's new men's and women's basketball locker rooms in the Cam Henderson Center. The firm also received an Honor Award for Design Excellence for its design of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, located on the north end of the former Fairfield Stadium.
 

The locker room design features an entrance hall colonnade that leads to a game film theater, lounge and kitchenette, as well as the customary lockers, showers and toilet facilities. A state-of-the-art audio and video system also was incorporated.

The Forensic Science Center was constructed in three phases and includes high-tech classrooms, DNA training and research laboratories, a digital evidence laboratory, chemistry and microscopy laboratories, and offices.

Both projects were completed in 2009. Oval Construction Management of Charleston was the general contractor for the locker rooms, while Neighborgall Construction of Huntington was the contractor for the Forensic Science Center.

The annual awards recognize exemplary design projects located in the state or designed by West Virginia architects.

 


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Monday April 19, 2010
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Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi promotes success of ramen noodle cook-off at D.C. event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Kappa Phi chapter of Beta Alpha Psi at Marshall University recently co-hosted a regional conference with the University of Pittsburgh in Washington, D.C., at which they promoted their ramen noodle cook-off, a campus event which raised more than $1,000 for Haiti.

"Many of the chapters were receptive to this idea and we look forward to promoting it on a higher level in the future," said Tyler Rowland, president of the Marshall chapter.

Beta Alpha Psi is the honors organization for accounting, finance and management information systems majors.

Marshall students also presented in the "best practices" competition, placing third in two categories - service learning events and an ethics case in business.  Anna Dingess, Grant Grishaber and Kassie Moore participated in service learning and Max Billmyer, Jessica Johnson and Joe Skopic presented the ethics case.

"Our group was proud to have placed third in the Service Learning Presentation category during the 2010 Regional Meeting," said Dingess.  "The basis of our presentation was 'Smart Finances@Your Library,' a newly implemented financial literacy program our chapter has developed with the Cabell County Public Library.  We were thrilled with a victory for our efforts." 

More than 40 schools attended the event with a total of 261 students and 42 professionals attending.  Matt White of ZBA Financial Group in Huntington was one of the professional presenters. Months of planning went into organizing the conference.

"We started working with Pittsburgh last spring in organizing the event," Rowland said. "They were great to work with, and many of the schools that attended the regional meeting commented on how well organized the event was."                          

Requirements for the membership in Beta Alpha Psi are rigorous as each student must maintain a high grade point average and do 40 hours of professional development along with 40 hours of community service each year to maintain membership in good standing. 


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Friday April 16, 2010
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73rd annual Awards Banquet highlights Alumni Weekend; distinguished alumni, friends and students to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 73rd annual Alumni Awards Banquet highlights Marshall University's 2010 Alumni Weekend, which takes place April 23-24.

The awards banquet on Saturday, April 24, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus honors distinguished alumni, friends and students. It starts at 6 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza with the President's Social, which is followed at 7 p.m. by the banquet in the Don Morris Room.

The cost to attend the banquet is $50 per person or $90 per couple. To RSVP or ask questions about the banquet, persons may call 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869.

The theme of this year's Alumni Weekend is "Old Friends and New Beginnings."  

Here is a complete list of the distinguished alumni award winners for 2010:

Distinguished Alumni Award

Dr. Gregory Hale (MD 1990) is a Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of South Florida. In 2010, he was named one of the Best Doctors in America in pediatrics hematology-oncology. Hale is a member of the Children's Oncology Group and serves on its Stem Cell Transplant Discipline Committee. He is a member of the American Society of Hematology, the American Society of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, World Marrow Donor Association, American Association of Blood Banks and other professional transplant and immunology organizations.

He attended Buffalo High School in Wayne County, graduating as a National Merit Scholar in 1983. He graduated from Marshall University in 1986 with a degree in chemistry, completing requirements in three years and graduating with a 4.0 grade point average. In 1990, Hale graduated first in his class from the Marshall University School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, followed by a fellowship in hematology-oncology at St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital in Memphis.

Distinguished Service to Marshall Award (two recipients)

Shelba Pew (BA 1936) of Huntington received her B.A. from Marshall College's Teacher's College program and went on to pursue a master's degree at Duke University. She returned to West Virginia and taught science in the public school system until her retirement. Since graduating from Marshall, Pew has spent much of her adult life helping future Marshall students through her generosity. Pew has donated to Marshall University through various gifts to the College of Science and College of Education and Human Services with four endowed scholarships and numerous annuities with The Marshall University Foundation, Inc. She served as a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy W.A.V.E.S. (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service), which was initiated during World War II by President Franklin Roosevelt.

Janis Faye Winkfield (BA 1991, MA 1997) of Huntington was the Senior Financial Aid Counselor at Marshall University at the time of her death on May 19, 2009. Winkfield had a passion to assist students in fulfilling their dreams of obtaining a degree. Students knew her for the motherly candor and persistence she always offered in making sure they kept an academic focus. Winkfield's efforts resulted in her being named Marshall Employee of the Month in December 2008. Janis's commitment to the Marshall University Alumni Association is substantiated by the numerous years she served on the board as an active advocate for both alumni and undergraduate students. She was selected as the Second Vice President of the Board of Directors in 2009 and was also a past President and Vice President of the Marshall University Black Alumni Inc.

Young Alumni Award

Justin Blankenship (BA 2000) of Hamlin, W.Va., has been employed at BB&T, one of the 10 largest financial institutions in the U.S., since 2001 as a Microsoft Windows systems engineer, focusing on Active Directory infrastructure design and engineering. In 2008, he was promoted to the role of Banking Officer and the newly created Client Server Engineer IV position. Blankenship is the founder and current president of the Lincoln County Friends of Marshall Club, an alumni and booster club of Marshall University in Lincoln County, W.Va. The group is also a regional chapter of the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, which Blankenship serves as chapter representative. Blankenship is an active member of the Marshall University Alumni Association and Big Green Scholarship Foundation. He is also a member of the Lewis College of Business's Sentry Buffalo Society.

Cam Henderson Scholarship Award

Lee Smith of Knoxville, Tenn., is a Marshall University football student-athlete who was chosen team captain by his teammates for the 2009 season because of his leadership and character. Smith carries a 3.24 GPA as he double majors in criminal justice and psychology. In addition to being a double major and a huge contributor to the football team, Smith is more importantly a devoted husband and proud father. He has also been named to the C-USA Commissioner's Honor Roll. Giving back to the community is extremely important to Smith. He has volunteered with the Big Green Kid's Club Picnic, Trick-or-Treat at Cabell Huntington Hospital, United Way Success by Six program and many additional organizations.

 

Community Achievement Award

Tiney M. McComb (1963) of New Albany, Ohio, is chairman of Heartland BancCorp, Gahanna, Ohio, which he formed in 1988. The company operates banking offices in Franklin and Licking counties, Ohio, under the name of Heartland Bank. McComb is also chairman of Heartland Investments Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Heartland Bank. Prior to forming Heartland, he was employed by Franklin Bank, a state-chartered community bank in Columbus, Ohio, from 1968 to 1987, becoming its president in 1978. Before joining Franklin Bank, McComb was affiliated with Park Financial Corporation in Ironton, Ohio, for six years. McComb attended Marshall University and graduated from the University of Wisconsin Graduate School of Banking. He participates in numerous seminars and speaking engagements to banking and civic groups. He is also active in many community activities and organizations such as Osteopathic Heritage Foundation and The American Red Cross, Columbus Chapter.

 

Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Linda Spatig, after completing doctoral studies at the University of Houston in 1988, came to Marshall to take a position as assistant professor in the College of Education and Human Services. Spatig has three accomplishments of which she is extremely proud. First, she worked with colleagues - over a period of several years and against staunch resistance at times - to establish what has become a nationally accredited, high-quality child care facility, the Marshall University Child Development Academy. Second, she worked with others to bring the Appalachian Studies Association (ASA) and its journal, the Journal of Appalachian Studies, to Marshall. Third, she has obtained, with assistance from others at the university and ASA, a National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant for Marshall. As a result of the award, two permanent research fellowships to support research on diversity in Appalachia were created.

 

Distinguished Education and Human Service Award

Dr. Thomas F. Scott will be honored by the College of Education and Human Services. He is a valued member of the College of Education and Human Services Advisory Board and longtime supporter of Marshall University and the COEHS. Scott is a Huntington orthopedic surgeon and has been practicing medicine since 1959. He graduated with his A.B. degree in 1954 from Dartmouth College and obtained his M.D. in 1958 from the University of Michigan. Scott completed his Orthopedic Surgery training at the University of Michigan Medical Center. Currently, Scott still sees patients on a part-time basis and he is the owner of Scott Orthopedic Center, Inc. in Huntington. Scott has given back and supported Marshall University and the Huntington community in many ways, including the establishment and continued support of the Francis A. Scott Scholarship. He has also served others as a State Senator representing Cabell and Wayne counties.

Alumni Association Club of the Year

The Lincoln County Friends of Marshall Club, under the leadership of President Justin Blankenship, was started in October 2007. The club's mission and goals include promoting and enhancing Marshall University's image in Lincoln County, academic student recruitment and assistance programs through the Marshall University Foundation and athletic support through the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, as well as providing an enjoyable opportunity for all Marshall University supporters to come together for social and intellectual enrichment. The Lincoln County Friends of Marshall Club has raised and contributed $32,708, not only for Lincoln County students who attend Marshall University but also for Marshall University athletics and alumni outreach since October 2007.

Nate Ruffin Scholarship

Faite Ahaghotu is a freshman biology/pre-med major from Rockville, Md. She is a member of Black United Students and My Sister's Keeper, and is a Multicultural Leadership Ambassador. In her role as an ambassador, she educates campus and community groups on issues related to her Jamaican, Caribbean and African cultures. Ahaghotu has traveled internationally and welcomes all opportunities to learn about people from different cultures.

Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship (two recipients)

Briana Blankenship, a music education major from Grantsville, W.Va., will receive the Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship for Marching Band. Blankenship is an active member of the Marshall Wind Symphony, 12.0 Jazz Ensemble, Marching Thunder, Trumpet Ensemble, Brass Trio, Choral Union, the Music Educators National Conference: The National Association for Music Education, Delta Omicron, Baptist Campus Ministries and Revolution. When she is at home, Blankenship is an active volunteer for her home church and the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Team. In addition to being actively involved in many organizations, Blankenship is an outstanding student, carrying a perfect 4.0 GPA.

Kelsey Deanne Waybright, a business management major from Ripley, W.Va., will receive the Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship for Cheerleading. Waybright is a dean's list student and constantly strives to be active in her community volunteering with middle and midget league cheerleaders.  She is a UCA Cheer Staff Member, works with Adopt-A-Family and aids with the MU Sweetheart clinic. 

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Friday April 16, 2010
Contact: Anna Swift, MUHSA service project coordinator, 304-690-1483

Marshall University Honors Students Association partners with community schools and agencies for hunger relief

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Honors Students Association (MUHSA) is following the old adage of "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."

The organization is sponsoring a dual-goal fundraising effort which will aid the Huntington Area Food Bank and lead to the purchase of a farm animal for a family in need in places such as Chile and Haiti.

MUHSA sponsored a canned food drive this week at Beverly Hills, Enslow, Huntington, Milton and Vinson middle schools.  The school with the highest number of canned goods donated to the Huntington Area Food Bank will win the opportunity to choose an animal to help a needy family through an organization called Heifer International. 

According to its Web site, Heifer International helps needy families affected by poverty or natural disaster become self-reliant through the gift of livestock and training in animal care. In its gift catalog, Heifer sells everything from the heifer cow to water buffalo - about 30 different options - to then be sent to low-income and low-resource families around the world.

"An especially far-sighted and impressive aspect of Heifer International's work is the way they require recipients of animals to "pass on the gift" - that is, an offspring of the animal Heifer gives them must go to someone else in the community, thus planting the seed for more," said  Dr. Mary Moore, MUHSA advisor.

To help raise money for the animal purchase, Uno Chicago Grill Pizza, located at Pullman Plaza in Huntington, will host a "doughraiser" April 19-23 with 20 percent of special ticket meal prices going to the cause. To participate, Uno's customers must present free certificates, which may be printed online at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/Flyers/UNO'S_Ticket.pdf or obtained by contacting Anna Swift at fahrmann3@marshall.edu. Those interested in making a one-time donation may also contact Swift.

The group hopes to raise the approximate $500 purchase price by the end of the month.


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Thursday April 15, 2010
Contact: Mark Smith, Department of Music,, 304-696-3117

Music department to present Ellington's Sacred Concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Choral Union, Chamber Choir and Jazz Ensemble 12.0 will present two performances of Duke Ellington's Sacred Concert beginning Saturday evening, April 24.

The first performance will take place at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 24 in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The second performance is at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 25 and will also take place in Smith Recital Hall. Both are free and open to the public.

The chamber choir was prepared for the concert by Dr. David Castleberry, its director, and the jazz ensemble was prepared by Dr. Ed Bingham, its director. Both directors are members of the Marshall music faculty. In addition to the three ensembles, the work will feature soprano soloist and Marshall alumna Kristen Pino and tap dancer Alisha Bowen from Elite Performance Academy.

"This music has never been performed at Marshall University before," said Mark Smith, director of the Choral Union, who will conduct the concerts. "The written music is difficult to obtain because each time it was performed, it was different. With a full choir, big band, soprano soloist and tap dancer, this is sure to excite all audiences."

For further information, persons may call the Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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Thursday April 15, 2010
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MU assistant professor Dr. David J. Peavler to deliver keynote address at Woodson fundraising banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. David J. Peavler, an assistant professor in Marshall University's Department of History since September 2009, will be the keynote speaker at the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc. fundraising banquet Saturday, May 1.

The 18th annual banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Proceeds from the banquet will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

Peavler is the director of African and African American Studies at Marshall University. He came to Marshall from Baltimore, where he taught at Towson University upon completion of his Ph.D. at the University of Kansas.

He is the author of several award-winning articles in leading academic publications such as the Journal of African American History. Among his current projects are the publication of a book on African American pioneers in the American west following reconstruction, and a second book titled Jim Crow in the Land of John Brown which details the origins of segregation and the Black freedom struggle in America's heartland.

In addition to his service to the community in higher education, Peavler is an Air Force veteran and former instructor of fire/rescue personnel in Iraq.

His speech is titled "Cast Down Your Bucket Where You Are: West Virginia and the Black Freedom Struggle," which details some aspects of local black history and the importance of collecting and preserving this history for future generations.

Music for the evening will be provided by Andrea Bowman, Kevin E. Johnson, Charles Johnson and David Barton, III.

Tickets for the banquet are available for a donation of $30. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at 740-894-5772; Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at 304-525-5651; or Karen Nance, secretary, at 304-736-1655.

The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass  High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.


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Sean Callebs to deliver commencement address at Marshall University

CNN correspondent graduated from MU in 1983

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sean Callebs, a 1983 Marshall University graduate and general assignment correspondent for CNN based in New Orleans, will deliver his alma mater's commencement address this spring, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Marshall's 173rd commencement is scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, May 8 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Callebs was a reporter and anchor for local television station WSAZ-3 in the 1980s. He began working for CNN in 1989 as an environmental reporter, and joined CNN Newsource in September 1998, covering stories around the world. He has reported from places such as Afghanistan, Jordan, Kuwait, Cuba, Japan, China, Mexico and Central America.

"I can't tell you what an honor it is coming back to Marshall University to speak to the 2010 graduating class," Callebs said. "Marshall, and Huntington, is where it all began for me, and gave me the foundation that allowed me to work at CNN and travel the world for more than 20 years."

Callebs has covered many history-making stories while at CNN, often receiving awards for his efforts. Here are some highlights of Callebs' career:

  • After the Oklahoma City bombing, he got the only interview with co-conspirator Michael Fortier.
  • He won an Emmy Award for coverage of Midwestern floods.
  • He was honored with a gold medal at the New York Film Festival for a special on Alaska dealing with the after-effects of the Exxon Valdez spill.
  • He traveled to Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., to provide coverage of the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy. 
  • He was part of the CNN team that covered Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.
  • He was anchoring for CNN the morning Saddam Hussein was captured, and was part of the team that received a Headliner Press Award for the coverage.
  • He served for two years as an anchor and correspondent for CNN Financial News.

"We are honored that Sean Callebs has agreed to deliver our spring commencement address," Kopp said. "During more than two decades with CNN, he certainly has distinguished himself, earning the trust of viewers worldwide. Every time he is on the air, he makes the Marshall University community immensely proud. I look forward to hearing this true 'Son of Marshall' inspire our new graduates."

In 2004, Callebs received the Marshall University Distinguished Alumni Award, which is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor. He said it is "rather ironic" that he will be speaking at Marshall's commencement 27 years after graduating.

"I did not have a chance to attend my own commencement because I was working as a young reporter at WSAZ," Callebs said. "So, for a few hours I will pretend I am a gangly kid again with my whole life in front of me and act as if this is my graduating class."

He said he remembers fondly his days as a student at Marshall University.

"It's hard for 22- or 23-year-olds to realize how much they learned at Marshall, and how the lessons there will help them each and every day for the rest of their lives," Callebs said. "I had so many great professors, but a handful still stand out. Dr. George Arnold, who taught journalism ethics. Dr. Ralph Turner, another great journalism professor and a stickler for detail. Dr. Robert Sawrey, a history professor who really inspired me to think out of the box. Tom Davis, a Gannett Distinguished Journalist who taught me about the real world.

"But my fondest memories are of the time I spent with Bos Johnson. He was my adviser in school, and has been my mentor in life. I daresay without the time I spent with him who knows what I would be doing." Johnson had a distinguished career as a reporter, anchor and news director at WSAZ before coming to Marshall as a faculty member.


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Marshall University professor co-authors 'Best Paper'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jennifer Mak, professor and director of sport management at Marshall University, co-authored a paper that was selected the 2010 Best Paper in Sport Marketing Track at the annual Association of Marketing Theory and Practice's conference in Hilton Head, S.C.

Mak, along with Dr. Steve Chen, assistant professor from the College of Business at Morehead State University, wrote the paper, "Collegiate Basketball Season-Ticket Holders' Purchasing Motivation and Interests."

The purpose of the paper was to explore different aspects of men's basketball season ticket consumption behavior. In addition, the study identified the differences among marital status and those who brought children to the game, to varied aspects of men's basketball season ticket consumption behavior.

For more information, call Mak at 304-696-2927.


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Three members of Marshall faculty awarded summer stipends for research proposal preparation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University science faculty have received three of eight grants recently awarded statewide by the Division of Science and Research, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (HEPC).

The awards, worth $5,000 each, are intended to assist tenured or tenure-track, or research faculty members at institutions of higher education in the state with the preparation of research or research equipment proposals for submission to external funding agencies or foundations.

Marshall faculty members awarded the grants include Dr. Derrick R.J. Kolling, assistant professor of chemistry; Dr. Suzanne G. Strait, professor of biological sciences; and Dr. Wendy C. Trzyna, associate professor of biological sciences.

Faculty members are expected to prepare research proposals as part of their routine activities. These summer stipends are designed to provide uninterrupted work, allowing development of stronger, more-competitive proposals in a timelier manner.

According to the HEPC, this year saw the largest number of applications in the grant program's history, with 22 submissions from faculty from institutions across the state. The grants are funded competitively through the state's Research Challenge Fund.


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SCORES competition attracts more than 1,700 students to Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,700 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, April 17 to participate in the 32nd annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

The SCORES Academic Festival is an exciting event for not only the students, but also for Marshall," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES coordinator with Marshall's office of recruitment. "The festival provides students with exposure to the social activities found on campus which are integral to students' education and growth.  The event is a great way for the university to not only recruit students, but allow them to visit a college campus and become familiar with the university community. This program allows talented students the opportunity to showcase their academic achievements while interacting with Marshall faculty, who are the heart and soul of this program.  Overall, this is an exciting day focused on celebrating the unique talents that each student brings to the festival."

The event, which runs from 8 a.m. to about 3 p.m., is open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, liberal arts, journalism and mass communications, information technology and engineering, health professions and science. The top three winners in each contest will be awarded a medal.

Scholarships will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place trophies will be given for each school division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

The SCORES awards ceremony takes place at 1:30 p.m. at Cam Henderson Center.

For more information, contact the SCORES office at 304-696-2246.


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Poet, writer from WVU to read from their work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Mary Ann Samyn and writer Mark Brazaitis, both faculty members at West Virginia University, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 21, in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.  Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall Visiting Writers Series.

A writer and poet, Brazaitis is the author of An American Affair, winner of the 2004 George Garrett Prize for fiction, as well as The River of Lost Voices: Stories from Guatemala, winner of the 1998 Iowa Short Fiction Award.  His first collection of poetry, The Other Language, selected for the ABZ Poetry award by Heather McHugh, has just been released.  He is a recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, and he directs the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Program in Creative Writing at West Virginia University.

Samyn is the author of four collections of poetry, including Captivity Narrative, winner of the Ohio State UP/The Journal Prize; Inside the Yellow Dress, a 2001 New Issues Press/Green Rose Selection; and most recently, Purr. She is the founder and director of Oakland University's Far Field Retreat for Writers and teaches in the MFA Program at West Virginia University.

Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition winner to perform Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brianna Williams, this year's winner of the Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition at Marshall University, will give a recital at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 18. The recital will take place in the Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus, and is free and open to the public.
 
Williams, a euphonium player and a junior majoring in music education at Marshall, is from Bluefield, W.Va. She will be assisted in the recital by Mila Markun, piano, and Austin Seybert, trombone, and will perform  a program of primarily 20th century music.
 
"Brianna has that rare combination of musicianship, intelligence and motivation that you always want to see in a student," said Dr. Michael Stroeher, professor of trombone and euphonium at Marshall, who is Williams' teacher. "I see great things for her in the future."
 
The Jackson Competition, considered the premier event of its kind at Marshall, is a yearly event in which the contestants are evaluated by outside adjudicators. Contestants are screened in three rounds: area preliminaries, semifinals and finals. The outstanding performer is awarded an endowed scholarship for the following academic year.


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Marshall to host midwifery specialist

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Faculty from Marshall University's School of Nursing will host a lecture by nurse-midwifery specialist Dr. Juliana van Olphen Fehr from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 18 at the home of Huntington Mayor Kim Wolfe, 1120 13th Ave. in Huntington.

Fehr is a certified nurse-midwife who practiced in Virginia and West Virginia for 13 years. She started the first nurse-midwifery program in Virginia at Shenandoah University, where she is a member of the faculty. She also is the author of the book Diary of a Midwife: The Power of Positive Childbearing.

Fehr will discuss the science and art of midwifery, as well as the special relationship between women and their midwives. She will also provide information about Shenandoah's collaboration with Marshall to bring a graduate program of study in midwifery to West Virginia.

The School of Nursing will also sponsor an open house for members of the university community to meet Fehr from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 19 in room 317 of Pritchard Hall on the Huntington campus.

 

For further information, persons may contact Dr. Madonna Combs in the Marshall School of Nursing by phone at 304-696-2628 or by e-mail at combsm@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University journalists reign at top of four-state region

CLEVELAND - Journalists from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University earned the most awards of colleges from a four-state area at the Region 4 Society of Professional Journalists conference April 9-10.

Marshall students picked up 15 Mark of Excellence awards, tying with Michigan State in the sweepstakes award, which tracks the number of awards won by each school. The Mark of Excellence awards honor the best in student journalism.

"Our students definitely made an impression," said Nerissa Young, assistant professor in the journalism school and adviser to The Parthenon. "The audience got to hear 'Marshall University' several times. When I was a student at Marshall, the journalism school was always competitive in the Mark of Excellence awards. After a few years of hiatus, it's safe to say we're back in the three areas we traditionally excel in - newspaper, radio and TV."

The school earned first-place awards in television and radio categories.

Brooks Taylor, junior broadcast journalism major from Richmond, Va., won first place in television feature photography for "The Pumpkin House." He won third place in television feature story with "The Pumpkin House." His television news photography on combat water survival training earned second place. Taylor produced the stories for "MU Report," a twice-monthly newscast produced by broadcast students that airs on West Virginia Public Television.

Perennial favorite Adam Cavalier continued his winning ways in the radio categories. The graduate student from Montgomery, W.Va., earned first place in radio news reporting for "Salvation for the Powerless" and radio sports reporting for "From the Herd to the Hornets: J.R. VanHoose." He earned second place in radio feature with "The Legend of Dr. Kim" and radio in-depth reporting for "The Longest Yards - The 2008 Marshall Football Season in Review."  He received third place in radio sports reporting for "Who's at Wideout." The stories aired on WMUL-FM, Marshall's award-winning radio station.

Leannda Carey took second place in radio news reporting for "Proposed Animal Ban" and radio sports reporting for "Enter Sandman." The junior broadcast journalism major from Wellsburg, W.Va., took third place in radio feature for "Holocaust Survivor." The stories aired on WMUL-FM.

Taylor's and Cavalier's first-place entries will advance to the national competition. Winners will be named in October at the national SPJ convention in Las Vegas.

The Parthenon, Marshall's campus newspaper, brought home awards of its own.

Former photo editor Carrie Kirk took second place in feature photography for "Epic Catch," a student levitating in an attempt to catch a flying disc. The May visual arts graduate from Charleston, W.Va., also earned second place in general news photography for a shot of a student receiving a dousing splash of slush.

Tom Bragg, sports columnist and former sports editor, earned second place for his "Third and a Mile" columns about Marshall sports. The senior print journalism major from Cross Lanes, W.Va., recently joined the staff at the Charleston Daily Mail.

A Marshall student on military deployment picked up third place in the general column writing category for her "Letters from Afghanistan" feature about her experiences in a war zone. Sara Yoke, a junior public relations major from St. Albans, W.Va., is on active duty until July with a W.Va. Army National Guard unit based in Charleston.

Region 4 includes Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia and western Pennsylvania. Universities within the region include West Virginia University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, Kent State University, Central Michigan University and Duquesne University, among others. The 37 categories included 479 entries in Region 4, the most of SPJ's 12 regions.

Founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi, SPJ promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and protects First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press.

----------------

Photo: Society of Professional Journalists national president Kevin Smith, left, joins Marshall students in celebrating the 15 awards won by the journalism school at the Region 4 SPJ conference in Cleveland. Parthenon sports columnist Tom Bragg, second from left, won for sports column writing. Former Parthenon photo editor Carrie Kirk, third from left, won for feature and news photography. Parthenon assistant sports editor Jonas Swecker helps display awards won by WMUL-FM reporters and "MU Report" journalist Brooks Taylor.


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Dr. Ron Walsworth of Harvard to deliver lecture at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ron Walsworth, a senior lecturer with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the Department of Physics of Harvard University, will present a free public lecture Thursday, April 15 in the Memorial Student Center, Room BE5 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Walsworth's lecture is made possible by a grant to Marshall University Professor Thomas Wilson of the MU Department of Physics from the American Physical Society Division of Laser Science "Distinguished Traveling Lecturer Program" and with support from the MU College of Science and Department of Physics.

The lecture, titled "The Search for Earth-like Planets Around Other Stars," runs from 7 to 8 p.m. A reception will follow.

According to Walsworth, a historic event is expected to take place over the next several years - the discovery of a planet similar to the Earth that orbits another star.  This discovery will open the door for exploration of habitable environments in the Universe, and could greatly advance our understanding of the origins of life both on Earth and elsewhere.

"To date, more than 400 planets have been discovered orbiting nearby stars," Walsworth explains in his abstract for the lecture.  "However, all these planets are large - somewhat like Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune in our solar system.  The reason only large planets have been discovered is that telescopes have not been sensitive enough to detect small, Earth-like planets. Now, this is all about to change, due to two major technological advances - the launch of the Kepler space telescope and the development of a laser-based calibration tool known as the 'astro-comb.'"

"Kepler was launched by NASA in March 2009 into an Earth-trailing orbit.  Freed from the obscuring effects of Earth's atmosphere, Kepler should identify a few dozen candidate "Sister Earths" over the next few years, by detecting small dips in the light from stars as orbiting planets pass in front.  However, such detections by Kepler will only determine the diameter of these planets - not their mass.  Knowing the planetary mass is essential to distinguish planets that largely consist of water and ice from true Sister Earths - rocky Earth-like planets that are thought to be optimal for life.

"The astro-comb uses very short ("femtosecond") pulses of laser light, synchronized by an atomic clock, to provide a precise standard for telescopes that measure the wavelength of light coming from stars.  The astro-comb corrects for inaccuracy and drift in the spectral sensitivity of such telescopes, thereby allowing detection of very small Doppler shifts induced in the spectrum of stars by the gravitational tug of orbiting Earth-like planets."

Walsworth and his colleagues at Harvard, MIT and the Smithsonian Institution have led the development of astro-comb spectral calibrators, and will soon perform observations of promising planets located by Kepler, so that true Sister Earths can be identified.  Over the next decade, new space-based telescopes - now in the planning stages - will probe the spectrum of reflected light from these Sister Earths to search for the chemical signatures of life and to acquire high-resolution images of these new worlds. 


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Marshall University to host Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University, in partnership with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, will present the 2010 Sustainable Schools West Virginia Summit Sept. 19-20.

The summit is designed to bring together leaders in education to discuss the important roles schools, colleges and universities have in creating sustainable campuses across West Virginia. The event will take place on the Huntington campus and is open to leaders in public and private higher education as well as public and private K-12 school administration. The event is sponsored in part by State Electric Supply Company of Huntington.

The opportunity to affect change statewide is appealing to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, who said he has experienced the positive difference a community of students, faculty and staff can bring to a campus.

"The benefits of our Greening Marshall movement have been tremendous," Kopp said. "The entire Marshall University Community has really gotten behind our new Sustainability Department and our efforts have resulted in some truly astounding reductions in energy and water use, as well as some impressive increases in the volume of recycling we do.

"At Marshall, we continue to make practical changes in the way we conduct our business and the way we live on campus that are not only good for our environment, they are also good for our bottom line," Kopp said. "We hope educators and administrators statewide will join us this fall for a great opportunity to share ideas and strategies for a more sustainable West Virginia."

The agenda is still in the planning stages, but will include a variety of breakout sessions, panel discussions and hands-on opportunities for collaboration and learning. It will target fiscal and financial officers; facilities, maintenance or operations professionals; civic engagement or community-based volunteer coordinators; as well as students.

Randy Huffman, cabinet secretary for the DEP, said this is the second summit his agency has held to try to assist institutions of learning.

"It's important to understand that the environment underpins all human activity and that we cannot sustain progress if we do so at its expense," Huffman said. "Today, more and more businesses understand the relationship between a healthy environment and sustainable operations. Therefore, there is a direct link between a healthy environment and a healthy economy.

"The DEP is excited to partner with Marshall University in an ongoing effort to bring sustainable practices to West Virginia's institutions of learning."

For more information, contact MU Sustainability Manager Margie Phillips at philli10@marshall.edu or 304-696-2992.


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Thursday April 8, 2010
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Public affairs show at Marshall University profiles Google Fiber project and spring football

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "We Are Marshall Today," Marshall University's public affairs show, welcomes MU's Chief Technology Officer Allen Taylor and Head Football Coach Doc Holliday to the interview set for the episode scheduled to begin running Friday, April 9.

Taylor talks with co-host Leah Edwards about the Huntington community's bid to win the Google Fiber project, which would bring an experimental high-speed fiber network to the city.  Taylor also discusses several information technology projects underway on campus.

Co-host Dan Hollis conducts a seven-minute interview with Holliday, which focuses on spring football practice and what's ahead for the 2010 season. Holliday also explains to Hollis how he got his nickname.

Rounding out the current show are a news story on Marshall's recent award for its video/computer gaming program, information on the upcoming Alumni Weekend, and a look at the medical school's annual residency match day.

"We Are Marshall Today" can be seen on Comcast channel 25 in the Huntington area daily at 9 a.m., 1 p.m. and 10 p.m.   The broadcast is also available on  Suddenlink Channels 19 and 22 in various other West Virginia markets.  Viewers may also see the programming at www.marshall.edu/wamtoday.

"We Are Marshall Today" is a production of University Communications, Digital Media Services and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

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Photo: Co-host Dan Hollis talks with football Coach Doc Holliday on the set of "We Are Marshall Today."  


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Wednesday April 7, 2010
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Rent-A-Text program coming to Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Bookstore will begin offering textbook rental services this fall, according to Dr. Karen Kirtley, assistant vice president of administration for the university.

Rent-A-Text will offer students approximately 50 percent off the price of new textbooks and will provide students with an affordable alternative to rising education costs, Kirtley said.

Marshall University's textbook rental program will:

         Be available to students in store and online with in-store pick up;

         Allow students to choose a preferred form of payment, including campus cards;

         Allow students the freedom to highlight and take notes all within the normal wear and tear associated with coursework; 

         Give students the choice to buy their textbooks at the end of the term.

Rent-A-Text is available through Marshall's existing partnership with Follett Higher Education Group. The program is based on Follett's comprehensive pilot program that saved students nearly $2 million on course materials in just one semester. Of those who rented textbooks, more than 90 percent of students surveyed expressed satisfaction with the pilot program.

"We have been at the forefront of cost-saving programs for more than a century," said Thomas A. Christopher, President of Follett Higher Education Group. "Helping to reduce the costs of higher education is part of our mission and we look forward to working with Marshall University to deliver substantial textbook savings to students."

Details about Rent-A-Text at the Marshall University Bookstore will be forthcoming. In the meantime, check out www.rent-a-text.com or www.facebook.com/rentatext for more information.


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Wednesday April 7, 2010
Contact: Calah Young, West Virginia Land Trust, , 304-346-7788

Marshall students to participate in tree-planting event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from the Marshall University Recreation and Park Resources program will be participating in a volunteer tree-planting event from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 10 at the Wallace Hartman Nature Preserve in Charleston. The event is being hosted by the West Virginia Land Trust.

The 50+ acre preserve is a public recreation space that was donated by Marshall alumna Dolly Wallace Hartman for the enjoyment of the residents of Kanawha County. It is accessible from Adrian Drive off South Ruffner Road in the South Hills area.

The Marshall students, along with WVLT Board members and supporters, will plant sycamore trees that have been provided by the West Virginia Division of Forestry's Mountaineer Treeways program.  The trees will help to stabilize the stream bank and absorb water to improve access to the site for hiking and other passive recreation. Organizers of the event say they hope to help area residents uncover what the Wallace Hartman Nature Preserve has to offer while also providing education about land conservation and the work of the land trust.

The WVLT is a private, member-supported, nonprofit organization and West Virginia's only statewide land trust. Since its incorporation in 1995, the organization has helped protect more than 17,000 acres statewide through voluntary conservation easements. Conservation easements are voluntary contracts between a landowner and a land trust, such as the WVLT, government agency or another qualified organization. These contracts allow landowners to place permanent restrictions on the future uses of some or all of their property for the purpose of protecting scenic, wildlife, botanical, recreational, agricultural or historical resources.

For  more information on the West Virginia Land Trust please visit www.wvlandtrust.org  or contact Calah Young at 866-982-5863 or wvlandtrust@te-associates.com.


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Marshall names Dr. Michael W. Prewitt dean of College of Health Professions

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, currently associate vice provost at the University of Missouri-Columbia, has been named dean of the College of Health Professions at Marshall University, according to Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall.

Prewitt will begin his duties July 1.

"I am very happy that Dr. Prewitt will be joining Marshall as the new College of Health Professions dean," Ormiston said.  "The depth of his administrative experience will be a great asset to the college.  He possesses a sound understanding of the college's need to expand its offerings to the state and to the region."

Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., Vice President for Health Sciences and dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said Prewitt brings with him a strong background and great enthusiasm.

"He is a good fit for Marshall's active and vibrant COHP program, and I believe he will take it to new heights," McKown said.

Prewitt has been with the University of Missouri since 1979, serving in a variety of roles, including interim vice president for undergraduate studies, director of the Student Success Center, associate dean of student affairs in the School of Health Professions, and faculty fellow in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies.

He holds three degrees from the University of Missouri-Columbia: a B.S. in Respiratory Therapy in the School of Health Related Professions; an M.Ed. in Higher and Adult Education, College of Education; and a Ph.D. in Higher Education.

At Missouri, Prewitt was honored with the School of Health Professions Alumni Association's Outstanding Faculty Award and the Outstanding Teacher Award from the School of Health Professions.

"I'm pleased to have been selected as dean of the College of Health Professions.  I look forward to working with everyone in the college as well as other colleagues at Marshall," Prewitt said.

Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College who chaired the search committee, commented, "Dr. Prewitt's broad administrative experience, coupled with his roots in the health professions, convinced the committee that he would be a strong advocate for the College of Health Professions." 


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Wednesday April 7, 2010
Contact: Kaylin Adkins, Helping Hungry Hearts Campaign Representative, , 304-634-1041

Outrunning Hunger 5K Run/Walk to raise awareness, money for food bank

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hunger is an epidemic in the Tri-State, and one local agency plans to help eradicate the problem by hosting a 5K race.

The Outrunning Hunger 5K Run/Walk will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 10 at Pullman Square in downtown Huntington. Registration begins at 8 a.m.

The race, hosted by Helping Hungry Hearts, will help raise awareness and money for the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB).  Helping Hungry Hearts is a student-run public relations agency from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University.

"When I came on board, I found out that there were a lot of people in Huntington that were not aware of this food bank's existence," said Jon Rickey, executive director of the HAFB. "We're on the side of the angels. All that we want to do is feed hungry people, and that's our mission."

The race is sponsored by several local businesses, including American Electric Power, Cabell County EMS, Cabell-Huntington Hospital, City Tan Express, Contempo Trophy, Fruth Pharmacy, Giovanni's, Hometown Sportswear, Hot Corner, MedExpress, Mug & Pia, Road ID, Route 60 Music Company, The Union Pub & Grill, The Village on Sixth Avenue and Towne Place Suites by Marriott.

Other businesses donated items for a race-day raffle, such as a free two-night stay at the Magnolia House in New Martinsville, W.Va., food coupons and other items. Each raffle ticket is $1.

"We have secured a lot of donations from local businesses in the area," said Ellen Kist, promotions team chair. "And, in my opinion, that really shows the caliber of people who not only work but also live in the Tri-State area. We really appreciate the donations, but we also appreciate the businesses and people who are helping to get the word out about the HAFB. It is crucial for the survival of any nonprofit to have people support the work they are doing. Without the HAFB, the fight against hunger would be an impossible battle to win."

Pre-registration ended April 3, but runners may still register online for the race for $20. Those interested may also register the day of the race. Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will be attendance, and radio stations, including Marshall University's WMUL, will set up live remotes at the race.

First-place runners and walkers in each age division will receive medals, and second- and third-place runners will receive ribbons. The awards ceremony will take place at 10 a.m.

Male and female runners and walkers will be separated into the following age divisions:

  • 14 and under
  • 15 to 19
  • 20 to 29
  • 30 to 39
  • 40 to 49
  • 50 to 59
  • 60 to 69
  • 70 and up

Runners may pick up their race packets and T-shirts at a spaghetti dinner from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Marshall University Newman Center on 5th Avenue. Runners have the opportunity to "carb up" before the race, and donations for spaghetti will be accepted on behalf of the HAFB. Participants may also pick up race packets and T-shirts the day of the race.

Other methods of donating are available for those who do not wish to participate in the 5K event. Helping Hungry Hearts and Uno Chicago Grill, located at Pullman Square, have teamed up to host a "doughraiser" April 3-10 to raise money to help Helping Hungry Hearts reach its goals. Uno's will donate 20 percent of each customer's check to the campaign, but a customer must have a ticket to participate in the doughraiser.

For more information about Helping Hungry Hearts or to register for the Outrunning Hunger 5K Run/Walk, visit www.marshall.edu/helpinghungryhearts  or e-mail the agency at helpinghungryhearts@marshall.edu. Also, contact co-director Whitney Parsley at 304-389-0390. To learn more about the HAFB, contact Brooke Ash at 304-523-6029 or brooke@hafb.org.

###

The Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) is a private, nonprofit organization founded in 1983 and based in Huntington, W.Va. The HAFB is affiliated with Feeding America, the country's largest hunger-relief organization. The HAFB serves more than 250 agencies in 17 counties in West Virginia, southeastern Ohio and eastern Kentucky. The HAFB's main mission is to curb the hunger problem by distributing nutritious food products through its member agency network.  The HAFB currently helps to feed 91,000 people per month in the Tri-State area.


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Tuesday April 6, 2010
Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist, , 304-696-6397

Marshall University to host Cyberinfrastructure Visualization demonstration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host a demonstration beginning at 1 p.m. Thursday, April 8 showcasing powerful visualization technology with applications for economic development, scientific research and medicine.

The project, called Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in West Virginia and Arkansas (CI-TRAIN), is a partnership among eight higher education institutions in West Virginia and Arkansas and is funded by a multi-million dollar National Science Foundation grant.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of the Marshall's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences, says the demonstration is an opportunity for local businesses and individuals to see how the visualization technology can be utilized to help accelerate knowledge discovery, spark idea creation and foster economic development in the region.

Thursday's event will feature Dr. Jack Smith, manager of Marshall's visualization laboratory, discussing the applications of a software package called Avizo, which is a general purpose 3D scientific visualization system often used  to  support geoscience, simulation, material science and medical imaging.

Who: Marshall University

What: 3D Scientific Visualization with Avizo

When: 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday, April 8

Where: Visualization Laboratory, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories, Marshall's Huntington campus

The event is open to the public, but space in the laboratory is limited. For more information and to reserve a spot for Thursday, contact Dr. Tony Szwilski at 304-696-5457.


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Monday April 5, 2010
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June Harless Center inducts three into Harless Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Human Service's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development will hold its 8th annual Harless Hall of Fame dinner on Thursday, April 15.

This year's ceremony, which starts at 6:30 p.m., will be held in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.  The ceremony is a time to show appreciation and give recognition to those people who have been identified as outstanding contributors to West Virginia's educational system with special focus on the rural areas of the state.

Inductees into the Hall of Fame typically include one teacher, one administrator, and one business/educational partner or organization that has provided exemplary leadership to ensure the success of the education of all students in West Virginia.

This year's inductees include:

         Dr. Lowell E. Johnson, member of the West Virginia Board of Education and president of the National Association of State Boards of Education's (NASBE) Board of Directors;

         Ralph Baxter, co-chair of the West Virginia 21st Century Jobs Cabinet and chairman and CEO of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe;

         Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin.

A showcase of the Harless Center's work and presentation of the Hallie Harless Distinguished Teacher Award also will be part of the night's events. 

First Lady Gayle Manchin, Senator Robert Plymale and superintendant Dr. Steven L. Payne, all former inductees, will present the new members into the Hall of Fame. Buck Harless, founder of the Harless Center, will be recognized for his exemplary vision and support for transforming education in West Virginia schools.

The mission of the June Harless Center is to provide leadership in educational initiatives for West Virginia educators and students, providing educators and families of rural West Virginia with a support system that addresses educational problems, sustains school improvement and provides positive growth in all educational factors.  The June Harless Center currently has ongoing projects with many counties in the state providing support and professional development.

For more information, contact Dr. Stan Maynard, executive director of the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development, at 304-696-2890, or via e-mail at maynard@marshall.edu.


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Monday April 5, 2010
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Marshall to host science conference for girls in grades 6-8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host the 2010 Expanding Your Horizons Conference for girls in 6th, 7th and 8th grades on Saturday, April 10 in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on the Huntington campus.

The goal of the conference is to allow students to discover the excitement of science and math by participating in hands-on workshops, according to Dr. Marcia Harrison, professor of biological sciences and coordinator of the conference. The workshop leaders are scientists and science students who will share their knowledge and experience with students and answer any questions they may have about careers in math and science.

The workshop selections cover a wide number of topics in biology, physics, math, and psychology.  They include:

  • In the Nanozone: The Science of Teeny Tiny:  The study of nanoscience and nanotechnology and how scientists study things that are so small.
  • Skeletons in the Closet: How the over 200 bones hiding under our skin fit together to create the framework of our bodies. 
  • Become a Legal Drug Dealer: Careers in Pharmacy: The world of a pharmacist, working with the medicines that everyone needs to stay healthy, is explored.
  • Uncovering the Psychology of Everyday Life: How social psychology is used to understand what goes on in our everyday lives.
  • Terrific Tessellations: A tessellation is a tiled pattern where a shape is repeated without any gaps or overlaps. Tessellations have appeared throughout art history, from ancient times to modern art. Students will learn about the mathematics of tessellations, and will create their own tessellated art which they can take home.
  • LaserFest Roadshow:  The 50th anniversary of the invention will be celebrated with a laser show in the star dome as students learn all about lasers.
  • Power It Up! An Introduction to Circuits: Circuits are used in phones, iPods, and any device that requires power. Participants will learn how to build a basic circuit to power a light bulb.
  • Rising Tide: Sea Level Rise and the New U.S. Coastline: Geographic Information System (GIS) software will be used to simulate rising sea levels.
  • Great Expectations: Probability is used to determine expected outcomes and make decisions based on that information.
  • ESTEEM PHYSICS: Engaging Students Through Exciting Experiments in Modern Physics
  • Wear Your DNA Necklace: Students will observe the properties of their own DNA by extracting the molecule from their cheek cells.

Parents and teachers of participants are invited to attend two adult information sessions.  One will focus on preparing for, applying to and financing college and will be hosted by the Marshall University Offices of Admissions and Student Financial Assistance. The other session will provide information about opportunities for students in West Virginia, including science camps, competitions and activity days, as well as NASA internships for high school and college students.

The conference is sponsored by the West Virginia Chapter of the Association for Women in Science (WV AWIS), and co-sponsored by the MU-ADVANCE Program and the Science and Research Division of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

For additional information, contact Harrison by phone at 304-696-4867 or by e-mail at harrison@marshall.edu.   


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'Old Friends and New Beginnings' theme of Alumni Weekend 2010

Spring football game, Alumni Banquet highlight event April 23-24

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alumni Weekend 2010, featuring the theme "Old Friends and New Beginnings," takes place Friday-Saturday, April 23-24, at Marshall University.

Numerous events are planned, including the annual Green and White Spring Football Game at 4 p.m. Saturday, and the 73rd annual Alumni Banquet honoring distinguished alumni and friends of Marshall University at 7 p.m.

"Alumni Weekend is always special, but this year will be even more exciting than usual as many of our alumni and friends will be visiting for the first time our beautiful Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center," said Nancy Pelphrey, Coordinator of Alumni Programs. "Marshall University continues to make great progress in all areas, from academics to athletics to facilities, and we are proud to share the good news with our alumni - particularly those who have not been back on campus for a while."

Here is a look at some of the events planned in conjunction with or during Alumni Weekend:

Thursday, April 22

Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) Seminar Series: "Culture, Technology and Society," featuring Dr. Rob DeSalle, curator of entomology at the American Museum of Natural History, Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center. A reception begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the program at 6:30 p.m. This event is free to the public.

Friday, April 23

The first official event of Alumni Weekend is a Champagne Reception, which begins at 6 p.m. in the MU Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Those attending are welcome to take a guided tour of the new facility. Cost to attend the Champagne Reception is $15. RSVP by calling 304-696-2901.

Marshall University ROTC, Department of Military Science, will have its annual Military Ball at the Memorial Student Center, BE5, starting at 6 p.m. with cocktails and a receiving line. The ceremony and formal dinner start at 7 p.m., with dancing and entertainment to follow.

ROTC alumni who wish to sponsor a cadet for $25 or sponsor a table for $200 can send their donations to MU ROTC, 216 Gullickson Hall, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755. Tickets are $40 per person or $75 per couple. For more information, contact CPT Mike Armstrong at 304-696-6450.

The Marshall University Theatre production of "Our Country's Good" begins at 8 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. For tickets, call 304-696-6395. Tickets are $12.

Saturday, April 24

A Presidential Coffee for the Heritage Society will take place from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall. Call Ed Zimmerman at 304-696-3739 for more information on this free event.

The Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1960). The class will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1960. The event will take place from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. in the Erickson Alumni Center Conference Center. The cost is $20 per person. A trolley tour of campus and downtown will immediately follow the luncheon.

The Young Alumni Committee of the Marshall University Alumni Association and the River Cities Alumni Club will co-sponsor a tailgate party from 1 to 3 p.m. in the West Lot of Joan C. Edwards Stadium, prior to the annual Green and White Spring Football Game. Free Hillbilly Hot Dogs and soft drinks will be served. Just look for the alumni banners.

The annual Green and White Spring Football Game will kick off at 4 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. For tickets, call 304-696-HERD or 800-The-HERD. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students.

The President's Social will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Admission is free.

The highlight of the weekend is the 73rd annual Alumni Banquet honoring distinguished alumni and friends, beginning at 7 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. The cost for the banquet is $50 per person or $90 per couple. Call the Office of Alumni Relations at 800-682-5869 or 304-696-2901.


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University Chorus to premiere 'Dream of Freedom' Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chorus will present the world premiere of Dr. Evan Mack's composition Langston Hughes' Dream of Freedom at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 11 in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The performance is free and open to the public.

The premiere is one of the culminating events in the College of Fine Arts' Birke Fine Arts Symposium, which started in February with a theme of "Giving Voice: Social Justice and the Arts."

Mack, who last year was a Joan C. Edwards Distinguished Professor of the Arts at Marshall, will lead the choir in a work that, he says, "expresses a need for the respect of diversity through all types of individuals in this world - making the word Freedom, through the bad and good, something to be celebrated."

"When I was visiting Marshall University last year, I noticed that both students and faculty were excited about new music in all of its forms; from idea to process to product," Mack said. "The 'Dream of Freedom,' true to the nature of Langston Hughes, explores a wide variety of styles, from art song to the blues, to new age, classical techniques to gospel."

The chorus was prepared for the premiere by Robert Wray, assistant professor of music at Marshall.

"I'm thrilled that this performance is part of t