FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 22, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator,, (304) 746-1989

Business majors at Kanawha Valley CTC can now parlay their associate degrees into bachelor's degrees from Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University entered into an agreement today that allows business majors who have earned associate degrees from Kanawha Valley Community and Technical College to seamlessly transfer those credits to Marshall in pursuit of bachelor's degrees, according to Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for Outreach and Continuing Studies. 

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and Kanawha Valley CTC President Joseph Badgley signed 2+2 Articulation Agreements today to benefit students in the fields of Accounting, Finance, Management, Management Information Systems, and Marketing. The signing took place in Old Main on Marshall's Huntington campus.

President Kopp said he is "quite pleased" to provide these degree options to students from Kanawha Valley CTC.

"Certainly, this partnership is a win-win for the business programs at both institutions, but more importantly, it's a win-win for the students," Kopp said. "We warmly welcome our Kanawha Valley CTC transfer students into the Marshall University family. I encourage them all to participate fully in all that we have to offer here on the Huntington campus - from student organizations to collegiate sporting events."

According to the official agreement, the deans of both programs will continually monitor the curriculum at both institutions to ensure consistency and program quality. Students who hold an A.A.S. degree at Kanawha Valley will earn a B.B.A. from Marshall by fulfilling their final two years of coursework on the Huntington campus. Once at Marshall, transfer students are a part of the Marshall University College of Business.

President Badgley said the Business Studies faculty at Kanawha Valley CTC, especially Dean Megan Lorenz, has developed a very positive working relationship with their counterparts at Marshall University. He said both groups are dedicated to providing transfer students the opportunity to succeed and pursue their education beyond completion of the associate's degree.

"I believe this relationship with Marshall University is just the beginning for Kanawha Valley CTC students wishing to complete a bachelor's degree," Badgley said. "The response from our students when they first learned of this agreement has been overwhelming. Many of our students are first generation and lack confidence in their ability to succeed when they first begin at KVCTC. To know that upon completion of their associate degree they can attend Marshall University and complete a baccalaureate degree from a nationally accredited program is beyond what many thought possible when they first began college."

Badgley added that this agreement provides benefit to both institutions.

"Marshall University gets transfer students who are already performing at a high level and Kanawha Valley CTC students have the opportunity to complete their bachelor's degree from nationally accredited programs at Marshall University," Badgley said. "I foresee this as a fruitful and beneficial partnership for both institutions and the first of what I hope will be many more to come."

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Photo: Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, left, and Kanawha Valley CTC President Joseph Badgley sign 2+2 Articulation Agreements today in Dr. Kopp's office on MU's Huntington campus. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 22, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Community can use Marshall Recreation Center for free Jan. 5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is inviting members of the community to try the Rec Center on MU's Huntington campus for free Thursday, Jan. 5.

Everyone will be able to experience all the Rec Center has to offer. In addition to use of the facilities, demos and classes will also be open to everyone and everyone who attends a class will receive a free water bottle.

"Improving your fitness with a new group, or friends and family, is one of the best ways to stay motivated," said Heather Smith, senior assistant director of fitness at the Rec Center. "Everyone should try a new, challenging fitness activity in the new year."

It's also a great way to introduce friends to the fitness opportunities at the Rec Center, and everyone will save money. Members can get one free month of membership for each person they bring who signs up for a membership, which will also be discounted 15 percent.

The Marshall Recreation Center facilities include a climbing wall, sport courts, fitness machines and an aquatics center with a vortex pool. This and more will be available for everyone to try.

Here is the schedule of events (no pre-registration necessary):

  • Spinning: 5:30 p.m.

  • Zumba: 6:15 p.m.

  • Burn and Firm: 7 p.m.

Free personal training consultations and Jiu Jitsu will be offered from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Rec Center lobby.

The recreation center is open from 6:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Jan. 5.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 20, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

Fruth Pharmacy establishes scholarship for Marshall School of Pharmacy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Fruth Pharmacy Scholarship for Marshall University's School of Pharmacy has been established through a $15,000 gift donated by the Mason County family-owned business.  

The recipients of the renewable award will be full-time students who have completed two years of pre-pharmacy prerequisites with a minimum GPA of 2.5 and have applied and enrolled in the pharmacy program.

Tracy Straub, program director of scholarships and donor relations with Marshall's development office, said that to qualify for the scholarship, potential recipients must be from Mason, Cabell, Kanawha, Putnam, Wayne, Roane, Jackson or Wood counties in West Virginia, or Gallia, Jackson, Meigs, Lawrence, Athens, Washington or Pike counties in Ohio.

Straub said the students also must have an interest in community pharmacy.

The Marshall University School of Pharmacy will welcome its inaugural class in fall 2012 and students will be eligible to apply for the scholarship.

For more information, contact Straub at 304-696-6781.

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Photo: Lynne Fruth, president and chairman of the board with Fruth Pharmacy, signs the guidelines for the new Fruth Pharmacy Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy as Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp (seated) looks on. Standing are, from left, Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, Tracy Straub, program director of scholarships and donor relations at Marshall, and Craig Kimble, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy for Fruth. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 20, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of FIne Arts,, (304) 696-3296

Marshall University president's office announces holiday art contest winners

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's College of Fine Arts were honored recently for their winning entries in a design competition run through the office of Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

The competition was for best print holiday card, best digital holiday card and best plate showcasing important elements of Marshall University. This year's contest attracted about 75 entries for the print holiday card and about 35 entries for the plate. An entire class entered the digital card category.

Kopp said the history of the awards dates back more than five years. He and his wife, Jane, help choose the award winners each year. 

"My wife and I were exploring ways to encourage students in the fine arts, particularly in visual arts, to help us by creating a holiday card coming from the university," Kopp said. "We also started a series of engraved plates showcasing our students' work to highlight some hallmark aspects  of Marshall University."

Byron Clercx, chair of Marshall's department of art and design, praised the Kopps for their support of the arts.

"To work at a university where the president is so overtly supportive of the arts is a dream come true. He and his wife have supported the arts in a number of ways for a number of years through their personal gifts," Clercx said. "By sponsoring these three competitions and even with the artwork hanging in his office, it means that we are a visible and viable part of the campus."

Margaryta Seliverstova, a junior art and design major, was the winner of the print card competition; John Fowler, a  junior art and design major, and Morgan Thompson, a senior graphic design major, were the first-place winners for their work on the plate; and the entire graphic design and digital media class took first place for their collaborative work on the digital card.

Levi Brunbaugh received the second-place award and Thompson received third place in the print card category. Since first place was shared, there was no second-place winner in the plate category. Amanda Wheeler received third place in that category. In the digital card category, Matthew Crutchfield received the second-place award and Matthew Smith received the third-place award.

Honorable mentions went to Whitney Lyons and Kelli Simpson in the print card category and to Jeffery Pennington in the plate category.

"It makes me feel great. It's a great opportunity to get your name out there and share your work outside the university and represent Marshall," Seliverstova said.

Thompson said her WMUL 50-year anniversary design was combined with Fowler's piece on the 75th anniversary of the Artists Series to create the plate design.

"It was something I felt was overlooked," she said. "Both of the anniversaries were smaller but need to be recognized as well."

Brent Patterson, professor of graphic design and new media, teaches the class that won the digital card competition. The students used individual pieces and combined them to make a larger piece incorporating the theme of "happy holidays."

"Normally the students compete against each other, but I decided to make it a group project taking the best of each student's work and make a really strong piece," Patterson said.

Jane Kopp said this contest is a great way for her to get involved in the university and to meet the students.

"We sit down together and look at all the choices. This year we were really surprised that we had even more choices," Jane Kopp said. "I love doing this with him and meeting the students, that's the important thing for me."

"It's fun to see what students come up with each year and reaffirms in my mind that we have very talented students in our fine arts programs," President  Kopp said. He said plates are given to the most generous donors. Cards go out to all the people on the mailing list. They issue about 75 plates and about 1,000 print cards each year.  The digital card goes up on the web.

The competition is open to all students at Marshall.

"I'd like to see it more widespread, not only graphics and the digital arts program, but across the campus," Stephen Kopp said.  "I think it's a great way to showcase the incredible talent we have here, but also for us as a university to recognize the work that they do."

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Photos: (Above) Winners of the holiday design contest received their awards from Stephen J. Kopp (third from left), president of Marshall University, and his wife, Jane (second from left).  Margaryta Seliverstova (far left), junior art and design major, was the winner of the print card. John Fowler (far right), junior art and design major, and Morgan Thompson (second from right), senior graphic design major, were the first-place winners for their work on the plate, and the entire graphic design and digital media class took first place for their collaborative work on the digital card. (Middle) The winning print card design. (Below) The winning plate design.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 20, 2011
Contact: Errin Jewell, RTI Marketing and Communications Manager,, 304-696-7098

CSX presents gift of $25,000 to Marshall University's Bucks for Brains program for rail research at RTI

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives from CSX Corporation today presented a gift of $25,000 to Marshall University for rail research conducted by the Rahall Transportation Institute (RTI), a National University Transportation Center based at Marshall.

The presentation took place at the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories on MU's Huntington campus.

RTI Director and CEO Robert H. "Bob" Plymale and Marshall University Foundation Vice President for Development Lance West accepted the check from CSX Executive Vice President and COO David Brown and CSX Regional Vice President of Public Affairs J. Randolph Cheetham.

"This is CSX's third donation for rail research at RTI and MU," Plymale said. "This contribution demonstrates CSX's commitment to helping RTI advance the rail industry through research initiatives that include technology testing, research and development for asset mapping and inspections; train, car and mobile worker tracking, and intelligent grade crossings."

CSX Corporation, based in Jacksonville, Fla., is one of the nation's leading transportation companies, providing rail, intermodal and rail-to-truck transload services. The company's transportation network spans approximately 21,000 miles, with service to 23 eastern states and the District of Columbia, and connects to more than 70 ocean, river and lake ports.

RTI is a leader in multimodal transportation and economic development. RTI is a National University Transportation Center recognized by the U.S. Department of Transportation for transportation excellence focused on applied technology, research, education, outreach and training.

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Photo: Robert H. "Bob" Plymale, center, and Lance West, right, accept a check for $25,000 from CSX Executive Vice President and COO David Brown this morning in a ceremony at the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Photo from Marshall University.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 19, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

Marshall University student receives four national awards for his work in animation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Patrick Eason, a senior graphic design major in Marshall University's College of Fine Arts, received four Pixie Awards for work he did at his internship at Rainmaker Inc., a public relations and advertising firm located in Charleston, W.Va.

The Pixie Awards, sponsored by the American Pixel Academy, honor outstanding work in animation, effects and motion graphics.There were 750 entries from all over the United States and Canada. Rainmaker Inc. was one of only three groups who won four awards, two of which were Pixie Platinum Awards, the highest level.

"The work I did for these was the 3D animation," Eason said. "We had submitted four spots two of which involved 3D models. Those two that involved models I handled fully, from motionography to animation. In addition, I created the logo animation at the end of each of the four spots."

Nancy Geletko, creative director at Rainmaker, said she was impressed with Eason's work ethic.

"I have been in this business for 30 years and frankly, Patrick is one of the most talented young students I have ever had the chance to work with," Geletko said. "I was going another route with video and he walked into my office and asked if he could try animation, and that impressed me, so I said, 'Give it a shot.' He was working day and night."

"As a student and intern, this is a great achievement for Patrick," Geletko said.

Mary Grassell, graphic design professor at Marshall University, said while she was impressed with Eason's awards, she wasn't surprised, due to his strong graphic design skills.

"We are proud of Patrick in the graphics department," Grassell said. "He has been an excellent student."

Eason said he will be staying at Rainmaker to help better his skills, but this experience has given him even more opportunities.

"Since I've won the awards my site has garnered a huge burst of traffic and even David Carter, world renowned graphic designer, has emailed me in response to the post I made about it and offered for me to come meet him in New York," Eason said.

Geletko said Rainmaker Inc. is the only West Virginia-based firm to win a Pixie Award.

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Photo: Marshall University student Patrick Eason won four Pixie Awards for work he did as an intern at Rainmaker Inc.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 16, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

Marshall faculty and students visit U.S. Army aviation center to learn how military is using information technology

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A delegation from Marshall University's Integrated Science and Technology Department is visiting the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence in Fort Rucker, Ala., this week to learn how the military is using computer modeling, simulation and digital forensics to enhance training.

The visit was undertaken at the invitation of Marshall alumnus Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield, the center's commanding general.

Brian M. Morgan, an associate professor, is leading the group. He says they are meeting with key Army personnel and attending presentations to learn how Marshall can further enhance its information technology (IT) programs and collaborations with the military.

Morgan, who coordinates the university's Computer and Information Technology (CIT) major, said, "We will bring what we are learning here back to campus to enhance our curriculum and help students in the computer and IT fields understand how their educations can lead them to military or civilian jobs in computer modeling and simulation.

"We also are forming relationships with the Army and the Department of Defense that we hope will lead to collaborative projects in the future. 

In addition to Morgan, Marshall representatives on the trip include Assistant Professor John E. Sammons and students Bradley Roeher, a junior CIT major from Logan, and Jonathan Sisson, a senior CIT major from Huntington.

Crutchfield began his military career in 1982, graduating from Marshall as a Distinguished Military Graduate and receiving a Regular Army commission. In his current position at Fort Rucker, he is responsible for all U.S. Army helicopter, unmanned aerial systems and aviation maintenance training. The headquarters for Army aviation, Fort Rucker is the largest helicopter training installation in the world.

For more information, contact Morgan at brian.morgan@marshall.edu or (304) 696-6469.

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Photo:  Marshall University representatives visit Fort Rucker, Ala., to learn how the military is using information technology. From left are student Jonathan Sisson of Huntington, Assistant Professor John E. Sammons, Marshall University alumnus Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield, Associate Professor Brian M. Morgan and student Bradley Roeher of Logan.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 13, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, (304) 696-6397

Marshall University Board of Governors approves school color change

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University Board of Governors during its meeting today adopted a resolution to change the university's official green color to PANTONE Matching System (PMS) 356, referred by Thundering Herd fans as Kelly green.

The resolution was adopted unanimously and is effective January 1, 2012.

Marshall University athletics has historically used Kelly green, even when the university switched to the darker green color (PMS 357) in 2001. The university test-marketed the Kelly green color earlier this year. Marshall athletics and administration officials said it was overwhelmingly positively received by fans and alumni, which led to the decision to return to Kelly green as the university's official color.

Marshall University officials say there will be minimal cost change implications, as campus items, such as letterhead and business cards will be replaced with the logotype in Kelly green only as the existing darker green items run out.  

In other action, the board approved a resolution to select Kansas City-based architecture company, AECOM, as the firm for the planning and design of four athletic facilities: indoor practice facility and track; academic support center; sports medicine translational research center; and soccer stadium complex.

"This is a great company that has designed dozens of sports-related facilities across the nation," said Mike Hamrick, director of athletics. "These are four, very unique, diverse, yet connected facilities and we think AECOM will do an excellent job."

The board of governors welcomed a new member today as well.

Wyatt Scaggs, a 1982 Marshall University graduate and Logan business owner, was appointed to the Marshall University Board of Governors by West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin earlier this fall. The Hon. Menis Ketchum, Justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, swore in Scaggs during the board's meeting today. Ketchum formerly was a member of the Marshall University Board of Governors.

"I am looking forward to serving with the folks at Marshall University," Scaggs said. "It's a fine institution and one I am privileged to be associated with."

Scaggs replaces former member Brig. Gen. H.F. Mooney, who served as a board member from 2004 through November 2011.

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Photo: Wyatt Scaggs has joined the Marshall University Board of Governors. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 12, 2011
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall University's Huntington campus to observe holiday hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities on Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open at various times during the holiday break, which takes place from Friday, Dec. 23, through Monday, Jan. 2.

The holiday hours are listed in the online chart.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 7, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Translational Genomic Research Institute dedicated at Marshall

Facility named in honor of former medical school dean
Charles H. McKown, M.D.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The new Charles H. McKown, M.D., Translational Genomic Research Institute at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine was dedicated in a ceremony Tuesday, Dec. 6.

The facility was named in honor of McKown, who served as the school's dean for more than 22 years before becoming Marshall's vice president for health sciences advancement this summer.

The Marshall University Board of Governors cited McKown's "extraordinary service to the University" in approving the facility's naming.

Dr. Robert C. Nerhood, interim dean of the medical school, said McKown's contributions to the medical school were many.

"His uncanny ability to almost instantaneously perceive convoluted relationships and unintended consequences of simple or complex actions has ideally suited him to be an eminently successful dean of a community-based medical school in West Virginia," he said. "I am not at all sure that this talent can again be found."

Nerhood said the genomic research facility is an outgrowth of McKown's vision and advocacy.

"Dr. McKown foresaw the importance of the new field of translational research in the area of cancer care," and then worked with philanthropist Joan Edwards and U.S. Sen. Robert Byrd to turn that vision into reality, he said.

In addition to Nerhood, speakers at the dedication ceremony included Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; Dr. Richard Niles, senior associate dean for research and graduate education at the medical school, and professor and chair of the university's Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology; Edward Seiler, director of the Huntington VA Medical Center; and McKown.

Videotaped greetings were given by U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin III and U.S. Representative Nick J. Rahall II. Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin was represented by Jacqueline Proctor, his director of communications.

A reception and tours of the facility followed the dedication ceremony.

The Charles H. McKown, M.D., Translational Genomic Research Institute is located on the top floor of the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. Completed this summer, it includes more than 10,000 square feet of research space and has advanced scientific equipment including a "next-generation" genetic sequencer. Several university researchers already are working at the institute.

In addition to naming the facility after McKown, the medical school has established a scholarship in his honor.

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Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, left, looks on as Charles H. McKown speaks during Tuesday's dedication ceremony. (Below) From left, Dr. Robert Nerhood, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Dr. Richard Niles, Edward Seiler and Jacqueline Proctor applaud as Charles H. McKown prepares to speak during Tuesday's dedication ceremony. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 6, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

MU Foundation issues reminder for holiday season charitable contributions

Year-end contributions may help defray tax liabilities in 2012

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Foundation Inc. planned giving officers are reminding individuals that Dec. 31 is the deadline to make charitable contributions for tax year 2011.

"While April 15 is the deadline to file your tax return for the previous year, now is the time to help lessen your tax burden by making charitable contributions," Ed Zimmerman, director of planned giving with the Marshall University Foundation, said.  "There are numerous ways to give to Marshall University which in turn helps students with the cost of their education and generates funding for capital expansion."

Zimmerman says he and associate director of planned giving Beverly Crabtree are available to meet with individuals and their tax advisors to determine the most effective giving methods for the donor.

"Anyone can make a gift to Marshall University.  The most common contribution is a cash donation, but securities, retirement plans, real estate, life insurance and even certain types of individual retirement accounts (IRA) may be used as vehicles for contributions, "Zimmerman said.  "Contributing to a charitable organization by December 31 allows taxpayers to generate income tax deductions that could reduce their tax bill."

Charitable use of IRAs is limited to individuals 70 years old through laws currently in place.   Zimmerman says Congress has renewed special incentives that allow gifts to charities designated as 501-C3 organizations through Dec. 31, but it's not known if Congress will continue the program in the future. To qualify, the charitable gifts must be made directly from the IRA to the organization.

Crabtree and Zimmerman say donors may direct their gifts to specific areas such as engineering or journalism or give to the university's most pressing needs.

"Additionally the holiday season is also a wonderful time to memorialize a loved one through the establishment of a scholarship," Crabtree said.   "Every dollar generated through the foundation helps students attend Marshall, provides funds for capital growth and improvement, and enhances curriculum."

For more information on year-end charitable giving, contact Zimmerman at 304-696-3739 or Crabtree at 304-696-6511.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 5, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Area high school students conduct award-winning research at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two area high school students working in the lab of Dr. Simon Collier at Marshall University are receiving national recognition for their research.

The students, Nathan N. Wang and Jared M. Galloway, are seniors at Fairland High School in Proctorville, Ohio. They have been working in Collier's lab since summer 2010 with Marshall graduate student David Neff on a project to explore the function of a rubber-like protein, resilin, in insect flight.

Research in Collier's lab focuses on the genetic control of the basic developmental processes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. According to Collier, Drosophila has been studied for more than 100 years because the organism has many genes and genetic pathways similar to humans. An associate professor of biology at Marshall, Collier is considered a pioneer in the field.

Neff, who is overseeing the students' research, said, "This is an important project because not only has it increased our understanding of insect flight, is also has potential implications for the design of biotechnological devices and possibly tissue implants, which could employ molecularly engineered protein sheets."

Wang and Galloway were nationally recognized for their research in October, when they were named semifinalists in the 2011 Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology. The highest science honor awarded to American high school students, the award is sponsored by the Siemens Foundation. Their project was one of only three from Ohio to reach the national semifinals.

Earlier this year, their project earned them superior ratings at the Fairland Schools Local Science Fair, the Ohio Academy of Science District 14 Science Day and the Ohio Academy of Science State Science Day, where they were recognized with the Sigma Xi Interdisciplinary Research Award presented by the Ohio State University chapter of the scientific research society.

Collier said, "Nathan and Jared are indeed outstanding young students with very bright futures ahead of them. They are doing exemplary research in our lab and I'm looking forward to watching where their academic careers take them. "

The research was supported with funding from the National Science Foundation and the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

For more information, contact Collier at 304-696-6111 or simon.collier@marshall.edu.

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Photo: From left, graduate student David Neff, faculty member Simon Collier, and Fairland High School students Nathan Wang and Jared Galloway are shown in Collier's lab. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 2, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winter Commencement set for Dec. 10; nearly 1,250 students to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 2011 Winter Commencement, which takes place Saturday, Dec. 10, will honor nearly 1,250 students who graduated in July or August 2011, or are tentatively scheduled to graduate this month. The ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. at Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus.

Among the 1,247 students, who received or are about to receive degrees, are 754 undergraduates and 493 with graduate degrees. About 400 students have indicated they plan to participate in the ceremony. They will be recognized individually, walking to the area in front of the stage where their names will be announced and they will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 174 students will graduate with honors. Fifteen will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 43 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 101 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

Two students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and 13 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Based on tentative grade point averages, two students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are Brittany Lin Ledbetter of Cross Lanes, W.Va., and Morgan Alexandra Lewis of Wayne.

Dr. Jamie Warner, a professor of political science at Marshall and MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2010-2011, will deliver the keynote speech.

The Hedrick Award she received last spring recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Warner has been at Marshall since 2002, when she was hired as an assistant professor of political science. In 2004, she was awarded both the Pickens-Queen and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Awards. Before coming to Marshall, she was a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of the South (Sewanee) from 2001 to 2002. She received her B.A. from Millersville University in 1991, her M.A. from Penn State University in 1995 and her Ph.D. in political science with a minor in women's studies from Penn State in 2001. 

DVDs available

Marshall University will produce a DVD of the Winter Commencement ceremony for purchase. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the Registrar's Office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Orders also will be accepted Dec. 10 at Henderson Center. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

Parking

Free parking for commencement will be available in the garage across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center, or on any university parking lot. The garage and the Joan C. Edwards Stadium West Lot provide the most convenient parking.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 2, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Aquatic ecotoxicologist joins Marshall University as Eminent Scholar

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mindy Yeager Armstead has joined the faculty of Marshall University's College of Science through the state's Eminent Scholars Recruitment and Enhancement initiative.

A nationally respected aquatic ecotoxicologist with 15 years experience in the commercial sector, Armstead will lead an interdisciplinary team of Marshall scientists focused on research and economic development activities associated with the region's water and energy resources.

"We are thrilled to have Dr. Armstead join our faculty," said Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of the College of Science. "Her reputation and experience make her the perfect choice to develop our targeted research cluster in freshwater resources."

Armstead said, "I'm excited to be at Marshall and look forward to leading a research program that will address some of the most pressing environmental issues in West Virginia and the Appalachian region. Water and energy present tremendous challenges and opportunities for research.  I look forward to working with the team at Marshall."

Prior to joining Marshall, Armstead was a senior scientist at the consulting firm Potesta & Associates Inc. in Charleston, where she led projects to determine water quality standards, assess aquatic community health, and develop strategies to improve or protect stream ecosystems.  Her current research interests include the golden algae Prymnesium parvum, selenium, total dissolved solids and the development of site-specific water quality criteria.

The state funded the $10 million Eminent Scholars initiative to help attract nationally recognized researchers to Marshall and West Virginia University. The goal of the program is to build university research programs, ultimately leading to business spin-offs, new patents and high-tech jobs at all skill and education levels.

"The Eminent Scholars program has made it possible for us to hire some of the best scientists in their fields, focused on some of the most important issues facing our society," said Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research. "Dr. Armstead is the most recent of those hires at Marshall and I look forward to watching as she builds this research program."

Before joining Potesta in 1997, Armstead was employed at TERRADON Corporation in Poca. From 1994 to 1996, she was a post-doctoral research associate in the Department of Biology at Virginia Tech, where she helped develop a watershed scale restoration plan for a stream damaged by acid mine drainage discharge. 

She has served as an adjunct faculty member at Wheeling Jesuit University and at Marshall, has been co-investigator on grants from the American Electric Power Service Corporation, and has co-authored numerous publications and technical reports. She is certified as a Licensed Remediation Specialist by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection.

Armstead has a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Charleston, a master's degree in aquatic ecology from Marshall, and a doctoral degree in biology with an emphasis in aquatic ecotoxicology from Virginia Tech.

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Friday December 2, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall, Marines team up to help kids in Toys for Tots campaign

St. Joseph Catholic Grade School participating as well

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the second consecutive year, Marshall University is teaming with the United States Marine Corps Reserves in supporting a drive to collect toys for needy children in the 2011 Toys for Tots regional campaign.

Toys for Tots collects new toys to give to children, ages toddler to early teen, who otherwise would be without during the holidays. St. Joseph Catholic Grade School in Huntington is participating in the annual drive as well.

"It has been great to have St. Joseph on board and working with us," said Kelly Sweetman, director of military affairs at Marshall. "We were able to take the Marines into the school and have the children meet them and learn about a different kind of mission. The children get to see our military in a different light. They learn that the Marines help in our community here at home; it's not just all about war."

The campaign collects toys for children in 14 West Virginia counties and four counties in Ohio. Collection boxes have been placed in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus, where they will remain throughout the campaign, which runs through Saturday, Dec. 17. Marshall's student group, VETS4VETS, and the Marines will be distributing the toys after the campaign ends.

"I am pleased to be able to have the children working with veterans and current military for the good of the community," said Andrew Wendt, president of VETS4VETS, referring to St. Joseph's participation. "West Virginia has a long military history and a high number of veterans. This project pulls us all together for the greater good and we become one group with a purpose."

St. Joseph principal Carol Templeton said it has been "a privilege and pleasure for St. Joseph Catholic Grade School to participate in the annual Toys for Tots campaign.

"This program has given an opportunity for our students to see the military in a different way," she said.

New, unwrapped toys, valued at no more than $30 each, are being collected. People may still sign up to receive toys by visiting www.toysfortots.org.

For more information, persons may e-mail Sweetman at Sweetman@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Sgt. Victor Arroyo, assistant coordinator of the Toys for Tots campaign, poses with first-grade students from St. Joseph Catholic Grade School and some of the toys the school has collected. The students are, from left, Riley Ibanez, Madison Nekvinda, Sinclair McKinney and Rama Rayyan. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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Tuesday November 29, 2011
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'Gentleman golfer' William Cammack Campbell to receive honorary degree at Marshall's winter commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A man known and admired worldwide for his extraordinary contributions to the game of golf, and similarly respected locally for his decades of public service, will be honored next week by Marshall University.

Lifelong Huntington  resident William Cammack Campbell, once called "a professional at being an amateur," will receive an honorary doctoral degree at Marshall's 2011 Winter Commencement. Campbell will be presented with a Doctor of Humane Letters degree during the ceremony, which starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, at Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus.

"I'm surprised, but it's a pleasant surprise," Campbell said.  "I have a long experience with Marshall, which was always a big, big part of Huntington and still is."

Campbell is the 166th person chosen to receive an honorary degree at Marshall.

"Bill Campbell has been and still is one of the greatest ambassadors ever for the city of Huntington and Marshall University," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "His reputation both on and off the golf course is impeccable. On the course he has always embraced the traditions and values that define the essence of golf in its purest form a true gentleman of golf and life. His numerous amateur victories, honors and leadership roles speak for themselves. Off the course, Bill has been a tireless, civic-minded member of our community and a great supporter of Marshall University. We are thrilled to present him with this well-earned, honorary doctoral degree."

Campbell, 88, said his involvement with Marshall dates back to 1928 when he was 5 years old and a student at the Marshall Lab School. Needless to say, the university has changed drastically since then. The recent growth in enrollment and facilities is remarkable, Campbell said.

"Marshall is growing tremendously and wisely," Campbell said. "Dr. Kopp is a very impressive person. Marshall, as an institution of higher learning, is a great plus for Huntington and the state."

Despite his affection for Marshall, Campbell never attended the university. He left the Marshall Lab School after completing nine grades to attend Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, N.H., where he spent four years before enrolling at Princeton University in 1941.  He took a 3 -year break from college to serve in the U.S. Army, where he saw combat duty in World War II and rose in rank to captain. Campbell was awarded the Bronze Star for Valor and his 100th infantry division three Battle Stars. He returned to Princeton after leaving the military, graduating in 1947 with a degree in history.

Despite undeniable talent as a young golfer - Campbell was the second-youngest to play in the U.S. Amateur at age 15, and first played the game at age 3 - and a world of potential, he never wanted to play weekdays or play golf for a living.

He chose to make a living in the insurance business, joining the John Hancock Life Insurance Company, and to play golf competitively as an amateur. The results were astounding as he:

  • Won 33 championships

  • In six decades, qualified for the U.S. Amateur 37 times, including his 1964 national title

  • In four decades, played in the U.S. Open 15 times

  • Was the U.S. Senior Amateur winner in 1979 and 1980, and was runner-up in the 1980 U.S. Senior Open

  • Was a member of 13 USGA international amateur teams and captain of four

  • Played on eight Walker Cup teams over a span of 24 years, most of any player on either side, and in eight Walker Cup singles matches, he was undefeated.

  • Played in the Masters 18 times in a span of 26 years, the most of any living amateur
    Won the West Virginia Amateur 15 times, and was runner-up seven times

  • Won the West Virginia Open three times

  • Won four North-South amateur championships

  • Won amateur championships of Mexico and the Canadian province of Ontario

Perhaps Campbell's most extraordinary accomplishments came in the 1980s when he became the first person ever  to head golf's two governing bodies. He was elected president of the United States Golf Association (USGA) in 1982 and 1983, and he was named captain of the Royal & Ancient Club of St. Andrews, Scotland, in 1987.

"That's unprecedented," said Joe Feaganes, Marshall's golf coach.

Feaganes said Campbell's contributions to the game of golf cannot be overstated.

"Worldwide, Bill Campbell may be one of the biggest names in amateur golf since Bobby Jones," Feaganes said. "For years he spoke at our team banquet for the Marshall Invitational, and the coaches and kids would sit on the edge of their seats as he talked about his experiences in the Masters, the U.S. Open, the U.S. Amateur. Not too many people come along in a lifetime like Bill Campbell. He's quite an individual; he really is."

Although he was working full time, playing in only important tournaments and raising a large family with his wife, Joan, Campbell found time to - as he put it - wear several hats at Marshall over many years.

He was chairman of the institutional board of advisors, which routinely met with Marshall's president. Campbell served under five presidents and two interims. He recalls being asked to help notify families of the 1970 plane crash victims as part of his advisory board duties.

Campbell also was a member of the executive committee formed to create a medical school at Marshall.

"It's amazing what started as an idea by Dr. Albert Esposito and the result that came from it, with others helping along the way," he said.

In addition, Campbell was president of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., and was the first chair of Marshall's Library Associates when they were first chartered in the spring of 1989.  Some of his other civic service included stints as president of the Huntington YMCA and the Huntington Chamber of Commerce, and long service on the boards of the Cammack Children's Center (named for his grandfather, C.W. Cammack) and the Huntington Museum of Art (formerly the Huntington Galleries).

He also served three years with the West Virginia House of Delegates. Although his stay in politics was short, he did sponsor a bill in 1951 that led to the creation of the Tri-State Airport. Later he was a private pilot for 37 years.

Bill and Joan Campbell have been married 57 years and raised six children. Today, she lives on the couple's farm in Greenbrier County while Bill splits time between Huntington - he still works for John Hancock - and Greenbrier County.

Campbell and Kopp have something in common, even though Kopp is not from Huntington.

"Dr. Kopp is living in the house that my grandfather built," Campbell said, referring to Judge C.W. Campbell.  "And I grew up in the house next to it. On the other side was my other grandfather, C.W. Cammack. I was surrounded by grandfathers."

In 2009, Campbell and the late Sam Snead were the first inductees into the West Virginia Golf Hall of Fame. Both also are members of the World Golf Hall of Fame. If there was a Hall of Fame for sportsmanship, Campbell likely would be the first member.

"When it comes to his reputation as a gentleman and ambassador for amateur golf, Bill Campbell is in a class all by himself," Feaganes said.

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Photo courtesy of Huntington Quarterly.


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Monday November 28, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, (304) 696-3296

Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0 to present 'Senior Day' concert Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0, under the direction of Dr. Ed Bingham, will present its finale performance of the fall semester at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Featured will be the music of the Maria Schneider Orchestra, The Radiohead Jazz Project, Stan Kenton, Bob Florence, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Gordon Goodwin.

This concert will showcase the outstanding student soloists of the ensemble, Bingham said. Austin Seybert, trombone, and Luke Miller, baritone saxophone, will perform featured solo compositions for their respective instruments. Both Seybert and Miller were selected to participate in the Mid-Atlantic Jazz Orchestra and have been two of the most prominent improvisation artists during their time as members of the MU 12.0 Jazz Ensemble. They were members of the MU Jazz Ensemble that performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival and the Jazz e Juan Festival in 2009.

In addition, vocalist Jennifer Billups will be featured in arrangements of Bart Howard's ever-popular tune Fly Me to the Moon, Jobim's Desafinado and the Dianne Schuur /Count Basie version of We'll Be Together Again. Billups was the featured vocalist for the MUJE's appearance at the inaugural conference of the Jazz Educators Network in St. Louis, where her performance attracted the attention of many vocal jazz professionals.

Finally, the MU Jazz Ensemble will usher in the holiday season with Stan Kenton's medley of Christmas favorites. The ensemble will add French horns and a tuba to accomplish the rich texture that is characteristic of Kenton's compositions.

Bingham said that the time has changed to 2 p.m. from any earlier announcements. Admission is free and the public is cordially invited to attend.

For further information contact Bingham by phone at 304-696-3147 or by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu.


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Monday November 21, 2011
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Marshall groups, WV Symphony Chorus to present Haydn, Beethoven works

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 200 musicians will join forces at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1, as the Marshall University Choral Union and Chamber Choir, together with the MU Orchestra and the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra Chorus, present Franz Joseph Haydn's "Lord Nelson" Mass and Ludwig Van Beethoven's "Choral Fantasy."  The event will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Bringing together choral and instrumental ensembles for large performances is not unusual in the MU music department and, in fact, this production follows last spring's collaborative presentation of Carl Orff's Carmina Burana with the Huntington Symphony Orchestra. What is different about this production is the presence of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra Chorus, a fixture on the Charleston music scene.  Dr. David Castleberry, director of choral activities at Marshall University, directs all of the choirs involved.

"I have looked forward to the chance to bring these choral forces together for a production and I think the results will be quite exciting for everyone involved," Castleberry said. "The Marshall Orchestra is playing wonderfully and will bring real depth and color to these extraordinary musical works."

The works on this program represent the height of the "classical" style, said Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, professor of music and director of the Marshall University Orchestra. "The choice of the Beethoven Choral Fantasy came to mind in discussing a new addition to our music faculty at Marshall, Dr. Henning Vauth. He is a wonderful pianist and we thought this would be an exciting way to welcome him to the department," Smith said.

In addition, soprano Marlayna Maynard, a graduate and voice teacher in the Marshall music department, will be featured as a soloist, alongside a number of current student soloists.

"The concert promises to be an outstanding event," Castleberry said, "but please note that there will be only one Huntington performance." A second performance will be offered at 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 2, at Christ Church United Methodist, located at the corner of Quarrier and Morris Streets in Charleston, W.Va.

Admission to both events is free. A free-will offering will be accepted at the Charleston concert.


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Friday November 18, 2011
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Marshall University study shows nanoparticles being used as additives in diesel fuels can travel from lungs to liver

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Recent studies conducted at Marshall University have demonstrated that nanoparticles of cerium oxide - common diesel fuel additives used to increase the fuel efficiency of automobile engines - can travel from the lungs to the liver and that this process is associated with liver damage.

The data in the study by Dr. Eric R. Blough and his colleagues at Marshall's Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems indicate there is a dose-dependent increase in the concentration of cerium in the liver of animals that had been exposed to the nanoparticles, which are only about 1/40,000 times as large as the width of a human hair. These increases in cerium were associated with elevations of liver enzymes in the blood and histological evidence consistent with liver damage. The research was published in the Oct. 13 issue of the peer-reviewed research journal International Journal of Nanomedicine.

Cerium oxide is widely used as a polishing agent for glass mirrors, television tubes and ophthalmic lenses. Cerium oxide nanoparticles are used in the automobile industry to increase fuel efficiency and reduce particulate emissions. Some studies have found that cerium oxide nanoparticles may also be capable of acting as antioxidants, leading researchers to suggest these particles may also be useful for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease and radiation-induced tissue damage.

Blough, the center's director and an associate professor in the university's Department of Biological Sciences, said, "Given the ever-increasing use of nanomaterials in industry and in the products we buy, it is becoming increasingly important to understand if these substances may be harmful. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate if inhaled cerium oxide nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects in the liver."

Dr. Siva K. Nalabotu, the study's lead author and a Ph.D. student in Blough's lab, said, "The potential effects of nanomaterials on the environment and cellular function is not yet well understood. Interest in nanotoxicity is rapidly growing.

"Our studies show that cerium oxide nanoparticles are capable of entering the liver from the lungs through the circulation, where they show dose-dependent toxic effects on the liver. Our next step is to determine the mechanism of the toxicity."

The research was supported with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, grant DE-PS02-09ER09-01.

For more information, contact Blough at blough@marshall.edu  or 304-696-2708.


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Tuesday November 15, 2011
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Old Main Corridor banners support Marshall, downtown Huntington

 HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Businesses and organizations can help connect Marshall University with downtown Huntington through the Old Main Corridor project by purchasing two-sided, full-color banners that will be installed prominently along 4th Avenue.

Two designs are available - one featuring Old Main and the other featuring the Marshall logo. The logo of the business or organization will be placed on the banners as well.Two designs are available - one featuring Old Main and the other featuring the Marshall logo. The logo of the business or organization will be placed on the banners as well.

"Displaying these banners is a great way to support Marshall and downtown Huntington, while promoting your business and making a statement about the cohesiveness of our community and region," said Matt Turner, Marshall's chief of staff. "They really show the spirit of the town and we would love to see them line both sides of 4th Avenue, from downtown to Old Main."

Byron Clercx, chairman of Marshall's department of art & design, said the banners were designed by Mary Grassell, an art and design professor at MU.

"Nostalgic, timeless and contemporary, the compositional hierarchy in Grassell's designs are elegantly positioned and easy to read, with prominent sponsor recognition areas on both sides of each banner," Clercx said. 

"Whether it's the illustration of the Old Main building or the contemporary Marshall block 'M'  logo, both banners enhance and attest to the streetscape revitalization the city has undertaken (and is taking) to provide a safe, aesthetic  and pedestrian friendly 'corridor'  that established residents and businesses as well as prospective employers, citizens and visitors identify as appealing."

The banners, which measure 2 feet by 5 feet, cost $750 for one, $1,200 for two or $2,000 for four. To order Old Main Corridor banners, call Rhonda Frye in Marshall University Communications at 304-696-3958, or e-mail her at Rhonda.frye@marshall.edu.

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Monday November 14, 2011
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June Harless Center awarded CREATE satellite grant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development in the College of Education at Marshall University was recently awarded $207,000 to establish a satellite of Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab.

This project is designed to implement robotics and technology initiatives in West Virginia schools, including Marshall University Professional Development Schools, and aligns with the mission of the Harless Center to provide leadership in education initiatives for West Virginia educators and students.

The grant, which was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, will enable educators and rural communities in West Virginia to access a real-time portal to the flow or cutting-edge technologies and programs being developed at the lab in Pittsburgh.

The satellite was created as a result of the success of the GigaPan Outreach Grant, which is beginning its second year.  Other programs to be initiated include Message From Me, Robot Diaries, and Hear Me.

Message From Me enables young children to better communicate with parents and caretakers about their daytime activities at childcare centers through the use of digital cameras, microphones, email, phone messaging and other technologies.

Robot Diaries integrates technology, literature, and history through the use of familiar art supplies, circuit boards, lights, motors and sensors.  Students design, build, and program robots that tell the stories of literary and historical characters and events while promoting technological literacy and informal learning.

Hear Me seeks to amplify childrens' voices using media and technology to create a world where children are heard, acknowledged and understood, thereby giving them the power to inspire social change.   Hear Me promotes purposeful and responsible use of media by and for children which can promote change in their lives, communities and the world.

The vision of the CREATE Lab is to catalyze local and global community change by technologically empowering people to creatively explore, learn, share and directly improve our ecology.  The Harless Center's mission is to provide leadership in education initiatives for West Virginia educators and students.

For more information, contact Carrie-Meghan Quick-Blanco at quickblanco@marshall.edu or visit marshall.edu/harless and cmucreatelab.org. 


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Friday November 11, 2011
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Marshall University hosts Military Spouse Day Nov. 19

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will sponsor Military Spouse Day beginning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 19, at the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Kelly Sweetman, Marshall's director of military and veterans affairs, says the event offers military spouses a chance to be treated to some special attention and learn about education and employment opportunities, as well as support services available.

In addition, a free luncheon is on the schedule, although space is limited and a reservation is required.

"We are very excited to offer this free event to our local military families," Sweetman said. "Military families have unique needs and we hope to help them connect with services available in our area and each other."

Sweetman says giveaways, free activities for children and youth, and advising sessions are included in the day's events, along with Mac Cosmetics makeup artists who will be on hand to give makeovers.

To register for the luncheon, contact Sweetman at 304-696-5278 or by e-mail at Sweetman@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 11, 2011
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Marshall Recreation Center to host Pump and Run competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pump and Run, a competition featuring a combination of weight lifting and a 5k run, will take place at 9 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 4, at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus.

Michele Muth, the recreation center's assistant director of marketing and memberships, said Pump and Run is a great opportunity to get an intense workout, train for other Pump and Run races, and enjoy the competition.

The pump - or weight lifting portion of the race - is first, followed by the 5k run on a Marshall Recreation Center treadmill.

There will be five age divisions ranging from 19 and under to 50 and older as well as male and female divisions. Participants must be at least 16 years of age to compete. Scores will be determined by the 5k time and number of repetitions. Participants can take up to 15 minutes off their running time by shedding 30 seconds with each repetition in the pump portion of the event.

Awards will be given to the overall top male and female contenders and to the first-, second- and third-place finishers in the men's and women's divisions.

Anyone interested in signing up may do so at the Marshall Recreation Center welcome desk or at www.tristateracer.com. All participants must be pre-registered by Dec. 3. The entry fee is $20.

For more information contact Chris Lane, the event director and personal training coordinator, at Lane13@marshall.edu. If interested in sponsorship, contact Muth at 304-696-4732 or e-mail her at Pallante1@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 11, 2011
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Dr. Jamie Warner to deliver winter commencement speech at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jamie Warner, a professor of political science at Marshall University and MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2010-2011, will deliver the keynote speech at Marshall's 2011 Winter Commencement Saturday, Dec. 10.

Commencement begins at 10 a.m. at Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Warner said she was "very honored" to be selected as the commencement speaker. She isn't yet certain what her remarks will be, but she knows what the graduates and their families are hoping for.

"Brevity," she said. "It's kind of complicated, trying to say something thought provoking in a short amount of time. But, you want to leave them with something to ponder."

The Hedrick Award she received last spring recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Warner has been at Marshall since 2002, when she was hired as an assistant professor of political science. In 2004, she was awarded both the Pickens-Queen and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Awards. Before coming to Marshall, she was a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of the South (Sewanee) from 2001 to 2002. She received her B.A. from Millersville University in 1991, her M.A. from Penn State University in 1995 and her Ph.D. in political science with a minor in women's studies from Penn State in 2001.

"Students attending this commencement are really lucky to have Jamie as their speaker," said Dr. Marybeth Beller, chair of the department of political science. "Things that Jamie Warner says are memorable."

Beller described Warner as "happy, upbeat and full of energy."

"Her classes are always exciting," Beller said. "She is a fantastic scholar, but she also brings a really interesting perspective to her classes because she helps students understand political theory by connecting it to popular culture. She makes studying academic discipline interesting for students."

Warner is married to Dr. George Davis, who also teaches political science at Marshall, and they are the parents of a two-year-old son, Luke.

Previous Winter Commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry in 2009 and Dr. Bonita Lawrence in 2010. Dr. Montserrat Miller spoke at the Winter Convocation in 2008.

Marshall's spring commencement is scheduled for Saturday, May 5, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.


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Thursday November 10, 2011
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Marshall to partner with Concord University and RCBI for university-based jobs initiative

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials from Marshall and Concord universities yesterday joined the deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) and U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall to announce federal funding of $500,000 over five years to establish the West Virginia EDA University Center.

A partnership among Marshall, Concord and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI), the center will provide direct business and technical assistance to entrepreneurs, small businesses and manufacturers, and will primarily serve the southernmost 17 counties in West Virginia.

Rahall and the deputy assistant secretary, Matt Erskine, hosted an event yesterday afternoon on Concord's campus in Athens to announce the funding.

The goal of the EDA University Center will be to help increase business productivity, spur innovation and entrepreneurship, and improve long-term regional competitiveness and economic diversification of industries across the state. Outreach and marketing activities to engage entrepreneurs and small businesses will be developed, and the center will host events to bring entrepreneurs together with regional industry leaders for networking and exchanging ideas.

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall vice president for research, and Charlotte Weber, RCBI director, attended the announcement, along with Dr. Kendra S. Boggess, Concord's interim vice president and academic dean.

Marshall's Center for Business and Economic Research will collect and analyze data about talent pools, workforce readiness and entrepreneurial pathways. These data will be used to help identify regional talent pools, industrial clusters and areas of economic opportunity. RCBI will help provide customized visualization, prototyping and advanced machining training and services for small businesses.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp applauded yesterday's announcement, saying, "Marshall University is pleased to partner with Concord University and the Robert C. Byrd Institute in this exciting initiative to connect small businesses and entrepreneurs in southern West Virginia with the resources that can help new and existing business enterprises flourish. We acknowledge with gratitude the EDA funding that will allow us to launch this new center, and we salute Congressman Rahall for his unwavering support for this project."

Maher said, "Marshall University and Concord University have the capacity to support small business development projects within a wide range of disciplines from engineering and biomedicine, to education, to recreation and tourism. These resources, together with the manufacturing expertise available at RCBI, will provide a valuable base for the technical and business assistance to be provided through the center."

Weber said, "RCBI is thrilled to be part of this important West Virginia partnership. America's diverse manufacturing community spurs innovation and discovery, and builds healthy, wealthy communities. Through this EDA grant, RCBI will provide greater emphasis on manufacturing diversification, entrepreneurship and start-up businesses. At RCBI we have the high-tech tools and training necessary to turn today's dreams into tomorrow's products."

At yesterday's event, Rahall thanked the EDA for its financial support of the project and praised its leadership role as the federal agency charged with producing jobs for the nation's distressed economy.

"Our world is a growing, complex and global economy, and advances in technology can create tectonic shifts overnight in economic outlooks," said Rahall. "Mean, lean agencies with a sharp focus on creating jobs that can grow long-term regional economies in that dynamic market need to keep making the kind of investment we are welcoming today."

Erskine was on hand to represent EDA's top administrator, John Fernandez, assistant secretary of commerce for economic development. 

In a prepared statement, Fernandez said, "Marshall University, Concord University and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing will play an important, collaborative role in supporting the new center's efforts to drive regional economic and job growth."

Following the funding announcement, Rahall convened a roundtable discussion with regional businesses to discuss the challenges and opportunities of the current economy. Participants in the roundtable included representatives from Blue Smoke Salsa, Concord's Hospitality Sector Program, Custom Manufacturing, the Development Authority of Mercer County, Eigenweg USA Inc., Frontier Communications, Greater Bluefield Chamber of Commerce, Hughes Supply, ManTech Inc., M-Rock Inc., New River Community and Technical College, Princeton-Mercer County Chamber Of Commerce, Region I Planning and Development Council, Smith Services Inc. and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.


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Thursday November 10, 2011
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New environmental specialist hired at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Travis M. Bailey recently joined the Marshall University staff as the environmental specialist in the Health and Safety Department, Brian Carrico, director of health and safety, said today.

Bailey, a native of Eleanor, W.Va., is a two-time graduate of Marshall University, having earned a bachelor's degree in microbiology and a master's degree in biology.  He has served as an adjunct faculty member for the past three years teaching microbiology, an endeavor he plans to continue.

Previously, Bailey worked 10 years at the Huntington Sanitary Board, beginning his career as a pretreatment analyst which involved monitoring the industrial facilities in the Huntington area.

He later was promoted to the Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) coordinator position. As CSO coordinator, Bailey was involved in getting a Long Term Control Plan (LTCP) approved by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

He will be overseeing Marshall's recently acquired Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit issued by the WVDEP.  The permit requires Marshall to reduce the amount of storm water and/or pollutants discharged from its property.  He also will be actively involved in educating the students, staff and faculty; mapping; inspections; and construction.


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Wednesday November 9, 2011
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Myriad of advanced degree programs to be featured during Open House on Marshall University's South Charleston campus

SOUTH CHARLESTON - Marshall University's South Charleston campus is hosting an Open House event Saturday, Nov. 12, that will feature not only a variety of advanced degree programs available in the Kanawha Valley, but also an up-close look at two new doctoral programs in Pharmacy and Physical Therapy, and the Regents Bachelor of Arts Degree.

Doors will be open from 10 a.m. to noon and faculty and staff will be on hand to discuss educational opportunities within individual programs. The campus is located just off of the Kanawha Turnpike on Angus E. Peyton Drive.

Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies, hopes to see a solid turnout for the event, particularly in times when many professionals find themselves facing career changes. 

"The South Charleston campus provides a multitude of opportunities for people to enrich their education and advance their careers," Pauley said.  "We thought this would also be a unique opportunity for people in the Kanawha Valley to become better acquainted with Marshall's wide array of degree options."

Many educational opportunities are accessible at the South Charleston campus. Depending on career goals and experience, people can apply to one of nearly 50 programs. Several programs will be represented Saturday including: 

  • Graduate School of Education and Professional Development - Special Education; Counseling; School Psychology; Elementary and Secondary Education; Reading Education; Leadership Studies; and the Doctor of Education program. 

  • College of Business - MBA and Executive MBA; Health Care Administration and Human Resources Management.

  • College of Health Professions - Nursing programs including RN, BSN and Master of Science in Nursing.

  • College of Information Technology and Engineering - Engineering with emphases in Engineering Management and Environmental Engineering; Environmental Science, Information Systems and Safety; Technology Management with emphases in Information Security, Information Technology, Environmental Management, Manufacturing Systems and Transportation.

  • School of Pharmacy - Learn about admissions criteria, prerequisite requirements, financial aid guidelines, and student policies for the inaugural class, which is anticipated to begin Fall 2012.

  • Physical Therapy - The program is accepting applications for priority consideration for its inaugural class through Dec. 1, 2011. The initial cohort will begin classes in May 2012.

  • RBA program - The RBA is a unique way to earn a bachelor's degree through flexibility in class scheduling, potential credit for work experience and the option of taking online, evening or weekend classes.

To access information about the campus online, go to http://www.marshall.edu/schas/.

For more information, e-mail or call Joyce Harrah, 304-746-2030, jsharrah@marshall.edu


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Delegate Doug Reynolds to speak at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Delegate Doug Reynolds will speak at Marshall University in Corbly Hall 105 on the Huntington campus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15. His topic will be "Collaboration: The Key to Workplace Success."

His appearance is sponsored by Alpha Kappa Psi, the co-ed professional business fraternity, and Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society. It is free to the public.

Reynolds, a Huntington resident who has been a member of the House of Delegates since 2006, represents the 16th district. He serves on the following committees: Banking and Insurance, Finance, Interstate Cooperation, and Natural Resources.

Reynolds is a successful attorney and entrepreneur. A graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law, he was admitted to the West Virginia State Bar in 2002.

He is the founder and director of First Bank of Charleston, a community bank chartered on the principles of providing financing for small, start-up businesses. Active in his community, Reynolds serves on the boards of the United Way of the River Cities, Boys' and Girls' Clubs of Huntington, Prestera Foundation and the City of Huntington Foundation.


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Chattanooga professor to deliver third lecture in series on constitutional democracy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. John Friedl, a professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, will be the third speaker in the Marshall University Amicus Curiae Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy Thursday, Nov. 17.

Friedl, a professor of political science and a professor of accounting at UTC, teaches Constitutional Law, Civil Liberties, First Amendment, Mass Communication Law and Business Law. His lecture begins at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. It is free to the public.

The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy is presented by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy and the College of Liberal Arts, with the financial support of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

Friedl said his talk is titled "Through the Looking Glass: The Constitution Means What Five Justices Choose It to Mean." He explained the theme:

"The theme of the talk will be that in almost every case to come before the Supreme Court, we cannot truly know the intent of the Framers. Their genius was to leave the language of the Constitution open-ended enough to allow future generations to apply the Constitution's core values and principles to a society that the Framers could hardly imagine.

"Accusations of 'judicial activism' have nothing to do with failure to adhere to the original intent of the Framers, but rather with whether the one who levels the accusation is pleased with the decision. When five members of the Court choose a desired outcome, that result becomes law, regardless of whether those five justices are substituting their judgment for that of a legislative body elected by the people - it is neither red nor blue, liberal nor conservative. It is, simply stated, an inescapable fact of life that the Court is a political body."

Previous speakers in the series were Dr. Jean Edward Smith, former John Marshall Professor of Political Science at Marshall, and Dr. Johnathan O'Neil, associate professor of history at Georgia Southern University.  The lecture series will continue in the spring semester of 2012 with three additional speakers.


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International Education Week kicks off Nov. 13 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University kicks off International Education Week Sunday, Nov. 13, with the 48th annual International Festival in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on MU's Huntington campus.


The theme of this year's International Festival, which takes place from 3 to 6 p.m., is "Living in a Global Society," which emphasizes the pressing need for universities in the United States to prepare their students to live and work in a globalized environment. The International Festival features exotic foods, traditional music and dance along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures. All of this will be provided by Marshall University's international students and international community individuals and groups. The event is free to the public.


In addition to the International Festival, other events to take place during International Education Week include the Festival of Flags and the Study Abroad Fair.


The annual Festival of Flags takes place throughout November in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center, the Drinko Library and other buildings throughout campus featuring a spectacular display of flags from all of the countries where Marshall University draws international students or sends students to study abroad. This semester's festival features flags from more than 60 countries and regions of the world.


On Tuesday, Nov. 15, Marshall will host the 8th annual MU Study Abroad Expo in the lobby of the Student Center from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. More than 20 study abroad providers are expected to take part in the fair. MU students and faculty will have the opportunity to discuss the programs directly with the providers, apply for a passport and get assistance with immunizations.


Dr. Clark M. Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs, said the International Education Week events are the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to enjoy the international diversity and global opportunities found on the Marshall campus and in the surrounding community.


Ryan Warner, Marshall's executive study abroad advisor, said it is a wonderful opportunity for Marshall students to receive information on destinations where they can study abroad. By allowing our students to study internationally with the opportunity to enhance their global knowledge, we are better preparing our students for graduation and enabling them to be active in a growing global society, Warner said.


Marshall has 478 international students from 60 countries. The university also sends about 150 students each year to study abroad. Marshall students can choose from more than 290 sites in 50 countries to study for a summer, semester or year at approximately the same cost as studying at home.


International Education Week is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of State to promote international awareness and international education skills.


For further details about the International Festival and International Education Week activities, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, cip@marshall.edu, or visit the Marshall University Center for International Programs office in Old Main 320.


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School of Pharmacy accepting applications for inaugural class

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy (MUSOP) is accepting student applications for its Doctor of Pharmacy program, which is scheduled to begin in fall 2012 according to Founding Dean Dr. Kevin Yingling.

Potential students may review the admission requirements at the school's website, http://www.marshall.edu/pharmacy/admissions. The school of pharmacy supplemental application is available online at http://www.marshall.edu/pharmacy/application.

General information about the new school of pharmacy, its faculty and the dean's welcome are available at http://www.marshall.edu/pharmacy.

Yingling says the Doctor of Pharmacy program at Marshall University is a 2 + 4 program, which means the first two years are devoted to prerequisite coursework, which are then followed by four years in the professional track at the MUSOP.

"We are very excited to begin receiving student applications for this expanding area of health care," Yingling said.   "Our first class will be composed of approximately 80 students who will benefit from the resources available at a top-tier university and its affiliated relationship with the VA hospital system."

Deadline for applications for the class of 2012 is March 1, 2012.  A $100 supplemental application fee should be submitted with the application.  This fee will be waived for students who submit their application materials prior to January 31, 2012.

Marshall's School of Pharmacy was approved by the Board of Governors in 2009 and has applied for accreditation status by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). For an explanation of the ACPE accreditation process, consult the Office of the Dean or ACPE (135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60603; Phone 312 644-3575; FAX 312 664-4652; web site www.acpe-accredit.org).

For additional information concerning the application process, contact Terri Moran, Director of Student Affairs and Assessment, at 304-696-7352.


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Chamber Choir to perform Nov. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present a free concert at 8 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 13, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Chamber Choir director Dr. David Castleberry said the concert will feature works ranging from renaissance pieces by Josquin des Prez and Claudio Monteverdi to present-day settings by Stephen Chatman and Gene Puerling.

The Chamber Choir is a select 40-voice ensemble that has been heard widely through concert tours, recordings and on West Virginia Public Broadcasting. This coming spring, the Chamber Choir will travel to France for a 12-day concert tour that includes a performance by invitation for a Sunday morning Mass at Paris's famed Notre Dame Cathedral.

"We are delighted to offer a preview of our tour repertoire here at Smith Recital Hall and a sampling of the wide range of choral literature this choir performs," Castleberry said.

For further information, call the Marshall Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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Friday November 4, 2011
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Marshall University gets federal funds to develop Virtual Mine Safety Training Academy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Work is under way to develop a Virtual Mine Safety Training Academy at Marshall University as a result of a $117,000 award from the Brookwood-Sago federal grant program.  

The grant program, which is administered by the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration, was named in remembrance of the 12 men who died in an explosion at the Sago Mine in Tallsmanville, W.Va., in 2006, and the 13 men who died in two explosions at the Jim Walter Resources Inc. No. 5 Mine in Brookwood, Ala., in 2001.  The program was established through a provision in the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, which West Virginia Sen. Jay Rockefeller helped introduce and win passage.

Marshall University's Center for Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) will develop the innovative training academy, which will be a comprehensive mine safety training tool with a Web-based, simulated environment that will include an underground room-and-pillar coal mine, according to Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS.

Szwilski brings significant mining experience with him to the project, and expertise in virtual technology for the academy will be provided by Jack Smith and other members of the CEGAS team, including undergraduate students from Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering and College of Science. 

"As we have witnessed from mining tragedies such as the Upper Big Branch mine disaster, all participating entities in an emergency response at a mine including the mining company, and federal and state officials must collaborate, coordinate and perform extremely well to best serve potentially trapped or isolated miners and their families," Szwilski said. "Our Virtual Mine Safety Training Academy will be a vital resource. Access to effective and quality mine emergency response training is critical."

The academy will provide easy access from any geographical location through the Internet to training resources housed in a virtual campus-like environment. The initial emphasis will be on mine emergency response and preparedness. The academy's platform also will house an underground coal mine, and will use a UNITY game-engine to create a unique multi-trainee and interaction site providing valuable mine emergency response exercises such as communications and decision-making in dangerous and stressful environments. 

The academy will essentially be continuation of the work that CEGAS has carried out over the past five years to build interactive programs and provide a semi-immersive environment through Marshall's engineering Visualization Lab to demonstrate a realistic virtual underground coal mine.

In total, the Brookwood-Sago grant program has made eight awards nationally for a total of $1 million in federal funding to train miners and mine rescue teams to prepare for emergencies and prevent accidents. The initial award announcement was made by Sen. Rockefeller, Sen. Joe Manchin and Congressman Nick J. Rahall.


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Theatre honorary returns to Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - After years of absence, Alpha Psi Omega, the honor society for theatre, is making its way back to Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Nicole Perrone, assistant professor of theatre at Marshall, said Alpha Psi Omega was formed at Fairmont State Normal School (now Fairmont State University) in Fairmont, W.Va., in 1925. Marshall students formed the second chapter of the organization. 

"Because of our history with APO, I think it's important that we stay active in the organization," Perrone said. "It provides camaraderie [among] theatre students at different universities and offers scholarship opportunities."

After seeing Alpha Psi Omega at another school, Marshall theatre student Nathan Mohebbi said he wanted to start an effort to bring it back to Marshall.

"I wanted to get involved because I am very passionate about Marshall's theatre program," Mohebbi said. "We have so much great talent here, but a lot of the students don't really have a way to get involved in other activities outside of the shows.  I knew that reactivating this fraternity would be a great way to show our students and other people how united and committed theatre students can be."

Perrone said the students already have several things planned this semester to get everything started.

"They are planning to have regular community service opportunities," Perrone said. "For example, they have already signed up to assist with Baskets for Branches this fall. They also hope to sponsor student-directed play readings or productions."

Mohebbi said Alpha Psi Omega differs from most clubs because it is several things mixed into one.

"I think that this is different from other clubs in the sense that it's a not just a social fraternity or honor society, though it is those things as well, but it is also a place to develop skills and hone in on students' talents," Mohebbi said. "It is also a great way to help charities and show people that theatre is a caring and welcoming environment."

Perrone said an email was sent to all students in the Theatre Department and applications were made available.

"It's really going to be a very exciting experience for all people involved and future people who want to join," Mohebbi said. "We are all extremely enthusiastic to get started."


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Former Young Thundering Herd star Rick Meckstroth to speak at memorial service honoring 1970 plane crash victims

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Rick Meckstroth, a freshman member of Marshall University's 1970 football team and later a three-year starter for the Young Thundering Herd, will be the keynote speaker at the annual memorial service honoring the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash.

The service, conducted by Marshall's Student Government Association, starts at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov. 14, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The public is invited to attend.

The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970, occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five.

As a freshman, Meckstroth was ineligible to play for the varsity team in 1970. But he and his fellow freshmen did practice with the varsity squad.

"We lived on the same floor and we practiced with them every day throughout the season until the crash," said Meckstroth, a native of Cincinnati. "I became very, very close to some of those guys."

He became particularly close with four players from Cincinnati - Jack Repasy, Mark Andrews, Bob Harris and Felix Jordan. Repasy, Andrews and Harris died in the crash. Jordan missed the game because of an ankle injury. 

"Some people still don't know the magnitude of that tragedy," Meckstroth said. "It still touches us. It touches all of us and it always will."

Meckstroth started at linebacker from 1971 - 40 years ago - through 1973 for Coach Jack Lengyel's Young Thundering Herd, and was named the team's most valuable defensive player in 1973. He said he is looking forward to speaking at the memorial service, but admittedly is a little nervous.

"It's emotional for me," he said.

Meckstroth has remained in Huntington since earning degrees from Marshall in 1974 and 1978. He co-founded Master Mechanical Insulation, Inc., which he recently sold to Atlantic Plant Services Inc. He is still employed with Atlantic Plant Services.

Ray Harrell Jr., president of Marshall's student body, said it is important to remember the victims each year with the memorial service.

"I am incredibly honored to be charged with the planning of such a memorializing event," Harrell said. "The 1970 plane crash is a tragic yet inevitable part of the history of our Marshall family, and I feel that our students share my sentiments of reverence for the occasion. It is of utmost importance that we continue to honor the victims and their families and I am hopeful that our annual ceremony continues to do so."

In addition to Meckstroth and Harrell, other speakers invited to take part in the memorial service include Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Marshall Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.

The service will conclude with the placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.


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Unheard Voices Exhibition opens Friday at Gallery 842

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - While many people around Huntington think sexual assault is not a problem in the community, the staff at CONTACT Rape Crisis Center knows otherwise. In 2010, CONTACT's victim advocates served 275 victims of sexual assault and another 65 friends and family members of the victims, for a total of 890.5 hours of services.

To bring awareness to this sensitive issue, CONTACT, in cooperation with the Marshall University Women's Center and the Marshall University Department of Art and Design, is hosting Unheard Voices, an interactive art exhibit featuring 20 handcrafted portrait castings and viewer-activated oral histories of people who have experienced sexual assault. The exhibit will also feature local artwork in a variety of media, all focused around the subject of sexual assault.

Students from the art department also will be exhibiting art pieces that relate to sexual violence awareness.

Sharon Pressman, executive director at CONTACT, said, "This is an event to create an awareness of what happens to victims of sexual assault and stalking and to let the community know what resources are available if they need help or services."

This exhibit is a return visit, Pressman said. CONTACT and the College of Fine Arts hosted Unheard Voices 15 years ago.

The exhibit is owned by the West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services.

Natalie Larsen, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Design at Marshall, said the exhibition is important because it creates a discourse on the realities of sexual assault.

"Unheard Voices is a unique exhibition that viewers/listeners are not likely to forget," Larsen said. "We all hear statistics about sexual assault, and statistics are important, but this exhibition puts a face and a story behind those numbers."

The exhibit starts with a public opening from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4. The exhibit will be open until Saturday, Nov. 12. Gallery hours are noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.


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Marshall Department of Music welcomes visiting Brazilian musicians

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two visiting Brazilian musicians, who are participating in a faculty exchange at the Marshall University Department of Music, will give a concert at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

Dr. Eduardo Meirinho, a guitarist, and Hans Twitchell, a cellist, have been on the campus since Nov. 1 as part of the faculty exchange portion of the Music Abroad Generating New Experience for Talented Students (MAGNETS) program.

"While Professors Meirinho and Twitchell are on campus, they will also teach private lessons, give master classes and help four Marshall students select their courses for study in Brazil next semester," said Dr. Ben Miller, professor of percussion at Marshall and the Marshall University project director for the MAGNETS program. "Professor Meirinho spent most of 2011 playing solo recitals across Brazil. He performed more than 100 concerts and will be performing a portion of that literature at Marshall. Professor Twitchell will be performing a contemporary composition for cello, piano and electronic tape. Both performers are outstanding musicians on an international level."

The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) in the U.S. Department of Education awarded $250,000 to Marshall University for the MAGNETS program in 2009.

Marshall and Morehead State University are participating in year three of the four-year program with the Federal University of Goias (UFG) and The State University of Santa Catarina (UDESC) in Brazil. There are students from UFG and UDESC studying at Marshall and Morehead this semester. In the spring, Marshall and Morehead students will be studying in Brazil.


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Thursday November 3, 2011
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Students to learn about being a doctor in rural Appalachia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, in partnership with MU's Heart of Appalachia Talent Search Program (HATS) and TRiO/Upward Bound program, is hosting "Doctor for a Day: Encouraging Early Exploration of Health Care Careers" Friday, Nov. 4.

About 40 high school and middle school students from Cabell, Wayne and Mason counties are expected to participate. "Doctor for a Day" will give the students a hands-on look at what it means to be a doctor in rural Appalachia. They will visit with three doctors and tour the Byrd Clinical Center, the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center and Cabell Huntington Hospital. 

The program was developed by Joan C. Viksjo, assistant director of the office of academic & career development with the School of Medicine. She said the program is part of a new student affairs career development and diversity initiative, aimed at fostering early exploration of medical careers among the community's youth. 

"Doctor for a Day" starts at 10 a.m. in the lobby of the Byrd Clinical Center and ends at 3:30 p.m. at the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

Here is the complete schedule:

10 a.m., speaker: Dr. Tom Rushton, Byrd Clinical Center

10:30 a.m., tour of the Byrd Clinical Center

11 a.m., tour of Cabell Huntington Hospital

12:30 p.m., Lunch at Giovanni's; speaker: Dr. Nancy Norton

2:30 p.m., speaker: Dr. Todd Green, Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center

3 p.m., tour of Byrd Biotechnology Science Center


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MU Chorus to perform 'Bluegrass Mass'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chorus will present The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass, at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 11, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The performance will feature well-known bluegrass performer Don Rigsby and Friends.

Robert Wray, assistant professor of choral music education and director of the chorus, said the work fuses the solemnity of the classically based mass with the energy and excitement of bluegrass music.

Wray emphasized the unique opportunity this performance will offer.

"Audience members will hear bluegrass and choral music in a completely different way in this piece," Wray said. "We are challenging two potentially different sects of music enthusiasts to come and enjoy the unique marriage of these two very different musical styles."


For students, it's an opportunity to perform with a professional ensemble in a genre that may not be familiar.


"Don Rigsby used to teach at Morehead State and we have an established relationship with them," Wray said. "One of my students, Jordan Henry, actually recommended Mr. Rigsby, so I did a little research and he seemed like a good fit for this endeavor."


The event is free and open to the public.


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Wednesday November 2, 2011
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Marshall University offering educational session on seasonal influenza

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Student Health Education Programs and the Cabell-Huntington Health Department are hosting an educational session on seasonal influenza, also known as the "flu," as part of a continuing public awareness campaign.

The session is scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, in the Ed Grose Room of the Harless Cafeteria, which is located on Marshall's Huntington campus at the intersection of 5th Avenue and  17th Street.

Additionally, students will have the opportunity to get vaccinated against seasonal flu, which this year includes protection against H1N1.   The vaccine is free to everyone.

The series of informational sessions is part of the West Virginia Adolescent Project: Take Your Best Shot campaign, a statewide initiative aimed at increasing the number of adolescents being vaccinated against a variety of diseases and infections.

This event will also include take-home educational materials, free food and giveaways.
For more information contact the Office of Student Health Programs at 304-696-4800.
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Wednesday November 2, 2011
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More than 100 students from three states to visit Marshall for Outstanding Black High School Student-Scholars Weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students representing 39 high schools from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4 and 5, to take part in the 25th annual Outstanding Black High School Student-Scholars Weekend.

The event, sponsored by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, is attended by the "best and brightest" African American junior and senior high school students from throughout West Virginia and from metro counties in Ohio and Kentucky. Students were nominated by their respective high schools, based upon leadership and their high academic standing.

Students and parents/guardians attending the weekend will participate in a number of activities, including a student and parent welcome luncheon; visits with deans of the various colleges; "real talk" that involves an open discussion with Marshall students and visiting high school students; a parent information session; campus tours conducted by the MU Society of Black Scholars; a dinner for students and parents, a team challenge and Friday night at the MU Recreation Center.

Approximately 275 students and parents will attend the annual awards breakfast on Saturday, Nov. 5. The keynote will be delivered by Lauren Hutchins, a former Outstanding Black High School Student, a Marshall graduate and a second-year law student at the West Virginia University School of Law. Visiting students will reside on campus overnight with Marshall students.

"This group of over 100 of the most intelligent and gifted minds in our state and region will soon join the ranks of so many other students that have attended and graduated from Marshall University, most of which enter graduate and post-graduate schools in various disciplines," said Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs. "Marshall University is extremely proud to recognize this impressive group of young, gifted and black scholars. That's where it's at!"

For more information, contact Cooley at 304-696-5430.


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Tuesday November 1, 2011
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Marshall physics professor receives NASA EPSCoR award of nearly $479,000

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University physics professor Dr. Thomas Wilson has been awarded $478,709 to conduct research to help improve the propulsion systems NASA uses for deep-space missions.

The three-year award was one of 28 made nationally this summer through the NASA EPSCoR program. Wilson submitted the proposal through the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium. His project is titled "Coherent Terahertz Acoustic Phonons: A Novel Diagnostic for Erosion in Hall Thruster Discharge Chamber Walls."

According to Wilson, NASA uses a special type of propulsion - electromagnetic (Hall) thrusters - for deep-space missions. These missions may last for many years as spacecraft move around the solar system; however, the wall structure of the thrusters is subject to erosion over time. The goal of his research is to better understand this erosion process and potentially improve the future design of these propulsion systems.

"The proposed work aims to significantly advance our fundamental knowledge base for these erosion processes and has the potential to lay the groundwork for intelligent selection and design of materials with improved erosion resistance that would increase thruster operational lifetime," Wilson said.

He said the findings may eventually bring cost savings to NASA in thruster testing and design. 

Wilson's collaborators include physicists and electrical engineers at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland; at the universities of Michigan, Rice and Stuttgart; and at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Marshall physics students also will collaborate on the project. The award provides research stipends for Marshall undergraduate physics majors. Hall thruster testing, research and development at GRC started in the 1990s, and Wilson hopes to take his undergraduate research assistants to the center to participate in the research project.

In addition, Wilson says his GRC collaboration should allow Marshall students pursuing master's degrees in physical science to compete successfully for NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program fellowships, which are awarded for one year as training grants in the amount of $30,000.

For more information, contact Wilson at 304-696-2752.


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Monday October 31, 2011
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Enterprise partners with Marshall University to offer car sharing on campus

WeCar provides Marshall with efficient, affordable, sustainable transportation alternative

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Enterprise Rent-A-Car announced today that they have partnered to provide car sharing to MU students, faculty and staff.

WeCar by Enterprise is a membership-based, automated car rental option that offers a sustainable and efficient transportation alternative to the Marshall community. Registered members have access to two vehicles - a Nissan Altima Hybrid and a Ford Fiesta - which are parked near Marshall's Public Safety Building on 5th Avenue.

The cars were on display today near the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus as the program was announced in a news conference.

Matt Turner, MU's Chief of Staff, said participating in the WeCar program should help reduce the number of automobiles on campus while presenting students, faculty and staff with a simple, easy way to get where they need to go. He said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp discovered the program and wanted to bring it to Marshall as a student service that also reduces the university's environmental footprint.

"The WeCar program gives our students the opportunity to travel off campus whenever they want, without relying on someone else to take them and without the high cost and hassle of keeping their own cars," Turner said. "These cars can be reserved for an hour, a day or even a weekend. Student groups can take advantage of WeCar, as can our international students. It's very convenient, it's inexpensive, it's easy and it always beats having to 'bum a ride.' "

Marshall students 18 and older, faculty and staff are eligible for membership. WeCar offers around-the-clock access to hourly, daily and overnight rentals, and allows members to maintain the benefits of a personal car while only paying for the vehicle when they use it.

The campus car-sharing program is especially popular with students because it provides a solution to car rental age restrictions and to financial concerns associated with having a car on campus.

Members reserve a vehicle online, then access the vehicle using a membership card and return it to the same location. Fuel and basic vehicle physical damage and state required liability protection are included in the standard rate plan.

"With WeCar, MU is providing a low-cost transportation opportunity to students, faculty and staff," said Ryan Johnson, assistant vice president, WeCar and Rideshare for Enterprise. "Our car-sharing program is a convenient, sustainable and totally automated solution to parking and transportation challenges at universities."

WeCar programs are supported by the extensive Enterprise Rent-A-Car neighborhood network of more than 5,500 rental offices located within 15 miles of 90 percent of the U.S. population. It is a natural extension of the local car rental service Enterprise pioneered and continues to provide.

WeCar operates car-sharing programs on more than 40 college campuses throughout the United States and Canada, as well as corporate and municipal programs throughout the United States.

Marshall students, faculty and staff with a valid driver's license can sign up for the program at www.wecar.com/marshall.

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Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp tries out one of the new vehicles to be used in the WeCar by Enterprise program. (Below) Marshall student Joshua Botkin, this year's Mr. Marshall, unlocks one of the university's WeCar automobiles using a card programmed with the information necessary to drive the car.  Looking on are, from left, Student Body President Ray Harrell Jr., Jim Withers from Enterprise and Sharafina Azman Al Rashid, this year's Ms. Marshall. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Monday October 31, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall honors donors with first Recognition Celebration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the Marshall University Foundation Inc. celebrated the philanthropy of many of their most generous donors Friday evening (Oct. 28) with the first Recognition Celebration at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

Approximately 125 people from throughout the country attended the event in which lifetime giving societies were announced, and plaques honoring the donors unveiled. Four plaques displaying the names of more than 250 donors have been hung on the walls of the foundation hall.

"Tonight we are honoring our largest donors to the university, thanking them for their generosity and philanthropy that is transforming Marshall University both now and in the future," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc. "It is very important to recognize their contributions and the impact they continue to have on the university."

Les Huff, a Gilbert, W.Va., native currently living in Phoenix, Ariz., drove 1,983 miles to attend the celebration.

"I got an invitation (from Kristi Arrowood, director of foundation development and strategic programs for the Marshall Foundation), and I thought it sounded good to me," Huff said.

Huff did not attend Marshall, but he chose to support MU because, he said, "It's one of the better schools and certainly about as close to Gilbert, West Virginia, as any of them."

Huff gives to Marshall through the Henson Mazey Huff Memorial Scholarship. It is reserved for a graduate of Gilbert High School who "needs the scholarship very badly," he said. Huff said he gives because of the potential impact the students from Gilbert can make on their community, then noted, "The first (scholarship recipient), Melissa Lester, is a cardiologist."

The giving societies announced Friday include:

The Legacy Society, which recognizes lifetime gifts and pledges of $5 million or more;

The Pathway of Prominence, which recognizes gifts and pledges of $1 million or more;

The Founders' Circle, which represents the spirit and dedication of three individuals from Marshall's early history who founded Marshall Academy. The following donor recognition societies, which are part of the Founders' Circle, include their names:

  • The John Laidley Society, in recognition of lifetime gifts and pledges of $750,000 to $999,999;

  • The James Holderby Society, in recognition of lifetime gifts and pledges of $500,000 to $749,999;

  • The William Buffington Society, in recognition of lifetime gifts and pledges of $250,000 to $499,999; 

The President's Circle, which recognizes contributions or pledges of $100,000 or more.

"Whenever we recognize and honor our donors we hope it inspires and challenges future generations to give back," Arrowood said. "We are so grateful to our donors and we are thrilled to be able to say thank you to each of them in person at this first Recognition Celebration."

Tim Haymaker is a member of Marshall's Pathway of Prominence and longtime MU supporter. He acknowledged the importance of Friday's event.

"It is highly important that any institution that receives gifts from donors give them credit and recognition," Haymaker said. "If they don't know they are appreciated, they won't give a second time. You have to recognize your donors and Marshall has done that tonight."

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Photos: (Above) Paula Tompkins, right, talks with Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp Friday during the first Recognition Celebration held in honor of donors. (Below) Les Huff, here talking to Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations, drove nearly 2,000 miles to attend Friday's first Recognition Ceremony held in honor of donors. Seated to the left of Huff and Littlehales is Shelba Pew. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Saturday October 29, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marines can earn Master of Arts in Leadership Studies at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is partnering with the United States Marine Corps College of Distance Education and Training (CDET) in Quantico, Va., to provide active duty Marine Corps officers the opportunity to earn a Master of Arts in Leadership Studies.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and John Hemleben, Dean of Academics with the CDET, earlier today signed a memorandum of understanding regarding the arrangement during a ceremony in Corbly Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Kelly Sweetman, director of military & veterans affairs at Marshall, said approximately 22,000 active duty Marines worldwide are eligible for this program, which requires participants to take six online classes through Marshall University.

"This is something that we are excited about at Marshall because it allows us to bring our education to our active duty service members regardless of where they are in the world," Sweetman said. "We currently have officers deployed to Afghanistan in our master's program as well as officers right down the road here in Huntington.

"Having the program online and a great team of professionals back in Charleston teaching and ensuring our Marines are getting a first-class educational experience without restrictions is something we are both very proud of and honored to do. Our service members deserve the best and we are constantly striving to make sure they get it through working with Marshall."

Through the program, officers can take six classes online through Marshall's Graduate School of Education and Professional Development in Charleston.  The additional transfer credits, equal to four classes, are earned through the Marine Corps Command and Staff College (CSC) distance education program or the Expeditionary Warfare School (EWS), qualifying them to graduate with a master's in leadership. They can take the MU classes before or after the CSC or EWS. 

Sweetman said Marshall joins the Universities of Oklahoma, Maryland and Indiana to have such an agreement with the Marines.  At this time several Marines are already signed up and have begun taking classes at Marshall with very positive feedback getting back to the Marine Corps CDET Assistant Dean Dennis Haskin who oversees these arrangements.

Haskin said he has been "very pleased with the military friendly staff assisting the Marine students at Marshall" and said he feels "this will be a very positive and long-lasting relationship with 'The Thundering Herd!' "

For more information, contact Sweetman at 304-696-5278.

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Photos: John Hemleben (left), Dean of Academics with the United States Marine Corps College of Distance Education and Training in Quantico, Va., and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp sign a memorandum of understanding today during a ceremony in Corbly Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Marshall and the Marines are partnering to provide active duty Marine Corps officers the opportunity to earn a Master of Arts in Leadership Studies.


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Friday October 28, 2011
Contact: John Yaun, Director of Housing and Residence Life, 304-696-6766

Marshall University community to experience 'Tunnel of Oppression' Wednesday, Nov. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will sponsor three performances of the "Tunnel of Oppression" at 5, 6, and 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on the Huntington campus.

Marshall is joining a growing list of schools that are staging their own interactive Tunnel of Oppression experience, said John Yaun, Marshall's Director of Housing and Residence Life. Originally developed at Western Illinois University, the Tunnel of Oppression, a collaborative event involving several campus departments and offices, will allow participants to experience different forms of oppression and discrimination through interactive scenes, monologues and multimedia.

"Participants will have the opportunity to see, touch, hear and feel the realities of oppression as a stepping stone toward creating diversity awareness and tolerance, and challenging our perceptions about issues surrounding oppression," Yaun said. "The Tunnel of Oppression is about creating a 'sensory experience' that will open people's eyes and hopefully serve as an agent of social change and a model of consciousness-raising, reflecting the realities of oppression in today's society."

Participants will be able to see and experience scenes regarding body image/obesity, autism, international student discrimination, homophobia, religious oppression, relationship violence and race, Yaun said.

For more information, contact Yaun by e-mail at yaun@marshall.edu, or by phone at 304-696-6766.


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Thursday October 27, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Three from Marshall win awards in 2011 WV Juried Exhibition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three artists with Marshall University connections - two faculty members and an M.A. graduate - were among those who won awards in the biennial West Virginia Juried Exhibition this year, sponsored by the West Virginia Division of Culture and History.

West Virginia artists were presented with 18 awards totaling $33,000 in a ceremony earlier this month at Oglebay Institute's Stifel Fine Arts Center in Wheeling. The exhibit features 72 works in the areas of painting, sculpture, printmaking, drawing, photography, mixed media and crafts by 60 artists from 23 West Virginia counties.

Daniel Kaufmann, assistant professor of photography in Marshall's College of Fine Arts, received a Governor's Award for Rooms 13.

"It is so rewarding to have work selected for the West Virginia Juried Exhibition," Kaufmann said.  "I am flattered my work was selected to receive the Governor's Award   it is meaningful that our students see that we are actively participating in the field."

Graphic design professor Mary Grassell won an Award of Excellence for her wood block print titled The Lace Stretchers, which depicts the artist and her sister helping their mother stretch lace curtains.

"The award was a surprise because it seems that printmakers are sometimes overlooked in juried competitions," Grassell said, "but I am happy to have this award. The print is meaningful to me, and I am glad it was meaningful to others."

Filter Feeders, a piece by recent M.A. graduate Nik Botkin, received the Merit Award, which had a $500 prize attached.

"It was an honor to be even invited to participate in the 2011 West Virginia Juried Exhibition," Botkin said. "When I found out I had received an award for my art I felt truly privileged to be recognized in such a prestigious event for doing something I love. More importantly, the more exposure my environmental work receives, the greater the chance I may have in opening people's eyes to how important it is to take care of our planetary home."

The exhibition will remain on display through Jan. 2 at the Stifel Fine Arts Center.

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Photos: Two of the works that won awards at this year's West Virginia Juried Exhibition: The Lace Stretchers by Mary Grassell (above) and Filter Feeders by Nik Botkin.


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Wednesday October 26, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First Honors College da Vinci Faculty Fellows named

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, and Dr. Allison Carey, assistant professor of English, are the Marshall University Honors College's first da Vinci Faculty Fellows, Dean Mary Todd said today.

Da Vinci Fellows are Marshall faculty who will teach one course a semester for the Honors College for each of four semesters. Two of those courses, taught in the fall term, will be interdisciplinary honors seminars. In the spring, the fellows will each offer a section of HON 200, the new second-year seminar on Leadership, Ethics and Civic Engagement that is required of all sophomores in the Honors College.

The fellowship offers faculty a significant professional development opportunity as well as experience working with honors students. Fellows will receive funding to attend a conference related to interdisciplinary, integrative or honors education.

The Faculty Fellows program was made possible through a five-year gift from the Jeanine Y. Francis Foundation. The college hopes to attract further funding to support additional fellows.

"The Honors College is thrilled to launch the da Vinci Faculty Fellows program, one designed both to provide a more consistent faculty presence in the college and to recognize faculty interest in working with honors students," Todd said. "We are grateful to the Francis Foundation for the initial funding that enabled us to seek applications from interested faculty for the da Vinci fellowship, and excited to welcome Drs. Warner and Carey as inaugural fellows. Both are exceptional scholars who will model excellence for honors students here at Marshall."

The Honors College, founded in 2010, currently serves 600 Marshall undergraduates. For more information on the college, visit www.marshall.edu/honors.

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Photos: Drs. Jamie Warner (above) and Allison Carey (below) are the first two da Vinci Faculty Fellows at Marshall University's Honors College.


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Wednesday October 26, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Celebrated West Virginia writer to appear at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - National Book Critics Circle Award nominee M. Glenn Taylor will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Taylor is the author of two novels, most recently The Marrowbone Marble Company, published by Ecco Press.  His first novel, The Ballad of Trenchmouth Taggart, published by Ecco Press, has received a wealth of critical attention and praise.  It prominently features Huntington locations in its action.

From receiving glowing reviews in national publications to inclusion in Barnes & Noble's Fall 2008 Great New Writers, Taylor has risen quickly to prominence.  As Eric Miles Williamson notes in The Houston Chronicle, his first novel is nothing less than a "stunning, fully realized, unique and ambitious book that proves there's still passion, fire and brilliance in the American novel." 

Taylor's stories have been published in such literary journals as The Chattahoochee Review, Mid-American Review, Meridian and Gulf Coast.  He teaches English and fiction writing at West Virginia University.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts and the West Virginia Humanities Council.  It is free to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Wednesday October 26, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, , 304-696-6397

25th annual Yeager Symposium at Marshall University spotlights gender and societal issues

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 25th annual Yeager Symposium, which features events on Wednesday, Nov. 2, and Monday, Nov. 7, focuses on "Gender and Society" and includes a lecture series on the portrayal of gender stereotypes in mass media, male-female relationships and gender-related violence.

"I'm very excited to be involved in planning the symposium," said Shelby Brewster, a senior Yeager Scholar and the event co-chairwoman.  "I'm particularly thrilled about the topic because I feel it is both very timely and pertinent to people our age."

Working with Brewster as co-chairwoman is Timmeka Perkins, also a senior Yeager Scholar, who agrees this year's symposium is tailored for the times.

"We have hot-button topics being presented by a combination of renowned speakers and up-and-coming students," she said.

The following is a schedule of events for the Yeager Symposium:

Wednesday, Nov. 2 - "The Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help," presented by Jackson Katz at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center, Room BE5.  Katz is a nationally-known lecturer recognized for his work in the field of gender violence prevention education with men and boys.

Monday, Nov. 7 - "The Interaction between the Media and Feminine Stereotypes," presented by graduate students Bethany Wellman and Alicia Baker at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center, Room BE5. Wellman is a master's degree candidate researching health behaviors and sexual activity. Baker is a doctoral candidate with a research emphasis on underserved and underrepresented populations.

Both events are free to the public.   The Yeager Symposium is sponsored by the Marshall University Honors College, West Virginia American Water and Wells Fargo Insurance Services.

For more information, contact Brewster at 719-650-7839 or Perkins at 410-924-4157.


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Tuesday October 25, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fitch Ratings gives Marshall revenue bonds upgrade to AA-

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Despite a topsy-turvy national economy, an international bond rating firm has just given Marshall University's credit rating an upgrade.

Fitch Ratings has given an AA- rating to new revenue bonds to be issued by Marshall University's Board of Governors at an expected issuance amount of $50 million. The new rating represents an upgrade from the previous rating of A+.

"We are in a period of time in the financial world where bond ratings are generally on the down side, not just in the private sector, it is also happening in the non-profit area," said John Hess, vice chairman of Marshall's Board of Governors. "It is truly remarkable that we would get upgraded at this time, which indicates that our fiscal management has been outstanding. We should all take great pride in what this board and administration has accomplished."

Marshall will use the debt to help finance capital improvement projects on or near the Huntington campus. The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission gave Marshall's board permission to finance the bonds on Oct. 13.

The projects  are a biotechnology incubator and applied engineering complex; an indoor athletic complex; a multi-floor parking structure; a soccer stadium complex; a fine arts incubator-visual arts project; a  modern academic instructional (high technology) facility, and land acquisition and demolition.

The bonds are expected via negotiated sale on or about Nov. 3.

Fitch said the ratings reflect:

  • Renewed student demand for auxiliary facilities, revenues from which provide approximately 79.3 percent of the pledged total for fiscal 2012, which recovered in fall 2011 to a healthy and sustainable level;

  • Broadened Security Pledge. The inclusion of additional revenue streams in the security pledge to ensure adequate debt service coverage, limiting potential reliance on the university's legally available funds further supports the AA- rating;

  • A strong University Operating Profile. The pledged revenues are fundamentally linked via a joint mission to Marshall University, which demonstrates historically positive operating results, a sound demand profile and recently improved liquidity.


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Tuesday October 25, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word places seventh among 21 teams with solid performance at Cumberlands, Berea

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's speech and debate team finished seventh out of 21 teams that participated last weekend in a two-day tournament in Kentucky.

The tournament took place at the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Ky., and at Berea College in Berea, Ky.

"There was great competition at the tournament and Marshall did very well," said Thundering Word Coach Danny Ray.

Five of the top teams in the nation were in the competition, Ray said. They included Western Kentucky, Tennessee State, George Mason, Eastern Michigan and Ohio University. Ray said Marshall placed above Miami of Ohio, which finished 10th in the nation last year.

Following is a list of those on the Thundering Word who received awards at the tournament.

Cumberlands event

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a junior political science/history major from Louisville, Ky., placed fourth in Communication Analysis and seventh  in Extemporaneous Speaking.

Jasmine Lewis, a sophomore political science major from Huntington, placed first  in Persuasion.  

Tessa Wooten, a junior broadcast journalism major from Huntington, was the top novice and finished fourth in After Dinner Speaking, and was second novice award winner in Dramatic Duo with Mary Margaret Chaffee, a freshman pre-science major from Terra Alta, W.Va.

Chaffee was second novice in Dramatic Duo with Wooten.

Lance West Jr., a junior economics major from Huntington, was the top novice and fifth  in persuasion, and third novice in Extemporaneous Speaking.

Devan Sample, a freshman Honors College undecided major from Martinsburg, W.Va., received second novice award in Prose, and top novice  in dramatic duo with Kris Anderson, a junior communication studies major from Princeton, W.Va.

Anderson was the top novice in Dramatic Duo with Sample and was the top novice in cumulative Individual Sweepstakes.

Jacqueline Stalnaker, a freshman Spanish major from Philippi, W.Va., was the top novice and seventh in Communication Analysis, and second novice in Informative Speaking.

Berea event

Lewis was third in Persuasion.

West was sixth and top novice in persuasion.

Vonderschmitt was fourth in Communication Analysis, sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking and seventh in Informative.

Wooten was second  novice in After Dinner Speaking.

Anderson  was second novice in Dramatic Duo with Sample.

Stalnaker was second novice in Communication Analysis and top novice in Informative.

Chaffee was third  novice in Informative.

 

Marshall will host the Chief Justice Speech and Debate Tournament on the Huntington campus Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29. For more information, call Ray at 304-696-5293.


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Tuesday October 25, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Countdown to Commencement 2011 is Nov. 1-2 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students planning to take part in the 2011 Winter Commencement can take care of responsibilities associated with the event by attending Countdown to Commencement on the Huntington campus.

Numerous services will be available for students at Countdown to Commencement, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 1 and 2, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Winter Commencement, celebrated for the third consecutive year at Marshall, is set for 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10 at Cam Henderson Center.

Countdown to Commencement 2011 is for summer and tentative  fall 2011 graduates of Marshall University. Students will be able to purchase academic regalia, announcements, diploma frames, class rings and other items to commemorate their graduation.

MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said Countdown to Commencement 2011 provides an opportunity for Marshall's graduates to confirm arrangements for participation in the annual commencement exercises in a one-stop-shopping experience.

"A large number of our graduates have taken advantage of Countdown to Commencement the past few years," Ferguson said. "It's just a convenient way to take care of pre-commencement responsibilities early. This way, our graduates and tentative graduates can fully enjoy the graduation experience in December."

The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement:

Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diploma; confirm commencement participation; receive commencement instructions; pick up honor cords and tassels (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to ask any questions related to commencement.

Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their caps and gowns, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings, graduation announcements and much more. They also can order personalized graduation announcements at this time.

Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2011 rings. All rings are on sale and priced as low as $149 for women and $169 for men.

Classic Photography - Cap and Gown portraits will be taken. There is no sitting fee, no obligation to purchase and free proofs will be available within 24 hours of the sitting.

Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career paths. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for JOBTRAX (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan counseling interviews. For loan counseling, students will need to bring their student IDs and the addresses and phone numbers of two references.

Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about federal student loan consolidation programs.

Center for International Programs - Graduating study abroad students and international students will be able to purchase international flag sashes. Also, information about work, teaching and study opportunities abroad will be distributed.

Campus ID Office - Issues regarding students' HigherOne accounts or Points accounts may be resolved.

Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.
 

For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Monday October 24, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communciations Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University residence halls open for community trick or treat

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Housing and Residence Life is sponsoring trick or treat in its residence halls beginning at 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31.

Area residents are invited to bring their children to the Huntington campus and trick or treat through 10 residence halls where staff members and residents of the building will pass out candy in the lobbies of each building.  Tracey Eggleston, a residence life specialist, said this is the third year for the event.

"Allowing area children to trick or treat in our residence halls is just one more way our students can engage with the community," Eggleston said.  "Plus, it gives parents a safe place to bring their children."

Candy also will be passed out in the lobby of the Marshall Recreation Center.

Trick or Treat on campus concludes at 7 p.m.

For more information, contact Eggleston at 304-696-6004.


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Monday October 24, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Nov. 16 collection date set for 'Baskets for Branches'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last spring, Marshall University's College of Fine Arts (COFA), led by three dedicated students, was able to collect more than 150 laundry baskets filled with  essential items for victims of domestic violence - requiring a U-Haul truck for delivery. This year they hope to surpass that number.

On Wednesday, Nov. 16, they will once again collect donated baskets on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"Baskets for Branches" benefits the Branches Domestic Violence Shelter, which served more than 2,000 women, men and children in 2010 in Cabell, Putnam, Wayne, Mason and Lincoln counties. The facility serves clients as a safe haven against further abuse, whether physical or emotional, for them and their children. In addition to providing housing, Branches offers legal assistance, counseling and case management to ready its clients to become independent. 

Marshall students Lindsay DiFatta (music education), Nikki Gilliam (art and design) and Nathan Mohebbi (theatre) will serve as student representatives of the Baskets for Branches committee. DiFatta and Gilliam are part of the original student committee that came up with the idea. Mohebbi represents the newly re-established Marshall chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, the honorary service fraternity for theatre.

 "A campaign like Baskets for Branches is important because so many people look the other way at domestic violence," DiFatta said. "It's so common. You always hear about it on the news and people have been desensitized to this huge problem. We wanted to put the issue back in the front of people's minds and then provide them with a way to help someone affected by it."

The shelter's needs are great: personal items such as underwear, pajamas, toothbrushes and hairbrushes; pillows, books, toys and even paper goods such as toilet paper and paper plates and cups are often in short supply. Adults who are rebuilding their lives also need products that will boost their self-esteem and confidence as they search for jobs or confront their abusers in court.  Thus, even make-up, hair care products and professional-looking clothes are important needs.  

Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art and Design, noted the deep meaning behind the baskets.

"Students, staff, faculty and friends fill laundry baskets with basic necessities to help women escaping from domestic abuse environments care for themselves, and any children with them, during an unimaginably difficult transition often without money or other means of support," Clercx said. "While seemingly composed of small things - toothpaste, shampoo, a hairbrush this 'survival kit' is greater than the sum of its parts. These acts of human kindness demonstrate sound character and provide comfort, restore dignity and rebuild courage. These fundamentals are at the core of the COFA and Marshall experience."

Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for COFA, said she is always overwhelmed by the amount of support this project receives, and hopes that it grows even larger this year.

"The College of Fine Arts invites everyone to join us in this collection drive," Ike said. "Last year, we were fortunate to have the help of organizations getting involved. Local businesses, doctor's offices, the residence halls and Greek organizations at Marshall - several groups worked together to collect items at their locations."

Jennifer Borda, executive director of Branches, said the staff looks forward to this event each year.

"We felt so fortunate last year to be able to provide extra household necessities to our clients because of Baskets for Branches," Borda said. "We are always so humbled by the success of the College of Fine Arts' event. We are so excited to be a part of this great event again this year."

For more information, or a list of suggested donations, contact Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Marshall University students Nikki Gilliam (left) and Lindsay DiFatta (center), with Marshall staff member Jaye Ike, pose with a collection of baskets donated to the Branches domestic violence shelter. Another collection of baskets will take place Nov. 16.


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Monday October 24, 2011
Contact: Dr. Keith Beard , Director of Communications, 304-696-2772,

Marshall Psychology Department to offer Social Anxiety Group

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's psychology department will soon begin a series of twice-a-week sessions for people dealing with social anxiety. People who deal with social anxiety often feel uncomfortable in social situations, worry about embarrassing themselves in social situations, avoid being around others because it "stresses them out," or fear that others will judge and evaluate them. 

"Social anxiety is a problem that affects dozens of students across campus and even more in the community," said Greg Rodgers, one of the therapists leading the group, "but it is a very treatable problem for people who are willing to take the steps to change it. This group is a great opportunity for people to help themselves." 

 "Being a part of a social anxiety group can be extremely helpful for the socially anxious person," said Dr. Keith Beard, director of the Marshall University Psychology Clinic. "It is an atmosphere where the person can feel safe to discuss his or her anxiety and interact with people in a safe environment. No matter how painfully shy a person is or how many 'butterflies' are in his or her stomach, there are skills that can be learned to help lessen these feelings and gain more confidence when interacting with others." 

This group lasts for eight sessions across four weeks and is free and confidential. Group meetings will occur in the Marshall University Psychology Clinic, located in Harris Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Pre-screenings for the group will begin as soon as enough members are acquired and group meeting times will be set based on the members' and group leaders' availability. 

For more information contact the clinic at by phone at 304-696-2772, option 1, or email Beard at beard@marshall.edu .


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Friday October 21, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University fills two fundraising positions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced that two fundraising positions have been filled, one in the Office of Development and the other in the Office of Planned Giving.

Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., said Christine Anderson of Culloden, W.Va., is the new assistant vice president for development, and Beverly Crabtree of Jackson, Ohio, is the new associate director for planned giving. Both started at Marshall Oct. 3.

"Both Chris and Bev are very talented women who have incredible development experience that will allow the advancement program to move to the next level," Area said. "We were very lucky to be able to attract them."

Anderson came to Marshall from the Clements Group, a 25-year-old, full-service institutional advancement consulting firm based out of Salt Lake City, Utah, and specializing in community colleges. As a senior vice president, she organized major gifts campaigns, serving more than 50 community and technical colleges in 16 states and helping colleges raise nearly $100 million.

Prior to joining the Clements Group, Anderson was director for development at Ashland (Ky.) Community College for nearly seven years. It was there that she implemented a comprehensive resource development program. During her tenure, the college established a foundation, conducted its first major gifts campaign and raised $2.2 million.

Area said Anderson will spend most of her time as a major gifts fundraiser and development officer. She also will have a supervisory role over scholarships, donor relations and the university fund. Anderson earned her Master of Arts in Journalism from Marshall in 1997.

Crabtree came to Marshall from the University of Rio Grande (Ohio), where she worked from 1984 to this past July. In different capacities in development during those 27 years, she participated in three capital campaigns that raised nearly $30 million.

Most recently, Crabtree was vice president for institutional advancement, directing and participating in institutional fundraising activities and encouraging alumni participation in such activities.

She was special assistant to the president from 1994 to 2005 and before that was director of planned giving for five years. In that position, Crabtree cultivated and secured a bequest of $1.67 million, which at the time of termination was the university's largest single gift.

According to Area, Crabtree will be working closely with Ed Zimmerman, director of planned giving, and continue to expand and cultivate the university's planned giving prospects. She is a 1981 graduate of Berea (Ky.) College, where she earned a bachelor of arts in English.


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Friday October 21, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Faculty woodwind and percussion trio to perform Oct. 26

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Triptych, a woodwind and percussion trio composed of Marshall University music faculty members Dr. Ann Marie Bingham, Dr. Ed Bingham and Steve Hall, will perform at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26, in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

They will be joined by faculty colleagues Dr. Wendell Dobbs, Kay Lawson, Dr. Martin Saunders, Dr. Steve Lawson, Dr. Michael Stroeher and Dr. Ben Miller for a performance of Jan Bach's Helix. The work features the saxophone and explores its dual personality as both a classical and jazz instrument.

The Binghams and Hall formed Triptych in the mid-1980s, when they taught together at Cumberland College in Williamsburg, Ky. They performed extensively and commissioned several works specifically for the trio. Most of their repertoire requires an enormous array of pitched and unpitched percussion instruments.


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Friday October 21, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-746-1964

Forum to highlight Marshall advances in next generation sequencing and bioinformatics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Scientific researchers, computer scientists and engineers will gather next week at Marshall University for a forum to focus attention on Marshall's research capabilities in the fields of genomics and bioinformatics.

The free forum, called "Next Generation Sequencing and Bioinformatics," will be held Thursday, Oct. 27, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. in room 402 of the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus. The program will include presentations about the university's resources for advanced research in these cutting-edge scientific fields, current research projects under way on campus, and a discussion about what will be necessary to continue to build momentum.

According to event organizers, the scientific fields of molecular biology and genomics have undergone a spectacular transition over the past 20 years due to technological advances. Research studies have evolved from a single gene approach to genome-wide investigations that generate a massive amount of data to analyze. This change has led to development of bioinformatics - a  research field that uses computer technology to help understand biological processes.

Over the past several years, Marshall has made a concerted effort to strategically build its capacity for this type of high-tech research. A new high-performance computing cluster has given Marshall students and faculty access to computing power, data and information previously available only to the most prestigious research institutions, and connection to the advanced Internet2 network that links the university with people, equipment and information at partner institutions around the world. Marshall is also the only institution in the state with a next generation sequencer, which allows scientists to sequence a genome faster and at lower cost than was possible with earlier methods.

Dr. Philippe Georgel, a professor of biological sciences in Marshall's College of Science, will be helping to lead the forum. He said the university has made great strides recently.

"Marshall University is gathering momentum in terms of securing first-class equipment and building intellectual capabilities to develop competitive next generation sequencing capabilities," Georgel said. "The decoding of the human genome has not only answered multiple biological questions, it has also opened new research avenues aimed at understanding how the expression of these thousands of genes can be coordinated."

Another forum participant, Dr. Jim Denvir, assistant professor of bioinformatics and biostatistics at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, agreed, adding, "The acquisition of state-of-the-art genomic sequencing technology has positioned Marshall University to play a leading role in emerging avenues of biological research. These new research technologies reveal both exciting possibilities and big challenges across multiple-scientific disciplines."

Organizers invite anyone with an interest in the topic to attend the forum. For more information or to register online, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/ngsbf.

The forum is made possible in part by a National Science Foundation grant that funds "Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in West Virginia and Arkansas (CI-TRAIN)," a partnership among eight higher education institutions in West Virginia and Arkansas.


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Thursday October 20, 2011
Contact: Lisle G. Brown, , 304-696-2344

Library Campaign to Aid Confederate Collection

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Library Associates group has selected Marshall's Rosanna Blake Library of Confederate History as the recipient of its second annual silent fund-raising campaign. The group hopes to raise $10,000 to aid the collection.

Last year's campaign by the Library Associates garnered $10,000 to help digitize the WSAZ News Film Archive. Both the WSAZ Archive and the Confederate History collection are part of MU's Special Collections, housed in the James E. Morrow Library on the Huntington campus.

During her lifetime Rosanna Blake amassed one of the nation's finest private collections of Confederate history. On her death, she left her collection to Marshall. It consists of more than 3,000 books and journals, as well as sheet music, newspapers, photographs and other items.

Books and other materials in the collection "need continuing quality care and preservation to assure their longevity," said Special Collections Curator Lisle G. Brown.

"Gifts to this year's campaign will help provide that special care," said campaign chair Dr. Carolyn Hunter. "As we did last year, we've decided not to host a fund-raising dinner or other event but instead simply ask those who value Marshall and its library treasures to make a donation. Last year's response to our appeal was gratifying and we know the community will be equally supportive this year."

Copies of two color lithographs of Confederate warships - the CSS Alabama and the CSS Florida - will be given to all those who make a donation of $250 or more.

Gifts may be made online at  www.marshall.edu/foundation . Click on "GIVE NOW" and note "MU Libraries Campaign for Special Collections" in the comment section of the form.

Gifts may also be made payable to The Marshall University Foundation, noting MU Libraries Campaign for Special Collections, and sent to the foundation at 519 John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25703.

The Library Associates is a group of friends of the Marshall University Libraries, that notes among its purposes helping stimulate private support of the libraries and encouraging awareness of the importance of the libraries to the community and the state.


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Thursday October 20, 2011
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Department of Music to celebrate 'Octubafest' next two Mondays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University tuba and euphonium studio in the Department of Music will present a recital of solo performances to kick off their annual celebration of Octubafest at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Then, on the following Monday, Oct. 31, "Tubonium," Marshall's tuba/euphonium ensemble, will present a concert with an array of Halloween-themed compositions to celebrate Tubaween. This year the program will feature a combined ensemble including Department of Music students and faculty, local high school students and community members. The Oct. 31 concert will also take place at 8 p.m. in Smith Music Hall.

"Come enjoy the festive costumes, decorations and free candy," said Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba at Marshall. "There will be 'kid-friendly' activities and costumes are welcome!" 

Admission to both of these events is free and open to the public. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or email Palton at palton@marshall.edu .   


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Wednesday October 19, 2011
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Marshall University celebrates pharmacy school progress

Renovations under way to house new program beginning next fall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Major progress in the extensive renovations to the Robert W. Coon Medical Education Building (MEB) at the Huntington VA Medical Center is a clear indication the opening of Marshall University's School of Pharmacy is moving closer to reality.

The $9 million overhaul of the facility is on schedule for completion in time to welcome the inaugural class of the university's new pharmacy school in fall 2012, guests attending a ceremony to celebrate the progress learned today.

"Studies show that more pharmacists are needed in West Virginia, a trend that is expected to continue," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "Our School of Pharmacy will help meet that need and in doing so, help improve the quality of life in our community, region and state. The renovation of the Medical Education Building is a huge step toward the school welcoming its first class of students next fall."

Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, the school's founding dean, said, "We are excited about the renovations to the building, which will result in a cutting-edge, technology-enabled learning environment and research facility for the students of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. Equally exciting is the prospect of deepening the long relationship between Marshall University and the VA Medical Center with its broad range of inpatient and ambulatory patient care services.

"We look forward to working closely with the VA and many other closely affiliated regional health care institutions to produce graduates who will make positive contributions to patient care throughout our state, region and nation."

Edward H. Seiler, director of the VA Medical Center, said, "The Marshall University School of Pharmacy is the latest advancement in a longstanding academic affiliation between the Huntington VA Medical Center and Marshall University. We are pleased that the School of Pharmacy will be located on our campus and look forward to the contributions its graduates will make to the healthcare industry in our region."

Those attending today's event, which was held on the lawn of the MEB, got a close-up view of a building that has been gutted on the lower two levels. Renovation to the facility, which is located adjacent to the Huntington VA Medical Center on Spring Valley Drive, is about 25 percent complete, according to Ron May, manager of project operations at Marshall.

"All the demolition is finished," May said. "We've been doing a lot of mechanical, electrical and plumbing work, and the ground floor is almost completely partitioned up. We're making good progress. The building will be ready in time for classes to start next fall."

To commemorate today's event, guests signed a section of drywall that will actually be used in the construction of the facility, serving as a sort of "time capsule" for future generations.

The renovation will result in a state-of-the-art, 76,000-square-foot learning, research and pharmacy practice facility. The MEB was constructed in the late 1970s at a cost of $9.3 million and was fully funded by the former U.S. Veterans Administration (now the Department of Veterans Affairs). The building was vacated when the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine faculty and classrooms were relocated to the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on the Huntington campus.

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted unanimously in December 2009 to approve the awarding of the Doctorate in Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. It is estimated that nearly 40 new high-paying faculty and staff positions will be created at the school within the first four years, and the school is expected to generate more than $150 million in regional economic impact. Marshall's "pedigree" in bioscience research will present new opportunities for funding and powerful private-sector partnerships with pharmaceutical and therapeutics companies, which will add to this economic development impact.

The school also will play a vital role in filling the significant shortage of pharmacists in the state. According to the Pharmacy Manpower Project, Inc., (http://www.pharmacymanpower.com/index.jsp)  in July 2011, West Virginia ranked third in the nation in states with the highest level of unmet demand for pharmacists. The study found that overall, 39 percent of the U.S. population resides in states in which filling open pharmacist positions was at least moderately difficult.

This situation will be exacerbated as the nation's - and West Virginia's - population ages. More pharmacists will be needed as the role of pharmacists evolves and expands into physician offices, outpatient care centers, nursing homes and rural health clinics.

The renovation is not the only area where progress is being made. Yingling announced the hiring this summer of the school's executive leadership team, including the following four people:

  • Dr. John V. Schloss, an academic and industrial researcher with more than 30 years of combined experience, as founding chair of pharmaceutical science and research;

  • Dr. H. Glenn Anderson Jr., former associate dean of academic affairs at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, as associate dean for academic and curricular affairs;

  • Dr. Kimberly Broedel-Zaugg, formerly a professor of pharmacy at Ohio Northern University, as founding chair of pharmacy practice and administration; and

  • Dr. Robert Stanton, previously regional clinical director for the nation's leading independent pharmacy services provider, Comprehensive Pharmacy Services, as director of the Office of Experiential Learning.

Also, Terri Moran was hired as the director of student affairs and assessment. Moran, who  has worked at Marshall for 16 years, previously served as assistant registrar. In addition, Karen Barker was hired as executive assistant to the dean. Barker had been administrative assistant for the university's Center for Teaching and Learning since 2005.

The School of Pharmacy has applied for accreditation status through the Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE), the accrediting body for pharmacy education, and administrators are working to develop the curriculum, admissions criteria, prerequisite requirements, financial aid guidelines and student policies. Officials are expecting a first class of up to 80 students.

For more information about the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, visit www.marshall.edu/pharmacy or call 304-696-7302.

-----------------------

Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp signs a section of drywall that will be used in the renovation of the School of Pharmacy. Guests attending today's celebration were asked to sign the drywall. (Middle) Del. Don Perdue speaks to the crowd at today's renovation celebration, which took place outside the Medical Education Building, home of Marshall's new School of Pharmacy. (Below)  Renovation of the Medical Education Building, home of Marshall's new School of Pharmacy, is about 25 percent complete. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University. 


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Wednesday October 19, 2011
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Marshall to welcome 32 bands Saturday for Tri-State Marching Festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host 32 marching bands Saturday, Oct. 22, for the Tri-State Marching Festival beginning at 11 a.m.

According to Marshall's band director, Steve Barnett, this is the largest band festival of its kind in this part of the country. Bands from West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio have been separated into categories based on the number of performers.

Scoring for the festival will be based on Music Performance (35 percent), Marching Performance (30 percent), General Effect (30 percent), and Percussion (5 percent). Trophies will be awarded to the 1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-place bands in each category, as well as recognition of percussion, drum major, color guard, dance team and featured twirlers.

Admission to the festival is $5 per person of school age and up. Public parking will be available for $2 in the south end of the west stadium parking lot until the lot is full. After that, patrons may park in the garage on 3rd Avenue and any other available spaces near the stadium.

"The Tri-State Marching Festival is a tremendous opportunity to showcase Marshall University," Barnett said. "We expect to bring more than 10,000 to the stadium, many of whom are prospective college students with their parents."

This year's judging panel includes Dr. Richard Lemke from South Point, Ohio (Marching Performance); Mark Culp, Central States Judges Association (General Effect); Miles Threlkeld, Central States Judges Association (Music Performance); Kris Logue, Central States Judges Association (Percussion); Will Stevenson, Central States Judges Association (Color Guard); Tommy Thompson, Huntington, W.Va. (Drum Major); Kim Maynard, Huntington, W.Va., (Twirlers/Majorettes); and Bridget Rowsey, Huntington, W.Va. (Dancers).


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Tuesday October 18, 2011
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Application process under way for Spring 2012 Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted through Friday, Nov. 11,  for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver Program for Spring 2012, according to Dr. Donna Spindel,  dean of the Graduate College. The scholarship program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.

The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Preference may be given to students who did not receive a waiver the previous semester.

Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by email. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at  http://www.marshall.edu/bursar.

Award recipients must be registered for graduate courses for the Spring 2012 term by Friday, Dec. 9, in order to receive a waiver.  Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Dec. 9 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at  http://www.marshall.edu/graduate/tuitionwaivers.asp

Persons with questions may call the Graduate College at 304-696-6606.


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Tuesday October 18, 2011
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Marshall Board of Governors receives strong financial report from auditors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.   - The Marshall University Board of Governors today received a strong financial report from the university's auditors during a meeting on the Huntington campus.

According to the accounting firm of Deloitte and Touche, LLP, Marshall's unrestricted net assets were 20 percent of the school's operating expenses for Fiscal Year 2010-2011. Mary Ellen Heuton, MU's interim chief financial officer, said the report is an indication of the strong financial health of the university.

Board members praised the sound financial management of the university, which has been achieved despite an unsteady national economy.

In other business, the board approved the fee schedule for the School of Pharmacy for Fiscal Year 2012-2013. Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, provided an update on the status of the school, which will welcome its first class in fall 2012.

The next board meeting is Dec. 13 in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on the Huntington campus.


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Friday October 14, 2011
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Marshall to kick off United Way campaign Oct. 17

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will begin its 2011 United Way campaign Monday, Oct. 17, with a kickoff celebration from 11 to 2 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus.

The campaign, which helps the United Way support dozens of local agencies, runs through Friday, Nov. 11.  

The theme of this year's campaign, conducted in conjunction with United Way of the River Cities, is Be One, Get One. The United Way is asking for each person who contributes to get another person to contribute.

"We are planning a fun kickoff on the 17th, a costume contest on Halloween and a big prize giveaway on November 11 to keep people thinking about the campaign," said Dr. Robert Bookwalter, chairman of the President's Green Ribbon Committee, which represents different departments and campuses. "The agencies supported by the United Way really need our help, so this year our goal is to get 110 new donors and to increase contributions to at least $35,000. Times are really tough for a lot of people in our community and our support will go a long way."

In addition to encouraging all MU personnel to send in pledges, the campaign will highlight three signature events.  The kickoff event on Monday will feature food, games and prizes.  On Halloween, there will be a Campus Costume Contest.     Entrants will be assigned a number, and students and coworkers can donate $1 to vote for their favorite costume.  Top vote getters for faculty, staff, students and administrators will win prizes.

The closing event for the campaign will take place on the MSC plaza on Nov.  11, when the XBox with Kinect will be given to the lucky winner.  Tickets for the XBox drawing can be purchased in MSC 2W38 throughout the campaign.  Prizes to be awarded throughout the campaign include autographed athletic items, two season tickets for Marshall men's basketball, free use of an administrator's parking spot for a week, and the Xbox 360 with Kinect, courtesy of a Student Activities Programming Board (SAPB) raffle.

United Way packets, including pledge cards, will  be hand delivered on the Huntington campus by student volunteers to every employee on campus the week of Oct. 17. Those who choose to donate may target their contribution to a specific agency listed in the pledge packet. The United Way of the River Cities, Inc., has 28 partner agencies.

In addition to annual pledges and payroll deductions, Marshall University employees may contribute by participating in numerous fund-raising activities planned during the campaign. An updated schedule of campaign activities will be available soon at www.marshall.edu/wpmu/unitedway .

One new activity is the Links United project.  Students can purchase paper links which will be added to a chain that the campaign hopes will surround the lobby of the MSC.  Links will be available Mondays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. throughout the campaign.

One of the most popular special activities is the opportunity for Marshall employees to wear jeans to work. Participants will be "permitted" to wear jeans to work on Tuesdays and Thursdays throughout the campaign.  Jeans days are Oct. 18, 20, 25 and 27, and Nov. 1,3,8 and 10.

Cost for the "I'm Wearing jeans for United Way" stickers is $3 for one, $5 for two or $20 for eight. They may be purchased in the following locations:

  • Old Main basement, mailroom (Leonard Lovely, 696-6644)

  • Old Main 207, Human Resources (Stephanie Gray, 696-2593)

  • Memorial Student Center 2W6 (Eleanore Beckett, 696-6472)

  • Holderby Hall 109 (Sharon Booth, 696-2569)

  • Gullickson Hall 112 (Cammy Holley, 696-5459)

  • Sorrell Bulding, Physical Plant (Anita Hill, 696-2989)

  • Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center 301Q (Anita Mathis, 696-7322)

  • MU Medical Center, dean's office 3408 (Wanda Webb, 691-1700)

 

Members of the President's Green Ribbon Committee are:

  • Carla Adkins, Payroll Representative

  • R.B. Bookwalter, Dean of the College of Education, Committee Chair

  • Cassey Bowden, United Way of the River Cities

  • Tootie Carter, Memorial Student Center Operations

  • Perry Chaffin, Director of Audits

  • Raymond Cousins, Resident Director

  • Lakesha Glover, Housing and Residence Life

  • Jana Hovland, Dietetics

  • Kelly Kutzavitch, Student Body Vice President

  • Lisa Martin, Judicial Affairs/Volunteer Services

  • Rhonda Mullins Frye, University Communications

  • Vanessa Myers, Student Affairs

  • Jeffrey O'Malley, Athletics Administration

  • Dale Osburn, Physical Plant

  • Nancy Pelphrey, Alumni Affairs

  • Matt Turner, Chief of Staff

  • Dave Wellman, University Communications

  • Lashawna Sampson, Student Activities Programming Board

For more information on the United Way campaign, call Bookwalter at 304-696-6703.

 

###


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Friday October 14, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

College of Liberal Arts sponsors October lectures

HUNTINGTON, W.Va . - Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts (COLA), in conjunction with the department of classics and a student environmental group, is hosting two events this month, both of which are free to the public.

The first event, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, in BE5 in the Memorial Student Center, is a screening of the documentary "Urban Roots," which examines the life of Detroit residents following the collapse of the auto industry and their transition into urban farming.  Following the documentary will be a panel discussion of faculty and local experts on community gardens including Dr. Godwin Djietror, professor of geography; Dr. Robert Behrman, professor of political science; Bethany Walters, director of Rolling Hill Folk Center, which is focusing on initiating a local food network; and Andi Leffingwell, director of Huntington's Kitchen, a community food center.

The event is sponsored by COLA and the Student Environmental Action Coalition.

Later this month, COLA and the department of classics will host a lecture on the coastal town of Tel Dor in Israel.   Dr. Christina Franzen, a professor of classics, will present, "Listening to the Past: The archeology of Dor" at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26, in room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center.

Franzen will explain the layout of the archeological site as well as how the artifacts in the area were uncovered.  The discussion also will include Franzen's thoughts and understandings of her visit to the Middle East and how her experiences affect her teaching.

For more information, contact Dr. David Pittenger, dean of COLA, at 304-696-2731.


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Friday October 14, 2011
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CIA recruiters to visit Marshall University's Huntington campus

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Recruiters from the Central Intelligence Agency will offer Marshall University students and alumni insider tips on how to apply with the agency during a visit to the Huntington campus Wednesday, Oct. 19.

The CIA will conduct information sessions at 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. in room 2W22 in the Memorial Student Center. During both sessions, students and alumni will learn about the CIA's application process, testing and background investigations. They also will have the opportunity to sign up for resume reviews by CIA recruiters. These reviews will help potential applicants target their resume for CIA employment positions.

CIA recruiters will review resumes from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, at Marshall's Career Services Center. Appointments are recommended; however, walk-ins will be seen as time permits.

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, encourages any student or alumnus interested in working in a challenging, global environment to attend the event.

While students from all majors are invited to attend, the CIA is especially interested in hiring foreign language, history, political science and international business majors.

For more information, contact Career Services at 304-696-2370.


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Thursday October 13, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University homecoming video subject of contest

All participants have to do is identify where JT is sitting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Where's JT?

In the Marshall University homecoming 2011 YouTube video, MU freshman JT Mitchell of Charleston, W.Va., is sitting in Joan C. Edwards Stadium to help promote homecoming.  As viewers might have noticed, while the white board messages and other items change, his seat location does not. 

The Marshall University Alumni Association knows where JT was seated and challenges the public to guess his seat location and possibly win prizes in the process. So, everyone is invited to check out the video at www.Youtube.com/herdvideo and then scout the stadium on game day and make their best guess.

Participants need to send their entries (one per person) on or before 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16, by e-mail along with the following information to homecoming@marshall.edu

    Name:
    Mailing address:
    Phone number:
    Where you think JT is sitting:
        Section:
        Row:
        Seat:

Winners will be notified by phone on Wednesday, Oct. 19.

Prizes will be offered to those with the three closest guesses.  In the event of a tie, those entrants will be entered into a drawing to determine the grand prize winner. 

Grand prize is a coach's windbreaker jacket used in the filming of the "We Are Marshall" movie with a certificate of authenticity.  Second place is two game tickets to either the Oct.  29 or Nov. 26 Marshall football home games (exact date and seat location to be determined by Marshall University). The third-place recipient will receive a $25 gift certificate to the Marshall University Bookstore.  Odds of winning are based upon the number of entrants and their guesses.

Mitchell is a 2011 graduate of George Washington High School. He is majoring in Nursing.

For more information, call Jon Sutton with Marshall University Alumni Relations at 304-696-2901.


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Wednesday October 12, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Visiting artist to present lecture-recital on contemporary American piano music

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Youmee Kim, assistant professor of piano at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Thursday, Oct. 20, to present a lecture-recital titled "Contemporary American Piano Music." The event will take place at 2 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall , and is free and open to the public.

Born in Korea, Kim received her Bachelor of Music degree from Ewha Woman's University there. She also holds a Master of Music and Performer Diploma from Indiana University and a Doctor of Musical Arts from The Ohio State University. She has won numerous awards, including the Women in Music Competition and the Ohio Federation of Music Clubs Scholarship. She has performed extensively in Korea and North America, and has been featured by the Saskatoon Symphony Orchestra in Canada. 

A specialist in 20th century American piano music, Kim has authored An Analysis and Performance Guide to Benjamin Lees' Odyssey I and II' (published by VDM in Verlag, Germany), and published articles for "International Piano Music." An active member of the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA), she serves as vice chair of the Southeast District of the Ohio MTNA.


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Wednesday October 12, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, , 304-746-1989

Marshall University hosts blood drive on South Charleston campus

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is hosting a blood drive for the American Red Cross on its South Charleston campus from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14. Donors have the option of giving blood or making a double-red cell donation during the drive. No appointment is necessary.

The South Charleston campus is located at 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., just off of the Kanawha Turnpike. The drive will be in Rooms 135 and 137. Parking is free and convenient.

For more information, contact Joyce Harrah at 304-746-2030 or jsharrah@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 12, 2011
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Marshall alumnus to share his experience as author and playwright

Craig Johnson also will read from his work during visit to MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va . - Marshall University graduate and best-selling author Craig Johnson is visiting the Huntington campus over the next few days for a series of events, including a public reading of some of his work.

As part of the Marshall University Visiting Writers Series, Johnson will read from his work at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 17, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. 

Johnson will be on campus for several events sponsored by the College of Fine Arts. Monday's reading is sponsored by the Department of English and the College of Liberal Arts.

Johnson, best known for his series of Viking/Penguin novels with lead character Wyoming Sheriff Walt Longmire, is a 1983 graduate with a bachelor of fine arts degree specializing in theatre.   He has received numerous awards for his writing, including a "superfecta" of starred reviews from Kirkus, Booklist, Publishers Weekly and Library Journal for The Dark Horse - which was named one of Publishers Weekly's best books of 2009.

Another Man's Moccasins received the Western Writers of America Spur Award for best novel of 2008 as well as the Mountains and Plains Award for fiction book of the year.  Junkyard Dogs and Hell is Empty were recently released by Viking. 

Johnson has served as a board member of the Mystery Writers of America and lives in Ucross, Wyo., population 25.

Recently, the A&E television network announced a television series is in production and is based on Johnson's Longmire books.

Johnson's appearances at Marshall will include several sessions with both College of Fine Arts and School of Journalism and Mass Communications students.

"I have some unique experiences, but I'm also looking forward to the energy and enthusiasm that the students have to share," Johnson said.  "As a Marshall alumnus, I know that I would have appreciated working with a New York Times bestselling author whose books are the basis for a TV series. I certainly appreciate the opportunity to visit my alma mater and to speak about my experiences to the college and public community."

The public events featuring Johnson are as follows:

  • At 8 p.m., Monday, Oct.17, he will read from his work and conduct a book signing in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre.

  • At 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 19, Marshall theatre students will read from Johnson's work in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Both events are free and open to the public.

For more information on Johnson's appearances, contact Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator with the College of Fine Arts at 304-696-3296.


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Tuesday October 11, 2011
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Marshall's new Physical Therapy Program accepting student applications

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's new Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is accepting student applications and plans to admit the inaugural class in May 2012, Dr. Penny G. Kroll, chairman of the Department of Physical Therapy, said today.

Kroll said students can review the program admission requirements at the College of Health Professions website, Physical Therapy webpage - http://www.marshall.edu/cohp/?page_id=331, in the "Applying to the Program" section, and can find the online program application by going to www.marshall.edu/graduate. She said she expects about 40 students to make up each class.

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program is an entry-level, 114-credit, three-year, lock-step clinical degree program for students who wish to pursue a career as a physical therapist practitioner, and who possess a baccalaureate degree and required prerequisite coursework. 

The application deadline is Dec. 1 for priority consideration. Students who apply after this deadline will be considered for any seats remaining in the class after that date.


Kroll said much has been accomplished since the DPT program was approved by Marshall's Board of Governors in 2009. She has been at Marshall for more than a year, working on developing the new program.


"So far, the curriculum has been developed, regional accreditation has been received, and I added a Director of Clinical Education last January," Kroll said. "We are now in the process of hiring additional faculty, and a good amount of space is being renovated over at the St. Mary's Educational Center at 5th Avenue and 29th Street to house the program. It should be ready in late April."


For more information, contact Kroll by e-mail at kroll@marshall.edu, or by phone at 304-696-5290.


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ROTC at Marshall University sponsors 2011 homecoming activities

Three dozen recruits to take Oath of Enlistment prior to homecoming game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University football fans might want to arrive at Joan C. Edwards Stadium a little earlier than usual this Saturday for a couple of special events preceding the Thundering Herd's 3 p.m. homecoming game with Rice.

Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield, a 1982 Marshall University graduate and current commanding general of the U.S. Army's Aviation School at Fort Rucker, Ala., is scheduled to give the Oath of Enlistment to approximately 40 new recruits. 

"The Oath of Enlistment ceremony dates back to the revolutionary war where all military personnel were required to swear allegiance to America and to defend its soil," said Lt. Col. Michael A. Stinnett, a professor of military science at Marshall.  "The men and women who will be taking the oath have recently chosen to enlist in the Army and are from across the state of West Virginia.  These future soldiers will soon ship to basic combat training and join the long line of Americans who have bravely fought to defend their country."

The ceremony is set for 1:55 p.m. at the west corner of the north end zone. 

Also, fans will be treated to a special show right before the 3 p.m. kickoff, as the Army Golden Knights Parachute Team is scheduled to jump into the stadium and deliver the game ball.  The Golden Knights perform at events around the country and have been in existence since 1959.

Additionally, Marshall's ROTC will sponsor a tailgate event with free food and drinks. The tailgate, which is open to the public, will be located on the northeast side of the stadium near 3rd Avenue. An Army simulation trailer featuring various weapons and virtual reality type computer simulation games will be set up near the Sorrell physical plant building.

For more information, contact Lt. Col. Stinnett at 304-696-2650.


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Homecoming car bash set for Wednesday at Buskirk Field

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students, faculty and community members will destroy a car painted in Rice University's blue and silver colors during WMUL-FM's 10th annual car bash Wednesday, Oct. 12.

The car bash, part of homecoming activities, will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus. Rice is Marshall's opponent Saturday in the homecoming football game, which starts at 3 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

In celebration of the 10th anniversary of the car bash, a 24-foot limousine will be pounded this year.

"The car bash is a tradition WMUL is proud of keeping on Marshall's campus for 10 years," Station Manager Leannda Carey said.  "It's not something you'll see just anywhere."

WMUL, Marshall's public radio station, will provide sledgehammers, gloves and goggles. All participants will need is one dollar and a little homecoming spirit.

"We all know homecoming is a time for a little trash-talking on the opponent," Carey said. "So we like to help students channel that aggression into something a little more fun."

The dollar admission fee will get participants access to two car-bashing minutes with the limo.

For more information, contact Carey at carey33@marshall.edu or at 304-696-2295.


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Marshall to present recital by visiting Brazilian students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will present a recital by visiting Brazilian students at 8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

Performers include Germano Perreira Lopes, piano and countertenor; Vitor Noah Sandes, guitar; Allison Unglaub, violin; Lucas Silvano, piano; and a jazz trio of Pedro Loch Gonoalves, guitar, Vinocius Costa Da Silva, drums and pandeiro, and
Blake Still, bass.

The visiting students are participating in the MAGNETS (Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students) Exchange Program funded by the U.S. Department of Education and its counterpart in the Brazilian Ministry of Education. Marshall University's American partner in the program is Morehead State University and there are two Brazilian partners as well. The four-year program includes Brazilian students studying at Marshall and Morehead State as well as exchanges of music faculty from the American and Brazilian universities.


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Award-winning Virginia State University Gospel Chorale returns to Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The award-winning Virginia State University Gospel Chorale will perform at Marshall University Monday, Oct. 17, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

The 7 p.m. concert is sponsored by Marshall's Center for African American Students. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the concert is free to the public.

"After such a strong performance last semester at Marshall, it was clearly evident that such a powerful and internationally recognized group must certainly be invited for an encore performance," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students. "This will be an extraordinary evening, appealing to all ages, and one of the best choral performances of the year mixed with gospel, the blues, jazz, dance and more."

The chorale has toured in the U.S. Virgin Islands, North and South Italy, Paris and Hungary for the Pope's Vatican Christmas Concert. It has performed with a host of international artists, such as blues legend B.B. King, jazz artist Dee Dee Bridgewater, Rhythm & Blues artist Solomon Burke and pop artist Michael Bolton.

The chorale has 105 members.

For more information, contact Cooley at 304-696-5430.


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Philosophy professor from Princeton to speak at Marshall Oct. 21

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kwame Anthony Appiah, Laurance S. Rockefeller University professor in the Department of Philosophy at Princeton University, will speak at Marshall University at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21.

Appiah is the guest speaker at the second annual da Vinci Lecture, sponsored by Marshall's Honors College, the Office of the Provost, MU's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi and BrickStreet Insurance.  The public lecture, titled "The Honor Code," and discussion will take place in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theater in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen , is Appiah's latest book. Dwight Garner of the New York Times said the book is "Plaintive and elegant Mr. Appiah brings, to the tidy feast that is his book, a carving knife sharp enough to slice tangled issues of social class thinly."

Appiah has been called the postmodern Socrates who believes one should "go where the question takes you." He specializes in moral and political philosophy, African and African American studies, and issues of personal and political identity, multiculturalism and nationalism.

"We are thrilled to have a scholar of Professor Appiah's stature as the 2011 da Vinci lecturer," said Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College. "A true public intellectual, his work on the ethics of identity invites serious conversation about how we as individuals construct ourselves and in turn relate to others."  

Appiah has taught philosophy and African American studies at the University of Ghana, Drexel, Cornell, Yale, Harvard and Princeton, and lectured at many other institutions in the United States.

Elected to both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Appiah presently is Chairman of the Board of the American Council of Learned Societies.

In 2009, Forbes Magazine included him on a list of the world's seven most powerful thinkers as defined by lasting influence on others and impact on public discourse.


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Forensic Science Graduate Program and student organization to host crime scene investigation workshop

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University forensic science graduate students and faculty will present a crime scene investigation workshop for high school students from Fairview High School of Ashland, Ky., Oct. 28 and Nov. 4 at MU's crime scene house.

About 55 high school science students are expected to attend the "CSI Huntington" workshop. They will participate in lectures, demonstrations and hands-on experiments in areas of DNA analysis, firearms identification, fingerprint analysis, blood pattern analysis and digital forensics.  They will also tour the Forensic Science Center's accredited forensic DNA laboratory which provides assistance to state and local law enforcement agencies across the United States.

The workshop will be presented by Master's United Forensic Science Association, a student organization comprised of forensic science graduate students in the nationally recognized two-year program. Proceeds from the workshop will go towards travel expenses to offset graduate student costs to attend the national meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences next February in Atlanta, Ga.

"CSI Huntington" workshops have been offered previously as a summer camp for middle school students and as a series of evening sessions to adults and high school students in the past.

A new forensic science course is being offered at Fairview High School.  Matt Moresea, who is teaching the class, said he and the students are very excited to visit the Forensic Science Center's forensic DNA laboratory and the crime scene house.

"With Marshall's forensics program being one of the top programs in the country, the students will have the opportunity to learn these techniques from some of the best and thus it might spark an interest for some of them for a career in forensic science or science in general," he said.

Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor of forensic science in the graduate program and faculty advisor for the "CSI Huntington" workshops, said the faculty and students are pleased to have this opportunity to expand the areas of forensic science offered in the workshop as well as the presentation of a one-day format for high school students. For more information about the participation in the workshops, contact Rankin at 304-690-4377.


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Homecoming celebrates Marshall University 'Through the Decades'

Homecoming celebrates Marshall University 'Through the Decades'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Homecoming 2011, featuring a theme of "Marshall University - Through the Decades," gets under way Monday, Oct. 10, with the first of many special activities planned throughout the week.

Marshall's homecoming is sponsored by Bank of America, Liberty Mutual, Pepsi, Huntington Bank, the Student Activities Programming Board, the Student Government Association, the Office of Student Affairs and the Black Alumni Association. 

Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs for the Marshall Alumni Association, said the theme represents a celebration of how far the university has come "through the decades."

"As we lead up to the 175th anniversary of the university, we have so much to be proud of," Pelphrey said. "The changes in the Huntington campus, how it has evolved into the wonderful place it is today ... we all look forward each homecoming to seeing the looks on the faces of those who have not been back for years as they marvel at what Marshall University has become. This year's homecoming is a celebration of Marshall University, past and present. We thank everyone involved, especially our sponsors."

Here is a schedule of Homecoming 2011 activities, beginning Monday:

Monday, Oct. 10
Office decorations

All departments on the Huntington campus are invited to decorate their offices using the homecoming theme. Prizes will be awarded.

Businesses are also encouraged to show their Thundering Herd pride by decorating their exterior and posting a photo on the Alumni Association Facebook site, http://www.facebook.com/mualumni.  The overall winner will be chosen by which business receives the most votes or "likes" on the MUAA Facebook page.

Wednesday, Oct. 12
Car bash

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. - WMUL-FM's annual Car Bash on Buskirk Field. This year's car will be a limousine as WMUL celebrates 10 years of car bashing in style.
 

Thursday, Oct. 13
Parade

6 p.m. - The annual homecoming parade, sponsored by the Student Government Association, starts in downtown Huntington and ends at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Prizes will be awarded to the top floats and marching bands. Parade participants will begin lining up at 5 p.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Prizes for the top three floats and top three bands are as follows: $750 for first place; $500 for second place; and $250 for third place.

Maj. Gen.  Anthony  G. Crutchfield, commanding general of the U.S.  Army Aviation Center of Excellence in Fort Rucker, Ala., and a 1982 Marshall graduate, will be the grand marshal.

Parade participants may register online at www.marshall.edu/sga. For more information, contact the SGA at 304-696-6436 or e-mail harrell7@marshall.edu.

Friday, Oct. 14
Green and White Day
Picnic on the Plaza

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - The Picnic on the Plaza, featuring free food and drinks, is the official kickoff to homecoming. It will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza and is open to all MU students, faculty, staff and administrators. The picnic is sponsored by the Alumni Association, the Office of Development and Huntington Bank.

Various activities are planned. The Marshall Maniacs will be giving away homecoming t-shirts to the first 100 attendees. Office decoration awards will be judged beginning at 11 a.m., and winners announced. The Huntington Food Bank will be accepting canned goods.  Inflatables will be set up on Buskirk Field and the homecoming court will be introduced. The DAWG 93.7 will broadcast live from the plaza. And, homecoming stuffed bears will be offered to the first 250 students that attend the picnic, compliments of the Student Activities Programming Board.

Champagne Reception

7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. - The MU Alumni Association and Black Alumni Association are co-hosting a Champagne Reception at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Cost is $25 per person.
 

Comedy Central on Campus

8 p.m. - The future stars of Comedy Central - Nick Vatterott, Sheng Wang, Rory Scovel and Jermaine Fowler perform at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Together the four have not only played all over the world, but they have performed alongside stars such as Jay Leno, David Letterman, former Artist Series Performer Daniel Tosh and many more. Call the Marshall Artists Series office at 304-696-6656 for tickets.
 

After party

10 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Black Alumni Association After Party, Room BE 5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center. Cost is $20 per person.
 

Saturday, Oct. 15
5k Alum Run

8 a.m. - The 16th annual Marshall University 5k Alum Run, a popular event for area runners and walkers, takes participants from Marshall's campus into downtown Huntington and back to the campus to finish the 3.1-mile course. The course is nearly 100 percent flat and straight.

Several registration options are being offered. Forms are available at the Marshall Recreation Center, located at 402 Thundering Herd Dr. (corner of 20th street and 5th Avenue, near the Marshall football stadium), and from either the rec center's website at www.marshallcampusrec.com or online at www.tristateracer.com.

The pre-race registration price is $20 and the cost is $25 the day of the race. Cash or check (made payable to MU Campus Rec Club) are accepted. Credit cards also are accepted through the online registration portal.
 

Tours of campus

10 a.m. - Anyone interested in a walking tour of campus may call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 and arrangements will be made to have a member of the Student Ambassador Association provide a guided tour.
 

Book signings
Hosted by the Marshall Book Store

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Craig Greenlee, November Ever After

11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  - Carter Taylor Seaton, Amo, Amas, Amat An Unconventional Love Story

Noon to 2 p.m. - Bob Barnett, Growing Up In The Last Small Town - A West Virginia Memoir

Tailgate blast

12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. - The MU Alumni Association, the Black Alumni Association and Parents and Family Weekend celebrate homecoming at 18th Street and 5th Avenue - beside Harless Dining Hall - with a tailgate blast. Cost is $20 per person.
 

Football game

3 p.m. - Marshall plays host to Rice University in a Conference USA battle at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Shortly before kickoff, Maj.  Gen.  Anthony G. Crutchfield will give the Oath of Enlistment to approximately 40 new recruits from West Virginia who chose to enlist in the Army.

Following the oath ceremony, the Army Golden Knights Parachute Team is scheduled to jump into the stadium and deliver the game ball.  The Golden Knights perform at events around the country and have been in existence since 1959.
 

Step show

Immediately following the football game - Step Show, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.
 

Homecoming dance

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Black Alumni Association homecoming dance, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room. Cost is $40 per person.


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8th annual Marshall Marathon set for Nov. 6 in Huntington

Course different than previous years, but remains flat and fast

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 8th annual Marshall University Marathon, scheduled for 7 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 6, follows a different course than in previous years, race director Tom Plummer said today.

The marathon, like always, begins on 3rd Avenue next to Cam Henderson Center and ends on the football field at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. But, instead of heading to the extreme west end of Huntington and back, the runners will stay mostly on the east end, allowing spectators and families to follow the race more closely.

The altered 26.2-mile marathon course, which is U.S. Track and Field certified, goes west to 14th Street and east as far as 27th street. It passes through Harris Riverfront Park and Ritter Park.

"Essentially, it's a two-loop course," Plummer said. "We think it will be more exciting and interesting with the runners staying in the parks and downtown."

Registration for the race is ongoing, and Plummer is hoping for a turnout similar to last year when about 1,550 to 1,600 runners and walkers from 40 states took part. The local economy benefits since many of the competitors are from out of state and spend one or two nights in the area.

"That's certainly a good thing for the city and surrounding areas," said Plummer, who is in his first year as race director after serving on the race committee since the first marathon.

Despite the course change, it will remain flat and fast, Plummer said, making the event one of the tops in the country in percentage of runners qualifying for the Boston Marathon. According to marathonguide.com, the Marshall Marathon ranked 28th last year with 20.7 percent of its runners qualifying for Boston.

In addition to the marathon, Marshall Marathon events include the half-marathon, the half-marathon relay and the 5-k walk.

Runners and walkers can register for the Marshall Marathon at www.active.com. The cost, if paid by Oct. 31, is $80 for the marathon, $50 for the half-marathon, $75 per team for the relay and $20 for the walk. Discount rates are available for military personnel.

More information on the race is available at www.healthyhuntington.org. Registration after Oct. 31 can be done only at the packet pickup from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Marshall Recreation Center.


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State Wind Working Group to be transferred from WVU to Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - The West Virginia Division of Energy has announced that the state Wind Working Group (WWG) will be transferred to Marshall University from West Virginia University. The group is sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy funds through the West Virginia Division of Energy.

The Wind Working Group will be directed by Christine Risch, Director of Research at Marshall's Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER). This will be in collaboration with Marshall's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS).

The WWG consists of wind developers, state regulators, economic development organizations, county officials, landowners, university researchers, representatives of the U.S. Department of Energy, the state energy office, environmental groups and the general public.

WWG's overall goal is generally to advance wind energy as an additional state energy resource. This includes promotion of small-scale wind opportunities and educating the public on net metering, in which those who install wind generation facilities can sell the energy they generate to electric distribution companies.

The WWG also will acquaint local economic development authorities with wind opportunities for sustainable economic growth, advance hybrid energy systems combining wind and fossil energy to provide continuous generation capability, and serve as a source of information to government, business and individuals on pending wind energy developments and policy initiatives.

CBER has been involved with several aspects of wind energy over the past five years, including economic impact studies, research on the impact of wind facilities on property values, research on integration of wind into the electricity transmission system, and review of state wind facility citing policy and government programs for wind energy development.

Under Risch's leadership, an assessment of state policies to promote alternative energy, including wind, was completed for the 13-state Appalachian Regional Commission. CBER contributed to the current West Virginia Energy Plan and is working on its revision. CEGAS has been developing wind assessment projects, focusing on measuring wind speeds on surface mine sites in West Virginia using Sonic Detection and Ranging (SoDAR) equipment to determine if the level of wind is capable of producing sufficient electricity to be economically viable.

Dr. Cal Kent, Vice President of Business and Economic Research at Marshall, noted, "Locating the Wind Working Group at Marshall recognizes the leadership that Christy Risch has provided for the state in alternative and renewable energy. This is another indication of the importance of CBER to the economic growth of the state."

The Wind Working Group's annual meeting took place last month at the Canaan Valley Resort in Davis, W.Va. Both CBER and CEGAS gave presentations at the meeting. The next WWG meeting will take place in September 2012. For more information, contact Risch at 304-696-6251.


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Georgia Southern professor to speak in series on constitutional democracy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Dr. Johnathan O'Neill, an associate professor of history at Georgia Southern University, will be the guest speaker in the second of a three-part lecture series on constitutional democracy titled "Amicus Curiae" at Marshall University.

O'Neill will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. His lecture, titled "Originalism and the Rule of Law Ideal," will consider the meaning of "originalism" in American constitutional law and politics - what it is and how it fits into the history of Supreme Court decision making and the broader landscape of American public life.

The Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy is presented by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy and the College of Liberal Arts, with the financial support of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

At Georgia Southern, O'Neill teaches courses on U.S. constitutional history and legal history of the U.S. His publications include, "Originalism in American Law and  Politics: A Constitutional History" and America and Enlightenment Constitutionalism." He is working on a new book, "Constitutional Knowledge and Constitutional Maintenance in Twentieth-Century America."

The lecture is free to the public.


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Marshall University faculty provide training on digital forensics to West Virginia arson investigators

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University faculty provided digital forensics training to arson investigators at the West Virginia Fire Investigation Conference sponsored by the West Virginia Chapter of the International Association of Arson Investigators.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center; John Sammons, assistant professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department; and Margaret Phipps Brown, Esq., professor of Criminal Justice, were featured speakers on Monday, Oct. 3, at the two-day conference in Beckley. Continuing education credits were available to eligible participants.  

Fenger discussed the identification of digital evidence and data recovery from destroyed or damaged digital evidence, and provided an overview of digital forensic capacities within West Virginia. Sammons, who also is director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence, covered investigative procedures in analyzing digital evidence.  Brown addressed search and seizure laws that govern digital evidence. She is an assistant prosecuting attorney in the Cabell County Prosecutor's Office.

The instructors collaborate as part of an agenda to increase awareness about digital forensics and digital forensic evidence and its impact on the criminal justice system, Fenger said. Continuing education and informational presentations are provided routinely to stakeholders including arson and criminal investigators, law enforcement, attorneys and judges.


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Distinguished scholar on history of African diaspora to deliver lecture Oct. 6

Event is part of Hispanic Heritage Month activities at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Herman Bennett, a distinguished scholar on the history of the African diaspora, with a particular focus on Latin American history, will deliver a lecture on Afro-Latin America Thursday, Oct. 6, at Marshall University.

Bennett's lecture, titled "The Archive of an Unimagined Past: The 'Black' Presence in New Spain's Recorded History," begins at 6 p.m. and takes place in Room BE 5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus. It is free to the public.

The lecture is the second of four Hispanic Heritage Month activities sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Affairs; the Center for International Programs; the Center for African-American Students' Programs; the College of Liberal Arts; the departments of Modern Languages, History,  Political Science,  Geography, Music and Biology; and the Marshall Artists Series.

Through his work, Bennett has called for scholars to broaden the critical inquiry of race and ethnicity in the colonial world. His books include Colonial Blackness: A History of Afro-Mexico and Africans in Colonial Mexico: Absolutism, Christianity and Afro-Creole Consciousness.

The next event in the Hispanic Heritage Month series is at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center when  Quique Sinesi and Berta Rojas perform a guitar concert.

For more information on the series, call Dr. Cristina Burgueno at 304-696-2746.


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Air Robotics Airborne Vehicle Systems founder guest speaker at RTI Transportation Seminar Series event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jeff Imel, founder of Air Robotics Airborne Vehicle Systems, will be the guest speaker in a Rahall Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) Transportation Seminar Series event Thursday, Oct. 6.

Imel will speak from 11 a.m. to noon in Room 276 of the Science Building on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The event is free to the public.

Air Robotics is an aerospace company that designs and manufactures blended wing body Airborne Vehicle Systems (AVS) for use in remote sensing and airborne scientific applications. It offers payload-agnostic functionality by virtue of its patent-pending Modular Payload Lifting System (MPLS).

Customers using Air Robotics Airborne Vehicle System can swap payloads in just minutes, in the field, allowing them to perform multiple missions using a single airframe.

For more information on the RTI Transportation Seminar Series, contact Bethany Williams at 304-696-5828.


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Artists Series to benefit from grand opening of Soma Intimates

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The grand opening of the Soma Intimates store in Huntington will support the Marshall Artists Series with a special offer beginning Thursday, Oct. 6, and continuing through Sunday, Oct. 9.

Ten percent of all proceeds from the Soma Intimates, Chico's and White House Black Market locations in Huntington will be donated to the Marshall Artists Series in honor of its 75th anniversary. This offer is made possible by Verna K. Gibson, former CEO of the Limited, member of the Chico's FAS Board of Directors and chairwoman of the Marshall University Board of Governors.

Soma Intimates is located at 943 3rd Ave. across from Pullman Square.


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Thursday September 29, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU seeks floats, bands for homecoming parade Oct. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association is encouraging participation in the annual homecoming parade, which takes place at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in downtown Huntington. Prizes will be awarded to the top floats and bands.

Student groups, high school bands and local organizations are invited to participate. The theme for homecoming 2011 is "MU Through the Decades." Parade participants will begin lining up at 5 p.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The parade will end at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Prizes for the top three floats and top three bands are as follows: $750 for first place; $500 for second place; and $250 for third place.

Maj. Gen.  Anthony  G. Crutchfield, commanding general of the U.S.  Army Aviation Center of Excellence in Fort Rucker, Ala., and a 1982 Marshall graduate, will be the grand marshal in the homecoming parade.

Parade participants may register online at www.marshall.edu/sga. For more information, contact the SGA at 304-696-6436 or e-mail harrell7@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 29, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

June Harless Center to begin second year of GigaPan training

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Education Research and Development, part of the College of Education at Marshall University, will hold its second year of GigaPan training for local teachers Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at Huntington High School.

Approximately 60 teachers from Cabell, Wayne, Lincoln, Nicholas and Randolph counties will be involved in the training.

A two-year GigaPan grant, which was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, will enable local and regional students to take GigaPan panoramic images of their communities and activities and share them with peers across the world.

The GigaPan camera is a simple robotic platform for capturing very high-resolution panoramic images with a standard digital camera. These images are then downloaded onto a computer where the software stitches the pictures together to create a single navigable image.

These images can be uploaded to the free user community site (gigapan.org), which allows images to be shared, stored, commented on, linked and embedded in any website. When looking at the final GigaPan image, users can view the entire panoramic or zoom into the minutest detail with full resolution.

The goal of the grant is to foster a spirit of global citizenship and understanding using technology in a safe forum for young people to share thoughts and ideas about their world. 

GigaPan is a collaborative project between Carnegie Mellon University and NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group, with support from Google.

For more information, contact Carrie-Meghan Quick-Blanco at quickblanco@marshall.edu or visit www.gigapan.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tonight's Recital Cancelled

Tonight's Department of Music recital, a performance by Wendell Dobbs, flute and John Ingram, piano, at 8 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall has been cancelled due to illness.  

 

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall speech and debate team gets season started with strong effort at Western Kentucky

Marshall speech and debate team gets season started

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's speech and debate team enjoyed a successful first tournament of the season last weekend at Western Kentucky University.

Coach Danny Ray said the Thundering Word won several awards over the two-day tournament in Bowling Green, Ky.

"This is a very prestigious tournament and this is the best we have performed this early in the season," Ray said. "This season looks very promising as we continue to grow as a team and add additional entries."

Other schools competing were Alabama, Rice, William Carrey College, Belmont, Miami, Truman State, Murray State, Central Michigan, Ohio State, John Carroll College, Lafayette College and Berea College.

Performing well for Marshall were:

Ryan Jackson, a senior Political  Science major from Huntington, who placed fifth in Poetry Interpretation and fourth in Duo Interpretation with Kris Anderson, a junior Communication Studies major from Princeton, W.Va.;

Hailey Lara, a sophomore Communication Studies major from Huntington, who placed fourth in Communication Analysis and was awarded the Top Novice competitor in Poetry Interpretation;

Devan Sample, a freshman English major from Martinsburg, W.Va., who was the Top Novice competitor in Prose Interpretation;

Mary Margaret Chaffee, a Science major from Terra Alta, W.Va., who was the Top Novice competitor in Dramatic Interpretation.

Marshall placed third overall in the combined speech and debate sweepstakes award and placed fourth in Individual Events. Ray said this finish would not have been possible without the points scored from the remaining team members who did not place in the final round. Those students competing were:

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a senior Political Science/History major from Louisville, Ky., who competed in Debate and Individual Events;

Garrison Crews, a freshman Political Science major from Huntington, who competed in Debate and Individual Events;

Elaine Adkins, a sophomore French/Oral Communications major from Huntington; Jasmine Lewis, a sophomore Political Science major from Huntington; Lance West Jr., a junior  International Business major from Huntington; and Jackie Stalnaker, a freshman Spanish/Political Science major from Philippi, W.Va.

The Thundering Word's next tournaments are Sept. 30-Oct. 3, at Lafayette College, and Oct. 7-10 at West Chester, both in Pennsylvania.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 27, 2011
Contact: Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs,, 304-696-4677

Marshall University to host Native American powwow

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Multicultural Affairs, in partnership with the Mekoce Shawnee Nation of West Virginia, will present a traditional Native American powwow Friday, Oct. 7, and Saturday, Oct. 8, at Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus.

"A modern powwow is a specific type of event where both Native American and non-Native American people meet to dance, sing, socialize and honor American Indian culture," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall. This powwow will feature drums, native dancers, storytellers and vendors of traditional native wares and food, she said.

The powwow will be open to the community both days, beginning at 10 a.m. A grand entry of participants will start at 11 a.m. each day.

Fourth-grade students in Cabell County will attend the powwow as a field trip on Friday, Oct. 7, starting with the grand entry at 11 a.m., followed by interactive activities for the children. 

In the event of rain, the powwow will take place in the Memorial Student Center.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 26, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-746-1964

New high-performance computing cluster gives Marshall unprecedented research, teaching and learning tools

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Taking on some of mankind's greatest challenges and advancing cutting-edge science, research and learning all require enormous computing power.

Now, researchers, faculty and students at Marshall University have access to a new high-performance computing (HPC) cluster that will enable them to make significant advancements in fields as diverse as bioinformatics, climate research, physics, computational chemistry and engineering.

According to Dr. Jan I. Fox, Marshall's senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer, all these disciplines rely on the state-of-the-art computing tools and methods provided by the new cluster.

"This new HPC cluster makes possible scholarly innovation and discoveries that were, until recently, possible only at the most prestigious research institutions," she said. "Along with our connection to Internet2, our students and faculty now have access to computing power, data and information we could only imagine just a few years ago."

Nicknamed "BigGreen," Marshall's new cluster is made up of 23 high-end computer systems housed in the university's Drinko Library. Once they have a user account on BigGreen, researchers can access the cluster and its resources from anywhere.

For the computer-savvy, it is important to note that BigGreen features 276 central processing unit cores, 552 gigabytes of memory and more than 10 terabytes of storage.  Eight NVidia Tesla graphics processing units with 448 cores each provide support for massively parallel computation, pushing BigGreen to roughly six Teraflops or six trillion floating point operations per second of theoretical peak computing power. A variety of scientific software packages are installed and available for use on the cluster, including COMSOL Multiphysics, Mathematica and CLC Genomics WorkBench.

For most people, it is enough to understand that BigGreen is powerful enough to allow simulations of black holes and gravitational waves. It can provide data support for sequencing of DNA at unprecedented speeds, and it can make possible the design of complex underground mine ventilation systems. The cluster can also accommodate molecular modeling, disaster simulations and gait analysis in the university's Visualization Lab.

Fox added that even those disciplines not traditionally associated with bits and bytes, like the humanities, can benefit from the university's new computing power.

"For example, a 3-D scan of Michelangelo's statue 'David' contains billions of raw data points. Rendering all that data into a 3-D model would be nearly impossible on a desktop computer," she said. "Using our high-performance computing capabilities, a student or professor could run that same data and produce the model in just a fraction of the time. It will literally change the way we work and do research at Marshall University."

Dr. John M. Maher, vice president for research, said Marshall's new computing capabilities will be transformational.

"As our research enterprise continues to grow, it will become increasingly important for us to be able to recruit and retain the brightest students and most-successful faculty researchers," he said. "To compete, we need to offer top-notch facilities and laboratories. This computing cluster is one of the most powerful available at any institution in the entire region, so it truly levels the field as we work to advance research and research collaborations, win grant funding and enhance students' classroom experiences."

BigGreen was made possible in part by a National Science Foundation grant that funds "Cyberinfrastructure for Transformational Scientific Discovery in West Virginia and Arkansas (CI-TRAIN)," a partnership among eight higher education institutions in West Virginia and Arkansas.

For more information about high-performance computing at Marshall or obtaining an account on the university's HPC cluster, visit http://www.marshall.edu/it/research.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 26, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Expo to take place Wednesday, Oct. 5, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct a Career Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. The expo is open to all Marshall students, faculty and alumni.

More than 70 employers are registered to have representatives at the event. A list of employers planning to attend the Career Expo is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/pdfs/Events/fallexpo2011_attendcomp.pdf.

An FBI information session will be held from 11 a.m. to noon the same day in room 2W22 of the student center.

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to dress professionally and come prepared with multiple copies of their resumes. Hogsett said even if students are not looking for a job, attending the expo presents an excellent networking opportunity.

Pre-expo training from the "Resume Doctor,"  Mirek Bialk, is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, in the student center lobby. Bialk, senior career adviser with Career Services, will be reviewing resumes for students during this time to get them in top shape for the expo.


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Saturday September 24, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Gillettes join Pathway of Prominence at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Longtime Marshall University supporters Joe and Pam Gillette became the latest to be honored with a plaque on the school's prestigious Pathway of Prominence in a recognition ceremony today on the Huntington campus. Donors who present gifts of $1 million or more to Marshall are honored with a plaque on the Pathway, which is located between Old Main and the Memorial Student Center.

The Gillettes' plaque is the 21st on the Pathway.

"Joe and Pam Gillette are dear friends whose commitment to Marshall is both inspiring and magnificent," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "As distinguished alumni, they are shaping a legacy through their dedication to Marshall. This enduring tribute to them commemorates that legacy and should make everyone associated with our great university proud. They are truly making a difference in so many ways."

In addition to the couple's generous financial support, Joe Gillette has served on many boards of directors at Marshall, including the Society of Yeager Scholars, the MU Alumni Association and the Marshall Foundation Inc. He currently is president of the Yeager Scholars board and first vice president of the Foundation board. He also is a past president of the Thunder Club.

"Joe and Pam have been major supporters of and contributors to Marshall for a long time," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation. "Their commitment to the growth of the Huntington campus and their involvement is outstanding. And, as Joe has said many times, they are planning on doing a lot more in the future. Joe has been very successful in his business as a Wendy's franchisee, and he and Pam are willing to share their wealth and experience with their alma mater."

In 2008, the Marshall University Welcome Center was renamed the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center in honor of Joe's late father. Joe and Pam made a financial commitment to the university which resulted in the renaming of the center. Joe said the center's new name was a way to memorialize his father.

He also established the Joseph M. Gillette Scholar Award, also named in memory of his late father, in 2006. The scholarship goes to a student selected to be a Yeager Scholar.

Other members of the Pathway of Prominence include:

The Arthur and Joan Weisberg family; Donald B. Harper; Bliss L. Charles; Timothy L. Haymaker and Sandra K. Haymaker; James E. Gibson and Verna K. Gibson; Elizabeth McDowell Lewis; Wilbur E. Myers; Daniel E. Wagoner and Virginia U. Wagoner; James F. Edwards and Joan C. Edwards; Clayton W. Dunlap and Bernice Virginia Dunlap; John Deaver Drinko and Elizabeth Gibson Drinko; James "H." Buck Harless; John Oliver Butler and Ruth Elizabeth Butler; Lyle A. Smith; Charles B. Hedrick and Mary Jo Hedrick; William E. Willis and Joyce L. Willis; F. Selby Wellman and Donna Bias Wellman; Robert L. Dardinger and Dianna L. Dardinger; the Maier Foundation, and C. Fred Shewey and Christine Shewey.

The Pathway of Prominence was unveiled on Friday, Sept. 20, 2002.

--------------------

Photo: Pam and Joe Gillette, right, take a look at a copy of their Pathway of Prominence plaque unveiled this morning in a recognition ceremony at Marshall University. From left are Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the MU Foundation. The Gillettes' plaque is the 21st on the Pathway. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.
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Friday September 23, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University department participates in national 'Worldwide Day of Play'

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - They are usually busy organizing programs and activities for college-aged students at Marshall University, but on Saturday, resident advisers with the Department of Housing and Residence Life are providing fun and entertainment for younger students.  

The event, which is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the field on the south side of Cam Henderson Center, is part of the 8th annual "Worldwide Day of Play" sponsored by the children's cable television network, Nickelodeon.   "Nick" will stop programming and go black for three hours on Saturday to encourage children to play.

Officials with Marshall's Department of Housing and Residence Life say the local celebration will feature plenty of backyard games such as hopscotch, four square and sack races.   In addition, a jumper castle will be on site and children will have the opportunity to check out a fire truck.

"Our resident advisers saw this event as a great way to encourage kids in the community to turn off the TV, get outside for some fun activities and see Marshall's Huntington campus," said Tracy Eggleston, residence life specialist.  "Specifically, Danielle Henderson and Ally Armstrong have spearheaded the local effort and done a fantastic job."

"This is a wonderful opportunity for Marshall students and staff to collaborate with the Huntington community and do something special for the children," said John Yaun, director of Housing and Residence Life.  

Eggleston says there will be free food, giveaways and planned activities. 

Campus radio station WMUL-FM is planning to broadcast live from the event, which is free and open to the public.

For more information contact Eggleston at 304-696-6004.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 23, 2011
Contact: Margie Phillips, Sustainability Manager, 304-696-2992

Movie 'Freedom' to be shown Oct. 3

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Sustainability Department will host a showing of the movie "Freedom" at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, in room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Elizabeth Rutherford, Marshall's recycling coordinator, said that a question-and-answer session will follow at which three signed copies of the DVD of the movie will be handed out to audience members.

"Freedom," which was produced by the filmmakers of the Sundance award-winner "Fuel," is about a couple who investigate alternatives to fossil fuels in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. According to the promoters of the film, it offers an array of green solutions for transportation, such as cellulosic ethanol, plug-in hybrids and other sustainable technologies. It includes interviews with former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, former NATO Commander Wesley Clark, singer/songwriter Jason Mraz, author Deepak Chopra and actors Michelle Rodriguez, Amy Smart and Ed Begley Jr.

In addition to the screening of the movie, the Huntington campus also will host the Freedom Bus Oct. 3. The bus is traveling to movie theaters and colleges and universities in support of the release of the movie. Tours of the Freedom Bus, which has 18 solar panels, a biofuel engine, and on-demand green energy videos, will begin at 10:30 a.m. and continue until 3:30 p.m. at the bookstore loading dock at the Memorial Student Center. 

For further information on the events of Oct. 3, contact Sustainability Manager Margie Phillips by phone at 304-696-2992, or by e-mail at philli10@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 23, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

Marshall University President, Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, elected chairman of West Virginia business organization

Marshall graduate and Charleston CPA will serve as vice chairman

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President, Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, has been elected chairman of the West Virginia Roundtable, an independent, non-profit and non-partisan business organization dedicated to creating a viable business climate in the Mountain State.

Kopp, who is in his seventh year as president of Marshall University, has served as a member of the Roundtable since 2006 alongside educational, business and community leaders from around the state.

"I am honored to serve as chairman of the West Virginia Roundtable and I am excited by the vast array of opportunities before us," Kopp said.  "The public policy initiatives advanced by our organization are targeted directly at the very heart of growing West Virginia's economy and our group of very talented leaders is committed to doing just that."

"The Roundtable has a legacy of distinguished leaders serving as its chair," said Paul Arbogast, president of the West Virginia Roundtable. "Dr. Kopp's vision and focus on the important issues facing West Virginia positions him to lead us successfully.  I look forward to working with him as our new chairman."

Kopp will be joined by newly-elected vice chairman Rick Slater, a Charleston certified public accountant and managing partner of Dixon Hughes Goodman.   Slater, a Marshall University graduate, says he is eager to begin working in his new position.

"I am honored to be elected as the vice chairman of the West Virginia Roundtable and excited to work alongside Chairman Stephen Kopp," Slater said.  "The Roundtable's diverse group of West Virginia's top CEOs affords business a tremendous opportunity to utilize unparalleled talent, experience and political influence in helping to shape the future of our great state."

Kopp succeeds chairman Dana Waldo, senior vice president and general manager of Frontier Communications, West Virginia.

The West Virginia Roundtable was developed in 1984 and seeks to create opportunity and wealth for all West Virginians. 

For more information, contact Arbogast at 304-357-0850.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 22, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Doctoral student and professor write chapter for molecular biology publication

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University doctoral student J. Adam Hall and faculty member Dr. Philippe T. Georgel have collaborated to write a chapter for a new book focusing on RNA processing in animal and plant cells.

Their chapter describes the interaction between RNA splicing and chromatin, and appears in the book "RNA Processing," which was edited by Paula Grabowski and published in August. The book is freely available online through open access publisher InTech.

In describing their research, Hall explains that RNA, or ribonucleic acid, acts as the "middle man" of molecular biology. DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is the carrier of basic genetic information. A cell uses DNA to make RNA, which in turn makes proteins.

Hall says that alterations to RNA can have a significant influence on the type and/or amount of protein produced, creating crucial differences in the identity of the cell and how it functions. The study of these modifications caused by factors outside of the DNA sequence itself is known as "epigenetics."

"Factors and mechanisms involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and protein production have been linked to a variety of human diseases and developmental disorders," said Hall. "Furthering the knowledge of these epigenetic processes and the factors involved, including the information we highlighted for this publication, will be a crucial component of translating scientific advances into potential medical breakthroughs down the road."

Georgel added, "In recent years, a much better understanding of gene regulation has led to many important breakthroughs in the fields of cellular differentiation, development and disease. The specific mechanism of regulation we describe in this chapter has never been reported before in any biological system, so we think it could be an important contribution to the existing body of work."

A native of Crown City, Ohio, Hall received his bachelor's degree in molecular biology from Marshall in 2005 and started his doctoral studies in 2006. He finished his graduate coursework with a 4.0 grade point average and was awarded the Biomedical Sciences program's top award for academic performance in 2007 and research performance in 2008.  In 2009, Hall became the first Marshall student to receive the prestigious National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein Pre-doctoral Fellowship, which provided two years of support totaling more than $70,000. He will complete his Ph.D. in December and plans to continue his scientific career in the field of epigenetics, with a focus on translational research.

Georgel is a professor of biological sciences and director of Marshall's Cell Differentiation and Development Center. He has been at Marshall since 2002.

The complete chapter is available at http://www.intechopen.com/source/pdfs/18456/
InTech-The_worlds_of_splicing_and_chromatin_collide.pdf.

For more information, contact Georgel at georgel@marshall.edu or call 304-696-3965.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 22, 2011
Contact: Jessica Baker, Graduate Assistant, School of Journalism and Mass Communications,

Marshall's School of Journalism and Mass Communications to host golf scramble fundraiser at Twin Silos

'J-School Golf Scramble' Sept. 30 will raise money for school's equipment needs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) will host its 2nd annual golf scramble at the Twin Silos Golf Course in Lavalette Sept. 30. Registration begins at noon and tee-off is at 1 p.m.

The purpose of the event is to raise money for equipment needs for the school's classrooms and teaching labs, said Melanie Griffis, director of development for the SOJMC.

"The School of Journalism and Mass Communications is a very hands-on program and we try to maintain the most current equipment in our teaching environments," said Dr. Corley Dennison, SOJMC dean.

Early registration allows participants to take advantage of a $75 individual or $275 team rate through Sept. 29. Registration the day of the event is $90 for individuals or $325 for teams. The fee includes 18 holes of play, golf balls, a cookout dinner and a gift bag. The day's activities will also include raffles and a silent auction, which will include a round for two on The Greenbrier Sporting Club's private Snead course and a two-night stay at The Greenbrier.

Registration and sponsor forms are available online at www.marshall.edu/sojmc.

For more information on the J-School Golf Scramble, contact Jessica Baker, graduate assistant in the SOJMC, by e-mail at marshallfan1988@yahoo.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 22, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Calvin Kent awarded designation of Assessment Administration Specialist

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Calvin Kent, Vice President for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University, was awarded the designation of Assessment Administration Specialist (AAS) at the annual meeting of the International Association of Assessors (IAAO) Sept. 20 in Phoenix, Ariz.

Kent was only the 155th person to receive this designation in the 75-year history of the international organization.  The IAAO designation " recognizes professionalism and competency in administration of a variety of functions for property tax purposes."

The designation is granted based on more than 200 hours of graded coursework and preparation of a major research project.  Kent's project concerned the property taxation of severed mineral interests in the United States. 

Kent is a Senior National Instructor for the IAAO and has conducted courses in many states besides West Virginia.  He teaches the advanced courses in property appraisal and administration with a special emphasis on mass appraisal and statistical procedures for property valuation.  IAAO has also certified him as a general property appraiser.

For the past five years Kent has been a member of the West Virginia Property Valuation and Training Commission.  The commission is responsible for the development of appraisal policy in the state as well as supervising the quality of assessing in the state's 55 counties. 

He served as vice chair of Gov. Cecil Underwood's "Tax Fairness Commission" and as a member of Gov. Joe Manchin's "Tax Modernization Project."  In the latter position, he chaired the sub-committee on Property Taxation and Local Finance.  He has served as an adviser to the West Virginia Legislature on property taxation, education, public health and municipal organization. 

In his work at Marshall, Kent heads the Center for Business and Economic Research and the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism, and holds the Elizabeth McDowell Lewis Distinguished Chair in Business. He has published more than 100 articles in major journals as well as seven books and major legislative reports.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 21, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield returns to Marshall University to serve as grand marshal in 2011 homecoming parade

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Maj. Gen.  Anthony  G. Crutchfield, commanding general of the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence in Fort Rucker, Ala., will be the grand marshal in Marshall University's homecoming parade next month. Crutchfield is a 1982 Marshall graduate.

The parade is set for 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in downtown Huntington. It starts at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena and ends at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Marshall plays its homecoming football game Saturday, Oct. 15, taking on Rice at 3 p.m.

"We are pleased and proud to welcome General Crutchfield as our grand marshal for the 2011 homecoming parade," said Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations. "He is a tremendous role model for our students and alumni. Not only will he serve as grand marshal in the parade, but he also will meet and engage with students on campus. We appreciate his willingness to share his experiences with our students and alumni during this great week."

Crutchfield began his military career in 1982, graduating from Marshall as a Distinguished Military Graduate receiving a Regular Army commission. In his current position as commanding general, he is responsible for all U.S. Army helicopter, Unmanned Aerial Systems and Aviation Maintenance training.

In addition to his military education, Crutchfield has a Master of Arts degree in business from Webster University and a Master of Arts degree in Strategic Military Studies from the Army War College.

His awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters, Bronze Star Medal with oak leaf cluster, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, the Air Medal, the Army Commendation medal with oak leaf cluster, the Army Achievement Medal with oak leaf cluster, the National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal and the Humanitarian Service Medal.

Crutchfield has been awarded the Master Aviator Badge, the Parachutist Badge, the Air Assault Badge and the Honorable Order of Saint Michael Silver Award. He has served tours in the United States and in Germany, Korea, Iraq and Afghanistan.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 20, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Area poets to read new work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poets Carrie Oeding and Kent Shaw will read from their work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Corbly Hall Room 105 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.  The reading marks the release of Oeding's new poetry collection Our List of Solutions.

Oeding's book won the Lester Wolfson Prize and is the premiere book of a new poetry series from Indiana University South Bend.  Her work has appeared in Best New Poets, Colorado Review, Third Coast, Diagram and elsewhere. She earned her Ph.D. in creative writing and American Literature from Ohio University in 2007.  She has taught at Ohio University, the University of Houston and the North Carolina Governor's School, and currently teaches at Marshall University.

Shaw is the author of Calenture, published by University of Tampa Press in 2008.  It is a lyric meditation on his experience in the Navy. Recent poems have appeared or are forthcoming in the Believer, Boston Review, Ploughshares, Missouri Review Online, Denver Quarterly and other magazines.  He holds the Ph.D. in Creative Writing from the University of Houston, where he taught with the Writers in the Schools program.  He currently teaches at West Virginia State University.

Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall Visiting Writers Series with support from the English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English department at 304-696-2403.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 19, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University to host Ohio River Basin conference next week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host a conference next week focusing on the economic and ecological potential of water resources in the Ohio River Basin.

The conference, "Ohio River Basin:  200 Years after the Voyage of the New Orleans," will be held Sept. 26-28 on the Huntington campus and is being presented jointly by the Ohio River Basin Alliance and the Ohio River Basin Consortium for Research and Education.

Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science, is a member of the conference planning committee.

"The goal of the conference is to bring together all the stakeholders to develop strategies and coordinate actions to help address the very complex water resource issues we face in the Ohio River Basin," he said. "Participants will be actively engaged in working groups to help address water availability and management, enterprise and infrastructure, environmental restoration and protection, and sustainable growth."

He added that there will also be scientific and student research presentations, as well as panel discussions focusing on mussel restoration, river navigation, climate change and the development of gas resources in the Marcellus Shale formation. A tour of a Marathon Petroleum Company tow vessel, cleaning dock and water treatment plant are also part of the program.

According to the alliance's website, the Ohio River Basin encompasses approximately 204,000 square miles. More than 27 million people live within the basin - almost 10 percent of the U.S. population - and the main stem Ohio River is a source of drinking water for more than three million people.

For more information, visit www.ohioriverbasin.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 19, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Volunteer Fair set for Sept. 26 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Community Engagement is hosting a Volunteer Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, at the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Elizabeth Appell Sheets, coordinator of the Office of Community Engagement, said the fair presents an excellent opportunity for students, faculty and staff to stop by, speak with representatives from several community service agencies and obtain information on the variety of service projects available in Huntington.

For more information on the fair contact Sheets by phone at 304-696-2285 or by e-mail at appell1@marshall.edu.


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Friday September 16, 2011
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications,, 304-746-1971

'A Much Curious Coop' on display on South Charleston campus

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Images of fanciful birds dressed in colorful fine clothing depicting their individuality and personalities are the basis of A Much Curious Coop, the latest art exhibit now on display in the Marshall University Library on the South Charleston campus.

The current collection features the work of Nitro resident Staci Leech-Cornell, a versatile artist and sculptor, who has had her work displayed in numerous shows and exhibitions.The Marshall exhibit will be on display through Oct.21. An opening reception for the artist will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. today in the library and is free and open to the public.

Leech-Cornell's collection is the latest in a series of exhibits showcasing the work of local artists on the South Charleston campus. Mark Tobin Moore is the exhibit coordinator for the show, which is sponsored by the Marshall Graduate Humanities program.

A graduate of Marshall with a B. A. and M.A. in Fine Arts, Leech-Cornell, who is also the Community Learning Center Manager for the Clay Center, says she began drawing and sculpting birds at a low point in her life. They provided a path through that low point and into a new set of ideas and imagery for her artistic creations, she says. Her bird images continued to evolve until they took on varying personalities and characteristics that make them all different and distinctive.

"The works in A Much Curious Coop represent the new appearance my bird imagery has become," Leech-Cornell says. "I dress these birds in fine clothing, dresses or sometimes suits. I never really have the chance in my life to play 'dress up' on many occasions and I find that when I do have the opportunity it's one that I don't particularly care for, but I love dresses and I adore suits These birds allow me to play 'dress up.' "

All the works are created by drawing with pen and ink, with added folded or cut paper pieces.

"The characters are created as the drawing progresses. Any slips of the hand or blops of ink sometimes help to determine what pattern the feathers may take, the length of the beak, the age of a face, and so on," Leech-Cornell says. "The drawings are presented in family or formal portrait style mainly because those are moments in my mind that people tend to 'dress up.' This is something that would happen in A Much Curious Coop."

For more information about the exhibit, contact the Graduate Humanities program at 304-746-2022 or cquinlan@marshall.edu.


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Friday September 16, 2011
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Gallery 842 to host improvisational music group

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Gallery 842 has become home to a university and community improvisational music effort known as General Sound Unit (GSU).

Mike Waldeck Jr., a member of the group, said he thinks having the group play in an art gallery actually provides inspiration to the group.

"Music should be played everywhere," Waldeck said. "Being around art actually helps us stay motivated [and] pushes the way we play, to play different moods or get different ideas."

"We chose the art gallery with the notion to have a different kind of venue to play in, the kind where the audience wouldn't have expectation," said Dr. Mark Zanter, professor of music theory and composition at Marshall.  "When you're at a concert, the audience has expectations. We put it in the art gallery to bring it out [and] bring it into a place where people are used to walking around and looking at art."

Robert Hege, a Marshall graduate, said the group plays improvised music, not knowing what they're going to play when they arrive at each performance.

"We don't want there to be conditions on the music; we want it to be less controlled so we're able to express more individualism among the players," Hege said. "I like this because this way everyone can contribute to the group on different levels."

Zanter said that all members are equally involved in this effort and that his position as a faculty member doesn't change that.

"GSU is dedicated to our interest, playing improvised music," Zanter said. "Creative music making comes first, and what is seen as musically important to the members is frequently a topic of discussion. As a faculty member involved in such an activity, it is hard to not be viewed as being in charge, but I always welcome and encourage members to be and act in an empowered fashion."

The group currently has six members, who are members of both the Huntington and Marshall University communities. They can be heard at 6 p.m. Thursdays at Gallery 842, which is located at  842  4th Ave.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Thursday September 15, 2011
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Marshall University School of Pharmacy adds new research chair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. John V. Schloss, an academic and industrial researcher with more than 30 years of combined experience, has been named founding chair of pharmaceutical science and research at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. He also will serve as a member of the Pharmacy Executive Council.

"Marshall University School of Pharmacy is starting with an impressive infrastructure for teaching and research," Schloss said. "This will be the third time I have helped start a new pharmacy program and the Marshall program has the potential to become a leader in the area of pharmacy education and pharmaceutical research. It is an exciting time to be a part of Marshall University."

After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Schloss conducted postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Prof. W. W. Cleland at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1978 until 1981.

Following completion of his postdoctoral work, Schloss joined the research and development division of E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. in Wilmington, Del., where he held positions as a principal investigator and research supervisor. While at DuPont, Schloss published nearly three dozen papers and presented at more than 60 international and national conferences.

Beginning in 1991, Schloss served as professor and chair of the department of medicinal chemistry in the University of Kansas College of Pharmacy. He maintained his affiliation with the pharmacy program in Kansas until 2005. During this time he helped develop a new pharmacy program as part of the Kuwait Health Sciences Center, while maintaining his research programs at the University of Kansas.    

In 2002, Schloss co-founded ThioPharma Inc., a biotech startup company focused on discovery-stage pharmaceuticals. While managing ThioPharma from 2002 to 2008, he served as director of chemistry at NeuroSystec, another biotech startup focused on site specific drug delivery to the inner ear, and was principal investigator on two grants funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the grants was from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the other was from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. 

Schloss' expertise in developing a school of pharmacy was tapped again in 2008, when he joined the University of New England. As a founding faculty member and chair of the department of pharmaceutical sciences, Schloss continued his research activities while developing curriculum, recruiting faculty and teaching.

"Dr. Schloss has an extensive background in both the scholarship and discovery in pharmaceutical sciences and will provide excellent leadership for the department's development," Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the school of pharmacy, said. "He is a fantastic addition to our team and we are happy to welcome him."

Schloss has received many honors, as well as several notable research awards and grants, including a DuPont Agricultural Products Department, Research and Development Division Accomplishment Award, a Gustavus and Louise Pfeiffer Research Foundation grant, National Institutes of Health grants, Office of Naval Research grants, US-Israel Binational Research Foundation grants and Maine Technology Institute grants. He also has provided substantial service to his profession through organizational leadership.

For more information, contact Schloss at 304-696-3094.


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Thursday September 15, 2011
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General faculty meeting is Sept. 28; MU to introduce 46 new faculty

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The fall general faculty meeting of Marshall University's 2011-12 academic year will take place at 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.
 
The agenda will consist of welcoming remarks by the faculty senate chair, Dr. Cam Brammer; singing of the Star Spangled Banner by Dr. Larry Stickler; the introduction of new administrators by provost, Dr. Gayle Ormiston, and the introduction of 46 new faculty by Brammer, School of Medicine senior associate dean for clinical affairs, Dr. Joseph Werthammer, and School of Pharmacy dean, Dr. Kevin Yingling; a State of the Faculty address by Brammer; and a State of the University address by University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.
 
All faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the new university personnel will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.
 
Those in new administrative positions who will be introduced are Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy; Dr. Robert Nerhood, interim dean, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine; Dr. Wael Zatar, interim dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering; Andrew Gooding, director of the Regents B.A. degree program; and Patricia Proctor, founding director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.
 
New faculty to be introduced are:

  • College of Education - Andrea Farenga, Michael Kallam and Linda Winter

  • College of Fine Arts - Frederick Bartolovic and Henning Vauth

  • College of Health Professions - Jessica Maynard

  • College of Information Technology & Engineering - Hyoil Han and Jonathan Thompson

  • College of Liberal Arts - Joshua Averbeck, Mallory Carpenter, Viatcheslav Gratchev and Patricia Proctor

  • College of Science - Mary Armstead, Min-Kook Kim, Elizabeth Niese, Dhana Rao, Jon Saken, Michael Schroeder and Samantha Vickers

  • Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - Frank Bosco, Won Jun Kwak, Alissa Sikula and Robert Simpson

  • Graduate School of Education & Professional Development - Tom Hisiro, Enobong Inyang and Jonathan Lent

  • Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - James Denvir, Paul Ferguson, Andrew Freeman, Russell Fry, II, Aamir Hussain, Emine Koc, Sean Loudin, Maria Lopez Marti, Gerald Oakley III, Rosa Carrasco Sanchez, Franklin Shuler, Jackie Stines, Jr., and Ryan Stone

  • School of Pharmacy - H. Glenn Anderson, Kimberly Broedel-Zaugg, John Schloss and Robert Stanton

  • W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications - Sandra York

  • University Libraries - Gretchen Beach and Larry Sheret.


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Wednesday September 14, 2011
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Jomie Jazz Guest Artist Series presents Grammy Award-winning saxophonist Chip McNeill

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Grammy Award winner Chip McNeill will perform at Marshall University's Jomie Jazz Forum at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20, as part of the Jomie Jazz Guest Artist Series. McNeill will be accompanied by Dr. Sean Parsons (piano), Phil Bowden (bass) and Steve Hall (drums). The group will be performing jazz standards as well as original compositions.

McNeill, who has performed with Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jr., will also be working with Marshall music students during his stay.

Parsons, who is an associate professor of music at Marshall, studied with McNeill as a doctoral student at the University of Illinois.

"At the invitation of one of my former students, Dr. Parsons, I plan to come to Marshall and to reiterate concepts, ideas, ways of making music and jazz specifically that will help the music students succeed in a career in music and jazz," McNeill said.

Parsons said that McNeill is an enthusiastic educator.

"One thing you'll notice about Chip is he takes no prisoners in his performance or his teaching," Parsons said. "It's 'go time' from the downbeat, and you better be ready to get on board because he's not going to wait for you Chip McNeill has been a big influence on my life as a musician. The time I spent in the classroom and in professional music situations with him has been instrumental in my development as an educator and performer. He is the type of artist who can share his experiences through his music, and one can't help but learn from him."

In addition to his position with the University of Illinois School of Music, McNeill is musical director and jazz tenor saxophonist for Grammy Award-winning recording artist Arturo Sandoval. He has toured with and recorded the compact discs "American" and "Hot House" with Sandoval. In 1998, "Hot House" won a Grammy for Best Latin Jazz recording. McNeill won a Grammy for his performance on "Hot House," and two of his charts were nominated for Grammys from the recording.

McNeill has also performed and toured with the legendary jazz trumpeter Maynard Ferguson, with whom he produced, wrote and performed on several recordings, including "Live in London," "These Cats can Swing," and Ferguson's final recording, "The One and Only."

In addition to Sinatra and Davis, McNeill has performed with Joe Williams, Dizzy Gillespie, Billy Eckstine and Wynton Marsalis. He has performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland, the Monterey Jazz Festival in California, and the Noto Jazz Festival in Japan.

The Sept. 20 concert is free and open to the public. The Jomie Jazz Forum is located on 5th Avenue in Huntington, connected to the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike, by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 14, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nearly 170 students expected for first Green and White Day of year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 170 high school students from 11 states will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, Sept. 17, to participate in the school's first Green and White Day of the academic year.

The open-house event begins with registration at 8:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center lobby. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will welcome the students at 9:30 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, then Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment, will speak at 9:50 a.m. on "the things that make Marshall University a unique and special place."

A question-and-answer session with a panel of faculty, staff and students follows at 10 a.m. At 11 a.m., students can learn about their programs of interest in a session called College Showcase, which takes place at various campus locations. Tours of campus are scheduled from 12:45 to 2 p.m.

Registrations for Green and White Day are still being accepted online at www.marshall.edu/recruitment  or by calling 304-696-3646.


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Tuesday September 13, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Palton to give recital Sept. 15

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba at Marshall University, will give a solo tuba recital, accompanied by pianist Mila Markun, at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Palton said he will perform a wide array of transciptions and original works for tuba, featuring works by Bozza, Faure, Penderecki, Winteregg, York and Mantia. Several of the compositions will be featured on his upcoming recording project.

Along with his duties at Marshall, Palton is active teaching in the public schools. He holds D.M.A. and M.M. degrees in tuba performance from the University of Kentucky and B.M.M.E. and B.M. degrees from Bowling Green State University. Previous teaching appointments included West Virginia State University, the University of Kentucky and Transylvania University.

Palton has won first place in several solo competitions, including the Susan Slaughter International Solo Tuba Competition (2010), the International Tuba Euphonium Conference Tuba Artist Competition (2006), the Bowling Green State University Competition in Music Performance (2002) and the National Federation of Music Clubs Orchestral Brass Solo Competition (2001), along with second places at the Susan Slaughter International Solo Brass Competition (2010), and the Potomac Festival Tuba Virtuoso Competition (2006).

He is sought after as a performer and clinician both regionally and throughout the country. He performed at the 2008 International Tuba Euphonium Conference where he premiered Azucar! by Alice Gomez. He also has given solo performances at the 2011 South-East Regional Tuba Euphonium Conference, the 2007 Mid-West Regional and North-East Regional Tuba Euphonium Conferences, and the 2006 Phi Mu Alpha National Convention.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, please call 304-696-3117 or email Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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Monday September 12, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall announces top scoring seniors on national assessment exam

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last spring more than 90 Marshall University seniors voluntarily took the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a national assessment examination that measures students' critical thinking, problem solving, analytical reasoning and written communication skills.

"We are very pleased with our students' outstanding scores," Dr. Mary Beth Reynolds, director of assessment, said.  "Congratulations to them as well as to their professors."

The following students scored the highest on the test.  They are listed alphabetically, with their hometowns, majors and colleges:

  • Angelina Browning of Nitro, W.Va., Biomedical Sciences, College of Science

  • Natalie M. Campbell of Nitro, W.Va., Psychology/English, College of Liberal Arts

  • Emma M. McCullough of Zanesville, Ohio, Communication Disorders, College of Health Professions

  • Ellen K. Moore of Knoxville, Tenn., Accounting, Lewis College of Business 

  • Kaitlin M. Reed of Whitehall, Pa., Marketing, Lewis College of Business 

  • Ashley R. Sanders of Barboursville, W.Va., International Affairs, College of Liberal Arts

  • Holyann N. Schiller of Bakersfield, Calif., English,  College of Liberal Arts 

  • William (Josh) Wassum of Spotsylvania, Va., Computer Science, College of Information Technology and Engineering

  • Mikhaela E. Young of Scott Depot, W.Va., Psychology/Humanities, College of Liberal Arts

For more information contact Reynolds at 304-696-2987.


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Saturday September 10, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Students can learn about meningitis and get vaccinated during Marshall-CHHD clinic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students are invited to attend a free informational session to learn more about the risks of meningitis at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the Ed Grose Room of the Harless Dining Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

The "Take Your Best Shot" vaccination event will be given by the Cabell-Huntington Health Department with support from the Marshall University Student Health Education Program. According to the health department, college freshmen who live in residence halls have a heightened risk of getting meningococcal disease (meningitis), which often infects the fluid on a person's spinal cord and the fluid that surrounds the brain. The disease can cause brain damage, hearing loss, vision loss and even death.

 

The health department will be offering the vaccine for free to individuals who are 18 years of age and younger. Students 19 or older will pay a fee of $109 for the vaccine. Amy Saunders, coordinator of MU's Student Health Education Program, said the vaccine is highly recommended for students living in close quarters.

 

"We are thankful to be working with the Cabell-Huntington Health Department to bring information about this disease and the vaccine to our students," Saunders said. "It's important for our students to be made aware that a vaccine can prevent this disease."

 

According to data from the CHHD, about 2,600 people get meningococcal disease each year in the United States. Anywhere from 10 to 15 percent of these people will die despite treatment with antibiotics.

 

During Tuesday's event there also will be refreshments, giveaways and opportunities to win gift cards to Kroger, iTunes, Wal-Mart, Target and the Marshall University Bookstore, as well as cards for free fuel.

 

For more information, contact Elizabeth A. Ayers, MS, Public Information Officer, Cabell-Huntington Health Department, at 304-523-6483 x258 or elizabeth.a.ayers@wv.gov; or Amy Saunders, Marshall University Student Health Education, at 304-696-4103 or saunde22@marshall.edu.


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Friday September 9, 2011
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Visiting Writers Series sets fall readings

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Visiting Writers Series has announced its fall schedule of author appearances.  Noted poets and prose-writers from around the nation and West Virginia will be reading from exciting new work at various locations on the Huntington campus.

Series Coordinator Prof. Art Stringer calls this fall's calendar "our most ambitious yet."  The five events will offer a rich variety of fiction and poetry.

Poets Carrie Oeding and Kent Shaw kick off the series at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Corbly Hall 105.  Oeding's first book, Our List of Solutions, won the Lester Wolfson Prize and is the premiere book of a new poetry series out of Indiana University South Bend. She currently teaches writing at Marshall.

Shaw is the author of Calenture, published by University of Tampa Press in 2008.  It is a lyric meditation on his experience in the Navy.  He currently teaches at West Virginia State University.

Craig Johnson will appear at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 17, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, located inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. He is the author of seven novels.  The Dark Horse received starred reviews from Kirkus, Booklist, Publishers Weekly and Library Journal, and was named one of Publisher's Weekly's best books of 2009. Junkyard Dogs and Hell is Empty were recently released by Viking.

A television series based on Johnson's protagonist, Wyoming sheriff Walt Longmire, is in development with A&E. He will be on campus as part of several events sponsored by the College of Fine Arts.  He has served as a board member of the Mystery Writers of America and lives in Ucross, Wyo., population 25.

Poets Chad Davidson and Greg Fraser read together at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center.  Davidson is the author of The Last Predicta, winner of the 2008 Crab Orchard Prize in Poetry.  He co-edited with Fraser the popular textbook Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches to Writing (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009).

Fraser is the author of two books of poems, Answering the Ruins (Northwestern University Press) and Strange Piete (Texas Tech University Press).  Both teach writing at the University of West Georgia.

National Book Critics Circle Award nominee M. Glenn Taylor will read in the Shawkey Room at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3. Taylor is the author of two novels, most recently The Marrowbone Marble Company.  His first novel, The Ballad of Trenchmouth Taggart, also published by Ecco Press, has received a wealth of critical attention and praise.  It prominently features Huntington locations in much of its action.  Taylor teaches English and fiction writing at West Virginia University.

And, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1, in the Drinko Library Atrium, An Evening with the MU Creative Writing Faculty will feature a sampling of new work.

Visiting Writers Series readings are free and open to the public.  The series is supported by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Fine Arts, the Marshall Foundation, the law firm of Jenkins-Fenstermaker and the West Virginia Humanities Council.

For more information, contact Stringer in the English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday September 9, 2011
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Marshall University chemistry students sponsor public lecture

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Student members of Alpha Chi Sigma, a national professional chemistry society, are co-sponsoring a public lecture later this month.    

Members of the Gamma Eta chapter are partnering with the Central Ohio Valley section of the American Chemical Society to bring a husband and wife lecture team to the Huntington campus at 7:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19 in the Memorial Student Center's room BE5.

Dr. James L. Marshall and Virginia "Jenny" R. Marshall will present "Rediscovery of the Elements," a lecture series based on their travels to old laboratories, mines, ancient buildings and houses where they found original elemental discovery sites. Most of the sites are located in Europe. The two researchers have been active in their "Rediscovery of the Elements" project since they married in 1998.  Their research culminated in 2010 with publication of their 10 years of discovery.

Dr. James Marshall received his Ph.D. in 1967 in organic chemistry from Ohio State University and has served as a professor at the University of Texas, Denton for more than 30 years.   Jenny Marshall received her M.Ed. with a specialty in computer science in 1985 from Texas Women's University.  She taught public school for 23 years in Texas.

Light refreshments will be served prior to the lecture, which is open to the public.

For more information contact Dr. Laura McCunn, assistant professor of chemistry, at 304-696-2319.


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Thursday September 8, 2011
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, , 304-691-1713

Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation awards major grant to Marshall University's Center for Rural Health

$2.6 million to help Appalachian communities fight type 2 diabetes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation has awarded $2.6 million to Marshall University's Center for Rural Health to help diabetes coalitions in 10 Appalachian communities implement effective local solutions to the widespread problem of diabetes.

The coalitions are part of Marshall's Appalachian Diabetes Control and Translation Project, which since 2000 has created 66 such coalitions in nine states through funding from the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Patricia Doykos, director of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, announced the five-year grant today at the Appalachian Regional Commission annual conference in Prestonsburg, Ky. The grant is part of the foundation's "Together on Diabetes" program, which supports efforts to develop and expand effective patient self-management programs and to draw whole communities into the fight against type 2 diabetes.

"Type 2 diabetes is one of the United States' greatest health challenges and disproportionately affects the poor, minorities and the elderly," said Lamberto Andreotti, chief executive officer of Bristol-Myers Squibb. " 'Together on Diabetes' draws on the strengths of communities and supports public- and private-sector partners coming together to identify and implement disease management approaches that work for large segments of the population."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp was pleased with the announcement of the grant.

"Study after study has shown that we have an alarming situation with type 2 diabetes in the areas served by the Marshall University Center for Rural Health," he said. "The awarding of this five-year grant will allow us to continue to work toward effective solutions to our region's unique challenges. We appreciate the vision, collaboration and generosity of the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation in assisting us in our work to alleviate a pressing medical need."

Appalachia has a higher rate of diabetes than the nation as a whole, and the problem is especially acute in the rural Appalachian counties classified as "distressed." A recent study showed the rate of diabetes there was more than 1.6 times the national average.

"Diabetes is such a big problem in distressed Appalachian counties in part because lifestyles have changed over the last 20 years," said Richard Crespo of Marshall, who is the project coordinator. "People have become more sedentary, leading to obesity, which is a major risk factor for diabetes. Thus the solution is in the community, not the doctor's office."

The grant will provide support for coalitions in 10 distressed counties, helping them to implement evidence-based programs that promote long-term behavior change and improve the health of people who have type 2 diabetes.

The CDC and ARC will provide training, and Marshall will guide the 10 diabetes coalitions through a planning process, equip them with evidence-based programs, and provide ongoing technical assistance. Marshall also will evaluate the program, looking at the coalitions themselves, changes in their communities, and improvements in patients' diabetes health.


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Thursday September 8, 2011
Contact: Dr. Corley Dennison, , 304-696-2809

Marshall's School of Journalism and Mass Communications launches four new graduate programs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications is offering a new Master of Arts in Journalism with a Health Care Public Relations emphasis and three new 15-hour graduate certificate programs in Digital Communications, Integrated Strategic Communications and Media Management.

Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said the new programs are designed to meet the expectations of the 21st Century workforce and represent the changing face of the media.

The new Health Care Public Relations emphasis is designed to meet the growing demand for public relations campaigns for medical services and organizations, writing and tactics for health care audiences and the use of social media in health care promotions. The program will accommodate individuals with or without previous experience in the field.

Graduate certificate programs may be completed as stand-alone, 15-hour programs to expand an individual's skill set or as part of a master's degree. The courses in each program target specific areas that will help students augment their knowledge or skills, advance their careers or pursue personal enrichment. The journalism and mass communications programs focus on print media, broadcast facilities and many forms of converged media including websites, blogs and social media.

Application to the programs is completed through Marshall University's Graduate College. Further information and an online application may be found online at www.marshall.edu/graduate.


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Wednesday September 7, 2011
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Mountain Voice Quartet cancels Sunday performance

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Mountain Voice Quartet that was scheduled to appear on Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, Sept. 11, in Smith Music Hall has had to cancel its performance, according to Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, director of Marshall's Department of Music. The group has not rescheduled the appearance at this time.


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Wednesday September 7, 2011
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Constitution Week at Marshall features series of events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate Constitution Week this year with a series of events on the Huntington campus, including the popular quoits tournament, a panel discussion on open government, a presentation from a retired trial judge who is an expert on civil rights and juvenile justice and a keynote address from MU President Stephen J. Kopp.

Constitution Week at Marshall is an annual observance to commemorate the adoption of the United States Constitution and the contributions of Chief Justice John Marshall, for whom the university is named. Constitution Week activities at Marshall, sponsored by the John Deaver Drinko Academy, start Monday, Sept. 12, and run periodically through Thursday, Sept. 22.

"Constitution Week was started by United States Senator Robert C. Byrd in order to draw attention to the important document that our system of government is based upon," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of Marshall's Drinko Academy. "Included within federal legislation that was passed in 2004 was a provision requiring educational institutions that receive federal funds to set some time aside on or near the September 17th anniversary of the document's signing to study the United States Constitution."

Registration and practice for a quoits tournament open to faculty, staff, students, fraternities and sororities takes place Sept. 12 at the west end of Buskirk Field, where the pits are located. Quoits, a game in which rings of iron are pitched at stakes much like horseshoes, was the favorite game of John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

Competition begins Tuesday, Sept. 13 with the finals on Wednesday, Sept. 14. The President's Invitational Quoits Media Challenge, featuring MU President Stephen J. Kopp and members of the news media, is at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 14.

"The President's Quoits Media Challenge is a lot of fun," Gould said. "They take it seriously. That was never more evident than last year when the tournament was played in a steady rain. Everybody was soaked, but they had a really good time." The team of Tim Irr and Keith Morehouse from WSAZ-3 is the defending champion.

Prior to the President's Quoits Media Challenge, at 11 a.m., a large cake celebrating John Marshall's birthday will be served on the Memorial Student Center plaza. President Kopp will cut the cake and the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps will perform.

Here is a look at other Constitution Week events planned at Marshall University:

Monday, Sept. 19

4:30 p.m. - The winner of the Judge Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition will be announced during a ceremony in the John Marshall Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center.

Tuesday, Sept. 20

2 p.m. - Judge Gordon A. Martin Jr. will be speaking about his book "Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote" in the Memorial Student Center Shawkey Room. Martin is a retired Massachusetts trial judge and former first assistant U.S. attorney, former special assistant to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and co-author of a civil rights case book.

Martin filed the first major voting rights case in Mississippi for the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Justice Department, and "Count Them One by One" is based on that case. 

Wednesday, Sept. 21

2:30 p.m. - A panel discussion titled "Openness: From the routine business of state and local government to national security issues," will take place in Room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center. Ed Dawson, editor and publisher of The Herald-Dispatch, will moderate the discussion.

Panelists include:

  • Tod Boettner, founding executive director of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy

  • David Herzog, a veteran investigative reporter, data journalist and educator who has reported for The Providence Journal, The Baltimore Sun and The Morning Call in Allentown, Pa.

  • Joseph Thornton, secretary of the West Virginia Department of Military Affairs and Public Safety

  • Thomas Kirk, director of the Intelligence/Fusion Center as part of Homeland Security in West Virginia

"It's going to be a great program," Gould said. "We have people (on the panel) who have great credentials and perhaps different opinions. It's all about the public's right to know and what are the limitations. How open should a state government be? It's a great opportunity for people to come out and talk about these vital issues."

Thursday, Sept. 22

12:30 p.m. - The Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre. The guest speaker will be Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.


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Tuesday September 6, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University professor edits new collection of essays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, a professor of humanities and anthropology and director of the graduate humanities program at Marshall University, is the co-editor of a new collection of essays, "Explorations in Cultural Anthropology," that reviews current anthropological themes such as language, kinship, gender and belief systems.   The essays are written by anthropologists, journalists and scholars in other disciplines.

Lassiter's partner on the project is Dr. Colleen Boyd, an associate professor of anthropology at Ball State University.

"This was an exciting book to work on, especially because Dr. Boyd and I have discussed, researched and taught about many of these issues for years," Lassiter said. "Several of the essays are classic anthropological essays, but most are contemporary writings that students will enjoy reading."

Lassiter says the idea for the book was an outgrowth of one of his previous books, "Invitation to Anthropology," which Boyd uses in her anthropology courses at Ball State.

"Dr. Lassiter is one of our most prolific faculty," noted Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "We are proud that he is a member of our college for the depth of insight he brings to his courses."

The book's publisher is AltaMira Press and the book is available for purchase at www.altamirapress.com.

For more information contact  Lassiter at 304-746-1923.


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Thursday September 1, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Technology Transfer Office to present intellectual property seminar, introduce online invention disclosure system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Technology Transfer Office (TTO) will present a free seminar from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9, in Room 402 of the Drinko Library on Marshall's campus in Huntington.

The program will begin with an overview of the main areas of intellectual property law (patent, trademark and copyright) and will continue with a focus specifically on patent protection in a university setting. The program will cover not only the statutory requirements for obtaining a patent, but also will include discussions about university ownership of inventions; the differences between a patent application and a technical publication; the differences between inventorship and authorship; issues to consider to preserve patent rights in an academic setting; and determining if an invention is ready for patenting.

The session will be led by attorney Terry Wright of the firm Stites & Harbison PLLC in Louisville, Ky. He is one of 16 registered patent attorneys at the firm and is a member of the Intellectual Property and Technology Service Group. His practice focuses on patent‐related aspects of intellectual property, including patent drafting, patent prosecution, and counseling clients about infringement, validity and patentability.

Wright has a background in life sciences and experience with academic research in the areas of cardiovascular biology, molecular and cellular biology, pharmacology and biotechnology. He counsels companies and university technology transfer/licensing offices regarding strategies for protecting patent‐based intellectual property.

Wright's presentation will be followed by an introduction of the TTO's new online invention disclosure system and a brief review of the technology transfer process at Marshall University, led by Amy Melton, TTO assistant director.

The program is free but reservations are requested. Send reservations to tto@marshall.edu. For more information, contact Melton at 304-696-4365.


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Thursday September 1, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

"This test is part of our plan to test the system at least once per semester," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

The most recent test of the system occurred Jan. 20.

The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall in partnership with third-party vendor Everbridge, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those in the active Marshall community (faculty, staff and students) who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.

Everbridge is a leading provider of emergency notification services to colleges and universities, health care systems, government agencies and municipalities.


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Thursday September 1, 2011
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MU music faculty member to present paper in UK

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Vicki Pierce Stroeher, associate professor of music at Marshall University, was invited to present her paper, " 'Without any tune': The Role of the Discursive Shift in Britten's Interpretation of Poetry" at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom at the "Literary Britten" Conference.

She will be reading the paper Saturday, Sept. 3.

Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) was a 20th century English composer of the operas Peter Grimes, Billy Budd, and the Turn of the Screw, as well as a number of other vocal and instrumental works. Stroeher said she is particularly interested in his songs and song cycles, and so most of her research over the years has focused on these and the intersection between poetry and music. This particular paper explores Britten's musical language and how he uses that language to interpret poetry. The paper will be published as part of a new book series.

"I first fell in love with Britten's works in college and have been researching Britten since my earliest days in graduate school," Stroeher said. "Being invited to present at this conference dedicated to his work is both an honor and a confirmation of my research efforts. I am humbled by it, but also excited about the opportunity to share my work with other Britten scholars."

Stroeher received her Ph.D. in musicology in 1994 from the University of North Texas. Her dissertation was titled "Form and Meaning in Benjamin Britten's Sonnet Cycles."  She received a bachelor's degree in music history and a bachelor's in music education from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, in 1981, and pursued additional studies at Indiana University and Goldsmith's College, University of London.

Additionally, Stroeher will be in residence at the Britten-Pears Library in Aldeburgh, England, for the month of September, working on transcribing and editing a volume of correspondence between Britten and his recital partner Peter Pears, with two colleagues from the Britten-Pears Library, Lucy Walker and Jude Brimmer.


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Thursday September 1, 2011
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Marshall's Week of Service begins Sunday, Sept. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Week of Service, a time when students do volunteer work on campus and in the community, begins on Sunday, Sept. 11, according to Elizabeth Sheets, coordinator of MU's Office of Community Engagement.

Marshall's week of service, called United We Serve, begins on the day that has been designated a National Day of Service and Remembrance.

"We're encouraging our students to give back to the community," Sheets said. "With the national commitment to serve, we've decided to participate as well."

Sheets said students may take on projects on their own, call her at 304-696-2285 if they need ideas, or e-mail appell1@marshall.edu for ideas and suggestions.

"We would like for people to contact my office and let us know how individuals and organizations plan to participate," Sheets said. "Then, those who actually go out into the community should contact my office and let me know what they've done."


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Wednesday August 31, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Parkersburg student first to receive graduate assistant award


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Kristin McComis Parsons Memorial Graduate Assistant Award, established by LinguaCare Associates, Inc., of Charleston, was presented to a first-year Marshall University graduate student in a ceremony Wednesday, Aug. 24.

The award of $3,000, which will be given annually, goes to a graduate student in speech pathology and is combined with a tuition waiver for the recipient.

Emily Rowe of Parkersburg was honored as the first recipient of the award by Jackie Frazier and Vickie Pullins, graduates of Marshall's Department of Communication Disorders in the 1970s and founders of LinguaCare. The ceremony took place in the Department of Communication Disorders in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Parsons, also a graduate of the program and a LinguaCare employee, died in January of this year of leukemia.

"Kristin was a hard-working, dedicated and excellent student clinician," said Kathy Chezik, recently retired chair of the Department of Communication Disorders. "Equally important, she was a compassionate, humble and loving person, who always worked hard and always maintained a positive attitude toward life."

Parsons was considered one of the Department of Communication Disorders' most outstanding graduates. She was a 1995 B.A. summa cum laude graduate with a 3.97 GPA, and a 1996 M.A. graduate. She was awarded Marshall's George J. Harbold Award for having the highest GPA at 4.0 in the graduate program.

Her score of 800 on the National Examination in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (NESPA), the national certification examination, has never been exceeded by any Marshall student.

-------------------

Photo: Jackie Frazier, right, one of the owners of LinguaCare Associates, Inc., looks on as Emily Rowe of Parkersburg displays the first Kristin McComis Parsons Memorial Graduate Assistant Award. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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Tuesday August 30, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University Alumni Association kicks off fall football season, new school year with 2011 HERDFEST

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association, in conjunction with 93.7 The DAWG, is kicking off the football season and new school year with its annual HERDFEST beginning at 6 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 1 at Pullman Square in Huntington.    

The 2011 HERDFEST will feature several musical groups including Jabberwocky, a student and Marshall alumni group which performs at 6 p.m., and Parrots of the Caribbean, a Jimmy Buffett tribute band which takes the stage at 7 p.m.   Additionally, Marshall cheerleaders, Marco, school administrators and DAWG personalities will attend.

"We are so excited for 2011 HERDFEST because it signals the beginning of a new school year and the return of our students, and Marshall University football," said Tish Littlehales, executive director of alumni relations at Marshall University.  "There's going to be lots of food, games and prizes at Pullman Thursday evening and we encourage everyone to come out for some great family fun."

Football fun continues on Sunday, Sept. 4 as the Marshall University Thundering Herd faces off with the West Virginia University Mountaineers in Morgantown in the sixth Friends of Coal Bowl. 

Those who can't make it to the game can head to Harris Riverfront Park in Huntington for a community-wide football  party, courtesy of the MU Alumni Association and 93.7 The DAWG.  Football fans can watch the game live on a 275-foot television screen situated by the Ohio River. Fans are encouraged to bring a can of food to help stock the shelves at the Huntington Area Food Bank.

Gates open at 1 p.m. with kickoff scheduled for 3:30 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public. Although fans are prohibited from bringing in food and drinks, concession stands will be available.

Future alumni events this fall include:

  • Sept. 24-MU Alumni Association hosts a Game Day Reception prior to the Marshall versus Virginia Tech game.    The reception begins at 11:30 a.m. and tickets are $15.  Tickets may be purchased through the alumni office by calling 304-696-2901.

  • Oct. 1-Travel Doctors Travel Agency and the Alumni Association are sponsoring a motorcoach trip to Louisville, Ky., for the Marshall-Louisville football game.  The cost is $149 per person.  Tickets for the football game are not included.  Call Travel Doctors at 304-562-0881 prior to Sept. 16.  Seating is limited.

  • Oct.8-Marshall University Alumni Association Herd Fan Cruise.  The cruise departs on Oct. 5 and returns on Oct. 8 in time for the pre-game tailgate and MU-University of Central Florida football game.  Contact Steve Ashworth at 877-822-8201 for more information about the cruise.   Contact the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-3385 for information about the tailgate.

  • Oct. 10-15-Homecoming 2011.  Visit the Marshall University Alumni webpage at www.marshall.edu/alumni for more information and a complete listing of fall football activities.
     

Contact the MU Alumni Association at 304-696-2901 for details on 2011 HERDFEST or any of the activities listed above.


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Monday August 29, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College of Health Professions dean selected to serve on Allied Health NetWork Steering Committee

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of Marshall University's College of Health Professions, has been selected to serve as a member of the Allied Health NetWork Steering Committee of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) by its current members. His selection was approved by the president of the ACCP, Dr. Suhail Raoof.


Prewitt has been a member of the ACCP since 2000 and has been a Fellow since 2001. He has been at Marshall since July 2010.


The two-year term on the Allied Health NetWork Steering Committee begins in October 2011.  The goal of the committee is to promote the prevention and treatment of diseases of the chest through leadership, education, research and communication by providing a forum for members with similar interests to network, and to create opportunities for collaboration in education, leadership, research and advocacy activities.


Committee members serve as expert resources to groups internal and external to the ACCP and provide expertise and personnel to support evidence-based guideline development of the Health & Science Policy Committee. 


The ACCP has 17,750 members from more than 100 countries. The members represent the range of specialties contributing to the field of chest medicine, including adult and pediatric pulmonary medicine, critical care medicine, sleep medicine, and cardiovascular medicine and surgery. The ACCP and its NetWorks reflect the diversity of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine professionals from all over the world.


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Monday August 29, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd supporters encouraged to participate in College Colors Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans choose many ways to show their support and pride for the Thundering Herd. Marshall encourages fans to show their support by wearing their green Marshall gear every Friday throughout football season.

The university kicks off Green Fridays on Friday, Sept. 2, with participation in the seventh annual National College Colors Day. Fans across the nation are encouraged to wear their college colors and support their favorite university.

College Colors Day, organized by the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), coincides with "back to school" and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics. By participating in College Colors Day, Marshall is continuing a tradition of encouraging members of the Marshall community to wear their Marshall gear on this special day.

Marshall University employees and students are encouraged to participate in Green Fridays to show their pride on campus throughout the season.

In addition, employees of local businesses may take part in a contest in which they wear their Marshall gear and have the opportunity to win prizes from the university. Any businesses wanting to participate must register with Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, to be eligible to win. Businesses may register at www.marshall.edu/greenfridays.

Businesses need to submit their location and the number of participating employees. A winner will be chosen every Friday before a home football game throughout football season. Because Marshall's final game of the regular season with East Carolina is on Saturday, Nov. 26 (Thanksgiving weekend), that winner will be chosen Friday, Nov. 18.

For more information, contact Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Friday August 26, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Japan Outreach Initiative program coordinator begins two-year stay at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Azusa "Hanah" Yamada is looking for an audience. More precisely, she's looking for lots of audiences.

As Japan Outreach Initiative (JOI) program coordinator at Marshall University, Yamada is spending the next two years in Huntington demonstrating various aspects of the Japanese culture for any interested community groups or schools.

"I would like to make U.S. people familiar with Japan," she said. "That's the bottom line."

The purpose of the Japan Outreach Initiative is to promote interest in and the study of Japan through grassroots exchanges between the U.S. and Japan. It is jointly administered by the Laurasian Institution and the Japan Foundation. The JOI position at Marshall is funded by the Japan Foundation, the Center for Global Partnership and Toyota Motor Manufacturing, West Virginia.

Yamada, 23, is housed in the Department of Modern Languages on MU's Huntington campus and reports to Natsuki Anderson, an associate professor in Modern Languages, and coordinator of the Japanese program at Marshall. Yamada has been at Marshall for about three weeks.

Anderson said she has no doubt that Yamada will succeed in her efforts to provide cultural enrichment throughout the area.

"I thought she was different from the other coordinators," Anderson said. "The others were more reserved and serious. She is more relaxed and very friendly. She is very outgoing and social."

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts, said having Yamada on campus benefits students and the community.

"From what we know about economic markets, the world is flat and becoming smaller," Pittenger said. "West Virginia currently enjoys many economic ties with Japan as more companies engage in international business. Having Ms. Yamada on campus will allow our students and the residents of the greater Huntington area to learn more about the Japanese people and their culture. Marshall University is dedicated to preparing its students to live and work in an international business environment that will benefit this great state."

Yamada said she is thrilled to be in Huntington and at Marshall. She is a graduate of Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, and is a native of Aichi prefecture, which is located in the middle of Japan.

"This type of job was kind of my dream," Yamada said.

Yamada gives presentations on Japanese festivals and ceremonies, the everyday Japanese lifestyle, school life in Japan, and Manga and Anime (comics and animation). She conducts activities such as trying on Kimono/Yukata, and making crafts such as Origami, dolls and fans. She conducts chopstick challenges and she even makes sushi rolls and a Japanese breakfast.

"The role of my job is to be a bridge between the U.S. and Japan," Yamada said. "I can provide various cultural experiences for any community groups or schools interested in Japan."

Yamada also conducts language classes. Beginners learn conversational phrases and Japanese characters and business people learn business phrases and Japanese manners. She also gives Japanese quizzes, sings Japanese songs and reads Japanese stories in Japanese and English, mostly to children.

All of her presentations and activities are free of charge. Anyone wanting to talk with Yamada about a possible presentation may call her at 304-696-7257 or e-mail her at yamadaa@marshall.edu.


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Thursday August 25, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Trip to Africa subject of promotional night sponsored by MUAA

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association is hosting a promotional night to introduce a 2012 trip to Africa with Ntaba Tours.

The informational session will run from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center on MU's Huntington campus. Light refreshments will be served. The trip, sponsored by the MU Alumni Association, is planned for Sept. 14-25, 2012.

Those attending the session will learn about the experience in Africa with Ntaba Tours, a U.S.-based travel company specializing in travel to southern and east Africa. The trip includes unique tours and wildlife safaris. Destinations include Capetown, Winelands, Kapama and many more.

Anyone planning to attend the promotional night is asked to RSVP by calling 304-696-2901 or 304-696-3134 before Sept. 8.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 19, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University School of Pharmacy names associate dean

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. H. Glenn Anderson Jr., former associate dean of academic affairs at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, has been named associate dean for academic and curricular affairs at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. He began his duties at Marshall on Wednesday.

Anderson was a founding faculty member of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, where he began his academic career in 1996 as an assistant professor of pharmacy practice. While in that position, he developed the school's first residency program. He was promoted to associate professor in 2002 and trained the school's first post-doctoral fellow in drug information. Anderson then served as Tech Tech's interim associate dean of curriculum from 2005 until 2006, when he was named associate dean of academic affairs.

In addition to his teaching, mentoring and administrative roles at Texas Tech, Anderson has held several practice positions, including clinical pharmacist with the Northwest Texas Healthsystems, clinical pharmacist with Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Managed Care, director of the Drug Information Residency Program and director of the Drug Information and Health Policy Development Center.

He also has worked as a pharmacist at the Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Huntington and the Ohio State Medical Center in Columbus. He served as a consultant for the Geriatric Medication Project sponsored by Merck-Medco Containment Services.

"I look forward to the challenges and opportunities involved in helping to establish the Marshall University School of Pharmacy," said Anderson. "The university's slogan, 'We AreMarshall,' invites interpretations of uniqueness and of excellence that are worthy goals for a new program. I firmly believe the school has and will continue to aggregate the resources required to meet these goals. This is a seminal time for the university and I am humbled to play a part."

Dr. Kevin Yingling, pharmacy school dean, said, "We are most pleased to have Dr. Anderson join our program. He has spent more than 15 years in pharmacy education and more than 20 years in pharmacy practice. These experiences have equipped him to provide excellent leadership in the areas of student affairs, academic assessment and curriculum development."

Yingling noted that Anderson also will serve as a member of the school's Pharmacy Executive Council.

Anderson received his bachelor's (1991) and his doctoral (1994) degrees in pharmacy, both from Ohio State University. In 1996, he completed a two-year, post-doctoral fellowship in drug information, also at OSU.

He was recognized with the Lourdes M. Cueller Award in 2004, the Collaborative Practice Award in 2002, and the Research and Education Foundation Research Award in 1998, all from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Anderson is an active member of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists, and the Panhandle Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

For more information, contact Anderson at andersonh@marshall.edu or 304-696-2305.


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Friday August 19, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall wraps up record freshman welcome week activities

More than 2,000 new students crack open the books this fall;
rates for returning students higher, as well

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In a colorful collage of rainbow-colored tee shirts, nearly 2,000 students joined in a group "We Are Marshall" cheer next to Marshall University's famed Memorial Fountain this morning to mark the end of a packed week of freshman orientation activities.

The photo of the group is symbolic of a scene from the 2006 globally distributed "We Are Marshall" movie but it also gives the Class of 2015 students an opportunity to commemorate the beginning of their college careers, said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.

While enrollment figures are not yet final, it appears Marshall's freshman enrollment will top last year's record of 2,051.  Overall enrollment also looks like it will be higher, as well, Ormiston said, but he emphasized student headcounts this early in the semester are subject to change as students add and drop classes and late registrations come online.

"One statistic with which we are particularly pleased is our overall retention rate for returning students, which is up about 3.8 percent right now," Ormiston said.

"At Marshall, student success is our top priority and we've begun a number of new intensive advising programs and student resources that are making a difference. The increase in student retention shows that we're making progress toward our goal, and we are going to keep moving in that direction."

To view video clips and photographs of today's cheer and Week of Welcome activities, visit www.marshall.edu and click on the freshman group photo.

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Photos: (Above) Nearly 2,000 students gathered on the Memorial Student Center plaza today for the Class of 2015 photograph. (Below) Beth Wolfe, director of Marshall's Office of Recruitment, leads the freshmen in the "We Are Marshall" cheer during Thursday's Freshman Convocation. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Thursday August 18, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Safety Technology Program reaccredited

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Bachelor of Science in Safety Technology Program has been reaccredited by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission (ASAC) of ABET, Inc.

Marshall submitted a Self-Study Report and the ASAC conducted a site visit Nov. 7-9, 2010. The findings of the ASAC resulted in the reaccreditation.

Dr. Allan Stern, chair of the Division of Applied Science and Technology, said being accredited by ABET is important to current and future Marshall students in the Safety Technology Program.

"The Safety Technology Program finds being accredited by ABET helps our students acquire meaningful professional career positions with nationally recognized companies regionally and nationally," Stern said. "These companies seek graduates from accredited safety programs.  Being recognized as one of only seven colleges and universities having this specific accreditation helps in student recruitment."

Pat Conlon, a professor in Safety Technology, helped prepare the Self-Study Report.

"We're very pleased," said Conlon, who noted that only 30 schools in the country have a B.S. in Safety Technology Program. "Our program is in good shape. The ABET criteria is a very good blueprint of the knowledge and skills needed in the safety industry. The ABET accreditation is a standard of excellence that our students, faculty, and alumni can be very proud of."

The Safety Technology program is multi-disciplinary, with a focus on the application of science, law, management and psychology of accident prevention and worker health. The program's goal is to prepare students to be competent safety professionals through a combination of academic, hands-on, industrial experience, combined with research by faculty and community involvement.

Enrollment in the program has steadily increased over the past five years. Current enrollment is 72 full-time and nine part-time students, which is approximately a 32 percent increase over enrollment during the last general review. The program faculty consists of five full-time members

For more information, contact Stern at 304-696-3069.


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Wednesday August 17, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, , 304-746-1964

Transition announced at Marshall institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eric B. Kmiec, director of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), has resigned his position at Marshall University effective Oct. 15 to become chairman of the chemistry department at Delaware State University in Dover, Del.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp has named Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, interim director of the institute. Kopp said a national search for the new director will begin immediately.

"Since we formed MIIR nearly four years ago, Marshall has been working to develop a significant biotechnology research presence that is attracting private investment and federal grants," Kopp said. "The progress that has been achieved is echoed by our recent announcement that we have reached the halfway mark in 'Bucks for Brains' fundraising.

"Our mission to produce patentable scientific breakthroughs through pioneering research continues, and I thank Dr. Kmiec for his leadership and assistance as we have built the institute from the ground up. I'm confident he has helped lay the groundwork for continued success in attracting this type of development to Marshall and the entire state of West Virginia."

Kmiec said, "My time here has been a wonderful experience that has helped me grow as a scientist and as a leader. While I look forward to the challenges awaiting me in Delaware - including building the foundation for a brand new program in the discipline that has been my life's work, chemical biology - I will always appreciate the opportunity that Marshall afforded me. I know that MIIR will continue to grow stronger and become even more successful. I have invested a large part of myself in getting the institute up and running, and will continue to support MIIR and Marshall University in any way I can in the future."

Kmiec came to Marshall in January 2009 after serving as a professor of biology at the University of Delaware and director of applied genomics at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute.

His wife Jennifer, the university's associate vice president for economic development, has also resigned her position and will be joining her husband in Delaware.

MIIR was created in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund and its precursor, the Eminent Scholars Recruitment and Enhancement initiative. The goal of the institute is to develop a focused program of cutting-edge research dedicated to creating new high-tech businesses. Since its inception, MIIR has grown from six to 13 employees, and has announced co-development agreements with two major biotechnology companies.


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Tuesday August 16, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, , 304-746-1989

14th annual Paint the Capital City Green rally is sold out

CHARLESTON - The 14th annual Paint the Capital City Green celebration coming to Charleston Embassy Suites on Thursday, Aug. 18, is a sellout.

Thundering Herd fans with advance only tickets will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp as well as key members of this year's team as they talk about the future of Marshall University football. Fans will also enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7 p.m.

The event, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

For more information, call The Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu.


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Monday August 15, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center to host third annual RecFest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 90 exhibitors will be showcased for Marshall University students and community members this weekend during the third annual RecFest at the Marshall Recreation Center on MU's Huntington campus.

RecFest 2011, presented by Chase Bank, runs from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. It is one of the final events of Marshall's Week of Welcome, which begins Wednesday, Aug. 17. Admission is free. Fall classes start Monday, Aug. 22.

RecFest provides an opportunity for incoming and returning students, faculty and staff to learn about the options available to them both on campus and in the Huntington area.

A variety of local businesses will be set up on the recreation center's 18,812 square feet of basketball court space. Several of the exhibitors will have giveaways and raffles. Huntington Cycle & Sport will give away a bicycle, the Cabell-Huntington Health Department will offer free vaccinations and health screenings, the Marshall Recreation Center will feature an interactive fitness area complete with personal trainers, Village Collection have a raffle for TOMS Shoes, and Wendy's will serve free treats.

Entertainment planned during the event includes The Drew Dunbar Band presented by Route 60 Music performing outside. WMUL-FM's Rudeboyz will provide music inside the recreation center, the recreation center will offer free repelling from the third floor to the basketball courts, T-shirts will be given out, and the first 1,000 visitors will receive free magnetic dry erase boards courtesy of MU Against Tobacco.

A large number of Marshall University student groups and campus organizations will be present at RecFest as well.

For more information, call 304-696-4732 or visit the Marshall Recreation Center welcome desk.


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Thursday August 11, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-606=6397

Marshall University School of Pharmacy names new department chair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kimberly Broedel-Zaugg, formerly a professor of pharmacy at Ohio Northern University, has been named Founding Chair of Pharmacy Practice and Administration for the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. Broedel-Zaugg began her duties with Marshall July 17.

Currently she is responsible for development of the department and assisting the leadership team as it builds the pharmacy program. When the first class is admitted in 2012, Broedel-Zaugg will assume teaching responsibilities as well. Her areas of expertise include sterile products, over-the-counter products, and health care systems.

"I am absolutely ecstatic about my new position at Marshall and am looking forward to building this program from the ground up," Broedel-Zauug said. "I really can't wait to have students in the hallways."

"With over 10 years of experience in pharmacy practice and 17 years of experience in pharmacy education, Dr. Broedel-Zaugg has an extensive background in both the scholarship and practice of pharmacy," said Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the school of pharmacy. "She will provide excellent leadership for the development of the department of pharmacy practice and administration."

Broedel-Zaugg graduated from Ohio Northern University in 1981 with a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. Completing her Master of Business Administration in 1989 at Ashland University, she went on to fulfill the requirements for a doctorate in pharmaceutical administration from Ohio State University in 1993.

While completing her advanced degrees, she worked as a staff pharmacist at Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio, as well as Doctors Hospital and Massillon State Hospital in Massillon, Ohio. She gained additional experience as a relief pharmacist for several home health agencies.

In 1994, Broedel-Zaugg joined the faculty at Ohio Northern University as an assistant professor and she received tenure in 2000. She was promoted to full professor in 2004.

Broedel-Zaugg has been awarded numerous teaching and mentoring honors in her field including the 2006-2007 Kappa Epsilon Unicorn Award for national service and leadership. Additionally, she was awarded the Kappa Epsilon Advisor of the Year award for 2008-2009 and the Kappa Epsilon Career Achievement Award in 2011. Kappa Epsilon is a national professional pharmacy fraternity.

For more information, contact: Broedel-Zauug at 304-696-2306.


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Thursday August 11, 2011
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Marshall paleontologist helps make scientific history with 78-million-year-old 'pregnant plesiosaur'

Unique fossils of adult animal and its embryo provide first evidence
of live birth among these prehistoric marine reptiles
 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University paleontologist Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe and Dr. Luis Chiappe, director of the Natural History Museum (NHM) Dinosaur Institute in Los Angeles, have determined that a unique specimen now displayed in the museum's Dinosaur Hall is the fossil of an embryonic marine reptile contained within the fossil of its mother.

Their findings will be published tomorrow in the journal Science.

The 78-million-year-old, 15.4-foot-long adult specimen is a Polycotylus latippinus, one of the giant, carnivorous, four-flippered reptiles known as plesiosaurs that lived during the Mesozoic Era. The embryonic skeleton contained within shows much of the developing body, including ribs, 20 vertebrae, shoulders, hips and paddle bones. The research by O'Keefe and Chiappe establishes that these dual fossils are the first evidence that plesiosaurs gave birth to live young, rather than hatching their offspring from eggs on land.

Although live birth (or viviparity) has been documented in several other groups of Mesozoic aquatic reptiles, no previous evidence of it has been found in the important order of plesiosaurs. O'Keefe and Chiappe have also determined that plesiosaurs were unique among aquatic reptiles in giving birth to a single, large offspring, and that they may have lived in social groups and engaged in parental care.

"Scientists have long known that the bodies of plesiosaurs were not well suited to climbing onto land and laying eggs in a nest," said O'Keefe, who is an associate professor of biology at Marshall. "So the lack of evidence of live birth in plesiosaurs has been puzzling. This fossil documents live birth in plesiosaurs for the first time, and so finally resolves this mystery. Also, the embryo is very large in comparison to the mother, much larger than one would expect in comparison with other reptiles. Many of the animals alive today that give birth to large, single young are social and have maternal care. We speculate that plesiosaurs may have exhibited similar behaviors, making their social lives more similar to those of modern dolphins than other reptiles."

Plesiosaurs have no known living relatives, but were common in the world's oceans during the Age of Dinosaurs. They were among the top predators in the Western Interior Seaway, the vast, tropical body of water that split North America during the Cretaceous when waters from the Arctic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico flooded onto the continent and met.

The remarkable NHM specimen was discovered in 1987 by Charles Bonner on the Bonner Ranch in Logan County, Kan. Virtually complete except for parts of the adult's neck and skull, the "mother" specimen and her baby were given extensive conservation by NHM and then mounted for display by Phil Fraley Productions (Patterson, N.J.) with the supervision of O'Keefe and Chiappe. The specimen is currently on display in the Dinosaur Hall, the new 14,000-square-foot exhibition at NHM featuring more than 300 fossils and 20 complete mounts of dinosaurs and sea creatures.

O'Keefe's research on plesiosaurs has taken him around the globe in search of these prehistoric creatures. He is credited with the discovery of a new plesiosaur, Tatenectes laramiensis, a type of marine animal that lived during the late Jurassic age when large dinosaurs, including apatosaurus, stegosaurus and allosaurus, roamed the Earth. O'Keefe made the discovery in what is now the Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming.

O'Keefe has taught biology and paleontology at Marshall University since 2006. He teaches human anatomy and comparative vertebrate anatomy and serves as a graduate adviser. He received his bachelor's degree in biology from Stanford University and his doctorate in evolutionary biology from the University of Chicago. He has published numerous scientific publications, and has served as a scientific adviser for National Geographic, IMAX and the Discovery Channel.

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About Marshall University

Marshall University is the oldest public higher education institution in West Virginia and one of the region's most dynamic universities, serving students from 47 states and more than 60 countries. Marshall offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs and competes in Division I intercollegiate sports in Conference USA. Located in the college town of Huntington, W.Va., Marshall is known for its safe and beautiful campus, dedicated professors, small class size, successful graduates and great value. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu. We AreMarshall.

Photo information:

(Above) Robin O'Keefe, courtesy of Marshall University
(Middle) Plesiosaur giving birth. Image courtesy of Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
(Below) Photo provided by the journal Science shows the detail of a Polycotylus latippinus' embryo. Photo courtesy Science

 
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Wednesday August 10, 2011
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Choral Union to begin 20th year with Castleberry as director

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.-- Marshall University's Choral Union is seeking new singers to join it, according to Dr. David Castleberry, who is beginning his 20th year as director of the group. Rehearsals begin Tuesday, Aug. 23. 

This fall, the ensemble will join with the MU Orchestra and the West Virginia Symphony Chorus to present performances of Franz Joseph Haydn's Mass in D Minor, also known as the "Nelson" Mass, along with Ludwig van Beethoven's Choral Fantasy, Castleberry said. The Haydn work is one of the finest settings in the choral-orchestral literature and the Beethoven work features a virtuoso part for solo piano. Concerts will take place on Dec. 1 and 2.

Since Castleberry serves as director of both the MU Choral Union and the West Virginia Symphony Chorus, combining forces for this concert is a natural collaboration, he said. Last spring, the Choral Union joined with the Huntington Symphony in a presentation of Carl Orff's Carmina Burana. "Any time we undertake a large production of this kind," Castleberry said, "we depend upon the cooperation of a lot of people. Working with Dr. Reed Smith and the Marshall University Orchestra is something we always enjoy. Combining choral forces will make this an even more lavish production." 

Smith agrees. "The Marshall University Orchestra will benefit greatly from collaborating with the Choral Union and the West Virginia Symphony Chorus on two important works of the Classical Period," she said. "I am especially pleased that we will be featuring our outstanding new piano faculty member, Dr. Henning Vauth, on Beethoven's rarely performed Choral Fantasy. This performance will be a treat for our local audience."

Under Castleberry's leadership, the Choral Union has performed works ranging from Handel's Messiah and Verdi's Requiem to Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms and Walton's Belshazzar's Feast. Rehearsals are held each Tuesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. in Smith Music Hall, Room 150. Music is available for purchase at rehearsal.

The Choral Union welcomes adult singers from throughout the Tri-state. No audition is required, but previous musical experience is helpful. For further information, persons may call 304-696-2963.


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Monday August 8, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

MIIR director to be featured speaker at Huntington's Disease Society of America event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eric B. Kmiec, director and lead research scientist at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), will be the featured speaker at the Huntington's Disease Society of America (HDSA) "Dining for a Cure" event on Sunday, Aug. 21, from 5-9 p.m. at Bridge Road Bistro in Charleston.

Kmiec will be speaking about his research on inherited disorders. Widely recognized as a pioneer of gene editing a technique in which synthetic DNA molecules are used to patch or repair mutations in human chromosomes Kmiec's research focuses on exploring therapies for diseases such as Huntington's disease, spinal muscular atrophy and muscular dystrophy.

"One of the most rewarding things about biotechnology and biomedical research is knowing that the work you do every day in the lab may someday help real people who are suffering from these terrible degenerative diseases," said Kmiec. "I enjoy sharing the research we're doing at our institute and how it may eventually lead to new treatments for Huntington's disease and other hereditary disorders."

"We look forward to welcoming Dr. Kmiec as our guest speaker and to hearing about the cutting-edge biological research he is doing to support a cure for Huntington's disease," said Caryn Freas, HDSA development director for the Mid-Atlantic Region. "There are many families in West Virginia who are affected by this devastating condition, and research like that being done at Marshall University by Dr. Kmiec provides hope that new therapies are on the horizon."

Huntington's disease is a hereditary, degenerative brain disorder that results in a loss of cognitive, behavioral and physical control, and for which, presently, there is no treatment or cure. The disease slowly diminishes the affected individual's ability to walk, think, talk and reason. According to the HDSA, more than 30,000 people in the United States are currently diagnosed with Huntington's disease. Each of their siblings and children has a 50 percent risk of developing the disease.  

Although medications can relieve some symptoms in certain individuals, research has yet to find a means of conquering or even slowing the deadly progression of Huntington's disease. The first therapy approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration specifically for Huntington's disease was released only one-and-a-half years ago. Several new potential treatments currently are moving through Phase 3 clinical trials.

Before joining MIIR in 2009, Kmiec was professor of biology at the University of Delaware and director of applied genomics at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. Research in his laboratory is supported through grants from the National Institutes of Health, private research foundations and the Discovery Initiative at the High Q Foundation. He is also the managing editor of Frontiers in Bioscience and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

He has more than 60 issued patents or patent applications to his credit and has founded several biotechnology companies. He is a co-founder and chief scientific officer of OrphageniX Inc., a biotechnology company focused on correcting genes that cause "orphan diseases."

For more information about MIIR or his research, contact Kmiec at (304) 696-3830 or kmiec@marshall.edu. For more information about the Aug. 21 HDSA event, contact Freas at (610) 260-0421 or cfreas@hdsa.org.

The event is being sponsored by Alpha Natural Resources.

--------------------

About the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research

MIIR was created at Marshall University in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund. Scientists at MIIR are conducting vital biotechnology research designed to improve the lives of people everywhere who suffer from Huntington's disease, muscular dystrophy, sickle cell anemia, juvenile macular degeneration and other diseases. The institute has experienced steady growth since its inception, and in the last two years has signed two co-development agreements with major biotechnology companies.


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Monday August 8, 2011
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Marshall University welcomes the Class of 2015

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University is welcoming the Class of 2015 this fall with Week of Welcome (WOW), an immersion program designed to facilitate successful entry into college life.

"These first few days of the fall semester give our freshman students a chance to connect with their colleges, their fellow students and the campus," said Dr. Frances Hensley, Senior Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of Undergraduate Studies. "In essence, it gives them a chance to own the campus for a few days prior to the arrival of upperclassmen."

Marshall's Week of Welcome officially begins Wednesday, Aug. 17, with move-in day at residence halls, followed by several evening activities including a family picnic, which begins at 5:30 p.m. at South Field. South Field is located near the Henderson Center. A photographer will be available to take pictures of students and their families.

Thursday, Aug. 18, features the President's Freshman Convocation at 9:30 a.m. in the Henderson Center. President Stephen J. Kopp and other university officials will speak to students.

"We know from studies concerned with student success that when new students commit themselves to becoming actively involved in the life of the university community, the people and place connections that develop greatly enhance the prospects for a successful transition to college life both socially and academically," Kopp said. "The various university activities during the Week of Welcome are designed to encourage our students to begin making these connections and take the first steps on their path to personal success."

UNI 100 also kicks off for the Class of 2015 Thursday morning immediately following Convocation. The assembly will most likely be one of the largest class gatherings ever at Marshall University with an estimated 1800 students expected to attend. Following completion of the morning activities, students will break for lunch and then attend individual college sessions in the afternoon. An 8 p.m. performance by comedian Rip Michaels finishes out Thursday's planned activities.

Friday, Aug. 19, begins with a class picture scheduled for 8:30 a.m. around the Memorial Fountain. Plenary sessions are scheduled for the remainder of the day, followed by a dance-a-thon Friday evening beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Memorial Student Center Plaza.

Additional activities scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 20, include shuttle service to Target for students. The shuttle will leave from the Memorial Student Center Circle on 5th Avenue between 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Students can also participate in Rec Fest at the Marshall Recreation Center. The event showcases vendors and groups from around the Tri-State.

"We view WOW as an opportunity to kick-start the freshman year," said Sherri Stepp, Director of University College and WOW organizer. "We want students to understand that the road ahead might be long, but the trip is worth it. There are caring people all over campus, from academic units to the Student Resource Center, who are willing to help them along the way.

Organizers say all freshman students, including commuters, are encouraged to attend all activities. Commuter students may check in on Wednesday in the Rec Center lobby or on Thursday beginning at 7:30 a.m. at the Henderson Center.

For further information, persons may view the WOW schedule online at www.marshall.edu/wow or contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 304-696-6690.


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Friday August 5, 2011
Contact: Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs,, 304-696-4676

Marshall accepting applications for new medical school initiative

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University has created a new initiative to enable undergraduate students of color to explore and experience the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. Applications for  PROJECT  P.R.E. M.E.D. ( P roviding R eal World E xperiences for future M arshall E ducated D octors)  will be accepted through Friday, Sept. 9.

"Through this program, we'll be giving students an in-depth understanding of the processes and preparation for applying to and attending medical school," said Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs at Marshall.

The program centers around a visit to the School of Medicine beginning Thursday, Oct. 13, and continuing through Saturday, Oct. 15. Students selected for the program will attend medical school classes, meet faculty and students participating in medical research, receive specific information on medical school preparation including the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and tour the School of Medicine facilities. Each student also will be linked with a medical school mentor.

Clarke said there will be no charge for the program for the selected applicants. On-campus lodging and meals will be provided as part of the program, and assistance with transportation costs may be available.

Requirements for applicants include a minimum grade point average of 3.0 and college sophomore, junior or senior status. Application materials, which will be evaluated competitively, must include the PROJECT  P.R.E.  M.E.D. application form and resume, a written summary of the student's interest in the program and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member or university administrator.

Application forms are available online at www.marshall.edu/mcip .

Questions about the program may be directed to Clarke by phone at 304-696-4676 or by e-mail at clarkes@marshall.edu .


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Friday August 5, 2011
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Coordinator of Marketing and Branding, , 304-696-3490

'Go Green' program gives Herd fans opportunity to encourage local retailers to carry Marshall gear

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans and supporters wanting to see more Thundering Herd merchandise in local stores can share that message with retailers thanks to a new "Go Green" program.

Through the "Go Green" program, fans will be able to take cards designed by the university to retailers that they would like to see carry more Marshall products. The cards ask that the retailers consider offering a greater selection of Marshall University-branded logo items.

"These cards let area businesses know that Marshall fans are shopping in their stores and they want to buy officially licensed Marshall gear," said Mallory Jarrell, marketing and branding coordinator at Marshall. "We hope these show that it's not just great to promote the Thundering Herd, but that it makes good business sense, too, because we know our fans are demanding more Marshall items."

Fans are asked to distribute the cards to retailers that offer no or a limited selection of Marshall items. The cards will be included in the 2011 football season ticket packages and distributed at other university events. Fans also may download and print the cards at www.marshall.edu/gogreen , the official web site for the program.

"Many times Herd fans are looking for their green and have a difficult time finding it among the other products that are offered," Jarrell said. "The 'Go Green' program gives our fans an easy way to encourage their local store manager to give them more ways to show their support for Marshall. We really want to get more green out there!"

Proceeds from royalties generated by officially licensed products benefit Marshall programs and scholarship funds. The purchase of more Herd gear means more funds for these programs.

For more information, persons may contact Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or at haye1@marshall.edu .

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Photos: Both sides of the card developed to assist Marshall fans in letting their retailers know they want to see more Marshall gear available.


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Friday August 5, 2011
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Local high school students, teachers taking part in summer research program at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is serving as host to a group of high school teachers and their students who are participating in a six-week summer research program funded by a National Science Foundation grant.  The program is housed on the Huntington campus.

The five-year grant, Teacher Research Experience for the Advancement of Knowledge (T.R.E.K.), is shared by Marshall, West Virginia University and West Virginia State University.  This is the initial phase of the program which will extend through the fall 2011 and spring 2012 semesters.  Teachers and students from Cabell Midland, Spring Valley and Tolsia high schools received stipends for their participation in the summer program.

Teachers were invited to bring an interested student to work alongside them while engaging in scientific research on a variety of topics.  The 12 participants teamed with scientists working on the cutting edge of nano and biotechnologies.

Topics offered, but not limited to, included RNA structural analysis; design/development of static RNA nanoarchitectures and mobile nanomachines; aging, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes DNA as a structural material; methods to label specific compounds within nervous tissue of animal models; and microbiology research involving Acanthamoeba.

Teachers taking part are James Coble and Robert McCloud, Spring Valley; Olivia Boskovic and William Strait, Cabell Midland; and Roger Spry, Tolsia.  Students include Jackie Maynard and Diana Ventura, Spring Valley; Mackenzie Blankenship and Kramer Kaplan, Cabell Midland;  and C.J. Shepard,  Taylor Spry and Matt Smiley, Tolsia.

Marshall faculty members participating are Dr. Brian Antonsen, Dr. Eric Blough, Dr. Michael Norton, Dr. Elmer Price and Dr. Wendy Trynza.

A closing reception will take place in downtown Huntington at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8, at the Marshall Hall of Fame Caf, 857 3rd Ave., where students and teachers will present an overview of the research that they conducted alongside MU researchers.

For additional information about the program contact Dr. Tina Cartwright, assistant professor of science education, at tina.cartwright@marshall.edu, or Stephanie Shrewsbury, outreach coordinator for the College of Science Department of Biology, at Shrewsburys@marshall.edu.


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Friday August 5, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, , 304-746-1964

Marshall professor presents oral cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University faculty member Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio recently returned from Italy, where he gave two presentations of his research at the International Congress of the Italian Society of Pathology and Oral Medicine.

The conference, which was held June 16-18 in Pugnochiuso, Italy, featured the most recent scientific findings in oral medicine, pathology, maxillofacial surgery, oral surgery and dental hygiene.

Claudio is an associate professor in the cancer biology research cluster at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and directs a laboratory in the new Translational Genomic Research Institute at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center.

His presentations, which were titled "Cancer stem cells and oral cancer" and "Novel therapies in oral squamous cell carcinoma," highlighted a discovery in his lab of how to isolate and propagate cancer stem cells.

According to Claudio, this advance allows for a two-pronged approach in the fight against oral cancer.

He said, "We can now test and select the most effective chemotherapy options available to eradicate not only the traditional target of tumor bulk but also the highly resistant cancer stem cells we now know to be the major source of recurrence and treatment failure due to their ability to regrow the tumor population. Our research offers the promise of personalized cancer treatment options for the individual cancer patient's needs."

Claudio added that attending the conference and giving the seminars in Italy also gave him the opportunity to highlight the research being done at Marshall.

"This is just one example of the strides we hope to gain through the Translational Genomic Research Institute - translating what we learn in the lab directly to improving bedside care," he said. "We also have recently entered into a Phase I clinical trial for the customized treatment of small cell lung cancer, so that is very exciting as well."

For more information, contact Claudio at 304-696-3516 or claudiop@marshall.edu.


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Thursday August 4, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Artists with Marshall connections to open exhibition Aug. 19

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visual artists John Farley, director of art galleries at Marshall University, and Marshall art and design major Lorin Michki will present a joint exhibition of their work at Gallery 842 in Huntington beginning Friday, Aug. 19.
 
Their exhibition, (re)discovery, opens at 6 p.m. Aug. 19 with a reception, which is free and open to the public.
 
Farley, of Huntington, is a Marshall University alumnus and was recently named The Herald-Dispatch Arts Citizen of the Year. Michki, also of Huntington, is an award-winning student whose emphasis is in printmaking.
 
The artists will exhibit recent drawings, paintings, prints and other works that explore questions of the human condition, Farley said.
 
"This exhibition is organized in collaboration with the Cabell Huntington Coalition for the Homeless, whose mission and vital civic services improve the welfare - the human condition - of so many in our community," Farley said. "A percentage of any money generated from the sale of artwork will be donated directly to the CHCH."
 
The collaboration with the CHCH is rooted in real-world experiences. Michki lost his home and nearly all his possessions in a fire last summer and was faced with the prospect of rebuilding. Farley took him in. At about the same time, Farley was working at Gallery 842 and developed a personal relationship with "Steve," a homeless man who searched trashcans on 4th Avenue for food. Farley frequently buys him a meal.

"Through this exhibition, we seek to promote and foster a spirit of personal and civic engagement, further elevate the arts within our community, and demonstrate the kind of collaborative spirit that will lead to increased awareness and change," Farley said.
 
For Michki, being asked to exhibit work in a two-man show was flattering.
 
"When John asked me about doing this show, I felt honored that he would want me to exhibit work with him and knew that this was too great an opportunity to pass down," Michki said.
 
"My work deals with various issues that relate to the question of 'reality' as being truly real or as something that we make real for ourselves, and how devastating a false reality can be to us in certain instances."
 
"The process and product of art-making is a universal thing, to be made relevant, enjoyable and accessible to all," Farley said. "We want the community to be able to come in, and buy some art - for it not to be solely a luxury item."
 
The artists were awarded a grant from Caf Huntington and a matching grant from Create Huntington to subsidize the cost of the exhibition, allowing them to make high-quality prints in an effort to make some of the artwork more affordable.

According to its website, Cafe Huntington provides "micro grants" to artists and activists in the Huntington area. Each month, a guest chef prepares a meal for which tickets are available for $10 per person. All of the income from that meal is given as a grant to support a local project, which is selected by vote of the meal attenders.

Create Huntington is a local organization whose focus is on improving community livability and whose projects include matching grants such as the one received by Farley and Michki.
 
Farley noted  that being awarded the matching grant from Create Huntington was an added bonus.
 
"Being awarded a Create Huntington matching grant allows us to do even more than we initially envisioned," Farley said. "  In a sense, it is also a positive affirmation of the things we have chosen to pursue, and it feels great to have already received so much community buy-in."
                                                                                                            
The exhibition will continue through Friday, Sept.  23. Gallery 842 is located at 842 Fourth Avenue in downtown Huntington. Admission is free and open to the public, Tuesdays through Saturdays, from noon to 7 p.m.

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Photos: (Above) Postcard for (re)discovery exhibition includes a work by each of the participating artists. (Below) John Farley (left) and Lorin Michki will present an art exhibition at Gallery 842 beginning Aug. 19.


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Thursday August 4, 2011
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Advance only tickets still available for Marshall University's 14th annual Paint the Capital City Green rally

CHARLESTON - Tickets are still on sale for the 14th annual Paint the Capital City Green celebration coming to Charleston Embassy Suites on Thursday, Aug. 18.

Thundering Herd fans will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp as well as key members of this year's team as they talk about the future of Marshall University football. Fans will also enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7 p.m.

Advance only tickets are $50 and must be purchased by close of business on Tuesday, Aug. 16, to be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win admission and hotel accommodations for two to an away game. For ticket information, call The Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu.

The event, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.


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Wednesday August 3, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington attorney named founding director of Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Patricia Proctor, a Huntington attorney and Marshall University alumna, has been named founding director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy at Marshall. Proctor assumes her duties Aug. 15.

The Center is a new interdisciplinary academic program that honors the lengthy service of Dr. Simon D. Perry, retired professor of Political Science, to Marshall University and its students. It promotes the teaching and original research regarding the formation and evolution of the Constitution, and examines its importance in contemporary legal, political, civil and cultural matters.

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, said Proctor embodies all of the ideals and perspectives that will make the Simon Perry Center a success.

"She has a deep knowledge of the law, the Constitution, American history and the American political process," Pittenger said.

Pittenger said Proctor, a member of the law firm of Steptoe & Johnson since 2004, will be teaching courses, directing the university's pre-law program, assisting with various campus and community programs and helping bring grants and private contributions to the center.

"I am honored to be associated with the center, which is a dynamic and meaningful way of paying homage to Dr. Perry's tremendous contributions to the university, and excited about the opportunity to help the center move forward," Proctor said.

Proctor earned her law degree in 1991 from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was a senior editor of the Journal of International Business Law. In 1984, she graduated magna cum laude from Marshall, where she was editor-in-chief of The Parthenon, the school's daily newspaper, and was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa, the national leadership honor society.

After graduating from law school, she spent one year as a law clerk to the Honorable Stewart Dalzell of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, assisting the judge in both civil and criminal matters.

Upon finishing her clerkship in 1992, she joined the Philadelphia law firm of Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, where she was a partner from January 2000 until returning to West Virginia to join Steptoe & Johnson in August 2004. She concentrates her practice in complex commercial litigation and employment law, at both the trial and appellate levels.

Proctor sits on the boards of directors of the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall, the Huntington Museum of Art, the West Virginia Public Broadcasting Foundation and the TEAM for West Virginia Children.

She has taught political science at Marshall as an adjunct professor and been a citizen member of the editorial board of The Herald-Dispatch in Huntington.

Perry, a native of Gilbert, W.Va., taught at Marshall for 48 years (1962 to 2010) and developed many of the new program's signature courses. He said Constitutional Democracy is a perspective that studies how people as well as social and political forces shape the Constitution and its interpretation, and how the Constitution defines us as a nation.


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Monday August 1, 2011
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Marshall University engineering professor named interim dean of CITE

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Wael Zatar, a professor of engineering at Marshall University, has been named interim dean of the school's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), effective today (Aug. 1). Zatar replaces Betsy Dulin, who resigned to return to teaching.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, said a national search for a permanent dean will take place this fall.

"I am confident Dr. Zatar will be able to lead the college in its transition from Dean Dulin to the next permanent dean," Ormiston said. "He is very enthusiastic about the future of the college and understands its needs. Dr. Zatar has a lot of experience and an outstanding record as a scholar."

Zatar has been at Marshall since August 2006. He previously served at the University of Kentucky and West Virginia Tech.

"I am very excited about the opportunity to serve as interim dean," Zatar said. "We will continue to work on important projects, such as the new engineering building and accreditation issues. We also are creating new areas of emphasis in our engineering program, which is very important."

Zatar received both his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering from Cairo University in Egypt, and his Ph.D., also in civil engineering, from Saitama University in Japan.

He has conducted state-of-the-art research for 21 years and has established strong partnerships and liaisons with funding agencies, industry and research institutions.

Zatar's research interests include bridge management, construction materials, highway testing standards, advanced experimental destructive and non-destructive testing techniques, reinforced and prestressed concrete, ultra high performance concrete, fiber reinforced polymer composite bridges, green and sustainable highway structures, health monitoring of transportation infrastructure systems, structural repair and retrofit, and specialized rehabilitation systems.

He has 91 technical publications and has written a number of book chapters addressing concrete structures.

At Marshall, he teaches Engineering Materials, Structural Analysis, Structural Steel Design, and Reinforced Concrete Design. In 2009, Zatar received the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute Distinguished Young Educator Achievement Award.

He is a member of 15 professional organizations, including the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Transportation Research Board, American Concrete Institute, and Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute.


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Thursday July 28, 2011
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Marshall University employee wins educational technology award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Blackboard, Inc., a company that helps colleges and universities implement online course management systems and other educational technologies, has honored Kathy Saville, director of Marshall University's MUOnline Design Center, with a 2011 Blackboard Catalyst Award for Community Collaboration.

The award is given to individuals who make significant contributions to the Blackboard community of users by sharing best practices for online learning.  

"What made this award so special to me was the number of colleagues from schools across the country who made and supported the nomination," Saville said.  "I am very honored to have received it." 

"Marshall University continues to be recognized as a national leader in the design and support of an innovative and high-quality online teaching and learning environment for our faculty and students," said Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for information technology and Marshall's chief information officer.   "We are all very pleased with Ms. Saville's recognition and achievement."                             

Saville, who has been with Marshall University since 2008, was honored by Blackboard at a conference earlier this month in Las Vegas.


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Monday July 25, 2011
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Summer undergraduate researchers to present their work

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 40 undergraduate students from 17 institutions have been hard at work in Marshall University laboratories this summer and will have an opportunity to share their research at presentations in the coming weeks.

Each of the students is participating in one of the five intensive undergraduate summer research programs on Marshall's campus. The nine- and 10-week programs allow undergraduate students to gain valuable, hands-on experience doing graduate-level research in the labs of some of Marshall's top scientists, mathematicians and engineers.

This summer's research programs at Marshall include:

 

 

While at Marshall, the students have been working on research projects related to a variety of topics, including biomedicine (cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes, toxicology and environmental health, and infectious diseases), mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology and computer science. In addition to the formal, hands-on research training they each receive from Marshall faculty members, the students are taking part in group classroom activities, workshops and seminars, and social activities.

The WV-INBRE and SRIMS student researchers will present their work in poster format and oral presentations on Thursday, July 28, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center (oral presentations beginning at 9:15 a.m. and poster session from 1-2:30 p.m.).  On Friday, July 29, the SURE and UBM students will present on the fourth floor of the Science Building (poster session from 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. and oral presentations beginning at 1 p.m.).  And on Thursday, Aug. 11, the REU and UBM students will present on the second floor of the Science Building (poster session from 1-3:30 p.m.).

"We are proud to offer these research experiences for undergraduate students. Our summer programs provide important training and education that help make students highly competitive in math, science and engineering research," said Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science. "As the culmination of weeks of work they have done this summer, the poster sessions provide an opportunity for students to practice presenting their findings a necessary skill if they plan to pursue a career in research."

Dr. Elsa Mangiarua, a professor in Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and director of the WV-INBRE Summer Research Program, added, "We are providing in-depth, mentored research opportunities for very talented undergraduates," she said. "The programs also promote awareness of graduate degree programs and careers in research."

Somerville and Mangiarua said that many of the students will continue their research projects during the coming academic year, and some will go on to present their results at professional conferences.

Each student receives a stipend. Depending on the program in which they are participating, they may also receive room and board, lab fees, and reimbursement for travel.

For more information, contact one of the following summer research program coordinators:  Diana Maue at maue1@marshall.edu or 304-696-3365, or visit http://bms.marshall.edu/srims (SRIMS); Dr. Marcia Harrison at harrison@marshall.edu or 304-696-4867, or visit www.marshall.edu/cellcentral/biom2/index.asp (UBM); Dr. Howard Richards at MarshallREU@gmail.com or 304-696-6466, or visit www.marshall.edu/reu/description.html (REU); Dr. Michael Norton at norton@marshall.edu or 304-696-6627, or visit www.marshall.edu/sure/2011participants.html (SURE); or Dr. Elsa Mangiarua at mangiaru@marshall.edu or 304-696-6211, or visit www.wv-inbre.net/summerprogram (WV-INBRE).

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Media Note:
  The July 28 session is the statewide WV-INBRE Summer Research Symposium. In addition to WV-INBRE and SRIMS students who have been doing research this summer at Marshall, that session will include undergraduate students and faculty fellows who have been conducting research at other colleges and universities around the state, as well as high school science teachers participating in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) program. More than 150 people are expected to attend, including research faculty from institutions across the state.

 


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Monday July 25, 2011
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Marshall Foundation receives Gold ADDY for annual report

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., received a Gold ADDY in the Western Virginia ADDY Awards for its 2009-2010 annual report, Kristi Arrowood, director of Foundation Development and Strategic Programs, said today.

The report, titled "Words To Live By," was developed by Access Inc. of Roanoke, a regional advertising agency owned by 1983 Marshall graduate Todd Marcum. The concept for the report was created by Arrowood.

"It's nice to be recognized by our peers for the publication that we produce for our alumni and donors," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the foundation. "And, it puts credibility and focus on what our core values are."

Those core values are four words that are engraved in the granite in the rotunda floor medallion of the Foundation Hall - respect, diversity, pride and integrity. They were featured throughout the annual report.

"They represent what the foundation stands for," Arrowood said. "It was just fitting to make everyone aware that those are the four words we try to live up to."

The Western Virginia ADDY Awards is the first step in a three-tier national competition sponsored by The American Advertising Federation (AAF), a not-for-profit industry association. It is the only creative awards program administered by the advertising industry for the industry.

The Marshall Foundation also won an ADDY for its 2006-07 annual report. The ADDY Awards are the world's largest advertising competition.

"It's exciting to think our work is being acknowledged and creativity awarded," Arrowood said. "It takes a lot of time and energy; it's nice to be acknowledged. And Todd and his team are always so generous with their time and talent to assist us."

Arrowood said one of the "unique features" of the annual report is having the medallion featured on each of the 32 pages as a constant reminder of the four "Words To Live By." An actual medallion magnet can be found on the last page.

Arrowood said photographers Rick Haye from Marshall and Rick Lee from Charleston contributed outstanding photos to the publication. Dawn Stein gave creative direction, Source Four was the printer and Magnets USA produced a special magnetic accent for the project.

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Photo: Kristi Arrowood, director of Foundation Development and Strategic Programs, shows off several copies of the Marshall Foundation's ADDY Award-winning annual report in the rotunda of the Foundation Hall. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

 
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Friday July 22, 2011
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WMUL celebrates 50th anniversary; faculty manager honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 100 people gathered to celebrate the 50th anniversary of WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, Saturday, July 16, at the MU Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Several people, some of whom worked for WMUL-FM in the station's early years, shared stories of their experiences at the station. Also, a 15-minute video highlighting the history of WMUL-FM - West Virginia's first public radio station - was played. The video included an update on the technology installed at the radio station over the years.

"I think everyone had a great time seeing some of their former classmates from when they were here and sharing stories from their time at WMUL-FM," said Krystle Davis, former promotions director for WMUL-FM and co-organizer of  the event. "We learned that although separated, in some instances by decades, our experiences were very similar and yet so different. We all left feeling proud at how successful the radio station has become, knowing we were a part of the building process."

Speakers included:

  • Michael J. Farrell, current Board of Governors member
  • Dr. Corley Dennison, current dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications
  • Bob Edmunds, 1960s on-air announcer and board operator for the station's live broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera
  • Jerry Handley, 1970s on-air announcer, news reporter and board operator for the station's live broadcast of the Metropolitan Opera
  • Dr. H. Keith Spears, faculty manager of WMUL, late 1970s to mid 1980s
  • Randy Lee, sportscaster in the 1980s
  • Doug Birdsong, sports director and staff member in the 1980s
  • Susan Curry Brun, student manager in the 1980s
  • Kimberly Jefferson Cobb, student manager in the 1980s
  • Chris Cobb, student manager in the 1980s
  • Brad Williamson, student manager in the 1990s
  • Todd McCormick, student manager in the 1990s
  • Vince Payne, student manager in the 2000s
  • Alex Reed, student manager in the 2000s
  • Melanie Chapman, news director in the 2000s
  • Adam Cavalier, student manager in the late 2000s to the early 2010s

Dr. Charles G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, was honored with a special presentation during the event.

Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, surprised Bailey with the announcement of the Dr. Charles G. Bailey Award, a scholarship created in his honor to be awarded to a student showing exemplary dedication to the radio station.

Davis led a fundraising drive in recent months in which $20,000 was raised for the scholarship through private donations. Board of Governors member Michael J. Farrell announced during Saturday's event that he would add $5,000 to the award fund and asked that everyone in the room reach out to others to contribute.

Davis said the award was established "to recognize (Bailey's) impact on our lives and his contribution to Marshall University and countless students."

"Dr. Bailey opened doors for many of us as students, job seekers, and now in our professional lives," Davis said. "We have many reasons to be thankful for his wisdom and his support."

Bailey has been teaching at Marshall since 1985. During that time, WMUL-FM student broadcasters  have received 1,136 awards in nationwide competition. They won a school-record 131 awards in the 2010-2011 academic year.

"I'm humbled and honored," Bailey said of the scholarship. "The day was not about me, it was about the former and current student staffs of WMUL-FM. But, they wanted to do this scholarship in my name and I'm very appreciative."

Bailey said the event celebrating WMUL's 50 years was "spectacular," particularly because some guests who worked for the station nearly a half-century ago were able to attend.

"Everyone in attendance got a much fuller picture of the history of the station," Bailey said. "The (event) was lengthy, but no one seemed to care. Everybody left that evening with smiles on their faces."

Bailey said the support WMUL-FM has received over the years has kept the station up to speed and on the air.

"The station has accomplished some great things," he said. "WMUL-FM has been successful and Marshall has supported it. I'll give the current and past administration a lot of credit for their support of both me and my students.  And I think we've repaid their faith and confidence in us."

Anyone interested in contributing to the Dr. Charles G. Bailey Award may do so by sending a check payable to the "MU Foundation" with memo line to read, "Dr. Charles G. Bailey Award - 300248" - to 519  John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25703, or online at www.marshall.edu/foundation by putting "Dr. Charles G. Bailey Award - 300248" in the comment section.

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Photos: (Above) Dr. Charles G. Bailey, left, receives the guidelines of a scholarship established in his honor from Dr. Corley Dennison during WMUL-FM's 50th anniversary celebration.(Below) Current and past WMUL-FM students and faculty pose for a photograph during WMUL-FM's 50th anniversary celebration. Photos by A Modern Focus Photography.

 
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Wednesday July 20, 2011
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MU Guitar Ensemble to perform in Brazil

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of Marshall University's Guitar Ensemble will represent Marshall in Brazil early next month. The ensemble, directed by Julio Alves, associate professor of music, will perform in the Brazilian cities of Brasolia and Goiania. 

The members of the group are both current and former students in Marshall's Department of Music, including Tiago Negreiros, Alexandre Lopes, Danilo Moraes, Michael Pitaniello, Pedro Silva, and Jason Breslin. Alves and Brazilian guest guitarist Julio Cruz will also join the group in the performances.

The first three recitals will occur in Brasolia. The first will be at the Professional Education Center School of Music of Brasilia (CEP- EMB) Aug. 3, followed by a performance at the University of Brasolia (UnB)  Aug. 5, and a last performance at the Mosteiro de Sao Bento, a traditional monastery in the Brazilian capital. Then the group will perform in Goiania, at the Federal University of Gois (UFG).  The recital there will mark the beginning of the academic semester of that institution. UFG and Marshall, Morehead State University, and Santa Catarina State University (UDESC, in Brazil) compose the Music Abroad Generating New Experiences for Talented Students (MAGNETS) student and faculty exchange project.

In addition to those performances, Lopes and Moraes will join Alves in his recital at the 5th Guitar Festival of BRAVIO (Guitar Society of Brasolia) July 28. The members of the group will also participate in ensemble exchange experiences with the Guitar Chamber Orchestra of the School of Music of Brasolia (Camerata de Violaes do CEP-EMB) and students of the University of Brasolia, and will attend workshops given by faculty of both schools on Aug. 2 and 5. 

For Alves, who has been directing the MU Guitar Ensemble since 2006, these experiences abroad represent the synthesis of the learning process the students went through at Marshall.

"There are several reasons for which this tour, supported by the Music Department and the College of Fine Arts, is to be celebrated," Alves said.  "It will give the opportunity for our students to develop their music skills even further by performing and working with the Brazilian faculty and students, and to make new connections that can lead to other opportunities in their professional careers. The communities of the two Brazilian cities will also be enriched with the presence of the MU Guitar Ensemble.  They will be able to hear our talented musicians perform music originally composed for guitar ensemble, as well as arranged for this instrumental formation, from several periods and styles."

Negreiros has recently joined the guitar faculty at the CEP-EMB. Lopes earned his M.A. in guitar performance last spring. Moraes, a prize winner in the 2010 guitar competition at BRAVIO, finished his Bachelor of Fine Arts in guitar performance last spring and will begin his M.A. at Marshall this fall. Pitaniello, a junior at Marshall, is one of the students from Marshall who studied in Brazil (at UDESC) last spring as part of the project. Silva, a guitar student from UFG, was a member of the MU Guitar Ensemble during the fall semester of 2010. Breslin also graduated summa cum laude from Marshall last spring.

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Photo: Marshall guitar professor Julio Alves (left) works with his student, Danilo Moraes. Both will be participating in the Marshall University Guitar Ensemble's trip to Brazil next month.


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Wednesday July 20, 2011
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Cline Family Foundation makes $5 million gift to Marshall University for sports medicine research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Cline Family Foundation has announced a gift of $5 million to Marshall University to establish an endowment to support new faculty and scientists in the university's planned sports medicine translational research center.

The Cline Family Foundation was established by Christopher Cline, a successful coal operator, entrepreneur and philanthropist. A native of southern West Virginia, Cline attended Marshall. He announced the gift Monday evening at a fundraising event he hosted at his home in Beckley.

"A true son of Marshall University, Chris Cline is committed to giving back to this state and to helping our university build a cutting-edge sports medicine research program that will serve the people of West Virginia and our region through discoveries, which advance our understanding of neuromusculoskeletal injuries - their prevention, recovery and intervention modalities to accelerate therapeutic outcomes," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "On behalf of the entire Marshall University family, I extend a heartfelt 'thank you' to the Cline Family Foundation for this generous donation to our beloved institution."

The donation has been matched through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, for a total benefit to Marshall of $10 million.

Translational sports medicine is an interdisciplinary area that blends basic science in tissue growth and repair, gene expression, and nanotechnology with biomechanics and physiology to address current challenges in sports medicine. The focus of Marshall's new translational sports medicine research program will be addressing those challenges across the continuum from the researcher to patient treatment.

The sports medicine translational research center will be located in the multipurpose indoor practice complex planned as part of a $30 million upgrade to Marshall's athletic facilities. The center will afford athletes the opportunity to participate in advancing state-of-the art care.

"This incredibly generous gift from the Cline Family Foundation will have a positive impact on our university's athletic program for years to come," said Marshall Director of Athletics Mike Hamrick. "The foundation's support for a sports medicine research initiative will greatly enhance the profile of our indoor practice facility and help make it possible for us to build a facility that is truly second to none. We are deeply grateful."

Chris Cline said, "I attended Marshall University, have been fortunate to have lived and employed people in West Virginia, and owe the state of West Virginia and its people for much of my success. I wanted to give something back that will be beneficial to the people of the state."

The son and grandson of West Virginia coal miners, Cline is the founder of Foresight Energy LLC. He has more than 35 years experience in the coal industry, beginning with his career as a contract miner in southern West Virginia. He has developed and operated coal mining, processing and transportation facilities in Illinois and Central Appalachia.

 

Marshall University Foundation Chief Executive Officer Ron Area said, "I salute the Cline Family Foundation. With this gift, they have made a significant commitment to Marshall University's future, to its students and to sports medicine research."

The state legislature created the West Virginia Research Trust Fund in 2008 with an initial appropriation of $50 million $15 million for Marshall and $35 million for West Virginia University. The universities can tap into the fund to double private gifts that support specific research initiatives linked to economic development, health care and job growth. To-date, Marshall has raised just over $8 million in gifts and pledges toward its $15 million goal.

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Photo: Mike D'Antoni, left, Christopher Cline, middle, and Chad Pennington pose for a photograph Monday during a fundraising event at Cline's home in Beckley. D'Antoni and Pennington are co-chairs of the Vision Campaign to raise $30 million to upgrade Marshall's athletic facilities. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

 
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Monday July 18, 2011
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Governor appoints two to Marshall University board of governors; new faculty, student representatives also to join board

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's board of governors will have four new members when it next meets on Tuesday, Aug. 9.

West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has appointed Phyllis Arnold and David Haden, both of Charleston, to the board. Marty Amerikaner, a psychology professor, will join the board as faculty representative, and Ray Harrell Jr., the new student government association president, will be the student representative on the board.

Leaving the board are Gary Adkins, Brent Marsteller, faculty representative Larry Stickler and student representative Edward Pride IV.

Arnold is regional president for BB&T Corp. and Haden is owner of i-Source, LLC, an insurance agency in Charleston. Their terms end June 30, 2015.

"I am honored and excited about becoming part of the Marshall University board of governors," Arnold said. "The experience of attending Marshall University to earn my MBA contributed greatly to my career and I view my years on the Marshall University Foundation Board and future service on the board of governors as opportunities to give back.

"Over the past six years Marshall has shown impressive growth in enrollment and curriculum development," she said. "President (Stephen) Kopp's leadership and working relationship with the board of governors has been pivotal to this success."

Haden is a longtime follower and supporter of Marshall University.

"I look forward to the challenge," he said. "I have a lot of years of practical knowledge of business and how Marshall is perceived in the community and the state."

He, too, has observed Marshall's improvements in recent years. He said the university has made  some "major strides," and cited as examples the new engineering program, the building of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center and the hiring of a strong leader in the athletic department in Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.

"We've made quantum leaps in the last four or five years," Haden said.

The four new board members will be sworn in at the Aug. 9 meeting, which will be conducted in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on the Huntington campus.

The other 12 board members are Letitia Neese Chafin of Williamson; Oshel Craigo of Winfield; Michael J. Farrell of Huntington; Verna K. Gibson, chair, of Sarasota, Fla.; John G. Hess, vice chair, of Barboursville; Ed Howard of Phoenix, Ariz.; Dale Lowther of Parkersburg; Joseph McDonie of Milton; H.F. Mooney Jr., of Charleston; Michael G. Sellards of Huntington; Joseph Touma, secretary, of Huntington; and Mike Dunn, classified staff representative.

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Friday July 15, 2011
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MU professor to present poster on effects of diet on breast cancer next month during Era of Hope Conference in Orlando

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Philippe T. Georgel, a professor of biological sciences and director of the Cell Differentiation and Development Center at Marshall University, will present a poster on the effects of diet on breast cancer at the Era of Hope 2011 Conference in Orlando, Fla.

The Era of Hope Conference provides a forum for scientists and clinicians from a variety of disciplines to join breast cancer survivors and advocates in learning about the advances made by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) awardees, to challenge paradigms and push boundaries, and to identify innovative, high-impact approaches for future research.

This year's conference is Tuesday, Aug. 2, through Friday, Aug. 5, at the Orlando World Center Marriott. The Era of Hope Conference is expected to attract more than 1,600 BCRP awardees, survivors and invited speakers. 

Georgel's abstract, done in collaboration with Dr. Elaine Hardman and titled Maternal Consumption of Omega 3 Fatty Acids to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk in Offspring, was chosen for the conference by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC).

The research project investigates the ability of a maternal diet rich in omega 3 fatty acids (found in fish oil and canola oil, for example) to reduce the incidence of breast cancer and to limit growth of malignant mammary tumors in the female offspring.

The mechanism involved appears to be linked to long-term changes in gene expression mediated by epigenetic events (regulatory events that do not involve DNA mutations).

"The DOD 'Era of Hope' selection committee picks projects they believe have a good chance to generate potential applications in the future in terms of prevention of breast cancer," Georgel said. "This type of study provides a window to the multiple long-term positive effects associated with a balanced diet, not only for the individuals but also for their offspring."

Georgel has been at Marshall since fall 2002.


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Friday July 15, 2011
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Marshall University Police Department warns of solicitation scam

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Police Department has received reports of an individual claiming to be a Marshall University student approaching Huntington residences to solicit money to help fund a student trip sponsored by the university's school of journalism and mass communications.

According to James E. Terry, Marshall's director of public safety, the individual is not believed to be a Marshall student, is not representing the university and no such trip is planned.

The individual is described as being a white male in his mid-20s, about 5-foot-10, 180-190 pounds and clean cut. He is driving a burgundy sedan.

Anyone approached by this person is asked to call their local law enforcement agency immediately.

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Thursday July 14, 2011
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Limited number of tickets still available for Saturday's Thunderfest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A limited number of tickets are still available for the 2011 ThunderFest Saturday, July 16 at Cincinnati's Great American Ballpark.

ThunderFest activities and festivities will take place before and during the Cincinnati Reds' 7:10 p.m. baseball game with the St. Louis Cardinals. More than 400 fans are attending ThunderFest and a near-sellout crowd is expected to fill the stadium.

Marshall University will be recognized on the field before the game and on the video screens during the game, and MU students will be singing Take Me Out to the Ballgame. Robert Wray, professor of choral music education at Marshall, will sing the National Anthem.

Former Marshall University baseball player and Major League Baseball all-star Jeff Montgomery will serve as special guest at ThunderFest. He will sign autographs beginning at 5:15 p.m. in the Marshall area of the Fan Zone at the ballpark. Assistant MU baseball Coach Joe Renner also will attend.

Other pre-game activities in the Marshall area of the Fan Zone include live music, games, Marshall prizes and more. Fans should enter the stadium near the Hall of Fame Museum and look for the inflatable Marco.

A limited number of tickets are still available by calling the Marshall Alumni Office at 304-696-3134. Those seats are located in sections 520 and 521 in the upper level behind home plate, and are priced at $18 apiece, according to Littlehales. A limited number of tickets also are available at www.reds.com/marshall.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 11, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Foundation Board of Directors announces six new members

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., Board of Directors has six new members, Chief Executive Officer Dr. Ron Area announced today.

The new members are James Farley of Cincinnati; Johnna Coats of Lexington, Ky.; Louis Weisberg of Charleston; John Ashford of Huntington; David Fox III of Huntington; and Gary Ambler of Ronceverte, W.Va.

Farley began his service in June while the other five, all serving three-year terms, began serving on July 1.

"We are pleased to welcome these six dedicated individuals to our Foundation board," Area said. "They all love Marshall University and they're all taking on major volunteer roles to assist the advancement area.  I am certain each one will play a major role in helping us fulfill our mission. I look forward to working with them and the entire board."

Board members with long-term service whose terms have expired include: William B. Andrews II of Huntington; Roger S. Dyer of Columbus, Ohio; R. Sterling Hall of Huntington; Ronald H. Hooser of Huntington; Marc A. Sprouse of Huntington; Charles E. Turner of Huntington; Arthur Weisberg of Huntington; and Earleen H. Agee of Huntington. All will become emeritus members.

Board officers are J. Patrick Jones, chair; Joseph M. Gillette, first vice chair; Lake Polan III, secretary; John K. Kinzer, treasurer; and Phyllis H. Arnold, immediate past chair.

The board has 36 members.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 8, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, , 304-696-6397

Marshall University partners with Toyota on student business project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four Marshall University students have completed an eight-week business  problem-solving partnership with Toyota Motor Manufacturing West Virginia, which allowed them to have an international business experience without leaving West Virginia.

 

Toyota and Marshall University representatives developed the program after an exploratory meeting last fall to discuss the university's relatively new International Business program and internship possibilities.  The academic program requires students to complete either a foreign study or a business experience that exposes them to global economic issues.

 

"Last October, Denise Hogsett and Debby Stoler with Career Services, myself, and two students visited Toyota in Putnam County and met with several executives," said Dr. Harlan Smith, head of the Division of Finance and Economics in the Lewis College of Business.  "Our talks culminated in the establishment of what Toyota calls a 'problem-solving partnership' with our students who then had an incredibly valuable learning experience."

 

"Career Services has had a long-standing relationship with Toyota and we are pleased this new business-education partnership has developed," said Stoler, assistant director of development and outreach with Career Services.  "Our visit to Putnam County last fall also connected Marshall University to several other international companies who are interested in possible student internships."

 

Toyota personnel trained the students using a Japanese business concept called Kaizen, which means "improvement" or "change for the better" and refers to the philosophy or practice that focuses on continuous improvement of processes in manufacturing, engineering and business management.  The team of students was required to be at the Buffalo plant two days a week for a minimum of 10 hours per week.

  

The four students who participated are Matthew Lawless, Klaudia Mucharzewska and Sarah Kay, all from the Lewis College of Business, and Michael "Chad" McClure from the College of Liberal Arts.

 

"The Toyota partnership was a great opportunity to get some hands-on experience in a business setting," McClure said.  "We were able to work closely with several members of the Toyota staff, learn from them and ultimately present our results to the senior management of the plant." 

 

Toyota General Manager Mike Lutz said his company welcomed the opportunity to build an educational bridge with Marshall University.

 

"This important educational opportunity helped prepare these students to be our next generation of leaders," Lutz said.  "This exercise was to teach them the concept of going back to basics, exposing real significant problems, and then making fundamental improvements, which is the foundation of the Toyota Production System."

 

For more information contact Smith at 304-696-3233 or Stoler at 304-696-6679 at Marshall University.  For Toyota information contact Sandy Maynard at 304-937-7403.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 8, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, , 304-746-1989

Advance only tickets available for Marshall University's 14th annual Paint the Capital City Green rally

CHARLESTON - Tickets are on sale for the 14th annual Paint the Capital City Green celebration coming to Charleston Thursday, Aug. 18.

Thundering Herd fans will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp as well as key members of this year's team as they talk about the future of Marshall University football. Fans will also enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. Festivities begin at 6 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7 p.m.

The event, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Advance only tickets must be purchased by close of business on Tuesday, Aug. 16. Advance tickets are $50 per person and will not be sold at the door. All tickets will be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win two tickets to an away game along with complimentary hotel accommodations.

Holliday said he is looking forward to Paint the Capital City Green.

"This event is a fantastic opportunity for me to bring some of my players down to Charleston for all the fanfare," Holliday said. "I hope our Kanawha Valley fans come out to meet members of the Marshall University Athletics family and see why everyone should be excited about our program. Our Capital City supporters truly bleed green!"

For ticket information, call The Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138, or contact them by e-mail at paintthecapital@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 7, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) kicks off Sunday; annual event attracts more than 100 students to MU campus

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 100 rising 9th- and 10th-grade students will have "Fun With Science" as they visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, July 10, through Friday, July 15, to participate in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

The students from throughout West Virginia will be joined by 11 HSTA teachers, five field site coordinators and Marshall faculty and staff in the summer institute, according to David Cartwright, director of the event.

HSTA is a highly successful academic and enrichment initiative designed to encourage high school students to enroll in college and pursue degrees in the health sciences.

"This statewide program chiefly aspires to enroll African American youth to offset the disparity of African Americans as professionals in related fields of study, while also targeting low-income and first-generation students," Cartwright said.

Marshall is presenting the institute in collaboration with West Virginia University. HSTA was started in 1994 by WVU with 45 students from two counties. It now averages around 800 students enrolled in the program each year from 26 counties throughout the state.

The emphasis at this year's summer institute at Marshall is on diabetes. The students will be tested to see if they are pre-diabetic. "The kids are going to learn about diabetes in all of its stages," Cartwright said.

They also will learn about how to maintain a healthy lifestyle, including correct eating habits. Activities planned for the week include bowling, roller skating, strength training, yoga and Zumba.

The annual kickoff dinner for the "Fun With Science" summer institute at Marshall is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 10, in Room BE 5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Ann Chester, director of the HSTA program in West Virginia, will be among those delivering remarks.

For more information on the 2011 HSTA Summer Institute, contact Helen Bonham at 304-696-4672.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 7, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall University's Literacy Education students working to make stronger readers this summer

SOUTH CHARLESTON - Area youngsters are learning to become stronger readers with help from some Marshall University graduate students.

Literacy Education students in the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development are spending several weeks this summer in an advanced practicum teaching children interested in reading achievement. The month-long program is housed in the Dunbar Intermediate School and will be in full swing through July 21. Dr. Terrence V. Stange, a professor in the Literacy Education Department, is overseeing the course.

"The Summer Reading Program is a great opportunity for our graduate school candidates to gain experiences that will benefit children in our communities," he said. "We are grateful to the many parents who involve their children in Marshall's efforts to offer effective learning environments."

This particular practicum is a required course for Master of Arts Degree candidates in Reading Education and for those pursuing a Reading Specialist Endorsement, West Virginia Teaching Certificate.  The summer session is currently full, but each spring Marshall University faculty members contact schools to establish sites and interest in a summer reading program. Students are invited by their classroom teachers to participate and their parents are contacted for permission.

Stange said Marshall students spend two one-hour sessions each day, Monday through Thursday, with children of varied age and grade levels studying the children's interests, attitudes, oral language, written language, spelling stages, word recognition, reading fluency, reading/listening comprehension levels and reading instructional levels. He said the practicum is specifically designed to better prepare graduate students to use assessments, plan strategies and implement 15 to 20 sessions of one-to-one instruction to benefit children's literacy knowledge.

Marshall students create lessons appropriate for each child's grade level and needs. They also reflect on their sessions and record details about what worked for each reading lesson, what could be improved, their accomplishments and goals. This summer, there are 14 children participating, ages 5-13, grade levels Pre-kindergarten through seventh grade.

"A key to the children's reading success this summer is selecting books at the right level," Stange explained. "Particular time and attention are devoted to choosing the perfect books for each child to help create a positive, supportive environment that not only engages and motivates the children to read, but improves their literacy development." 

Stange believes his graduate students benefit every bit as much as the children in the program.

"We've read research literature that suggests the more children read, the better they become and the better they become, the more they read.

"This practicum is one of my favorite courses because reading is a very complex process, and our program offers our candidates a forum to work with children to encourage learning, develop literacy skills, and promote enjoyment of reading. I hope all of our young students want to read more after they participate in our program this summer."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 7, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University enables Internet2 access for West Virginia schools and other institutions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va., and ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Students and researchers across West Virginia can now have access to advanced online resources through Internet2, a national networking consortium that provides high-speed bandwidth to the research and education community across the country.  Marshall University officials today announced the university, in cooperation with the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, has successfully sponsored the statewide West Virginia educational system under the aegis of The West Virginia Internet2 Consortium as the newest Internet2 Sponsored Education Group Participant (SEGP). This announcement makes West Virginia the 40th state to offer SEGP connections.

According to Dr. Jan I. Fox, senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer at Marshall, the SEGP sponsorship allows Marshall to share its existing connection to Internet2's nationwide advanced research and education network with the state's undergraduate higher education institutions, community and technical colleges, K-12 community, state and local governments, healthcare facilities, libraries and museums, and other partners.

Fox said those entities are typically not eligible or able to become Internet2 members themselves due to the size of their institution or the costs associated with individual access, but will now be able to use the network to expand global and local collaborations, from participating in "live" ocean voyages with famed oceanographer Bob Ballard through his JASON project to telemedicine and other advanced virtual health care applications.

"In rural states like West Virginia, Internet2 is the leveling agent that allows us to compete and collaborate globally while still remaining in our beautiful state," she added.

The project was funded by a National Science Foundation grant (NSF) to West Virginia's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) for a comprehensive initiative to enhance cyberinfrastructure across the state's higher education system. Last year, Marshall received $525,874 from the grant to enable inter-campus Internet2 Network access.

Internet2 is an advanced networking consortium led by the research and education community which currently connects nearly 70,000 research and educational institutions nationwide and interconnects 80 international research networks. Internet2 provides access to significant emerging technologies and advanced applications not available within the limitations of traditional networks while convening a community of thought leaders, users and innovators who collaborate to advance the frontiers of high-performance research and education networking. In early 2011, Internet2 extended its reach by establishing The United States Unified Community Anchor Network (U.S. UCAN) project dedicated to enabling Internet2 Network access for more schools, public libraries, public safety, health care organizations, and other community anchor institutions.  In support of the FCC National Broadband Plan, U.S. UCAN is envisioned to enable broadband access to 200,000+ community anchor institutions to serve their communities with next-generation advanced network applications.

"We extend a warm welcome to The West Virginia Internet2 Consortium in becoming the 40th Internet2 SEGP and applaud Marshall University for its sponsorship of the many West Virginia educational institutions now enabled for connection to Internet2. There is no clearer example of Higher Education technology innovation tangibly benefitting its surrounding community. It's our hope that the state education system will very rapidly begin to experience the benefits Internet2 Network access and community involvement provides in driving next-generation educational delivery," said Rob Vietzke, Internet2 executive director of Network Services.

An advisory group for The West Virginia Internet2 Consortium will oversee implementation of the West Virginia SEGP project. In addition to Fox, advisory group members include Dr. Jorea Marple, superintendent, West Virginia Department of Education; Dr. Paul Hill, vice chancellor for science and research, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission/Council for Community and Technical College Education; Kay Goodwin, cabinet secretary, West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts; Keith Burdette, cabinet secretary, West Virginia Division of Commerce; Dan O'Hanlon, director, West Virginia Network for Educational Telecomputing (WVNET); Kyle Schafer, chief technology officer, West Virginia Office of Technology; and Lawrence Malone, project coordinator, West Virginia Telehealth Alliance.

Fox also acknowledged Marshall staff members who spearheaded the initiative, including Dr. Arnold R. Miller, assistant vice president for information technology; Allen Taylor, chief technology officer; and Michael Adkins, director of information technology infrastructure.

The West Virginia SEGP's physical connection to Internet2 will be made through a partnership with the Ohio Academic Resources Network (OARnet), Ohio's statewide research and education network.

The NSF grant for the project was funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. West Virginia EPSCoR is directed by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/segp or contact Fox at 304-696-6706 or fox@marshall.edu.

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About Marshall University

Marshall University is the oldest public higher education institution in West Virginia and one of the region's most dynamic universities, serving students from 47 states and more than 60 countries. Marshall offers undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs and competes in Division I intercollegiate sports in Conference USA. Located in the college town of Huntington, W.Va., Marshall is known for its safe and beautiful campus, dedicated professors, small class size, successful graduates and great value. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu. We Are...Marshall.

 

About Internet2

Internet2 is an advanced networking consortium led by the research and education community. An exceptional partnership spanning U.S. and international institutions who are leaders in the worlds of research, academia, industry and government, Internet2 is developing breakthrough cyberinfrastructure technologies that support the most exacting applications of today - and spark the most essential innovations of tomorrow. Led by its members and focused on their current and future networking needs since 1996, Internet2 blends its human, IP and optical networks to develop and deploy revolutionary Internet technologies. Activating the same partnerships that produced today's Internet, the Internet2 community is forging the Internet of the future. For more information, see www.internet2.edu.

 

About OARnet

The Ohio Academic Resources Network (OARnet) provides technology solutions for Ohio's education, public broadcasting, health care and government communities. Established in 1987 by the Ohio Board of Regents, OARnet identifies and deploys shared services that reduce costs, deliver quality programs, increase productivity and improve customer service. Our communities voluntarily participate in the OARnet consortium because they value these benefits and services. Ultimately, OARnet promotes community and economic development by expanding access to affordable technology. For more information, visit www.oar.net.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 6, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University science educator wins research award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Derrick Kolling, a chemistry professor at Marshall University, has been awarded a $35,000 Cottrell College Science Award to continue his research on photosynthetic oxygen evolution.  The grant funding is part of the spring 2011 awards given by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA), which seeks to support early career scientists at primarily undergraduate institutions.

 

"I'm very pleased to receive this award. It means that our lab will be able to continue research on the catalyst responsible for photosynthetic oxygen evolution," Kolling said. "A better understanding of this catalyst will allow researchers to design abiotic systems that may be used to generate hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight." 

 

Kolling, who has been at Marshall since 2009, said the funds will allow five additional undergraduate students to participate in summer research over the next two years. 

   

"RCSA is one of the premier agencies that support the research of starting faculty," said Dr. Michael Castellani, chair of the Department of Chemistry.  "Derrick's work is incredibly exciting and engages large numbers of our undergraduate students.  He's been a great addition to our department."

 

The Cottrell Awards are given for research in the physical sciences or for research in closely related fields.   According to a news release from RCSA , eligible faculty must be within the first three years of a tenure-track appointment and within 12 years of receiving a doctoral degree.

 

"Since 1988, five new faculty members in the Department of Chemistry have received RCSA awards, and four of those awards have come in the last six years," said Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of the College of Science.  "This shows that the Chemistry department is having great success in bringing top-tier chemists to the College of Science."

 

The Cottrell Awards, totaling $1.8 million, were given to 48 young scientists this spring.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 5, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall still accepting $100 enrollment deposits for newly admitted students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is still accepting required tuition deposits of $100 for all newly admitted students planning to attend classes this fall.

Requiring the enrollment deposit is a new process at Marshall, according to Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment.

"It really gives us a better sense of how many students we are expecting in the fall," Wolfe said. "It is a common process. Most institutions have some form of enrollment deposit."

Wolfe stressed that the $100 is a deposit and not a fee. The $100 goes directly toward the tuition students owe. New students must pay the deposit before they can register for orientation or sign up for housing. Remaining orientation sessions are scheduled July 19-22 and Aug. 4-5.

"It is required," Wolfe said. "They can't move forward until they pay the deposit."

Students may pay by phone by calling the bursar's office at 800-438-5389; mailing a check to the bursar's office at Marshall University, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV, 25755; or online at http://www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition-payment/payment-options/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 30, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Nerhood named interim dean of Marshall's medical school


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert C. Nerhood has accepted the position of interim dean for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

 

Nerhood, who retired in 2010, is an emeritus faculty member who formerly served as the school's senior associate dean for clinical affairs and chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 

He succeeds Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., who was dean for more than 22 years. McKown will continue to serve the university as vice president for health sciences advancement.

 

"Both of these leaders bring tremendous experience and knowledge to their new roles," Kopp said. "I have great confidence in the talented administrative team that will be led by Dr. Nerhood and charged with advancing the priorities and mission of the School of Medicine. I also look forward to working closely with Dr. McKown to accelerate the university's overall priorities in development and community relations."

 

Nerhood said, "I am very pleased and honored to have been asked to participate in this exciting and important transition at the School of Medicine. Dr. McKown has been a very able and dedicated leader, and the school owes its existence to his efforts. We owe to him a great debt of gratitude, and I feel certain the faculty and staff are prepared to successfully deal with the challenges inherent in this transition as our school continues to move forward."

 

Nerhood previously served as chairman of the West Virginia Section of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and his other roles in that organization included serving on its Advisory Council, as chair of the Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Committee, and as chair of the ACOG District IV Perinatal Committee.

 

He is a former chair of the West Virginia Perinatal Task Force, and also was president of the Cabell County Medical Society, chairman of the Board of Directors for Cabell Huntington Hospital, and vice president of the Board of Directors for University Physicians & Surgeons Inc.

 

Before becoming chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Marshall, Nerhood was chairman of ob/gyn at Berkshire Medical Center and clerkship coordinator for the Berkshire Medical Center/University of Massachusetts School of Medicine.

 

He is a graduate of the West Virginia University School of Medicine, with internship and residency training at Harrisburg Polyclinic Hospital and WVU.

 

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Photos: (Above) Dr. Robert Nerhood; (Below) Dr. Charles McKown.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 29, 2011
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, , 304-691-8961

Second annual Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference to be hosted by Marshall Forensic Science Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Center will host the second annual Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference (AIDE) July 11-15  to provide training in digital forensics and evidence recovery, electronic discoveryand information security.

The conference will offer a wide array of training for professionals and students in the fields of law, digital forensics, law enforcement and information security. The conference runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, July 11, through Wednesday, July 13; from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, July 14, and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, July 15.

 

John Sammons, an assistant professor in Marshall's Integrated Science and Technology Department, is the director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence. "Anyone who works with digital evidence, whether they are a lawyer, a police officer, or an information security professional, must keep pace with technology," he said. "The risks today are simply too high to do otherwise. The AIDE provides the type of cutting edge training that these folks need to protect our communities and companies as well as serve their clients."

Sammons said the conference offers a wide array of great speakers from the FBI, Purdue University, AccessData, several law firms, the West Virginia Prosecuting Attorneys Institute, the West Virginia State Police, Digital Intelligence and many more. "This is an outstanding opportunity for professionals and students alike," he added.

Continuing education credits are available for law enforcement, attorneys and information security professionals. First responder certification will be offered on digital evidence.

Registration fees are free for current AIDE members, $50 for nonmember professionals, and $20 for students, and are due the first day of attendance. Pre-registration is required for lunch, which will cost $10 per day. Payment for lunch is due on the days of attendance.

On July 12 and 13, Access Data will conduct training on Summation, a software solution used to manage, organize and analyze every aspect of the litigation process.  AccessData is a leading provider of e-discovery, computer forensics and cyber security software for law firms, corporations and government agencies. The Summation training is being offered separately from the AIDE conference. The following two courses will be offered at a fee of $500 for each course: "Loading Case Data into Summation" on Tuesday, July 12, and "Summation Case Management, Advanced Topics" on Wednesday, July 13.

To register for the conference or to learn more, please visit the AIDE website at http://aide.marshall.edu/Events/2011/2ndAIDEConfer.htm.

Sponsors for the event include Jackson Kelly PLLC Attorneys at Law; Access Data; Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC Attorneys at Law; InfoSec Daily Podcast; Digital Intelligence; Marshall University Forensic Science Center; Marshall University Department of Integrated Science and Technology, and Marshall University Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 29, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Undergraduate students participate in summer research opportunities at Marshall University

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fifteen undergraduate students from nine institutions are spending their summer doing biomedical research in Marshall University's laboratories.

 

The students are participating in two nine-week programs - one sponsored by the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE) and the other by the university's Biomedical Sciences Summer Research Internship for Minority Students (SRIMS) program.

 

Dr. Elsa Mangiarua, a professor in the cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes research cluster at Marshall, is the director of the WV-INBRE Summer Research Program. She said both programs allow participants to gain valuable, hands-on experience doing graduate-level research in the labs of some of Marshall's top scientists.

 

"We are providing in-depth, mentored research opportunities for very talented undergraduates," she said. "The programs also promote awareness of graduate degree programs and careers in biomedical research."

 

Diana Maue, who coordinates the SRIMS program, added, "This is a chance for these students to do meaningful scientific research, share their findings, network and build academic competitiveness for graduate school."

 

While at Marshall, the interns are working in state-of-the-art facilities on research projects related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes, toxicology and environmental health, and infectious diseases. The students will present their research results at a symposium held during the last week of the program.

 

In addition to the formal research training they each receive from their Marshall faculty mentors, the interns are taking part in workshops and seminars about a variety of topics related to research and graduate education. Students in 

The students participating in the WV-INBRE Summer Research Program include (with their hometowns indicated in parentheses) (Huntington) from Alderson-Broaddus College;  Daniel Mai (Seal Beach, Calif.) and Sarah Monsheimer (Silver Spring, Md.) from University of Charleston; Benjamin Kordusky (Sod), Emma Levin-Nielsen (Vienna) and Richard Phil Thomas (Elizabeth) from West Virginia Wesleyan College; Hannah Cavender (Charleston), Josh Kim (South Charleston) and Niraj Nepal (Dunbar) from West Virginia State University; and Andre Lamyaithong (Man) from Wheeling Jesuit University.

 

The students participating in the SRIMS program are Kelsey Cowen (New Hudson, Mich.) from Cedarville University; Rebecca Furby (Charles Town) from Shepherd University; Amber Mills (Carbondale, Ill.) from Murray State University; and Marie Southerland (Ravenna, Ohio) from Ashland University.

 

The WV-INBRE Summer Research Program is funded through a $16 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Marshall - in partnership with researchers at West Virginia University - received the award to help build expertise in biomedical research.

 

Support for the SRIMS program comes from the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology/ Minority Access to Research Careers program.

 

Each student receives a stipend. Depending on the program in which they are participating, they may also receive room and board, lab fees, and reimbursement for travel to and from Marshall.

           

For more information about the WV-INBRE Summer Research Program, visit http://www.wv-inbre.org or contact Mangiarua at mangiaru@marshall.edu or 304-696-6211. For more information about the SRIMS program, visit http://bms.marshall.edu/srims or contact Maue at maue1@marshall.edu or 304-696-3365.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 28, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nearly 200 attend President Kopp's State of the University address in D.C.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 200 Marshall University supporters, including members of West Virginia's congressional delegation, joined Marshall's president, athletic director and football and basketball coaches at the nation's capital Tuesday, June 21, to celebrate the university's recent growth and expansion projects now under way.

 

The crowd, which included many Big Green members, gathered during Marshall's annual State of the University address and reception at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.  The Newseum is an interactive museum of news located at 555 Pennsylvania Ave.

 

West Virginia's congressional delegation includes Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, Senator Joe Manchin, Representative Nick Joe Rahall II, Representative Shelley Moore Capito and Representative David McKinley. Kopp met earlier in the day with all members of the delegation to discuss the university's priorities and concerns on the federal level.

 

Kopp, who has been at Marshall for six years, spoke of the importance of setting high expectations, of the importance of higher education and the attributes of college graduates. He updated the audience on the university's progress on many fronts, including planned new facilities such as the Biotechnology Incubator and Applied Engineering Complex, the Fine Arts Incubator and the soccer complex; record enrollment; new programs of excellence, and campus improvements, such as the modernizing of all classrooms.

 

Manchin and Rahall each spoke at the event. Marshall coaches Doc Holliday and Tom Herrion, and Athletic Director Mike Hamrick, spoke about the university's commitment to excellence in athletics, with an emphasis on academic achievement and stringent team standards. Ten of MU's 14 sports teams had a grade point average of 3.0 or better for the spring term.

 

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Photo: Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp delivers the State of the University addresss at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. June 21.

 

View a gallery of more photos of the event.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 27, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University and spinouts to be showcased at BIO International Convention

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University biotechnology research and three of the university's high-tech spinout companies will be showcased as part of this week's BIO International Convention in Washington, D.C.

The largest annual global event for the biotechnology industry, the BIO International Convention attracts an audience of more than 15,000 biotech business leaders, scientists, executives and investors from around the world.

According to Jennifer Kmiec, associate vice president for economic development for the Marshall University Research Corporation, the Bioscience Association of West Virginia (BioWV) - along with the Biotech Alliance of the Huntington Area Development Council (HADCO) and the West Virginia Development Office - is hosting a West Virginia Pavilion at the convention.

"The West Virginia Pavilion is intended to highlight key participants in the state's life sciences community," she said. "There is a great deal of very exciting biotechnology work happening in labs here at Marshall and we are pleased to have this opportunity to share it with colleagues from the rest of the country and around the world."

Kmiec, who is also vice-chair of BioWV, said the Marshall-related companies to be featured at the pavilion include Vandalia Research, Progenesis Technologies and Cordgenics. All three businesses were founded based on technologies developed at Marshall and are headquartered in the state.

South Charleston-based biotechnology company TRAX BioDiscovery, as well as West Virginia University and its spinout Protea Biosciences, also will be represented at the convention.

Kmiec said the Discover the Real West Virginia Foundation (DRWVF) is sponsoring a reception Tuesday afternoon at the pavilion to promote opportunities for investment and expansion in West Virginia. Guest speakers will include U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.).

During the reception, Rockefeller will invite biotech executives to visit West Virginia this fall as part of a DRWVF-sponsored biotech trade/investment mission.  

Kmiec added, "In addition to featuring the biotech research being done in West Virginia, the pavilion and the reception will show the world what a great place our state is to live and work. We hope to use the events to help attract new entrepreneurs, inventors, researchers, investors and high-tech businesses to West Virginia."

BIO International Convention attendees include a mix of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, plant and life science, medical diagnostic, instrumentation and technology companies of all sizes, including the top 10 pharmaceutical companies in the world. Also represented are economic development organizations and businesses that support the industry, including law firms, service providers, investors, and suppliers of laboratory equipment and products. Representatives from more than 200 universities and academic communities also attend for networking, educational sessions and collaboration opportunities. There is a strong international attendance, with participants from approximately 60 countries.

For more information, visit www.biowv.org or contact Kmiec at kmiecj@marshall.edu or 304-840-3374.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 24, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communciations Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall student from Milton recognized on Capitol Hill for research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University senior Emily Beckelhimer of Milton was recognized this spring for her biomedical research at the annual Posters on the Hill event in Washington, D.C. 

Beckelhimer, whose faculty advisor is Dr. Menashi Cohenford, exhibited a poster on the Analysis of Tissue Sections from Normal and Malignant Mouse Colorectal Tissues which examined an approach to early detection of cancer cells through a process called Fourier Transform-Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy. Her research was one of 74 projects chosen from more than 700 applications.

 

The Council on Undergraduate Research sponsored the April event, which spotlights undergraduate research in an effort to encourage more students to pursue research opportunities.  


"A great thing about Posters on the Hill was the diversity of the students' presentations.  I had the opportunity to meet people who were interested in many different facets of my research," said Beckelhimer.  "As a presenter and a researcher, that helps me by exposing me to new ways of thinking about every part of my project.  It was a very encouraging atmosphere."

 

"When Emily first joined my lab, she had minimal exposure to research. Her hard work, determination and interest to learn new concepts and techniques are what allowed her to gain the recognition she deserves," Cohenford said.

 

Beckelhimer is a microbiology major at Marshall. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 22, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

11th annual engineering academy begins Sunday at Marshall University

Thirty-five high school students from six states will participate

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-five students representing six states and 24 high schools will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, June 26, through Thursday, June 30, to take part in the 11th annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE).

 

The Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence is a week-long, hands-on camp during which high school students have the chance to experience campus life while learning more about the engineering profession. Participants are instructed by professors from Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering, and are housed in the Marshall Commons residence halls.

 

Dr. William Pierson, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science at Marshall, said the theme of the academy's activities is teamwork.

 

"The theme is the importance of teamwork in planning and in working together to achieve a common goal," Pierson said. "In addition, the academy is a good way to make students aware of the importance of engineering and computer science and what exciting opportunities these professions have to offer."

 

Students are selected for the camp based upon their interest in and aptitude for engineering. Grades, courses taken and letters of recommendation are taken into consideration. The camp is designed to attract rising high school juniors.

 

Jerry Casto, an engineer from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will give a presentation during the opening ceremony, which begins at 3 p.m. Sunday in Corbly Hall Room 105. Casto will speak about infrastructure maintained by the corps and the potential impact on the regional economy when problems occur such as a recent failure of the Greenup Locks and Dam. He also will talk about his recent engineering experiences in Afghanistan.

 

The academy is made possible by grants from Chesapeake Energy and the Rahall Transportation Institute, as well as support from Marshall University and local businesses and agencies such as J.H. Fletcher, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, State Electric Supply Company and the Society of American Military Engineers.

 

The 2011 camp participants include:

 

Bruce Swiney of St. Albans, W.Va.; Austin Hammond of Tornado, W.Va.; Brendan Mullins of Charleston, W.Va.; David Holstine of Charleston, W.Va.; Lee Klocke of Cross Lanes, W.Va.; Ann Larsen of Charleston, W.Va.; Brittney Lowers of Charleston, W.Va.

 

Peyton Smith of Falling Waters, W.Va.; Cody Legge of Culloden, W.Va.; Vivian Yau of Hurricane, W.Va.; Patrick Thomas of Hurricane, W.Va.; Jacob Houdyschell of Kenova, W.Va.; Jacob Parsons of Milton, W.Va.; Chase Nicholson of Point Pleasant, W.Va.

 

Jessica Hensely of Wayne, W.Va.; Luke Browning of Huntington; Michael DeRosa of Huntington; Jacob Maynard of Huntington; Kevin Dillon of Huntington; Anthony Reynolds of Huntington; Jesse Gorecki of Huntington

 

Max Pinion of Morgantown, W.Va.; Brenton Wyne of Fairmont, W.Va.; Jenna Hamlin of Peachtree City, Ga.; Madeline Glasheen of Plantation, Fla.; Shawn Effingham of LaGrange, Ky.; Taylor Toberg of Catlettsburg, Ky.; Charles Sexton of Grayson, Ky.

 

Ryann Conley of Grayson, Ky.; Allyson Brewer of Martin, Ky.; Elizabeth Walker of Parma, Ohio; Austin Conn of Cincinnati, Ohio; Damian Hughes of Kettering, Ohio; Stephanie Lee of Los Altos, Calif.; Van Lara of Mendocino, Calif.

 

Here is the complete schedule of events for the 2011 academy:

 

Sunday, June 26

2 to 3 p.m., check-in at Wellman Hall, Marshall Commons

3 to 5 p.m., welcome and presentation by Jerry Casto, United States Army Corps of Engineers:  Greenup Gate Failure, Ohio River Infrastructure and Afghanistan Experiences, CH105.

5 to 6:30 p.m., dinner at Fat Patty's

6:30 to 9 p.m., icebreaker and team-building activities at the Marshall Recreation Center

 

Monday, June 27

8 to 9:45 a.m., civil engineering activities briefing at the Weisberg Engineering Lab

classroom

9:45 to 11:30 a.m., introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing and environmental sampling at Buskirk Field and the Weisberg Engineering Lab

11:30 a.m. to noon, lunch in the Harless Dining Hall

12:30 to 4:30 p.m., introduction to civil and environmental engineering: surveying, GPS, materials testing and environmental sampling at Buskirk Field and the Weisberg Engineering Lab

4:30 to 6 p.m., recreation time

6 to 7 p.m., dinner at the Hall of Fame Caf

7 to 8:30 p.m., activity - replicator at the Weisberg Engineering Lab

 

Tuesday, June 28

8 to 9 a.m., introduction to trebuchet design at the Weisberg Engineering Lab, Room 101

9 a.m. to noon, trebuchet design and construction at Buskirk Field

Noon to 1 p.m., luncheon with Society of American Military Engineers

members  at the Harless Dining Hall, Ed Grose Room

1 to 2 p.m., complete trebuchet construction

2 to 3 p.m., trebuchet competition

3 to 5 p.m., activity - roller coaster, Weisberg Engineering Lab

5 to 6:30 p.m., dinner -- pizza! pizza! (and, introduction to ITS, Weisberg Engineering Lab)

6:30 to 8 p.m., recreation time

 

Wednesday, June 29

8 to 9 a.m., introduction to computer science - GH206A

9 to 11:30 a.m., exploring encryption - GH206A

11:30 to 12:30 p.m., lunch, Harless Dining Hall

12:30 to 3:30 p.m., Finch Robotics Challenge - GH206A

3:30 to 4:30 p.m., visualization presentation - Visualization Lab, Weisberg Engineering Lab

4:30 to 6 p.m., recreation time

6 to 7 p.m., dinner, Fat Patty's

7 to 8:30 p.m., concrete testing, Weisberg Engineering Lab

 

Thursday, June 30

8 a.m. to 6 p.m., field trips

8 to 9:30 a.m., travel to Toyota Plant in Buffalo, W.Va.

9:30 to 11:30 a.m., tour Toyota

11:30 am to 12:30 p.m., lunch at Golden Corral in Cross Lanes

12:30 to 1:45 p.m., travel to West Virginia Exhibition Coal Mine

2 to 4 p.m., tour Exhibition Mine

4 to 4:30 p.m., travel to New River Gorge Bridge overlook

4:30 to 5:30 p.m., tour NRGB Visitor Center

5:30 to 6:30 p.m., travel to Waves of Fun

6:30 to 9 p.m., dinner and pool party, Waves of Fun

9 to 9:30 p.m., return to Marshall

 

Friday, July 1

9 to 10 a.m., check out of residence halls

10 to 10:30 a.m., EEAE evaluation and wrap-up, MSC, Room BE5

10:30 to 11:30 a.m., awards presentation, MSC, Room BE5

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 21, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University sponsoring regional forum on geohazards and transportation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Engineers, geologists and transportation planners from across the region will gather in Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 2-4 for the Appalachian States Coalition for Geohazards in Transportation's 11th annual technical forum, "Geohazards Impacting Transportation in the Appalachian Region."

 

Coordinated by Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) and sponsored in conjunction with the university's Nick J. Rahall II Appalachian Transportation Institute, the forum will be hosted this year by the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

 

According to CEGAS Director Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the coalition and head of the planning committee for this year's forum, members of the coalition meet annually to share information about research developments and projects related to rock falls and landslides along highways, seismic activity, and flooding and subsidence impacting transportation infrastructure in the region. Coalition members represent the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Corporation, the Federal Highway Administration, and the departments of transportation and state geological surveys in Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.

 

"It is an exciting prospect to work with federal, state and private entities to share best practices on the prevention and remediation of geological problems that affect transportation throughout the Appalachian region," Szwilski said. "We encourage anyone with an interest in this topic to join us for what promises to be an excellent program."

 

He added that this year's event will include a pre-conference field trip to the U.S. Route 64 area through the Ocoee River Gorge. The area, which is used for transportation, forestry, conservation, recreation and power generation, was the site of three rock slides in 2009-10, one of which closed the highway for five months. The field trip will feature discussions and visits to areas of interest to geologists, geotechnical engineers, environmental scientists, planners and others interested in the geohazards and constraints of development of the area designated as the nation's first U.S. Forest Service Scenic Byway.

 

The early registration deadline for the forum is Friday, July 8. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas or contact Szwilski at szwilski@marshall.edu or 304-696-5457.

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 17, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL student broadcasters collect school-record 131 awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2010-2011 academic year was the best in school history for WMUL-FM student broadcasters, at least in terms of award-winning entries in contests with other state and national broadcasters.

Marshall University's public radio station finished the year with a school-record 131 awards, including 21 in the last contest of the year - the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2010 broadcast journalism awards, which were announced Saturday, June 11, at the Fifth Quarter Restaurant in Charleston.

"This remarkable effort helps to bring to a crescendo this record-shattering year by the volunteer student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications from state, regional and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the William Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

WMUL received 12 first-place awards and nine honorable mentions in the WVAP Broadcasters Association's awards.  The Radio Broadcast Journalist of the Year award, Best Reporter award, Best Sportscaster award, and Best Host award were all achieved by Adam Cavalier, a master's graduate from Montgomery, for 2010.

Since 1985, WMUL student broadcasters have won 1,136 awards, according to Bailey.

The 12 first-place award-winning entries in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2010 broadcast journalism awards were:

RADIO BROADCAST JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

Adam Cavalier

BEST REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, April 9, 2010. Participants were Robert Iddings, a recent graduate from St. Albans, producer; Leannda Carey, a senior from Wellsburg, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; and Dave Traube, a graduate student from Beckley, sports anchor.

BEST BREAKING NEWS COVERAGE

"SGA Election Complaints" by Leannda Carey, broadcast and available online during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, April 9, 2010. 

BEST INTERVIEW

"The Sowards-Roudebush Report." Hosts Matt Sowards, a graduate from Salt Rock, Jay Roudebush, a graduate student from Charleston, and host/engineer Deven Swartz, a graduate from Philippi, interviewed former U.S. Army Sargent Pepe Johnson about "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" on their political debate styled talk program.  The program was broadcast Tuesday, April 6, 2010.

BEST PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAM

"Cold War Media," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during  "Campus Concern" Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010. 

BEST TALK SHOW

"Campus Concern." Host Adam Cavalier interviewed Marshall President Stephen Kopp about his recent "State of the University Address" on this campus public affairs talk program.  The program was broadcast Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010.

BEST REPORTER

"A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" throughout 2010.

BEST ANCHOR OR ANCHOR TEAM

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" with news anchor Leannda Carey, broadcast Friday, April 9, 2010.

OUTSTANDING SPORTS OPERATION

The FM 88 sports team. Sports director for the 2010 spring and fall semesters was Robert Iddings.

 

BEST SPORTSCASTER

"A Compilation of Work" written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2010.

 

BEST SPORTS PLAY-BY-PLAY

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the Ohio State University football game played at the Horseshoe in Columbus, Ohio, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.  The students participating in the broadcast were Robert Iddings, play-by-play: Adam Cavalier, color;  Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, engineer.

BEST HOST

"A Compilation of Work" written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast for the Newscenter 88 team and the FM 88 sports staff throughout 2010.

 

The nine honorable mention award-winning entries were:

OUTSTANDING NEWS OPERATION

The Newscenter 88 team. News director for the spring and fall semesters was Leannda Carey.

BEST REGULARLY SCHEDULED NEWSCAST

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, Oct. 15, 2010.  The students who participated in the newscast were: Robert Iddings, producer; Adam Cavalier, news anchor; Leannda Carey, news anchor; and Aaron Payne, sports anchor.

BEST BREAKING NEWS COVERAGE

"Manchin - Raese Gubernatorial Poll," written and produced by Adam Cavalier and Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," and available online Friday, Oct. 15, 2010.

BEST TALK SHOW

"The Sowards-Roudebush Report." Hosts Matt Sowards, Jay Roudebush and host/engineer Deven Swartz  interviewed former U.S. Army Sargent Pepe Johnson about "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" on their political debate styled talk program.  The program was broadcast Tuesday, April 6, 2010.

BEST REGULARLY SCHEDULED SPORTSCAST

"FM 88 Sports Report" written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, April 22, 2010.

BEST SPORTS SPECIAL

"The Opening Kickoff:  The 2010 Marshall Football Season Preview" was written and produced by the program's hosts Aaron Payne and Adam Rogers, a sophomore from Charleston.    Reporters for the program were Adam Cavalier, Robert Iddings and James Roach, a senior from Richwood.   The preview was broadcast and made available online during the WMUL-FM pregame before the Marshall 2010 season opener at Ohio State, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.

BEST SPORTS TALK SHOW

"Sportsview with Herd Head Basketball Coach Tom Herrion," broadcast Wednesday, April 28, 2010.  The host of the program was Robert Iddings and the producer was Adam Rogers.

BEST SPORTSCASTER

"A Compilation of Work" written and reported by Robert Iddings, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2010.

 

BEST WEBSITE

WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2010 web master for WMUL-FM Online is Tyler Kes, a sophomore from Burnsville, Minnesota.

 

Communicator Awards

 Students from WMUL-FM received five Awards of Excellence and four Awards of Distinction in the 17th annual Communicator Awards 2011 Audio Competition. The winners were named on June 1.

The Communicator Awards come from the International Academy of Visual Arts, which recognizes outstanding work in the communications field.  Entries are judged by industry professionals who seek out companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry.  The 2011 contest had more than 6,000 entries.

The Award of Excellence winning entries by WMUL-FM are in the following categories:

On-Air Talent/Humor

"Sexy Voices," a comedy radio program written, produced and hosted by Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, and Morgan Shillingburg, a senior from Charleston, broadcast Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2010.

On-Air Talent/Humor

"Peer Pressure Awareness," a parody public service announcement written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg and Aaron Payne, broadcast during their radio comedy program "Sexy Voices" Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010.

Promo, PSA, Commercial

"26.5," a public service announcement written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, placed in WMUL-FM's  Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, to the present.

Promo, PSA, Commercial

"The Recipe for Better Radio," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Friday, Sept. 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a recent master's graduate from Montgomery.

Promo, PSA, Commercial

"Moviephone," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Patrick Webb, a senior from Huntington.

The Award of Distinction winning entries by WMUL-FM are in the following categories. 

Promo, PSA, Commercial

"Brush Your Teeth," an in-house public service announcement broadcast  in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Patrick Webb.

Sports Program

"The Marshall Women's Basketball 2009-2010 Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast before the Marshall - West Virginia Wesleyan  women's basketball game Monday, Nov. 1, 2010.

Sports Package

"Enter Sandman," written and produced by Leannda Carey, a senior from Wellsburg, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Program before the Marshall at Virginia Tech football game Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009. 

News Feature Package

"Model Trains:  A Family Affair," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, April 12, 2010.

Winners of The Communicator Awards come from radio stations, production facilities, advertising and public relations agencies, corporate communications departments, government entities, technicians, narrators, writers and other professionals associated with the production of audio broadcasts and materials.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 16, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall orientation sessions expected to attract about 2,200 students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hundreds of new Marshall University students will be on the Huntington campus next week, some two months before attending their first classes, to participate in New Student Orientation.

 

Beginning Tuesday, June 21, the first of about 2,200 MU freshmen and transfer students will visit the campus for orientation. Each new student is expected to attend one of the sessions, which run from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day June 21 through 25, July 19 through 22 and Aug. 4 and 5.

 

Orientation is a program designed to acclimate new students to the campus. Participants receive valuable information from the offices on campus, get identification cards made, register for classes and tour the campus.

 

Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment, said 142 students have registered for the Tuesday, June 21 session, which is for honors students only. The other dates are open to all new students.

 

"We hope that students who attend orientation will leave feeling prepared and confident for their first day of classes, and that they will feel like they are now members of the Marshall University family," Wolfe said.

 

While the June 22-25 and July 19 sessions are full, students may still register for the July 20-22 dates and the August 4-5 dates. Wolfe said students must first pay their $100 enrollment deposit before they can register. They can do so by calling the bursar's office at 304-696-6620 or 800-438-5389. Once the deposit is paid, they can register at www.marshall.edu/orientation.

 

Sessions planned for parents include time with financial aid advisors and student services staff, as well as discussions of campus safety issues and other academic and financial topics.

 

"We hope the parents will take advantage of their portion of the program, to learn more about what their students' experience will entail 

Week of Welcome activities for freshmen begin Wednesday, Aug. 17, and the first day of fall classes is Monday, Aug. 22.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 15, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU board approves Intent to Plan for master of science in Public Health

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Health Professions (COHP) has been granted permission by the MU Board of Governors to establish a plan to create the second master of science degree in Public Health (MPH) in West Virginia.

 

Approval of the program took place Tuesday during the board's regular meeting in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

 

Graduates from the MPH program will apply the knowledge and skills of public health practice in areas that include all five core domains of knowledge basic to public health: biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, behavioral and health sciences, and health services administration, according to COHP Associate Dean Charles Hossler.

 

"There is a great demand for public health across the nation and in West Virginia," Hossler said. "West Virginia ranks nearly last in all health markers placing the state's population at great risk for acute and chronic health problems."

 

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's provost, said the university is committed to developing programs that provide unique opportunities for advanced study in fields important to the vitality of the region, state and nation.

 

"The master of science in Public Health fits into the overall mission of the College of Health Professions and the university as a whole, which includes a commitment to improving the education, health and welfare of West Virginia and the Appalachian region through innovative and necessary programs of study," Ormiston said.

 

Hossler said the program's mission is to educate students in the biological, environmental and behavioral determinants of key public health issues for the purpose of promoting and maintaining health, preventing disease and disabilities and educating the public on health-related matters.

He added that public health professionals work to optimize the health of populations and communities through participation in the scholarship of discovery, integration and teaching.

 

"The primary goals of public health officials are the prevention of problems through the development of educational programs, policy changes, administration of services and the elimination of health disparities by conducting and applying research," Hossler said. "Through these activities the MPH program will bring to West Virginia an improvement in health and prevention of disease and disabilities."

 

Earlier this spring, the College of Health Professions announced that it is offering a new bachelor program in Public Health - the first such degree to be offered in West Virginia. Admissions to that program have begun for the fall 2011 inaugural class.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 14, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall to partner with UK as part of national research funding project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced it will be partnering with the University of Kentucky (UK) as part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutional Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program aimed at speeding the time for laboratory discoveries to benefit patients.

NIH has awarded $20 million to support research at UK's Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), making it part of a select national biomedical research network. Marshall will be awarded a subcontract of up to $750,000 over the course of the five-year grant.

The funding will support scientists in Marshall's clinical research program, training fellowships and early stage clinical research trials. The partnership also will give Marshall access to the expertise and resources at UK's CCTS, and opportunities to apply for significant research grants accessible only through the CTSA program.

"Marshall University is proud to be partnering with the University of Kentucky on this national grant award," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "Our participation in this multi-state award ensures that the state of West Virginia will be represented in this national consortium of medical research institutions. We share the commitment of all CTSA members to work together to achieve the transformative strategic goals of this innovative program and look forward to realizing the full potential of its promise, especially on behalf of the people of Appalachia."

According to Dr. John M. Maher, vice president for research at Marshall, investigators in the national CTSA network are already working together to advance medical research on many of the diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect those who live in the region.

He said that researchers at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research will be involved in the project, and that the areas targeted for clinical research collaboration with UK include cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

"CTSA funding of Marshall's partnership with the University of Kentucky will accelerate our efforts in clinical and translational research, and forge new collaborations to solve some of the most pervasive health problems in Appalachia," added Maher.

Dr. Philip Kern, associate provost for clinical and translational science at UK, said, "Marshall has substantial clinical expertise and basic science research strength in these areas and we welcome the opportunity to partner with them to enhance both of our biomedical research programs."

Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said the populations served by Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health and the UK Centers for Rural Health, which border each other geographically, provide the opportunity to enhance translational research and participation in clinical trials throughout the Appalachian region.

McKown added, "This award is significant because not only will our researchers be able to tap into the national CTSA resources to help speed the translation of scientific discoveries into treatments for patients, we will also be able to more fully engage our rural communities in clinical research efforts and better train a whole new generation of researchers."

NIH launched the CTSA program in 2006 to encourage collaboration across scientific disciplines and spur innovative approaches in tackling research challenges. With the addition of the 2011 recipient institutions announced today, the program is fully implemented and includes 60 CTSAs across the nation.

For more information about the CTSA program, visit www.ncrr.nih.gov/ctsa. The CTSA consortium website, which provides information about the consortium, current members and new grantees, can be accessed at www.CTSAweb.org. For more information about the UK CCTS and its partners, visit www.ccts.uky.edu.

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Additional Quotes:

"I congratulate Marshall University on receiving this prestigious grant. The CTSA is a significant step forward for our state because now we can combine expert research from across the country with Marshall's strong focus and experience in rural medicine. This also means that we will have access to future NIH funding and resources that will lead to better health care initiatives for people in West Virginia, and other rural and underserved areas of the country."

U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller

 

"Today's announcement is not only a wonderful opportunity for Marshall University, but also for our entire state. This partnership fosters future progress in health studies and incorporates Appalachian rural communities into critical medical research. I applaud Marshall's staff, faculty and students for their participation in this important partnership, because I am confident that all West Virginians will benefit from this collaborative effort."

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin

 

"Marshall has opened an important and sizable door of opportunity to meet rural health needs and to address chronic diseases all too prevalent in Appalachia. Marshall medicine was born out of a federal investment; by supporting these initiatives and helping Marshall to unite its valuable resources and insight with researchers elsewhere, we help shape the course of future clinical research in the nation."

U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall

 

"Marshall University has forged a path as a leader in the biomedical field. This collaboration with the University of Kentucky further solidifies Marshall's position while offering great promise for improved health care in our state and region. I look forward to the new discoveries that will emerge from this opportunity."

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin

 

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Photos:

(Above) Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp speaks during a news conference today announcing that Marshall is partnering with the University of Kentucky on a national research funding project.

(Below) Dr. John Maher, vice president for research at Marshall University, speaks during the same conference.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 10, 2011
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall forensic science professor selected chair-elect of Mid-Atlantic Assoc. of Forensic Scientists Criminalistics Section

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. J. Graham Rankin, a forensic chemistry professor in Marshall University's Forensic Science graduate program, has been selected as chair-elect of the Criminalistics Section of the Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Scientists. 

 

He will assume the chair position in May 2012 following next year's meeting in Ellicott City, Md.  During his term as chair-elect, he will be responsible for organizing the presentations in the Criminalistics Section for next year's meeting and assisting the current chair, Susan Stanitski of the Virginia Department of Forensic Science.

 

"Criminalistics is the branch of forensic science concerning the analysis and interpretation of physical evidence such as drugs, fire debris, explosives residue and other trace evidence," said Rankin.  "It is an honor to be selected for this position by one's peers, who are working at the laboratory bench every day processing evidence from crime scenes."

 

Rankin also presented two papers based on work of Amber Rasmussen and Amanda Heeren, who are 2011 graduates of the Forensic Science graduate program.  During the summer of 2010, Rasmussen developed a method for the analysis of the active ingredients in marijuana mimics, also known as "spice," while she was an intern with the Kentucky State Police Eastern Laboratory Chemistry Section in Ashland, Ky.  "Spice type" products are plant material coated with one or more synthetic compounds that have similar hallucinogenic properties as marijuana when smoked.  These products were made illegal at both the state and federal levels earlier this year.

 

Heeren, who has worked in Dr. Rankin's lab for the past two years, studied the effect of various charred wood substrates on the interpretation of ignitable liquid residues in fire debris.  Her work was instrumental to the receipt of a major grant from the National Institute of Justice by Rankin last fall. 

 

Both projects are being continued this summer by graduate students in Rankin's lab at Marshall.


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Friday June 10, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Career Services offers easier electronic gateway for job seekers and employers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Career Services at Marshall University is making the employment process a little easier to navigate by upgrading its jobs website.

 

Students, alumni, faculty, staff and even employers can now access www.marshall.edu/jobtrax directly.  The employment site previously had a much longer web address which sometimes caused navigation issues for users.

 

"As they say in the real estate industry, location is key," said Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services. "This easy-to-remember address will help our students and our employers and representatives get directly to the JobTrax site with very few keystrokes.  The change will afford users a much easier pathway to employment. "

 

JobTrax is a web-based service that allows students and alumni to search for jobs, research employers, post their resumes, and even sign up for on-campus interviews.   The resource also allows faculty to assist their students in finding employment and allows employers to post their job openings free of charge.

 

For more information on JobTrax or to ask questions about Career Services, contact Glen Midkiff at 304-696-3396.


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Wednesday June 8, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, , 304-696-3296

Jazz-MU-Tazz brings jazz performances to Pullman Square June 18

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jazz-MU-Tazz, Marshall University's summer jazz festival for high school musicians, will present a series of performances from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 18, at Pullman Square. The event concludes the annual festival.

Groups to be heard that day will include the Marshall University Jazz Ensemble, Project Postbop (a Marshall University student combo), and a high school jazz ensemble and jazz combos composed of festival attendees. Culminating the evening will be the Tommy Money Orchestra at 8 p.m.  These performances are free and open to the public.  

Student participants in the festival, which begins June 13, take classes in jazz performance and improvisation as well as other related music topics, said Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of music and director of jazz studies at Marshall.  In addition to the daily classes, evening activities such as concerts, jam sessions, movies and recreational activities will round out each day. This year, the students will be working with guest artist/instructor Dr. Dave Dickey, a trombonist.

Originally from Des Moines, Iowa, Dickey attended the University of North Texas and received a bachelor's degree in jazz studies. While at North Texas, he recorded two CDs with the famed One O' Clock Lab Band directed by Neil Slater Dickey. He then moved to Miami and lived there for six years as a performing and touring musician and jazz radio disc jockey for WDNA-Miami. While living in Miami, he received his master's in jazz performance from Florida International University.  He then moved to Urbana, Ill., to work on his D.M.A. in jazz performance the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. Dickey currently lives in Saint Louis, Mo., teaching jazz trombone at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Dickey also will be performing with Bluetrane, Marshall's faculty combo, at the Paramount Arts Center in Ashland, Ky., at 8 p.m. Friday, June 17, as part of the center's "Jazz Alley" series. Adult tickets are $25, and are available online at www.paramountartscenter.com, by calling the center at 606-324-3175 or by visiting the center in person from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.


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Wednesday June 8, 2011
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Rockefeller, Rahall Announce $1.1 Million award for Marshall to help West Virginia elementary students


WASHINGTON, D.C. - Senator Jay Rockefeller and Congressman Nick Rahall today announced that Marshall University has received a prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) grant for $1,174,800 to implement after‐school Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs for students in Kanawha, Cabell and Wayne counties. The program will help hundreds of students aged 8 to 11 and teachers studying elementary education.

"I am proud of all that Marshall University is doing to promote math and science learning for young students in southern West Virginia," said Rockefeller. "It's clear that math and science expertise is a route to many of the best paying jobs, and we need to get our students interested in these subjects at an early age. A world-class workforce that is equipped for the challenges of the 21st century will pay incredible dividends for this generation and future ones also."

"We must prepare our students in the classroom today for the workforce of tomorrow," said Rahall, a longtime supporter of STEM education and increased investments in research and development and workforce training as a means of creating jobs in West Virginia.  "We must fire up our children's interest in science, math, and technology to keep our workforce globally competitive in the 21st Century; that is how we diversify our economy and ensure that our young people can build well-paying careers right here in their own backyards."

"SCI-TALKS targets students at an age when building interest in science is critical for maintaining the natural curiosity that children have about the world around them," said Dr. Cartwright.  "By building a safe learning environment outside the formal school day where student talk becomes a central lesson feature, both elementary students and elementary education college students will work together to improve student interest and learning in science, technology, engineering and math." 

Cartwright's co-investigators include Dr. Todd Ensign of the NASA Independent Verification and Validation Facility in Fairmont, Dr. Brittan Hallar of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission's Division of Science and Research, and Dr. Brenda Wilson of West Virginia State University.


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Tuesday June 7, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall Day at Great American Ballpark features former Herd and Major League Baseball player Jeff Montgomery



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Former Marshall University baseball player and Major League Baseball all-star Jeff Montgomery will serve as special guest at the 2011ThunderFest Saturday, July 16, at Cincinnati's Great American Ballpark.

Montgomery, along with Marshall baseball coach Jeff Waggoner, will be available for photographs and autograph signing prior to the game, which features the Reds taking on the St. Louis Cardinals at 7:10 p.m.  The day's festivities also include university recognition on the field prior to the game and on the video screens during the game, and Marshall representatives singing Take Me Out to the Ballgame.

 

Montgomery played baseball at Marshall and was drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in 1983 as a pitcher.  He played one season with the Reds, posting a 2-2 record in 1987. Montgomery was traded to the Kansas City Royals in 1988 where he played until retirement in 1999.

 

He had an outstanding career with the Royals as a closer, recording a team-record 304 saves in 12 seasons (1988-1999). He is a member of Kansas City's Hall of Fame.

 

Montgomery currently serves as vice president for Union Broadcasting in Kansas City, Mo.

 

"This is a wonderful opportunity to promote Marshall University to thousands of people attending the game and we are absolutely thrilled Jeff will be with us," said Tish Littlehales, Executive Director of Marshall University Alumni.  "This is our fourth year for Thunderfest and it's always a big hit with our alums all across the region."

 

Corporate and individual tickets sales are currently under way.  Group tickets may be purchased by contacting the Marshall Alumni Office at 304-696-3134.  Individual tickets are available at www.reds.com/marshall or through the alumni office.

 

Contact Littlehales for more information at 304-696-2523.


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Monday June 6, 2011
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Marshall University partners with Regional Chamber of Commerce for children's event in Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is providing assistance to the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce for its 4th annual Children's Arts Festival Extravaganza (CAF).

  

The free event is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, June 11, on Ninth  Street between Third and Fourth Avenues.  Activities are geared toward children 12 and under and feature stamp art, newspaper art and face painting. Other features include entertainment by various community groups, a balloon artist and sidewalk chalk drawing.

 

Marshall University's Department of Art & Design has been heavily involved with this year's event.  Dr. Maribea Barnes, assistant professor of art and design, and several art education majors have designed and prepared many of the art projects, which are geared specifically toward elementary and pre-school age children.

  

"I'm so pleased our students are involved in this community project," Barnes said. "The event allows them to interact with children in an environment that provides invaluable experience as they work toward their teaching degrees in art."

 

Marshall University students, staff and faculty are volunteering for the community event, which is organized by the Chamber's Downtown Live committee. Downtown Live works to plan and execute downtown events to encourage traffic for downtown retail and restaurant businesses. 

 

For more information on Marshall's involvement with the event contact Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, at 304-696-6397.


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New Works Project features plays by students, alumni

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Theatre will present its 5th annual New Works Project beginning Thursday, June 16, and running through Saturday, June 18.

The New Works Project is a contemporary theatre festival created to help develop, promote and present readings of plays in their earliest stages.  The New Works Project has presented the work of both local and national playwrights. Works presented have included full-length plays, shorts, one-act plays, musicals, children's plays, screenplays and television pilots.

This season's schedule is as follows:  

         Thursday, June 16, at 7  p.m.: The Student Playwright Project

This is a chance to see five brand-new short plays, all written, directed and performed by Marshall University students.  Plays include: Marlboro Man, written by Chuck Herndon; A Last Supper, written by Erik Woods; In Progress, written by Rocky Scarbro; and Burgle, written by Dylan Clark. The featured act of the evening will be Marshall University theatre alumnus Jonathan Joy's new work, Count Your Blessings.

         Friday, June 17, at 7 p.m.: The Contemporary Theatre Project

Well, written by Lisa Kron, is a Tony Award nominee that puts an entirely new spin on the art of storytelling. This is a mother-daughter tale recounting the life of the play's author. Depicting herself as an anxious performance artist, Kron illustrates the struggles of healthy living and, ultimately, "wellness."

         Saturday, June 18 at 7 p.m.: The Musical Theatre Project

Collis P! had its first reading at the premiere season of the New Works Project in 2007.  Now in its final stages of development, this original musical is back.  Collis P! centers around the larger-than-life character of Huntington, W.Va.'s own founding father - Collis P. Huntington.

One of the most important aspects of the New Works Project is its audience collaboration sessions. After each evening's presentation, audience members are encouraged to stay and give direct feedback to the playwright and company, in order to bring each play one step closer to its full completion. 

Each performance will take place in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on Marshall's Huntington campus. All shows are free to the public but donations are encouraged in order to support future performances of new works.

For ticket information, contact Sam Kincaid at 304-696-ARTS (2787).

The Marshall University New Works Project is sponsored by Marshall University's College of Fine Arts. 


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Friday June 3, 2011
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Application process begins for fall Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the fall semester, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Preference may be given to students who did not receive a waiver the previous semester.

Student waivers have a maximum value of $750 to cover the cost of up to three credit hours for graduate coursework. Faculty/Staff employee benefit waivers cover the complete cost of up to three credit hours for graduate coursework (with the exception of required fees).

  • Deadline for the applications is Friday, July 22. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition-payment/tuition-fee-due-dates/.

  • Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for spring 2011 by Friday, Aug. 5, in order to receive a waiver. Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Aug. 5 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/forms/tuitionwaiverfall2011.pdf.

Completed waiver applications can be submitted in person, by U.S. mail, or by e-mail.

For more information, contact the Graduate College office at 304-696-6606.


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Friday June 3, 2011
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Marshall assistant professor receives Inspire Integrity Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael Householder, an assistant professor in Marshall University's English Department, is the 2011 recipient of the Inspire Integrity Award given by the National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS).

 

The Inspire Integrity Award is the nation's only student-nominated faculty award that recognizes professors for their commitment to inspiring and instilling integrity in their students. It is awarded to full-time university staff who have made an impact on their students and community through integrity. MU student Chassidy Marcum nominated Householder for the award.

 

"We're proud to honor Dr. Householder," said Stephen E. Loflin, CEO and founder of NSCS. "He couldn't be more deserving of this award. We are so pleased to have the opportunity to shine a spotlight on his outstanding accomplishments and commitment to integrity."

 

Householder will receive a $1,000 personal stipend and a $1,000 contribution to the foundation of his choice. Marcum will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

 

"I am honored and humbled to be the national recipient of this award," Householder said. "I am especially pleased that the National Society of Collegiate Scholars also awards $1,000 to a foundation of my choice and to the student who nominated me.  Hopefully this award will bring more attention to the terrific teachers we have at Marshall."

 

Householder received his B.A. from Brown University in 1989. After teaching high school for several years, he earned a Ph.D. in English from the University of California-Irvine in 2003.While at Southern Methodist University he was recognized for his teaching with the prestigious Golden Mustang Award. At Marshall, he teaches courses in American and transatlantic literature to 1860. He is the author of Inventing Americans in the Age of Discovery: Narratives of Encounter (Ashgate, 2011).

 

Householder is the fourth recipient of the Inspire Integrity Award. NSCS has awarded Faculty of the Year awards since 2005. However, in 2007, NSCS refocused the awards on integrity, and inaugurated the Inspire Integrity Awards.

 

NSCS is a national academic honor society and member of the Association of College Honor Societies. It has more than 800,000 members at more than 280 chapters in all 50 states.


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Thursday June 2, 2011
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RecFest offers opportunity for businesses to introduce themselves on campus

Exhibitors wanted for the third year of Marshall Recreation Center event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is seeking businesses and organizations who wish to showcase their names and services to more than 14,000 Marshall University students at its annual RecFest. This year's event will take place from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20, as part of the university's Week of Welcome activities.

 

Basic and premier exhibit spaces are available to any business or organization. Discounts are available for organizations that sign up before July 1 and for Marshall-affiliated organizations.

 

"RecFest is the perfect opportunity for businesses to introduce themselves to Marshall students in a fun and laid-back way," said Michele Muth, RecFest director. "Contests and giveaways are a great way to attract students and help them become repeat customers."

 

In previous years, more than 100 RecFest exhibitors have attracted thousands of students plus staff, faculty and local residents, Muth said.

 

Interested exhibitors can visit the Recreation Center's website at www.Marshallcampusrec.com, or contact Muth or Matt Weber at MURecfest@live.com or 304-696-4732.


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Thursday June 2, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall Executive MBA hosts information session June 4; next class of students to begin in July

 

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Lewis College of Business is looking for professionals interested in earning an accredited Executive MBA. The next cohort will begin classes in July 2011.

 

There will be an informational session Saturday, June 4, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Marshall University South Charleston Campus, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr. Professors and administrators will be on hand to answer questions about admissions, curriculum, financial aid and offerings unique to the Marshall program.

 

The Marshall University Executive MBA is an accelerated program focusing on the needs of working professionals so they can earn an internationally accredited MBA without great disruption to work and family schedules. The program comprises 12 face-to-face, cutting-edge courses taught over a 16-month time frame. It follows a cohort format (students move through the program as a team in a set sequence) and meets on Saturdays at the Marshall University South Charleston campus.

 

Diverse classes focus on business ethics, leadership and global issues that, along with management skills and tools, are crafted to enrich the career accomplishments of students with or without business backgrounds. The program also includes a domestic business trip as well as an international residency abroad.

 

For more information, call 304-696-2627 or go to http://www.marshall.edu/lcob/graduate/emba/.


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Wednesday June 1, 2011
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Marshall University announces newest class of Yeager Scholars

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six incoming freshmen are the newest members of the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University.

 

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, director of the Society of Yeager Scholars, said she looks forward to working with the incoming class.

 

"We are delighted with the quality of our incoming scholars. These are students who are highly recruited by other institutions," LoCascio said. "Marshall University is fortunate to attract such talented students."

 

Yeager Scholars will have an enhanced curriculum throughout their college careers. Some of the requirements include: maintaining a cumulative 3.5 grade point average, completing four interdisciplinary seminars, and involvement in campus and community activities.  They will also have the opportunity to study literature, political science or history abroad at Oxford University in England as well as study in a country of the scholar's chosen foreign language.

 

Dr. Mary Todd, dean of the Marshall University Honors College, home of the Society of Yeager Scholars program, said the Honors College is pleased to welcome the latest class of Yeager Scholars.

 

"The diverse interests, the experience and the record of academic excellence of these six students offer strong evidence that they are the leader-scholars the Yeager program has always sought," Todd said.


The students had to submit an application followed by two interviews - one by telephone and one by a panel of interviewers on the Marshall University Huntington campus. The final selection was made by university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars board members and community members.

 

The following students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2015:

 

Tyler Austin Bonnett of Crab Orchard, W.Va. Bonnett is a graduate of Woodrow Wilson High School in Beckley. He is a National Merit semifinalist, AP Scholar and member of the National Honor Society, and has other academic memberships and awards. Bonnett was senior class vice president and played on his high school's varsity baseball team four years, receiving honorable mention all-state and Most Outstanding Player in 2010 honors. At Marshall, he intends to pursue a degree in physics.
 
Alexis Renee D'Amato of Pittsburgh, Pa. D'Amato graduated from North Allegheny Senior High School in Wexford, Pa. She was a member of the Student Council, National Honor Society, Key Club, French Club and other school and community associations. D'Amato has established and runs an online jewelry company where she sells her own designs. At Marshall, she will enroll in the biological sciences department and hopes to pursue a veterinary career.
 
Shaun Ross Gardiner of La Plata, Md. Gardiner graduated from Maurice J. McDonough High School in Pomfret, Md. He is a member of the National Honor Society and served as his school's service coordinator, an AP Scholar with Distinction, captain of "It's Academic" and math  school teams, was a member of the marching band, and woodwind section leader for the Charles County Youth Orchestra. Gardiner is interested in politics and will be a political science major at Marshall.
 
Katie Lynn Kramer of Naples, Fla. Kramer graduated from Naples High School where she was involved in academic and athletic activities. She is an AP Laureate Diploma Candidate, an AP Scholar with Distinction, a member of the National Honor Society, her school's Spanish Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, student government and other organizations. An accomplished swimmer, Kramer set school swimming records, served as varsity swimming captain and received several athletic awards. She will pursue a marketing degree from the Lewis College of Business.
 
Sarah Elizabeth Legg of Hurricane, W.Va. Legg is a 2011 graduate of Hurricane High School. She received a commendation from the National Merit Scholarship Program, earned all-state, Class AAA, and all-Mountain State Athletic Conference honors in volleyball, was team captain of the volleyball and basketball teams, and was freshman class vice president at her former high school. Legg has been an active community volunteer for many different organizations. She will enroll in the College of Science at Marshall as a biochemistry major.
 
Hannah Grace Smith of Parkersburg, W.Va. Smith attended Parkersburg South High School. She was a 2010 recipient of the NCTE Achievement in Writing award, a member of the National Honor Society and the National French Honor Society. She was secretary of her senior class and teaches a weekly ballet class to third graders. Her community involvement includes the Mid-Ohio Valley Ballet Company, the Parkersburg South Choir, and Interact, a high school community service organization. Smith intends to be an English major in creative writing.

 

    Bonnett

D'Amato

Gardiner

Kramer

Legg

Smith


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Friday May 27, 2011
Contact: Allyson Goodman, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, , 304-696-6025

Marshall advertising majors win one competition, advance in two others

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University advertising majors in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications took first place in a statewide public service announcement competition. In two other challenges, one student's resume design and a team's media plan are advancing to national level contests.

 

A five-member student team prepared the winning strategy, script and video for a 30-second PSA to deter underage drinking in a competition organized by the Underage Drinking Prevention and Social Marketing Project. The team will work with a professional crew June 13-15 to produce the PSA for statewide distribution. Advertising seniors Wm. Travis Stephens of Parkersburg, W.Va., Chelsey Hughes of Elkins, W.Va., Morgan Miller of South Point, Ohio, Elizabeth Whanger of Cross Lanes, W.Va., and Dale Johnson, a broadcast journalism major from Kenova, W.Va., are on the team.

 

The Underage Drinking Prevention and Social Marketing Project is funded by the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws program, which is administered in West Virginia by the State Division of Justice and Community Services.

 

In a media planning competition, two senior advertising majors made up one of only six teams selected from across the nation to participate in Media Scholars Week June 5-10 in Washington, D.C. Ashley Hesson of Chesapeake, Ohio, and Morgan Miller of South Point, Ohio, earned the invitation by participating in the Media Scholars Case Competition. Their strategic media plan for a hypothetical special election referendum issue was selected from among all national submissions as finalists.

 

The Washington Media Scholars Foundation, an "inside the beltway" non-partisan, non-profit organization, sponsors the competition that introduces students to nationally recognized media industry leaders. Following a week of tours and meetings with media executives, Hesson and Miller will present their strategic plan to a panel of judges for the chance to win the National Excellence in Media Award.

 

The foundation organizes programs that connect deserving students with top executives from broadcast, cable, radio, digital, print, media research, planning and placement, public policy and major trade associations.

 

In the third contest, a resume design by Millwood, W.Va., senior Wade McComas has advanced to the National Student Addy Competition June 4 in San Diego, Calif. McComas won a Gold Addy from the West Virginia Advertising Federation that earned entry into the District 5 (Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia) Addy Competition. At the district level the design was awarded a Silver Addy and was forwarded to the national competition.


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Thursday May 26, 2011
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Marshall University student artist chosen for 'Best of West Virginia'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University College of Fine Arts student G.W. Lanham has been chosen as one of the "Best of West Virginia" in Tamarack's upcoming juried exhibition of artwork. It's a show that Tamarack officials say showcases the most talented and creative artists in the state.

Located off I-77/64 at Exit 45, Tamarack specializes in handcrafted products made in West Virginia, and in food court dining, catering and conference center services. The "Best of West Virginia" exhibition will open with a reception at 3 p.m. Sunday, June 19, and run through Saturday, Aug. 13.

Lanham is an art major at Marshall, with an emphasis in ceramics. "I like to make functional things that are inspired by nature," he said. "I like to see my work in peoples' hands."

Ceramics professor Earline Allen, who retired this spring after 41 years of teaching at Marshall, encouraged him to enter the show. "I'm glad that I have a professor who goes above and beyond," Lanham said. "She'll spend an evening looking for shows that her students should enter, and customize the opportunities to our work styles. She really has put her all into us."

Lanham was thrilled that his work was accepted into the show, and noted the amount of talent in Appalachian ceramic artists.

"I was ecstatic," he said. "I didn't think I would get into this show especially since I'm still a student. There are so many artists in the area who are amazing potters. I bought a pitcher from a guy who didn't even realize the extent of his talent - and to me it's a superb piece!"

Some of Lanham's pottery is available for purchase at the Red Caboose, the retail shop in the Convention and Visitors Bureau at Heritage Station near Harris Riverfront Park and Pullman Square. For him, it's about making something for someone - not just an object.

"I make pots for individuals and families to use, not to be placed on a shelf and forgotten about. My interest is in how they are used in everyday life," Lanham said. "I want people to create memories around the use of my pots, even if it's just drinking that morning cup of coffee out of a favorite mug A beloved mug or bowl can have an intimate connection to memory through the ritual ways it is used."


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Wednesday May 25, 2011
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WMUL-FM students surpass 100 awards for 2010-2011 academic year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received six Platinum awards, five Gold awards and two Honorable Mention awards in The Hermes Creative Awards 2011 Competition. 

In addition, the station received nine Broadcast Education Association awards and 12 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence awards in April.

The Hermes winners were named in a letter dated Friday, May 4, from Arlington, Texas. With the addition of those 13 awards, the student broadcasters have won a record-setting 101 awards for the 2010-2011 academic year with two contests still remaining -  the Communicator Awards and the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's Awards.  The total includes 30 first-place awards, 31 second-place awards, 10 third-place awards and 30 honorable mention awards.

"I am proud and grateful for the honor these Hermes Creative Platinum awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University," said Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

The Hermes Creative Awards are administered and evaluated by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals.  It is an international competition created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media.  There were approximately 4,400 entries in The Hermes Creative Awards 2011 competition.

The Platinum Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were:

Radio Newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, April 9, 2010. Participants included Robert Iddings, a senior from St. Albans, producer; Leannda Carey, a senior from Wellsburg, anchor; Adam Cavalier, a graduate student from Montgomery, anchor; and Dave Traube, a graduate student from Beckley, sports anchor.                                                                                                

Radio Comedy Script

The script for the comedy program "The Hand You Were Given" was written by Morgan Shillingburg, a senior from Charleston. The documentary script was completed Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.

Radio Sports Program

"Marshall Football 2009:  The End of the Line" was written and produced by Adam Cavalier,  broadcast and  made available online before the Marshall 2010 season opener at Ohio State, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Bowling Green State University football game played at Doyt Perry Stadium in Bowling Green, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 18, 2010.  The students calling the football game were Adam Cavalier, play-by-play; Robert Iddings, color; and Scott Hall, a graduate student from Stevens City, Va., engineer.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Southern Mississippi women's basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center Saturday, Jan. 31, 2011.  The student broadcast team included Adam Cavalier, play-by-play; Dave Traube, color; and Will Vance, a freshman from Charleston, engineer.

Overall Website

WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul.  The 2010-2011 webmaster for WMUL-FM Online is Tyler Kes, a sophomore from Burnsville, Minn.

The Gold Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were:

Radio Newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, Oct. 1, 2010. Participants were Robert Iddings, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; and Jimmy Sanders, a senior from Stroudsburg, Pa., sports anchor.

News Reporting Podcast

"Coping with Disaster:  Montcoal, West Virginia" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, April 9, 2010.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Ohio State University football game played at the Horseshoe in Columbus, Ohio, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.  The student broadcast team included Robert Iddings, play-by-play; Adam Cavalier, color; and Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, engineer.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga men's basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center Saturday, Nov. 20, 2010. The student broadcast team included Dave Traube, play-by-play; Jarrod Clay, a junior from Barboursville, color; and Tyler Kes, engineer.

Radio Promotional Announcement

"Moviephone," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Patrick Webb, a senior from Huntington.

The Honorable Mention award-winning entries were:

Radio Sports Program

"Herd Roundup" with hosts Adam Cavalier and Dave Traube, broadcast Friday, Oct. 15, 2010.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Little League Baseball Tournament of State Champions game between West Virginia and Virginia played at Mitch Stadium in Kenova, W.Va., Monday, Aug. 2, 2010.  The student broadcast team included Aaron Payne, play-by-play; Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, analyst; and Jarrod Clay, engineer.

 

Broadcast Education Association Awards

WMUL students received one Best of Festival award, three first-place awards, one second-place award, two third-place awards and two honorable mention awards during the Ninth Annual Broadcast Education Association (BEA) Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony in April at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

BEA has more than 1,400 academic and professional members and 250 academic institutional members.

The Broadcast Education Association and the Charles and Lucille King Family Foundation's (www.kingfoundation.org) 2011 Best of Festival award for audio news was:

News reporting

"Coping with Disaster:  Montcoal, West Virginia" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9, 2010. "Leannda Carey has received the ultimate compliment for her on-air news reporting at WMUL-FM by being presented the Best of Festival award for her report of the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster from Montcoal, West Virginia," Bailey said. "This highest of honors bestowed by BEA upon Leannda Carey is well-deserved.  I am excited about the prospects for her professional future."

The first-place award winning entries in audio were:

Newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, April 9, 2010. Participants were Robert Iddings, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; Dave Traube, sports anchor.

Feature Reporting 

"Model Trains:  A Family Affair," written and produced by Adam Cavalier that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, April 12, 2010.

Sports Reporting

"The Mitch Express," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "Tournament of State Champions," from Mitch Stadium in Kenova, W.Va., Wednesday, Aug.  4, 2010.

The second-place award-winning entry in audio was:

Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Bowling Green State University football game played at Doyt Perry Stadium in Bowling Green, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 18, 2010.  The student broadcast team included Adam Cavalier, play-by-play; Robert Iddings, color; Scott Hall, engineer.

The third-place award-winning entries in audio were:

Promo, PSA, Commercial

"Moviephone," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, through the present time, written and produced by Patrick Webb. 

Sports Play-By-Play

Marshall versus Memphis men's basketball game at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington, broadcast Saturday, Jan. 27, 2010. Calling the game were Robert Iddings, play-by-play; Andrew Ramspacher, a  recent graduate from Dublin, Ohio, color; and Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, engineer.

The honorable mention award winning entries in audio were:

Comedy or Drama

"The Hand You Were Given," written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, broadcast Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.

Sports Reporting

"Facing the 3-3 Stack" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.

 

Mark of Excellence Awards

Students from the School of Journalism also did well in another contest, receiving 12 Mark of Excellence awards from the Society of Professional Journalists at a ceremony in April.

The ceremony, which took place in Erlanger, Ky., was part of the Region 4 and 5 Spring Conference. According to the national SPJ website, 4,000 entries were judged and 100 awards were presented in categories ranging from news reports to features to opinions to photography in the areas of newspaper, online, radio and television.

 

Of the 100 awards handed out and 16 universities represented, WMUL secured 11 awards. Adam Cavalier broke his record by receiving seven awards, three of them for first place.

 

"This solid performance in SPJ's Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by the talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of journalism and Mass Communications," said Cavalier, station manager for WMUL. "I am thrilled to have been a part of it for the last few years."

 

First-place winners advanced to the national competition.

 

Students from WMUL-FM won four first-place awards, four second-place awards and three third-place awards.

The first-place award-winning entries in radio were:

Radio Newscast, Category 23

The three required newscasts used to enter this category were:

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, Oct. 1, 2010. Participants were Robert Iddings, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; and Jimmy Sanders, sports anchor.

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, March 5, 2010.  Participants were Robert Iddings, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; and Kyle Hobstetter, a senior from Portsmouth, Ohio, sports anchor.

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, Dec. 3, 2010. Participants were Adam Cavalier, producer; Robert Iddings, news anchor; Adam Cavalier, news anchor; and Anthony Easterling, community volunteer, Philadelphia, sports anchor.

Best News Reporting, Category 19

"Coping with Disaster:  Montcoal, West Virginia" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9, 2010. Carey's entry was designated as a national finalist in the Radio News Reporting-4 Year College/University category. 

Best Feature, Category 20

"Model Trains:  A Family Affair," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, April 12, 2010.

Radio Sports Reporting, Category 22

"The Mitch Express," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "Tournament of State Champions" from Mitch Stadium in Kenova Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2010. Cavalier's entry was designated as a national winner in the Radio Sports Reporting-4 Year College/University category.

The second-place award-winning entries in radio were:

Best News Reporting, Category 19

"SGA Election Complaints," by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9, 2010.

Best Feature, Category 20

"Serving Students: Jessica Jordan," by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Dec. 3, 2010.

Radio In-depth Reporting, Category 21

"Marshall Football 2009:  The End of the Line" was written and produced by  Adam Cavalier, broadcast and  made available online before the Marshall 2010 season opener at Ohio State, Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010.

Radio Sports Reporting, Category 22

"Spring Practice Brings Intensity," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, April 7, 2010.

The third-place award-winning entries in radio were:

Best Feature, Category 20

"The Drumline," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010.

Radio In-depth Reporting, Category 21 

"The Marshall Women's Basketball 2009-2010 Season in Review," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast before the Marshall - West Virginia Wesleyan  women's basketball game Monday, Nov. 1, 2010.

Radio Sports Reporting, Category 22

"Whiteside versus Jordan" by Robert Iddings, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2010.


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Spring graduate Elizabeth Fleming awarded Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Elizabeth Fleming, a May 2011 graduate of Marshall University, has been awarded a Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship for graduate study, Dr. Mary Todd, dean of the Honors College, announced today.

 

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi annually awards 57 fellowships of $5,000 each and three at $15,000 each to members entering the first year of graduate or professional study. Fleming is one of the $5,000 recipients.

 

She plans to attend the School of International Service at American University in Washington, D.C., and to pursue a career in the Foreign Service, working for the State Department or serving in the U.S. International Diplomatic Corps.

 

"Receiving the Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship is such a wonderful blessing from the Lord," Fleming said. "I am very passionate about studying international politics at American University and hope to make Phi Kappa Phi proud of my efforts."

 

Marshall's chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, which was approved by the organization's board of directors in spring 2010, was formally installed in November. Initiation of the new members took place in April.

 

"The new Marshall chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is delighted that one of our inaugural initiates has been awarded a Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship," Todd said. "Liz Fleming is a wonderful model of the academic excellence and service the Society promotes."

 

Susan Gilpin, associate dean of the Honors College and secretary of Marshall's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, nominated Fleming for the fellowship.

 

"Traditional expressions of support are not adequate for a student of Elizabeth's intellect and passion," Gilpin said. "Phi Kappa Phi will be proud to list Elizabeth among its graduate fellowship recipients and even more proud of what she is certain to achieve in her graduate career."

 

Fleming is serving as a summer intern in the office of Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

 

"I am absolutely loving the D.C. area and am looking forward to learning more about our nation's government and foreign policies when I am here this fall," she said.

 

Fleming, a native of South Bend, Ind., excelled in her academic and athletic endeavors at Marshall. A Yeager Scholar studying International Affairs, she graduated this spring with an overall 4.0 grade point average. A four-year starter on Marshall's volleyball team, she earned numerous honors, including being named an ESPN Academic All-American and making the Conference USA All-Academic Team for three consecutive years.


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Allen's pottery to be exhibited at Gallery 842 in retrospective exhibition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - After 41 years of teaching at Marshall University, ceramics professor Earline Allen is retiring - but not without a bang.  An exhibition of her work, titled Becoming: An Earline Allen Retrospective, opens with a reception at 6 p.m. Friday, May 27,  at Gallery 842 in downtown Huntington.

 "I have chosen 'Becoming'  as the title of my retrospective because it symbolizes my quest to become that which marks a particular aesthetic and technical achievement in my work," Allen said.  "This mark is elusive;  it is a moving target, ever changing.  I like to think of my journey as a remarkable destination which constantly invites me to continue my exploration." 

Gallery 842 is located at 842 4th Ave. and is open from noon to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

"Earline Allen has devoted 41 years to Marshall University, her students, and this community," said John Farley, director of Gallery 842. "For me, exhibits such as this are always particularly rewarding because the inspiration is just as much about the impact of the individual. It is an opportunity to showcase the work of an artist who is equally renowned as an exceptional professor, mentor, advocate and citizen."

Allen was born  in Long Island, N.Y. At the age of three, she moved with her family to Logan, W.Va., to live near her father's family. From an early age her family encouraged her to go into teaching, a field in which Allen admits she had little interest initially. She had other interests in life, such as music and art, but after one classroom experience she changed her mind.

 

"I didn't go to school to become a teacher," Allen said. "I majored in biology to start with, then went over completely to art." 

 

Allen said that after her first classroom observation, she knew what she wanted to do.

 

"I didn't think I would like it, but I did and I haven't regretted becoming a teacher at all," Allen said. "I really love teaching. I think it's the best thing a person can do."

 

Allen got her first job teaching at Spring Hill Junior High School in South Charleston, W.Va. In her first year she taught science, then for the following three years she taught art while earning her Master of Fine Arts degree. She began teaching full time at Marshall as an art professor in 1970.

 

Tommy Warf, a student of Allen's who also serves as president of Keramos, the student pottery organization that Allen advised, sees her as more than just a teacher.

 

"She is a woman who has spent her life and her passion to try to not just teach students but to help students become functioning members of society," Warf said.

 

In addition to teaching, for the past eight years Allen has been heavily involved in Empty Bowls, a national initiative to combat hunger.  Allen says she had heard about the project while attending a national conference and thought that it would be great to do at Marshall.

 

"Empty Bowls has become the most successful fundraiser on campus and she's the driving force," Jaye Ike, coordinator of special projects for the College of Fine Arts, said. "She's the reason we have it. She's the unsung hero."

 

There have always been interests for Allen outside of teaching, some of which she plans to pursue after her final semester of teaching.

 

"I'm thinking about maybe doing a little bit of writing and I have an intense interest in music as well that I would like to continue," Allen said. "I love performing, I love singing. I'd like to become better prepared as a musician."

 

Allen says that she's always enjoyed her time teaching and is somewhat nervous about leaving Marshall, but is looking forward to her future and opportunities to do what she loves and enjoy life.

 

"Leaving is very bittersweet because I love what I do, but being a teacher, I have less time to pursue my other interests," Allen said. "I'm looking forward to becoming a better, more involved artist in my own right. I'll have the time I need to develop my work. I plan to travel as well and have some fun."


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Eleven undergraduate researchers awarded stipends for summer studies

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven undergraduate students at Marshall University have been selected to receive the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellowship which provides each student with a $4,000 stipend and supplies for their research.

Marshall University has participated in the SURE program since 2005. The program is funded through the West Virginia Research Challenge Fund, and is administered by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research. SURE participants conduct their research during a 10-week time period which this year began May 16 and concludes July 29.

"We want students to know how strongly Marshall supports undergraduate research," said Dr. Mike Norton, director of the SURE program. "This is the time when these young minds start utilizing their research skills in preparation for graduate school."

The following students have been awarded SURE Fellowships for summer 2011. They are listed with their project name, their class ranking, field of study, and research faculty mentor.

  • Kevin Adkins, senior, forensic chemistry, The Design and Development of RNA Nanostructures for Drug Delivery, Dr. Bin Wang

  • Emily Beckelhimer, senior, biology, Microspectroscopic Evaluation of Human Lung Tissues Sections: A Study Employing Chemometric Analysis, Dr. Menashi Cohenford

  • Sumaiya Chaudhry, sophomore, biochemistry,  Fatty Acid Signatures in Obesity, Dr. Nalini Santanam

  • Lori Coyner, senior, molecular biology, The Cellular Localization of Fuzzy, Fritz, and Inturned Effector Proteins and the Link to Cell Polarity, Dr. Simon Collier

  • John Cuchta, junior, geology, Determining Engineering and Geochemical Properties of Paleosols, Dr. William Niemann

  • Megan Graham, senior, biology, Ex Vivo Studies of Endothelium, Dr. Elmer Price

  • Evan Riley, junior, chemistry, Microalga Chlorella Vulgaris as a Potential Source for Biodiesel, Dr. Jagan Valluri

  • Margaret Stephens, senior, ecology, An Assessment of the Ecosystem of the Cheat Mountain Salamander, Dr. Thomas K. Pauley

  • Erica Thompson, senior, integrated science and technology, The Diversity and Distribution of Freshwater Mussels in Twelve-pole Creek, West Virginia, Dr. Thomas Jones

  • Megan Welch, senior, integrated science and technology, Fecal Coliform Levels for Fourpole Creek Watershed, West Virginia, Dr. Mike Little

  • Benjamin Woodworth, junior, biochemistry, Sustainable Biodiesel from Microalgae: Metabolome Mapping of Chlorella Vulgaris, Dr. Derrick Kolling

For more information contact Norton at 304-696-6627.


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Career Services workshops at Marshall focus on career development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services is offering a series of free workshops this summer that focus on career development. 


The workshops are open to the community and Marshall students, and will take place at 3:30 p.m. June 14-16 in the Marshall Career Services Center at 1681 5th Ave.


Topics include:

  • Tuesday, June 14:  Resume Development

  • Wednesday, June 15:  Job Search Strategies

  • Thursday,  June 16:  Interviewing Tips


Glen Midkiff with Career Services said space is limited for the workshops. Those wanting to attend are asked to RSVP by calling 304-696-2370.


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Physical Therapy program offers informational sessions for students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's new physical therapy department is offering informational sessions every third Friday of the month to introduce potential students to the program.

 

Marshall University's Board of Governors approved the Doctor of Physical Therapy program in 2009 and the program is presently seeking candidacy from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education.  If candidacy is granted, in November 2011 the program can begin accepting applications for the first class, set to commence in May 2012.  Students interested in applying to the program will be required to hold a baccalaureate degree by May 2012 and have completed prescribed prerequisites.


"This series of information sessions will allow students to meet with faculty on an informal basis to determine what is needed to apply," said Dr. Penny Kroll, chair of the physical therapy department. "We'll give them all the information they need to apply to the program and answer any questions they might have regarding the curriculum and the application process."

 

The information sessions are scheduled as follows: June 17, July 15, August 19, September 16, October 21, November 18 and December 16.


 All sessions are scheduled from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Pritchard Hall, Room 324 on the Huntington campus. Potential students are asked to email the program at physicaltherapy@marshall.edu with the date of the session they'd like to attend.

 


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Service Awards Luncheon set for June 9 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 27th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, June 9, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. The Employee of the Year will be named during the luncheon.

The following is a list of university staff members who will receive awards:

For 10 Years of Service: Eleanor Anders, Terry Blake, Thomas Burnside, Travis Callihan, Patricia Campbell, Royce Chadwick, David Daniel, Rodney Elliott, Paul Glover, Anna Gue, Gregory Harmon, Nancy Heffernan, John Huxley, Ian Levstein, Tawnia Mathis, Gloria McFann, Linda McLain-Hartlage, Karen Midkiff, Kandice Napier, Leonard Nida, Joseph Perry, Holly Simpkins, Tracy Smith, Michael Smith, Timothy Sowards, Rita Spears, Crystal Stewart, Heather Stirewalt, John Sutherland, Julia White and Daniel Williamson.

For 15 Years of Service: Monica Brooks, Dennis Chappelle, Lisa Christopher, Kimberly Fry, Paul Hermansdorfer, David Steele, Denise Wiley and Timothy Woolum.

For 20 Years of Service: Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Thomas Bergquist, Judy Blevins, Pamela Bowen, Charles Carico, Linda Eastham, Tami Fletcher, Christopher Kennedy, Beverly Lee, Mark Nethercutt, Carolyn Plybon, Barbara Simpkins, Patsy Smith, Sherri Stepp, Barbara Tubbs-Ford and Debra Wood.

For 25 Years of Service: Dianne Anestis, John Ball, Linda Bowen, Jonathan Brown, Virginia Campbell-Turner, Leslie Cavender, Harold Cook, Pamela Hamilton, Gina Kates, Betty Lewis, John McComas, Melinda Morgan, James Morris-Smith, Gael Setliff, LuAnn South and Wilma Thomas.

For 30 Years of Service: Ruby Dean, Mike Dunn, Marilyn Fox, James McKeny, Elizabeth Nickell, Nancy Schultz and Wanda Webb.

For 35 Years of Service: Stephanie Gray, Charles McKown, Glenna Racer, Kristine Standifur and Sheila Wiley.

For 40 Years of Service:  Paul Dempsey.

Retirees: Sherry Adkins, Thomas Bergquist, Bonnie Berry, Leslie Cavender, Janet Clark, John Curry, Brenda Flemings, Elizabeth Graybeal, Florence Harshbarger, Carol Henson, Jacqueline Hersman, Sharon Lake, Henry Lambert, Karen Lucas, Juanita Marley, Joyce Maynard, Dennis Meadows, Vickie Navy, Nancy Person, Faye Ronk, Nancy Schultz, Stephen Shumlas, James Sinnette, Samuel Stanley, Mary Wolfe, and Nancy Wooten.

To be eligible for awards employees must have completed 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 years of service to Marshall University by May 1, 2011.

###


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Andrew Gooding named director of Marshall's RBA program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Andrew Gooding, an instructor in Marshall University's Department of Integrated Science and Technology since 1999, is the new director of MU's Regents Bachelor of Arts (RBA) program, effective Monday, May 16.

 

Gooding replaces former interim director Dr. Elaine Baker, who retired.

 

"I'm excited about the position," Gooding said. "The RBA staff really tries to do what's best for students. Helping students get ready for life after college is something I like to do."

 

Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for Outreach and Continuing Studies, said his office is excited to have Gooding as director of the RBA program, which is part of the Office of Outreach and Continuing Studies.

 

"Andrew brings a rich background and great enthusiasm to the office which will enhance our students' experience," Pauley said.

 

As director of the RBA program, Gooding works with returning students who have graduated from high school a minimum of four years ago to help them complete their undergraduate degrees in a timely manner.  He works with longtime RBA advisors Jerri Clagg and Rita Spears.

 

Gooding was raised in Ithaca, N.Y., received his bachelor's degree at Bates College and did graduate work at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. His graduate work focused on rhetorical theory and criticism and his research focuses on collective memory and trauma.

 

Gooding was hired by the IST department to teach courses in public speaking, technical writing, group communication and the impact of science and technology on society and bioethics, as well as to prepare students for senior projects. 

 

He is certified as a writing-intensive instructor by the Writing Across the Curriculum program at Marshall.  He also teaches the IST Connections courses as Core I Critical thinking courses.

 

Gooding has been the speech mentor for the Yeager seminar series and worked for the Rahall Transportation Institute completing reports, writing grant proposals, and editing technical papers.

He lives on the south side of Huntington with his wife, Grace, and two children, Evan and Christopher. He helps coach the Marshall University table tennis club, assists with Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, and coaches youth soccer and fencing.

 


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Intuit CEO Brad Smith keynote speaker for Marshall University Executive MBA hooding ceremony

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Thirty professional students in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration class were honored Saturday during a special hooding ceremony at the Charleston Marriott.

Brad Smith, president and CEO of Intuit, delivered the keynote address. Smith, who just last month was inducted in the Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame, is from Kenova, W.Va., and has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration from Marshall and a master's degree in Management from Aquinas College in Michigan. He became president and chief executive officer of Intuit in January of 2008 culminating a five-year rise through the company where he successfully led several of its major businesses. Intuit is a leading provider of business and financial management solutions for small and mid-sized businesses, financial institutions, consumers and accounting professionals and is consistently ranked as one of the most-admired software companies and best places to work.

The students were formally hooded with their academic regalia during the ceremony by Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp with assistance from College of Business Dean Chong Kim.

The cohort has successfully completed all the requirements of the Executive MBA program including a recent international residency in Frankfurt, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary, according to Dr. Uday Tate, director of Marshall's Executive MBA program.

"This ceremony recognizes the accomplishments of our professional business students in a formal, professional setting befitting the hard work and dedication that went into earning their Executive MBA degrees," Tate said. "They have studied together for more than 60 Saturdays on the South Charleston campus. We are proud of these students and we appreciate the sacrifices they made to advance their education and careers."

The Marshall University Executive MBA cohort, Class of 2011, includes: Michael Allen of Huntington, Troy Andes of Hurricane, Shannon Bailey of Princeton, Todd Beane of South Charleston, Shawna Boyer of Barboursville, Kayla Brown of Cross Lanes, Kevin Chikombero of Harare, Zimbabwe, Christina Dalton of Charleston, Clayton Ferguson of Morgantown, Brian Gartley of Morgantown, Walt Hawthorne of Beckley, David Hayes of Dunbar, LTC, John J. Hess of Barboursville, Gregory Hutton of Teays Valley, Carl Jimison of Huntington, Evan Johnson of St. Albans, Tom Johnson of Charleston, Courtney Kovach of Huntington, Michael Little of Huntington, Michael Moncada of Scott Depot, Joy Dee "Xan" Mooney of Wayne, Lalena Price of Charleston, Anthony Ridenour of Hurricane, Kathy Rittenhouse of Hurricane, Megan Roush of Charleston, Jason Shepherd of Boomer, Jennifer Thacker of Welch, Gordon Waters of Proctorville, Ohio, Shad West of South Charleston and Cody Wiseman of Cross Lanes.


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June Harless Center to hold year-end GigaPan celebration

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services, will have a year-end GigaPan celebration Monday, May 23.

 

The event will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. in Room BE 5 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

The GigaPan camera is a simple robotic platform for capturing very high-resolution panoramic images with a standard digital camera.  These images are then downloaded onto a computer where the software stitches the pictures together to create a single navigable image.  The images are easily stored on the Web, browsed and zoomed

 

On display will be projects from the first year of a two-year grant, which was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and enabled teachers to integrate innovative technology into existing curriculum. In addition, the project supported local and regional students to take GigaPan panoramic images of their communities and activities and share them with peers across the world. 

 

The grant aims to foster a spirit of global citizenship and understanding using technology in a safe forum for young people to share thoughts and ideas about their world.  Schools showcasing projects are from Marshall University Professional Development Partnership Schools and include Huntington High, Kellogg and Ceredo elementaries, Vinson Middle, Cherry River Elementary in Nicholas County and Beverly Elementary in Randolph County. 

 

This celebration on May 23 is free to the public and anyone interested is encouraged to attend.  For more information, contact Carrie-Meghan Quick at quickblanco@marshall.edu or visit gigapan.org. 


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Marshall Fly Fishing Team Prepares for Tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. For the second time in two years, Marshall University is endorsing a fly-fishing team in a nationally broadcast tournament scheduled for Thursday through Saturday, May 19- 21, in Cabins, W.Va.

The team, called "Team Marshall Fly Fishing," is composed of Brady Hanson of Arlington, Va., and Dr. David Zieg of Ranchland, Colo. The two anglers have a total of more than 30 years in fly-fishing experience and will compete as part of a 10-team field.

"This event continues to bring exposure to both Marshall University and the state of West Virginia," said Greg Hall, co-director of the tournament and a 1973 graduate of Marshall University. "Fly fishing is a sport that is experiencing major growth, particularly among professionals and women."

Hall previously fished as part of Team Marshall, but opted to help with tournament administration this year.

"I'm grateful that the College of Science and the Career Services office at Marshall are helping us with this team," said Hall.   "I just can't say enough about the support we've been given."

The tournament will be broadcast nationally on a future episode of "Fly Rod Chronicles with Curtis Fleming," (www.flyrodchronicles.tv) which is carried on the Sportsman Channel.  Check local listings for show times.

For more information contact Hall at greg@flyrodchronicles.tv


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Application period under way for "Jazz-MU-Tazz"

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Applications are now being accepted for Marshall University's 13th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival for high school musicians who will be entering grades 9 through 12 in the fall, according to Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of music and director of jazz studies at the university.

The festival will take place from Monday, June 13, through Saturday, June 18. Applications and a $25 registration fee are due Wednesday, June 1.

The festival will include classes in jazz performance and improvisation as well as other related music topics, Bingham said. Participants will perform in the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Jazz Ensemble as well as have the opportunity to perform in small groups, culminating with a final concert at the Pullman Square Plaza June 18.  In addition to the daily classes, evening activities such as concerts, jam sessions, movies and recreational activities will round out each day.

"Students who attend Jazz-MU-Tazz have a great time during the week in rehearsals, discussion forums, jam sessions and other social activities," Bingham said. "If you don't believe us, ask one of the previous year's participants!"

Jazz-MU-Tazz participants have the choice of staying on the Huntington campus or commuting from their homes. Campus housing will be at Marshall Commons and meals are available at the Harless Dining Room (in the same complex). High school-age students will be supervised by Jazz-MU-Tazz staff members and by residence hall personnel. 

In addition to music faculty members from Marshall, trombonist Dr. Dave Dickey will serve as guest instructor/artist. Originally from Des Moines, Iowa, Dickey attended the University of North Texas and received a bachelor's degree in jazz studies. While at North Texas, he recorded two CDs with the famed One O' Clock Lab Band directed by Neil Slater Dickey. He then moved to Miami and lived there for six years as a performing and touring musician and jazz radio disc jockey for WDNA-Miami. While living in Miami, he received his master's in jazz performance from Florida International University.  He then moved to Urbana, Ill., to work on his D.M.A. in jazz performance the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana. Dickey currently lives in Saint Louis, Mo., teaching jazz trombone at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Further information on the festival and a downloadable brochure and application form are available on the Marshall website at www.marshall.edu/jazz.


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English professor wins writing award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor has been awarded a prestigious prize for his fictional short story which chronicles a day in the lives of four young boys.

 

John Van Kirk, a professor of English, was recognized by The Iowa Review which sponsors a yearly contest in poetry, fiction and nonfiction.  Van Kirk will receive a $1,000 cash prize and his story, "Landscape with Boys," will be published in the magazine later this year.

 

"The story is set in a suburban cemetery," Van Kirk said.  "It's based on a real place where my brothers and I often played when we were boys."

 

Van Kirk has been teaching courses in creative writing and international literature at Marshall University since 1993.  He has written a novel, "The Enchanted Pond," which is scheduled to be published by Red Hen Press in 2013.


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'100 Cities, One Night for Autism' features acclaimed documentary, 'Wretches & Jabberers'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington is one of 100 cities across the United States participating Thursday, May 12, in "100 Cities, One Night for Autism," a unique theatrical screening of the critically acclaimed documentary, "Wretches & Jabberers," sponsored nationally by the John P. Hussman Foundation and the Autism Society.

 

Locally the film will be shown at 7:30 p.m. in the Marquee Cinema in downtown Huntington. This showing is sponsored by the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University, the Autism Services Center and the Autism Society - River Cities.

 

"Wretches & Jabberers" follows two men with autism, Tracy Thresher and Larry Bissonnette, who embark on a global quest to change attitudes about disability, intelligence and communication. The feature film is about personal struggles and the power of relationships and the personal connections people make through communication.

 

"We encourage everyone in our community to come and see this film. It is an eye opener about perceptions of disability," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University.

 

The documentary was directed by Academy Award winner Gerardine Wurzburg ("Educating Peter") with a soundtrack featuring original music by composer J. Ralph.

 

The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots autism organization dedicated to improving the lives of all affected by autism. The mission of the John P. Hussman Foundation is to provide life-changing assistance through medical research, education and direct aid to vulnerable individuals having urgent needs or significant disabilities.

 

For more information, call 1-800-344-5115.


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Students collect canned food for professor to deliver to Alabama tornado victims

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students in a health sciences medical terminology class at Marshall University held a canned food drive to benefit victims of the recent deadly tornadoes that ravaged several southern states.

 

The students collected approximately 2,000 canned food items for Alabama residents out of respect for Dr. Tim Tolbert, an assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology, who is an Alabama native. Tolbert is driving to his home state this week to deliver the goods to an organization based in Northeast Alabama, specifically Calhoun, Dekalb and Etowah counties.

 

"I know all too well the needs of the affected communities," Tolbert said. "I'm very proud of our students and I know their efforts will be appreciated.


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Marshall University K-12 Summer Program starts June 27

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. Marshall University is once again offering a month-long K-12 Summer Program in Charleston, designed to provide children under 18 with activity-based learning experiences in writing, reading and math.


Students will explore the theme "Many Lands, Many Stories" and have opportunities to become involved in hands-on activities. The program will take place at Stonewall Jackson Middle School from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, June 27 through July 28.  Assessment and counseling services also will be available.


The cost for each child is $100 and includes breakfast and lunch. Scholarships are available on a need basis. Participants will be scheduled for an orientation session from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. on either Wednesday, June 22 or Tuesday, June 23. Since this is a full inclusion program, both regular and special education students are encouraged to apply. 


The program utilizes supervised graduate students in clinical experiences leading to certification or licensure.


Enrollment forms and additional information can be obtained by contacting Dr. Joyce Meikamp, Director of Clinical and Field-Based Experiences at Marshall, by phone at 304-746-1983 or by e-mail at jmeikamp@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday May 4, 2011
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Graduate College announces summer thesis grant recipients

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight graduate students at Marshall University have received summer thesis grants for this year, Dr. Donna J. Spindel, dean of the graduate college, announced today.

The purpose of the grant is to provide funding for students who are working on thesis projects, Spindel said.  The selection is made on the quality and significance of the thesis research, the likelihood that the research will eventuate in a completed thesis and the justification of need for support. The grant amount is $500 and is provided by the Marshall University Research Corporation.

Following is a list of recipients:

  • Lauren Angel, M.A., History, The West Virginia Dance Festival: An Enduring and Evolving Community (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Kevin Barksdale).
  • Derek Bozzell, M.S., Biological Sciences, The Effects of Auditory Call Playback on Anuran Visual Encounter Surveys (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Thomas K. Pauley).
  • Elizabeth V. Fet, M.S., Biological Sciences, Fish population dynamics within the Ohio River: Are dams acting as barriers? (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Philippe Georgel).
  • Derek S. Hancock, M.S., Environmental Science, Digital Conversion of Scientific Technical Manuals (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Tracy Christofero).
  • Jennifer L. Hancock, Psy.D., Psychology, Assessing the Needs of West Virginia Cancer Survivors (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Pamela Mulder).
  • Sarah M. McConnell, M.A., English, Portrait of an Appalachian Woman Writer: Investigating the relationship between literacy and identity among Appalachian Women of the working-class (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Chris Green).
  • Robert Desmond Shura, Psy.D., Psychology, Effects of Partner Attachment Quality on PTSD Severity with Combat-Exposed Veterans (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Marc Lindberg).
  • Claire E. Snyder, M.A., History, Change by Coalition: WV FREE and the Reproductive Rights Movement in West Virginia (Thesis Adviser: Dr. Greta Rensenbrink).

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Retrospective exhibit on artist Hank Keeling begins Friday evening in South Charleston

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. A retrospective art exhibition, "Hank Keeling: A Life in Art," honoring the local artist who died in 2010, will open Friday, May 6, in the Marshall University South Charleston Library and Research Commons on Marshall's South Charleston campus. The show is being sponsored by Marshall's Graduate Humanities Program.

 

An opening reception will take place that evening from 5:30 to 8 p.m. in the library.  Introductions will be made at 6 p.m. and Richard Ressmeyer will give a gallery talk at 6:15 p.m.

 

Both the exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

 

Keeling, who was born in St. Albans, achieved recognition far beyond the borders of his home state with his engaging images achieved through combining collage, drawing and painting. His effervescent yet significant works can be found throughout the United States, Europe and China. His contemporary modern art has been featured in numerous exhibits, museums and art stores, and his work has been the subject of several feature articles.

 

After receiving a B.F.A. in Interior Design in 1947 from Pratt Institute, Keeling attended classes for several years at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, Art Students League and Brooklyn Museum of Art, all in New York City. He also participated in several summer workshops in Provincetown, Mass., where he studied with artists Leo Manso and Victor Kandell. In the late 1960s Keeling returned to this area and received a master's degree in fine arts from Marshall in 1969.       

 

Keeling found recognition not only as an artist but also as a teacher and mentor. As a teacher and chair of the art department at the University of Charleston, he was a strong force in modeling the careers of countless artists, public school teachers and university professors. Keeling was always generous in sharing his talents and his knowledge of art, teaching classes throughout the community and at local art museums.  Some West Virginia collections that include his work are the Avampato Museum (formerly Sunrise Museum), the Parkersburg Art Center and the West Virginia State Art collection. He also was listed in Who's Who in American Art as an influential American artist. Keeling retired from the University of Charleston as an Associate Professor of Art, Emeritus.

 

The Keeling exhibit at Marshall came about in part because of a Graduate Humanities spring seminar taught by Mark Tobin Moore, also titled "A Life in Art: Hank Keeling." The seminar included biographical research, art preparation, and the writing and producing of a catalog of the exhibition. Students assisted in curating and installing the Keeling exhibit, which will run through August 12.

 

The Keeling show is one of a rotating series of exhibits designed to showcase the work of local artists or those with local ties. The exhibits are free and open to the public.

 

The Marshall University South Charleston campus is on Angus E. Peyton Drive, off Kanawha Turnpike, just past the Dow Center. Free parking is available on site. For additional information, call  304-746-2022.      


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MU professor to read from his work in Galway, Ireland

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University English Professor Art Stringer will be reading from his work at the May Over The Edge Writers' Gathering at The Kitchen @ The Museum in Galway, Ireland Friday, May 13.

 

He will be joined by Ron Houchin of Huntington and others in the 8 p.m. readings.

 

Stringer is the author of two collections of poems, Channel Markers (Wesleyan University Press) and Human Costume (Salmon Poetry). His work has appeared in such journals as The Nation, Antaeus, The Ohio Review, Denver Quarterly, Prairie Schooner, Shenandoah and Poetry Northwest, as well as in Backcountry: Contemporary Writing in West Virginia.

 

He has edited and introduced a new edition of Louise McNeill's Paradox Hill, (West Virginia University Press, 2009).  He has read his work in a wide range of American locales and also previously in Galway.  For 20 years, he has taught writing and literature at Marshall University.

 

For 30 years, Houchin taught public school in the Appalachian region of southernmost Ohio. He has three books published by Salmon Publishing, Death And The River (1997), Moveable Darkness (2002), andMuseum Crows (2009).

 

His other books Among Wordless Things (2004) and Birds In The Tops Of Winter Trees (2008) were published by Wind Publications of Nicholasville, Ky. His awards include Appalachian-Book-of-the-Year-in-Poetry, a National Society of Arts and Letters Prize, an Ohio Arts Council Fellowship, a poetry prize from Indiana University and a Writer's Digest Award. 


Houchin earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall.


For more information, visit http://www.overtheedgeliteraryevents.blogspot.com/ or call Stringer at 304-696-2403.


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Burnis R. Morris, MU's Carter G. Woodson Professor, selected as 20th Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Burnis R. Morris, Marshall University's Carter G. Woodson Professor, has been selected as the 2011-2012 Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow, according to Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy.

Morris is the 20th faculty member to have been appointed as a Drinko Fellow. Dr. Simon Perry was the first Drinko Fellow in the 1994-1995 academic year.

 

"Burnis has been an outstanding addition to the Marshall University faculty," Gould said. "He certainly merits the title of Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Fellow. I am especially pleased that he will be using his time as Drinko Fellow in the next academic year to work on certain aspects of the life of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, a one-time resident of Huntington, a distinguished scholar and father of African American history."

 

Appointed annually, the Fellow receives a generous stipend, a reduced teaching load, and other financial and clerical support for two academic years to undertake research projects and other scholarly pursuits.

 

Morris will present the results of his work to the university community at a symposium next spring during Marshall's annual Celebration of Academics.

 

Morris, known nationally for his work advising and training professional journalists who cover philanthropy and tax-exempt issues, has held the position of Carter G. Woodson Professor in the Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications since 2003.

"The Drinko Academy Fellowship is one of the most prestigious honors a faculty member can receive in West Virginia higher education," Morris said. "I am grateful to the Drinko Academy for its support and recognition. I look forward to an exciting year."

Morris said he will continue his research into Woodson's career and revisit his most famous work, "Mis-Education of the Negro," first published in 1933.

"The book, now a classic, was a strong indictment of American education, especially how it systematically ignored contributions from racial minorities," Morris said. "Although the education system has been more inclusive in the decades since Woodson's observations, one would have to be Rip Van Winkle not to notice the system still has major problems; it is attacked from the left and the right, incessantly. I hope to figure out whether any of Woodson's major criticisms in 'Mis-Education' are relevant 78 years later - and of course, whether many of today's criticisms echo Woodson's observations. There should be enough material for a book."

Morris has served as head of the Journalism Division at Marshall since 2006. He has created two courses, copy editing and sports reporting, and taught other courses across a wide spectrum in mass communications -- including advanced reporting, public affairs reporting, computer-assisted reporting, mass media history, women, minorities and the media and public relations. He is a member of the Marshall University Faculty Senate and its Executive Committee, chair of the JMC Diversity Committee and Special Projects Committee and former chair of the Faculty Senate's Student Conduct and Welfare Committee.


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Child Development Academy at Marshall plans new nature playground

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 100 volunteers, including Marshall University AmeriCorps members and Marshall University School of Medicine students, are expected to participate Saturday, April 30, in an effort to redesign the Child Development Academy's playground into a certified Nature Explore Outdoor Classroom.

 

The Child Development Academy at Marshall University is an early education center that benefits the children of Marshall students, employees and the extended community. It is located at 522 22nd St. in Huntington.

 

The redesign is part of a national program sponsored by the National Arbor Foundation.

 

"This project has been in the works for months and is truly a community and university project," said Susan Miller, director of the academy.  "We have dozens of volunteers committed to participate including our parents, medical students, Marshall AmeriCorps members, members of the Marshall women's soccer team, our staff, and community members including the Junior League."

 

Miller says transformation of the academy's traditional playground into an outdoor classroom includes designs based on the area's location in Appalachia.   Materials for the project have been donated by a variety of community organizations and businesses.

 

Work on the playground is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. For more information contact Miller at 304-696-5803.


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Choral groups to conclude academic year with Friday concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 150 singers from Marshall University choral groups will participate in a Choral Collage concert at 8 p.m. Friday, April 29, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The program is free and open to the public.

The groups, which include the Marshall University Chorus, Choral Union and Chamber Choir, will join to repeat some of the highlights of Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana," which they performed with the Huntington Symphony in February. Each group also will perform some of their spring repertoire individually.

Conducting the ensembles will be Dr. David Castleberry, director of choral activities at Marshall, and Robert Wray, assistant professor of music.

"After a semester that has included performances with the Huntington Symphony, a tour, and many campus concerts, this will be a great way to wrap up the academic year," Castleberry said.


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174th Marshall University commencement set for May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 7 when the university celebrates its 174th commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

 

Among the 1,531 students receiving degrees are 933 undergraduates, 531 graduate students and 67 from the School of Medicine. The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2011 graduates only.

 

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said about 800 students have indicated they plan to participate in the commencement ceremony.

 

Ferguson said 401 students will graduate with honors. Fifty-nine will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 134 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 198 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Three students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and seven associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

 

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

 

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages, 12 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs.

 

The 12 with tentative 4.0s are: Ennis Ayla Barbery of Athens, W.Va.; Rachel Perry Blake of Huntington; Cameron D. Buchman of Huntington; Angela Louise Bumgarner of Beckley, W.Va.; Kathleen M. Clark of Twinsburg, Ohio; Elizabeth Anne Fleming of South Bend, Ind.; Molly Gallagher of Morgantown, W.Va.; Kenneth Robert Mullen of Huntington; Patrick Lee Stewart of Matheny, W.Va.; Catherine A. Togger of Hurricane, W.Va.; Elijah Alderson Wise of Huntington, and Jenna Marie Workman of St. Albans, W.Va.

 

Pulitzer Prize winner and two-time Marshall University graduate Julia Keller will deliver the commencement address and receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree.

 

Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events:

 

Thursday, April 28

 

5:15 p.m., Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement, Buskirk Field

 

6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, rooms 113-116 at the center

 

Friday, April 29

 

2 p.m., College of Fine Arts Awards Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

4 p.m., International students' end of year/graduation party, Village on 6th student apartments

 

7 p.m., Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

Wednesday, May 4

 

1 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications awards ceremony, Smith Hall 154

 

7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

 

Thursday, May 5

 

7 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, South Charleston High School, 1 Eagle Way, South Charleston

 

 

Friday, May 6

 

11 a.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

 

11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

 

4 p.m., John Marshall Emerging Leaders Institute (JMELI) graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

 

4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department recognition ceremony, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

 

4:30 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, 520 18th St

 

5 p.m., Honors College's Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

 

6 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications spring graduates banquet, Foundation Hall

 

7 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

7 p.m., College of Health Professions' nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church

 

7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church  

 

7 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

Saturday, May 7

 

9 a.m., Marshall University's 174th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, Communication Disorders graduation reception, Smith Hall 143

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, an invitation event at Wesvanawha, 845 4th Ave.

 

1 p.m., College of Science Convocation, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

 

1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation celebration, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

 

Main commencement notes:

 

  • The commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web beginning at 8:30 a.m. To access the stream, visit www.marshall.edu.
     

  • Marshall University will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena from campus. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.
     

  • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremony for purchase at $15 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office Web site (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Additionally, orders will be accepted at the arena May 7. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.
     

  • A professional photographer (Legacy Photographics) will take two photographs of each graduate after the graduate has received his or her representative scroll. The photographer will send proof information to graduates using MU e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.


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Marshall University festival celebrates student learning

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Minds of Marshall Festival, a month-long series of university-wide events celebrating academic accomplishments, wraps up this week at Marshall University.

 

"Marshall University, its faculty and staff are committed to making every student's learning experience a quality one," said Dr. Karen Mitchell, professor of mathematics and festival organizer.  "This series of activities highlights our students' work and represents the very heart of what we do here at Marshall."

 

The schedule of events may be found at www.marshall.edu/go/mom2011.

 

The festival is sponsored by the university's individual colleges and showcases both undergraduate and graduate learning.

 

For more information, contact Mitchell at 304-696-3042.

 


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Presidents from Marshall, Alcorn State sign faculty exchange agreement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and M. Christopher Brown II, president of Alcorn State University in Lorman, Miss., today signed a document making a faculty exchange program between the two institutions official.

 

The signing of the Alcorn State University-Marshall University Partnership In Education Agreement took place in the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus. Alcorn State is the nation's first historically black land grant institution, and last fall enrolled about 3,200 students.

 

"Marshall University and Alcorn State University have been working for two years to make this wonderful program a reality," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Marshall. "It will create incredible synergy between the two institutions and faculty from each one will have the opportunity to teach in a completely different environment. It is a great partnership for Marshall University."

 

Through the exchange, a Marshall faculty member will spend a semester teaching at Alcorn State and an Alcorn State faculty member will spend a semester teaching at Marshall. The program is expected to begin this fall. A similar student exchange between the two schools begins in fall 2012.

 

"This is the beginning of a great, new relationship between Alcorn State, the second-oldest university in the state of Mississippi, and Marshall, the oldest (public) university in West Virginia," Brown said. "We look forward to this exchange and a long-standing and mutually collaborative relationship."

 

Clarke said the idea of a faculty exchange program surfaced in a meeting of Marshall's Faculty Diversity Committee.

 

"We wanted to do an exchange with a historically black college," Clarke said. "We wanted the culture they had to bring and we wanted them to embrace our culture. I chose Alcorn State because when I was at the University of Nebraska, we did a faculty exchange with Alcorn and it was wonderful."

 

---------

 

Photo: Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, left, and M. Christopher Brown II, president of Alcorn State University, sign the Alcorn State University-Marshall University Partnership in Education Agreement today during a ceremony in the Drinko Library on MU's Huntington campus. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Greenbrier Classic Badge winners announced at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., in partnership with the 2011 Greenbrier Classic, today announced the following winners of Alumni Badge packages for two for the 2011 Greenbrier Classic: 

Joe Zegeer, Connie Reed, Johnny Abbott, Yetta Meadows, Fran Klaiber, Charles Stone, Gary Groves, Gina McCoy, Jeanette Muth, Cheryl Parsons, Keith Glenn, David Jenkins, Jay Stone, Robbie Welty, Chuck Shannon, William Chaffin and Carol Galbraith.

Winners were selected from tickets sold by retail partners including Fifth Third Bank, Hometown Sportswear, Macreedo's, Fat Patty's, Sport Mart, MU Hall of Fame Caf and Shoop's. The contest generated nearly $2,000 to benefit scholarships at Marshall University. 

Lead retail partner Fifth Third Bank topped sales during the contest with 1,000 tickets sold at branches throughout West Virginia and Kentucky. Fifth Third officials presented a $1,000 check to the Marshall University Foundation immediately following the drawing.  

"Fifth Third recognizes the importance of access to higher education and is happy to have partnered with Marshall University and The Greenbrier Classic in providing this support," said Bob Welty, state president of Fifth Third Bank. "We are proud of the efforts of our branches who participated and their good work in leading sales."

The Ashland, Ky., branch of Fifth Third Bank led sales among 11 participating branches while Sport Mart in Charleston, W.Va., led retail sales.

Those interested in attending the 2011 Greenbrier Classic can take advantage of a special buy one, get one free offer for MU Alumni and friends.  Those who purchase an Alumni Grounds Badge can receive a second badge free.

More information is available at www.marshall.edu/bogo. A portion of the proceeds from the badges purchased will benefit Marshall University through the Greenbrier Badges for Charity Program.  

For more information, contact Rebecca Randolph, assistant vice president for development at Marshall University, by phone at 304-696-3292, or by e-mail at samplesr@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Tim McNeely (left), Tournament Director for The Greenbrier Classic, draws winners of the Alumni Badges, assisted by Rebecca Randolph, assistant vice president for development at Marshall University.  Looking on is  Bob Welty, state president of Fifth Third Bank.


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Marshall University Executive MBA class heads to Germany, Hungary for international residency

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Twenty-nine professional students in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration class will embark on an international study abroad residency to Frankfurt, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary, beginning this Saturday.

 

The students, who have been studying together on Saturdays at Marshall's South Charleston campus for the past 18 months, depart from Charleston Saturday morning and return to Charleston on Sunday, May 1. While in Europe, students will interact with locally owned and operated businesses and international companies during the weeklong residency abroad.

 

The excursion is an important part of the Marshall Executive MBA experience and involves five full days of class, lectures, presentations and on-site tours, said Dr. Uday Tate, director of the Executive MBA program.

 

"This is the last leg of the cohort's journey," Tate said. "Our students, who will be hooded two weeks after we return, can now take the principles they have mastered in class and honed with the help of their professors and peers and see how everything comes together on an international level. This is an amazing opportunity for our students and a component of an Executive MBA that serves seasoned professionals very well."

 

While in Germany the cohort and accompanying professors will explore the business of the wine industry in the region of Rheingau; delve into international marketing in a seminar with FrankfurtRheinMain GmbH; and learn about executive recruitment and development during a meeting with the executive vice president of DHR International.

 

While in Hungary, seminar topics include shared services and near-shoring presented by Kinetic Concepts, Hungary's Company of the Year; status of venture capital in Hungary presented by Mid Europa Venture Capital; legal aspects of cross border mergers, acquisitions and divestitures in Hungary and Central and Eastern Europe presented by Kajtr Takcs Hegymegi-Barakonyi Baker & McKenzie; and shared services in Central and Eastern Europe presented by Hewlett-Packard Hungary.

 

Students participating in the residency include: Michael Allen of Huntington; Troy Andes of Hurricane; Shannon Bailey of Princeton; Todd Beane of South Charleston; Shawna Boyer of Barboursville; Kayla Brown of Cross Lanes; Kevin Chikombero of Harare, Zimbabwe; Christina Dalton of Charleston; Clayton Ferguson of Morgantown; Brian Gartley of Morgantown; Walt Hawthorne of Beckley; David Hayes of Dunbar; LTC. John J. Hess of Barboursville; Gregory Hutton of Teays Valley; Carl Jimison of Huntington; Evan Johnson of St. Albans; Tom Johnson of Charleston; Courtney Kovach of Huntington; Michael Little of Huntington; Michael Moncada of Scott Depot; Xan Mooney of Wayne; Lalena Price of Charleston; Anthony  Ridenour of Hurricane; Megan Roush of Charleston; Jason Shepherd of Boomer; Jennifer Thacker of Welch; Gordon Waters of Proctorville, Ohio, Shad West of South Charleston and Cody Wiseman of Cross Lanes.

 

Also accompanying the cohort on the trip are Lewis College of Business professors - Tate, who is also a professor of marketing, Dr. Suneel Maheshwari, professor of accounting, and Dr. Michael Newsome, professor of economics.


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Wednesday April 20, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Joe Johns to speak at Marshall's Honors Convocation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Joe Johns, a 1980 Marshall University graduate and CNN correspondent based in Washington, D.C., will be the featured speaker Friday, April 29, at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation at MU's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The convocation, part of Marshall's 17th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. It will be followed by a public reception.

 

"We look forward every year to the Honors Convocation, which is the only university-wide recognition of our undergraduates' academic excellence," said Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College. "It is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the achievements of students whose faculty have identified them as outstanding in their field of study."

 

Todd said more than 100 students will participate and for the first time all 64 graduates of the Honors College will receive a special medallion. Also for the first time, the students will be accompanied by their department chairs when they are recognized on stage.

 

Todd said it is appropriate that Johns deliver the keynote address to a group of outstanding students. At Marshall, Johns was a standout student-athlete, winning four Southern Conference championships in the shot put and discus for the Thundering Herd track and field team, while consistently earning dean's list honors in the classroom. He earned a degree in political science from Marshall and a law degree from American University.

 

With a commanding stage presence, he also was regarded as one of the best actors at Marshall in the late 1970s, performing key roles in numerous productions for the theatre department.

 

Today, Johns is highly respected in his field. Before joining CNN in 2004, he covered Capitol Hill for NBC News for more than 10 years. He has received many honors, including two National Association of Black Journalists Salute to Excellence awards. He also was among the NBC Nightly News team to receive an Edward R. Murrow Award for reports on the "Beltway Sniper" saga. He also played a key role in CNN's "America Votes 2008" coverage.

 

Johns visited Marshall in 2008 when he served as grand marshal in the university's homecoming parade. He also was the featured speaker that year at the 38th annual memorial service honoring the victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash.


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Tuesday April 19, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of FIne Arts, 304-696-3296

African Drumming and Dance Ensemble to perform April 26

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University African Drumming and Dance Ensemble will perform a concert at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The group, under the direction of Steven Hall, coordinator of percussion at the university, will perform traditional music from the West African countries of Benin, Guinea, Togo and Ghana.

"Traditional African music is very much a community activity on a number of different levels," Hall said. "This music is used to maintain a deep connection with the history and memory of the ancestors. Most traditional music has four aspects: drumming, dancing, singing and costumes."

When the weather permits the group is often seen rehearsing on the lawn of Smith Music Hall, facing Hal Greer Boulevard, since, according to Hall, "this music is meant to be performed outside in the open air where anyone in the neighborhood can enjoy."

Most of the members in the group are not music majors and the ensemble is open to any MU student with a desire to learn about non-western cultures, Hall said.

Admission to the April 26 event is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or email  Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday April 19, 2011
Contact: Anna Swift, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, 304-690-1483

Emeritus professors Arnold, Turner to speak at Marshall University Journalism School luncheon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Emeritus professors George Arnold and Ralph Turner will speak at a luncheon for Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications (SOJMC) on Saturday, April 23.

Arnold, who taught at the SOJMC for 36 years, and Turner, who taught for 32, will speak about the history of the SOJMC. Turner also will discuss The Parthenon, the Society of Professional Journalists and the SOJMC internship program.

Turner is responsible for having brought the campus newspaper from a semiweekly production to four days a week. He also won "chapter advisor of the year," along with Arnold, from the Society of Professional Journalists and created an internship program that has since become a model used by other universities and colleges.

Arnold, who produced the "Media Writer's Handbook: A Guide to Common Writing and Editing Problems," said both he and Turner are pleased to be presenting at the luncheon.

"Since we retired, Dean (Corley) Dennison and the rest of the faculty have been very, very good about inviting us back, and so we have remained active," Arnold said. "We've remained close to the program, and we appreciate that fact that they still haul us off the shelf and dust us off and let us be a part of the program from time to time."

 

The noon luncheon, which follows an 11 a.m. ceremony at the Memorial Fountain and precedes the 4 p.m. Green and White game, will take place in the Shawkey Dining Room of the Memorial Student Center. The event is sponsored by Clear Channel Communications.

 

Tickets are $20 for Marshall students, $25 for non-Marshall students and $35 for adults. Tickets must be purchased 72 hours in advance. Contact makeyourmark@marshall.edu or www.marshall.edu/makeyourmark.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Neera Clarkson, WMUL-FM Promotions Director,, 304-951-1750

WMUL-FM 88.1 efforts benefit Locks of Love

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM 88.1, the student broadcast voice of Marshall University, will be host to an event to benefit Locks of Love Thursday, April 21, at the Marshall Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The three-hour event begins at 11 a.m. and is scheduled to end at 2 p.m.

 

Haircuts and styles will be provided free of charge to anyone who is willing to donate 10 inches or more of his or her hair. The new styles will be provided by the Huntington School of Beauty Culture.

 

Hair from the Herd will benefit Locks of Love, a not-for-profit organization that provides recipients with a custom, vacuum-fitted hairpiece made entirely from donated human hair.  The vacuum fit is designed for children who have experienced a total loss of scalp hair and does not require the use of tape or glue.  Most of the recipients suffer from an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata for which there is unfortunately no known cause or cure. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that resulted in permanent hair loss.

 

The Locks of Love organization, which began operation in 1998, has helped more than 2,000 children since its first year of operation. Thousands of bundles of donated hair are received as a result of the national publicity that Locks of Love has received from newspapers, magazines and television programs.  More than 80 percent of the donors are children, making this a charity where children have an opportunity to help children.

 

Donated hair is evaluated for its usefulness according to the following guidelines:

  • To donate hair that can be used in a hairpiece, hair must be at least 10 inches in length.
  • It must be bundled in a ponytail or braid.
  • Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be used.
  • Locks of Love also accepts hair donations that are less than 10 inches. This hair is sold and used to cut overhead costs.

WMUL-FM also will be accepting monetary donations for Locks of Love. One hundred percent of all money raised will go to Locks of Love.

 

For more information about Locks of Love, call 561-963-1677 or 1-888-896-1588 for toll-free recorded information.  Locks of Love also may be reached at www.locksoflove.org, or by e-mail at volunteer@locksoflove.org.

 

For more information about the Hair From the Herd event, Neera Clarkson may be contacted by cell phone at 304-951-1750 or by e-mail at wmulpromotions@gmail.com.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University offering educational session on pertussis vaccine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Student Health Education Programs and the Cabell-Huntington Health Department are hosting an educational session on vaccines as part of a continuing public awareness campaign.

 

The session is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, in the Ed Grose Room of the Harless Dining Hall, which is located at the intersection of 5th Avenue and 17th Street in Huntington.

 

"Pertussis (Whooping Cough) and Vaccine Myths" is the topic and will feature guest speaker Jenny Murray, whose daughter contracted pertussis as an infant.


The sessions are part of the West Virginia Adolescent Project: Take Your Best Shot campaign, a statewide initiative aimed at increasing the number of college students being vaccinated against a variety of diseases and infections. Attendees will have the opportunity to receive a free Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccine.

 

This event also will include take-home educational materials, free food and giveaways. For more information, contact the Office of Student Health Programs at 304-696-4800.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students to be initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Initiation of the 75 students who have accepted an invitation to join the newly installed Marshall University chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi will take place at 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19 in Room BE 5 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

 

Initiation is a public and formal way to recognize the new members. Of the 75, an estimated 40, along with members of their families, are expected to attend the initiation.

 

Marshall's chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, which was approved by the organization's board of directors in spring 2010, was formally installed in November.

 

"The addition of Phi Kappa Phi is wonderful for Marshall University," said Dr. Gordon Crews, charter president of the chapter. "It is a great opportunity for students who have demonstrated a great level of academic achievement. Dr. Mary Todd (dean of the MU Honors College) worked really hard to get Phi Kappa Phi here, so it is an honor to be voted in as the charter president. We hope that now, the students who are being initiated Tuesday will help us get the word out to other students when we do another call to those who achieve at that level next year."

 

Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest, largest and most selective all-discipline honor society. The society has chapters on nearly 300 campuses in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Philippines.

 

Membership in Phi Kappa Phi is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners of Maier Latin, writing awards announced at Marshall

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Winners of the Maier Awards, sponsored annually by the Maier Foundation Inc., and hosted by Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, were announced today at a ceremony in the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's  Huntington campus.

 

Outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions were recognized during an awards ceremony.

 

The Maier Latin Cup Awards were established in 1979 by William J. Maier Jr., father of former Maier Foundation President Ed Maier, to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.

 

A high school graduate at the age of 16, Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the state. He credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

 

The Maier Latin Cup Awards celebrate publicly the best high school Latin students in West Virginia. They are administered by Marshall's Department of Classics.

 

Also, Marshall's Department of Classics sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation. This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

 

The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1972 by William J. Maier Jr., in honor of his father. These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall.

 

Here are the winners of this year's Latin and writing awards.

 

Maier Latin Sight-Translation Contest

Latin I

First place: Alec Reed, Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Second place: Sara Nix, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Latin II

First place: Lauren Howell, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Second place: Samantha Harris, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Latin III

First place: Emily Blake, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Latin IV

First place: Stephanie Rice, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

 

Maier Latin Cup Awards Competition

First place: Samantha G. Harris, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Second place: Andrea E. Tyree, George Washington. Teacher: Ruth Diller

Third place: Amanda G. Nelson, George Washington. Teacher: Ruth Diller

 

Maier Latin Scholarship recipient

Sarah Marie Burns of Riverton, W.Va., first-year graduate student in Latin M.A. program

 

William J. Maier Writing Awards

First-Year Composition

First place: Drilling for Disaster, Adam Shaver, Biological Sciences, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. K. Prejean

Second place: The Difficulties of Living Gluten-Free, Victor Monheim, Nursing, Orrville, Ohio. Faculty mentor: Professor M. Daniel

Third place: Health-Care Quality Reports Do More Harm than Good, Deborah M. Moore, English, East Lynn, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. R. Ellison

Fourth place: Modern Day Slavery: Intervention and Prevention, Shoshannah Diehl, English, Stockbridge, Ga. Faculty mentor: Professor M. Daniel

Honorable mention: Henry V: Sympathetic or Not, Dreama Pritt, Regents Bachelor of Arts, Hurricane, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. T. Burbery;

Helga Thorn Accepts Her Past, Hailey Bellomy, Communication Studies, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Van Kirk

 

Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose

First place: 'Survive to Sound this Wailing Tone': Writing the Mortal Body in Anne Bradstreet's Elegies, Rajia Hassib, English Graduate Program, Logan, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder

Second place: 'I'm Lying': Nattative Reliability in The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Ian Ferrell, English Education, Union Bridge, Md. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Van Kirk

Third place: This/Then, Delaney McLemore, English, Philomath, Ore. Faculty mentor: Dr. R. Peckham

Fourth place: A Lover of Peace: Pacifism and the Construction of Identity in Letters from an American Farmer, Zachary Miller, English, South Charleston, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder;

      A Word to the Wise is Enough, Cristin Haught, English, Appomattox, Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder

 

Graduate Non-Fiction Prose

First place: The Saintly Strumpet: Reconciling the Two Desdemonas, Julie Ann Baker, English Graduate Program, Ashland, Ky. Faculty Mentor: Dr. E. Taft

Second place: The Taming of a Tale: Shakespeare's Treatment of Folklore in The Taming of the Shrew, Katherine Mohn, Master of Arts in Teaching, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty Mentor: Dr. M. Moore

Third place: The Fragmented Search for Selfhood: Identity and Form in the Postmodern Short Story, Sarah Morgan, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. A. Viola

Fourth place: Rereading Recalcitrance: The War Stories of Hemingway, Salinger, and O'Brien, Chris Brewer, Master of Arts in English, Chapmanville, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. A. Viola

 

Graduate and Undergraduate Fiction

First place: The Taste of What? Rajia Hassib, English graduate program, Logan, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. J. Hill

Second place: Skin Deep, Renee Gibbs, College of Science, St. Albans, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Third place: The Cheerleader, Christina Haymaker, Integrated Science and Technology, Elizabeth, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Fourth place: Inglorious, Caleb Whisenant, English, Crab Orchard, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. J. Hill

 

Graduate and Undergraduate Poetry

First place: Sea Story and other Poems, Erika Tharp, English, Washington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Second place: Hoarders and Vultures and other Poems, Cory Jackson, Beckley, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Third place: Bartender Tips and other Poems, Nick A. Dailey, English, Point Pleasant, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Fourth place: The Shoemaker and other Poems, Jad Adkins, English, Kenova, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

 

---------------

 

Photo: Ed Maier, center, poses with winners of the Maier Awards, announced today in the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center at Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday April 15, 2011
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

Newswoman, Appalachian-roots rock band visit set of 'Up Late' this week



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Up Late" welcomes WSAZ newswoman Charly Arnolt to the show this week.

Arnolt, who has been with the station since September 2010, talks with host Jamie LoFiego about her life outside of journalism. She also works on her delivery of pick-up lines with J.J. Smart (Patrick Webb, a junior broadcast major from Huntington).

 

In other action, student crew member, the Rev. Jim Nash, goes on location to investigate extravagant offices of certain staff members at Marshall University. His exclusive takes him to the basement dwelling of a local TV talk show host.

 

This week's musical guest is Deadbeats and Barkers, a three-piece Appalachian-roots rock band from Huntington whose sound blends elements of vintage rock, delta blues, funk, jazz and bluegrass and whose influencers include The Band and Paul Simon, with a nod to artists like Stevie Wonder, The Meters and Hank Williams.

 

This episode airs on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" also can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

 

"Up Late" grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with the university's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.

--------

 

Photo: Charly Arnolt will appear on "Up Late" this week.


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Friday April 15, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Wednesday, April 27, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Camilla Brammer.

 

Three people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

 

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:
 

  • Dr. Camilla Brammer, Communication Studies, College of Liberal Arts, 26 years of service

  • Dr. Barbara Guyer, Special Education, College of Education and Human Services, 36 years of service

  • Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 25 years of service

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

 

  • Dr. Rachael Peckham, English, assistant professor, junior recipient among all faculty

  • Dr. Thomas Wilson, Physics, professor, senior recipient in the field of Sciences and Technology

  • Dr. Richard Agesa, Finance/Economics, professor, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business

Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisors. They are:

 

  • Dr. Michael Cunningham, professor, Leadership Studies, Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, from the South Charleston campus

  • Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, from the Huntington campus

The Sarah Denman Faces of Appalachia Fellowship Award, which includes a $3,000 award, is presented each year to one faculty member. This year's recipient is:

 

  • Dr. Donna Sullivan, associate professor, Sociology

 

Marshall also is recognizing 14 retiring faculty who have a combined 401 years of service. They are:
 

  • Earline Allen, Art and Design, College of Fine Arts, 41 years of service

  • Dr. George Arthur, School of Education, College of Education and Human Services, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Sirous Arya, Surgery, School of Medicine, 10 years of service

  • Dr. Emmett (Noel) Bowling, Reading Education, MU Graduate College, 34 years of service

  • Kathy Chezik, Communication Disorders, College of Health Professions, 40 years of service

  • Joe Fuller, Engineering, College of Information Technology and Engineering, 31 years of service

  • Dr. Barbara Guyer, School of Education, College of Education and Human Services, 36 years of service

  • Dr. Sandra Marra, Nursing, College of Health Professions, 19 years of service

  • Dr. Michael Moore, Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine, 33 years of service

  • Dr. Leslie Petteys, Music, College of Fine Arts, 24 years of service

  • Dr. Gilbert Ratcliff Jr., Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 22 years of service

  • Dr. Maria-Carmen Riddel, Modern Languages, College of Liberal Arts, 29 years of service

  • Dr. Gary Saunders, Accountancy and Legal Environment, Lewis College of Business, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Joe Stone Jr., Accountancy and Legal Environment, Lewis College of Business, 40 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as announced yesterday, are:
 

  • Dr. Jamie Warner, professor, Political Science, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Dan Hollis, associate professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Dr. April Fugett-Fuller, assistant professor, Psychology; Dr. Maribea Barnes, assistant professor, Art and Design; Brent Patterson, assistant professor, Art and Design, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

A reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center after the meeting.


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Thursday April 14, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, , 304-746-1989

Professionals invited to learn about Marshall's Executive MBA program; next class of students to begin in July

SOUTH CHARLESTON - The Marshall University Lewis College of Business is looking for professionals interested in earning an accredited Executive MBA. The next cohort will begin formal classes this summer.


There will be an informational session from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 16, on the Marshall University South Charleston campus, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., South Charleston. Professors and administrators will be on hand to answer questions about admissions, curriculum, financial aid and offerings unique to the Marshall program.

 

The Marshall University Executive MBA is an accelerated program focusing on the needs of working professionals so they can earn an internationally accredited MBA without great disruption to work and family schedules. The program is comprised of 12 face-to-face, cutting-edge courses taught over a 16-month time frame. It follows a cohort format (students move through the program as a team in a set sequence) and meets on Saturdays at the Marshall University South Charleston campus to provide little disruption to students' careers.

 

Diverse classes focus on business ethics, leadership and global issues that, along with management skills and tools, are crafted to enrich the career accomplishments of students with or without business backgrounds. The program also includes a domestic business trip as well as an international residency abroad.

 

Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs, encourages interested professionals to consider current economic challenges when deciding to pursue advanced degrees.

 

In today's economy, America's corporate culture is re-thinking how to plan and how to conduct business ethically and efficiently," Ormiston said. "Despite the current economic obstacles facing us all, we must consider the business challenges of the time as a critical moment of opportunity for educational enrichment, personal growth, and the chance to diversify our professional skill sets."

 

For more information, call 304-696-2627 or go to http://www.marshall.edu/lcob/graduate/emba/.

 

The current Executive MBA cohort is finishing its capstone course and will be hooded in a ceremony in Charleston on May 14 after completing an international residency in Frankfurt, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary.


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Thursday April 14, 2011
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University faculty members receive stipends for research proposal preparation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University science faculty have received two of four grants recently awarded statewide by the Division of Science and Research of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

The awards, worth $5,000 each, are intended to assist faculty members at West Virginia institutions of higher education with the preparation of research or research equipment proposals for submission to external funding agencies or foundations.

 

Marshall faculty members awarded the grants are Dr. Gary E. Schultz Jr., assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Bin Wang, assistant professor of chemistry.

 

According to Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, faculty members are expected to prepare research proposals as part of their routine activities. He said these summer stipends are designed to provide uninterrupted work, allowing development of stronger, more-competitive proposals in a timelier manner.

 

The grants are funded competitively through the state's Research Challenge Fund.


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Thursday April 14, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Jamie Warner selected as Marshall's Outstanding Faculty Award winner


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Dr. Jamie Warner, a professor of political science at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2010-2011.

 

Warner will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

 

Marshall's Office of Academic Affairs announced two other awards honoring four faculty members in addition to the Hedrick Award winner. They are:

 

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dan Hollis, associate professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communications

  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. April Fugett-Fuller, assistant professor, Psychology; Dr. Maribea Barnes, assistant professor, Art and Design; Brent Patterson, assistant professor, Art and Design

 

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

 

Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

 

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

 

Jamie Warner has been at Marshall since 2002, when she was hired as an assistant professor of political science. In 2004, she was awarded both the Pickens-Queen and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Awards. Before coming to Marshall, she was a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of the South (Sewanee) from 2001 to 2002.

 

Warner received her B.A. from Millersville University in 1991, her M.A. from Penn State University in 1995 and her Ph.D. in political science with a minor in women's studies from Penn State in 2001.

 

"Creating an environment where students feel free to open up and think in ways foreign to their usual modes of thought is the major goal in every class I teach, even, perhaps especially, if we are covering very conventional material," Warner said when describing her teaching philosophy. "I believe that a critical, self-reflective attitude is crucial to every student's ability to make a difference in the world, regardless of major or career choice."

 

Dr. Marybeth Beller, chair of the Department of Political Science, said Warner is an exceptional colleague whose work sets an important benchmark for faculty at Marshall University.

 

"Few faculty members can claim - without hesitation - to have excellence performance ratings in teaching, service and scholarship," Beller said. "I am so proud that my colleague in the Department of Political Science, Dr. Jamie Warner, is one such member of the faculty."

 

At Marshall, Warner has held the position of associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts, taught many honors seminars, and served on countless university, college, and department committees.

 

Dr. Susan Gilpin, associate dean of Marshall's honors college, nominated Warner for the Hedrick award.

 

"Dr. Warner has produced a record of achievement in scholarship, teaching and service that more nearly resembles that of one many years her senior," Gilpin said. In describing Warner's classroom presence, Gilpin said she is "dynamic and her standards are high."

 

Dr. Wendy Williams, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology, also nominated Warner. She said she has known Warner for five years in her capacity as a teacher, researcher and Marshall University community member.

 

"Let me say clearly and frankly that Jamie is one of the most intelligent scholars that I have had the pleasure to know," Williams said. "Personally, I strive to meet the same level of excellence that Jamie models."

 

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

 

This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

 

Dan Hollis makes it clear to his journalism students that he cares about them and wants them to succeed. In fact, Burnis Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Dr. Chris Swindell, a journalism professor, both of whom nominated Hollis for the Reynolds award, describe him as "the student's best friend."

 

"He challenges good students and cajoles the not-so-good into believing they can become better," Morris and Swindell said in their nomination. "Students of all stripes crowd into his small office - sometimes for additional learning, other times for moral support. His former students simply hang out there. Dan generously bestows words of wisdom, and they learn."

 

Hollis has been at Marshall since August 1999 when he was hired as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 2003. He said he wants his students to live lives of passion filled with an appreciation of learning and dedicated to quality.

 

"I always tell students I have the best job in the world," Hollis said. "I love what I do and I can't wait to get to work in the morning. The first day of school is my favorite day of the year surpassing Christmas and my birthday. I want my students to see that, feel that, live that."

 

Hollis received his B.S. degree from the University of Southern Indiana in 1983, and his M.A. from the University of Kentucky in 1997. He has won numerous awards at Marshall, including the National Broadcasting Society "First Place" Video News Award for the past five years and seven of the past eight years. He said he loves doing creative work in the form of television feature stories.

 

"I love combining great video with great writing and great sound, and the 'packages' as we call them in the business give me unique opportunities for student discussion and interaction," Hollis said.

 

Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

 

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

 

Dr. April Fugett-Fuller has cultivated a reputation among students of being both tough and fair, according to Dr. Wendy Williams, who nominated her for the Pickens-Queen award.

 

"She teaches a lot of statistics courses, which are required for our majors who are generally not excited about taking these courses, yet she still maintains high teaching evaluations," Williams said of Fugett-Fuller.

 

Elijah A. Wise was a student of Fugett-Fuller's at Marshall.

 

"Dr. Fugett-Fuller is the best instructor I have had during my tenure at Marshall University," Wise said. "But more importantly, she has been a fantastic mentor who, time and time again, has gone out of her way to assist me. She constantly pushes me to succeed and displays a steadfast confidence in my potential as a student and researcher."

 

Fugett-Fuller has been at Marshall for three years. In addition to teaching, she is the faculty advisor for Psi Chi (the psychology honorary society) and the Undergraduate Psychology Program Coordinator.

 

"Central to my teaching philosophy is to provide a dynamic learning experience for the students as a whole, and to set them up as lifetime learners," Fugett-Fuller said.

 

Fugett-Fuller received her B.A. in psychology from Morehead State University in 2002, her M.A. in experimental psychology from Morehead in 2004 and her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Kansas in 2008.

  

Maribea Barnes, who has been at Marshall since fall 2007, says teaching visual art is her true passion. She said she knows that her role as a teacher can have a tremendous impact on the direction of her students' lives.

 

"We serve not only as a teacher, but as a mentor and advisor," she said.  "At Marshall, I have the opportunity to serve in each of these roles."

 

Barnes is committed to advancing arts education not only in the classroom, but in the community as well. For the past two years, she has worked with the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's Children's Arts Festival Extravaganza (CAF) event.

 

"In all honesty, this event would not be the educational, creative and fun project it has become without Maribea's artistic input and genuine interest in making sure children are introduced to the visual arts," said Leah Clark Payne, a communications specialist at Marshall, who worked alongside Barnes in helping organize the event.

 

Hannah Kinker has taken two classes taught by Barnes, and Barnes has been her advisor. Kinker said Barnes played the major role in helping her choose a career in Art Education.

 

"Dr. Barnes has taught and encouraged me to meet challenges that I had never before thought possible," Kinker said, "and I will forever be grateful for my time as her student."

 

Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art & Design, said he holds Barnes in high esteem.

 

"As a classroom teacher, field supervisor, student advisor/mentor, scholar, program advocate/recruiter and community volunteer (she) is the consummate colleague and team player," Clercx said.

 

Barnes received her B.A. in French from Concordia College in 1991, her K-12 Teaching License in art education from Concordia in 1994, her M.A. in art history from the University of St. Thomas in 2003 and her Ph.D. in art education from Ohio State in 2008.

 

Brent Patterson is described by Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts, as "one of the most innovative and inspiring teachers in COFA as well as one of the most dedicated educators I've ever known."

 

Patterson has been teaching in the area of New Media at Marshall since the fall of 2006. Jonathan Cox, a professor of art who has worked with Patterson, said Patterson is a truly gifted teacher and creative artist.

 

"I am pleased and proud to teach, work and serve with Brent Patterson," Cox said.

 

In Patterson's classes, students "read, watch, write, discuss and practice with practice being the principal activity," Patterson said. He said he is constantly revising and experimenting with his pedagogical methodology with the goal of creating a better environment of respectful and mutually beneficial discourse supported by carefully planned and evaluated assignments, discussions and personal guidance.

 

Stephanie Lloyd has taken several courses from Patterson, whom she says is "passionate about teaching."

 

"Teachers like Professor Patterson, who inspire students to be passionate about a subject, are rare," Lloyd said.

 

Van Horn said Patterson has distinguished himself through his efforts to develop exciting curriculum and opportunities for Marshall students in the area of electronic media while also invigorating the department with his "intellectual rigor."

 

"He is an exemplary teacher who is in command of the ever-changing technology that defines his area of expertise," Van Horn said.

 

Patterson received his B.A. in fine art/multimedia from Ohio State University in 2001 and his M.F.A. in fine art/multimedia from Washington State University in 2004.

 

###

 
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Marshall to compete in national speech and debate tournament

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five members of the Thundering Word, Marshall University's speech and debate team, will be in Normal, Ill., this weekend to participate in the National Forensics Association National Tournament at Illinois State University.

 

Marshall actually qualified 42 slots for the NFA National Tournament, but has strategically decided to take the 17 best slots, filled by the five students, to the tournament, according to Coach Danny Ray. The tournament runs April 15 through 18 (Friday through Monday).

 

"I am very proud of the accomplishments of our students, especially their dedication to a demanding program of training and competition," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts. "That they have come this far is a testament that they represent the best of a Marshall University education. I am also proud of Coach Ray, his assistants, and the faculty of the Department of Communication Studies. They never miss an opportunity to show our students that they have the reserve and capacity to do great things."

 

The students representing the Thundering Word are:

 

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a junior political science major and John Marshall scholar, who qualified in Lincoln-Douglas Debate by reaching the semifinal round at West Chester University. He was a finalist at Ohio University, a semifinalist at the Ohio State tournament and the top debate speaker at the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Persuasive Speaking by finishing third at Miami (Ohio) and the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Rhetorical Criticism by finishing first and second at Berea College, third at Ohio State, second at Miami and third at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Kai Stewart, a freshman oral communications major from Parkersburg, W.Va., who qualified in Lincoln Douglas Debate by reaching the semifinal rounds at Ohio State, the Ohio state tournament and Marist College. She was the West Virginia state champion in Lincoln Douglas Debate. She also qualified in Impromptu Speaking by finishing in third place at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Ryan Jackson, who qualified in Prose Interpretation by finaling at George Mason and West Chester, finishing in second place at Berea College and the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Informative Speaking by finaling at Berea College, West Chester, Ohio State and the West Virginia state tournament. Jackson finished first in Poetry Interpretation at West Chester, third in both tournaments at Ohio University, and second at the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Dramatic Interpretation and After Dinner Speaking by being the state champion in those events. Jackson and Jasmine Lewis qualified in Duo at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Jasmine Lewis, a freshman political science major from Huntington, who qualified in Persuasion by reaching the final rounds at both tournaments at Berea College, finishing first  at Marshall's Chief Justice tournament, making the finals at Miami and being the top novice at Ohio University. She placed third at the West Virginia state tournament. She qualified in Poetry by reaching the finals in both tournaments at Ohio University, and the West Virginia state tournament. Lewis qualified in Dramatic Interpretation by making it to the final rounds at Miami, Ohio and the West Virginia state tournament. Along with her Duo with Jackson, she and Elaine Adkins were finalists at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Elaine Adkins, a freshman French/Oral Communication Education major from Huntington, who  qualified in Poetry Interpretation by reaching the final round at West Chester and Berea, and winning the event at the Ohio State University. She also was a finalist at Ohio and the West Virginia state tournament in this category.  She qualified in Prose and Dramatic Interpretation by reaching the final rounds at Ohio University and the West Virginia state tournament. Her last qualification is the Duo with Jasmine Lewis.

 

Vonderschmitt and Lewis will be representing West Virginia at the Interstate Oratorical Association's National Tournament, April 21-23 at James Madison University by finishing as the best in Persuasion at the West Virginia State Tournament.

 


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Julia Keller to deliver commencement speech at Marshall University

MU alumna won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2005

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pulitzer Prize winner Julia Keller, cultural critic for the Chicago Tribune and a two-time graduate of Marshall University, will deliver the keynote speech at Marshall's 174th commencement on Saturday, May 7. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

 

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, daughter of the late Dr. James R. Keller, a mathematics professor at Marshall, and Patricia Keller, who taught English at Chesapeake High School in Chesapeake, Ohio.

 

Keller earned her bachelor's degree in English from Marshall in 1976, and a master's degree in English from Marshall in 1981. She earned a doctoral degree in English from The Ohio State University in 1996.

 

In 2005, Keller won the Pulitzer Prize for her three-part series on a 10-second tornado that ripped through Utica, Ill. The Pulitzer Board described Keller's account of the tornado, which was published in December 2004, as "gripping" and "meticulously constructed."


"I'm so pleased to be returning to Marshall to deliver the commencement address to the class of 2011," Keller said. "I grew up in Huntington and my father taught mathematics at Marshall, and my fondest childhood memory is accompanying him to Marshall basketball games, where he kept statistics for the team. To my infinite delight, I was allowed to sit next to him at the press table in Memorial Field House. It made me feel extraordinarily special - just as does the invitation to speak to this year's Marshall graduates."

 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the university is honored to welcome back a distinguished alumna whose achievements have been recognized at the highest level.

 

"Julia Keller is a very distinguished and accomplished daughter of Marshall. Her dedication to excellence is clearly evident in her award-winning works. As a symbol of the principles for which Marshall University stands, Julia embodies the pride and determination that is Marshall University," Kopp said. "She is a gifted communicator, as our graduates will witness during our upcoming commencement ceremony. I look forward to welcoming Julia back to Marshall and to hearing her inspiring message to our graduates."

 

Keller was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In 2006, she served as McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. She has also taught writing and literature at Ohio State, the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from Dominican University.

 


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More than 1,500 to participate in SCORES at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, April 16 to participate in the 33nd annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

 

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

 

"The SCORES Academic Festival is an exciting event for not only the students, but also for Marshall," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES coordinator with Marshall's office of recruitment. "The festival provides students with exposure to the social activities found on campus which are integral to students' education and growth.  The event is a great way for the university to not only recruit students, but allow them to visit a college campus and become familiar with the university community. This program allows talented students the opportunity to showcase their academic achievements while interacting with Marshall faculty, who are the heart and soul of this program.  Overall, this is an exciting day focused on celebrating the unique talents that each student brings to the festival."

 

Events take place at 9, 10:15 and  11:45 a.m. with lunch provided on campus.  The awards ceremony begins at 1:30 p.m. in the Cam Henderson Center.  Events are open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, liberal arts, journalism and mass communications, information technology and engineering, health professions and science. The top three winners in each contest will be awarded medals.

 

Scholarships will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place trophies will be given for each school division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

 

For more information, contact the SCORES office at 304-696-2246.

 


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School of Journalism and Mass Communications to celebrate past, present and future of school

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - For former, present and future students of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) at Marshall University, the upcoming Legacy Luncheon is a chance for several generations to meet and share their experiences with one another.

 

The Legacy Luncheon will take place on Saturday, April 23, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Scheduled in conjunction with the Green and White Game events, the luncheon will begin at noon, and luncheon tickets will include a ticket to the spring football scrimmage.

 

The luncheon was proposed by members of the Public Relations Campaigns class taught by Professor Terry Hapney as part of a multi-faceted campaign to promote and build the SOJMC. Tasked with addressing student recruitment, fundraising and awareness of the SOJMC, the Campaigns class developed the idea of the luncheon as a way to connect all aspects of the project in a culminating event.

 

"The challenge in our campaign is addressing three very broad areas of recruitment, fundraising and awareness," said Tori Marra, co-chair of the campaign. "Rather than planning three smaller, individual events, we wanted a single event that would allow us to connect everyone who has a vested interest in the success of the SOJMC."

 

More than just a fundraising luncheon, the event is seen by Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as an opportunity to build relationships within the school. "We hope that our past, present and future students will find this luncheon to be a great way to connect with others who share their dreams and passions for careers in journalism and communications," he said. "We look forward to rekindling old relationships and inspiring our next generation of students."

 

The luncheon will feature remarks by Jack Houvouras, Marshall alumnus and owner of HQ Publishing, Dr. George Arnold and Dr. Ralph Turner, retired faculty from the SOJMC, and Dean Dennison. Attendees will also have the opportunity to record video testimonials about the role the SOJMC and Marshall University have played in their lives.

 

Tickets are currently on sale for $35, with a student rate of $25. All proceeds will benefit the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Table sponsorships are also available. Contact Marra at marra7@marshall.edu for more information. Reservations can also be made online at www.marshall.edu/makeyourmark.

 


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Former Ashland Inc. Foundation president to speak at Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc. fundraising banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles Whitehead, former president of the Ashland Inc. Foundation, will be the keynote speaker at the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation Inc. fundraising banquet Saturday, April 23.

 

The 19th annual banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Proceeds will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

 

Whitehead will speak on "the value of preserving history." He was an original member of the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation board, and orchestrated construction of a life-size statue of Woodson in Huntington. He has held offices at the local, state and national levels of the NAACP.  

 

Whitehead has been honored numerous times for his community service. Examples include:

 

  • In 1999, Marshall University presented him with the John Drinko Distinguished Service Award, given to those who volunteer and support their fellow man and contribute to civic well-being.

  • In 2000, he received the 2000 A.D. Albright Award from the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce for his personal and professional contributions in education.

  • In 2000, Whitehead received the prestigious Charles W. Anderson Laureate Award from the Commonwealth of Kentucky for his unparalleled contribution and quest for the equal opportunity for the people of Kentucky and commitment to freedom and justice.

  • In 2001, he served as grand marshal of the Lincoln Heights Day Parade for being a distinguished businessman, humanitarian and positive role model. Whitehead is a native of Clarksdale, Miss., but grew up in Lincoln Heights, Ohio.

  • In 2003, he received the Northern Kentucky University Lincoln Award, which acknowledged his hard work and dedication to the community.

Whitehead is a 1961 graduate of Central State University in Ohio, where he earned his B.S. degree in accounting.

 

Music for the banquet will be provided by Kevin E. Johnson and Charles Johnson. Tickets for the event are available for a donation of $30. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at 740-894-5772; Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at 304-525-5651; or Karen Nance, secretary, at 304-736-1655.

 

The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.


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Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0 to welcome guest saxophonist Craig Treinen Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University's Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Dr. Ed Bingham, will present its final performance of the 2011 spring semester at 8 p.m. Thursday,  April 14, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. This concert will feature the music of the Count Basie Big Band and will feature guest soloist Craig Treinen, a Kansas City-style saxophonist.

Treinen is currently the director of jazz studies/applied saxophone at Washburn University. He has performed in Kansas City as the lead alto saxophonist for the Kansas City Boulevard Big Band, for which he recorded three albums. Other performances included local big bands such as Trilogy Big Band, Tony Dipardo Big Band, Topeka Jazz Workshop Big Band, Blue Devils Big Band, The Des Moines Big Band and Mom's Big Band in Lawrence, Kan.

Also an alumnus of Washburn University, Treinen entered the United States Air Force as a saxophone specialist in the Heartland of America Band (formerly th