FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 29, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

Child Development Academy at Marshall plans new nature playground

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 100 volunteers, including Marshall University AmeriCorps members and Marshall University School of Medicine students, are expected to participate Saturday, April 30, in an effort to redesign the Child Development Academy's playground into a certified Nature Explore Outdoor Classroom.

 

The Child Development Academy at Marshall University is an early education center that benefits the children of Marshall students, employees and the extended community. It is located at 522 22nd St. in Huntington.

 

The redesign is part of a national program sponsored by the National Arbor Foundation.

 

"This project has been in the works for months and is truly a community and university project," said Susan Miller, director of the academy.  "We have dozens of volunteers committed to participate including our parents, medical students, Marshall AmeriCorps members, members of the Marshall women's soccer team, our staff, and community members including the Junior League."

 

Miller says transformation of the academy's traditional playground into an outdoor classroom includes designs based on the area's location in Appalachia.   Materials for the project have been donated by a variety of community organizations and businesses.

 

Work on the playground is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. For more information contact Miller at 304-696-5803.


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Thursday April 28, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of FIne Arts, , 304-696-3296

Choral groups to conclude academic year with Friday concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 150 singers from Marshall University choral groups will participate in a Choral Collage concert at 8 p.m. Friday, April 29, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The program is free and open to the public.

The groups, which include the Marshall University Chorus, Choral Union and Chamber Choir, will join to repeat some of the highlights of Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana," which they performed with the Huntington Symphony in February. Each group also will perform some of their spring repertoire individually.

Conducting the ensembles will be Dr. David Castleberry, director of choral activities at Marshall, and Robert Wray, assistant professor of music.

"After a semester that has included performances with the Huntington Symphony, a tour, and many campus concerts, this will be a great way to wrap up the academic year," Castleberry said.


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Wednesday April 27, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

174th Marshall University commencement set for May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 7 when the university celebrates its 174th commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

 

Among the 1,531 students receiving degrees are 933 undergraduates, 531 graduate students and 67 from the School of Medicine. The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2011 graduates only.

 

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said about 800 students have indicated they plan to participate in the commencement ceremony.

 

Ferguson said 401 students will graduate with honors. Fifty-nine will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 134 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 198 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Three students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and seven associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

 

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

 

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement. Based on tentative grade point averages, 12 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs.

 

The 12 with tentative 4.0s are: Ennis Ayla Barbery of Athens, W.Va.; Rachel Perry Blake of Huntington; Cameron D. Buchman of Huntington; Angela Louise Bumgarner of Beckley, W.Va.; Kathleen M. Clark of Twinsburg, Ohio; Elizabeth Anne Fleming of South Bend, Ind.; Molly Gallagher of Morgantown, W.Va.; Kenneth Robert Mullen of Huntington; Patrick Lee Stewart of Matheny, W.Va.; Catherine A. Togger of Hurricane, W.Va.; Elijah Alderson Wise of Huntington, and Jenna Marie Workman of St. Albans, W.Va.

 

Pulitzer Prize winner and two-time Marshall University graduate Julia Keller will deliver the commencement address and receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree.

 

Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events:

 

Thursday, April 28

 

5:15 p.m., Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement, Buskirk Field

 

6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, rooms 113-116 at the center

 

Friday, April 29

 

2 p.m., College of Fine Arts Awards Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

4 p.m., International students' end of year/graduation party, Village on 6th student apartments

 

7 p.m., Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

Wednesday, May 4

 

1 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications awards ceremony, Smith Hall 154

 

7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

 

Thursday, May 5

 

7 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, South Charleston High School, 1 Eagle Way, South Charleston

 

 

Friday, May 6

 

11 a.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

 

11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

 

4 p.m., John Marshall Emerging Leaders Institute (JMELI) graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

 

4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department recognition ceremony, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

 

4:30 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, 520 18th St

 

5 p.m., Honors College's Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

 

6 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications spring graduates banquet, Foundation Hall

 

7 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

7 p.m., College of Health Professions' nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church

 

7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church  

 

7 p.m., College of Education and Human Services hooding ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

 

Saturday, May 7

 

9 a.m., Marshall University's 174th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, Communication Disorders graduation reception, Smith Hall 143

 

Immediately following Marshall's commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, an invitation event at Wesvanawha, 845 4th Ave.

 

1 p.m., College of Science Convocation, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

 

1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation celebration, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

 

Main commencement notes:

 

  • The commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web beginning at 8:30 a.m. To access the stream, visit www.marshall.edu.
     

  • Marshall University will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena from campus. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.
     

  • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremony for purchase at $15 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office Web site (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Additionally, orders will be accepted at the arena May 7. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.
     

  • A professional photographer (Legacy Photographics) will take two photographs of each graduate after the graduate has received his or her representative scroll. The photographer will send proof information to graduates using MU e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.


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Wednesday April 27, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, , 304-696-6397

Marshall University festival celebrates student learning

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Minds of Marshall Festival, a month-long series of university-wide events celebrating academic accomplishments, wraps up this week at Marshall University.

 

"Marshall University, its faculty and staff are committed to making every student's learning experience a quality one," said Dr. Karen Mitchell, professor of mathematics and festival organizer.  "This series of activities highlights our students' work and represents the very heart of what we do here at Marshall."

 

The schedule of events may be found at www.marshall.edu/go/mom2011.

 

The festival is sponsored by the university's individual colleges and showcases both undergraduate and graduate learning.

 

For more information, contact Mitchell at 304-696-3042.

 


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Tuesday April 26, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Presidents from Marshall, Alcorn State sign faculty exchange agreement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and M. Christopher Brown II, president of Alcorn State University in Lorman, Miss., today signed a document making a faculty exchange program between the two institutions official.

 

The signing of the Alcorn State University-Marshall University Partnership In Education Agreement took place in the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus. Alcorn State is the nation's first historically black land grant institution, and last fall enrolled about 3,200 students.

 

"Marshall University and Alcorn State University have been working for two years to make this wonderful program a reality," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Marshall. "It will create incredible synergy between the two institutions and faculty from each one will have the opportunity to teach in a completely different environment. It is a great partnership for Marshall University."

 

Through the exchange, a Marshall faculty member will spend a semester teaching at Alcorn State and an Alcorn State faculty member will spend a semester teaching at Marshall. The program is expected to begin this fall. A similar student exchange between the two schools begins in fall 2012.

 

"This is the beginning of a great, new relationship between Alcorn State, the second-oldest university in the state of Mississippi, and Marshall, the oldest (public) university in West Virginia," Brown said. "We look forward to this exchange and a long-standing and mutually collaborative relationship."

 

Clarke said the idea of a faculty exchange program surfaced in a meeting of Marshall's Faculty Diversity Committee.

 

"We wanted to do an exchange with a historically black college," Clarke said. "We wanted the culture they had to bring and we wanted them to embrace our culture. I chose Alcorn State because when I was at the University of Nebraska, we did a faculty exchange with Alcorn and it was wonderful."

 

---------

 

Photo: Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, left, and M. Christopher Brown II, president of Alcorn State University, sign the Alcorn State University-Marshall University Partnership in Education Agreement today during a ceremony in the Drinko Library on MU's Huntington campus. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday April 22, 2011
Contact: Rebecca Randolph, Assistant Vice President for Development at Marshall University, , 304-696-3292

Greenbrier Classic Badge winners announced at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., in partnership with the 2011 Greenbrier Classic, today announced the following winners of Alumni Badge packages for two for the 2011 Greenbrier Classic: 

Joe Zegeer, Connie Reed, Johnny Abbott, Yetta Meadows, Fran Klaiber, Charles Stone, Gary Groves, Gina McCoy, Jeanette Muth, Cheryl Parsons, Keith Glenn, David Jenkins, Jay Stone, Robbie Welty, Chuck Shannon, William Chaffin and Carol Galbraith.

Winners were selected from tickets sold by retail partners including Fifth Third Bank, Hometown Sportswear, Macreedo's, Fat Patty's, Sport Mart, MU Hall of Fame Caf and Shoop's. The contest generated nearly $2,000 to benefit scholarships at Marshall University. 

Lead retail partner Fifth Third Bank topped sales during the contest with 1,000 tickets sold at branches throughout West Virginia and Kentucky. Fifth Third officials presented a $1,000 check to the Marshall University Foundation immediately following the drawing.  

"Fifth Third recognizes the importance of access to higher education and is happy to have partnered with Marshall University and The Greenbrier Classic in providing this support," said Bob Welty, state president of Fifth Third Bank. "We are proud of the efforts of our branches who participated and their good work in leading sales."

The Ashland, Ky., branch of Fifth Third Bank led sales among 11 participating branches while Sport Mart in Charleston, W.Va., led retail sales.

Those interested in attending the 2011 Greenbrier Classic can take advantage of a special buy one, get one free offer for MU Alumni and friends.  Those who purchase an Alumni Grounds Badge can receive a second badge free.

More information is available at www.marshall.edu/bogo. A portion of the proceeds from the badges purchased will benefit Marshall University through the Greenbrier Badges for Charity Program.  

For more information, contact Rebecca Randolph, assistant vice president for development at Marshall University, by phone at 304-696-3292, or by e-mail at samplesr@marshall.edu.

---

Photo: Tim McNeely (left), Tournament Director for The Greenbrier Classic, draws winners of the Alumni Badges, assisted by Rebecca Randolph, assistant vice president for development at Marshall University.  Looking on is  Bob Welty, state president of Fifth Third Bank.


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Thursday April 21, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall University Executive MBA class heads to Germany, Hungary for international residency

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Twenty-nine professional students in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration class will embark on an international study abroad residency to Frankfurt, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary, beginning this Saturday.

 

The students, who have been studying together on Saturdays at Marshall's South Charleston campus for the past 18 months, depart from Charleston Saturday morning and return to Charleston on Sunday, May 1. While in Europe, students will interact with locally owned and operated businesses and international companies during the weeklong residency abroad.

 

The excursion is an important part of the Marshall Executive MBA experience and involves five full days of class, lectures, presentations and on-site tours, said Dr. Uday Tate, director of the Executive MBA program.

 

"This is the last leg of the cohort's journey," Tate said. "Our students, who will be hooded two weeks after we return, can now take the principles they have mastered in class and honed with the help of their professors and peers and see how everything comes together on an international level. This is an amazing opportunity for our students and a component of an Executive MBA that serves seasoned professionals very well."

 

While in Germany the cohort and accompanying professors will explore the business of the wine industry in the region of Rheingau; delve into international marketing in a seminar with FrankfurtRheinMain GmbH; and learn about executive recruitment and development during a meeting with the executive vice president of DHR International.

 

While in Hungary, seminar topics include shared services and near-shoring presented by Kinetic Concepts, Hungary's Company of the Year; status of venture capital in Hungary presented by Mid Europa Venture Capital; legal aspects of cross border mergers, acquisitions and divestitures in Hungary and Central and Eastern Europe presented by Kajtr Takcs Hegymegi-Barakonyi Baker & McKenzie; and shared services in Central and Eastern Europe presented by Hewlett-Packard Hungary.

 

Students participating in the residency include: Michael Allen of Huntington; Troy Andes of Hurricane; Shannon Bailey of Princeton; Todd Beane of South Charleston; Shawna Boyer of Barboursville; Kayla Brown of Cross Lanes; Kevin Chikombero of Harare, Zimbabwe; Christina Dalton of Charleston; Clayton Ferguson of Morgantown; Brian Gartley of Morgantown; Walt Hawthorne of Beckley; David Hayes of Dunbar; LTC. John J. Hess of Barboursville; Gregory Hutton of Teays Valley; Carl Jimison of Huntington; Evan Johnson of St. Albans; Tom Johnson of Charleston; Courtney Kovach of Huntington; Michael Little of Huntington; Michael Moncada of Scott Depot; Xan Mooney of Wayne; Lalena Price of Charleston; Anthony  Ridenour of Hurricane; Megan Roush of Charleston; Jason Shepherd of Boomer; Jennifer Thacker of Welch; Gordon Waters of Proctorville, Ohio, Shad West of South Charleston and Cody Wiseman of Cross Lanes.

 

Also accompanying the cohort on the trip are Lewis College of Business professors - Tate, who is also a professor of marketing, Dr. Suneel Maheshwari, professor of accounting, and Dr. Michael Newsome, professor of economics.


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Wednesday April 20, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Joe Johns to speak at Marshall's Honors Convocation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Joe Johns, a 1980 Marshall University graduate and CNN correspondent based in Washington, D.C., will be the featured speaker Friday, April 29, at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation at MU's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The convocation, part of Marshall's 17th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. It will be followed by a public reception.

 

"We look forward every year to the Honors Convocation, which is the only university-wide recognition of our undergraduates' academic excellence," said Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College. "It is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the achievements of students whose faculty have identified them as outstanding in their field of study."

 

Todd said more than 100 students will participate and for the first time all 64 graduates of the Honors College will receive a special medallion. Also for the first time, the students will be accompanied by their department chairs when they are recognized on stage.

 

Todd said it is appropriate that Johns deliver the keynote address to a group of outstanding students. At Marshall, Johns was a standout student-athlete, winning four Southern Conference championships in the shot put and discus for the Thundering Herd track and field team, while consistently earning dean's list honors in the classroom. He earned a degree in political science from Marshall and a law degree from American University.

 

With a commanding stage presence, he also was regarded as one of the best actors at Marshall in the late 1970s, performing key roles in numerous productions for the theatre department.

 

Today, Johns is highly respected in his field. Before joining CNN in 2004, he covered Capitol Hill for NBC News for more than 10 years. He has received many honors, including two National Association of Black Journalists Salute to Excellence awards. He also was among the NBC Nightly News team to receive an Edward R. Murrow Award for reports on the "Beltway Sniper" saga. He also played a key role in CNN's "America Votes 2008" coverage.

 

Johns visited Marshall in 2008 when he served as grand marshal in the university's homecoming parade. He also was the featured speaker that year at the 38th annual memorial service honoring the victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash.


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Tuesday April 19, 2011
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of FIne Arts, 304-696-3296

African Drumming and Dance Ensemble to perform April 26

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University African Drumming and Dance Ensemble will perform a concert at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The group, under the direction of Steven Hall, coordinator of percussion at the university, will perform traditional music from the West African countries of Benin, Guinea, Togo and Ghana.

"Traditional African music is very much a community activity on a number of different levels," Hall said. "This music is used to maintain a deep connection with the history and memory of the ancestors. Most traditional music has four aspects: drumming, dancing, singing and costumes."

When the weather permits the group is often seen rehearsing on the lawn of Smith Music Hall, facing Hal Greer Boulevard, since, according to Hall, "this music is meant to be performed outside in the open air where anyone in the neighborhood can enjoy."

Most of the members in the group are not music majors and the ensemble is open to any MU student with a desire to learn about non-western cultures, Hall said.

Admission to the April 26 event is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or email  Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday April 19, 2011
Contact: Anna Swift, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, 304-690-1483

Emeritus professors Arnold, Turner to speak at Marshall University Journalism School luncheon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Emeritus professors George Arnold and Ralph Turner will speak at a luncheon for Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications (SOJMC) on Saturday, April 23.

Arnold, who taught at the SOJMC for 36 years, and Turner, who taught for 32, will speak about the history of the SOJMC. Turner also will discuss The Parthenon, the Society of Professional Journalists and the SOJMC internship program.

Turner is responsible for having brought the campus newspaper from a semiweekly production to four days a week. He also won "chapter advisor of the year," along with Arnold, from the Society of Professional Journalists and created an internship program that has since become a model used by other universities and colleges.

Arnold, who produced the "Media Writer's Handbook: A Guide to Common Writing and Editing Problems," said both he and Turner are pleased to be presenting at the luncheon.

"Since we retired, Dean (Corley) Dennison and the rest of the faculty have been very, very good about inviting us back, and so we have remained active," Arnold said. "We've remained close to the program, and we appreciate that fact that they still haul us off the shelf and dust us off and let us be a part of the program from time to time."

 

The noon luncheon, which follows an 11 a.m. ceremony at the Memorial Fountain and precedes the 4 p.m. Green and White game, will take place in the Shawkey Dining Room of the Memorial Student Center. The event is sponsored by Clear Channel Communications.

 

Tickets are $20 for Marshall students, $25 for non-Marshall students and $35 for adults. Tickets must be purchased 72 hours in advance. Contact makeyourmark@marshall.edu or www.marshall.edu/makeyourmark.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Neera Clarkson, WMUL-FM Promotions Director,, 304-951-1750

WMUL-FM 88.1 efforts benefit Locks of Love

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM 88.1, the student broadcast voice of Marshall University, will be host to an event to benefit Locks of Love Thursday, April 21, at the Marshall Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The three-hour event begins at 11 a.m. and is scheduled to end at 2 p.m.

 

Haircuts and styles will be provided free of charge to anyone who is willing to donate 10 inches or more of his or her hair. The new styles will be provided by the Huntington School of Beauty Culture.

 

Hair from the Herd will benefit Locks of Love, a not-for-profit organization that provides recipients with a custom, vacuum-fitted hairpiece made entirely from donated human hair.  The vacuum fit is designed for children who have experienced a total loss of scalp hair and does not require the use of tape or glue.  Most of the recipients suffer from an autoimmune condition called alopecia areata for which there is unfortunately no known cause or cure. Others have suffered severe burns or injuries or endured radiation treatment to the brain stem or other dermatological conditions that resulted in permanent hair loss.

 

The Locks of Love organization, which began operation in 1998, has helped more than 2,000 children since its first year of operation. Thousands of bundles of donated hair are received as a result of the national publicity that Locks of Love has received from newspapers, magazines and television programs.  More than 80 percent of the donors are children, making this a charity where children have an opportunity to help children.

 

Donated hair is evaluated for its usefulness according to the following guidelines:

  • To donate hair that can be used in a hairpiece, hair must be at least 10 inches in length.
  • It must be bundled in a ponytail or braid.
  • Bleached hair cannot be used. Hair that has been dyed or permed can be used.
  • Locks of Love also accepts hair donations that are less than 10 inches. This hair is sold and used to cut overhead costs.

WMUL-FM also will be accepting monetary donations for Locks of Love. One hundred percent of all money raised will go to Locks of Love.

 

For more information about Locks of Love, call 561-963-1677 or 1-888-896-1588 for toll-free recorded information.  Locks of Love also may be reached at www.locksoflove.org, or by e-mail at volunteer@locksoflove.org.

 

For more information about the Hair From the Herd event, Neera Clarkson may be contacted by cell phone at 304-951-1750 or by e-mail at wmulpromotions@gmail.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Media Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University offering educational session on pertussis vaccine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Student Health Education Programs and the Cabell-Huntington Health Department are hosting an educational session on vaccines as part of a continuing public awareness campaign.

 

The session is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, in the Ed Grose Room of the Harless Dining Hall, which is located at the intersection of 5th Avenue and 17th Street in Huntington.

 

"Pertussis (Whooping Cough) and Vaccine Myths" is the topic and will feature guest speaker Jenny Murray, whose daughter contracted pertussis as an infant.


The sessions are part of the West Virginia Adolescent Project: Take Your Best Shot campaign, a statewide initiative aimed at increasing the number of college students being vaccinated against a variety of diseases and infections. Attendees will have the opportunity to receive a free Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccine.

 

This event also will include take-home educational materials, free food and giveaways. For more information, contact the Office of Student Health Programs at 304-696-4800.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students to be initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Initiation of the 75 students who have accepted an invitation to join the newly installed Marshall University chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi will take place at 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19 in Room BE 5 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

 

Initiation is a public and formal way to recognize the new members. Of the 75, an estimated 40, along with members of their families, are expected to attend the initiation.

 

Marshall's chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, which was approved by the organization's board of directors in spring 2010, was formally installed in November.

 

"The addition of Phi Kappa Phi is wonderful for Marshall University," said Dr. Gordon Crews, charter president of the chapter. "It is a great opportunity for students who have demonstrated a great level of academic achievement. Dr. Mary Todd (dean of the MU Honors College) worked really hard to get Phi Kappa Phi here, so it is an honor to be voted in as the charter president. We hope that now, the students who are being initiated Tuesday will help us get the word out to other students when we do another call to those who achieve at that level next year."

 

Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest, largest and most selective all-discipline honor society. The society has chapters on nearly 300 campuses in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Philippines.

 

Membership in Phi Kappa Phi is by invitation and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors, having at least 72 semester hours, are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction.


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Monday April 18, 2011
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners of Maier Latin, writing awards announced at Marshall

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Winners of the Maier Awards, sponsored annually by the Maier Foundation Inc., and hosted by Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, were announced today at a ceremony in the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's  Huntington campus.

 

Outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions were recognized during an awards ceremony.

 

The Maier Latin Cup Awards were established in 1979 by William J. Maier Jr., father of former Maier Foundation President Ed Maier, to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.

 

A high school graduate at the age of 16, Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the state. He credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

 

The Maier Latin Cup Awards celebrate publicly the best high school Latin students in West Virginia. They are administered by Marshall's Department of Classics.

 

Also, Marshall's Department of Classics sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation. This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

 

The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1972 by William J. Maier Jr., in honor of his father. These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall.

 

Here are the winners of this year's Latin and writing awards.

 

Maier Latin Sight-Translation Contest

Latin I

First place: Alec Reed, Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Second place: Sara Nix, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Latin II

First place: Lauren Howell, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Second place: Samantha Harris, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Latin III

First place: Emily Blake, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Latin IV

First place: Stephanie Rice, Covenant School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

 

Maier Latin Cup Awards Competition

First place: Samantha G. Harris, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Robin Snyder

Second place: Andrea E. Tyree, George Washington. Teacher: Ruth Diller

Third place: Amanda G. Nelson, George Washington. Teacher: Ruth Diller

 

Maier Latin Scholarship recipient

Sarah Marie Burns of Riverton, W.Va., first-year graduate student in Latin M.A. program

 

William J. Maier Writing Awards

First-Year Composition

First place: Drilling for Disaster, Adam Shaver, Biological Sciences, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. K. Prejean

Second place: The Difficulties of Living Gluten-Free, Victor Monheim, Nursing, Orrville, Ohio. Faculty mentor: Professor M. Daniel

Third place: Health-Care Quality Reports Do More Harm than Good, Deborah M. Moore, English, East Lynn, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. R. Ellison

Fourth place: Modern Day Slavery: Intervention and Prevention, Shoshannah Diehl, English, Stockbridge, Ga. Faculty mentor: Professor M. Daniel

Honorable mention: Henry V: Sympathetic or Not, Dreama Pritt, Regents Bachelor of Arts, Hurricane, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. T. Burbery;

Helga Thorn Accepts Her Past, Hailey Bellomy, Communication Studies, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Van Kirk

 

Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose

First place: 'Survive to Sound this Wailing Tone': Writing the Mortal Body in Anne Bradstreet's Elegies, Rajia Hassib, English Graduate Program, Logan, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder

Second place: 'I'm Lying': Nattative Reliability in The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, Ian Ferrell, English Education, Union Bridge, Md. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Van Kirk

Third place: This/Then, Delaney McLemore, English, Philomath, Ore. Faculty mentor: Dr. R. Peckham

Fourth place: A Lover of Peace: Pacifism and the Construction of Identity in Letters from an American Farmer, Zachary Miller, English, South Charleston, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder;

      A Word to the Wise is Enough, Cristin Haught, English, Appomattox, Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. M. Householder

 

Graduate Non-Fiction Prose

First place: The Saintly Strumpet: Reconciling the Two Desdemonas, Julie Ann Baker, English Graduate Program, Ashland, Ky. Faculty Mentor: Dr. E. Taft

Second place: The Taming of a Tale: Shakespeare's Treatment of Folklore in The Taming of the Shrew, Katherine Mohn, Master of Arts in Teaching, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty Mentor: Dr. M. Moore

Third place: The Fragmented Search for Selfhood: Identity and Form in the Postmodern Short Story, Sarah Morgan, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. A. Viola

Fourth place: Rereading Recalcitrance: The War Stories of Hemingway, Salinger, and O'Brien, Chris Brewer, Master of Arts in English, Chapmanville, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. A. Viola

 

Graduate and Undergraduate Fiction

First place: The Taste of What? Rajia Hassib, English graduate program, Logan, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. J. Hill

Second place: Skin Deep, Renee Gibbs, College of Science, St. Albans, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Third place: The Cheerleader, Christina Haymaker, Integrated Science and Technology, Elizabeth, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Fourth place: Inglorious, Caleb Whisenant, English, Crab Orchard, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Dr. J. Hill

 

Graduate and Undergraduate Poetry

First place: Sea Story and other Poems, Erika Tharp, English, Washington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Second place: Hoarders and Vultures and other Poems, Cory Jackson, Beckley, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Third place: Bartender Tips and other Poems, Nick A. Dailey, English, Point Pleasant, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

Fourth place: The Shoemaker and other Poems, Jad Adkins, English, Kenova, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

 

---------------

 

Photo: Ed Maier, center, poses with winners of the Maier Awards, announced today in the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center at Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday April 15, 2011
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late," , 304-696-2967

Newswoman, Appalachian-roots rock band visit set of 'Up Late' this week



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Up Late" welcomes WSAZ newswoman Charly Arnolt to the show this week.

Arnolt, who has been with the station since September 2010, talks with host Jamie LoFiego about her life outside of journalism. She also works on her delivery of pick-up lines with J.J. Smart (Patrick Webb, a junior broadcast major from Huntington).

 

In other action, student crew member, the Rev. Jim Nash, goes on location to investigate extravagant offices of certain staff members at Marshall University. His exclusive takes him to the basement dwelling of a local TV talk show host.

 

This week's musical guest is Deadbeats and Barkers, a three-piece Appalachian-roots rock band from Huntington whose sound blends elements of vintage rock, delta blues, funk, jazz and bluegrass and whose influencers include The Band and Paul Simon, with a nod to artists like Stevie Wonder, The Meters and Hank Williams.

 

This episode airs on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" also can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

 

"Up Late" grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with the university's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.

--------

 

Photo: Charly Arnolt will appear on "Up Late" this week.


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Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Wednesday, April 27, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Camilla Brammer.

 

Three people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

 

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:
 

  • Dr. Camilla Brammer, Communication Studies, College of Liberal Arts, 26 years of service

  • Dr. Barbara Guyer, Special Education, College of Education and Human Services, 36 years of service

  • Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 25 years of service

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

 

  • Dr. Rachael Peckham, English, assistant professor, junior recipient among all faculty

  • Dr. Thomas Wilson, Physics, professor, senior recipient in the field of Sciences and Technology

  • Dr. Richard Agesa, Finance/Economics, professor, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business

Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisors. They are:

 

  • Dr. Michael Cunningham, professor, Leadership Studies, Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, from the South Charleston campus

  • Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, assistant professor, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, from the Huntington campus

The Sarah Denman Faces of Appalachia Fellowship Award, which includes a $3,000 award, is presented each year to one faculty member. This year's recipient is:

 

  • Dr. Donna Sullivan, associate professor, Sociology

 

Marshall also is recognizing 14 retiring faculty who have a combined 401 years of service. They are:
 

  • Earline Allen, Art and Design, College of Fine Arts, 41 years of service

  • Dr. George Arthur, School of Education, College of Education and Human Services, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Sirous Arya, Surgery, School of Medicine, 10 years of service

  • Dr. Emmett (Noel) Bowling, Reading Education, MU Graduate College, 34 years of service

  • Kathy Chezik, Communication Disorders, College of Health Professions, 40 years of service

  • Joe Fuller, Engineering, College of Information Technology and Engineering, 31 years of service

  • Dr. Barbara Guyer, School of Education, College of Education and Human Services, 36 years of service

  • Dr. Sandra Marra, Nursing, College of Health Professions, 19 years of service

  • Dr. Michael Moore, Biochemistry and Microbiology, School of Medicine, 33 years of service

  • Dr. Leslie Petteys, Music, College of Fine Arts, 24 years of service

  • Dr. Gilbert Ratcliff Jr., Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 22 years of service

  • Dr. Maria-Carmen Riddel, Modern Languages, College of Liberal Arts, 29 years of service

  • Dr. Gary Saunders, Accountancy and Legal Environment, Lewis College of Business, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Joe Stone Jr., Accountancy and Legal Environment, Lewis College of Business, 40 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as announced yesterday, are:
 

  • Dr. Jamie Warner, professor, Political Science, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Dan Hollis, associate professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Dr. April Fugett-Fuller, assistant professor, Psychology; Dr. Maribea Barnes, assistant professor, Art and Design; Brent Patterson, assistant professor, Art and Design, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

A reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center after the meeting.


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Thursday April 14, 2011
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, , 304-746-1989

Professionals invited to learn about Marshall's Executive MBA program; next class of students to begin in July

SOUTH CHARLESTON - The Marshall University Lewis College of Business is looking for professionals interested in earning an accredited Executive MBA. The next cohort will begin formal classes this summer.


There will be an informational session from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 16, on the Marshall University South Charleston campus, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., South Charleston. Professors and administrators will be on hand to answer questions about admissions, curriculum, financial aid and offerings unique to the Marshall program.

 

The Marshall University Executive MBA is an accelerated program focusing on the needs of working professionals so they can earn an internationally accredited MBA without great disruption to work and family schedules. The program is comprised of 12 face-to-face, cutting-edge courses taught over a 16-month time frame. It follows a cohort format (students move through the program as a team in a set sequence) and meets on Saturdays at the Marshall University South Charleston campus to provide little disruption to students' careers.

 

Diverse classes focus on business ethics, leadership and global issues that, along with management skills and tools, are crafted to enrich the career accomplishments of students with or without business backgrounds. The program also includes a domestic business trip as well as an international residency abroad.

 

Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs, encourages interested professionals to consider current economic challenges when deciding to pursue advanced degrees.

 

In today's economy, America's corporate culture is re-thinking how to plan and how to conduct business ethically and efficiently," Ormiston said. "Despite the current economic obstacles facing us all, we must consider the business challenges of the time as a critical moment of opportunity for educational enrichment, personal growth, and the chance to diversify our professional skill sets."

 

For more information, call 304-696-2627 or go to http://www.marshall.edu/lcob/graduate/emba/.

 

The current Executive MBA cohort is finishing its capstone course and will be hooded in a ceremony in Charleston on May 14 after completing an international residency in Frankfurt, Germany, and Budapest, Hungary.


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Marshall University faculty members receive stipends for research proposal preparation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University science faculty have received two of four grants recently awarded statewide by the Division of Science and Research of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

The awards, worth $5,000 each, are intended to assist faculty members at West Virginia institutions of higher education with the preparation of research or research equipment proposals for submission to external funding agencies or foundations.

 

Marshall faculty members awarded the grants are Dr. Gary E. Schultz Jr., assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Bin Wang, assistant professor of chemistry.

 

According to Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, faculty members are expected to prepare research proposals as part of their routine activities. He said these summer stipends are designed to provide uninterrupted work, allowing development of stronger, more-competitive proposals in a timelier manner.

 

The grants are funded competitively through the state's Research Challenge Fund.


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Dr. Jamie Warner selected as Marshall's Outstanding Faculty Award winner


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Dr. Jamie Warner, a professor of political science at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2010-2011.

 

Warner will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

 

Marshall's Office of Academic Affairs announced two other awards honoring four faculty members in addition to the Hedrick Award winner. They are:

 

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dan Hollis, associate professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communications

  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. April Fugett-Fuller, assistant professor, Psychology; Dr. Maribea Barnes, assistant professor, Art and Design; Brent Patterson, assistant professor, Art and Design

 

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

 

Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

 

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

 

Jamie Warner has been at Marshall since 2002, when she was hired as an assistant professor of political science. In 2004, she was awarded both the Pickens-Queen and College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teaching Awards. Before coming to Marshall, she was a visiting assistant professor of political science at the University of the South (Sewanee) from 2001 to 2002.

 

Warner received her B.A. from Millersville University in 1991, her M.A. from Penn State University in 1995 and her Ph.D. in political science with a minor in women's studies from Penn State in 2001.

 

"Creating an environment where students feel free to open up and think in ways foreign to their usual modes of thought is the major goal in every class I teach, even, perhaps especially, if we are covering very conventional material," Warner said when describing her teaching philosophy. "I believe that a critical, self-reflective attitude is crucial to every student's ability to make a difference in the world, regardless of major or career choice."

 

Dr. Marybeth Beller, chair of the Department of Political Science, said Warner is an exceptional colleague whose work sets an important benchmark for faculty at Marshall University.

 

"Few faculty members can claim - without hesitation - to have excellence performance ratings in teaching, service and scholarship," Beller said. "I am so proud that my colleague in the Department of Political Science, Dr. Jamie Warner, is one such member of the faculty."

 

At Marshall, Warner has held the position of associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts, taught many honors seminars, and served on countless university, college, and department committees.

 

Dr. Susan Gilpin, associate dean of Marshall's honors college, nominated Warner for the Hedrick award.

 

"Dr. Warner has produced a record of achievement in scholarship, teaching and service that more nearly resembles that of one many years her senior," Gilpin said. In describing Warner's classroom presence, Gilpin said she is "dynamic and her standards are high."

 

Dr. Wendy Williams, an associate professor in the Department of Psychology, also nominated Warner. She said she has known Warner for five years in her capacity as a teacher, researcher and Marshall University community member.

 

"Let me say clearly and frankly that Jamie is one of the most intelligent scholars that I have had the pleasure to know," Williams said. "Personally, I strive to meet the same level of excellence that Jamie models."

 

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

 

This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

 

Dan Hollis makes it clear to his journalism students that he cares about them and wants them to succeed. In fact, Burnis Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Dr. Chris Swindell, a journalism professor, both of whom nominated Hollis for the Reynolds award, describe him as "the student's best friend."

 

"He challenges good students and cajoles the not-so-good into believing they can become better," Morris and Swindell said in their nomination. "Students of all stripes crowd into his small office - sometimes for additional learning, other times for moral support. His former students simply hang out there. Dan generously bestows words of wisdom, and they learn."

 

Hollis has been at Marshall since August 1999 when he was hired as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 2003. He said he wants his students to live lives of passion filled with an appreciation of learning and dedicated to quality.

 

"I always tell students I have the best job in the world," Hollis said. "I love what I do and I can't wait to get to work in the morning. The first day of school is my favorite day of the year surpassing Christmas and my birthday. I want my students to see that, feel that, live that."

 

Hollis received his B.S. degree from the University of Southern Indiana in 1983, and his M.A. from the University of Kentucky in 1997. He has won numerous awards at Marshall, including the National Broadcasting Society "First Place" Video News Award for the past five years and seven of the past eight years. He said he loves doing creative work in the form of television feature stories.

 

"I love combining great video with great writing and great sound, and the 'packages' as we call them in the business give me unique opportunities for student discussion and interaction," Hollis said.

 

Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

 

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

 

Dr. April Fugett-Fuller has cultivated a reputation among students of being both tough and fair, according to Dr. Wendy Williams, who nominated her for the Pickens-Queen award.

 

"She teaches a lot of statistics courses, which are required for our majors who are generally not excited about taking these courses, yet she still maintains high teaching evaluations," Williams said of Fugett-Fuller.

 

Elijah A. Wise was a student of Fugett-Fuller's at Marshall.

 

"Dr. Fugett-Fuller is the best instructor I have had during my tenure at Marshall University," Wise said. "But more importantly, she has been a fantastic mentor who, time and time again, has gone out of her way to assist me. She constantly pushes me to succeed and displays a steadfast confidence in my potential as a student and researcher."

 

Fugett-Fuller has been at Marshall for three years. In addition to teaching, she is the faculty advisor for Psi Chi (the psychology honorary society) and the Undergraduate Psychology Program Coordinator.

 

"Central to my teaching philosophy is to provide a dynamic learning experience for the students as a whole, and to set them up as lifetime learners," Fugett-Fuller said.

 

Fugett-Fuller received her B.A. in psychology from Morehead State University in 2002, her M.A. in experimental psychology from Morehead in 2004 and her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Kansas in 2008.

  

Maribea Barnes, who has been at Marshall since fall 2007, says teaching visual art is her true passion. She said she knows that her role as a teacher can have a tremendous impact on the direction of her students' lives.

 

"We serve not only as a teacher, but as a mentor and advisor," she said.  "At Marshall, I have the opportunity to serve in each of these roles."

 

Barnes is committed to advancing arts education not only in the classroom, but in the community as well. For the past two years, she has worked with the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's Children's Arts Festival Extravaganza (CAF) event.

 

"In all honesty, this event would not be the educational, creative and fun project it has become without Maribea's artistic input and genuine interest in making sure children are introduced to the visual arts," said Leah Clark Payne, a communications specialist at Marshall, who worked alongside Barnes in helping organize the event.

 

Hannah Kinker has taken two classes taught by Barnes, and Barnes has been her advisor. Kinker said Barnes played the major role in helping her choose a career in Art Education.

 

"Dr. Barnes has taught and encouraged me to meet challenges that I had never before thought possible," Kinker said, "and I will forever be grateful for my time as her student."

 

Byron Clercx, chair of the Department of Art & Design, said he holds Barnes in high esteem.

 

"As a classroom teacher, field supervisor, student advisor/mentor, scholar, program advocate/recruiter and community volunteer (she) is the consummate colleague and team player," Clercx said.

 

Barnes received her B.A. in French from Concordia College in 1991, her K-12 Teaching License in art education from Concordia in 1994, her M.A. in art history from the University of St. Thomas in 2003 and her Ph.D. in art education from Ohio State in 2008.

 

Brent Patterson is described by Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts, as "one of the most innovative and inspiring teachers in COFA as well as one of the most dedicated educators I've ever known."

 

Patterson has been teaching in the area of New Media at Marshall since the fall of 2006. Jonathan Cox, a professor of art who has worked with Patterson, said Patterson is a truly gifted teacher and creative artist.

 

"I am pleased and proud to teach, work and serve with Brent Patterson," Cox said.

 

In Patterson's classes, students "read, watch, write, discuss and practice with practice being the principal activity," Patterson said. He said he is constantly revising and experimenting with his pedagogical methodology with the goal of creating a better environment of respectful and mutually beneficial discourse supported by carefully planned and evaluated assignments, discussions and personal guidance.

 

Stephanie Lloyd has taken several courses from Patterson, whom she says is "passionate about teaching."

 

"Teachers like Professor Patterson, who inspire students to be passionate about a subject, are rare," Lloyd said.

 

Van Horn said Patterson has distinguished himself through his efforts to develop exciting curriculum and opportunities for Marshall students in the area of electronic media while also invigorating the department with his "intellectual rigor."

 

"He is an exemplary teacher who is in command of the ever-changing technology that defines his area of expertise," Van Horn said.

 

Patterson received his B.A. in fine art/multimedia from Ohio State University in 2001 and his M.F.A. in fine art/multimedia from Washington State University in 2004.

 

###

 
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Julia Keller to deliver commencement speech at Marshall University

MU alumna won a Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2005

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pulitzer Prize winner Julia Keller, cultural critic for the Chicago Tribune and a two-time graduate of Marshall University, will deliver the keynote speech at Marshall's 174th commencement on Saturday, May 7. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

 

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, daughter of the late Dr. James R. Keller, a mathematics professor at Marshall, and Patricia Keller, who taught English at Chesapeake High School in Chesapeake, Ohio.

 

Keller earned her bachelor's degree in English from Marshall in 1976, and a master's degree in English from Marshall in 1981. She earned a doctoral degree in English from The Ohio State University in 1996.

 

In 2005, Keller won the Pulitzer Prize for her three-part series on a 10-second tornado that ripped through Utica, Ill. The Pulitzer Board described Keller's account of the tornado, which was published in December 2004, as "gripping" and "meticulously constructed."


"I'm so pleased to be returning to Marshall to deliver the commencement address to the class of 2011," Keller said. "I grew up in Huntington and my father taught mathematics at Marshall, and my fondest childhood memory is accompanying him to Marshall basketball games, where he kept statistics for the team. To my infinite delight, I was allowed to sit next to him at the press table in Memorial Field House. It made me feel extraordinarily special - just as does the invitation to speak to this year's Marshall graduates."

 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the university is honored to welcome back a distinguished alumna whose achievements have been recognized at the highest level.

 

"Julia Keller is a very distinguished and accomplished daughter of Marshall. Her dedication to excellence is clearly evident in her award-winning works. As a symbol of the principles for which Marshall University stands, Julia embodies the pride and determination that is Marshall University," Kopp said. "She is a gifted communicator, as our graduates will witness during our upcoming commencement ceremony. I look forward to welcoming Julia back to Marshall and to hearing her inspiring message to our graduates."

 

Keller was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In 2006, she served as McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. She has also taught writing and literature at Ohio State, the University of Notre Dame and the University of Chicago. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from Dominican University.

 


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More than 1,500 to participate in SCORES at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, April 16 to participate in the 33nd annual Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

 

SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different areas of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

 

"The SCORES Academic Festival is an exciting event for not only the students, but also for Marshall," said Sabrina Simpson, SCORES coordinator with Marshall's office of recruitment. "The festival provides students with exposure to the social activities found on campus which are integral to students' education and growth.  The event is a great way for the university to not only recruit students, but allow them to visit a college campus and become familiar with the university community. This program allows talented students the opportunity to showcase their academic achievements while interacting with Marshall faculty, who are the heart and soul of this program.  Overall, this is an exciting day focused on celebrating the unique talents that each student brings to the festival."

 

Events take place at 9, 10:15 and  11:45 a.m. with lunch provided on campus.  The awards ceremony begins at 1:30 p.m. in the Cam Henderson Center.  Events are open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, liberal arts, journalism and mass communications, information technology and engineering, health professions and science. The top three winners in each contest will be awarded medals.

 

Scholarships will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place trophies will be given for each school division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

 

For more information, contact the SCORES office at 304-696-2246.

 


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Marshall to compete in national speech and debate tournament

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five members of the Thundering Word, Marshall University's speech and debate team, will be in Normal, Ill., this weekend to participate in the National Forensics Association National Tournament at Illinois State University.

 

Marshall actually qualified 42 slots for the NFA National Tournament, but has strategically decided to take the 17 best slots, filled by the five students, to the tournament, according to Coach Danny Ray. The tournament runs April 15 through 18 (Friday through Monday).

 

"I am very proud of the accomplishments of our students, especially their dedication to a demanding program of training and competition," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts. "That they have come this far is a testament that they represent the best of a Marshall University education. I am also proud of Coach Ray, his assistants, and the faculty of the Department of Communication Studies. They never miss an opportunity to show our students that they have the reserve and capacity to do great things."

 

The students representing the Thundering Word are:

 

Kendrick Vonderschmitt, a junior political science major and John Marshall scholar, who qualified in Lincoln-Douglas Debate by reaching the semifinal round at West Chester University. He was a finalist at Ohio University, a semifinalist at the Ohio State tournament and the top debate speaker at the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Persuasive Speaking by finishing third at Miami (Ohio) and the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Rhetorical Criticism by finishing first and second at Berea College, third at Ohio State, second at Miami and third at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Kai Stewart, a freshman oral communications major from Parkersburg, W.Va., who qualified in Lincoln Douglas Debate by reaching the semifinal rounds at Ohio State, the Ohio state tournament and Marist College. She was the West Virginia state champion in Lincoln Douglas Debate. She also qualified in Impromptu Speaking by finishing in third place at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Ryan Jackson, who qualified in Prose Interpretation by finaling at George Mason and West Chester, finishing in second place at Berea College and the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Informative Speaking by finaling at Berea College, West Chester, Ohio State and the West Virginia state tournament. Jackson finished first in Poetry Interpretation at West Chester, third in both tournaments at Ohio University, and second at the West Virginia state tournament. He qualified in Dramatic Interpretation and After Dinner Speaking by being the state champion in those events. Jackson and Jasmine Lewis qualified in Duo at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Jasmine Lewis, a freshman political science major from Huntington, who qualified in Persuasion by reaching the final rounds at both tournaments at Berea College, finishing first  at Marshall's Chief Justice tournament, making the finals at Miami and being the top novice at Ohio University. She placed third at the West Virginia state tournament. She qualified in Poetry by reaching the finals in both tournaments at Ohio University, and the West Virginia state tournament. Lewis qualified in Dramatic Interpretation by making it to the final rounds at Miami, Ohio and the West Virginia state tournament. Along with her Duo with Jackson, she and Elaine Adkins were finalists at the West Virginia state tournament.

 

Elaine Adkins, a freshman French/Oral Communication Education major from Huntington, who  qualified in Poetry Interpretation by reaching the final round at West Chester and Berea, and winning the event at the Ohio State University. She also was a finalist at Ohio and the West Virginia state tournament in this category.  She qualified in Prose and Dramatic Interpretation by reaching the final rounds at Ohio University and the West Virginia state tournament. Her last qualification is the Duo with Jasmine Lewis.

 

Vonderschmitt and Lewis will be representing West Virginia at the Interstate Oratorical Association's National Tournament, April 21-23 at James Madison University by finishing as the best in Persuasion at the West Virginia State Tournament.

 


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School of Journalism and Mass Communications to celebrate past, present and future of school

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - For former, present and future students of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) at Marshall University, the upcoming Legacy Luncheon is a chance for several generations to meet and share their experiences with one another.

 

The Legacy Luncheon will take place on Saturday, April 23, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Scheduled in conjunction with the Green and White Game events, the luncheon will begin at noon, and luncheon tickets will include a ticket to the spring football scrimmage.

 

The luncheon was proposed by members of the Public Relations Campaigns class taught by Professor Terry Hapney as part of a multi-faceted campaign to promote and build the SOJMC. Tasked with addressing student recruitment, fundraising and awareness of the SOJMC, the Campaigns class developed the idea of the luncheon as a way to connect all aspects of the project in a culminating event.

 

"The challenge in our campaign is addressing three very broad areas of recruitment, fundraising and awareness," said Tori Marra, co-chair of the campaign. "Rather than planning three smaller, individual events, we wanted a single event that would allow us to connect everyone who has a vested interest in the success of the SOJMC."

 

More than just a fundraising luncheon, the event is seen by Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as an opportunity to build relationships within the school. "We hope that our past, present and future students will find this luncheon to be a great way to connect with others who share their dreams and passions for careers in journalism and communications," he said. "We look forward to rekindling old relationships and inspiring our next generation of students."

 

The luncheon will feature remarks by Jack Houvouras, Marshall alumnus and owner of HQ Publishing, Dr. George Arnold and Dr. Ralph Turner, retired faculty from the SOJMC, and Dean Dennison. Attendees will also have the opportunity to record video testimonials about the role the SOJMC and Marshall University have played in their lives.

 

Tickets are currently on sale for $35, with a student rate of $25. All proceeds will benefit the School of Journalism and Mass Communications. Table sponsorships are also available. Contact Marra at marra7@marshall.edu for more information. Reservations can also be made online at www.marshall.edu/makeyourmark.

 


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Former Ashland Inc. Foundation president to speak at Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc. fundraising banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles Whitehead, former president of the Ashland Inc. Foundation, will be the keynote speaker at the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation Inc. fundraising banquet Saturday, April 23.

 

The 19th annual banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Proceeds will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

 

Whitehead will speak on "the value of preserving history." He was an original member of the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation board, and orchestrated construction of a life-size statue of Woodson in Huntington. He has held offices at the local, state and national levels of the NAACP.  

 

Whitehead has been honored numerous times for his community service. Examples include:

 

  • In 1999, Marshall University presented him with the John Drinko Distinguished Service Award, given to those who volunteer and support their fellow man and contribute to civic well-being.

  • In 2000, he received the 2000 A.D. Albright Award from the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce for his personal and professional contributions in education.

  • In 2000, Whitehead received the prestigious Charles W. Anderson Laureate Award from the Commonwealth of Kentucky for his unparalleled contribution and quest for the equal opportunity for the people of Kentucky and commitment to freedom and justice.

  • In 2001, he served as grand marshal of the Lincoln Heights Day Parade for being a distinguished businessman, humanitarian and positive role model. Whitehead is a native of Clarksdale, Miss., but grew up in Lincoln Heights, Ohio.

  • In 2003, he received the Northern Kentucky University Lincoln Award, which acknowledged his hard work and dedication to the community.

Whitehead is a 1961 graduate of Central State University in Ohio, where he earned his B.S. degree in accounting.

 

Music for the banquet will be provided by Kevin E. Johnson and Charles Johnson. Tickets for the event are available for a donation of $30. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at 740-894-5772; Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at 304-525-5651; or Karen Nance, secretary, at 304-736-1655.

 

The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.


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Marshall University Jazz Ensemble 12.0 to welcome guest saxophonist Craig Treinen Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University's Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Dr. Ed Bingham, will present its final performance of the 2011 spring semester at 8 p.m. Thursday,  April 14, in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. This concert will feature the music of the Count Basie Big Band and will feature guest soloist Craig Treinen, a Kansas City-style saxophonist.

Treinen is currently the director of jazz studies/applied saxophone at Washburn University. He has performed in Kansas City as the lead alto saxophonist for the Kansas City Boulevard Big Band, for which he recorded three albums. Other performances included local big bands such as Trilogy Big Band, Tony Dipardo Big Band, Topeka Jazz Workshop Big Band, Blue Devils Big Band, The Des Moines Big Band and Mom's Big Band in Lawrence, Kan.

Also an alumnus of Washburn University, Treinen entered the United States Air Force as a saxophone specialist in the Heartland of America Band (formerly the USAF Strategic Air Command Band) stationed in Omaha, Neb, after he graduated. While serving, he was the principal alto saxophonist in the symphonic band and served as the musical director, staff arranger and lead alto saxophonist with the Heartland of America Band's jazz ensemble,  the "Noteables."

In addition to his duties at Washburn, Treinen is serving as artistic director for the Coleman Hawkins Legacy Jazz Festival, which is a two-day event held in Topeka, Kan. He is also the education director for the Topeka Jazz Workshop Inc.  He has performed with such legendary performers as Lee Greenwood, Shirley Jones, Crystal Gayle, Bob Denver, Frank Mantooth, Brian Strippling, Karin Allison, the Shirelles, the Jimmy Dorsey Big Band, Kevin Mahogany, Todd Strait, Terrell Stafford, George Duke, Bobby Watson, Eric Marienthal and many others all over the world.

Admission is free and the public is cordially invited to attend, Bingham said.


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Marshall computer science students win awards


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Two Marshall University computer science students won top honors at the 25th annual Eastern Kentucky University Symposium in the Mathematical, Statistical & Computer Sciences. The competition took place April 1 in the Powell Building on EKU's campus in Richmond, Ky.

Joshua King, a computer science senior from Huntington, won first place for best undergraduate presentation and Sean Sovine, a computer science sophomore from Charleston, W.Va., took second place in the same category.   Two other computer science students, Devon Albrecht, a junior from Lapeer, Mich., and Daniel Kissel, a junior from Hurricane, W.Va., also participated in the competition.

 

"I am very pleased with the outcome of our presentations, especially since this was our first time," said Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, assistant professor in the College of Information Technology and Engineering.  "It shows the depth and breadth of undergraduate research in the computer science department, plus it was an excellent opportunity for our students to showcase their achievements."

 

Sovine's award is his second significant academic achievement this year.   He was awarded the Science, Mathematics & Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense.    The academic award includes a full tuition and fees stipend and a two-year employment contract with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers upon graduation.


"We are proud to have Sean as our first DOD SMART scholarship winner and are sure he'll continue to succeed and do great things in his chosen profession," said Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering.  "Our computer science faculty and students are exceptional and it's nice to see them recognized for their efforts by such a distinguished group of professionals."

Students earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science at Marshall University learn how to analyze, design, build, test and deploy computer-based systems in state-of-the-art computing facilities.

For more information, contact Wahjudi at 304-696-5443.


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Dr. Ancella R. Bickley to deliver Moffat Lecture at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ancella R. Bickley, professor emeritus of English and former Vice President of Academic Affairs at West Virginia State University, will deliver the 2011 Charles Hill Moffat Lecture Thursday, April 21 at Marshall University.

 

The lecture, which is free to the public, will take place at 4 p.m. in Room BE 5 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. The title of Bickley's lecture is "African American History of West Virginia."

 

Bickley also is the co-editor of Memphis Tennessee Garrison: The Remarkable Story of a Black Appalachian Woman.

 

Dr. David Peavler Trowbridge, an assistant professor of African American history at Marshall, said Bickley is the reason African American history in West Virginia has been preserved.

 

"Students at Marshall have spent the past semester conducting original research on topics in African American history," Trowbridge said. "Examples include the integration of Marshall University, Charleston and Huntington schools; lynching in West Virginia; the Barnett Hospital of Huntington; sit-ins in Huntington and Charleston; the 45th USCT (United States Colored Troops) - an Appalachian Civil War regiment composed of black troops from West Virginia; Affrilachian poets; race relations in law enforcement; the experiences of black teachers in one-room schools prior to integration and the integration of Mingo County schools.

 

"These topics were inspired by a list I was able to put together last semester based largely on the research of Dr. Bickley. As a newcomer to the state, I traveled to archives and spoke with librarians across the state and most of the secondary sources I found on black history in West Virginia were written or directed by Dr. Bickley. She has done more than any West Virginian since Carter Woodson to collect and preserve African American history. It is truly an honor to have Dr. Bickley come to Marshall to share her knowledge, and I hope everyone who can make it Thursday afternoon will come to hear Dr. Bickley discuss her life's work."

 

The lecture is named in honor of Dr. Charles Moffat, who taught history at Marshall from 1946 to 1977 and was recognized as one of the top professors in Marshall history by Marshall Magazine.

 

The lecture is sponsored by Marshall's Department of History, Phi Alpha Theta and the College of Liberal Arts.


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Friday April 8, 2011
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Former WSAZ newswomen say goodbye to Marshall University's 'Up Late' audience

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two WSAZ newswomen visit the set of "Up Late" this week to bid farewell to their Marshall University audience.


Former weekend anchor Stephanie Schelkun and former morning meteorologist Marina Jurica make their last appearances on the student-produced late-night show. Schelkun is moving to Albany, N.Y., and Jurica is moving to Minneapolis, Minn. The cast prepares a special montage of their "Up Late" experiences and recurring character Gerry T. Troll reunites with Jurica on set to reprise their on-screen spark.


In other action, student crew member Kelley Bugler, a senior from Texas, challenges Kyle Hobstetter, a journalism graduate student from Portsmouth, Ohio, to a series of events to become the show's new co-host and one guy takes on campus armed with his Vuvuzela, a South African horn.


This week's musical guest is Dylan Rees, an acoustic/electronic/pop artist from Huntington.


This episode airs on MyZ-TV at 11 p.m. Saturday and on WSAZ at 4:30 a.m. Sunday. The show also can be seen on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week and on Suddenlink Communications Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" also can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.


"Up Late" grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with the university's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Marshall University geography majors earn internships with National Weather Service

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Two Marshall University geography majors have been selected for summer internships with Engineering Perfection PLLC and the National Weather Service in Charleston, W.Va.

 

The interns are Ben Stratton, a 21-year-old junior from Hurricane, and Bob Maynard, a 36-year-old junior from Clifton and a recipient of a Marshall University Trailblazer Scholarship funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Marshall Trailblazer Scholars are motivated nontraditional students who have dependents and are interested in pursuing degrees in the fields of science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

 

Stratton and Maynard will begin work on the collaborative public-private project beginning in June. Both students will help develop flood inundation maps using Geospatial Information Systems (GIS) for the state of West Virginia with the aim of providing better visualization for real-time flooding. The project will serve as a possible prototype for other areas around the nation.

 

Dr. Kevin Law, the West Virginia State Climatologist and Marshall University assistant professor of geography, said there is a need for better flood information and that Maynard and Stratton will be involved creating maps that will provide a great public service.

 

"A classic example of this need happened recently when the Ohio River was above flood stage," Law explained. "It was difficult for the public to know precisely which areas were going to be affected by the high water."

 

The aim of this project is to address that issue by using GIS to map areas that will be affected by high water at different flood stage levels.

 

Alan Rezek is Meteorologist in Charge of the National Weather Service in Charleston.

 

"Flooding is at the top of the list when it comes to damage to life and property in West Virginia," Rezek explained. "Flood inundation mapping can have a tremendous impact on mitigating both.  While we have known this for years, finding the resources to get the mapping done has been a challenge.  I am confident the citizens of West Virginia will benefit greatly from Marshall University stepping forward to bring together skilled students, an entrepreneur from the private sector and the flood expertise of the National Weather Service on this joint venture."

 

The National Weather Service is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), whose mission is to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans and coasts. Engineering Perfection PLLC is a private company that provides environmental, flood assessment and geographic services for the West Virginia region.

 

------

 

Photo: Marshall juniors Bob Maynard, left, and Ben Stratton have been selected for summer internships with Engineering Perfection PLLC and the National Weather Service in Charleston, W.Va. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

 
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Marshall launches Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, a new and innovative academic program that will promote the study of the history and contemporary significance of this nation's Constitution, has officially been launched, Marshall University and the College of Liberal Arts announced today.

 

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, said the college already has raised funds well in excess of $500,000 to support the program. It is named after Dr. Simon Perry, a professor of political science who served Marshall University for 48 years and developed many of the program's signature courses. The College is now working to raise an additional $1 million for the Center's endowment.

 

"The Center represents an ambitious plan to enhance how we teach and study the Constitution and its history," Pittenger said. "Currently, there is a recognizable lack of knowledge among our citizens about how our government developed and how it now functions. Thus, the goal of the Center is to provide Marshall University students a broad and comprehensive understanding of the scope and function of our constitutional system. The efforts of the Center will not stop at the University's boundaries as the program will also serve the interests of the greater Huntington community."

 

  • The Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy will be an interdisciplinary academic program that will improve the quality of scholarship and classroom instruction related to the history and contemporary concerns related to the Constitution. Pittenger said the specific goals of the program are to:

  • Support a faculty scholar who will teach courses in the program, oversee a pre law program, and engage in scholarship related to Constitutional history and contemporary interpretation;

  • Provide Marshall University students a broad array of courses in history, political science and the other liberal arts that allow them to better understand the importance of the Constitution in defining the American government, the great leaders who defined and shaped this nation, and interplay between social and political events and the Constitution;

  • Provide faculty resources to revise and develop courses, at all levels of the curriculum, that will improve students' understanding of their responsibilities as engaged citizens;

  • Provide the broader Huntington community lecture series and other events that promote awareness of matters related to the Constitution;

  • Support students through scholarships and other forms of support who wish to engage in the study of the constitution and prepare for careers in law and political science.

"I came to Marshall in 1962 having been trained in the new behavioral movement in political science," Perry said. "While this perspective contributed much to understanding various political phenomena, I recognized that many gaps, especially historic ones, required attention. Therefore I developed a new curriculum addressing some of the things that may people overlooked, or what I call Constitutional Democracy.

 

"Constitutional Democracy is a perspective that studies how people as well as social and political forces shape the Constitution and its interpretation, and how the Constitution defines us as a nation. We want students to understand how the magnificent American experience - our constitutional system - was designed. Our constitutional democracy, however, is not frozen in time.  It has evolved over the centuries and has been shaped by important moments in time and the work of many people."

 

Named after John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Marshall University has a proud tradition of providing its students a contemporary education that prepares them for the world of thought and work and to be engaged citizens in their community.

 

"This new program will help students better understand that the Constitution, with all of its majestic generalities, affects their lives as citizens," Pittenger said. "The program will also emphasize how they, as individuals or members of groups, can influence how we are governed."

 

A native of Gilbert, W.Va., Perry attended public school in Mingo County and earned undergraduate degrees in political science and history from Berea College. He then received a Master of Arts from the University of Tennessee and a doctorate in Political Science from Michigan State University.

 

He began teaching at Marshall University in the fall of 1962 and retired at the end of the 2010 academic year. During that time he taught an inestimable number of students. Notable among his many accomplishments has been the development of the courses that define the core of the minor, the Simon D. Perry Program on Constitutional Democracy.

 

Chief among these courses are Political Biographies: Shapers and Definers; Power in American Society; Politics in History; and Social Class, Power and Conflict. The design of these courses is noteworthy as they expose students to the traditions of history, biographical narrative, political theory and critical analysis as means to study this nation's formation and development.

 

Marshall University traces its origin to 1837, when, under the leadership of local lawyer John Laidley, residents of Guyandotte and the local farming community created a comprehensive school for their children. The school was named Marshall Academy in honor of Laidley's friend, the late Chief Justice John Marshall, and the Virginia General Assembly formally incorporated the school on March 30, 1838. The West Virginia Legislature revised the school's charter and name in 1867 to create the State Normal School at Marshall College. The school's name was revised to Marshall University in 1961 when the Legislature granted the school its university status. The university now functions through 12 academic units: the Lewis College of Business, the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Information Technology and Engineering, the College of Liberal Arts, the College of Health Professions, the College of Science, the Graduate College, the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the Honors College, University College and the School of Medicine. Marshall University offers curricula leading to baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral degrees.

 

For more information or to make a contribution, contact Pittenger by phone at 304-696-2731 or by e-mail at Pittengerd@marshall.edu.


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Greek Week kicks off Friday at Marshall University


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Greek community will begin its annual Greek Week Celebration tomorrow with a new twist on some of the activities.

 

Greek Week 2011, which runs Friday, April 8, through Thursday, April 14, includes events that will be open to the greater student body and the Huntington community.

 

Early this semester, a group of students created a theme and mission statement for Greek Week. This year's theme is "I'm a survivor," which Greek Advisor Jonathan James said is fitting because the official philanthropy of Greek Week 2011 is the American Cancer Society's Relay For Life.

 

The Marshall Greek community is composed of 20 organizations that work together through the governing councils of the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Greek Week features a variety of competitions involving fraternities and sororities.

 

The purpose of Greek Week, according to the student-developed mission statement, is "to promote Greek unity within the Marshall Greek community through healthy competition that promotes leadership and service to others, while recognizing the achievement of our community tradition of being active in campus involvement and throughout the community."

 

One of the features of this year's Greek Week activities takes place Saturday, April 9, at Hillbilly Hot Dogs, located at 1501 3rd Ave. The first Greek Week Home Wrecker Hot Dog Eating Competition and Concert runs from 4 to 7 p.m.

 

"The 'Home Wrecker' is a one-pound, all-beef hot dog that is loaded with all sorts of condiments and items that pack on the heat for a total of 3.5 pounds of hillbilly goodness," James said. 

 

More information on the Home Wrecker is contained in the video at  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=js1jfYZxCvs&feature=fvst.

 

At approximately 4:30 p.m., at least 15 students representing their respective organizations will compete at the same time to see who can eat his or her Home Wrecker the fastest, or the most of his or her Home Wrecker, in 12 minutes.

 

James said the public is invited to attend the Home Wrecker competition and concert.

 

"We basically want to pack the Huntington location of Hillbilly Hot Dogs, and with a successful turnout this will become an annual event in Greek Week as long as the owner (Sonny Knight) lets us come back," James said. "It'll be fun to watch, and the additional features of the day should be enjoyable, too."

 

The band Fletcher's Grove will be performing two shows Saturday at Hillbilly Hot Dogs beginning at 4 p.m. - an opening set before the Home Wrecker competition, and a closing set after the competition.

 

Also open to the public is The Greek Show, from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Sunday, April 10, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Each participating organization is judged on how well it performs a song, a set of songs, or a skit that incorporates all of the other organizations in the Greek community.

 

"Sometimes the Greek Show can get a little wild, but it is all in good fun," James said. "At the end of the day (and week) the Greek community benefits from a week to celebrate its presence and showcase what being Greek is all about.

 

"This includes, but is not limited to, brotherhood/sisterhood, scholarship, leadership and service. Without our sponsors - Hillbilly Hot Dogs, The Village on Sixth Avenue, Marshall Recreation, Relay For Life, and Greek101 - we would not be nearly as successful with the planning of this year's Greek Week. Our students have a lot to be grateful for as a Greek community."

 

Here is the schedule of Greek Week events: 

 

Friday, April 8

 

     9 to 10 a.m., Relay For Life Banner Competition, Memorial Student Center

     10 a.m., Flag Football, Marshall Recreation Center's Multipurpose Field

 

Saturday, April 9

 

    11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Greek Olympics, Marshall Recreation Center's Multipurpose Field

    4 to 7 p.m., Home Wrecker Hot Dog Eating Competition, Hillbilly Hot Dogs

    4 to 7 p.m., Greek Social, Hillbilly Hot Dogs

 

Sunday, April 10

 

    3:30 to 7 p.m., Greek Show, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

 

Monday, April 11

 

   10 a.m. to noon, Swim Relay Tournament, Marshall Recreation Center

    3 to 8 p.m., Six on Six Volleyball Tournament, Marshall Recreation Center

 

Tuesday, April 12

 

    10 a.m. to noon, Soccer Shootout, Multipurpose Field

    2 to 8 p.m., Soccer Tournament, Multipurpose Field

 

Wednesday, April 13 (Giving Back to Marshall University/Huntington Community Day)

 

      8 to 9 a.m., Faculty/Staff Appreciation Breakfast, John Marshall Dining Room

      11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Supporting KODA's Donate Life Event, Buskirk Field

      11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Supporting Walk a Mile in Her Shoes and Human Ribbon Campaign, Multipurpose Field

       7 to 9 p.m., Trivia, Don Morris Room

 

Thursday, April 14

 

    10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Basketball Tournament, Marshall Recreation Center

     7 to 8:30 p.m., Greek Awards Banquet, Don Morris Room

 

For more information on Greek Week, contact James at 304-696-2284.

 

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More than 100 low brass musicians to converge on Marshall University April 16

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host "Low Brass Day 2011"  beginning at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 16, in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The events will be hosted by Marshall faculty members Dr. George Palton and Dr. Michael Stroeher.

"The day will include a faculty concert, clinics, chamber and large ensemble concerts, and a massed ensemble," Palton said.  "Everyone is welcome, and bring your horns!"

Featured artists and clinicians include Christopher Hayes and the Ohio University trombone studio, William Mann and the Morehead State University trombone studio, Gretchen McNamara and the Wright State University trombone studio, Stroeher and the Marshall University trombone studio, Thomas Zugger and the Capital University trombone studio, Stacy Baker and the Morehead State University tuba/euphonium studio, Ben Miles and the Wright State University tuba/euphonium studio, Palton and the Marshall University tuba/euphonium Studio, and Tony Zilincik and the Capital University tuba/euphonium studio.

In addition, there will be  exhibits from Kerr's Music and Cimarron Music, Palton said. 

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this event or music at Marshall University, please call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.   

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Tuesday April 5, 2011
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Empty Bowls to benefit from Lambda Society's Pride Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lambda Society plans to donate half of all proceeds from its Pride Week to the Empty Bowls fundraiser this year.


The Lambda Society is a student organization committed to providing support to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and straight communities of Marshall University and the surrounding area. Empty Bowls, now in its 8th year, raises awareness of the hunger issue while helping the hungry. The event offers patrons a handmade ceramic bowl and modest soup lunch for a $12 donation to the Huntington Area Food Bank.


Pride Week coordinator Jo Troller said the Lambda Society donates half its Pride Week proceeds to different charities every year.

"We made the decision of Empty Bowls because it was something the campus already was involved in, and because hunger is something that crosses all areas of diversity sexuality, sex, race, etc.," Troller said.

The group normally makes its donation to two or three different charities, but this year thought it would make a bigger impact to donate to only one.

 

"We realize if we really want to make a difference it is much more helpful to just donate a large amount of proceeds to one charity," Troller said.

 

Toller said that, although it is up to the members to choose what charity Lambda Society will donate to each year, he hopes it will play a stronger role with Empty Bowls in the future.

 

"I would like to see us taking more hands-on roles with Empty Bowls," Troller said. "I feel that working with Empty Bowls is a chance for Lambda to get to work with other groups and will encourage involvement with Empty Bowls for future years in Lambda."

 

Pride Week will continue through Saturday, April 9. Empty Bowls will take place Friday, April 8, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave., in Huntington.
 


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Percussion Ensemble to perform Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Percussion Ensemble will give a concert at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 7, on the university's Huntington campus. The group, under the direction of Steven Hall, coordinator of percussion, will perform selections ranging in style from ragtime to Afro-Cuban.

"This performance is a wonderful opportunity to hear a wide variety of interesting and exotic percussion music played by a talented and dedicated group of university students," Hall said.  He added the program covers a wide musical and ethnic range, including a large-scale composition, "Stained Glass," which was inspired by the beauty and color of stained glass; an Afro-Cuban-inspired selection titled "Joaquin On Sunshine" and a ragtime piece featuring xylophone soloist Mike Cochran.

The percussionists in the ensemble are primarily music education and performance students specializing in percussion at Marshall.  However, the ensemble is open to any Marshall student with percussion experience, according to Hall.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, please call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 1, 2011
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WMUL students receive 25 awards in national competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received eight grand prize awards and 17 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 20th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 48th Annual Audio/Video Production awards competition ceremony Saturday, March 29, at the Sheraton Universal Hotel in Hollywood, Calif.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"No other school won more grand prizes or overall awards than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters in the NBS scriptwriting, audio and online categories," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities." 

NBS/AERho has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 88 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media.  Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000.  Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from NBS chapters.

WMUL's grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, Oct. 1, 2010. Robert Iddings, senior from St. Albans, Producer; Leannda Carey, senior from Wellsburg, anchor; Adam Cavalier, graduate student from Montgomery, anchor; Jimmy Sanders, senior from Stroudsburg, Pa., sports anchor.

Audio News Package

"Marshall University: A Safe Campus" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Feb. 5, 2010.

Audio News Segment

"Coping with Disaster:  Montcoal, West Virginia" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9.

Audio Feature Package

"The Bells of Morrow Library" by Ashton Bias, a junior from Madison, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newcenter 88," Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2009.

Audio Feature Segment

"Serving Students: Jessica Jordan" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Dec. 3, 2010.

Audio Sports Package

"Whiteside versus Jordan" by Robert Iddings, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2010.

Audio Sports Segment

"Facing the 3-3 Stack" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.

Overall Web Site

WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2010 webmaster for WMUL-FM Online was Tyler Kes, a sophomore from Burnsville, Minn.

 

WMUL's honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Friday, April 9, 2010. Robert Iddings, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, anchor; Dave Traube, graduate student from Beckley, sports anchor.

Audio News Program

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast Thursday, April 22, 2010.  Aaron Payne, senior from Winfield, producer; Ashton Bias, anchor; Joseph Troller, senior from Tipp City, Ohio, anchor; Adam Cavalier, sports anchor.

Audio News Segment

"Obama Delivers Miners' Eulogy" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Monday, April 26, 2010.

Audio News Segment

"SGA Election Complaints" by Leannda Carey, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 9, 2010.

Audio Comedy Segment

"Butt Disease" written and produced by Aaron Payne and Morgan Shillingburg, a senior from Charleston, broadcast during their radio program "Sexy Voices" Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2010.

Audio Comedy Program

"The Hand You Were Given" written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, broadcast Friday, Sept. 10, 2010.

Audio PSA

"26.5," a public service announcement, written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, placed in WMUL-FM's PSA rotation from Monday, May 3, 2010, to the present.

Audio Sports Package

"Darryle Merthie:  Ironman" by Robert Iddings, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Tuesday, March 2, 2010.

Audio Sports Package

"Andi Williamson Brings the Heat to the Herd" by Adam Rogers, a sophomore from Charleston, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010.

Audio Sports Segment

"Brian Anderson Finishes his Career" by Robert Iddings, broadcast during the "WMUL-FM Pregame Show" prior to the Marshall versus Tulane football game, Saturday, Nov. 27, 2010.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup" with hosts Adam Cavalier and Dave Traube, broadcast Friday, Oct. 15, 2010.

Audio Magazine Program

"Herd Roundup" with hosts Adam Cavalier and Dave Traube, broadcast Friday, Feb. 5, 2010.

Audio Magazine Program

"The Conference USA Report: Week 2" broadcast Friday, Sept. 10, 2010. Adam Rogers, host, and the following reporters: Adam Cavalier; James Roach, senior from Richwood; Will Vance, freshman from Charleston; Marcus Constantino, freshman from Bluefield; Tyler Anders, freshman from Bluefield; John Roach, freshman from Proctorville; Jimmy Sanders, senior from Stroudsburg, Pa.; Daniel Francisco, sophomore from Bluefield.

Audio Magazine Program

"The Conference USA Report: In Space" broadcast Friday, Sept. 17, 2010. Aaron Payne, host, and the following reporters: Leannda Carey; Derek Ramsey, freshman from Huntington; Tyler Anders; Daniel Francisco; John Roach; John Rose, sophomore from Olney, Md.; Adam Cavalier; Will Vance; Jimmy Sanders; Tyler Kes; James Roach.

Audio Sports Program

"The WMUL-FM Pregame Show:  Ohio State" broadcast Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010. Aaron Payne, producer and reporter; Dave Traube, host; James Roach, host; Adam Cavalier, reporter; Robert Iddings, reporter.

Audio Sports Program

"Sportsview" broadcast Wednesday, April 28, 2010. Robert Iddings, host; Adam Rogers, producer.

Audio Sports Play-By-Play Programming

Marshall versus Memphis men's basketball game at Cam Henderson Center broadcast Saturday, Jan. 27, 2010. Calling the game were Robert Iddings, play-by-play; Andrew Ramspacher, recent graduate from Dublin, Ohio, color analyst; Aaron Payne, engineer.

For more information on WMUL's awards, contact Bailey at 304-696-2294.


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