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Tuesday December 18, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners announced in holiday design contest at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Marshall University students Rachel Moyer of Proctorville, Ohio, Doug Hawley of Charleston and a group of four students in an advanced video production class received first-place honors in this year's annual holiday design contest for students, sponsored by MU President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane.
 
The competition included categories for a holiday card, a commemorative plate and a digital greeting.
 
 Moyer, a junior graphic design major in the College of Fine Arts, School of Art and Design, was the first-place winner in the card design. Hawley, also a junior in the School of Art and Design, won the plate competition.
 
The first-place video was designed by David Pelts of Huntington, Morgan Thompson of Lucasville, Ohio, Kaitlyn Smith of Parkersburg, W.Va., and Christina Dotson, also of Parkersburg. The video can be seen at https://vimeo.com/55705216.
 
 Students in Brent Patterson's advanced digital media class grouped up into teams to make the holiday videos. In addition, guitar students of Dr. Julio Alves collaborated with the teams and performed the music specifically for this project. Those students were Danilo Moraes and Jonathan Thorne.
 
"The students in this class are new to video and animation and as such had to overcome many technical as well as conceptual challenges, but that is how learning happens, and they all did very well," Patterson said. In addition to the holiday card video, Patterson said, the students in the class created several short animations and short films.
 
In the card competition, Rebecca Keith of Mineral Wells, W.Va., was second and third place went to John Ross Fowler of Scott Depot, W.Va. Felicia Stephenson of Charleston received honorable mention.
 
 In the plate competition, Fowler was second, Emma Nilsson of Huntington was third and Kacy Manilla of Huntington received honorable mention.
 
Two groups totaling seven students tied for the digital greeting runner-up spot. The students are David Burner of Huntington, Enam Banaja of Barboursville, Adam Howell of Hurricane, W.Va., Katie Abbott of South Charleston, Ola El-Abed of Huntington, Joe Nelson of Barboursville and David Lovejoy of Huntington.
 
 Members of the third-place group in the video competition were Nilsson, Benjamin Joel Richardson of Huntington, Sam Pauley of Barboursville and Margaryta Seliverstova of Huntington.
 
 President and Mrs. Kopp began the card design and plate design competition in 2007 as a way of recognizing the talent of Marshall's students. The plates are given to the most generous donors while the cards go out to all the people on the mailing list. About 75 plates and about 1,000 print cards are issued each year.
Photos: (Above) From left are Byron Clercx, chair of Marshall's department of art and design; students Kacy Manilla and Rachel Moyer; MU President Stephen J. Kopp; and students John Fowler and Felicia Stephenson. Moyer took first place in the card design competition. (Middle) From left are Byron Clercx; student Emma Nilsson; President Kopp; and students Doug Hawley and John Fowler. Hawley won the plate design competition while Nilsson's group was third in the video competition.(Below) From left are Brent Patterson, professor of graphic design and new media; students Christina Dotson and Kaitlyn Smith; President Kopp; students Morgan Thompson and David Pelts; and Byron Clercx. These four students made up the winning group in the video competition.


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Tuesday December 18, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Alpha Natural Resources presents Marshall Foundation with gift of $20,000 to support engineering majors in CITE


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Monday December 17, 2012
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Pharmacy receives diversity grant from Walgreens

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has received a $10,000 diversity grant from Walgreens as part of the national pharmacy chain's Diversity Donation program.  

Half of the funding will be distributed as scholarships to students of underrepresented minority groups and to a student who embraces diversity and promotes inclusion initiatives on campus.   In addition, the grant will be used to facilitate "pipeline" programs aimed at increasing the enrollment of diverse groups at the school of pharmacy.

"Walgreens has shown its dedication to ensuring the next generation of pharmacists understands the importance of being educated in a truly diverse environment," said Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy.  "Student body diversity better prepares our future health care professionals to treat people of all backgrounds."

"We are so pleased that Walgreens has selected Marshall as one of the recipients for this grant," said Dr. Shelvy L. Campbell, director of diversity programs at Marshall's School of Pharmacy. "The funding allows us to build on the diversity initiatives that are central to our mission."

Dr. Debra Harris, a pharmacy supervisor with Walgreens, presented the school with the grant in December.

"Walgreens is excited to support diversity initiatives at schools around the country," she said.  "We look forward to working with Marshall University as it develops its new program."

The scholarships will be available for the 2013-2014 academic year.

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Photo: Dr. H. Glenn Anderson (second from left), associate dean of academic and curricular affairs, accepts a diversity grant packet from Dr. Debra Harris, pharmacy supervisor, Walgreens. Also pictured are Dr. Robert Stanton, assistant dean, Office of Experiential Learning (left), and  Dr. Shelvy Campbell, director of diversity (right).


Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University 


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Saturday December 15, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Marshall graduate students hooded in special ceremony in Charleston

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Master's and doctoral level Marshall University students who took classes on the South Charleston campus were hooded Thursday evening in a special ceremony.

More than 160 students were eligible to be hooded during the ceremony, which was held at Emmanuel Baptist Church on the West Side of Charleston. Marshall University's Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies, Dr. Rudy Pauley, served as the guest speaker

Within the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development: 
  • Twelve students earned master's degrees in Adult and Technical Education. They are Kristy Michele Abel, Interdisciplinary Studies; Zahra Mohammed Alqahtani, Training and Development; Jared Barker, Adult Education; Serena M. Burdette, Career and Technical Education; Julie Hagan, Adult Education; Aaron M. Hill, Interdisciplinary Studies; Melanie Hough, Career and Technical Education; Joshua Robertson, Training and Development; Joy Michele Robinson, Adult Education; Alma Rodriquez, Training and Development; Amy Saxton, Training and Development; and Mona Lisa Templeton, Career and Technical Education.
  • Thirty-three students earned master's degrees in Counseling. They are Maria Aiello, Mental Health Counseling; Marion L. Anderson, Mental Health Counseling; Tammy Lynn Angle, Mental Health Counseling; Jennifer G. Bird, School Counseling; Jennifer Brooke Bogar, Mental Health Counseling; Tyler Ross Burns, Mental Health Counseling; Erin Chaffin, School Counseling; Noelle R. Chafin, School Counseling; Carl Chinn, Mental Health Counseling, James E. Clark, II, School Counseling; Keith Cole, Mental Health Counseling; Kelly Marie Crabtree, Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling; Lucy Cruickshanks, Correctional Counseling; Brittany Davis, Mental Health Counseling; Danielle Ford, Mental Health Counseling; Samantha Fox, School Counseling; Stephen Givens, Mental Health Counseling; Guidon Stephen Grundlehner, School Counseling; Scott Johnson, School Counseling; Sarah Jordan, Mental Health Counseling; Estzer Kiss, Mental Health Counseling; Andrea Koutsunis, Mental Health Counseling; Latisha June Marcum, School Counseling; Katrina Matney, Mental Health Counseling; Susan Merrill, Mental Health Counseling; Alana Reveal, Correctional Counseling; Brittany Rose, School Counseling; Holly Sanders, School Counseling; Toni Renee Sayre, School Counseling; Mary Jo Selbe, Mental Health Counseling; Amanda Shrewsbury, School Counseling; Ben H. Smith, Mental Health Counseling; and Erica D. Wilson, School Counseling.
  • Two students earned master's degrees in Early Childhood Education. They are Connie L. Bowers and Kristi M. French.
  • Thirteen students earned their master's degrees in Elementary Education. They are Samantha J. Dolson, Early Childhood Education; Donna Marie Ferguson, Math through Algebra I; Rhonda Renee France, Math through Algebra I; Briana Friend, Individual Plan of Study; Beth Graves, School Library Media; Danielle S. Lee, Middle Childhood Education; Angela Mellace, Lindsay Paxton, Individual Plan of Study; Cassandra K. Richardson, Leah Elise White, Brandi L. Wilson, Math through Algebra I; Bryan Wilson, and Marcella Charlotte Wright.
  • Twenty-six students earned a master's degree in Leadership Studies. They are Tammy Brown, Principalship; Douglas C. Cipoletti, Principalship; Kenneth E. Cooper, Leadership Specialist; Lauren Edwards, Leadership Specialist; Derek Franklin, Principalship; Travis Heavner, Principalship,; Kristy Ann Johnson, Principalship; Christina Marie Jones, Principalship; Christina Demetrice Laing, Principalship; Russell L. Lippencott, Leadership Specialist; Christina Michelle Lowers, Principalship; Kyre-Anna Minney, Principalship; Tony Minney, Principalship; Jessica Pierson, Principalship; Lindsey Quesenberry, Principalship; Britni Ramsey, Principalship; Matthew Ray Riggs, Principalship; Christy Ann Roy Principalship; Jeffery A. Sanders, Principalship; Matthew J. Shock, Principalship; Timothy Skelton, Leadership Specialist; Jennifer Spencer, Principalship; Eric D. Staats, Principalship; Jenae VanHoose, Principalship; Kristianna Venderlic, Justice Leadership; and Charles Wentz, Principalship.
  • Nine students earned master's degrees in Reading Education. They are Donna Marie Atwood, Megan B. Burdick, Shelia Jane Coleman, Katherine Davis, Christine Fletcher,  Amber Gillenwater, Peggy Huffman, Rebecca A. Spencer and Susan Velte.
  • Twelve students earned master's degrees in Secondary Education. They are Christine Bird, Teaching English as a Second Language; Teresa Jo Boggs, Instructional Processes and Strategies; Chris Coughlin, Middle Childhood Education; Ashley Dalton, School Library Media; Kristin Mae English, Online Program; Adam R. Hunt, Online Program; Madalyn Oltman, Individualized Plan of Study; Angela D. Peck, Online Program; Kristen Personius, Educational Computing; Sarah Jo Roberts, School Library Media; Amber Ullman, Individualized Plan of Study and Rhonda Wood, Individualized Plan of Study.
  • Ten students earned master's degrees in Special Education. They are Orlando Dowell, Multi-Categorical; Sarah Kingery, Autism; Autumn B. Lisle, Multi-Categorical; Karen Elmore Messinger, Multi-Categorical; Sherri Morgan, Multi-Categorical; Brandy Pickens, Pre School; Gloria Richardson, Pre School; Kelly Sandy, Multi-Categorical, Abby Stevens, Multi-Categorical; and Shirley Succurro Skaggs, Multi-Categorical.
  • Fourteen students earned master's degrees in Teaching. They are Krystal Cook, Ronald Donahoe, Robin Feldhake, Christopher J. Harris, Angela Dawn Litton, Marc D. Lowe, Tally Mainland, Robert E. McPeak, Katheryn Prussia, Susan L. Slappe, David Alan Stewart, Daniel Tench, Guy Vann and Bridget Ward.
  • Eight students earned an Education Specialist Degree. They are Jacob Bolen, Curriculum and Instruction; Elbert Davis, Curriculum and Instruction; Beth Peterson, Curriculum and Instruction; Shelly Ann Ratliff, Curriculum and Instruction; Melissa Raye Rhodes, Curriculum and Instruction; Christopher Trotter, Adult and Technical Education; Myra Beam, School Psychology; and Rachel K. Wakefield, School Psychology.
  • Seven students earned doctoral degrees. The titles of their dissertations are in italic. They are Rachael Alley, A Case Study of Athletic Training Educators' Sports Care Responsibilities, Service, and Professional Advancement in Athletic Training Education Programs; Jean Chappell, Study of Prior Learning Assessment in Degree Completion; Sarah Lee, A Descriptive Study of Response to Intervention (RTI) Implementation at the Elementary Levels in West Virginia; Carol Perry, Creating Pathways for Low-Skill Adults: Lessons for Community and Technical Colleges from a Longitudinal Study; Calisa Pierce, Best Instructional Practices in Development Education: Faculty Perceptions; Hannah Toney, The Perceived Self-Efficacy of West Virginia Public Elementary School Teachers to Teach Character Education; and Brenda Tuckwiller, Teacher Perspectives on Performance Based Student Assessment in Career and Technical Education in West Virginia Public Schools.

Within the Marshall University Graduate College:

  • Six students earned master's degrees in Psychology. They are Danielle Brooks, Jena Hatmaker, Heather Julian, Krista Miller, Whitney Pressley and Kelly Tyda.

Within the College of Business Graduate School of Management:

  • Eight students earned master's degrees in Health Care Administration. They are Rebecca Browning, Rodrigo Camargo, Thaisa Camargo, Pamela Meadows, Brooke Miller, Ryanne Nichols, Gary Salyers and Chelsie Slack.
  • Three students earned master's degrees in Human Resource Management. They are Kasie Ray, Chelsie Slack and Jenna Workman.

Marshall University's Winter Commencement will take place in the Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16.

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Photo: Kristen Personius receives her hood from Dr. Lisa Heaton, professor of elementary and secondary education. Students earning master's and doctoral degrees from Marshall University were hooded in a special ceremony in Charleston Dec. 13.
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Wednesday December 12, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students collect 20 awards in four contests

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received 20 awards in their past four contests, the station's faculty manager announced today.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said the students received the following:

  • One  first-place award and one finalist award in the 2012 College Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards.
  • A Finalist Award in the 2012 Pinnacle National Awards Competition.
  • Four Platinum Awards, five Gold Awards and four Honorable Mention Awards in the MarCom Creative Awards 2012 Competition.
  • Four Silver Awards in the Eighth Annual International Davey Awards Competition for 2012.  

Here is a look at WMUL's award-winning entries:

CBI awards

First place

Best Radio Newcast - "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Thursday,  Oct. 6, 2011.  Participating students were: Adam Rogers, a junior from Charleston, producer; Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, anchor; Leannda Carey, a graduate student from Wellsburg, anchor; Jerry Smith, a senior from Huntington, weather; and Kyle Gibson, a junior from Bluefield, sports anchor.

Finalist

Best Podcast - "The Conference USA Report:  Halloween Spooktacular," broadcast Friday, Oct. 28, 2011.  The students who participated were: Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Huntington, host; Adam Rogers, reporter; Jarrod Clay, a senior from Barboursville, reporter; Hunter Morrison, a sophomore from Huntington, reporter; Kyle Gibson, reporter; Joshua Rose, a junior from Olney, Md., reporter; Marcus Constantino, a junior from Bluefield, reporter; and Andrew Harrison, a sophomore from Toms River, N.J., reporter.

Pinnacle awards

Finalist

Best Radio Sportscast - WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus East Carolina University football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington, West Virginia, Saturday, Nov. 26, 2011.  Students calling the game were: Aaron Payne, play-by-play; Adam Rogers, color; Leannda Carey, sideline reporter; Scott Hall, engineer.

MarCom awards

Platinum 

Public Affairs Program - "Minding the Meters:  Huntington Municipal Parking Board," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was  broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, April 28, 2011.

News Package/Podcast - "Graffiti on Campus," by Josie Landgrave, a sophomore from Huntington, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 1, 2011, and made available online Monday, April 4, 2011.

Sports Package/Podcast - ""The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the pre-game show for Marshall at Ohio University football from Peden Stadium in Athens, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011, and made available online the same day.

Magazine Program - "In the Know:  Marshall This Week," with hosts Adam Rogers Aaron Payne, broadcast Friday, April 8, 2011.

Gold

Newscast - "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, April 1, 2011. Participating students were: Brittany Barnes, a senior from Hurricane, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Adam Cavalier, a master's graduate from Montgomery, anchor; and Jarrod Clay, sports anchor.

News Feature Package/Podcast - "The Fife and Drum Corps," by Jimmy Sanders, a senior from Stroudsburg, Pa., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, and also made available online Monday, Oct. 3, 2011. 

Sports Package/Podcast - "Coach Geth," by Aaron Payne, was broadcast during "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012,  and made available online the same day.

Sports Program - "The Conference USA Report:  Halloween Spooktacular," broadcast Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. 

Sports Play-by-Play - WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus the University of Memphis women's basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012.  The students calling the game were: Aaron Payne, play-by-play; Adam Rogers, color, Bennett Siffrin, a junior from New Martinsville, and Peter Wilson, a senior from Charleston, engineers.

Honorable Mention

Public Service Announcement -- "West Virginia Literacy," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Tuesday, April 12, 2011, through the present time, was written and produced by Brittany Barnes.

Sports Play-by-Play - WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus East Carolina University football game played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Nov. 26, 2011. Students calling the game were: Aaron Payne, play-by-play; Adam Rogers, color; Leannda Carey, sideline reporter; and Scott Hall, engineer

Sports Play-by-Play -- WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus West Virginia University football game played at Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown, W.Va., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2012. Students calling the game were: Adam Rogers, play-by-play; Aaron Payne, color; Leannda Carey, sideline reporter; and Scott Hall, engineer.

Comedy Program - "Mecha Colossus, Episode 3" or "A Geographical Challenger Appears," a comedy program broadcast Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011, written and produced by Morgan Shillingburg, a recent graduate from Charleston, Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having broadcast one of the best public affairs programs in the country concerning Huntington's Municipal Parking Board, a news wrap-up program as well as producing another long line of solid news and sports packages," Bailey said. "WMUL-FM student broadcasters were acknowledged as having written and produced a highly regarded newscast, a compelling weekly football preview program, and an exciting women's college basketball game. I am proud and grateful for the honor these MarCom Creative Platinum, Gold and Honorable Mention Awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Marshall University."

Davey awards

Silver

Radio News Feature Package -- "The Fife and Drum Corps," by Jimmy Sanders, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, and also made available online Monday, Oct. 3, 2011. 

Radio Sports Package - "The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the pre-game show for Marshall at Ohio University football from Peden Stadium in Athens, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011.

Radio Public Service Announcement - "West Virginia Literacy," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Tuesday, April 12, 2011, through the present time, was written and produced by Brittany Barnes, a senior from Hurricane.

Radio Comedy Program - "The Patrick and Alex Show:  The Hunger Games," written and produced by Patrick Webb, a recent graduate from Huntington; Alex Constantino, a recent graduate from Parkersburg; Kyle Hobstetter, a recent master's degree graduate from Portsmouth, Ohio; A. Jay Meadows, a senior from Madison; Brittany Barnes, Tyler Kes, a senior from Burnsville, Minn., Aaron Payne and Aaron Rogers.
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Wednesday December 12, 2012
Contact: Ryan Warner, Study Abroad Advisor, 304-696-2379

Marshall senior receives scholarship to study abroad

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Matthew Walker, a history and Japanese major at Marshall University from Charleston, W.Va., has been selected to receive a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to participate in a study abroad program during the spring 2013 academic term. He will study at Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan, through Marshall's bilateral exchange program.

The Gilman scholarship program aims to diversify the kinds of students who study abroad and the countries and regions where they go. The program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, and the Institute of International Education (IIE) serves as the administrator of the program, which is headquartered in IIE's Houston, Texas, office. 

Scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply towards their study abroad program costs. 

Since the establishment of the Gilman program by the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000, more than 13,000 students nationwide have received this prestigious award. Congressman Gilman, who retired in 2002 after serving in the House of Representatives for 30 years and chairing the House Foreign Relations Committee, commented, "Study abroad is a special experience for every student who participates. Living and learning in a vastly different environment of another nation not only exposes our students to alternate views, but also adds an enriching social and cultural experience. It also provides our students with the opportunity to return home with a deeper understanding of their place in the world, encouraging them to be a contributor, rather than a spectator in the international community."

Recipients of the scholarship have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of other cultures, countries, languages, and economies - making them better prepared to assume leadership roles in government and the private sector. According to IIE President Allan Goodman, "International education is one of the best tools for developing mutual understanding and building connections between people from different countries. It is critical to the success of American diplomacy and business, and the lasting ties that Americans make during their international studies are important to our country in times of conflict as well as times of peace."

A complete list of selected Gilman Scholarship recipients, including each student's home state, university and country of study, is available at www.iie.org/gilman
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Tuesday December 11, 2012
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine researchers study Vitamin C deficiencies in patients on blood-thinning medication

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A case study published by two Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine researchers shows that patients taking warfarin, an anticoagulant medication, may inadvertently be limiting their vitamin C intake because of dietary restrictions associated with the medicine.

The clinical study by Dr. Lynne Goebel, professor of medicine, and Dr. George Yousef, a first-year resident in the Department of Internal Medicine, was accepted for publication in the Journal of General Internal Medicine and released online Dec. 2.

According to the study, patients taking the drug warfarin are often told to monitor their intake of vitamin K-containing foods since vitamin K lessens the blood thinning effects of the medication. These dietary restrictions may cause patients to inadvertently limit their intake of other nutrients, including vitamin C.

"To my knowledge, this is the only case of vitamin C deficiency in a patient taking warfarin reported in the literature," Goebel said.  "Hopefully the publication will raise awareness for this problem and lead other physicians to consider this diagnosis in their patients taking warfarin."

The case study profiled a 64-year old female patient whose clinical presentation included a rash on both upper legs that was not associated with any pain, itching or history of trauma. The patient also denied contact with any plants or new soaps or lotions. Subsequent testing revealed vitamin C deficiency.

A diet low in vitamin C can lead to a variety of health issues including bleeding gums, poor wound healing, and rashes, commonly known as scurvy.

"I hope patients will make sure they are taking in food with vitamin C, although any dietary change should be monitored by their doctor," Goebel said.  "The new recommendations for diet advice in patients taking warfarin is to take in a consistent amount of food with vitamin K rather than avoiding this food altogether."

Goebel has undertaken a larger study on vitamin deficiencies in people taking the drug warfarin to assess if the problem is more widespread.


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Friday December 7, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winter commencement 2012 to honor nearly 1,200 MU graduates

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will honor nearly 1,200 graduates from July and August 2012, and students who are tentatively scheduled to graduate this month at the annual Winter Commencement Sunday, Dec. 16, at Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus. The ceremony begins at 2 p.m.

Among the 1,193 students who received or are about to receive degrees are 756 undergraduates and 433 with graduate degrees. About 400 students have indicated they plan to participate in the ceremony. They will receive congratulations from President Stephen J. Kopp and be presented with a scroll by their academic dean.

Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 191 students will graduate with honors. Twenty-four will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 59 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 99 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and eight associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

Based on tentative grade point averages, three students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are Kimberly Michelle Frazier of Cross Lanes, W.Va., Sarah Luliana Moawad of Winfield, W.Va., and Trevor Bartlett Stone of Huntington, W.Va.

Marshall began conducting a winter graduation ceremony in 2008 with a convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The speaker was Dr. Montserrat Miller, a professor of history. Winter commencement began in 2009 and the tradition of having an MU professor deliver the keynote address continued.

Previous commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, in 2009; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, professor of mathematics, in 2010; and Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, in 2011.

This year's speaker is Dan Hollis, an associate professor of journalism who recently was named the 2012 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching West Virginia Professor of the Year.

Hollis received the 2011 Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award at Marshall, and received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001. In addition, he has taken first place in six consecutive years, and seven of the past eight, in the News/Sports/Public Affairs category of the National Broadcasting Society and Alpha Rho Epsilon Professional Electronic Media Awards.

Hollis joined Marshall in the fall of 1999. He was born in southwestern Indiana and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana in 1983. During college and after graduation, he worked at WFIE-TV in Evansville, Ind., as an award-winning photographer, producer and reporter. In 1989, he became a freelance videographer, often shooting recruiting videos for major colleges and universities.

In 1996, Hollis decided to return to school to pursue his true love: teaching. He received his master's degree in communications from the University of Kentucky in 1997 and taught there two years before joining Marshall.

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DVDs Available

Marshall University will produce a DVD of the winter commencement ceremony that can be purchased for $20. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Orders also will be accepted Dec. 16 at Henderson Center. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

Parking

Free parking for commencement will be available in the garage across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center, or on any university parking lot. The garage and the Joan C. Edwards Stadium West Lot provide the most convenient parking.


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Friday December 7, 2012
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Marshall University Executive MBA students hooded in special ceremony

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Seventeen professional students in Marshall University's Executive Master of Business Administration class were honored this week during a special hooding ceremony at the Charleston Marriott.

Timothy R. Duke, president and CEO of Steel of West Virginia, Inc., delivered the keynote address. Duke has more than 39 years of progressive management experience and has been employed at Steel of West Virginia, Inc., since 1987.VThe company is a multi-plant steel manufacturer with sales of approximately $365 million and is the largest wholly owned subsidiary of Steel Dynamics Inc., which has $8 billion in sales. Duke is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University and received his Master of Business Administration from Duquesne University. He serves on a number of boards, including the Marshall University College of Business.

The students were formally hooded with their academic regalia during the ceremony by Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp with assistance from College of Business Associate Dean Margie McInerney.

"This ceremony recognizes the accomplishments of our professional business students in a formal, professional setting befitting the hard work and dedication that went into earning their Executive MBA degrees," said Dr. Uday Tate, director of the Executive MBA program. "They have studied together for more than 60 Saturdays on the South Charleston campus. We are proud of these professionals, we appreciate the sacrifices they made to advance their education and careers, and we expect great things from them."

The cohort has successfully completed all the requirements of the Executive MBA program in 16 months including a recent international residency in Santiago, Chile. Duane Jackson, a customer service manager with AT&T in Huntington, was pleased with the recent trip to Chile.

"The Marshall University international trip was the highlight of the MBA program. The class time and visits to the Chilean companies gave me a quality insight into how business transactions are accomplished outside the U.S.," Jackson said. "The Chilean tour was an excellent way of bringing together principles taught in the program and showing applications in the real world."

Richard Hardy, chief financial officer at First Sentry Bank in Huntington, agreed.

"It was an exciting and informative trip that allowed us to experience and learn about international trade and business while also providing time to enjoy the culture of Chile," Hardy said. "The trip was a lesson that will serve us well should we venture overseas for business or pleasure in the future."

The Marshall University Executive MBA cohort, Class of 2012, includes: Jami Barker of Elkview, Kevin Chattin of Ona, Dallas Enoch of Charleston, Nathan Godby of Huntington, Richard Hardy of Huntington, Duane Jackson of Huntington, Arash Kayfan, M.D., of Chesapeake, Ohio, James Kirk of Huntington, Tara Martinez of Charleston, Dustin Noble of Huntington, Christopher Orndorff of Barboursville, William Pritt of Hurricane, Brian Rodgers of Ronceverte, Nathan Rose of Charleston, Jason Swann of Williamson, Andrew Varney of Huntington and Wesley Sears of Point Pleasant.

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Photo: The Marshall University Executive MBA cohort, Class of 2012, after their hooding ceremony at the Charleston Marriott Dec. 2.


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Thursday December 6, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word finishes third in Ohio State tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word speech and debate team placed third in a field of 28 colleges and universities Sunday, Dec. 2, in the Ohio State Holiday Frolic Invitational in Columbus, Ohio. It was Marshall's final tournament of the fall season.

"This is the best performance the young Thundering Word has had at a regional tournament in the five years I have been coaching," said the team's coach, Danny Ray. "Practically every ballot placed us in the top three in the round that scores points. Several squads that placed below us had 40 or more entries compared to Marshall's 25."

Western Kentucky was the overall champion and North Central College of Chicago was second. Marshall outscored several squads with much larger entries, including Ball State University, Carson-Newman College, Lafayette College, Ohio State University, University of Akron, Illinois State University, Miami University, Marion University, Wayne State University and the Universities of Cincinnati, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and the Pacific. Every student from Marshall scored points in the preliminary rounds which helped propel the team into third place.

Students who traveled to Columbus were:

Christian Adams, honors student and junior Psychology/Biomedical Sciences major from Ona, W.Va., placed fourth in Poetry Interpretation and third in Dramatic Duo Interpretation with Victoria Ledford. Adams also competed in Prose Interpretation.

Josh Gainer, a junior Political Science major from Parkersburg, W.Va., was the tournament champion in Novice Poetry Interpretation. He also placed third in Novice Prose and fifth in Novice Dramatic Interpretation.

Victoria Ledford, honors student and junior Chemistry/Pre-med major from Braxton, W.Va., was fifth in Individual Sweepstakes. This is a special honor for students who compete in all genres. They must have at least one event in oral interpretation of literature, one event in limited preparation and one event in public address. Ledford also placed third in Dramatic Duo with Adams. She also scored points in Persuasion, Impromptu, Informative and Rhetorical Criticism.

Taryss Mandt, a University College student from Arlington, Va., and former national champion in Oral Interpretation at the National Catholic High School Forensic Tournament, placed third in Novice Dramatic Interpretation. Mandt also competed in Informative Speaking and Programmed Oral Interpretation.

Eric Newfeld, a junior transfer student from Barboursville, W.Va., was the tournament champion in Novice Extemporaneous Speaking and scored points in Impromptu Speaking.

Matthew Osteen, an honors student and a sophomore Biochemistry major from Jefferson, W.Va., was second in Novice Extemp. He also competed in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Rhetorical Criticism and Impromptu Speaking.

Garrett Walker, a sophomore Sociology/Anthropology major from Greensboro, N.C., was second in Novice Impromptu Speaking and scored points in Extemp and Informative Speaking.

Juliet Djietror, a freshman International Student/Pre-medical sciences major originally from Ghana, placed fourth in Novice Prose Interpretation. Djietror, the daughter of Geography professor Dr. Godwin Djietror, also competed in Persuasion.

Competing in her first tournament was honors student Marjorie McCoy, a freshman Chemistry major from Beckley, W.Va., who reached the finals in both Novice Prose and Novice Persuasion.

Marshall has qualified 19 slots for next spring's national tournament. They are:

  • Christian Adams - Prose, Poetry and Duo.
  • Victoria Ledford - Rhetorical Criticism, Persuasion, Poetry and Duo.
  • Joshua Gainer - Prose, Poetry and Dramatic Interpretation.
  • Taryss Mandt - Informative and Dramatic Interpretation
  • Eric Newfeld - Extemp and Impromptu.
  • Matt Osteen - Lincoln Douglas Debate and Extemp
  • Garrett Walker - Impromptu
  • Juliet Djietror - Prose
  • Erin Jorden - Poetry

Marshall's team will travel to Butler University in Indianapolis, Ind., and Webster University in St. Louis in January.


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Visiting Writers Series plans reception, faculty reading for Dec. 12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series and Marshall University's English department will present a reception and faculty reading at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12, in the Drinko Library atrium on the Huntington campus.

Wine and cheese will be served during the reception and Marshall's faculty of creative writers will read from their work, according to Dr. Rachael Peckham in the English department.


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Monday December 3, 2012
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Visiting guitarist to perform at Marshall Dec. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Erisvaldo Borges, a Brazilian guitar player and teacher, will be visiting Marshall University's Huntington campus to perform for students, faculty and members of the community. The performance is scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7, in the Smith Recital Hall.

Dr. Julio Alves, associate professor of guitar at Marshall, said he looks for someone who can make a positive contribution to the academic experience when looking for a visiting artist. 

"I focus on bringing guests who are not only talented performers, but who also like to share their artistry and are excited to work with our students," Alves said. "Such is the case of Mr. Borges. He is both an experienced teacher and an excellent performer."

Borges has performed in major cities in Brazil and in five other Latin American countries: Venezuela, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Honduras. Some of his performances have been broadcast by radio stations and national television stations. He also recorded several CDs during the period from 1996 to 2008.  He is the author of about 400 compositions and wrote the melody of the anthem of Teresina, the capital of the state of Piaui in Brazil.

Borges has taught guitar at the Centro Federal de Educaoao Tecnolugica do Piauo and at the Universidade Federal do Piauo. He has participated as teacher in several guitar and music festivals in Brazil. Between 2009 and 2010 he was the Executive Superintendent of the Fundaoao Cultural Monsenhor Chaves in Teresina. He currently serves as chair of guitar at the Instituto Federal de Educaoao, Cincia e Tecnologia do Piauo in Teresina.

"The audience will be able to see not only a real display of technical virtuosity on the guitar, but also experience an evening of lyrical and relaxing music by one of Brazil's top guitar performers of nowadays," Alves said. "Another interesting feature of the performance is the fact that Mr. Borges will play some of his own compositions during the concert."

For further information, persons may call Marshall's Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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Monday December 3, 2012
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Herd fans invited to reception before Marshall-West Virginia men's game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Friends and fans of Marshall University are invited to gather in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center Wednesday, Dec. 5, for a reception that will precede the annual Chesapeake Energy Capital Classic men's basketball game between Marshall and West Virginia University.

The Marshall University Alumni Association is hosting the reception, which is sponsored by Pepsi and runs from 6 to 7:30 p.m. The first 175 people to arrive will receive a free 175th anniversary Kelly green T-shirt.

"Every Thundering Herd fan attending the game is encouraged to attend the reception," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs. "We love packing the South Hall wall-to-wall with fans wearing Kelly green as we prepare to take on WVU. This is always one of our most well-attended and fun events of the year and this year will be no different."

Pelphrey said the T-shirt giveaway is part of Marshall University 175th anniversary celebration, which has been ongoing for the past year.

"The reception and the T-shirt giveaway will bring to a fitting conclusion the celebration of our 175 years as a university," Pelphrey said. "Hopefully we can celebrate with victories Tuesday over WVU in the women's game and Wednesday in the men's game."

The MU and WVU women square off at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the civic center. The public is invited to a free reception sponsored by the Big Green that starts at 6 p.m. in Parlor A at the civic center. Complimentary appetizers and hors d'oeuvres will be served, and Coach Matt Daniel is expected to stop by.

Wednesday's reception, which is free to the public, features complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar, and a DJ providing music. The MU pep band and cheerleaders will stop by, as will Thundering Herd mascot Marco and the dance team.

Representatives from 14 campus organizations will take part in the reception, setting up displays and sharing information with visitors. Those planning displays are:

The College of Health Professions, the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, Outreach and Continuing Studies, Career Services, the College of Business, the Marshall University Research Corporation, Planned Giving/Office of Development, the Office of Recruitment, the School of Medicine, the College of Education, the College of Fine Arts, Information Technology, the College of Information Technology and Engineering, and the School of Pharmacy.

For more information on Wednesday's reception, call Pelphrey at 304-696-3134.


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Monday December 3, 2012
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Chemistry professor secures grant to involve students in petroleum research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor has secured a three-year, $65,000 grant to do petroleum research with the assistance of undergraduate students.

The funding, which was awarded by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund through a competitive process, will begin in 2013.

According to Dr. Laura McCunn, assistant chemistry professor, she and seven undergraduate students will use the funds to study how several specific molecules decompose when they are heated in the absence of oxygen.

McCunn says the results of their research will help shed light on biofuels and the mechanisms for combustion of conventional fossil fuels like petroleum. She and the students are particularly interested in exploring the decomposition of aldehydes, which occur as byproducts in biofuels and can be emitted from biodiesel engines.

"Our results will contribute to a model for the breakdown of fuels at high temperatures or for combustion of fuel mixtures that are not fully oxygenated," she said. "It's significant in the petroleum field because this model could help predict the pollutants or soot that could be generated from particular fuel mixtures."

To conduct the experiments, McCunn and the students will use an instrument they constructed in her laboratory. The hyperthermal nozzle they built will allow the research team to cause the thermal breakdown of sample molecules in an oxygen-free environment. The products of the process will be condensed and trapped for analysis using a special spectrometer.

McCunn says her lab is already using the process to study one aldehyde, but the grant will allow them to extend their experiments to include two more.

The grant program funding the project is aimed specifically at involving undergraduates in advanced research activities in preparation for graduate school or employment.

McCunn said, "Research is a really important part of the students' education. They will learn things in my lab that can't be taught in a traditional classroom. The hands-on laboratory work teaches them problem-solving skills, perseverance and how to work independently."

She said another important skill the students will learn from the project is how to explain their research to various audiences.

"I'll be taking them to scientific meetings where they'll have the chance to present their work," she said. "It's important to be able to explain your research and your findings, because that's a big part of being a scientist."

She added that the students will also be participating in events like the annual Undergraduate Research Day at the West Virginia State Capitol, giving them the chance to talk about their work with non-scientists.

"Undergraduate Research Day is particularly exciting because the people in our state legislature get a chance to see how engaged our students are and what types of real-world research they are doing at Marshall. It's also a chance for the students to practice explaining to the general public what their research means," she added.

McCunn said undergraduate research programs like the one funded through this grant have enhanced the Department of Chemistry at Marshall.

"Because of research opportunities like this, the quality of our students is just getting better and better. We are better as a whole because of undergraduate research," she said.

---------------

Photo: Dr. Laura McCunn, assistant chemistry professor, has been awarded a grant from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund to do research with the assistance of seven undergraduate students. Their work will contribute to a model to help predict the pollutants or soot that might be generated from particular fuel mixtures. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.
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Charity badges for 2013 Greenbrier Classic available soon; portion of proceeds will go to Marshall University scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Friends and fans of Marshall University and professional golf can make someone's holiday truly "green" this year by giving them the gift of a 2013 Greenbrier Classic Charity Badge.

Next year's Greenbrier Classic, a PGA TOUR FedEx Cup event at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., is scheduled July 1-7. Beginning Dec. 15, Marshall University will appear on the tournament's ticket sales website, www.Greenbriershopping.com, under the Badges for Charity icon. Marshall will receive a percentage of the proceeds purchased through the Badges for Charity program.

"The money that we receive from badges sold goes into our general scholarship fund," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation and Senior Vice President for Development. "It's a good way to celebrate the holiday season - give someone special the opportunity to attend the Greenbrier Classic in July while also supporting the Marshall University scholarship fund."

Profits from the badge sales, Area said, are a source of revenue for Marshall during difficult economic times.

"We want to thank the Greenbrier operation and (resort owner) Jim Justice for including Marshall University in their approved charity list," Area said. "We hope everyone marks their calendars for Dec. 15, the first day the badges can be purchased."

The following badges will be available:

Weekly Grounds Badge, $169

This badge will provide tournament admittance for the entire week. Weekly parking is included. Tickets to the 2013 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series are complimentary with the purchase of a weekly badge.Benefactor Badge, $285

This badge will provide tournament admittance for the entire week with access to special hospitality with air-conditioning, upgraded restroom facilities, flat-screen televisions to watch all the tournament action, and premium food and beverage items for purchase. Weekly parking is included. Tickets to the 2013 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series are complimentary with the purchase of a weekly Benefactor Badge.

Alumni Badge, $495

This badge will provide tournament admittance for the entire week with access to special hospitality with air-conditioning, upgraded restroom facilities, flat-screen televisions to watch all the tournament action, complimentary dry snacks and non-alcoholic beverages (Monday and Tuesday), and unlimited tailgate-style food and non-alcoholic beverages (Wednesday through  Sunday).

Special appearances will be made by Marshall University coaches and alumni athletes. Weekly parking is included. Tickets to the 2013 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series are complimentary with the purchase of a weekly Alumni Badge.

Clubhouse Badge, $5,000

This badge will provide tournament admittance for the entire week with access to The Greenbrier Clubhouse and Slammin' Sammy's with unlimited food and beverage, in addition to all benefactor and alumni hospitality venues. Weekly parking is included. Tickets to the 2013 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series are complimentary with the purchase of a weekly Clubhouse Badge.

The tournament, in its fourth year, will have a field of 156 PGA TOUR professionals competing for a $6.3 million purse.


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Friday November 30, 2012
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Dan Hollis, recently named Carnegie Foundation West Virginia Professor of the Year, featured speaker at Commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University professor Dan Hollis will be the keynote speaker at the school's annual Winter Commencement Sunday, Dec. 16, at Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus.

Commencement begins at 2 p.m. and is for students who graduated in July or August 2012, or are tentatively scheduled to graduate in December.

Hollis, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications, and current interim assistant dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, was recently selected as the 2012 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching West Virginia Professor of the Year.

"I think having a faculty member give the winter commencement address is a great tradition Marshall has," Hollis said. "I'm happy and proud to represent my colleagues this year.

"It's probably going to be the only time I'll get to address such a large gathering of students at such an important point in their lives. I'm feeling the pressure a bit, but I hope to give the graduates a little something that motivates and honors them."

Alyssa Salyers, one of Hollis' students, is graduating and will attend commencement on Dec. 16.  She has no doubts she and the other graduates in attendance are in for a treat. She said she knew even before meeting Hollis at the Scholastic Journalism Program that she wanted to be a journalist, but after meeting him knew she had to come to Marshall "to learn to be a journalist from that man."

"Dan's energy and enthusiasm are infectious," she said. "His style of teaching interests and inspires his students."

Salyers said Hollis' most special quality is his ability to make each of the students believe that he cares about them, that he is in their corner and will do anything he can to help them learn, grow and succeed.

"He causes us to believe in ourselves and our ability to succeed," she said. "Somehow, this man manages to be the consummate professional even as he alternately teaches, exhorts, listens, advises, encourages, supports and mentors each green freshman through his or her college years. His effectiveness is evidenced by the many students who remain in touch with him throughout their lives and their careers."

Hollis has been at Marshall since the fall of 1999. He was born in southwestern Indiana and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana in 1983. During college and after graduation, he worked at WFIE-TV in Evansville, Ind., as an award-winning photographer, producer and reporter. In 1989, he became a freelance videographer, often shooting recruiting videos for major colleges and universities.

In 1996, Hollis decided to return to school to pursue his true love: teaching. He received his master's degree in communications from the University of Kentucky in 1997 and taught there two years before joining Marshall.

At Marshall, Hollis has received the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award and the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award.  He also has taken first place in six consecutive years, and seven of the past eight, in the News/Sports/Public Affairs category of the National Broadcasting Society and Alpha Rho Epsilon Professional Electronic Media Awards for his creative work, which can also be seen on HerdVideo, Marshall's YouTube channel.


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Friday November 30, 2012
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West Virginia legislators tour Marshall University Forensic Science Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 25 West Virginia legislators received a tour of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center Monday, Nov. 26, to gain firsthand knowledge about its academic program and the forensic services provided to law enforcement within the state and the nation.

The delegation received a tour of the nationally accredited forensic DNA laboratories and the West Virginia State Police Digital Forensics Unit housed at the Forensic Science Center

Legislative representatives included the chairs of Subcommittee B of the Joint Standing Committee on the Judiciary, Sen. Herb Snyder (D-Jefferson) for the senate and Delegate Meshea Poore (D-Kanawha) for the house, and other committee members.

Snyder said forensic science, law enforcement and the judiciary are critical areas. "I was supportive of Marshall's forensic science program and services prior to the tour," he said, "but after seeing how the center operates and learning more about its activities, I am extremely supportive of the great things the Forensic Science Center is doing."

The tour was a follow-up on a presentation to Subcommittee B of the Joint Standing Committee on the Judiciary given by Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Forensic Science Center, in June about the operation and management of the center.

Other legislators in attendance included Sen. Roman Prezioso (D-Marion), chair of the Senate Finance Committee, and local legislators Sen. Evan Jenkins (D-Cabell) and Delegate Kelli Sobonya (R-Cabell).

Jenkins said Marshall's Forensic Science Center is special to him because he worked on the CODIS legislation more than a decade ago and was one of the first to get involved to get the initiative established. "Dr. Fenger put us on the world map," he said. "The challenge now is to continue support and growth and keep homes and kids safe. It deserves our full support."

Fenger said it was an honor to have the legislators visit the center and to have the opportunity to discuss the issues, importance and impact of forensic science education and casework done in the labs.

Poore said the Marshall University Forensic Science Center is nationally recognized as a model for the nation for its laboratories and how to handle forensic science data. "We felt it necessary for members not only to hear about it but actually see the good work being done and find out how the Legislature can help."

Cpl. Robert J. Boggs, a West Virginia State Police Digital Investigator stationed at the West Virginia State Police Digital Forensics Unit, said getting legislation on "sexting" passed is one of the ways the Legislature can help officers in the lab offset caseloads regarding child pornography investigations.

Last year Poore introduced sexting legislation. She said she is excited about introducing it again this year after receiving feedback that West Virginia state troopers are interested in the legislation. "I look forward to working with members of the West Virginia State Troopers Association and the Marshall University lab to get a strong piece of legislation passed regarding the sexting topic," Poore said.

Poore added West Virginia is "getting it right" through helping other states through forensic science training and analysis, and it needs to be recognized.

Sobonya sponsored the Internet Child Protection Act, House Bill 4492, which passed in 2004.  The act made it a felony for child predators to solicit children over the Internet and enabled law enforcement to charge predators before they make physical contact with children. "It was good to hear from Cpl. Boggs that the law helps law enforcement go after predators before they have contact with children," she said.

Marshall's Forensic Science Center is one of the best kept secrets in Huntington and is a model for the nation, Sobonya added.  She worked with the Forensic Science Center previously on providing training for sexual assault nurse examiners to develop continuity and uniformity in the way DNA is collected from sexual assault victims. "It is important to protect the integrity of DNA samples so they are admissible in court," she said.


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Friday November 30, 2012
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Fruth Pharmacy provides School of Pharmacy with scholarship support gift

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University School of Pharmacy announced today it has received a $10,000 gift for student scholarships from West Virginia-based Fruth Pharmacy.

Dean Kevin Yingling, R.Ph., M.D., said the relationship with Fruth Pharmacy is fundamental to the growth of the school."We are grateful for the unwavering support from the Fruth Pharmacy family," Yingling said.  "Lynne Fruth and her team understand the importance of educating the pharmacists of tomorrow and they have become valued advisors to all of us at the Marshall School of Pharmacy."

Fruth said the company has a robust history of providing help to many students.

"Fruth Pharmacy has long partnered with Marshall to provide scholarships for Fruth employees and other deserving students," she said.  "Specifically helping the Marshall School of Pharmacy is a natural partnership for us. Fruth Pharmacy is committed to assisting in the development of the next generation of pharmacists that will be serving the rural communities of West Virginia and Ohio."

Recipients of the Fruth Pharmacy Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy  will be from Mason, Cabell, Kanawha, Putnam, Wayne, Roane, Jackson and Wood counties in West Virginia or Gallia, Jackson, Meigs, Lawrence, Athens, Washington and Pike counties in Ohio and have an interest in community pharmacy. 


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Thursday November 29, 2012
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Marshall piano students take prizes in state competitions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Two Marshall University graduate student pianists have won prizes this fall on the state level in competitions sponsored by the West Virginia Music Teachers Association.

Jiao Li, a graduate student in piano performance, is this year's state winner of the national MTNA's Young Artist Competition, and Will Murphy, also a graduate student in piano performance, received second prize in the Mountain State Competition, which is sponsored annually by the WVMTA.

Dr. Henning Vauth, assistant professor of music at Marshall, said Li will represent West Virginia in the eastern division Young Artist competition.

Li said she was very excited to win such a prestigious competition in West Virginia.

"When I was informed of the announcement, I could not believe my ears," Li said. "I studied hard with my teacher; he gave me a lot of help. I would like to thank Dr. Vauth and Marshall University for giving me this opportunity. I will keep working hard."

Murphy said at the time, he was practicing for his graduate recital, and the competition was a good way to perform a portion of his recital pieces for practice and feedback.

"This was helpful because I was able to receive comments regarding my performance of the music," Murphy said. "This is the reason I went, not for the competition, but for the feedback. Winning second prize was an added bonus. I was very happy with the outcome and I thought the judges were fair in making the decision of the winners."

Murphy said the competition was a great experience for him as a pianist.

"I am glad I competed and got the chance to see where I fit among other pianists in the state," Murphy said. "If it weren't for my professor, Dr. Henning Vauth, I probably would not have gone to the competition. He definitely saw that the potential was there and just gave me the extra push I needed." Vauth said these competitions not only helped Li and Murphy grow as pianists but showed others what talent there is at Marshall University.

"It's really quite a big deal for us and very exciting, since it hasn't happened before," Vauth said. "Teachers from across the state have heard Jiao and Will during the competitions and prize winners' recital; hopefully this will help further improve the reputation of our piano area."

Both of the competitions occurred during the West Virginia Music Teachers Association conference Oct. 11 at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, W.Va.


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Tuesday November 27, 2012
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Marshall medical student elected to national association post

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jay R. Bronder, a second-year medical student at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, was recently elected by his peers as a regional representative to the American Medical Association's House of Delegates (AMA-HOD). 

The AMA House of Delegates is the principal policy-making body of the American Medical Association

"I'm very excited to represent Marshall University and our region in this organization," Bronder said. "Part of my responsibility is to act as a mentor and liaison between Region 5 and the HOD to help refine resolutions coming from Region 5 students to the full house.  I'm looking forward to being part of this process."

Dr. Marie Veitia, associate dean for student affairs, congratulated Bronder on his election.

"We are very proud of Mr. Bronder," she said. "He will represent the School of Medicine very well and is certainly deserving of this position."

The AMA's House of Delegates meets twice annually and represents the views and interests of a diverse group of member physicians on a variety of issues including health, medical, and professional and governance matters.

Bronder is a native of Monroeville, Pa. 


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Tuesday November 27, 2012
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Architectural, consulting firms seek input from public for Marshall's 2013 Facilities/Land Use Master Plan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives from architectural and consulting firms will conduct a campus/community open house at Marshall University on Tuesday, Dec. 4, as they seek input for MU's 2013 Facilities/Land Use Master Plan.

The topics of the open house are Introduction to Campus Master Plan and Identification of Goals and Concerns. The master plan will be presented to MU's Board of Governors by September 2013 and to the Higher Education Policy Commission by December 2013, according to Dr. Karen Kirtley, Marshall's senior vice president for administration. Marshall's most recent master plan update was approved by the Board of Governors in 2003.  

The campus/community open house takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Dec. 4 in room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the university's Huntington campus. The public is invited to meet with the consultants and share ideas.

Conducting the open house will be the consulting firm of SmithGroup JJR from Ann Arbor, Mich., which will have representatives at Marshall Dec. 3-6.  In addition to SmithGroup JJR, the consultant team consists of Corbin Design, Michael Baker, Jr. Inc., Paulien and Associates, and The Protection Engineering Group.


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Saturday November 24, 2012
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Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp issues statement following the passing of Arthur Weisberg

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp issued the following statement today following the passing of Arthur Weisberg:

"I and the entire Marshall University community are deeply saddened by the passing of Mr. Arthur Weisberg. I consider Art a dear friend and mentor and I've been so fortunate to have known him. I have especially cherished the time we shared together. He was never short on kind words and always willing to share his advice and wisdom - just two of the noble attributes that define this remarkable man. 

"Huntington and the State of West Virginia have lost one of our greatest captains of industry and philanthropy. Art chose to make Huntington his home and throughout his lifetime here, he was committed to improving the quality of life for its current and future residents. Art and the entire Weisberg family have left an indelible imprint on this university through their support of our academic programs and willingness to give back to the community they so dearly love. 

"Jane and I and all of us at Marshall extend our love and heartfelt prayers to Joan and the entire Weisberg family."
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Tuesday November 20, 2012
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Choral Union to perform 'Midnight Mass for Christmas' Nov. 29-30

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union and the West Virginia Symphony Chorus will give two performances of Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Midnight Mass for Christmas" Thursday, Nov. 29, in Huntington and Friday, Nov. 30, in Charleston, with Dr. David Castleberry conducting.

"The Midnight Mass is a charming work, based on French Noels that are woven into the choral textures of this marvelous liturgical work," Castleberry said. "It is a delightful, evocative piece that will appeal to audiences."

In addition, the choruses will perform Charles Theodore Pachelbel's "Magnificat" and organist William Murphy will play selections from Claude Balbastre's "Premier Suite de Noels."

The Huntington performance will take place at 8 p.m. at Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, 413 10th St., while the Charleston performance is at 8 p.m. at Christ Church United Methodist, located at Quarrier and Morris Streets.

Admission is free and open to the public. Donations will be gratefully accepted.


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Monday November 19, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall students, local players to participate in TUBACHRISTMAS Dec. 1



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University tuba and euphonium players are inviting players of those instruments in the Huntington area to join them in the local celebration of "TUBACHRISTMAS." TUBACHRISTMAS is an annual event that is being celebrated for the 39th time in more than 250 cities throughout the United States and in several foreign countries, according to Dr. George Palton, who teaches tuba and euphonium at Marshall and is coordinating the event.
 
This year's Huntington TUBACHRISTMAS will take place Saturday, Dec. 1. Registration for participants will start at 10 a.m. and rehearsal will begin at 11 a.m. at the Marshall University-Henderson Center Marching Band Complex on the Huntington campus. The performance will take place at 2 p.m. the same day at the Huntington Mall.
 
The ensemble will be conducted by Steve Barnett, Director of Bands at Marshall University.
 
TUBACHRISTMAS was created by Harvey Phillips as an annual event honoring his teacher, the late tubist William J. Bell, who was born Christmas Day, 1902. Every Christmas season, tuba and euphonium players of all ages, from specific geographic areas, gather to pay respect to all the great artists/teachers who represent their heritage. Every TUBACHRISTMAS performance features traditional Christmas carols specially arranged for the first TUBACHRISTMAS (December 22, 1974 in New York City's Rockefeller Plaza) by American composer Alec Wilder, who died on Christmas Eve in 1980.
 
 For further information about this event or music at Marshall University, please call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 16, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall recognized for efforts in promoting diversity, inclusion



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been selected as a winner of the first 2012 INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award, the December 2012 issue of the magazine reported today. Marshall is one of 48 recipients featured in the issue.

HEED is a national award honoring U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity, said Marshall met or exceeded the parameters and guidelines set by a panel of judges in earning "the first ever national award for colleges, universities and school systems that exhibit outstanding efforts and success in the area of diversity and inclusion among the entire community of students, faculty, staff and vendors."

"We hope the HEED award serves as a reminder that diversity and inclusion must remain priorities in the 21st century higher education landscape," Pearlstein said. "Every college and university should recognize the importance of diversity and inclusion as being part of their everyday life on campus. Our students of today are the employees of tomorrow and the future of our country. As students begin to enter the workforce and a global society, they must first be surrounded by and supported by faculty and staff that understand the differences among cultures and their needs."

Potomac Publishing, Inc., publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, evaluated applications from colleges and universities throughout the United States in order to measure their level of success in regard to diversity and inclusion. The winners, including Marshall but listed in no particular order, are published in the December issue.

"There is no ranking," said Holly Mendelson, also an INSIGHT publisher. "The needs of each school are so different. What's right for one campus may be completely different than what's right for somebody else."

Mendelson said the judges were very impressed with Marshall's efforts to encourage diversity and inclusion and the success it has had in doing so. The vision of Marshall's Division of Multicultural Affairs is, in part, "to provide leadership, support and advocacy for diverse populations, historically underrepresented individuals and groups."

"Marshall has really done an outstanding job," Mendelson said. "We had all kinds of schools apply and we really asked for a lot of information, which Shari (Clarke) provided to us. Marshall should feel good about what they are doing."

Dr. Shari Clarke is Marshall's vice president for multicultural affairs.

"This award is recognition and affirmation of a broad range of accomplishments," Clarke said. "It's nice to be recognized for what we do. We really focus on creating a climate of inclusion and diversity. We are very proud and honored to receive this award."

Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp praised Clarke and her staff for their "expert contributions to our advancement of diversity not only at Marshall, but across the Higher Education landscape."

"She is supported by passionate students, faculty and staff who share our vision for a diverse, inclusive and multicultural Marshall University community that fosters, encourages and enriches opportunities for personal and intellectual growth for all," Kopp said.

Marshall excels in many areas regarding diversity and inclusiveness, Mendelson said. She cited some examples:

"Marshall has a lot of veterans in the student population," she said. "They're doing a good job of providing students with a world of opportunity with their study abroad programs. They take care of people with disabilities and they have top-notch facilities. Marshall strives to insure that its school represents growing diversity reflective of the state."

Mendelson said Marshall also excels in the way it reaches out to the community with events such as Outstanding Black High School Students Weekend. "There's a tremendous effort there," she said. "And their Multicultural Leadership Ambassador Program is definitely something unique."

Clarke has instituted many new programs since coming to Marshall four years ago. She said she is most proud of the Multicultural Faculty in Residence Program, the faculty exchange program between Marshall and Alcorn State University, the Ivy Academy (leadership conference for 8th-12th-grade girls) and the Multicultural Leadership Ambassador Program.

"They've educated over 5,000 individuals since 2009," she said of the ambassadors.

Kopp said he appreciates and admires the efforts of Marshall University's Multicultural Ambassadors.

"They are a group of diverse young men and women who strive, on their own time, to break down stereotypes and confront bias and prejudices of all kinds," Kopp said. "They perform this calling through thoughtful communication and one-on-one interactions. They are brave. They are impressive. They are inspiring. Quite simply, they enrich our entire community."

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About INSIGHT Into Diversity

INSIGHT Into Diversity is the oldest and largest diversity magazine and website in higher education today. For nearly 40 years, it has been connecting employees with institutions and businesses that embrace a workforce that is reflective of the world. INSIGHT Into Diversity successfully connects employers to the most highly qualified individuals regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, medical condition or history, veteran status, gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.

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Photo: Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of multicultural affairs at Marshall University.


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Friday November 16, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University students produce parody video to promote science

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A group of Marshall University students has produced a parody of a popular music video as part of a national contest to promote science.

The parody, called "The Lab Song," is a take-off on the Bruno Mars music video "The Lazy Song." The students' video has only been online for a few days but it has already generated more than 1,800 views.

The group worked on the video as part of a nationwide contest called "Stand Up for Science!" sponsored by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. The society is soliciting entries that creatively promote federally-funded research and its role in improving the health, quality of life or economy in local communities.

Led by junior biochemistry major Sumaiya Chaudhry, the students who produced the video represented departments and majors from across the university, including journalism, the sciences, art, music and theater.

Like the Bruno Mars video, the students' version features dancing monkeys and a catchy tune. Chaudhry said that the group of 20 or so undergraduate students did all the work on the video. She directed and filmed, wrote the lyrics, did the post-production work and even played ukulele in the song. Other members of the team produced the music, sang, acted and helped with lighting.

Chaudhry says she had wanted to do a parody video about science for a while and the contest seemed like a good opportunity to get people together and excited about the project.

"This whole process has been very gratifying to see students over various disciplines contributing to this project in a productive and creative way," she said. "It has been very challenging to get this project going, but it was totally worth it. I hope to see more interdisciplinary projects at the university because collectively we can create something bigger, better, and, hopefully, more enjoyable."

Another member of the group, junior advertising major Tyler Rice, who appears as a monkey in the video, said the students have done posters to promote their contest entry and will also be using Twitter and other social media avenues to help get the word out.

"Currently, our goal is to increase views of the video," said Rice. "There will be a public voting period in December, but we plan to deal with that closer to the voting period. Right now we just want to get the video out there and generate as many views as we can." 

The video can be seen on YouTube at http://youtu.be/_7uCcRfrQ0A. For more information, contact Chaudhry at chaudhry3@marshall.edu or Rice at rice103@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 16, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Ground broken for Marshall University's new soccer complex

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Construction of a state-of-the-art soccer complex for Marshall University's men's and women's soccer teams is set to begin this week, with work to be completed by Aug. 1, 2013, in time for the start of the fall season.

To celebrate the start of construction, Marshall officials today conducted a ceremonial groundbreaking on the West Lot of Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The soccer complex will be built at 2590 5th Ave. in Huntington, the former site of the historic Veterans Memorial Field House. 

The Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex is expected to pay almost instant dividends in areas such as recruiting and training, even before the first match is played.

"This is an exciting and historic day for Marshall University athletics," said Mike Hamrick, MU's director of athletics. "Our soccer teams will now have one of the top, if not the top, facilities in the country. It's also historic because this is the first step toward continuing our facilities enhancement." 

The soccer complex is part of a $30 million project that includes a state of the art indoor practice facility, which will have an indoor track, an athletics hall of fame, an academic support center and a sports medicine translational research center. 

"The soccer complex is the first one," Hamrick said, "and then the domino effect really starts with the other projects." 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said MU's facilities will rank among the best in Conference USA once construction is completed on the soccer complex and the indoor practice facility. The soccer complex, in particular, will benefit more than just Marshall, he said.

"The new soccer complex will serve not only Marshall's men's and women's soccer programs but our community as well," Kopp said. "The rising competitiveness of both our men's and women's soccer teams will benefit greatly from this state-of-the-art facility. It's easy to foresee the benefit of this facility with respect to future student-athlete recruitment as well as greater competitive successes on the playing surface."

Longtime men's Coach Bob Gray recalled when his teams played their home matches at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"Then we developed Sam Hood Field from scratch (on campus) and it served its purpose for many years," said Gray, who is in his 18th year at Marshall. "Now, to have a state-of-the-art facility like we're going to have will be a tremendous boost to our program. It will help in every facet of recruiting and training that you need to have to be a top notch program."

Marshall's men's teams posted a record of 80-41-9 in 14 seasons at Sam Hood Field. The women's program began in 1998 and their overall home record during those 14 years was 47-56-12. 

The new complex will be about 12,000 square feet in size, with a 500 square-foot press box, about 1,000 seats and a 47-space parking lot. Hamrick said the facility will include coaches' offices for both programs, locker rooms, a concession area and ticket offices. 

MU women's Coach Kevin Long said the new facility will put Marshall on a level playing field with some of the country's top programs.

"It will be much more effective training on a field that matches the fields we will be playing on," Long said. "We could never do that before. Also, this is a very loud statement by the administration that soccer is a strong program and it is here to stay. The fact that we will have a state-of-the-art stadium that surpasses all the teams in our conference should translate to recruits that the administration believes in the program. This type of belief not only speaks volumes to the recruits, but also helps parents to know what a program's level of support is."

Marshall's teams played their home matches on the road this fall, mostly on local high school fields. Gray is looking forward to the convenience and familiarity that comes with having a home stadium.

"Just the fact that our offices and locker rooms and conference room will all be housed in the same building is exciting," Gray said. "It will give us a more professional approach about training and preparing for our matches. And the state-of-the-art field turf helps us in that, when we have inclement weather, we won't have to worry about tearing the field up."

Hamrick and both coaches are excited about what the stadium will mean to the community. It will be used to help develop youth programs, high school matches will be played there, local club teams will play there, and tournaments such as the U.S. Youth Soccer Region I Championships, which return to the Tri-State in 2015, will play many of their matches there. That tournament was played locally in 2009 and 2010, and had an economic impact of around $12 million each year.

Gray acknowledged that he already is seeing the benefits of having a new facility in the near future.

"We had a very good recruiting class this year and it's helped us schedule wise," Gray said. "We're going to have a great number of home games next year. There's been a snowball effect with all of our programs and it started with the Rec Center. Marshall is on the rise and a lot of good things are happening with the athletic department."

The total cost of the new soccer complex will be about $8 million, according to Hamrick. That includes $673,409 for demolition of the field house.

The design firm for the project is AECOM Technical Services of Kansas City, Mo., and the construction firm is MIRC Construction Services of Hurricane, W.Va.

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Photo: Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, center, leads a large group in a ceremonial groundbreaking for the university's new soccer complex this afternoon outside Joan C. Edwards Stadium. To Kopp's right is Mike Hamrick, Marshall's Director of Athletics, and to Kopp's left is Chad Pennington, co-chair of Marshall's Vision Campaign. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Thursday November 15, 2012
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Dan Hollis, associate professor of journalism at Marshall, selected by Carnegie Foundation as W.Va. Professor of the Year

He calls award a 'great honor,' a bonus for doing something he loves

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Dan Hollis, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at Marshall University, has been selected as the 2012 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching West Virginia Professor of the Year. Hollis was selected from nearly 300 top professors in the United States.

The selection was announced today during an awards luncheon at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Hollis, who in addition to teaching is serving as interim assistant dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, was on hand to receive his award.

"Obviously, it's a great honor," Hollis said. "I love teaching, being in the classroom and interacting with students. It's my life. Anytime you get recognized for doing something you love, it's a bonus."

The recipient of the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award at Marshall University is annually nominated for the Carnegie award. Hollis received the 2011 Reynolds award. 

Three other Marshall professors have won the Carnegie award: Dr. Karen Mitchell, a mathematics professor, in 1995; Dr. John McKernan, an English professor, in 2000; and Dr. Steven Mewaldt, a psychology professor, in 2003.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall, said Hollis winning the award was no surprise to him.

"Dan is very popular in the classroom, and it's obvious he connects well with his students," Ormiston said. "He is enthusiastic, fun and engaging. Dan once said the first day of school each semester is like Christmas morning to him. Most of all, he is an outstanding professor. We congratulate Dan on winning this very prestigious award."

Paul Gessler is a reporter at WBFF-TV in Baltimore, Md., and a former student of Hollis.  He wrote a letter of support for Hollis during the selection process.

"His energy and sense of humor can hold a lecture hall clamoring for more," Gessler said in the letter. "Often times during class, passing students would peer into Hollis' class, inevitably to answer their internal dialogue, 'Who is that guy, and why is he walking on chairs?' His name is Dan Hollis. And, no one's quite sure why he does that."

Gessler said that while Hollis' classes are enjoyable, he is "no easy out."

"You have to work hard for your grade," Gessler said. "If a student doesn't meet expectations on an assignment, I've seen him assign a new, tougher project for the student as a chance to climb out of a hole. Second chances need to be earned from him."

Gessler said that regardless of whether a student is celebrating or heartbroken, Hollis is there for them.

"We have fun, but the students know I care and care a lot," Hollis said. "There are many great teachers at Marshall, many in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications alone. For whatever reason, someone singled me out, but the honor is in representing all my colleagues."

In addition to the Reynolds award, Hollis received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001. He also has taken first place in six consecutive years, and seven of the past eight, in the News/Sports/Public Affairs category of the National Broadcasting Society and Alpha Rho Epsilon Professional Electronic Media Awards for his creative work which can also be seen on HerdVideo, Marshall's YouTube channel.

Hollis joined Marshall in the fall of 1999. He was born in southwestern Indiana and received his undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana in 1983. During college and after graduation, he worked at WFIE-TV in Evansville, Ind., as an award-winning photographer, producer and reporter. In 1989, he became a freelance videographer, often shooting recruiting videos for major colleges and universities.

In 1996, Hollis decided to return to school to pursue his true love: teaching. He received his master's degree in communications from the University of Kentucky in 1997 and taught there two years before joining Marshall.

CASE and the Carnegie Foundation have been partners in offering the U.S. Professors of the Year awards program since 1981. TIAA-CREF, one of America's leading financial services organizations and higher education's premier retirement system, became the principal sponsor for the awards ceremony in 2000. Additional support for the program is received from a number of higher education associations, including Phi Beta Kappa, which sponsors an evening congressional reception.

This year, a state Professor of the Year was recognized in 30 states and the District of Columbia. CASE assembled two preliminary panels of judges to select finalists. The Carnegie Foundation then convened the third and final panel, which selected four national winners. CASE and Carnegie select state winners from top entries resulting from the judging process. Hollis was selected from faculty members nominated by colleges and universities throughout the country.

The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an independent policy and research center that supports needed transformations in American education through tighter connections between teaching practice, evidence of student learning, the communication and use of this evidence, and structured opportunities to build knowledge.

Headquartered in Washington, D.C., with offices in London, Singapore and Mexico City, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education is a professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals at all levels who work in alumni relations, communications, fundraising, marketing and other areas.

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Photos: Dan Hollis, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at Marshall University, has been selected as the 2012 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching West Virginia Professor of the Year.

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Video of Dan Hollis teaching at Marshall is available at http://youtu.be/7KnFSHa0IpA.


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Thursday November 15, 2012
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

Marshall and INTO University Partnerships agreement will bring students from across the world to Huntington


HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - Marshall University and INTO University Partnerships today finalized a long-term agreement that is expected to build the institution's global profile and increase international student enrollment at the university.

Marshall and INTO have been developing the partnership for the past two years to build on Marshall's growing international reputation and to bring greater awareness of global cultures to West Virginia's college students and communities.

INTO is a private company that forms innovative joint venture partnerships with leading universities to expand opportunities for higher education, ensuring student success and transforming lives. Students benefit from university-designed programs, university-led teaching, and supportive university environments while enjoying full access to university campus facilities, resources and services. Since 2006, the company has successfully launched partnerships with 17 universities in the United Kingdom, United States and Asia.

"Today we celebrate the start of an innovative program that truly will internationalize Marshall University and our greater Huntington community," said Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall. "Our plan is very progressive and, in many ways, pioneering, because of its potential global influence on our students, our university and our state.

"We are very excited about the outstanding learning and growth experiences we can offer the many international students who will choose to come to West Virginia each year and enroll at Marshall. Perhaps as significant are the diverse learning and cultural enrichment opportunities their involvement at Marshall will create for the thousands of Marshall University students from across our state and nation. This initiative literally will create a multicultural, global village on our Huntington campus."

Marshall becomes the fourth U.S. university to sign on with INTO, following Oregon State University, the University of South Florida and Colorado State University.

Marshall currently has an international population of about 400 students from 60 countries. The Center for International Programs was established in 1993 and provides a variety of international programs and support services, including study abroad, cooperative international research, community outreach, the English as a Second Language Institute and immigration assistance for students and employees. The university's annual International Festival is one of the most popular university-sponsored events, drawing thousands of students and members of the community. 

>INTO will use its extensive global recruitment network across 75 countries to help enroll 200+ additional students in the INTO Marshall program from key international markets. The first intake of INTO Marshall students will be August 2013. This added international student enrollment will diversify the student body at Marshall while helping to sustain the university's growth and advance the institution's ambitious goals for comprehensive internationalization. INTO University Partnerships is a member of the American International Recruitment Council, which requires its members to adhere to stringent quality assurance practices for recruitment.

"We are delighted to welcome Marshall to our growing network of leading universities. Marshall offers a small-town, family-like experience that has proven very welcoming to international students. We will build on the strengths of Marshall's existing programs and increase access for international students who want to pursue their higher education goals at Marshall," said Andrew Colin, chairman of INTO University Partnerships. "We have experienced exceptional student performance at our three existing U.S. partner universities, and we look forward to INTO Marshall enjoying similar successes in the coming years."

INTO Marshall will ensure the success of international students by delivering innovative academic preparation programs and personalized support services in a completely renovated, on-campus international study center. Pathway programs combine academic coursework and English language training to help international students adapt to an American university environment and prepare for future success as a degree-seeking student at the university. Marshall University instructors will teach all Pathway programs.

Marshall Provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston said the portfolio of academic Pathway programs has been designed to help accelerate student success as INTO Marshall students adjust to the rigors of the U.S. university environment.

"Our faculty have worked with INTO to design a specific curriculum that will help international students fit well into the culture of Marshall University," Ormiston said. "Our partnership with INTO will enhance Marshall's established international student programs and provide a richer international experience for all of our students, faculty, and staff and indeed the entire community and state."

Photos: (Above) Andrew Colin, left, chairman of INTO University Partnerships, and Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp sign an agreement today that is expected to build the institution's global profile and increase international student enrollment at the university. The signing took place on Marshall's Huntington campus at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center. (Middle) Andrew Colin, left, chairman of INTO University Partnerships, and Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp shake hands after signing an agreement today that is expected to build the institution's global profile and increase international student enrollment at the university. (Below) More than 20 countries are represented by the visitors to Marshall University's Huntington campus Nov. 15. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

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About INTO University Partnerships INTO University Partnerships specializes in large-scale transformational partnerships that support and drive leading universities' internationalization goals. Within our university-led partnerships, INTO expands opportunities for international students to pursue higher education, investing in the resources, systems and processes to deliver a first-class student experience. Students benefit from university-designed and -delivered programs, highly supportive learning environments and state-of-the-art learning and living spaces while enjoying full access to their host university's campus facilities, resources and services. Since 2006, INTO has launched joint venture partnerships to internationalize 17 campuses in the U.K., the U.S. and Asia. More information can be found at www.into-corporate.com.

About Marshall University

Marshall University, founded in 1837 and located in Huntington, W.Va., is the state's  oldest public institution of higher education. The university was named in honor of John Marshall, the longest-serving Chief Justice of the United States, who also is regarded as the definer of the U.S. Constitution. Marshall offers 74 undergraduate majors and 52 graduate and professional degrees and has an enrollment of 14,000 students. Marshall University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, and its Thundering Herd athletic teams compete in 15 NCAA Division 1 intercollegiate sports.


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Wednesday November 14, 2012
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Nobel laureate visits Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

Dr. Gnter Blobel receives honorary degree from Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gnter Blobel, M.D., Ph.D., who received the 1999 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery that proteins have built-in signals that direct their movement in cells, visited the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University today and met with faculty, staff and students. 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp presented Blobel with an honorary doctoral degree in science from the school. 

For decades, Blobel, a cellular and molecular biologist, has studied the protein distribution system within cells. His studies showed that the movement and position of proteins within a cell depend on specific signals which direct them to proper cell destinations.   Ultimately, the protein-signaling mechanisms discovered by Blobel were discovered to be universal, found in yeast, plant, animal and human cells.

His work has shed light on diseases such as cystic fibrosis and kidney stones, which have been linked to errors in the signal and transport systems.

In awarding Blobel with an honorary degree, President Kopp praised the researcher for his life-long curiosity and commitment to the life sciences.

"Dr. Blobel is the epitome of a great research scientist and humanitarian, one who has dedicated his entire career to unlocking the mysteries of human disease and benefiting humankind," Kopp said.  "He is among the most respected researchers in the world and it is with pleasure and great pride that we bestow upon him our highest honor, this honorary doctoral degree."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, said Blobel's visit serves to both ignite passion and encourage young researchers to pursue their scientific goals.

"It is inspiring for us to meet with a scientist like Dr. Blobel, someone who has truly reached a scientific pinnacle," he said. "I am absolutely delighted that he has found the time in his busy schedule to visit us at Marshall, and I am grateful to Dr. Nader Abraham, our new vice-dean for research, for arranging this incredible visit."

Blobel, who has received many distinguished awards during his career, said he is pleased to receive the honorary degree from Marshall.

"I am humbled and totally surprised to receive this honorary degree from Marshall University," he said.  "Marshall is a distinguished university and I am so pleased receive this honor."

Blobel's research continues as he now works to understand the signals between a cell's nucleus and cytoplasm.   Experts say the keys to unlocking these type communications will eventually help explain how diseases like cancer occur.

Blobel received his M.D. from the University of Tbingen in 1960 and his Ph.D. in 1967 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he worked with Van R. Potter in the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research. He did postdoctoral work at The Rockefeller University in the laboratory of George E. Palade and has been at the university since.   Blobel was named the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Professor in 1992 and also serves as an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Born in a small town in eastern Germany (now Poland) in 1936, Blobel and his family fled the country during World War II.   On their way to the west, they passed through the city of Dresden, which only days later was destroyed in an air bombing.   Blobel's oldest sister was killed some weeks later in an air attack on a train in which she was traveling. 

In memory of his sister and in an effort to help rebuild the city of Dresden, Blobel founded Friends of Dresden, Inc., a charitable organization, with the goal to raise funds in the United States to help rebuild the many beautiful structures in Dresden that were destroyed in World War II.


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Tuesday November 13, 2012
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

Marshall geography professor invited by Oxford University to share thoughts with Atlas of the World publication



Dr. Joshua Hagen comments on geography of Europe and Syria, and concept of 'Homeland' 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joshua Hagen, professor of geography at Marshall University, has been invited by Oxford University's Atlas of the World to share his thoughts on the relationship between geography and current events for their publication, Place of the Year 2012.   Atlas is the only world atlas which is updated annually, guaranteeing that users will find the most current geographic information.

Hagen, who is co-author of Borders:  A Very Short Introduction, commented for the publication on the geography of Europe and Syria as well as the concept of "Homeland."

Hagen noted that Europe's ongoing fiscal crisis has served to aggravate pre-existing regional and national divisions and in the process has added an array of political, cultural and linguistic challenges to the dire economic situation which is ravaging most of Europe.   He explained  that Spain, for example, has fallen on grim economic times as unemployment has climbed to 25 percent and the Spanish government has had to bail out banks and several regional governments, including Catalonia, Spain's largest regional economy.

"Catalans have maintained a strong regional identity, including their own language, despite recurring efforts by Spanish governments to centralize authority and suppress regionalism," Hagen wrote.  He added that although recent decades have seen improved relations between Catalonia and the Spanish government, including recognition of the Catalan language and a significant degree of autonomy, anger, and resentment from the recent economic depression have still spilled over into culture and politics causing long-standing antagonisms to flare up again.

The continuing economic crisis has also worsened similar cultural-linguistic disputes in Belgium, Italy and the United Kingdom, according to Hagen, and on a broader scale the fiscal crisis has revived long-standing stereotypes of Germans versus Greeks and Europe's Nordic countries versus the Mediterranean. 

"Depending on one's perspective, Germany and Europe's North are portrayed as responsible, hard-working and frugal or stingy, bossy and arrogant.  Conversely, Mediterranean Europe is viewed as lazy, corrupt and hapless or victimized, swindled and resilient," he wrote. 

In discussing Syria, Hagen noted that Syria's current government is dominated by Alawites, a religious minority that comprises only about 12 percent of the total population but is a majority in the country's Mediterranean coast region.

"The forces rebelling against the Syrian government are mainly drawn from the country's dominant Sunni Arab populations," he explained.  "It is impossible to predict the exact course of future events, but Syria's demographic and physical geography make it very unlikely that the government will succeed in re-establishing undisputed control over the country."

Hagen pointed out that the geography of Syria will likely be changed irreversibly, as ethnic-linguistic-religious groups sort themselves out into relatively similar enclaves and significant numbers of minority groups leave the country altogether. 

He stressed that, although there have been predictions of a borderless world and an end of geography, mounting calls for economic protectionism and rising anti-immigrant sentiment would signal a rising tide of nationalism and national territoriality.  In closing, Hagen noted that  "Growing fears of insecurity, scarcity, and powerlessness are likely to fuel increased pressures to define and defend national homelands." 

In addition, some main points of Borders: A Very Short Introduction, were discussed in a recent online article of The New Yorker. The author of the New Yorker article, Adam Gopnik, summarized some of the points Hagen made on page 3 of a 5-page online article titled "Faces, Places, Spaces. The Renaissance of Geographic History" in the section, "A Critic At Large." Gopnik wrote, in part:

"Another version of space history is available these days, though. This might be called the cartographic turn, and is characterized by the argument that, while geography matters, it is visible only through the maps that we make of it. Where borders fall is as much a matter of how things are seen as how they really are. We can know the shape of the planet only through maps maps in the ordinary glove-compartment sense, maps in a broader metaphoric one and those maps are made by minds attuned to the relations of power. All nations are shaped by belligerence and slaughter. Their borders are a fretwork of scars; they are the history of violence made legible on earth. A new field of "border studies" has grown up around this insight, with its own journals and its own institutions: there's a much respected Journal of Borderlands Studies, and there are institutes of border studies at several European universities. The newly published "Borders: A Very Short Introduction" (Oxford), by Alexander C. Diener and Joshua Hagen, makes an excellent and, well, very short introduction to the subject."


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Tuesday November 13, 2012
Contact: Michele Muth, Marshall Recreation Center Assistant Director, 304-696-2943

Marshall Recreation Center and First Year Residence Halls partner to bring holiday joy to Tri-State

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center and the Marshall University First Year Residence halls are partnering this holiday season to help local agencies and children in the Huntington Community with a program called "Rec the Halls with Holiday Hopes."

Wish lists are being collected from local agencies such as Golden Girls, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Ronald McDonald House, A.D. Lewis Community Center and NECCO. The wishes will be hung on a tree in the lobby of the Marshall Recreation Center and in the First Year Residence Hall South dorm. People may stop by the Recreation Center or Residence Hall starting Wednesday, Nov. 14, to collect a wish to fulfill. 

A wrapping party will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 13, to wrap the gifts for the agencies. Volunteers will be rewarded with snacks and drinks, while enjoying each other's company in a festive atmosphere.

The person collecting the wish is asked to purchase the item listed and either drop it off at the Rec Center before Dec. 13 or bring it to the wrapping party.

For more information call Marshall Recreation Center Assistant Director Michele Muth at 304-696-2943 or e-mail her at pallante1@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday November 13, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Pharmacy community gathers supplies for Hurricane Sandy victims

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - Boxes of items containing basic supplies were shipped Friday from collection points at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy to needy Hurricane Sandy victims in New Jersey.

The effort to collect items including diapers, baby wipes, bedding, children's underwear, formula, bottles and cleaning supplies was initiated by Janet Wolcott, Pharm.D., a clinical professor at the school and a New Jersey native.

"I wanted to do something for the people of the Jersey Shore, mainly because I'm from the area and have many friends and family affected by the storm," she said. "The students graciously jumped on the bandwagon and started collecting things. A few also made contacts with people they know to see if others were interested in donating items.  We shipped very large boxes on Friday just chock full of supplies."

Wolcott said the students have also contacted area pharmacies asking them to join the effort, which will continue for several more weeks. She said she and a few students will be driving to New Jersey in the coming weeks to drop off more collected supplies.   Area residents who would like to donate items may contact Wolcott at 304-696-7337.

This is the second community volunteer project pharmacy students have initiated recently.  In October, in recognition of pharmacy awareness month, students visited with patients at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center offering books and magazines. Wolcott said community engagement events like the visitation schedule and disaster collection effort are consistent with the school's mission to better the lives of local, state, regional and national residents.

The Marshall University School of Pharmacy opened its inaugural program in August with 80 students from more than a dozen states.


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Monday November 12, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

University receives $721,000 gift for mechanical engineering professorship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has received a $721,000 bequest from the estate of Huntington businessman J. Robert "Bob" Fletcher to fund the engineering professorship bearing his name. The donation is expected to be matched through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund for a total benefit to the university of more than $1.4 million.

The J. Robert Fletcher Professorship for Engineering will support an endowed faculty position in mechanical engineering at Marshall. The Fletcher family established the endowment in 2010 with a gift of $125,000, which was matched by the trust fund at that time.

Fletcher, who died in May 2009, moved to Huntington in 1947 with the family business. Along with his father and brother, he designed underground roof support systems for coal and limestone mines and built a manufacturing plant in Huntington. Today, J.H. Fletcher & Co. is one of the world's premier manufacturers of underground roof support systems.

Fletcher's daughter, Sally Fletcher Duncan, said, "My parents Bob and Kae Fletcher always felt that an education was of the utmost importance for a young person to achieve success in life. We hope this bequest will help many deserving Marshall students graduate from college and become successful and contributing members of our society."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp praised the Fletcher family for their dedication to the university and the community.

"This gift will continue the tradition of J. H. Fletcher & Co.'s leadership in supporting engineering at Marshall University and will carry on Bob Fletcher's legacy as a leader in catalyzing economic development in this region," Kopp said. "Marshall University owes a debt of gratitude to the Fletchers for their generosity and foresight in establishing this endowed professorship."

The state Legislature created the West Virginia Research Trust Fund in 2008 with an initial appropriation of $15 million for Marshall. The university can tap into this fund to double private gifts that support specific research initiatives linked to economic development, health care and job growth.


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Monday November 12, 2012
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June Harless Center holds Arts and Bots training in Mingo County

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve elementary and middle school science and art teachers from Mingo County took part in training Nov. 5 for Arts and Bots, a program that integrates technology, robotics and art. 

Schools represented included Burch Elementary, Gilbert Middle, Matewan Middle, Williamson Middle, Burch Middle and Mingo Central High School. The training, presented by the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of the College of Education at Marshall University, was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. 

The Arts and Bots project uses familiar arts and crafts supplies, circuit boards, lights, motors and sensors.  Students design, build and program robots that tell stories of literary and historical characters and events while promoting technological literacy and informal learning.

Arts and Bots is one of several projects implemented by the Harless CREATE Satellite, a branch of Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab at the June Harless Center.  The satellite provides robotics and technology initiatives to West Virginia schools including Marshall University Professional Development Schools. 

Due to its success Arts and Bots, originally designed to encourage middle school girls' interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) topics, was expanded to include both genders and a larger age range.  The Harless CREATE Satellite enables educators and rural communities in West Virginia a real-time portal to the flow of cutting-edge technologies and programs being developed at the lab in Pittsburgh.

The vision of the CREATE Lab is to catalyze local and global community change by technologically empowering people to creatively explore, learn, share and directly improve our ecology.  This initiative aligns with the mission of the Harless Center to provide leadership in education initiatives for West Virginia educators and students. 

For more information, contact Dr. Stan Maynard at maynard@marshall.edu or visit marshall.edu/harless and cmucreatelab.org.


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Thursday November 8, 2012
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University Chorus to sing 'The Fountain' by Evan Mack at memorial service Nov. 14



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's University Chorus will be performing a special piece written specifically for Marshall at the 2012 memorial service for victims of the 1970 plane crash. Performing with the chorus will be Dr. Evan Mack, who composed the work.

Mack, a composer, pianist and member of the faculties of Skidmore College and the College of St. Rose, was an artist-in-residence at Marshall in 2009, giving master classes and concerts.

" 'The Fountain' " is a work that Evan Mack composed for the students of Marshall University," said Robert Wray, director of the University Chorus. "It was premiered by the Marshall University Chorus in the spring of 2012."

The memorial service, an annual observance to honor the 75 persons who lost their lives in the 1970 plane crash, will take place this year at noon Wednesday, Nov. 14, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Mack says he found inspiration for the piece in a poem written by 19th Century poet James Russell Lowell, also called "The Fountain."

"Musically it was quite freeing to set the text where the music symbolizes the continuing of life, flowing into each generation," Mack said. "This made it a perfect fit to connect the piece to the Marshall community, rather than just the fountain. The piece is meant to connect students past and present, just like the water circulated through the fountain. This ceremony gives a special connection to students of all generations, something that most colleges and universities can't claim." 

"I was asked to write a new piece, as both the University Chorus and the Chamber Choir were doing a joint concert featuring my music in spring 2012," Mack said. "Having worked with the choirs before, I knew how well they could sing. It took a long time to find the right text; then I found the poem by James Russell Lowell."

Along with premiering "The Fountain," the University Chorus has also premiered Mack's "Langston Hughes' Dream of Freedom," and two of Mack's other pieces. The Chamber Choir premiered his piece "Of Fire and Form."

Mack said his hope for the piece is that it would be something special for the students to premiere a work that was written for them, and that he hopes future choirs can sing this work and feel connected.

In addition to performing with the chorus, Mack will be meeting with students and rehearsing with them while he is at Marshall.

"I am honored that my piece will be sung at this year's ceremony," Mack said. "I am even more excited that I will be playing piano with the chorus at the memorial." 


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Wednesday November 7, 2012
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Poets Carpathios, Good to read from their work Nov. 14



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.- Poets Neil Carpathios and Crystal Good will read from their work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, in the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University. Their appearance is part of the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series.

Carpathios is the author of three full-length poetry collections: Playground of Flesh, At the Axis of Imponderables, and Beyond the Bones. He also writes for the column "Let's Talk Poetry" in The Portsmouth Daily Times, devoted to showcasing work by local poets in the Southern Ohio region. The recipient of fellowships and grants from the Ohio Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts, Carpathios teaches and is Coordinator of Creative Writing at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio.

 

Good is a part of the "Affrilachian" (African-American-Appalachian) poetry movement and the author of the collection Valley Girl. Her poems explore themes in quantum physics, Appalachian culture, gender equality and mountaintop removal. Good is the founding member of OneKanawha, a diversity and anti-racism advocacy group. In 2005, she was honored by Gov. Joe Manchin as a West Virginia Innovative Artist. Currently, she serves as the Director of Brand Experience at Mythology LLC.

The reading is free and open to the public, and a book-signing will follow.

 

For more information, contact Dr. Rachael Peckham in the department of English at 304-696-3649.


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Wednesday November 7, 2012
Contact: Haven Campbell, Marshall University Career Services, 304-696-2370

Marshall University to host fall career webinar series

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - Marshall University Career Services will host a career webinar series for students with important information on how to prepare themselves for life after college. The series features eight career authors and experts who share their knowledge on interviewing, life planning, job search, networking and much more.

"We want to provide as much information as possible to help our students develop the professional skills they need to be successful," said Debby Stoler, assistant director of development and outreach in Career Services. "This series of one-hour seminars is given by experts and experienced professionals and covers a variety of topics that can give students the tools they need to be competitive as they step into the world."

The webinars will take place from 3 to 4 p.m. every Wednesday starting today and running through Dec. 12 at the Career Services office. For detailed information on each webinar visit the Career Services webpage and click on "Events." Students can also register online to watch them from home at http://talentmarks.com/webinar.aspx.

--------------- 
About TalentMarks

TalentMarks provides students, graduates and alumni access to information they will need to build successful careers. By offering career coaching, lifestyle coaching and career courses they hope to push students to be the best they can be. Founded in 2009, the company is continually growing to build relationships and provide excellent, affordable career coaching to anyone who needs it. More information is available at http://www.talentmarks.com/


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Tuesday November 6, 2012
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Cyber safety summit rescheduled for Nov. 28 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's free cyber safety summit, originally scheduled for Oct. 30 but postponed because of weather conditions that day, has been rescheduled to Nov. 28 beginning at 10 a.m., according to John Sammons, assistant professor of Integrated Science and Technology and director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

The summit will take place in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is for adults, college students and younger students aged 12-14.


During the sessions, participants can learn how to prevent cyber bullying, keep themselves and their families safe online, handle the dangers of social media, keep their information and computers safe and identify scams. In addition, they can find out how and why criminals target them and more.


The event is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Science & Technology, the FBI, and the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.


To reserve a seat, e-mail sammons17@gapps.marshall.edu.


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Marshall Theatre to present 'The Arabian Nights' starting Nov. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Theatre Alliance will present Mary Zimmerman's award-winning adaptation of "The Arabian Nights" in a two-week run beginning tomorrow.

Performances begin Wednesday, Nov.7, and continue through Saturday, Nov. 10, this week. Next week, they will start Thursday, Nov. 15, and go through Saturday, Nov. 17. All shows begin at 8 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on the Huntington campus.

Nicole Perrone, assistant professor of theatre at Marshall, said a play such as "The Arabian Nights" provides an invaluable learning opportunity for the students.

"In an educational theatre setting, we're always looking for shows that will provide the right kinds of challenges for our students," Perrone said. "This show relies on the strength of the ensemble most of the 17-member company remains onstage throughout the performance.  Each actor sings, dances, plays a musical instrument and performs many roles."

Perrone also mentioned the importance of costume and stage design for helping the audience believe they have left Huntington behind and, in this instance, traveled to Bagdad. Nicole Peckens designed costumes for "The Arabian Nights" as part of her senior capstone project, and Emily Pritchard composed all original melodies, accompaniment and underscoring, Perrone said.

Perrone said she looks forward to seeing the combination of costumes, music and acting on opening night. She also said parents should be aware the production may not be appropriate for young children, as Zimmerman made a point of choosing the funniest and saddest, yet most erotic, of the "Thousand and One Nights" stories.


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Monday November 5, 2012
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Sharing GIS technology with community purpose of GIS Day 2012 at MU



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate GIS Day 2012, an international, annual, one-day event designed to share with and showcase Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology for the local community, on Wednesday, Nov. 14.

GIS Day 2012 activities at Marshall are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and are sponsored by the geography department, integrated science and technology department, and the Rahall Transportation Institute.  Activities will take place in room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center and in Corbly Hall on the Huntington campus. They will include undergraduate and graduate research posters, a keynote speech from Ranger Frank Sellers from the National Park Service, and activities for students from Spring Valley and Chesapeake high schools. Those students will participate in Google Earth, ArcGIS and GPS contests.


Dr. James M. Leonard, a geography professor and director of the Geography Department GIS Lab at Marshall, said about 40 high school students are expected to attend, and about 20 Marshall students will submit posters.

"And, we expect perhaps an additional 35 Marshall students will show up to view the posters and attend the talk by Ranger Sellers," Leonard said.

Leonard said Sellers, a ranger at New River Gorge National River, is expected to talk about Chief Justice John Marshall's 1812 expedition through the Allegheny Mountains to find a canal route between Richmond, Va., and the Ohio River.  Marshall traveled the New and Greenbrier rivers on this expedition.

The GIS Day events will begin in BE5, where undergraduate and graduate posters will be on display throughout the day.  After an introduction in BE5, the high school students will move to Corbly Hall 332 for two contests - ArcMap and Google Earth.

At 11 a.m., Sellers will present his work in BE5, with lunch following from noon  to 1 p.m.  That's when the GPS contest starts in BE5, although high school students will be walking around campus looking for items as part of the contest.  The wrap-up will be around 2 p.m. in BE5.


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Chamber Choir to present fall concert Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present its fall concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The performance will feature works by Mozart, Brahms, Vaughan Williams, Villa-Lobos and others, Castleberry said.

The Chamber Choir is a select 40-voice ensemble whose recent accomplishments include a 10-day tour of France last spring, during which they performed at Paris's famed Cathedral of Notre Dame and received standing ovations throughout a tour that included additional concerts in Sarlat, Domme, and Nice. A CD compilation from the performance tour will be released later this fall.

Castleberry said membership includes many students preparing for careers in music, but is open to students all across the campus by audition.

"The choir upholds a high standard of excellence each year because of the students who commit themselves to reach as high as they possibly can," Castleberry said. "When you hear them sing, their qualities of focus, dedication and joy in making music are obvious."

Sunday's concert will last approximately one hour. It is free and open to the public. 


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Marshall, St. Joe join Marines in 2012 Toys for Tots regional campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and St. Joseph Catholic Grade School are teaming with the United States Marine Corp Reserves in supporting a drive to collect toys for needy children in the 2012 Toys for Tots regional campaign.

This afternoon at St. Joe, about 80 students in grades K-2 joined Sgt. Victor Arroyo, coordinator of the campaign, and Kelly Sweetman, director of military affairs at Marshall, in a countdown that officially got the campaign under way. It will run through Dec. 7, with distribution to follow. The campaign covers 20 counties - 14 in West Virginia, three in Ohio and three in Kentucky.

Toys for Tots collects new toys to give to children, ages toddler to early teens, who otherwise would do without during the holidays.

Our goal is 4,000 kids and 15,000 toys," Arroyo said. "That way each kid receives three toys."

This is the third consecutive year in which Marshall has teamed with Toys for Tots and St. Joseph in the Toys for Tots campaign. Today, the Marines presented each of the St. Joe students participating in the kickoff with a cup, pencil, ruler and commemorative coin for their hard work the past two holiday seasons.

"It has become something we all look forward to doing each year. This is about community pulling together," Sweetman said of St. Joe's participation in the campaign. "The St. Joe kids do a tremendous job each year collecting toys and handing them out."

Counties included in the campaign are Wayne, Lincoln, Logan, Cabell, Putnam, Kanawha, Mason, Jackson, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Clay, Braxton and Boone in West Virginia; Gallia, Lawrence and Meigs in Ohio; and Boyd, Greenup and Lawrence in Kentucky.

Huntington-area drop-off locations include:

  • Huntington, WV Housing Authority Family Resource Center, 2920 Marcum Terrace, Marvin Gray Family Center Gym
  • Medicap Pharmacy, 4352 5th St. Rd., Huntington
  • Sun Tan City, 2957 5th Ave., Huntington
  • Sun Tan City, 360 Diederich Blvd., Ashland, Ky.
  • Marshall University Memorial Student Center, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington  (beginning Wednesday, Nov. 7)

Arroyo, who was the assistant coordinator last year, will run this year's campaign out of the Teays Valley reserve unit. Photo: Cpt. Steven Dodson, left, listens as Sgt. Victor Arroyo, coordinator of the Toys for Tots campaign, talks with St. Joe students about the campaign. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University. 


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College of Fine Arts to collect items for Cabell County school pantries



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts will host "Pack the Backpack," an event to collect items for Cabell County school pantries, Tuesday, Nov. 13, on the university's Huntington campus.

Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts, said students from the college's Student Leadership Council have organized this initiative in an effort to help stock the school pantries. The students will collect items like nonperishable food, toiletries, bedding and more from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center.

Theresa Rapp, career specialist at Huntington High School, said that donations are greatly appreciated.

"I want to assure you that every single donation, regardless of the size, is certainly needed and appreciated by the students at Huntington High School," Rapp said.

"Every day I encounter a student in need of food or personal care items such as shampoo, deodorant or soap.  I am very grateful that the MU students are extending their support to the community at Huntington High. What a blessing!"

For members of the council, this is an effort to give back to the community that surrounds the campus.

"We believe as the College of Fine Arts Student Leadership Council that giving back to the community is not only a necessity, but that it builds and fosters a spirit among COFA students that cannot be accomplished in any other way," Bradlee Jordan, theatre student and SLC president, said. "When we heard that some schools are trying to ramp up their pantries before Thanksgiving break so they can send items with students who will otherwise go without, we were pleased to be part of the solution."

SLC member and music student Shey Dillon agrees.

"As artists, musicians and students, we feel it is very important to give back to the community that supports us and this wonderful university," Dillon said. "No one is more in need or deserving of this gesture than the many children of Cabell County who go without so many basic necessities. We hope that we can set an example that others will follow."

Martha Evans, principal at Guyandotte Elementary, said she tries diligently to remind her students of the historical bond that they have with Marshall University and that this event is another example of that bond.

"By an act of the Assembly of Virginia in 1809, what is now Guyandotte was established as the county seat of Cabell County," Evans said. "The founding fathers of this community built a school and when their sons had completed the standard education offered there, they wanted more for their sons, so they established 'Hometown Academy,' which eventually became Marshall Academy, the forerunner of Marshall University.  Therefore, Guyandotte exists at the very heart of Marshall University and we continue to respect that heritage."

"I want our students to realize that connection," she said. "I want them to know that if college is the path they want to follow - they can. We want them to connect with Marshall, and eventually attend. My goal is for them to know that they can pursue a college education." 

For more information, contact Ike by phone at 304-633-9251 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu


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Friday November 2, 2012
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Mo Lajterman, brother of crash victim, to speak at memorial service

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mo Lajterman lives in New Jersey and visits Marshall University maybe once every couple of years. Yet, he and all of the Lajtermans, including Mo's brothers, Tito and Abe, have a long-distance relationship with Marshall that Mo describes with one word - family.


Mo Lajterman and his brothers will return to Marshall on Wednesday, Nov. 14, for the annual memorial service celebrating the lives of the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash, including the Lajtermans' brother, Marcelo.


The service starts at noon on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The public is invited to attend the event, which is conducted by the Student Government Association.


This year's visit will be different for Mo Lajterman. He won't be in the memorial service audience; rather, he'll be on the stage as the featured speaker.


"It was very shocking when I got the call from (Athletic Director) Mike Hamrick; I never expected it," Lajterman said. "I'm very honored and very emotional about it, but I had to take a couple of days to think about it. But now, I'm looking forward to it."


Lajterman and his brothers have made the nine-hour drive from New Jersey to Huntington a few times in recent years. They usually spend much of their time on the road talking about Marcelo.


"I'm a very emotional person," said Mo, who was 17 when the plane went down. "I'm not a professional speaker. I try to speak from the heart. It was such a tragic accident and it still feels like it was yesterday. We still cry over it. But these trips to Huntington help. We feel really close to our brother when we make these trips."


The trips didn't happen for many years after the crash. In fact, Mo came to Huntington for the first time - by himself - in 2000 for the premiere of the documentary, "Ashes to Glory."


"I didn't know a soul," he said. "Now, we feel like Marshall's our home."


Marcelo Lajterman was 19 years old when he died in the crash. He was a kicker for the Thundering Herd in 1970. Although it has been 42 years since the crash, the Lajterman family makes sure that Marcelo's name lives on through the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship Fund.


The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., announced establishment of the scholarship in 2008. In 2010, members of the Lajterman family presented the foundation with a check for $23,000 to endow the scholarship. Marcelo wore number 23 on his Herd jersey.


The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970, occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included 36 Marshall football players, nine coaches and administrators, 25 fans and the crew of five.


"The Student Government Association is esteemed to have the privilege of organizing the annual Memorial Ceremony again this year," said Student Body President Ray Harrell Jr. "My chief of staff and the planning committee have done an excellent job with this year's program and we are hopeful that it will serve to honor the victims of this terrible tragedy and their families. I hope that members of the Marshall and Huntington communities will take an hour out of their day to join us for this special event."


In addition to Lajterman and Harrell, others who will speak in the memorial service include Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall Athletic Director Mike Hamrick, Football Coach Doc Holliday and a representative from the Marshall Alumni Association.


Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Sen. Joe Manchin, Rep. Nick Rahall and Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito have been invited to attend and speak.


The service will conclude with the placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath and remain silent until next spring.

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Photo: The photo of Marcelo Lajterman, one of the victims of the Nov. 14, 1970, plane crash, was taken from Marshall's 1970 football media guide. His brother, Mo Lajterman, will speak at the 2012 memorial service for victims of the crash.


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Thursday November 1, 2012
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Marshall University classes resume today in Beckley



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University classes will proceed as normal today and tonight at the Erma Byrd Higher Education Center in Beckley. Marshall had canceled classes Tuesday and Wednesday at the center because of severe weather.

Marshall offers courses at its main campus in Huntington, and branch campuses in South Charleston, Point Pleasant, Teays Valley and Beckley.

 

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Thursday November 1, 2012
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Marshall grad student takes first place in Charleston Toastmasters contest

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate student Irfan Khan took first place at the Mountain Division Table Topics speech contest,  a Toastmasters International-sanctioned event, Oct. 27 in Charleston. Khan has now qualified to compete in the District 40 contest in Cincinnati Nov. 3. At the district level, Toastmasters from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky compete for the title Best Speaker. 

"Table Topics is about developing your ability to organize your thoughts quickly and respond to an impromptu question or topic," said Monica Horter, vice president for public relations of the Huntington Centennial Toastmasters Club, at which Irfan practices his public speaking. "At a meeting, Table Topics usually begins after the prepared speech presentations. The Toastmaster of the meeting will introduce the Topicsmaster, who will walk to the lectern and assume control of the meeting. The Topicsmaster will give a brief description of the purpose of Table Topics and mention if the topics will carry a theme. The Topicsmaster will state the question or topic briefly and then call on a respondent. Each speaker receives a different topic or question and participants are called on at random." 

The Huntington Centennial club is open to the public and welcomes visitors, Horter said. The next meeting will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at the Central Christian Church at 1202 5th Ave. For more information, persons may call Horter at 304-542-6721 or e-mail mhorter1@gmail.com.


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Wednesday October 31, 2012
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Marshall University classes resume today, except those offered at Beckley Center



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University classes will proceed as normal today, except for those offered at the Erma Byrd Higher Education Center in Beckley. Marshall joins Bluefield State College and Concord University in canceling classes at the Beckley Center due to severe weather. 

Marshall offers courses at its main campus in Huntington, and branch campuses in South Charleston, Point Pleasant, Teays Valley and Beckley. 
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Sociology & anthropology speaker series continues Nov. 7 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Richard J. Chacon, an associate professor of anthropology at Winthrop University, will speak on Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the Shawkey Dining Room of the Memorial Student Center (2E28) on Marshall University's Huntington campus.  The presentation and discussion will run from 4 to 6 p.m. 

 

Chacon's presentation, part of the speaker series of Marshall's department of sociology & anthropology, is titled "Conservation or Resource Maximization?  Analyzing Subsistence Hunting Among the Achuar of Ecuador." 

 

In this presentation, Chacon will discuss findings from his extensive anthropological fieldwork experience among the indigenous peoples of South America in which he has employed methodological and theoretical approaches that range from those basic to the biological and health sciences to studies of the role played in natural resource use by particular systems of belief and associated ritual practices.

 

Chacon will examine whether observed behavior among the Achuar (and other indigenous groups of the Americas) can be attributed to Western contact as well as ethical issues raised by his findings.

 

Chacon has conducted anthropological investigations throughout Latin America, documenting the subsistence patterns and belief systems of the Yanomam of Venezuela (known by many as the "Fierce People" through a book of that name by the anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon), the Yora of Peru and the Achuar (Shiwiar) of Ecuador. He has also examined ritual violence among the Otavalo and Cotacachi Indians of Highland Ecuador.

 

His publications include: The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), New York: Springer (2012);  North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), Tucson: University of Arizona Press (2007); Latin American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), Tucson: University of Arizona Press (2007); and The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians (Eds., R. Chacon and D. Dye), Springer: New York (2007).  

 

Chacon's presentation is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be served.

 

For more information, contact Dr. Brian A. Hoey at hoey@marshall.edu.

 


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Tuesday October 30, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall classes canceled Tuesday in South Charleston, Teays Valley and Beckley due to weather

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's South Charleston campus is closed today due to a weather-related power outage, so all classes offered there are canceled and employees should not report to work. 

 

Classes provided by Marshall at Beckley's Erma Byrd Higher Education Center and at the Teays Valley Center in Putnam County are canceled today due to the winter storm. 


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Tuesday October 30, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall classes canceled Tuesday in South Charleston, Teays Valley and Beckley due to weather

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's South Charleston campus is closed today due to a weather-related power outage, so all classes offered there are canceled and employees should not report to work.

Classes provided by Marshall at Beckley's Erma Byrd Higher Education Center and at the Teays Valley Center in Putnam County are canceled today due to the winter storm.


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Monday October 29, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University breaks ground for engineering complex

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University officials, joined by special guests Art and Joan Weisberg and other friends and supporters of the university, broke ground today on a $50 million engineering complex on the Huntington campus.

Construction will begin this week on the 145,000 square-foot, four-story Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex. The facility, which will be one of the largest academic buildings on campus when completed, will be located on Third Avenue between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

 

Construction of the complex is expected to take about 28 months. 

 

Weisberg is president of Arthur's Enterprises, which this past summer made a large gift pledge to the Marshall University Foundation to help pay for the complex.

 

"Today truly is another significant day in the history of Marshall University," President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We are thrilled that Art, Joan and other members of the Weisberg family could join us for this wonderful celebration of this very significant investment in the future of Marshall University, to which they have supported so earnestly. We are very proud and honored that this spectacular building will bear the Weisberg family name."

 

Weisberg's reason for supporting Marshall's engineering program, which now has about 600 students,  is simple: "I love Huntington and I know this gift will make a lasting difference," he said when the gift was announced.

 

President Kopp said interdisciplinary and inter-professional education will be enhanced through the opportunities afforded through the addition of this building.

 

"This new applied engineering complex will move Marshall University and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) majors to the forefront in terms of the quality and caliber of facilities available to support and advance STEM education - especially in new fields of engineering," he said. "The interdisciplinary and integrated learning environments will foster collaborative research and inter-professional education that previously was not available to the University. The idea that you can link engineering with other disciplines in this building is very powerful."

 

Sen. Robert H. Plymale, chairman of the Senate Education Committee, was the lead sponsor of legislation in 2004 that led to the restart of Marshall's engineering program. He said today's groundbreaking proves just how far the program has come in a few short years.

 

"My congratulations to Dr. Kopp and the Weisberg family for recognizing and committing to this project, and its importance to Marshall, the state of West Virginia and the entire country," Plymale said. "I respect the Weisbergs so much and Dr. Kopp for his commitment to seeing this through. This is a defining moment for Marshall University."

 

Plymale said bringing engineering back to Marshall took years of hard work.

 

"It's one of the most satisfying projects I've been involved in," Plymale said. "It's one that I've worked on literally for 20 years."

 

Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the new complex "will not only provide facilities for substantial development of engineering areas like mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and bioengineering, but will enhance our capabilities in specific engineering sub-disciplines such as environmental engineering, transportation engineering and structural engineering as well.

 

"The complex will be the home for all our undergraduate and graduate programs and will essentially give us the opportunity to grow and expand into some areas that are important to the region," he continued. "The completion of the complex will enable us to have state-of-the-art instructional and research facilities and will likely result in significant enrollment increases in all our programs. Undergraduate programs such as engineering, computer science and safety technology are expected to encounter significant expansions."

 

The need for more engineers is on the rise, Zatar said. He said engineers saw a 12 percent growth in hiring demand in September, with more than 184,000 job postings online. And, he said, the national unemployment rate for recently graduated undergraduate engineering students dropped from a little over six percent in 2009 to two percent in 2011.

 

Zatar said projects today are requiring more highly skilled professionals and the nationwide shortage of engineers is evident. He added that engineering and computer science graduates are in high demand and earn salaries above the national average. In fact, he said, engineering graduates have received the highest compensation for graduates from four-year programs.

 

"Professional societies such as the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Society of American Military Engineers are excited to see the resurgence of the engineering program at Marshall University because it will assist in leading our nation into the future," he said. 

 

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, said the impact of the new building will be profound and felt long into the future.

 

"The engineering program will now have a state-of-the-art physical space in which to grow and thrive," Maher said. "In addition, research at Marshall will be immensely enhanced by the proximity of high-tech facilities and faculty along the Third Avenue corridor. Researchers in engineering will now be closer to colleagues in medicine, pharmacy, chemistry, biology and physics, and the offices of the research corporation will be more convenient to the campus community. Marshall's already considerable strengths in collaborative, multidisciplinary research will be taken to new levels by this forward-looking investment."

 

The completion of the engineering complex means Marshall will have added more than $100 million in academic facilities on the north side of Third Avenue from Hal Greer Boulevard to the parking garage across from Cam Henderson Center in just a little over eight years.  The Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center opened in 2006, and the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories opened in 2008.

 

The construction firm BBL Carlton of Charleston will build the engineering complex. The design firms are Bastian & Harris Architects from Charleston and Hastings & Chivetta Architects from St. Louis.

 

-------------------------------

Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, center, leads a ceremonial groundbreaking marking the start of construction of the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex. The event took place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Pictured are, from left, A. Michael Perry, Louis Weisberg, Sen. Robert Plymale, Joan Weisberg, Dr. Kopp, Dr. Wael Zatar, Dr. Chuck Somerville, Dr. John Maher and Chuck Moore. (Below) Joan Weisberg listens as her husband, Arthur Weisberg, speaks to the audience during today's ceremonial groundbreaking at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Construction on the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex begins this week. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday October 26, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia DEP contracts with MU Geography Department to employ student interns to convert paper mine maps to GIS format

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) has sub-contracted with Marshall University's Geography Department to employ student interns to convert paper mine maps to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database format.

The contract for the GeoMine project is actually a renewal of a previous contract that lasted from December 2011 to September 2012. The current contract, which provides an additional $129,000 in funding from the WVDEP, runs through December 2013.

 

"This is a feather in our cap," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "Our Department of Geography offers an outstanding education that allows students to learn both the political-economic-historical perspective of geography as well as the powerful tools used to create complex maps using GIS technology."

 

Dr. James M. Leonard, a geography professor and director of the Geography Department GIS Lab, said the contract has so far employed 12 different undergraduate and graduate students. He said the GeoMine project is a joint venture among several federal agencies, notably the U.S. Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation, and Enforcement and several state-level environmental protection agencies, including the WVDEP.

 

"The project goal is to create a Geographic Information Systems database for monitoring and regulating coal mining in Appalachia," Leonard said. "I expect additional students to be hired as the needs of WVDEP may require.  One hundred percent of the funding has gone to students."


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Friday October 26, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Yeager Symposium focuses on 'Emerging Threats to National Security;' Pulitzer winner Laurie Garrett to speak on bioterrorism

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Laurie Garrett, a nationally known, award-winning author, lecturer and political analyst, will speak on "Bioterrorism: The Modern Peril," at Marshall University Monday, Nov. 5, at the 26th annual Yeager Symposium.

 

Garrett, who has won the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism, the Peabody Broadcasting Award and the George C. Polk Award for Reporting, is senior fellow for global health with the Council on Foreign Relations. She will speak at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

 

The first part of the symposium, titled "The New Terror: Emerging Threats to National Security," will take place Tuesday, Oct. 30.  Dr. Jason Morrissette, a political science professor at Marshall, will speak on "The Politics of Fear: Domestic and Lone-Wolf Terrorism in the U.S." His presentation starts at 7 p.m. in  room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

 

Yeager Scholars Shaina Taylor and Rikki Miller, co-chairs of the symposium, said Garrett was their first choice to be the speaker on bioterrorism.

 

"Her body of work is outstanding from any point of view," Taylor said. "Rikki and I worked tirelessly to bring her to Marshall, and we were overjoyed when we received her confirmation. What makes Garrett so special, though, is not only her lengthy list of accomplishments but her ability to present dense scientific material in a way that is both accessible and easy to understand."

 

Garrett was one of three scientific consultants on the Warner Bros. film "Contagion." She is the author of multiple books, including The Coming Plague, Betrayal of Trust and I Heard the Sirens Scream.

 

Morrissette's expertise is in World Politics, Conflict and Security, Post-Soviet Politics and Environmental Politics. He was one of three faculty members who received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2010.

 

"We really wanted to showcase some of Marshall's own talent," Taylor said. "He is extremely knowledgeable on the topic, and his lecture style is very much engaging." 

 

Taylor and Miller, both seniors, said they wanted to select a topic for the lecture series that had as much broad, interdisciplinary appeal as possible.

 

"Finding a way to fuse politics and biology was not always necessarily easy or evident to us in the early stages of the planning process, but we eventually settled upon the umbrella concept of terrorism in the 21st Century, which allowed us to feature speakers on domestic and lone-wolf terrorism as well as bio-terror," Taylor said. "We felt that this topic not only had broad appeal, but that it also spoke to many fears and anxieties relevant to the American people today."

 

Both events are free to the public. A book signing will follow Garrett's presentation.


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Thursday October 25, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall Opera Theatre to present 'Amahl and the Night Visitors' Nov. 9 and 10



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Opera Theatre, together with the Sanctuary Choir of Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, will present the beloved seasonal opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors,"  at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, and 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10,  at Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church at 513 10th St. in Huntington.

The one-act opera by composer Gian-Carlo Menotti is one of the most popular operas in the repertoire and has been enjoyed by audiences around the world, said Linda Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall University and director of the opera. Its story of the power of love delivers a potent message in today's world. Amahl, a poor crippled shepherd boy, and his mother receive a brief visit from the Three Kings who are on their way to see the newborn Christ child. When Amahl is miraculously cured, he joins the kings in their journey to celebrate the new child's birth.

"We are pleased to feature two young Huntington singers, Majesty Hill and Ethan Proctor, who will share the part of Amahl," Dobbs said. "We also welcome Marshall alumna and adjunct professor Marlayna Maynard who will sing the Mother."

The cast also includes Marshall University vocal students, including Sean Price, Robert Nunez and Sean Link, who portray the kings. They are joined by dancers directed by Ella Hay from the Art Center School of Dance. 


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Thursday October 25, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Maniacs, SGA co-hosting tailgate before MU plays UCF



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Maniacs and the Marshall University Student Government Association are co-hosting a tailgate Saturday before the Thundering Herd's home football game with UCF.

The tailgate is located just outside Joan C. Edwards Stadium, on the practice football field next to the weight room. The tailgate festivities run from 4 to 7 p.m., and the game kicks off at 8:04 p.m.

The tailgate is sponsored by Fat Patty's and will be staffed by Sodexo. The first 100 students attending receive a free burger from Fat Patty's.

Fat Patty's also is offering 300 wings with three different flavors. Sodexo is catering more than 200 hot dogs and two side dishes, and cold beverages will be served.

All Marshall University students are encouraged and allowed to attend as long as they can provide their student I.D. cards and a valid "901" number to the staff hosting the event. Admission is free.
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Wednesday October 24, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word does well against nationally ranked teams

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Thundering Word speech and debate team finished third in a two-day combined team sweepstakes event at West Chester University near Philadelphia the weekend of Oct. 13-14.

 

Several nationally ranked teams competed, including George Mason University and Lafayette College. Other teams competing were Bowling Green State University, West Chester University, St. Joseph's University, Cedar Crest College, James Madison University, Northern Virginia Community College, Nassau Community College, Suffolk Community College and Lincoln University.

 

On Saturday, during the alumni portion of the swing tournament, Marshall was sixth in the team sweepstakes competition. Individual finalists included:

  • Christian Adams, a junior psychology/pre-med major from Ona, W.Va., was sixth in Poetry Interpretation and sixth in Prose Interpretation.
  • Victoria Ledford, a sophomore chemistry/pre-med major from Burnsville, W.Va., was sixth in Communication Analysis.
  • Taryss Mandt, a freshman University College student from Arlington, Va., was sixth in Programmed Oral Interpretation and fourth in Informative Speaking.

During the Honors portion of the swing tournament on Sunday, Marshall finished in third place in the team competition. Individual standouts included:

  • Ledford placed second in Communication Analysis, second in Persuasion and fifth in Duo Interpretation with Adams. Adams also placed fifth in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Mandt placed third in Programmed Oral Interpretation and third in Informative Speaking.
  • Erin Jorden, a freshman history education major from Wheeling, W.Va., was third in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Josh Gainer, a junior political science major, placed sixth in Poetry Interpretation.

The week before the West Chester event, Marshall sophomore Matt Osteen, competing for the Thundering Word, was the champion of both tournaments in a two-day debate tournament at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa.

Osteen, a bio-chemistry/pre-med major from Jefferson, W.Va., was Marshall's lone debater. In addition to his two championships, he was awarded the third-best speaker award at both tournaments, helping Marshall place third in the two-day competition.

 

Marshall Coach Danny Ray said the tournament is considered one of the most competitive in the nation.


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Wednesday October 24, 2012
Contact: Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Autism Society board to meet at Marshall University this weekend, 304-696-2332

Autism Society board to meet at Marshall University this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Autism Society of America has selected the West Virginia Autism Training Center and Marshall University's Huntington campus as the site for its fall board of directors meeting, which will take place Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27.

"The board of directors is honored to convene this weekend at Marshall University, an institution highly regarded as a national leader supporting students with autism," said Jim Ball, executive chairman of the Autism Society Board of Directors. "The Autism Society commends Marshall University on its many years of positive work, including supporting the society's initiatives to make college more accessible for those on the spectrum. West Virginia also has special significance as the home state of Ruth Sullivan, the first president of the Autism Society, who has given so much of herself to the organization and its cause for the last 47 years."

The Autism Society, the nation's leading grassroots autism organization, exists to improve the lives of all affected by autism. This is accomplished by increasing public awareness about the day-to-day issues faced by people on the spectrum, advocating for appropriate services for individuals across the lifespan, and providing the latest information regarding treatment, education, research and advocacy.

"We are excited to welcome the Autism Society board of directors to Marshall University and honored to have been selected as the site for their fall meeting," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center.  "We will have the opportunity to provide the board with presentations about our work with families and educators of individuals with autism spectrum disorders throughout our state. We will also highlight our College Support Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome, which has become a national model for universities throughout the United States."

The West Virginia Autism Training Center was established by the West Virginia Legislature in 1983 and housed at Marshall University. Since that time, the center has served more than 2,500 West Virginians with autism spectrum disorders and their families, educators and others significant in their lives. A variety of resources and services are offered statewide, including a direct service intervention model called Family Focus Positive Behavior Support. The mission of the center is to provide support to individuals with autism spectrum disorders as they pursue a life of quality.

The Autism Society board will meet at the West Virginia Autism Training Center conference room in Old Main, room 315, at 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. There will be a reception that Friday from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the John Marshall Room at the Memorial Student Center. The board meeting will continue its meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center. The public is welcome, Becker-Cottrill said.


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Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Grant to support mine safety research at Marshall University


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) at Marshall University is receiving $96,306 from the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration to support mine safety research.

 

Researchers at CEGAS will use the grant funds over the next year to develop a computer program to perform mine ventilation network planning calculations. The program will simulate a mine's ventilation system and its response to altered conditions, including external influences such as temperatures and internal influences such as mine fires.

 

The CEGAS researchers plan to incorporate the program into a virtual mine safety training academy to produce realistic mine emergency response exercises.

 

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, will serve as the principal investigator on the grant. He will be supported by research associates Dr. Jack Smith, who also serves as co-principal investigator, and Justin Chapman, as well as IT services manager Mark Lewis.

 

"This program, which we call VFIRE, will be a unique educational and training tool," Szwilski said. "Using the Internet, students and trainees will be able to log into a virtual underground mine from anywhere. They will be able to perform realistic mine emergency response exercises in collaboration with other participants, while interacting with a simulated ventilation system. We are confident VFIRE will be an innovative product that will have numerous applications including mine safety and training."

 

The grant is being awarded through the Brookwood-Sago program, which provides education and training within the mining industry. The funding is used to develop and implement training and related materials for mine emergency preparedness, as well as for the prevention of accidents in underground mines.

 

"We can never over-emphasize the importance of training, especially in the area of mine emergency response," said Joseph A. Main, assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health, when the awards were made last month. "These grants enable organizations that are dedicated to mine safety to develop programs that may one day save miners' lives."

 

The Brookwood-Sago program was established through a provision in the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006. The grants were named in remembrance of 13 men who died in two explosions at the Jim Walter Resources Inc. No. 5 Mine in Brookwood, Ala., in 2001, and 12 men who died in an explosion at the Sago Mine in Tallmansville, W.Va., in 2006.

 


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Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University launching DegreeWorks

Program enables students, faculty to easily view students' academic progress

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is in the process of launching DegreeWorks, a degree-auditing and tracking tool to be used by both faculty and students.


The program is currently available to all faculty and academic advisors and will be available to students through their myMU account starting Wednesday, Oct. 24.


Students are encouraged to stop by the Memorial Student Center between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday to learn more about the program and how to use it. Students who visit the information table during that time can register to win an iPad or free books for the spring semester (up to a $500 value).


DegreeWorks is used to track students' academic achievement based on the requirements for his or her selected major as determined by the Marshall University course catalog.


Using DegreeWorks, students and faculty can easily view the students' academic progress toward a degree, review the requirements already completed, and use the provided information to plan out the remaining requirements to complete a degree at Marshall University.


Dr. Corley Dennison, associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies, said the program is easy to use and will assist students with class registration.


"DegreeWorks allows students up to the minute tracking on the path to graduation," Dennison said. "With a couple of mouse clicks, students will see the courses they've taken and the classes they need to take."


DegreeWorks provides students with information that helps them focus on academic goals and how to achieve them. The program also includes a feature to help students who are considering changing majors.


To learn more about DegreeWorks, visit www.marshall.edu/degreeworks or contact the Student Resource Center.


Starting Wednesday, Oct. 24, students can log in to DegreeWorks and begin using its reporting and auditing capabilities. To do so, students should log in to myMU, and click on the DegreeWorks link on the Student Information tab.


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Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall senior new president of National Student Council for SAME

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nathan S O'Kane, a Marshall University senior from Alexandria, Va., is the new president of the National Student Council for the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME). 

 

"It's an honor, absolutely," O'Kane said of being elected in January of 2012 and taking office as president at the beginning of the 2012 fall semester. "I'm very proud to do this. It feels good to represent Marshall University."

 

SAME is the premier professional military engineering association in the United States, facilitating interaction between the public and private sectors to enhance engineering support to national security.

 

Its membership comprises more than 20,000 leaders representing the uniformed military services as well as numerous government agencies, nonprofit associations, academic institutions and private-sector firms.

 

O'Kane, who will graduate from Marshall next May with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.), said SAME has 49 student chapters, with representatives from each region of the continental United States. The national student chapter membership has reached about 750.

 

At a student chapter workshop earlier this month in St. Louis, representatives from the different regions discussed successes of student chapters and challenges they face. They agreed on the idea of creating an annual report "to measure the student chapters' health," O'Kane said. Also, student chapters can now earn the honor of "distinguished chapter," he said.

 

"That's something to strive for," O'Kane said. "We got a lot done. Most importantly, we came up with a way of measuring the health of the student chapters. None of the chapters are the same. This has to do with the big picture and how close they are following the strategic plan developed by SAME."

 

Jeff Huffman, an assistant professor of engineering at Marshall and faculty adviser for the student chapter of SAME-ASCE (a dual chapter involved with both the Society of American Military Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers), said O'Kane has a "high energy level."

 

"Nathan energized our MU student chapter as president in 2011-2012 and I am positive that he will do the same for the National Student Council of SAME," Huffman said.


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Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall, RCBI host roundtable discussion to celebrate Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge awards

University to partner in federal jobs initiative


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and its Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI) hosted a roundtable discussion focused on spurring job growth in regional economies. Marshall was selected to host the event, which was convened by U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, because the university and RCBI are key players in one of two West Virginia projects recently selected for funding through the federal Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge.

 

At the roundtable held at the RCBI facility in Huntington, Rahall, officials from Marshall and representatives from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration (EDA), the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development joined local businesses to discuss how federal investments in southern West Virginia can facilitate economic growth and job creation in the region.

 

Officials joining Rahall for the roundtable included Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president, Marshall University; Matt Erskine, acting assistant secretary for economic development, U.S. Department of Commerce; Earl Gohl, federal co-chairman of the Appalachian Regional Commission; Bobby Lewis, state director, rural development, U.S. Department of Agriculture; and Keith Burdette, secretary, West Virginia Department of Commerce.

 

Rounding out the panel were representatives of RCBI, Concord University, TechConnect West Virginia, the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, Carbon Fiber Composites, Collaborative for the 21st Century, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the West Virginia Community Development Hub and the National Capital Investment Fund. The moderator was Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research.

 

Panel participants addressed a number of topics, including the network of partnerships that will carry out the Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge projects, the state of entrepreneurship and how the grants will advance other economic development activities in the region.

 

The two West Virginia projects funded through the Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge include the Southern West Virginia Rural Jobs Accelerator, which will receive $717,985 in federal funds, and the West Virginia Value Chain Cluster Initiative, which was awarded $815,000. The West Virginia initiatives were two of 13 funded from a national pool of 62 applicants.

 

In the Southern West Virginia Rural Jobs Accelerator, the Marshall University Research Corporation and RCBI are partnering with TechConnect West Virginia, the Concord University Research and Development Corporation, and the National Capital Investment Fund on an effort to create new jobs in southern West Virginia. The partners will use the grant funding to concentrate on the expansion of manufacturing and tourism by providing technical assistance, workforce development, entrepreneurism support and a wealth of collaborated resources in Fayette, Logan, McDowell, Mercer, Mingo, Monroe, Raleigh, Summers and Wyoming counties.

 

The second award, for the West Virginia Value Chain Cluster Initiative, is a statewide project that will expand the business and financial capacity of four regional food-related "value chain clusters." It will deliver a comprehensive and integrated set of hands-on technical assistance and coaching services that will further strengthen management, operational and financial expertise of the clusters. The primary objective is to support the clusters' ability to increase capacity and extend their impact and the long-term sustainability of their value chains.

 

The Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge is an interagency collaboration combining the resources of the EDA, the USDA, the ARC and the Delta Regional Authority into one funding opportunity focused on regional approaches to rural economic growth. The competition was established last summer to bring greater federal attention and collaboration to the needs of rural communities and spur job creation and economic growth in rural regions across the country.


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Monday October 22, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cyber safety summit takes place Oct. 30 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is sponsoring a free cyber safety summit beginning at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30, according to John Sammons, assistant professor of Integrated Science and Technology and director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

 

The summit will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse and the Memorial Student Center  on the Huntington campus from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is for adults, college students and younger students aged 12-14.

 

During the sessions, participants can learn how to prevent cyber bullying, keep themselves and their families safe online, handle the dangers of social media, keep their information and computers safe and identify scams. In addition, they can find out how and why criminals target them and more.

 

The event is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Science & Technology, the FBI, and the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

 

To reserve a seat, e-mail sammons17@gapps.marshall.edu.


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Monday October 22, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Biomedical sciences doctoral students take top awards at regional conference


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two biomedical sciences doctoral students from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine captured first place in both categories of a research competition held earlier this month in conjunction with the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference.

 

They were among more than 40 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows from Marshall, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky and Ohio University competing at the conference, which was held Oct. 12 at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at Charleston Area Medical Center.

 

Marshall biomedical sciences Ph.D. candidate Johannes Fahrmann received first place in the oral presentation category of the competition for a presentation about his research to explore the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in late stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

 

Rounak Nande, who is also a doctoral student in the university's biomedical sciences program, was awarded first place in the poster category for a poster describing his project to help develop a delivery system for targeted gene therapy to improve the treatment of prostate cancer.

 

Fahrmann said the conference was a valuable experience and he hopes to continue his involvement with the event in the future.

 

"The conference was aimed at networking, collaborations and showcasing the research being conducted by students at the attending universities," he added. "I was given the honor and privilege to represent Marshall University through an oral presentation describing my cancer research, and was very pleased to receive the overall award. Neither the award nor the conference itself could have come to fruition without the dedicated work of the organizing committee, which included our own graduate student Allison Wolf."

 

He also expressed appreciation to his faculty mentor, Dr. Elaine Hardman, Marshall professor of biochemistry and microbiology.

 

Hardman praised Fahrmann's work, saying, "Johannes is an outstanding senior graduate student who will do well in research. The presentation he made was completely his own work he developed the idea, wrote a grant, obtained the funding to do the work and has excellent results. His work has clear clinical relevance and, we hope, will apply to enhancing cancer therapy in the near future. He is a leader in the department and an outstanding role model for the younger graduate students. I am delighted with his success and to have him for a student."

 

Nande said of the experience, "I, too, felt privileged to take part in the first-ever ARCC conference put together by the four universities. I would like to thank my mentor at Marshall, Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, and my collaborators from the Tri-State Regional Cancer Center in Ashland, Ky., Dr. Michael Gossman and Dr. Jeffrey Lopez, for having confidence in me to present our research."

 

Claudio, who is an associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology and director of the McKown Translational Genomics Research Institute, said he was pleased with Nande's success at the conference and emphasized the potential importance of the student's research.

 

"A major challenge for effective gene therapy is the ability to specifically deliver nucleic acids and potentially toxic gene products directly into diseased tissue. This system Ron helped develop in our lab allows for the specific delivery of smart biological drugs to diseased tissues using the blood stream. The advantage of this technique is that the therapeutic viruses are released in a concentrated manner in the diseased tissue, eliciting an enhanced therapeutic effect while minimizing complications," added Claudio.

 

Two additional Marshall graduate students, Kristeena Ray and Sarah Mathis, were selected as winners in their categories of the poster competition Ray for a poster showcasing her research into the role of epigenetics in endometriosis-associated pain and Mathis for a poster describing her work to help develop a test that could make possible individualized chemotherapy treatments. Ray works in the lab of Dr. Nalini Santanam, Marshall professor of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology. Claudio serves as Mathis's faculty mentor.

 

The conference was organized and hosted by the four institutions with the goal of expanding the field of cell biology research and fostering interactions among scientists at the universities in the Ohio Valley/mid-Appalachian region. In addition to the oral and poster presentations, the program featured keynote speaker Dr. Vinay Pathak, a senior investigator in HIV drug resistance at the National Cancer Institute, and networking opportunities for more than 80 students and faculty members who participated in the program. The conference was funded through a grant from the American Society for Cell Biology.

 

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Photo:  Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine biomedical sciences Ph.D. students Johannes Fahrmann, standing, and Rounak Nande, seated, captured first place in their respective categories at a research competition held earlier this month in conjunction with the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference. Fahrmann won the oral presentation category and Nande took first place in the poster category. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Monday October 22, 2012
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Storyteller, educator among those recognized with 'Because of You' awards for contributions to coalfields heritage



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A retired miner who travels the state telling schoolchildren about the early days of the industry and the coordinator of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College's mine management program were among nine people recognized earlier this month with "Because of You" awards for significant contributions to the state's coalfields heritage. The awards were presented as part of the 2012 Miners' Celebration held Oct. 4 at Tamarack.

Those honored at the celebration included (with links to YouTube videos about each honoree shown at the ceremony) Bill Alderman, assistant professor and coordinator of the mine management program at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College (Educator of the Year Award); John W. Brown III, former president of Brown Equipment and Machine (Equipment Innovation Award - posthumous); Chuck Farmer, president of Rouster Wire Rope and Rigging (Equipment Innovation Award); Clarence Martin, chief executive officer/chief financial officer of State Electric Supply Company (Management Professional Award); Kenneth Perdue, director of safety operations at Alpha Natural Resources (Safety Professional Award); Fred Powers, storyteller and retired miner (Community Involvement Award); Page Reed, owner of Emerald Marine Products Corporation (Engineering Award); Linda Raines Torre, owner of Decota Consulting Company Inc. (Women in Mining Award); and Art Weisberg, owner and founder of State Electric Supply Company (Community Investment Award).

McDowell County native and bestselling author Homer Hickam, who wrote "Rocket Boys" and other memoirs about growing up in the mining community of Coalwood, also was on hand to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award. The program concluded with a salute to the community effort to build a memorial to the victims of the Upper Big Branch mine disaster. The monument, which stands along state Route 3 in Whitesville, was dedicated in July.

Approximately 200 representatives of the state's mining industry gathered for the conference, which also highlighted successes in coalfield community development.

The Miners' Celebration was a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; Strategic Solutions LLC; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

Sponsors included Marshall University, State Electric Supply Co., the West Virginia Division of Energy and West Virginia Executive. Contributors were Alpha Natural Resources, Brickstreet Insurance, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP and The State Journal.

For more information about the 2012 Miners' Celebration or the "Because of You" awards, contact Dennis Jarvis at 304-696-3506.


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Friday October 19, 2012
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall University Forensic Science professor presents research at international meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program, presented research results at the International Symposium of Fire Investigation Science and Technology (ISFI 2012) meeting at the University of Maryland, College Park, Oct. 15-17.

 

ISFI 2012 was the fifth presentation of this biennial professional symposium emphasizing the application of modern fire science and technology to fire investigations and analyses.

 

ISFI 2012 accepted more than 60 papers covering the entire spectrum of fire investigation science and technology. Fire investigation scientists and experts from 10 countries across four continents presented papers. The international gathering was organized by the National Association of Fire Investigators (NAFI).

 

Rankin's presentation is based on research by Dana Greely, MSFS (May 2012) who is currently working as a trace evidence chemist for the Hamilton County Coroner's Office in Cincinnati, Ohio.  At the Tri-State  Fire Academy in Huntington, Greely and Bob Sullivan, Certified Fire Investigator for the Cabell County Prosecutor's Office, performed a number of control burns of gasoline and kerosene on carpet resulting in "pour patterns" sometimes found at fire scenes where such liquids were used as accelerants.  Her subsequent measurement of the residual liquids in the burned carpet has overturned the "traditional wisdom" about where to best sample pour patterns at a fire scene. 

 

Greely previously presented her research at a meeting of the West Virginia Chapter of the International Association of Arson Investigators in the fall of 2011 and at the American Academy of Forensic Science in Atlanta last February.  "Her presentation in the fall 2011 led to an opportunity to do a full scale burn of a house in Parkersburg used for fire training," Rankin said.  Results of that full scale burn confirmed the smaller scale tests at the West Virginia Fire Academy in Huntington and are included in the presentation at the ISFI 2012 meeting.

 

This research was supported by the cooperative agreement "Interpretation of Ignitable Liquid Residues in Fire Debris Analysis: Effect of Competitive Adsorption, Development of an Expert System and Assessment of the False Positive/Incorrect Assignment Rate," project number 2010-DN-BX-K272 through the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The project is slated to continue through 2013.  Five Marshall graduate students currently are participating in the project along with Dr. Nicholas Petraco, an associate professor at the City University of New York.  Rankin is the principal investigator of the project.


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Marvin L. Stone Library at Marshall rededicated



School of Journalism celebrates opening of Marvin L. Stone Reading Room

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marvin L. Stone Library at Marshall University was rededicated today during a ceremony in The Parthenon student newspaper newsroom on the Huntington campus. 

 

The highlight of the rededication was a ribbon cutting that marked the official opening of the Marvin L. Stone Reading Room, which is now located inside the newsroom. Terry Stone, Marvin Stone's widow, was on hand to cut the ribbon.

 

"He would be so proud," Terry Stone said of her late husband as she addressed the crowd.

 

Stone was a 1947 Marshall alumnus, graduating from the School of Journalism. He was best known as Editor-in-Chief of U.S. News & World Report, and had a career in journalism that spanned 40 years.

 

The Marvin L. Stone Reading Room has many items on display, including some of his papers and personal items. Those include letters from Presidents Jimmy Carter, George Bush and Ronald Reagan, and press credentials that gave Stone access to many major events. Students can access Stone digital archives from the reading room.

 

The Parthenon newsroom was packed with students, staff, faculty and guests, including Marvin L. Stone's cousin, Michael Clark, and his daughter, Jamie Stone, for the ribbon cutting. The reading room formerly was used by journalism broadcast students for editing. 

 

"The students are curious about the room back here," said Dr. George Arnold, a former MU journalism professor and colleague of Stone's. "They want to know more about Marvin Stone."

 

And they will, said Janet Dooley, interim dean of the School of Journalism.

 

"We, as professors, can tell the stories, but here, with gifts from the Stone family and several items lent from the (Marvin) Stone collection ( in the Drinko Library), we're surrounded by only a few of the markers of his career and life. His legacy becomes very real and tangible to visitors."

 

Terry Stone said her husband was very dedicated to Marshall.

 

"I think it was the fact that he learned so much and he was appreciated so much, even as a student," she said. "He was a typical newsman and I reveled in the fact that he knew people, helped people and did what he wanted to do. It just made me very proud of him."

 

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Photo: Terry Stone cuts the ribbon to officially open the Marvin L. Stone Reading Room at Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University. 


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Friday October 19, 2012
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Celebration of Octubafest includes two events on Huntington campus



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University Tuba and Euphonium Studio will present solo performances to kick off the annual celebration of Octubafest.  The first of two events will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, in the Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Marshall's Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, "Tubonium," will perform a concert with an array of Halloween-themed compositions to celebrate TUBAWEEN!  This year the program will feature a combined ensemble including Marshall University Department of Music students and faculty, local high school students and community members. Everyone is invited to attend and enjoy the festive costumes, decorations and free candy.  There will be "kid-friendly" activities and costumes are welcome.  The concert will be at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29, in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus.

 

"This year's tuba/euphonium ensemble is the largest in the history of the university," said Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba. "Along with their high school guests the ensemble will feature nearly 30 tuba and euphonium players in full Halloween costume.  Be sure to come early for candy and the legendary pumpkin chocolate chip cookies!"


Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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Thursday October 18, 2012
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Countdown to Commencement is Nov. 7-8 at Marshall University



Graduates can take care of pre-commencement responsibilities in central location

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct Countdown to Commencement from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 7 and 8, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

 

The purpose of Countdown to Commencement is to assist those participating in this year's winter commencement, set for 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16, at Cam Henderson Center, in preparation for the event. It is designed to assist graduates in communicating with campus administrative offices in a central location.

 

"Countdown to Commencement has  proven to be very popular among our graduates, both in the winter and the spring," said MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson. "With everything in a central location, it saves them a lot of running as they take care of those pre-commencement responsibilities. We encourage everyone who plans to take part in the December ceremony to come by on November 7th or 8th."

 

Winter commencement is for July, August and December 2012 graduates.

 

The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement:

 

Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diploma; confirm commencement participation; obtain commencement instructions; receive recognition cords for military service or ROTC; pick up honor cords and tassels (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to ask any questions related to commencement.

 

Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their caps and gowns, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings, graduation announcements and much more. They also can order personalized graduation announcements at this time.

 

Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2012 rings. All rings are on sale and priced as low as $169 for women and $189 for men.

 

Classic Photography - Cap and Gown portraits will be taken. There is no sitting fee, no obligation to purchase and free proofs will be available within 24 hours of the sitting.

 

Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

 

Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

 

Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career paths. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for JOBTRAX (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

 

Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan counseling interviews.

 

Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about federal student loan consolidation programs.

 

Campus ID Office - Issues regarding students' HigherOne accounts or Points accounts may be resolved.

 

Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.

 

For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Thursday October 18, 2012
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Marshall student broadcaster twice named national finalist

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Leannda Carey, a student broadcaster with WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, was twice named a national finalist in the 2011 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the categories of radio sports reporting and radio in-depth reporting, respectively.

The awards were presented at the recent SPJ Convention and National Journalism Conference at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists.  WMUL-FM Station Manager Leannda Carey twice received recognition in the SPJ's National Mark of Excellence Contest for her work and that is no small accomplishment," said  Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

"These national finalist awards are further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications."

The national finalist award-winning entry in radio sports reporting 4-year college/university category from Marshall was:

 "The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Carey, a graduate student from Wellsburg. It was broadcast during the Marshall vs. Ohio University football pre-game show in Athens, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011.

The national finalist award-winning entry in radio in-depth reporting 4-year college/university category from Marshall was:

"Minding the Meters:  Huntington Municipal Parking Board," written and produced by Carey. It was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, April 28, 2011.

Overall there are 39 categories for print, radio, television and online journalism in the SPJ National Mark of Excellence contest.  There were approximately 4,000 entries from schools across SPJ's 12 regions in the contest.  SPJ has been presenting the Mark of Excellence Awards since 1972.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
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Weekend at Marshall features marching festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host the Tri-State Marching Festival Saturday, Oct. 20. Band performances begin at 11 a.m. in Joan C. Edwards Stadium on Marshall's Huntington campus. Stadium gates will open at 10:15 a.m.

According to Marshall's band director, Steve Barnett, this is the largest band festival of its kind in this part of the country. Bands from West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and Virginia have been separated into categories based on the number of performers.

Marshall's Marching Thunder will also perform an exhibition at the conclusion of the performances at approximately 9 p.m.

Admission to the festival is $5 per person of school age and up. Public parking will be available for $2 in the south end of the west stadium parking lot until the lot is full. After that, patrons may park in the garage on Third Avenue and any other available spaces near the stadium.

"The Tri-State Marching Festival is a tremendous opportunity to showcase Marshall University," Barnett said. "We expect to bring more than 10,000 to the stadium, many of whom are prospective college students, with their parents."

The event is sponsored by Marching Thunder and Kappa Kappa Psi, the band honorary fraternity.


Click to view schedule.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
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First Unity Walk Celebration expected to draw hundreds of MU students



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Hundreds of Marshall University students are expected to gather on the Huntington campus on Wednesday, Oct. 24, to take part in the first We Are Family! Unity Walk Celebration.

Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said the event was created to give all Marshall students the opportunity to come together to celebrate their unity and the fact that they are all part of the same "family," and to recognize their individual differences.

"We all rejoice and celebrate being a part of the Marshall family," Cooley said. "I don't know of any other university where students have as much pride and exhilaration about their university as Marshall University students. We recognize that with the massive amount of students and the large number of organizations, we are all part of the same family, but we have never come together to celebrate together. We've never celebrated as a family."

That's the goal - to celebrate as a family - of Cooley and the Center for African American Students' Programs, the Student Government Association, Student Affairs, Greek Affairs, the Athletic Department and Residence Services, all of which are sponsoring the event.

"We want to increase and instill more pride in who we are," Cooley said. "We are all Marshall."

The Unity Walk Celebration begins at 6 p.m. at or near the Memorial Student Center plaza. Students who are not affiliated with any organization will meet on the plaza. Students from organizations will meet in groups in a line expected to extend from Buskirk Field to Old Main to Drinko Library to Corbly Hall. Cooley is expecting more than 500 students to participate.

A DJ on the plaza will "crank up," Cooley said, the song "We Are Family," which will be the cue for the student organizations to begin walking toward the plaza, where they will meet up with the other students. Many will be carrying banners, Cooley said, and each group will have its own chant.

"They'll arrive here on the plaza and we will have celebratory music," Cooley said. Each group will have a designated speaker, who will talk for 30 seconds. The students will then be treated to food and drinks. 

Cooley said all student organizations, including all athletic teams, are expected to be represented.

Faculty and staff are invited to participate, as are Marshall alumni in the community. Cooley said he already has received requests to conduct the event as part of homecoming activities beginning next year.
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Wednesday October 17, 2012
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Marshall University International Festival celebrates diversity

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Tri-State's international community is diverse and growing. From students to professionals, people from all over the globe now call our region home. On Saturday, Nov. 3, local residents will have a new opportunity to learn more about the traditions and foods of other cultures.

 

Marshall University's International Festival, now in its 49th year, will take things to a new level when the event moves to the Big Sandy Superstore Arena after outgrowing its previous location on Marshall University's Huntington campus. International restaurants from the Tri-State area will join the event featuring sample size portions of their cuisine for festivalgoers.

 

The festival is open to the public from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 3 and is free of charge to enter. Food tickets will be available for purchase, allowing guests to sample a variety of dishes from all around the world.

 

More than 400 international students and members of the Tri-State community representing 60 countries will set up displays about their native cultures, dress and music.

 

"This is a great step forward for a long-running Marshall event," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs.

 

Music and dance from many different countries and cultures will also be featured, including Middle Eastern music and dance by TarabRaqs and Latin music by Comparsa!.

"We're using all the genres to engage with the world without having to leave Huntington," Egnor said.

 

Sponsored by FoodFair Supermarkets, the Marshall University International Festival is partnering with Cabell County Schools and Mountwest Community and Technical College to expand the festival and provide a memorable experience for all ages, including children and families.

 

Participating restaurants include: The Original Hibachi Japanese Steakhouse; El Ranchito - Authentic Mexican Restaurant; Crumpets & Tea (British menu); Mama Rosa's (Mediterranean menu); Nawab Indian Cuisine; Wonderful Chinese Restaurant; Thai House Restaurant; The Red Door - A Gathering Place . . . (Ciao Bella Healthy Italian); La Famiglia - A Southern Italian Deli and Marshall Dining by Sodexo.

 

For more information about the festival and more about the participating restaurants, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
Contact: Haven Campbell, Marketing & Event Graduate Assistant, 304-696-2370

Career Services to feature etiquette expert at upcoming dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its biannual etiquette dinner, featuring etiquette consultant Terri Thompson, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, in Memorial Student Center room BE5, located on the lower level.

During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, and answer any questions students might have.

All current Marshall students are encouraged to attend. However, juniors and seniors will be given preference. Professional dress is required.

Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services Center. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner. Cancellations must be made within 72 hours of the event to receive a full refund.

This fall will mark the seventh time Thompson has attended the event. Thompson is an etiquette coach and reinvention expert who started the companies, Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

For more information, contact Career Services by phone at 304-696-2370 or by e-mail at  career-services@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Cycling Club plans Spin-a-thon for Daniel Hughes



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Cycling Club will host a Spin-a-thon at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25.

The Spin-a-thon will consist of three 30-minute spin classes (7 to 7:30 p.m., 7:45 to 8:15 p.m., and 8:30 to 9 p.m.) and will be instructed by Stephanie Vlahos. The proceeds from the event will go to benefit Daniel Hughes, a local teen who was hit by a dump truck while riding his bike to class on The Ohio State University campus.

The cost is a minimum $10 donation per bike, per class, and there are 24 bikes available per class. For specific details and registration information, visit the Facebook event page "MUCC Spin-A-Thon for Daniel Hughes" or email Corey Clark at marshalluniversitycyclingclub@gmail.com.

 Related websites are: 


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
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Application process begins for Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Applications are now being accepted for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the spring 2013 semester, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Students who received a Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver for fall term, 2012, are not eligible for a waiver for spring 2013.

  • Deadline for the applications is Friday, Nov. 9. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition/dates.html.
  • Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for spring 2013 by Friday, Dec. 7, in order to receive a waiver. Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Dec. 7 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.
Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/tuitionwaivers.asp. Completed waiver applications must be submitted in person or by U.S. Mail. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted.

For more information, contact the Graduate College office at 304-696-6606.


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
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Two University of Cincinnati writers to read from their work at MU



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Novelist Chris Bachelder and Danielle Cadena Deulen, a poet and essayist, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in Smith Hall 154 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The readings, part of the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series at Marshall, are free to the public and will be followed by book signings.

Bachelder is a novelist, e-book pioneer and frequent contributor to the publications McSweeney's Quarterly Concern and The Believer. Born in Minneapolis, Minn., he grew up in Christiansburg, Va.

Bachelder received his M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Florida at Gainesville. His novel Lessons in Virtual Tour Photography was McSweeney's first e-book, which earned more than 45,000 downloads by 2004.

Bachelder is best known for his scrapbook-style novels, Bear v. Shark (2001) and U.S.! (2006). His fourth and most recent book, Abbott Awaits, was published in 2011 at Louisiana State University Press. He currently lives in Ohio where he is an assistant professor of fiction in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Cincinnati.

Deulen's collection of poems, Lovely Asunder, won the Miller Williams Arkansas Poetry Prize and was published with the University of Arkansas Press in 2011. Her memoir, The Riots, published with University of Georgia Press in 2011, won the 2010 AWP Prize in Creative Nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2011 Grub Street National Book Prize in Nonfiction, and won the 2012 Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) New Writers Award.

Formerly, she was a Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her poetry and essays have appeared in such journals as The Utne Reader, The Missouri Review, The Iowa Review, Smartish Pace, and The Indiana Review.

Deulen received her M.F.A. in Creative Writing from George Mason University and her Ph.D. in English from the University of Utah. She currently lives in Ohio where she is an assistant professor of poetry in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Cincinnati. 
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Monday October 15, 2012
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Lots to close for construction of new engineering complex at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As construction begins soon at Marshall University on the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, a 145,000 square-foot, 480-foot long facility, parking adjustments will be necessary for MU students, faculty and staff, James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety, said today.

 

"For more than two years, we've been planning for the relocation of parking spaces that will be lost due to the construction of the Weisberg Engineering Complex," Terry said. "That's why we built the 6th Avenue Parking Facility before this construction begins. 

 

"Often, with progress comes some inconvenience. We ask for understanding and patience as our community has to alter their campus parking habits. While a construction project of this magnitude will change the face of our campus, we do have enough parking locations to accommodate our students, faculty, staff and visitors."

 

In all, about 150 spaces on F Lots between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on the north side of Third Avenue will be closed beginning the evening of this Friday, Oct. 19. Also, the first five rows of spaces at the east end of the general lot on the north side of Commerce Avenue - formerly home to  Weiler Steel - will be used for staging during construction, leaving 250 spots open on that lot.

 

Terry said other parking options include the new 411-space parking garage on 6th Avenue where people can park for 50 cents an hour. Employees, if they wish, can pay $40 a month to park in the garage. The west lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium can be used, or people may upgrade their permits and park in the Third Avenue garage across from Cam Henderson Center.

 

Thundering Herd fans have been tailgating for years on the F Lots before Marshall football games. They, too, will be asked to find a new home to tailgate. Marshall has three home games remaining this season: Oct. 27 vs. Central Florida, Nov. 3 vs. Memphis and Nov. 17 vs. Houston, all Saturdays.

 

"We understand the importance of this new facility, and that a lot of people will need to alter their game-day routines in the name of progress," said Mike Hamrick, Marshall's Director of Athletics. "But, we have the greatest fans in the country. If they want to continue tailgating, I'm sure they'll seek out and find a new place somewhere in the vicinity of the stadium. We appreciate everyone's cooperation."

 

Tailgaters could move to the general lot across Commerce Avenue, the lot on the west side of the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories, or a lot on the south side of Sixth Avenue.

Construction on the $50 million facility is expected to take 28 months, meaning it is projected to open in early 2015.


Click on map to view in larger PDF format.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 15, 2012
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police receive United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police today received a United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice for their collaborations on digital forensics, DNA testing and investigations.

 

U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin presented the award to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and West Virginia State Police Col. C.R. "Jay" Smithers at the 2012 U.S. Attorney's Law Enforcement and Victim Assistance Awards Ceremony at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

The award was given in recognition of the noteworthy partnership and collaboration between the Marshall University Forensic Science Center and the West Virginia State Police.

 

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, and Cpl. Robert J. Boggs, a Digital Forensics Investigator with West Virginia State Police, were also present for the presentation of the award.

 

Goodwin said, "The West Virginia State Police and Marshall University Forensic Science Center's unique partnership has not only brought justice to countless crime victims, but it's allowed law enforcement to identify and apprehend criminals using innovative technology. I am proud to present the United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice for their outstanding work."

 

The annual awards ceremony, hosted by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of West Virginia, recognizes commendable service of federal, state and local law enforcement officers, as well as other leaders who have made significant contributions on behalf of the criminal justice system in the state.

 

"This is a very significant milestone in Marshall's history," Kopp said. "To be recognized along with the elite law enforcement agencies for the work we do to assist law enforcement in solving crimes is a testament to just how powerful and how advanced our Forensic Science program is here at Marshall University. We're one of a kind and I'm very proud of what they do. The work our folks do on behalf of local, state and national law enforcement is very, very important in solving crimes that would be most likely unsolvable."

 

Smithers said the West Virginia State Police partnership with Marshall University's Forensic Science Center is invaluable.

 

"This collaborative effort in a university setting allows us to take advantage of high tech tools, software and innovative thinking," Smithers said.  "The field of digital forensics is constantly changing and our partnership with Marshall University allows for better opportunities to detect, investigate and successfully prosecute those involved in criminal activities."

 

Fenger said the partnership between the West Virginia State Police and Marshall's Forensic Science Center has developed over a 20-year period.  "We have developed a working relationship that addresses the needs of the West Virginia population in the areas of public safety, but it also benefits the students of the Forensic Science graduate program because they get to observe how law enforcement handles criminal investigations, and they get to interact with working professionals," he said.

 

Fenger added that the award is important to Marshall's Forensic Science Center because it recognizes the hard work and dedication of its staff in all facets of the organization.

 

Boggs said the partnership between Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police is a model of true success and real world benefits to both the university and state police. "More importantly, I believe the benefits to the citizens of West Virginia are what really stand out in this collaboration," he added.

 

"Efforts at the West Virginia State Police Digital Forensics Unit (housed at the Forensic Science Center) have led to the prosecution of many types of people and crimes, especially those who choose to victimize the ones we cherish the most in society, our children," Boggs said. "In my opinion, that alone is a success directly realized by the partnership between Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police."

 

Boggs said being able to perform digital forensics is a very complicated task. "Having a law enforcement investigative element placed inside an academic institution provides a chance to combine resources and efforts to do real good for the public," he said. "Digital forensics changes very rapidly, and having access to academic resources from professors and graduate students as well as access to the best hardware and software really makes a difference when investigating, and ultimately having a successful prosecution."


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Friday October 12, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's 6th Avenue parking facility fully operational beginning Oct. 17



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's new Sixth Avenue parking facility will become fully operational at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, James E. Terry, director of public safety, said today. 

The 411-space garage has been open since the start of the fall semester, but not fully operational because of what Terry called "unexpected technical issues" that have since been resolved.
Hours of operation will be from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Friday, and entry will be from the 6th Avenue entrance. The entrance at the 5-1/2 alley will be closed. Because overnight parking is prohibited, all vehicles must be removed by 11 p.m. The facility is closed and secured from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Weekend hours will be based on need and special events.

The fee for parking in the facility is 50 cents an hour, cash only, and will be collected when the driver leaves the facility.  The lost ticket fee is $5.


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Thursday October 11, 2012
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University biomedical sciences students to co-host conference in Charleston

National Cancer Institute senior investigator to be guest speaker


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine biomedical sciences students, in collaboration with students from West Virginia University, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University, will host the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference in an effort to expand the field of cell biology research in the region.


The conference is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. this Friday, Oct. 12, in Charleston at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at Charleston Area Medical Center, and is funded by a grant from the American Society for Cell Biology.


"The goal of this scientific meeting is to foster interactions among students at four universities within the Ohio Valley/mid-Appalachian region: West Virginia University, Marshall University, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University," said M. Allison Wolf, one of the conference organizers and a graduate student at Marshall. "An annual, regional meeting of students from these peer institutions will generate unique benefits emerging from a larger gathering of students, including stimulating professional networking and discovering common research interests that may lead to future collaborations and sharing of resources."


Dr. Richard Niles, senior associate dean for research and graduate education, praised the students for their efforts to coordinate the initiative.


"This is an outstanding opportunity for our graduate students to gain valuable experience in organizing and dealing with the logistics of running a scientific conference," Niles said.  "It will also develop their peer networking skills, which will become important for whatever career path they choose.  I am very proud of Allison for taking on this organizational task despite her demanding Ph.D. research activities."


The conference will feature keynote speaker Dr. Vinay Pathak, a senior investigator with the National Cancer Institute, whose area of study includes research on projects relating to HIV drug resistance.


For more information contact Allison Wolf at 304-696-3576.


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Thursday October 11, 2012
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Marshall Recreation Center to host 4th annual Haunted Rec event to support Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is inviting kids to get ready to get active in a spooky Halloween setting as it hosts the 4th annual "Haunted Rec" event from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23. The event is free and open to the public.

The recreation center is partnering with the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's Young Professionals Committee to encourage kids to be active through the Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative.

 

The goal of the Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative, a program created by Generation WV, is to use the members of young professionals organizations to inspire communities across the state to make environmental changes that will reverse the current rise in childhood obesity rates. Community members can come to "Haunted Rec," the Huntington area's Healthy Kids, Healthy WV event, for entertainment and education, and leave with message points and motivation to make a difference in the community.

 

At "Haunted Rec" kids can take on an opponent as they tackle the haunted obstacle course which will include howling hurdles, creepy ladder drills, horrifying hula hoops, bone-chilling box jumps and much more. By popular demand, the Rec Center is also bringing back the Haunted House. The spooky house is full of surprises lurking around every corner.

 

All participants will be able to take part in the Rec's "Eat This Not That" challenge with a spooky, Halloween twist. They can test their food knowledge and make the most healthful choices as they decide what to eat and what to avoid.

 

Every participant will leave the Rec with a goody bag full of treats, not tricks! Participants are asked to wear costumes.

 

For more information call Marshall Recreation Center Assistant Director Michele Muth at 304-696-2943 or e-mail pallante1@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 10, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tennessee professor to speak at MU on 1824 'election gone wrong'

Daniel Feller, Ph.D., is second speaker in Amicus Curiae fall lecture series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Daniel Feller, Ph.D., the Betty Lynn Hendrickson Professor of History at the University of Tennessee, will be the featured speaker Tuesday, Oct. 16, in the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University.

Feller's lecture, titled The People's Will Denied? Backroom Politics And The Election Of 1824, is the second in the Amicus Curiae fall 2012 series. It starts at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's Huntington campus, and is free to the public.

Feller will discuss the presidential election of 1824, which was decided in the U.S. House of Representatives, where John Quincy Adams was elected president, despite not having won the popular vote.  His discussion will focus on issues relevant to the current political environment while applying lessons learned from that contested election.

"It will be fun to talk about an 'election gone wrong' that happened long enough ago to allow us to be entertained while learning about how and why the U.S. President came to be chosen by the House of Representatives and the political context that led to and resulted from the situation," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy. "We are particularly lucky to have Dan Feller to teach us.  He is not only an award-winning history professor, he is also the director of the University of Tennessee's Center for Jacksonian America.  Dr. Feller was the senior academic adviser for the PBS documentary Andrew Jackson:  Good, Evil and the Presidency, and he brings extraordinary depth to what promises to be an entertaining and educational discussion."

Feller also is the editor and director of The Papers of Andrew Jackson. His book, The Jacksonian Promise, 1815-1840, was published in 1995.

The Amicus Curiae (Friend of the Court) series is sponsored by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, and supported by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

For more information on Feller's appearance at MU, contact Proctor at 304-696-2801.

 


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Wednesday October 10, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduate College to sponsor Graduate School Fair Oct. 24

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Graduate College will sponsor a Graduate School Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, for college students, teachers and other working professionals who are considering a graduate program at Marshall.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

"This is a great opportunity for people to learn about the graduate educational opportunities here at Marshall and talk directly to representatives from graduate programs across the university," said Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. "We'll also have information on how to apply to graduate school and on what financial support options are available."

Marshall University has 48 master's degree programs, seven doctoral degree programs and 33 graduate certificate programs, Spindel said.

For further information, contact the Graduate College by phone at 304-696-6606 or by e-mail at graduatecollege@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 10, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU assistant professor to discuss importance of including women in process of rebuilding, creating sustainable peace



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Anara Tabyshalieva, an assistant professor in Marshall University's department of history, will speak from noon to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26,  in the Drinko Library auditorium (room 402) on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Tabyshalieva will discuss her new book, a volume she co-edited with Albrecht Schnabel, called Defying Victimhood: Women and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding.  Published this year by the United Nations University Press, the book affirms the importance of including women in the process of rebuilding and creating sustainable peace after war. 

Too often, this collection of comparative case studies and country studies shows, women are marginalized in this process, thereby subverting the possibilities for sustainable peace.  By "defying victimhood," the authors affirm, women can become activists, peace builders and full participants in rebuilding political, economic, and social and security structures. 

Tabyshalieva's talk is part of the Women's Studies Faculty Colloquium series.  It is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will follow.

For more information, contact Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, director of Women's Studies, by e-mail at rensenbrink@marshall.edu, or by phone at 304-696-2955.


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Tuesday October 9, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Benefit concert to assist Marshall University music staff member



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A group of music faculty members from Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will perform a benefit concert at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, at Fellowship Baptist Church for Beverly McKinney, the school's administrative assistant, who is battling brain cancer.

The Violauta Duo, made up of Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flute, and Dr. Julio Alves, guitar, will be joined in the concert by their wives, violinist Kristen Alves and soprano Linda Dobbs, with all proceeds going to McKinney to assist with mounting medical costs.

Julio Alves said after getting past the shock of McKinney's diagnosis, he wanted to do something to help.

"This concert is our way to support Beverly and to honor her for all she has done for each one of us at our department," Alves said. "We invite everybody from our community to attend the recital and to help us raise funds for Beverly."

The concert will begin with the Violauta Duo playing "Gran duetto concertante, Op. 52" by Mauro Giuliani, "Pavane" by Gabriel Faure and two movements from "Suite Buenos Aires" by Maximo Diego Pujol. After a short intermission, the second part will feature the four performers in different chamber music combinations. First, Linda Dobbs and Kristen Alves will perform music by Howard Boatwright ("Soldier, Soldier" from Two Folk Song Settings), followed by Julio and Kristen Alves playing an arrangement of Massenet's "Meditation" from Thais. Two trios will conclude the program: Linda Dobbs and the Violauta Duo performing Saint-Saens' "Une flute invisible," and Kristen Alves and the Violauta Duo interpreting the second divertimento by G. Kummer and Libertango by A. Piazzolla.

"Making music with colleagues is always a pleasure and the pleasure is doubled when it's helping a dear friend," Wendell Dobbs said.

Julio Alves emphasized how beloved McKinney is to his family.

"Beverly is loved very much by our family," he said. "Our girls love her and always look for her when they go to Marshall, or to the ballet studio where she taught piano, and especially at church. This sudden change in her life has taken us all by surprise ... Since music is such an important part of her life as well as ours, we decided to honor her by performing this recital. Although the recital will help with some medical expenses, my primary reason for performing it is to bless her and lift her up in this challenging time. I want to give her some extra happiness in return for all the joy and love she has given our family."

Donations may also be sent to the Marshall University School of Music and Theatre, c/o Ruby Dean, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, W.Va. 25755.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Fellowship Baptist Church is located at 3661 U.S. 60, Barboursville, W.Va. 25504. For directions, persons may phone 304-736-8006.

----------------

Photo: Julio Alves, Kristen Alves, Linda Dobbs and Wendell Dobbs will give a benefit concert Oct. 14 to assist music staff member Beverly McKinney with medical expenses.


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Tuesday October 9, 2012
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall graduate pledges $300,000 for Medical School scholarships


Don Blankenship honors mother by naming gift in her memory

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Donald L. "Don" Blankenship, a 1972 Marshall University graduate, has generously committed $300,000 over a three-year period for scholarships at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

 

Blankenship made the pledge in honor of his mother, Nancy Marie McCoy, who passed away in 1995. The first $100,000 gift was received in early September.

 

"The demographics of southern West Virginia mean that there will be a continuing and increasing need for high quality local doctors," Blankenship said. "I am fortunate to be able to contribute in a small way toward fulfilling this need, while at the same time honoring my mother's memory, helping my alma mater, and helping these gifted students to achieve their dreams of becoming doctors."

 

Ten second-year medical students who meet the financial scholarship requirements and exhibit high academic achievement will each receive $10,000 to help defray the cost of medical school tuition. The awards will be renewed for each student annually for two years, pending satisfactory academic progress.

 

The students chosen to receive the awards are:

 

  • James T. Buchanan, Jr., Chester, W.Va.
  • Rudolf Burcl, Huntington, W.Va.
  • John M. Davitt, Washington, D.C.
  • Aaron M. Dom, Wellersburg, Pa.
  • Jessica A. Layne, Milton, W.Va.
  • Andrew S. Martin, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Joseph V. Russo, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Jonathan S. Seibert, Harrisburg, N.C.
  • Stephanie L. Taylor, Cumberland, Md.
  • Adam J. Van Horn, Huntington, W.Va.

 

"We are grateful to Mr. Blankenship for his support of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and specifically his commitment to helping our students," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs. "His generous gift will go a long way in assisting our students achieve their dreams."

 

Don Blankenship is a recipient of Marshall University's Distinguished Alumnus Award, and he was inducted into the College of Business Hall of Fame in 1999. Additionally, he was the recipient of the West Virginia Society of CPAs' 2002 Outstanding Member in Business and Industry award.


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Monday October 8, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

6th Avenue entrance, exit of new garage to be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 6th Avenue entrance to and exit from Marshall University's new parking garage will be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to construction, said James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety.

 

Terry said the garage's entrance and exit off the 51/2 alley and Elm Street will be open.

 

The garage, located at 6th Avenue and Elm Street, opened in August.


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Monday October 8, 2012
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-2038

MU professor named Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor has been named the  first recipient of the Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year Award established by  the West Virginia Section of the  American Society of Civil Engineers (WVASCE).

Dr. Richard McCormick, a professor of engineering in the  College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE),  received the award at the WVASCE's annual meeting, which was held recently at Hawk's Nest State Park.

McCormick was nominated by his dean at Marshall University, Dr. Wael Zatar, who also is president of the WVASCE. Dr. William Pierson, professor and chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science, and Dr. Betsy Dulin, former dean of CITE and currently a professor of engineering, provided letters of support for him.

The ASCE award may be presented annually to a tenured faculty member in an engineering school in West Virginia who is a resident at the time of the nomination and a member of the WVASCE.

After knowing McCormick for nine years, Zatar said, "As the dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall University, I am really proud to have someone with the character, attitude, and professionalism of Dr. McCormick.  Talking about an outstanding professor, educator, colleague and friend, I was very fortunate to have Dr. McCormick assisting and encouraging me over the years. He is certainly among those civil engineering professors who have shaped the industry and the economy of this region." And, according to Zatar, McCormick has devoted his life to "strengthening the education of civil engineering students, providing a very positive impact on the civil engineering students, providing a very positive impact on the civil engineering profession, and enhancing the quality of life in West Virginia."

Prior to coming to Marshall McCormick spent many years at West Virginia University Institute of Technology, where he served in a variety of roles as a faculty member, department chair, interim executive vice president and vice president for academic affairs, Zatar said. Dulin was one of McCormick's  students at WVUIT before they later became colleagues at Marshall.

"Like many engineering students who went before and followed after me, I benefitted from his guidance and his example, and his ability not only to teach the required material but to mentor, advise and inspire," Dulin said. "As his colleague and former dean, I have continued to be impressed by his work ethic, his dedication to student success, and his ability to 'get things done' even when faced with roadblocks or problems of various sorts."

In addition, she said, McCormick's "character, attitude and approach to his work, his colleagues, and - first and foremost - his students,  has remained unchanged."

Pierson and McCormick have been colleagues at both WVUIT and Marshall  and,  according to Pierson, "There is no doubt that Dr. McCormick is one of the most gifted and effective professors of civil engineering that I have known."  For example, he pointed out that McCormick received the highest student rating of all undergraduate engineering professors during the spring 2011 semester results that are consistent with other evaluation cycles.  Another proof of McCormick's teaching effectiveness is the overall performance of MU engineering students on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam, Pierson said.

"Our average passing rate on the FE exam has been above 83 percent, which is above the national average of about 75 percent over the same time period," Pierson said.  "This success is, in my opinion, due in large part to the quality of the educational experience provided by Dr. McCormick in key foundation courses."

"I am very honored to be named the recipient of the first WVASCE Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year award." McCormick said.  "I was also humbled to read the very nice comments submitted by my colleagues in support of my nomination.  I have had many students go on to very successful careers in civil engineering, largely through their own hard work and dedication, and I am happy that I have been able to play a small part in their success."
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Monday October 8, 2012
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Dr. Nader G. Abraham named vice dean for research at School of Medicine

 International researcher brings NIH grants and team of researchers to medical school

Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., Dr. H.C., FAHA, an internationally-recognized researcher in the field of obesity and vascular disease, has been named the inaugural vice dean for research at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., Dr. H.C., FAHA, an internationally-recognized researcher in the field of obesity and vascular disease, has been named the inaugural vice dean for research at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, President Stephen J. Kopp and Dean Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., announced today.

Several members of Abraham's research team will begin their official duties on Nov. 1, with the entire research operation in place in early 2013.

Abraham currently serves as chairman and professor of the department of physiology and pharmacology at the University of Toledo College Of Medicine. He is also affiliated with New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., The Rockefeller University in New York and University of Catania in Italy.
 
"Dr. Abraham brings to Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine exceptional experience and a proven track record in advancing successful grant-funded research. Put simply, he is a research catalyst," Kopp said. "He is especially adept in fostering clinical translational research and building successful interdisciplinary research teams, attributes that will be of great benefit to our entire university. He most certainly will complement our efforts to expand applied research activities that yield commercially-viable discoveries."

"This is a great day for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and Marshall University. Dr. Abraham is one of the preeminent biomedical researchers in the world, and his joining our faculty raises our profile immediately," Shapiro said.

He continued, "Dr. Abraham has the unique and remarkable ability to energize and inspire others. This is illustrated by the group of scientists that will be coming with him. Recruiting any of these individuals on their own would be considered a terrific accomplishment for our school. I truly believe that Dr. Abraham is a key recruitment that will give Marshall University a significant leap forward toward becoming a premier biomedical research institution."

Widely recognized for his research on vascular disease, which is a prelude to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases including hypertension, stroke, diabetes and obesity, Abraham and his team of researchers specifically study heme oxygenase, the most potent anti-oxidant gene in the human body. The team's research also includes ways to speed up the implementation of laboratory findings into clinical therapeutic strategies for patients, i.e., translational medicine.
 
"I'm very excited about joining the faculty at Marshall University," Abraham said. "I will be focusing on translational research projects in collaboration with the clinical departments, which will be an exciting experience for our medical students. I very much enjoy working with outstanding clinicians with little basic science experience and seeing them evolve into translational researchers. Truly, Marshall offers a unique opportunity to achieve these goals."

Abraham is currently the principal investigator on two National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants focusing on stem cells-heme oxygenase, hormonal regulation of blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Over his 30-year-plus career, Abraham has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on grants or projects totaling more than $17.3 million. As project leader for a program project in pharmacology, he has worked on five grants with total NIH funding of more than $60 million, bringing his total career grant support to more than $77 million.

Several career highlights for Abraham include the following leadership positions:

  • 1996, chairman of the Society of Hematology and Stem Cells;
  • 2000, chairman of the 1st International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, New York;
  • 2002, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Italy;
  • 2005, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Japan; and
  • 2007, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Poland.

Over his career, Abraham has received dozens of awards including the following:

  • National Institute of Health, Research Career Development Award;
  • Dr. David M. Ovitz Lecturer Award, University of Calgary, Canada;
  • Distinguished Professor Award, University of Saskatoon, Canada;
  • Dean's Distinguished Award for Stem Cell Research, University of Catania, Italy;
  • Honorary doctoral degree in Pharmacy, University of Catania, Italy;      
  • Dean's Distinguished Award, New York Medical College, New York; and
  • Honored Professorship, Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science.

He has served as an invited lecturer internationally, including in China, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Copenhagen, Czech Republic and Poland. He is the author or co-author of more than 300 original articles and has mentored numerous postdoctoral and graduate students.  He is a Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Abraham brings to the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine a team of researchers including the following individuals:

  • G. Drummond, Ph.D., a former associate professor at Rockefeller University and an expert in heme oxygenase who pioneered the use of metalloporphyrins to inhibit bilirubin production, and has more than 20 years of clinical trial experience in preventing jaundice in newborn infants.
  • D. Kim, Ph.D., a researcher in human stem cells;
  • K. Sodhi, M.D., a researcher in hypertension associated with obesity and diabetes;
  • S. Monu, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow who works on the expression of an endogenous antioxidant;
  • M. Maheshwari, a doctoral student; and,            
  • M. Choi, a lab assistant.

Abraham earned his Ph.D. in 1976 from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He spent his postdoctoral fellowship at The Rockefeller University, where he discovered and isolated the rat and human heme oxygenase gene responsible for the over-production of bilirubin in newborn infants, which manifests as jaundice. In early 1982, he developed inhibiters of heme oxygenase for the prevention of jaundice with his mentor Dr. A. Kappas, former vice president of The Rockefeller University and physician-in-chief.

In 1977, he became an associate scientist at New York Medical College in New York. He initiated the college's first program project on heme oxygenase in 1985. During his time there, he was promoted to the rank of professor with tenure in medicine in 1993.

Abraham was named a visiting professor of medicine at New York University in 1993, at which time he also continued his affiliation with The Rockefeller University as a visiting scientist.
In 1996, he re-joined New York Medical College as a professor in the departments of pharmacology and medicine and also served as director of the stem cell and gene therapy program.

In 2009, while maintaining affiliations with both the New York Medical College and The Rockefeller University, Abraham was named chairman and professor of the department of physiology and pharmacology at the University of Toledo College of Medicine.  During his tenure as chair of the department at Toledo, NIH and pharmaceutical support increased from $2.5 million to more than $7 million in less than four years. 


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Saturday October 6, 2012
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall, Dixon Hughes Goodman open new SmartRoom

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives of Marshall University and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP cut a ribbon to celebrate the opening of the DHG SmartRoom, the most technologically advanced room in the College of Business Thursday in Suite 106 of Corbly Hall on the university's Huntington campus.

"We wanted the experience to be more than just a name on a plaque," said Rick Slater, Managing Partner of DHG. "As we've witnessed big changes in business and technology, our partners have become even more passionate about making an impact on campuses across our footprint."

"We can't thank DHG enough," said Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the College of Business at Marshall. "This new facility will serve our faculty and students very well."

Marshall received a gift of $150,000 from the certified public accounting firm of Dixon Hughes Goodman, designated toward renovation of room 106 of Corbly Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus, in May. The room, now known as the Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP SmartRoom, features a 24-inch, multi-touch Smart Podium Display from Smart Technologies; dual 80-inch LED flat-panel displays; and high-density wireless services. In addition, the room is furnished with new seating and tables with capacity for 58 students, as well as updated lighting controllable by zones.


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Photos: (1) Cutting the ribbon to officially open the Dixon Hughes Goodman SmartRoom are from left, Lance West, Marshall Foundation Vice President for Development; Bob Simpson, partner at DHG, who also teaches at Marshall; Norman Mosrie, partner at DHG and president MU College of Business advisory board; Rick Slater, managing partner at DHG; Matt Turner, chief of staff at Marshall University; and Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the MU College of Business. (2) Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the MU College of Business, describes the advanced features of the DHG SmartRoom. (3) Marshall University senior Jonathan Austin thanks Dixon Hughes Goodman on behalf of his fellow students. Photos by Tyler Kes.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

6th Avenue entrance, exit of new garage to be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 6th Avenue entrance to and exit from Marshall University's new parking garage will be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to construction, said James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety.

Terry said the garage's entrance and exit off the 5-1/2 alley and Elm Street will be open.

The garage, located at 6th Avenue and Elm Street, opened in August.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Effect of 'Don Quixote' on Dostoevsky and his works topic of lecture to be delivered by Marshall Prof. Slav N. Gratchev

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Prof. Slav N. Gratchev will deliver a lecture titled Cervantes and Dostoevsky: Crossing the Boundaries of Space and Time, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

In his presentation, Prof. Gratchev will examine how Cervantes' classic novel, Don Quixote, affected Dostoevsky and his great works, specifically Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and Brothers Karamazov. His lecture is being presented by Marshall's College of Liberal Arts.

 

Gratchev is an assistant professor of Spanish at Marshall University. He received his first M.A. in Saint Petersburg, Russia and his second M.A. at the University of Alverta, Canada. He received his Ph.D. at Purdue University. The main area of his research is Spanish Literature of Renaissance and Baroque combined with a keen interest in Spanish Cinema.

 

"We are very fortunate to have Professor Gratchev in our department of modern languages as he brings considerable skill in teaching languages and foreign literature," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "His broad ranging interest in literature helps us understand the evolution of the novel as an art and a window into minds of others."

 

Gratchev's lecture is free to the public.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Forensic Science Center to host lecture for honors students on criminal behavior

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and College of Science will conduct a special lecture, "Nature versus Nurture," sponsored by the Honors College for its students at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center.

The lecture will cross-examine whether traits of human behavior are inherited or learned and whether humans may have genetic tendencies toward deviant or criminal behavior. Guest speakers Michael Farrell, Esq., and the Honorable Paul Farrell will talk about their experiences in the legal system from a criminal behavior perspective.

This presentation is part of a semester-long Honors course co-taught by Dr. Wendy C. Trzyna, associate professor of microbiology in the department of biological sciences in the College of Science and Dr. James Sottile, professor of educational psychology in the College of Education.

Throughout the course, Dr. Trzyna presents information from the Human Genome Project and discusses inherited traits while Dr. Sottile presents a different viewpoint based on his expertise in behavioral psychology and how traits are learned.

Trzyna said this course explores the contributions of genetics and environmental components to learning and motivation and other complex behavioral traits, such as aggression, intelligence, addiction, talents and many others. "The long standing debate of "nature vs. nurture" is even more relevant today as much more information has become available through the completion of the Human Genome Project," she said.

Undergraduate students from the Honors College and graduate students from the Forensic Science Master's Degree program will attend the event. Honors College students are from the following areas of study: business, engineering, computer science, biology, chemistry, dietetics, fine arts, education and exercise science.

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim dean of the Honors College, said it is the newest college at Marshall with nearly 600 students enrolled, and it is still growing. Admission to the college is by invitation only and is based on standardized test scores and grade point averages. The Honors College is not a degree-granting college so students are also enrolled in a degree-granting college for their major of study. Each honors student is required to take a minimum of two honors seminar courses that are interdisciplinary.

The "Nature versus Nurture" lecture is one in a series in the honors seminar course "Genetics and Learning." This semester students will also have the opportunity to isolate and test their own genomic DNA for a specific genotype related to athleticism.  

Trzyna said it is important that students at Marshall see that there is a vast resource of knowledge and experience throughout the Huntington community. "We are extremely fortunate that some of these individuals are willing to give of their time for the education of our students," she said.

The Honorable Paul T. Farrell currently serves as Chief Judge of the 6th Judicial District. He was appointed to the bench in February 2011 by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin following a 33-year legal career including five years as a federal prosecutor, eight years as an assistant Cabell County prosecutor and 15 years as a civil defense attorney with the firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, PLLC. During his career as a lawyer, he was recognized by the Best Lawyers in America in the field of medical malpractice defense.

Michael J. Farrell is a litigator who has devoted most of his career to the defense of claims against product manufacturers, health care providers and lawyers. His most prominent criminal defense trial involved former West Virginia Governor Arch A. Moore, Jr. He has served on West Virginia Higher Education Boards since 1998 and currently is completing his 10th year on the Marshall University Board of Governors. In 2005, he was the interim president of Marshall University.

He has been a frequent lecturer for continuing legal education programs presented to West Virginia judges, lawyers and other groups of professionals. In 2012, the Best Lawyers in America recognized him as one of the 10 best lawyers in West Virginia. Chambers USA, a London-based rating agency, and the International Who's Who of Product Liability Defense Firms, has accorded him comparable honors. He is an elected member of the prestigious American College of Trial Lawyers. He has published numerous articles in professional journals.

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Thursday October 4, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming continues at Marshall with events, activities;

Picnic on the Plaza is Friday, parade and football game are Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University continues 2012 homecoming activities Friday and Saturday with the theme of "Remember the Past, Thunder into the Future."

Highlighting Friday's events is the Picnic on the Plaza, the first official event of the homecoming weekend, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  The picnic on the Memorial Student Center plaza will feature music, games, prizes and free lunch.

The two major homecoming events on Saturday are the homecoming parade at 11:30 a.m., and the Thundering Herd's football game with the University of Tulsa at 3:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

About 75 units will participate in the parade, which begins at the intersection of 8th Street and 4th Avenue in downtown Huntington. It  heads east on 4th Avenue to 12th Street, where it turns right. It then turns left on 5th Avenue and finishes at 20th Street.

Art Weisberg, a Huntington philanthropist and president of Arthur's Enterprises, will be the grand marshal in the parade.

Float judges will be stationed on the balcony of the Memorial Student Center on 5th Avenue and the parade judges will be on the porch of the Elks Club on 4th Avenue.

A complete list of Marshall's 2012 homecoming activities can be found at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/RELEASE/2012/pr092812.htm.


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Wednesday October 3, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Partial Thundering Word squad has 'remarkable success' at WKU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word, the school's speech and debate team, took fourth place in combined sweepstakes and enjoyed some individual success last weekend in the Fall Forensic Fiesta at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky.

Coach Danny Ray said his team enjoyed "remarkable success" in its first tournament of the season. Only about one-third of the team took part and the competition included some of the nation's top teams, such as Western Kentucky University, the University of Alabama, Ball State University and Rice University.

Here is a look at some of Marshall's performances:

 

         Victoria Ledford, a sophomore chemistry/pre-med major from Braxton, W.Va., placed fourth in Persuasion, seventh in Rhetorical Criticism, and fourth in Duo Interpretation with Christian Adams, a  junior biomedical sciences major from Ona, W.Va.

 

         Taryss Mandt, a University College student from Arlington, Va., and last year's high school national champion in Oral Interpretation, was the top novice in Programmed Oral Interpretation and Informative Speaking.

 

         Matthew Osteen, a sophomore biochemistry major from Jefferson, W.Va., was the third top novice speaker in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, going 2-2 in his first debate competition ever.

 

         Eric Newfeld, a junior psychology major from Barboursville, W.Va., competed in both Extemporaneous Speaking and Impromptu Speaking.

 

Marshall's debaters travel to Lafayette College this weekend and the entire team will travel to West Chester, Pa., Oct. 12-13.


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Tuesday October 2, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming court announced at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The field of candidates for Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall has been narrowed to six after Marshall University announced its homecoming court today in the Memorial Student Center.

Homecoming 2012, with a theme of "Remember the Past, Thunder into the Future," began Monday and runs through Saturday.

Christina Caul-Jackson, coordinator for student involvement, said the three candidates for Miss Marshall are:

  • Casey Adams, a senior biology major from Huntington

  • Andrea Celorio, a senior international business and finance major from Guadalajara, Mexico, now living in Poca, W.Va.

  • Leslie Thomas, a senior biology major from Montgomery, W.Va.

The three candidates for Mr. Marshall are:

  • Rusty Sartin, a junior nursing major from Kermit, W.Va.

  • Stephen "J.R." Sheppard, a first-year exercise physiology graduate student from Delbarton, W.Va.

  • Zachary Morris, a junior public relations major from Montgomery, W.Va.

Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall will be crowned during halftime of Marshall's homecoming football game Saturday against the University of Tulsa. Kickoff is at 3:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Numerous homecoming-related events are scheduled throughout the week. To view the schedule, visit http://www.marshall.edu/pressrelease.asp?ID=2851.

One event not on the schedule is WMUL-FM's annual Car Bash, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday on Buskirk Field. Cost to bash a minivan painted in Tulsa's colors (old gold, royal blue and crimson) is $1 for two minutes. The remains of the minivan will be hauled on a trailer in the homecoming parade, which starts at 11:30 a.m. Saturday in downtown Huntington.


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Tuesday October 2, 2012
Contact: Kimberly White, Marshall University Women's Studies Advisory Committee, , 304-696-6115

Meet the Candidates and voter registration event is Thursday, Oct. 11, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Women's Studies and the Women's Center at Marshall University are hosting a Meet the Candidates event and voter registration drive from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center located on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

 

The purpose of the forum is to give students and community members the opportunity to meet the candidates who are running for governor, attorney general, house of delegates in the 16th and 17th districts, county commissioner, assessor, mayor of Huntington, Cabell County magistrate and Huntington City Council to discuss the economic, civic, commercial, cultural, industrial and educational interests of the area.


The League of Women Voters will register eligible voters and representatives from the Republican, Democrat, Mountain and Libertarian parties and will sponsor tables with candidate information, party platforms and suggestions for how to get involved this election year.

 

The open forum will allow candidates to introduce themselves to members of the audience, and after introductions, candidates will be on hand to chat directly with students and members of the community.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information contact Kim White at 304-696-6115.


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Friday September 28, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students, faculty to learn about opportunities to study, teach abroad Oct. 5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University will sponsor its first KIIS International Study Abroad Fair for students and faculty beginning at 8:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 5, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

KIIS, the Kentucky Institute for International Studies, is a nonprofit consortium of colleges and universities that allows students to study abroad in both semester and summer programs in more than 20 countries from Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America. Marshall became the first university outside of Kentucky to become a part of this consortium, and now faculty and students can teach and study through the KIIS program

The day's activities will begin with a faculty informational breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. for those faculty members who are already involved in the program and those who are interested in teaching their courses abroad for the summer of 2014. Any faculty member who would like to attend the breakfast must make a reservation to attend. Reservations may be made by sending an e-mail to Ryan Warner, Study Abroad Coordinator, at warner68@marshall.edu.

The event will then be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for students to discuss their 2013 summer study abroad options with faculty from Marshall and other KIIS consortium members.

Seven Marshall faculty members were selected to teach during the Summer 2013 term in the KIIS program. They include Dr. Wendell Dobbs, France (College of Fine Arts); Dr. Mark Zanter, Austria (College of Fine Arts); Dr. Shawn Schulenberg, Chile (College of Liberal Arts);  Dr. Marybeth Beller, Turkey (College of Liberal Arts);  Dr. Dallas Brozik, Canada (College of Business), Ian Hagarty, Italy (College of Fine Arts); and Dr. Slav Gratchev, Spain (College of Liberal Arts).


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Friday September 28, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College of Liberal Arts plans homecoming tailgate Oct. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts (COLA) is sponsoring a homecoming tailgate from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, on the green space between Harless Dining Hall and City National Branch Bank at 5th Avenue and 18th Street.

The tailgate will be located beside the Tailgate Blast, which is sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association, Black Alumni Association and Parents and Family Weekend.

Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, and his wife, Denise, are hosting the COLA tailgate. David Pittenger said the menu includes homemade gumbo, bread and other treats, along with beer, wine and "a good time for all." He plans to do the cooking.

Cost to attend the COLA tailgate is $15.

For more information or to RSVP, call David Pittenger at 304-696-2731.

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Photo: Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, plans to cook for the college's homecoming tailgate party.


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Thursday September 27, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

17th annual Alum Run 5k set for Saturday, Oct. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 17th annual Alum Run 5k, a popular event for area runners and walkers, will once again take place during Marshall University's homecoming weekend, starting at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, in Huntington.

 

Runners and walkers are invited and anyone (including non-alumni) may participate.

 

The Alum Run 5k will take participants from Marshall's campus into downtown Huntington and back to the campus to finish the 3.1-mile course.  The course, which was used last year and in past runs, is nearly 100 percent flat and straight.

 

There are several ways to register. Forms are available at the Marshall Recreation Center, located at 402 Thundering Herd Dr. (corner of 20th Street and 5th Avenue), near Joan C. Edwards Stadium. They also are available on the Rec Center's website (www.marshallcampusrec.com) or through www.tristateracer.com.

 

The pre-race registration price is $20, which is good through Oct. 5. The cost is $25 if registration is submitted on the day of the race. Cash or check (payable to MU Campus Rec Club) is accepted. Credit Cards are also accepted through the online registration portal on www.tristateracer.com.

 

Race packet pick-up will be from 1 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, in the lobby of the Recreation Center. Late packet pick-up and race-day registration will be from 6:30 to 7:45 a.m. in front of Cam Henderson Center.

 

Participants will be treated to a post-race celebration and an awards ceremony, starting at about 9:15 a.m. at the Recreation Center. Refreshments and beverages will be available, and participants may use the center's shower and locker facilities.

 

For additional information concerning the race, visit www.marshallcampusrec.com, or contact the race Director, Kayla Dodd, by phone at 304-542-7490, or by e-mail at dodd18@marshall.edu.


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Thursday September 27, 2012
Contact: Haven Campbell, Career Services Graduate Assistant, 304-696-2370

More than 70 employers expected to attend this fall's Career Expo

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its annual Fall Career Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

 

The expo is open to all Marshall students, faculty and alumni.  Recruiters will be sharing information on part-time, full-time and internship positions.

 

More than 70 employers are expected to have recruiters at the event, representing the areas of customer service, IT/computer science, health care, media sales, insurance/financial services, corrections, retail management and many others.

 

A continually updated list of employers planning to attend the Career Expo is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/events/careerexpo.html

 

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to dress professionally and come prepared with multiple copies of their resumes. Hogsett said even if students are not looking for a job, attending the expo presents an excellent networking opportunity.

 

Leading up to the event, the Resume Doctor, Senior Career Counselor Mirek Bialk of Career Services, will be reviewing resumes for students on from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, in the Memorial Student Center lobby.  No appointment is necessary.

 

For more information about the event, contact Debby Stoler in Career Services at 304-696-6679 or stolerd@marshall.edu, or the Career Services front desk at 304-696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu.  

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 27, 2012
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Marshall University School of Pharmacy students volunteer at SeniorFest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 20 Marshall University School of Pharmacy students will participate in Cabell Huntington Hospital's 2012 SeniorFest Saturday, Sept. 29, at the hospital.

 

The students will assist with CHH's pharmacy project where hospital pharmacists will educate seniors on Medicare Part D information and also provide information about prescription medicines.   Pharmacy students will also volunteer in general areas for the event.

 

"This is an excellent venue for our pharmacy students to be involved in the well-being of our community," said Dr. Robert B. Stanton, assistant dean for the office of experiential education at the School of Pharmacy.  "I am very proud that so many of our students are willing to give up their free time on a Saturday to help with such a worthy cause."

 

Dr. Kimberly  Broedell-Zaugg, chairman of the department  of pharmacy practice and administration at the School of Pharmacy, said the experience is a valuable one for students.

 

"The School of Pharmacy at Marshall is very excited about being involved with SeniorFest at Cabell Huntington Hospital," she said. "This is a wonderful opportunity for our students to interact with older community members, local health care providers, and to serve the Tri-State area."

 

CHH's SeniorFest is open to anyone age 50 and over.   Dozens of screenings, medication reviews and  flu shots will be available.    Joy Pelfrey, director of senior services at Cabell Huntington, said the assistance from pharmacy students is greatly appreciated.

 

"We're so excited to have the student pharmacists participate in this year's event," Pelfrey said.   "This will be an enriching experience for them.  They will work one-to-one with seniors assisting with the issues seniors face with the delicate balance between the disease process, medications used to treat them in a safe manner and the ability to have the resources available to purchase their meds."

 

The Marshall University School of Pharmacy opened its inaugural program to 80 students last month.


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Tuesday September 25, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Kristina Pollard is new director of Marshall's H.E.L.P. Center

She is a former high school assistant principal in Mississippi

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Kristina Pollard recently was named just the third director of Marshall University's H.E.L.P. (Higher Education for Learning Problems) Center, Dr. Robert Bookwalter, dean of the College of Education, has announced.

Pollard came to Marshall from the DeSoto County School District in Hernando, Miss., where she was the assistant principal at Horn Lake High School.

"The H.E.L.P. program is one of the top programs in the nation for providing services to help students with learning challenges succeed in college," Bookwalter said. "The program has grown since Dr. Barbara Guyer founded it over 30 years ago and has thrived under the leadership of Lynne Weston.  We are fortunate to have hired Kristina Pollard as Lynne's successor.

Pollard, who was born and raised in San Diego, assumed her new position Aug. 1. Weston retired from Marshall that same day.

"Kristina has had a successful career as a teacher and administrator and has experience working in special education programs," Bookwalter said. "She is enthusiastic, innovative and committed to providing the best services to our students.  We look forward to the continued growth of the H.E.L.P. program under Kristina's leadership."

One of her primary responsibilities at Horn Lake was supervising the special education department, a position that provided her with a wealth of experience and knowledge before she came to Huntington.

"I came to Huntington with the expectation of continuing my quest to serve young people," she said. "It is a blessing to be able to do so through the H.E.L.P. Center and its purpose for serving individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. When I saw the position online I knew I could effectively lead this team with my educational experiences and skills."

Her husband, Lytrel, coaches cornerbacks for the Thundering Herd football team. He was hired in February, and Kristina joined him in Huntington after the school year ended in Mississippi.

Pollard said she loves her job and the whole purpose behind the H.E.L.P. program. Currently, 200 students are in the program, along with 75 tutors and 10 full-time staff members.

"Helping young people reach their goals makes me feel very good," she said. "The whole idea, the dream Dr. Guyer had, is absolutely amazing. The respect for the program, the impact it has ... it's absolutely astonishing that there are not more programs like this."

Pollard said her vision for H.E.L.P. is to maintain its standards of excellence while moving it to the "next level."

Pollard received her B.S. from Jackson State University in Jackson, Miss., and her M.Ed. from William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Miss., and she is currently completing her Ed.S. from Walden University. She has been in education since 1998, beginning her teaching career in the Dallas Public Schools.

She and Lytrel have two sons, Tylor and Klabron.

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Photo: Kristina Pollard is the third director of Marshall's H.E.L.P. (Higher Education for Learning Problems) Center. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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Friday September 21, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

President Kopp to give State of the University address Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will give his annual State of the University address when the fall general faculty meeting convenes at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Other items on the agenda include welcoming remarks by the faculty senate chair, Dr. Eldon Larsen; introduction of new administrators by provost Dr. Gayle Ormiston;  the introduction of 80 new faculty by Larsen,  Dr. Joseph Werthammer, Chief medical officer and senior associate dean for clinical affairs at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy; and a State of the Faculty address by Larsen. 

All faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. Following the meeting a reception to honor the new university personnel will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center. 


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Friday September 21, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Henderson Center briefly evacuated due to HVAC unit malfunction

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - At about 9:30 this morning, smoke alarms were activated in the Henderson Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus due to the malfunction of a rooftop HVAC unit motor. There was no active fire, but the failure of the HVAC motor created smoke, which entered the building, causing the alarms to sound. 


As a precaution, Marshall safety officials evacuated the Henderson Center and Gullickson Hall and contacted the Huntington Fire Department to inspect the buildings. No injuries or other damage were reported. The smoke has since been cleared and public safety officials have allowed employees and students to re-enter. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 21, 2012
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center,, 304-691-8961

Marshall University professor presents research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor of the Marshall University forensic science graduate program, presented research results to develop a field method for identifying the hallucinogenic herb Salvia divinorum Sept. 12 at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

 

Rankin presented the seminar to students and faculty of the forensic chemistry program within the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at IUPUI as part of its regular seminar series.

 

Forensic chemistry graduate students in Marshall's graduate program conducted the research the field method using Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-IR) technology.   Begun in 2010, graduate student research on the project will continue for at least another year with analysis of more than 500 more samples representing more than 300 species of Salvia. 

 

Salvia divinorum is becoming more prevalent, especially among college students, because it is legal in most states, and a recent law signed by President Obama in July made many of the common synthetic cannabinoids ("Spice" products) illegal.  It is commonly smoked like marijuana and is said to give a marijuana-like high although it contains a different hallucinogen from marijuana or Spice products. It has few distinguishing botanical characteristics unlike marijuana and no simple color test that can be performed at the time of seizure. Thus, a simple screening test is needed. 

 

ATR-IR instruments are now being used in the onsite investigation of meth labs, and many law enforcement agencies have this equipment available for other uses.

 

Graduates of Marshall's graduate program who contributed to the research previously were Elise Chom and Rebecca Mead.  Forensic science graduate students currently working on the research are Shaina Chang, Michelle Ball and Matt Brewer. 

 

A manuscript based on this work has been submitted to the Journal of Forensic Science for publication.  The manuscript is currently in the peer review process.


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Friday September 21, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to 'remember the past, Thunder into the Future' at homecoming

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's celebration of 175 years of service continues this fall with a Homecoming theme of "Happy 175th Birthday Marshall, Remember the Past, Thunder into the Future."


Homecoming week is Oct. 1-6, culminating with the Thundering Herd football team playing the University of Tulsa in a Conference USA game at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.


"We'll have a full slate of diverse activities for students, staff, alumni and Marshall supporters," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs. "The university continues to grow year by year, so those alumni who haven't been back to campus for a while are in for a real treat. There will be something for everyone this year and we're looking for a great turnout."


Art Weisberg, a Huntington philanthropist and president of Arthur's Enterprises, will be the grand marshal in the homecoming parade, which begins at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, in downtown Huntington.


Here is a breakdown of homecoming week events and activities:


Homecoming events
Monday, Oct. 1

Office decorating contest. Offices are asked to decorate using the homecoming theme with prizes to be awarded on Friday, Oct. 5, at the Picnic on the Plaza.

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Plazapalooza, Memorial Student Center


Tuesday, Oct. 2

Noon, T-shirt giveaway and homecoming court announced, Memorial Student Center


Thursday, Oct. 4

11 a.m. - Office decoration judging begins.


Friday, Oct. 5
Green and White Day

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - Free picnic on the Memorial Student Center Plaza with music, prizes, games and lunch. This is the first official alumni event of homecoming weekend.

Noon to 3:30 p.m. - Family check-in for Parents and Family Weekend, Office of Student Affairs in Memorial Student Center

3 to 6 p.m. - Black Alumni Association registration in the Memorial Student Center lobby

4 to 6 p.m. - Deans' reception gives students' families a chance to meet with the deans and leadership from other Marshall University offices, third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library.

6 p.m. - Marshall women's volleyball game with East Carolina University, Cam Henderson Center. Admission is free to all Parents and Family Weekend visitors.

7:30 to 9:30 p.m. - Champagne Welcome Reception. The MU Alumni Association and the Black Alumni Association will be co-hosting the reception at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. The cost is $25 per person. For information or to make a reservation, contact Fran Jackson at 304-696-6705 or jacksonf@marshall.edu.

10 p.m. to 1 a.m. - Black Alumni Association's Laid Back Friday after party (an evening of music, fun and games) in the Memorial Student Center basement


Saturday, Oct. 6

9 a.m. - 5K Alum Run. The course starts on Third Avenue between 19th and 20th streets and will end near the front of Cam Henderson Center. The entry fee is $20 for early registration and $25 for late registration. The event is sponsored by the Marshall Recreation Center. To register, contact Michele Muth at pallantel1@marshall.edu.

9:30 a.m. - Breakfast with the President, for those attending Parents and Family Weekend, will take place in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. Breakfast will begin after a brief greeting and comments by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

10 a.m. - Black Alumni Association business meeting/registration, Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, conference room

11:30 a.m. - Homecoming parade, starting in downtown Huntington and ending at Joan C. Edwards Stadium

1 to 3 p.m. - Tailgate Blast. The MU Alumni Association, Black Alumni Association and Parents and Family Weekend are celebrating at 18th Street and 5th Avenue with a tailgate party. Cost is $25 per person. In addition, the College of Liberal Arts is sponsoring a tailgate party during the Tailgate Blast, hosted by Dean David Pittenger and his wife, Denise. Call Betty Cook at 304-696-2835 with questions and to RSVP.

3:30 p.m. - The Thundering Herd plays the Tulsa Golden Hurricane in the homecoming football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium

8 p.m. - NPHC Stepshow in the Big Sandy Superstore Arena

9 p.m. to 1 a.m. - A Red Carpet Affair. Black Alumni dance sponsored by Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. The Epsilon Delta chapter at Marshall will be celebrating 50 years on MU's campus.

Sunday, Oct. 7

9 a.m. - Black Alumni Association Prayer/Memorial Service at Pullman Plaza Hotel

For more information on homecoming or to make a reservation, call the alumni office at 304-696-2901 or 304-696-3134.


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'Dysfunctional U.S. politics of today' topic of lecture to be delivered at Marshall University by Thomas E. Mann

Speaker has been a guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,

PBS Newshour with Judy Woodruff and Morning Joe

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Thomas E. Mann, W. Averell Harriman chair and senior fellow in Governance Studies at The Brookings Institution, will be the first speaker in this fall's Amicus Curiae (Friend of the Court) Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy at Marshall University.

 

Mann will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on MU's Huntington campus. The event is free to the public.

 

Mann will discuss the long-term political trends leading to what he calls "the dysfunctional U.S. politics of today" and offer detailed and striking prescriptions for what it will take to change the situation.

 

After the lecture, Mann will sign copies of The New York Times bestseller, It's Even Worse Than It Looks; How The American Constitutional System Collided With The New Politics Of Extremism, which he co-authored with Norman J. Ornstein.

 

"More than any time in my lifetime, the United States is challenged at home and so is our place in the world," said Paul A. Volcker, former chairman of the Federal Reserve. "When Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein get together to sound a loud alarm about the way our political system is being torn apart, it's time to listen - and listen hard.

 

"Then the tough part - how do we restore some sense of common purpose, of working together to make our government work? Mann and Ornstein set out ways to rebuild political bridges, beginning right now. We better get to work."

 

Mann has made recent media appearances with The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Morning Joe, The Rachel Maddow Show, The Diane Rehm Show and PBS Newshour with Judy Woodruff.

 

The Amicus Curiae series is presented by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy with support by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.


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Renowned scholar to discuss 'The Eight Rival Religions That Run the World

Speaker has been featured on the cover of Time magazine

and on TV's 'Oprah' and 'The Daily Show with Jon Stewart'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen Prothero, who has been described by Newsweek magazine as "a world religions scholar with the soul of a late-night comic," will deliver a public lecture Friday, Sept. 28, at Marshall University.

Prothero, chair of the department of religion at Boston University, is the featured speaker in the third annual da Vinci Lecture, presented by Marshall's Honors College and the office of the provost. The public lecture and discussion begin at 7 p.m. in room BE 5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Prothero's lecture is titled God Is Not One: The Eight Rival Religions That Run The World And Why Their Differences Matter - the same title as his book published in 2010. He is the New York Times bestselling author of Religious Literacy.

"He is an exciting speaker, very provocative," said Dr. Clayton McNearney, a professor in Marshall's department of Religious Studies who has heard Prothero speak. "He can situate a discussion of American religion within a global context. Students will come away having learned something."

Prothero's bestselling books inspired a cover story in Time magazine and he also has appeared on Oprah, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, National Public Radio and other top national media outlets. He writes and reviews for The New York Times Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Washington Post, USA Today, Los Angeles Times, Salon, and other publications. He holds degrees in American Religion from Harvard and Yale.

Prothero is the author of numerous other books, including the critically acclaimed The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation; Religious Literacy; and American Jesus: How the Son of God Became a National Icon.

He is a regular contributor to CNN.com's Belief Blog, a frequent guest on NPR, a speaker on religious literacy at the White House, and a prolific writer for professional journals and the popular press.

###


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Work of Michael Paxton to adorn Gallery 842 walls--literally

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Gallery 842 will exhibit large-scale chalk and pastel drawings by Michael K. Paxton, an artist based in Chicago and a Marshall University alumnus, executed directly on the gallery walls. Titled Riven, this production has involved months of coordination and several intensive days of collaborative work with students on site, according to John Farley, director of the gallery.

"We are excited and proud to bring such a distinguished alumnus and his work back to Marshall University, the Huntington community, and the surrounding region," Farley said. "Michael's success serves as an example to our students. There is no educational substitute for the interaction and hands-on experience gained by working one-on-one with an accomplished artist - not to mention 'one of our own.' "

Paxton will give a public presentation discussing his artistic career at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, in Smith Hall 154 on Marshall's Huntington campus. An opening reception will take place from 6 to 8  Friday evening, Sept. 21, at Gallery 842, which is located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington.

"Michael Paxton is a highly accomplished artist who got his education at Marshall University," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts at Marshall. "Bringing him back to campus so that he can share his expertise and insights with our students is a privilege for us.  He graduated from Marshall and has gone on to enjoy a highly productive career so he can help our students understand what the demands are of a practicing artist."

The son of fifth-generation West Virginians, Paxton grew up in Raleigh and Wayne counties in West Virginia and received a B. A. in art from Marshall University in 1975. Granted a full fellowship to the graduate program of the art department of the University of Georgia in Athens, Ga., he received his M.F.A. in drawing and painting in 1979. Paxton was a visiting artist at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1981. Two years later he and his wife moved to Chicago, where he has maintained a studio ever since.

"My drawing is a search for a deeper understanding of space, place and the complicated experience of sensation and vision," Paxton said. "Although I try to reduce the influence of illustrating any literary meaning in my drawings, the fact that I am a sixth-generation West Virginian - my early life and young adulthood in deep Appalachia, as well as the curse of coal that has plagued my family, home and mountains - can't help but have an influence on my work and choices that I make."

"As a young incoming freshman to Marshall University in 1971, 41 years ago this month, I had a very limited exposure and education in the fine arts," Paxton said. "I was driven then mostly by a creative burning desire to do something, make something, to be an artist of some sorts. Through the concentrated efforts of the late June Kilgore, my mentor, and others like Michael Cornfeld and Beverly Twitchell, my hunger was force fed and nurtured by their dedication to give me the very strongest foundation, which I have built my career on ever since."

With more than 35 years of concentrated work dedicated to the art of drawing, Paxton is a veteran of numerous exhibitions and installations. From Enoch to Strange Creek, a traveling installation that deals with his family's long history in Clay and Braxton counties of West Virginia, has been featured in one-person exhibitions at the Chicago Cultural Center; the Muskegon Museum of Art in Muskegon, Mich.; the Miami University Museum of Art, Oxford, Ohio; the Laura Mesaros Gallery at West Virginia University in Morgantown, W.Va.; and the Stifel Fine Arts Center in Wheeling, W.Va.

This past summer, he participated in a residency with the Air Le Parc Project and Research Center in Pampelonne, France. Work has recently been published in the 2012 Studio Visit Magazine, and also in Linework, an Anthology of Comics and Graphics, published by Columbia College Chicago. He also was recently featured in a group exhibition, Rights, Radicals + Revolutions, during the spring of 2012 at Columbia College Chicago and at the same time was awarded a Faculty Development Grant from the Center for Teaching Excellence, Columbia College Chicago.

Paxton has been featured as a visiting artist at Miami University; West Virginia University; Loyola University in Chicago; Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill.; and the Snow City Arts Foundation in Chicago, among others. Paxton's work is included in a long list of public, private and corporate collections. He has been an adjunct instructor in drawing and painting in the art and design department of Columbia College Chicago since 2005.


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Campus organizations, Huntington Area Food Bank to host Hunger Bowl

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington Area Food Bank, along with Marshall University's Student Government Association and offices of Community Engagement, Service Learning, Student Activities and Fraternity and Sorority Life, will host a flag football tournament to benefit the Huntington Area Food Bank and promote Hunger Action Month during Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin's Day to Serve.

The inaugural Hunger Bowl will take place from 10 a.m. through 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at Buskirk Field on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Huntington Area Food Bank will have donation barrels in the Memorial Student Center from Monday, Sept. 24, through Friday, Sept. 28, for those who wish to donate nonperishable foods.

"When the office of Community Engagement contacted us we were excited to work with them," said Scott Frasure, Director of Development for the Huntington Area Food Bank. "They wanted to promote the governor's Day to Serve as well as Hunger Action Month in a way that could get the entire university involved. So we got together and came up with what we think is a great way to raise food, funds and awareness. We are looking forward to the inaugural Hunger Bowl being a successful event for Huntington Area Food Bank and Marshall University."

To register a flag football team for this event visit http://www.marshall.edu/wpmu/community-engagement/. Teams will consist of six members and registration is $15 per team. The deadline to register is Thursday, Sept. 27.

The winning team will be awarded the inaugural Hunger Bowl trophy and a Marshall University prize basket. All students, faculty and student organizations are encouraged to participate in this event. The overall goal is to raise enough food and monetary donations to equate to 1,200 meals.

Elizabeth Sheets with the Marshall University Office of Community Engagement said she knew her office would participate when she read that Gov. Tomblin had declared Sept. 29 as West Virginia Day to Serve.

"Upon further research, I discovered that Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia are also joining this day to serve, and they are focusing their volunteer efforts on supporting food banks across their states and the District of Columbia," Sheets said. "I thought it would be a great idea to partner with the Huntington Area Food Bank.  Although the governor didn't give a specific area of service, in one of his earlier statements declaring this day to serve he applauded the efforts by the West Virginia State Fair for its successful food drive earlier this summer.  I just looked at it as a 'win-win!' Marshall students love to give back, and the Huntington Area Food Bank serves several counties within our state."

The Huntington Area Food Bank is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization affiliated with Feeding America, the largest hunger relief agency in the United States. It services 260 agencies in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia.

HAFB receives products from Feeding America, USDA, local donors, regional grocers, restaurants, farmers, food manufacturers and food processors. It distributes these perishable and non-perishable items free or at a discounted price which assists in covering its maintenance and transportation expenses.

To find out more go to www.hafb.org. or www.facebook.com/huntingtonareafoodbank.


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National Forensic Tournament coming to Huntington next spring

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - An estimated 900 to 1,200 students and coaches from around the country will be in Huntington for the five-day NFA (National Forensic Association) Tournament April 18-22, said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts.

"This is quite a feather in the cap for the college and the university," Pittenger said. "Clearly, the event will have a notable economic impact on the city and will allow Marshall University to display its charm, hospitality and innovative academic programs."

Marshall got the nod to serve as host of the tournament for a number of reasons, Pittenger said.

"It's a competitive process," he said, "and we earned the honor. We'd hosted tournaments in the past so we know how it's done. And, we're in a relatively good-sized metropolitan area so we're able to handle a large number of teams and competitors. Also, we've been very successful recently in speech and debate. We're very proud of this accomplishment."

Danny Ray, who coaches the Thundering Word, Marshall's speech and debate team, said about 40 states will be represented.

"It's big. Our entire campus will be used," Ray said. "More than 100 schools from all over will participate. It's national exposure for Marshall, plus it will bring in about $2 million to the community and university."

Ray said Marshall served as host of the tournament in 1985 and 1991. He said there are other national tournaments, but this one "is the one that is most important to most schools."

The Thundering Word will compete in the national tournament. Each school normally brings several judges, but using two judges per round means the host school (Marshall) likely will have to provide 40 to 50 judges to cover shortages.


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Guitar duo to give two recitals in Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Saborio-Alves Duo, guitarists Dr. Julio Alves, who is on the music faculty of Marshall University, and Andrs Saborio, will perform on two recitals beginning Sept. 24.

The first performance will take place at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The next evening, Tuesday, Sept. 25, the duo will perform at 7 p.m. at  Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church in Huntington.

The two artists recently performed this program in Costa Rica for the celebration of the Brazilian independence day. It features several Brazilian music styles (choro, maxixe, baiao, valsa-choro, jongo, and frevo) and also a Costa Rican bolero. Some of the compositions were originally written for two guitars, while others were arranged from works for other instruments.

Saborio currently teaches at the University of Costa Rica and at the Universidad Nacional. He won several prizes in international guitar competitions, including first place in the V Festival y Concurso Internacional de Guitarra de Cochabamba, Bolivia, in 2008; third place in the  I Concurso Internacional de Guitarra de Culiacan, Mexico  in 2008; and second place in the 7th Annual Competition in the Performance of Music from Spain and Latin America, Indiana University in 2004.  He has performed as a soloist and as a chamber musician in Costa Rica's main theaters as well as in the United States, Mexico, Holland, Spain, Germany, Nicaragua, Panama, Brazil, Bolivia and Cuba.

"To play in a duo with a virtuoso guitarist such as Andrs Saborio will simply be an extremely rewarding musical experience," Alves, who has been at Marshall since 2006, said. "In my mind, we are like two kids just about to enter into a playground . we look forward to engaging the audiences in this fun atmosphere. I would like to invite everybody in our local community for a relaxing hour where people can enjoy standards of the Brazilian Choro literature in arrangements that promote entertaining dialogues between the two guitars."


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Leading scientist in autism to present at the Marshall University School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Martha Herbert, an assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, will give a presentation from noon to 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, in the Harless Auditorium at the Marshall University Medical School.

The presentation, titled The Autism Revolution: From Broken Brain to Chronic Treatable Systemic Condition, is co-sponsored by the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University and the Marshall University School of Medicine, department of pediatrics.

It is open to the public and admission is free, but anyone wanting to attend must register at

http://www.marshall.edu/atc/content/marthaherbertregistration.php.

Herbert also is a pediatric neurologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and an affiliate of the Harvard-MIT-MGH Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, where she is director of the TRANSCEND Research Program (Treatment Research and Neuroscience Evaluation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders).

"Dr. Herbert is one of the world's leading medical scientists in the field of autism," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at MU. "She is moving the field beyond the conventional view that autism is a hard-wired impairment that cannot be fixed to a view that looks at autism as a whole body condition that is a collection of problems that can improve with proper treatment.

"Medical professionals, therapists, educators, families of children with autism spectrum disorders and the community at large will gain greater insight into what Dr. Herbert calls a revolution in how we think, and what we do about autism."

Herbert earned her medical degree at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Prior to her medical training she obtained a doctoral degree at the University of California, Santa Cruz, studying evolution and development of learning processes in biology and culture in the History of Consciousness program, and then did postdoctoral work in the philosophy and history of science.

She trained in pediatrics at Cornell University Medical Center and in neurology and child neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where she has remained.

Herbert's new book, The Autism Revolution: Whole Body Strategies for Making Life All it Can Be, will be for sale at the presentation.

For more information, contact Becker-Cottrill at 304-696-2332 or 304-544-3085.


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Marshall-connected artists' work on display in Charleston, Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Two artists with Marshall University connections have been chosen to exhibit work in the Inspired: A West Virginia Series of Juried Exhibitions, which is on display at the Culture Center in the State Capitol Complex in Charleston.

MU art gallery director John Farley and ceramics graduate and current graduate student Tommy Warf were both invited to exhibit work in this exhibition.

In addition, Farley and Marshall artists Dan Cook, Miyuki Cook and Jason Kiley will exhibit artwork in Exhibition 2012, which is an invited juried show that takes place biannually at the Huntington Museum of Art.

Charleston's Inspired series was designed to celebrate West Virginia's sesquicentennial.

"It's an honor to be given the opportunity to display additional works at the Culture Center as part of the Inspired series," Farley said. "For myself - and the other artists as well - it is a chance to view our winning works in a broader context, and give the public a more complete sense of what motivates us as artists."

"It is very flattering to have our work shown with the best of the best artists from our state," Warf added. "It is moments like this that make me feel as though I am a true artist and not just the lucky student."

The Inspired exhibition opened Monday and will continue through Sunday, Feb. 10. The gallery is free and open to the public.

Huntington's Exhibition 2012, sponsored by the Tri-State Arts Association, opened Sunday and will continue until Saturday, Oct. 21.

Since 1953 the Tri-State Arts Association's purpose has been to encourage and promote a public interest in and understanding of all schools of art, as well as develop a closer relationship between art and the community, said Libby Varner, the 2012 exhibition chairperson.

"This exhibition encompasses that goal," Varner said. "The dynamic artistry in this area cannot be denied and all of the artwork submitted to this show was wonderful. The TSAA encourages all artists to indulge in their visions."

-------------

Photo: Tommy Warf, left, with The West Virginia Coal Ladies Auxiliary, 2011, mixed clays and John Farley with Don Kinnard: When We Die, We will Die with Our Arms Unbound, 2011, colored pencil. The two works were chosen for the Inspired series at the Culture Center in Charleston.

 
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Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students and faculty inducted into national honor society

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve 4th-year medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were inducted today into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) in a ceremony at the Harless Auditorium in the Marshall University Medical Center.

The society, established in 2002, is an association of individuals and medical school chapters whose members are selected as exemplars of empathy, compassion, altruism, integrity and service in working with patients, their families and others in the field of medicine.

The GHHS is an initiative of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation which was created in 1988 by Dr. Arnold P. Gold and his wife Dr. Sandra Gold in an effort to nurture and preserve the tradition of the caring physician.   The Gold Humanism Honor Society now celebrates 10 years and 101 chapters in the United States and Canada.

"My husband and I are delighted to represent the Arnold P. Gold Foundation at this inaugural induction of the Gold Humanism Honor Society," Dr. Sandra Gold said. "The creation of this new chapter signifies the students and faculty at Marshall place high value on the interpersonal skills and attitudes that are essential for excellent patient care."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, was honored in 2002 with the Arnold P. Gold-Healthcare Foundation of New Jersey Humanism in Medicine Award.

"The GHHS honors that aspect of being a health care provider which I think is most admirable. Of the different distinctions that I've been fortunate enough to receive, being selected as an honoree from the GHHS in 2002 is probably the one I'm proudest of," Shapiro said.

Shapiro went on to say he's extremely proud of the Marshall students and Marshall faculty who have demonstrated outstanding commitment to excellence and compassion in patient care and are now being inducted.

The following students were inducted into the honorary:

  • Brian Abadir, Proctorville, Ohio
  • Matthew Q. Christiansen, Gandeeville, W.Va.
  • Matthew B. Curry, Huntington, W.Va.
  • John B. Epling, Summersville, W.Va.
  • Joshua A. Hess, Hurricane, W.Va.
  • Caleb R. Huff, Glenwood, W.Va.
  • Jacob T. Kilgore, Kenova, W.Va.
  • P. Gordon McLemore, Murray, Utah
  • Bi Mo, Philadelphia, Pa.
  • Kathleen H. Richardson, Long Valley, N.J.
  • Melissa A. Rowe, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Adam T. Short, South Charleston, W.Va.

 

Several faculty members were also inducted into the society and recognized as recipients of The Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.   They include: Dr. Renee S. Domanico, associate professor, pediatrics; Dr. Shirley M. Neitch, professor, internal medicine; and Dr. Gerard J. Oakley, professor, obstetrics & gynecology. Dr. Darshana T. Shah, professor, pathology and associate dean of faculty affairs & professional development was also inducted and will serve as chapter advisor.

Attending today's ceremony was Dr. Richard I. Levin, newly-selected President and CEO of the Gold Foundation.   Levin formerly served as vice principal for health affairs and dean of the faculty of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, as well as vice dean for education, faculty and academic affairs at New York University.

In addition to creating the Gold Humanism Honor Society, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation is credited with starting the White Coat Ceremony welcoming medical students into their first year of education.  The White Coat Ceremony or a similar rite of passage takes place at more than 90 percent of the schools of medicine and osteopathy in the United States.   The Foundation also facilitates nearly a dozen other programs all geared toward nurturing the relationship between physician and patient.


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Conference and reception to celebrate state's coal mining enterprise

"Rocket Boys" author Homer Hickam among those to be honored with awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives of the state's mining industry will gather at Tamarack in Beckley on Thursday, Oct. 4, for the 2012 Miners' Celebration a conference and reception to celebrate the past, present and future of West Virginia's coal mining enterprise.

The free program will begin at 3 p.m. with a series of short presentations to highlight successes in coalfield community development. Speakers will include West Virginia Adjutant General Maj. General James A. Hoyer, Rachel Lester of the West Virginia Division of Energy's Office of Coalfield Community Development, coalfields historian Stan Bumgardner and Gary Hartley of The Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve.

The reception and light buffet will begin at 5:30 p.m. and is open to all conference attendees. McDowell County native and bestselling author Homer Hickam, who wrote "Rocket Boys" and other memoirs about growing up in the mining community of Coalwood, will be on hand to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award and to participate in the program.

Conference organizers also will present "Because of You" awards to recognize nine individuals for their significant contributions to West Virginia's coalfields heritage in the following categories:  Community Re-Investment, Community Involvement, Engineer, Safety Professional, Equipment Innovation, Management Professional, Women in Mining, Educator of the Year and Coal Miner of the Year. The Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present several awards, including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.

The program will conclude with a salute to those who led the community effort to build a memorial to the victims of the Upper Big Branch mine disaster. The monument, which stands along state Route 3 in Whitesville, was dedicated on July 27.

"West Virginia's mining industry depends upon thousands of individuals in many different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the conference planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every one of these people whether they are miners, safety engineers, environmental professionals, equipment suppliers, community leaders or teachers contributes to each ton of coal produced.

"It is because of them the mining industry is successful. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved in what we call our state's mining 'ecosystem.' "

Szwilski said the Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; Strategic Solutions LLC; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

Sponsors include Brickstreet Insurance, Marshall University, State Electric Supply Co., the West Virginia Division of Energy and West Virginia Executive magazine. Contributors are Alpha Natural Resources, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP and The State Journal.

The conference and reception are free and open to the public, but advance registration is requested. To register online or for more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas


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Marshall medical alumni celebrate 'Milestones and Memories' homecoming with events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alumni of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine gather in Huntington today and Saturday for the 26th annual alumni weekend.

Today's events include continuing medical education sessions featuring the Dr. Tara and Indu Wable Sharma Annual Memorial Lecture with keynote speaker Henri J. Roca III, M.D., beginning at 2:15 p.m. The lecture will take place in the Harless Auditorium at the Marshall University Medical Center.

Roca is the medical director at Greenwich Hospital Center for Integrative Medicine and a medical school professor at both Louisiana State University and Yale.   Roca graduated from medical school at LSU and completed residency training at Marshall.

The day rounds out with an alumni banquet at 6:30 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus where Sen. Ron Stollings, M.D., Class of 1982, will be recognized as the 2012 Distinguished Alumnus.

Stollings is board-certified in internal medicine and has a private practice in Madison.   He has served West Virginians as a state senator in the West Virginia Legislature since 2006 and is chairman of the Senate Health and Human Resources committee.   He is a former member of the Higher Education Policy Commission and past president of the West Virginia Medical Association.

Additional weekend activities include a Saturday morning meet and greet with Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, and a tailgate prior to the 7 p.m. game against Western Carolina. The meet and green starts at 10:30 a.m. at the Marshall University Medical Center, and the tailgate begins at 4:30 p.m. on the field behind the Robert "Bobby" L. Pruett Training Complex on Third Avenue.

Classes celebrating with reunions this year are the Class of 1982, Class of 1987, Class of 1992, Class of 1997, Class of 2002 and the Class of 2007.


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Washington Post columnist to read from her memoir at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Washington Post columnist Donna Britt will read publicly from her memoir, Brothers (& Me), at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, at Marshall University.

The reading, which is free to the public, will take place in Smith Hall 154 on Marshall's Huntington campus. Britt's appearance is part of the Visiting Writers Series at MU, which is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and the English Department.

Britt wrote for The Detroit Free Press and USA Today before she joined The Washington Post as a columnist in 1991. Her column explores issues of race relations in America, gender politics, popular trends, books, film, music and various other topics.

She was born in Gary, Ind., the sole daughter in a family of four. She studied film at Hampton University before going on to earn a master's degree from the University of Michigan. During her last year in Ann Arbor, her older brother Darrell was shot to death by Gary police - the subject of Brothers (& Me), which was listed as one of "10 Titles to Pick Up Now" in  O Magazine.

Britt has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in journalism, and she received a Distinguished Writing Award for commentary and column writing from the American Society of Newspaper Editors.

For more information, contact Dr. Rachael Peckham in Marshall's Department of English at 304-696-3649.


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Thursday September 6, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

"This test is part of our plan to test the system at least once per semester," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

The most recent test of the system occurred Jan. 25.

The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall and delivered thru the Blackboard Connect service, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those in the active Marshall community (faculty, staff and students) who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at http://www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.


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Thursday September 6, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Grant allows June Harless Center to expand Arts and Bots funding

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development in the College of Education at Marshall University was recently awarded a $10,000 grant from Alcon Laboratories, Inc., to expand funding for the Arts and Bots project.

Arts and Bots integrates technology, literature and history through the use of familiar art supplies, circuit boards, lights, motors and sensors while promoting technological literacy and informal learning. Students design, build and program robots that tell stories of literary and historical characters and events.

Arts and Bots is one of several projects implemented by the Harless CREATE satellite, a branch of Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab at the June Harless Center. The satellite integrates robotics and technology initiatives in West Virginia schools including Marshall University Professional Development Schools. This initiative aligns with the mission of the Harless Center to provide leadership in education initiatives for West Virginia educators and students.

The grant, which was originally designed to encourage middle school girls' interest in STEM topics, was expanded to include both genders and a larger age group due to its success. The funds will be used to provide teachers stipends, equipment and support to 16 teachers in eight schools. In addition, it will enable educators and rural communities in West Virginia a real-time portal to the flow of cutting edge technologies and programs being developed at the lab in Pittsburgh.

The vision of the CREATE Lab is to catalyze local and global community change by technologically empowering people to creatively explore, learn, share and directly improve our ecology. The Harless Center's mission is to provide leadership in education initiatives for West Virginia educators and students.

For more information, contact Dr. Stan Maynard at maynard@marshall.edu or visit marshall.edu/harless and cmucreatelab.org.

Also, anyone interested in supporting the June Harless Center programs within the College of Education may contact Rick Robinson in the Marshall Foundation by phone at 304-696-7081, or by e-mail at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 5, 2012
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Estate planning seminar offered Sept. 13 at Marshall Foundation Hall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., is sponsoring an estate planning seminar Thursday, Sept. 13, at the MU Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

Howard "Buck" Crews and James Graley, attorneys with Campbell Woods, PLLC, will present the seminar titled "Create an Estate Plan that Works for You." They will discuss topics such as impending tax law changes, charitable giving, wills, trusts and annuities.

The event, which is free to the public, runs from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Foundation Hall, which is located at 519 John Marshall Dr. on the Huntington campus. Refreshments and light hors d'oeuvres will be served.


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Wednesday September 5, 2012
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MU students needed to carry flags for Healing Field 9/11 flag memorial

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will take part in Huntington's second annual Healing Field 9/11 flag memorial by carrying American flags in a march from the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus to Spring Hill Cemetery at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7.

Student Body President Ray Harrell said he is asking 75 students to each carry a flag to the cemetery, where they will be placed in the field in honor of the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash. Students interested in participating may call Harrell at 954-495-5181. The website for the event is http://www.healingfield.org/huntington12/.

A brief ceremony will follow the march.

Three thousand full-sized United States flags will fly on eight poles in perfect rows at Spring Hill, which is located at 1427 Norway Ave. The living display of heroism will symbolize a patriotic tribute to the strength and unity of Americans.

Flags will be posted from Friday through Tuesday, Sept. 11.


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Wednesday September 5, 2012
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Tri-State restaurants invited to participate in Marshall University's 49th annual International Festival on Saturday, Nov. 3

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - International restaurants from throughout the Tri-State Area will be participating in Marshall University's 49th annual International Festival, scheduled from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3, at the SMG-managed Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Restaurants can still apply for a spot in the festival. Participants will receive a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales and promotion of their restaurant. The deadline to apply is Friday, Sept. 14, and space is limited. The application form can be downloaded from the Marshall University Center for International Programs website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

In past years, the festival has taken place in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. However, as the event's popularity has grown, so, too, has the need for a larger venue. As the largest entertainment venue in the Tri-State, Big Sandy Superstore Arena hosts concerts, family shows, trade shows, regional and state athletic competitions.

"Typically, over 1,000 people will attend," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs. "But we anticipate many more people will attend this year with the participation of the restaurants and the larger venue."

Admission to the festival is free and the event is open to the public.

In addition to the international foods prepared by restaurants, the International Festival will also feature music and dance from around the world along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures provided by Marshall University international students and the Tri-State international community, in partnership with Cabell County Schools and Mountwest Community and Technical College.

"The international festival events are the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to enjoy the international diversity and global opportunities found on the Marshall campus and in the surrounding community," Egnor said.  Currently, Marshall enrolls more than 400 international students from 60 countries.  Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp has set a goal for Marshall to double the number of international students in the next three years.

Each restaurant will offer tastings of its signature menu items.  Egnor said that by purchasing food tickets, guests can sample a variety of foods from all over the world at a very affordable price.  "Festivalgoers," he said, "will have an opportunity to easily explore new restaurants and sample different international dishes they would not ordinarily try. You won't walk away hungry."

For further details about Marshall University's annual International Festival, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu, or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.


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Wednesday September 5, 2012
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students participate in national addiction education program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three medical students at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine each attended an intensive addiction education institute  at the Betty Ford Institute in California this summer.

The three second-year students, Aaron M. Dom, from Wellersburg, Pa., William D. Hall, from Fairfax, Va., and Mindy Becker Hodge of Ashland, Ky., attended three different sessions which focused on giving them the opportunity to become part of the world renowned Betty Ford Center experience.

Instead of participation in a classroom setting, the students learn by integration into the daily life of either a patient in treatment or participants in the family program of the center.

"Addiction sends out shock waves to everyone associated with the patient," Dom said. "While I knew I would see some patients with addiction in my future practice, I learned that I'm more likely to see the family members who are impacted by their loved one's addiction. This was a great opportunity to see addiction from a family member's perspective."

Students Hall and Hodge also agreed that the experience was incredibly beneficial.

"Addiction in all forms is a huge problem, particularly in our Appalachian area," Hodge said.  "This institute helped me learn how to do a better job of managing the medical case and better relate to my patients."

Hall said one of the most important aspects of the training for him "was the realization that addiction is truly a disease and can be treated."  Additionally, he hoped by participating he'd learn some of the ways to defeat the stigma of mental illness and addiction.

Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students have been chosen to attend the Institute since 2005.

"We are delighted that our students have been selected to participate in this program which only invites about 100 students every year," said Dr. Marie Veitia, associate dean for student affairs.  "It is a great opportunity for them to learn about addiction in a manner that is unique and not available locally."

The mission of the Betty Ford Institute is to conduct and support collaborative programs of prevention, education and research that will lead to a reduction in the effects of addictive disease on individuals - especially parents and children in family settings - as well as on organizations and communities.

----------

Photos: Medical students Aaron Dom (above), Mindy Hodge (middle), and WIlliam Hall (below) attended seminars at the Betty Ford Institute in California this summer.


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Tuesday September 4, 2012
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Amicus Curiae Lecture Series continues with five notable speakers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five lectures featuring notable scholars and opinion leaders who will talk about the Constitution and important matters in the nation's political process will be delivered during the 2012-2013 academic year at Marshall University.

Each lecture is part of a series on the Constitution of the United States of America titled Amicus Curiae, or Friend of the Court.

The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy, which debuted a year ago, is sponsored by Marshall's Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy and the College of Liberal Arts, with financial support from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

All five lectures will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

"We are extremely fortunate to have the support of the West Virginia Humanities Council and Simon D. Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy for this lecture series," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series is a classroom to the greater Huntington community. We hope that all people who want to learn more about this great nation and its Constitution will join us for these informative and provocative lectures."

Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, said the excellent attendance during the first year of the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series "demonstrated that both the Marshall community and the community at large are passionately interested in issues related to our democracy.

"This year, we are thrilled with both the caliber of the lecturers and the relevance of the topics they will address," Proctor said. "We have an acknowledged expert on Congress coming to discuss the dysfunction plaguing our national politics and to offer solutions.  We have the director of the Center for Jacksonian America coming to talk about the election Jackson alleged was stolen from him.  In November, an internationally-known expert on the presidency will discuss the failures of the electoral college - a particularly relevant issue in an election year.

"In the spring, the co-author of The Great Decision - a Supreme Court litigator and former White House counsel to President Clinton - is coming to discuss Marbury v. Madison and the political context surrounding John Marshall's most important decision during the week of its 210th anniversary.  Finally, in April, we have a Marshall alumnus, who graduated from Harvard Law School and has spent his career in the Department of Justice, coming to discuss civil rights."

Here is a brief look at each speaker and his topic:

7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012 - Dr. Thomas E. Mann, the W. Averell Harriman chair and senior fellow in Governance Studies at The Brookings Institution, will speak on Congress's role in governance and its current performance in fulfilling its mandate as outlined in the Constitution.  He posits that there have been worse times for Congress, but comparable periods include the run-up to the Civil War and to the War of 1812. Mann is the co-author, with Dr. Norman Ornstein, of The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track
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Friday August 31, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine volunteer faculty member honored with national teaching award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jason A. Hudak, a three-time Marshall University graduate, has been selected as a recipient of the 2012 Pfizer Teacher Development Award. The prestigious honor is given to only 13 physicians nationwide by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Foundation.

The Pfizer award is presented to community-based, new physicians who combine their clinical practice with part-time teaching of family medicine. Hudak has a private practice in Barboursville and serves as a volunteer clinical faculty member with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

"I was really surprised to receive this award," Hudak said.  "As a new volunteer faculty member, I was learning to teach just as much as the students were learning to learn. It's been an unexpected blessing."

Hudak graduated from Marshall with his undergraduate degree in 2001 and then with his medical degree in 2005.   He completed a residency in Family Medicine in 2007.

Hudak was nominated by colleagues in the Marshall Department of Family and Community Health, including Dr. Mitch Shaver, who is residency director for the department.

"We are so proud of Dr. Hudak," Shaver said.  "A professional demeanor was one of many outstanding attributes Dr. Hudak exhibited during his residency and I think a reason why students really enjoy their rotation in Family Medicine with him - he portrays such a great example."

This is the second consecutive time a Marshall University Family Medicine residency graduate has received the AAFP Pfizer Teaching Development Award.   Last year, Dr. Scott Davis was also recognized.

Hudak will be honored at the AAFP's Scientific Assembly meeting later this year in Philadelphia.


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Friday August 31, 2012
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State Supreme Court of Appeals returns to Marshall Sept. 18; public invited to attend session and hear four cases

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals returns to Marshall University's Huntington campus in September to conduct a session that includes four distinctive cases.

The Court's appearance on Tuesday, Sept. 18, will be its fifth in the past eight years at Marshall, but first since 2009. It is one of the many events to be staged during Constitution Week at MU, which begins Monday, Sept. 10, and concludes Thursday, Sept. 27.

The docket for the Supreme Court's visit can be found at http://www.courtswv.gov/supreme-court/calendar/2012/dockets/sept-18-12ad.html. The session begins at 10 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The public is invited and encouraged to attend the session and a reception honoring the judges which follows in the Performing Arts Center lobby. In addition to hors d'oeuvres, pizza will be served.

The five Supreme Court justices hear appeals of decisions over all matters decided in the circuit courts, including criminal convictions affirmed on appeal from magistrate court and appeals from administrative agencies.

Menis E. Ketchum II is the Court's chief justice. He is a former member and chairman of Marshall University's board of governors. Other justices are Robin Jean Davis, Brent D. Benjamin, Margaret L. Workman and Thomas E. McHugh.

Obstructing an officer, negligence and first-degree murder convictions will be appealed during the session. A simple way to describe the other case to be heard, which is actually the first on the docket, is, "Can my neighbor order my dog killed?" It deals with dog-related injuries sustained by a 2-year-old girl.

"It is a very interesting docket," said Dr. Alan Gould, director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall, which sponsors Constitution Week activities. "We invite all students, faculty and members of the community to join us as the Court hears and rules on these noteworthy appeals."  

Constitution Week at Marshall is an annual observance to commemorate the adoption of the United States Constitution and the contributions of Chief Justice John Marshall, for whom the university is named. Constitution Week activities are sponsored by the John Deaver Drinko Academy.

Gould said Constitution Week was started by United States Senator Robert C. Byrd in order to draw attention to the important document that our system of government is based upon.

"Included within federal legislation that was passed in 2004 was a provision requiring educational institutions that receive federal funds to set some time aside on or near the September 17th anniversary of the document's signing to study the United States Constitution," he said.

Highlighting the other events planned during Constitution Week is a slightly revamped quoits tournament. Quoits, which is similar to horseshoes, was John Marshall's favorite sport.

On Monday, Sept. 10, teams of faculty, staff, students, fraternities and sororities can sign up to play for trophies and prizes. To sign up, participants need to stop by the quoits pits on the west end of Buskirk Field between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. that Monday, e-mail Kristen Pack at milhoan4@marshall.edu, or call her at 304-696-3183. Deadline to register is 5 p.m. that day.

Competition begins Tuesday, Sept. 11, and runs through Thursday, Sept. 13. On Friday, Sept. 14, the winning team will play the Quoits Presidential Round, taking on MU President Stephen J. Kopp in a new competition. That game begins at 11:30 a.m.

On Monday, Sept. 24, as in years past, the President's Invitational Quoits Media Challenge will take place at 11:30 a.m. WSAZ's Tim Irr and Keith Morehouse won the championship last year. All quoits action is on the west end of Buskirk Field. Before the quoits challenge begins, President Kopp will cut the John Marshall birthday cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

Here is a brief look at other Constitution Week events:

  • 4:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 17 - Announcement of the winner of the Judge Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay competition, John Marshall Dining Room

  • 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26 - First of five Amicus Curiae lectures. The guest speaker is Thomas E. Mann, author of New York Times Bestseller, It's Even Worse than It Looks: How The American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism, Marshall Foundation Hall

  • 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 - The Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility. Professor Jean Edward Smith will speak on the topic, History Misconstrued: Marshall, Grant and Eisenhower, Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre


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Wednesday August 29, 2012
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Lectures by distinguished scholars center around civil rights movement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host a series of lectures by distinguished scholars  centering around the long civil rights movement in the U.S. during the fall semester, according to Dr. David Trowbridge, associate professor of history and director of African and African American Studies.

"The series is inspired by a course that I am co-teaching with Joan Browning, one of the original Freedom Riders," Trowbridge said. "Joan told me that her top priority was to get students to think beyond the 'Eyes on the Prize' series.  I hope these six topics will help to achieve that goal.  Our speakers include Bancroft Prize winners and recipients of the Carter G. Woodson Medallion.  We are certainly fortunate to have six scholars of this magnitude come to Marshall this semester."

The lecturers and their topics include:

Tuesday, Sept. 11 - Dr. Thomas J. Sugrue will speak on the unique aspects of the civil rights struggle in Northern communities.  He is the author of Sweet Land of Liberty:  The Forgotten Struggle  for Civil Rights in the North, and is the recipient of the Bancroft Prize for the best book in the field of history.

Tuesday, Sept. 25 - Dr. Tracy  K'Meyer will lecture about the unique history of nearby communities within Kentucky and their experience during the civil rights movement.  K'Meyer is the author of Civil Rights in the Gateway to the South:  Louisville, Kentucky, 1945-1980.

Tuesday, Oct. 9 - Dr. Hasan Kwame  Jeffries will address the voting rights movement in Alabama which gave rise to the original Black Panthers a local political party in Lowndes County, Ala.  He is the author of Bloody Lowndes:  Civil Rights and Black Power in  Alabama's Black Belt.

Tuesday, Oct. 23 - Dr. Danielle McGuire will speak on the connection between the civil rights movement and efforts to confront violence against  black women in the Jim Crow South.  She is the author of At the Dark End of the Street:  Black Women, Rape, and Resistance,  A New History of the Civil Rights Movement.  McGuire was the winner of the 2011 Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.

Tuesday, Nov. 6 - Dr. John M. Glen's topic will be the connection between Appalachia and the civil rights movement.   A scholar of Appalachian history, he will discuss the importance of the Highlander School and other interracial collaborations in Appalachia during the movement.  Glen is the author of Highlander:  No Ordinary School.

Tuesday, Nov. 13 - The final lecture features Dr. Bettye Collier-Thomas speaking on the unique experiences of women and their contributions to the civil rights movement.  She also will discuss the way the civil rights movement led to greater activism among women.  She is the author of numerous books including the award-winning  Sisters in the Struggle:  African-American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement.

All six lectures will begin at 7 p.m. in the Marshall Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on the Huntington campus and are free to the public.  This series is sponsored by the West Virginia Humanities Council and Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, the Center for African-American Students' Programs, Multicultural Affairs, the Department of History, and the African and African American Studies Program. 


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Tuesday August 28, 2012
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Students from Raleigh, Mingo, Kanawha counties awarded Friends of Coal Scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University freshmen from Raleigh, Mingo and Kanawha counties in West Virginia have been awarded the Friends of Coal Scholarships for 2012.

The recipients are Marva Virtiena Lewis of Beckley, Christopher George Robinson of Chattaroy and Erinn Whitney Rodriguez of Gallagher.

Lewis is a graduate of Woodrow Wilson High School in Raleigh County and will major in Pre-Science/Pre-Med; Robinson is a graduate of Mingo Central High School in Mingo County and will major in Pre-Science/Pre-Med; and Rodriguez is a graduate of Riverside High School in Kanawha County and will major in BSN Nursing.

Each student will receive a one-time award of $2,500, which is the result of the sponsorship provided by the Friends of Coal for the Marshall University-West Virginia University football series. Marshall plays WVU Saturday, Sept. 1, in Morgantown in the seventh and final game of the cross-state rival series known as the Friends of Coal Bowl.

Students eligible to receive the scholarship must have had high GPAs in high school, live in southern West Virginia and demonstrate financial need.

"The Friends of Coal from across the state are so proud of these great students from Raleigh, Mingo and Kanawha counties who represent the strength, tenacity and integrity that will help secure the future for our industry, our people and the State of West Virginia," said Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association. "The accomplishments of these students exemplify the high standards of hard work, dedication and loyalty for which West Virginians are so well known. We're so pleased to recognize their achievements."

Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs at Marshall, said the Friends of Coal Scholarships have benefited both schools and all of the recipients in many ways.

"We thank the West Virginia Coal Association for their support of higher education," Hensley said. "Eighteen Marshall University students have received the Friends of Coal Scholarships, dating back to 2007 when the first three were awarded. Everybody wins with these scholarships - the recipients, the university and the state."


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Tuesday August 28, 2012
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Marshall University scientist receives National Science Foundation grant for laboratory equipment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University scientist has received a $338,845 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to fund high-end laboratory equipment that will be used by researchers and students in biochemistry, chemistry and physics.

The grant to Dr. Derrick Kolling, assistant professor of chemistry, along with colleagues at Marshall and the University of Charleston, was awarded competitively through the NSF's Major Research Instrumentation program. Kolling will use the funds to purchase a device called an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The equipment will be housed in Kolling's lab at Marshall.

According to Kolling, the spectrometer incorporates a powerful magnet and a source of microwaves to observe unpaired electrons many of which are known as free radicals.

"The real power of this instrument lies in the fact that it can identify free radicals and map their surroundings," he said. "Free radicals play a vital role in a number of chemical processes, including control over blood pressure and the underlying chemistry of photosynthesis, among many others."

He added that EPR spectroscopy is also useful in understanding the electronic organization of many metal compounds.

Kolling says he and colleagues will use the new equipment to enhance their ongoing research projects to improve alternative energy production, help detect environmental toxins and chemical and biological threats, design more efficient semiconductors and safer radioactive waste disposal systems, and further the medical community's understanding of the disease atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries."

He said, "At least five of our faculty members in three departments will be using this device in their research right away. Just as importantly, it will immediately benefit our students. Studies show that student interest in science is enhanced by their use of high-end equipment. Generating and measuring samples on this spectroscope is an opportunity that few undergraduate students get. Through the hands-on experience they gain here, they will become better trained and more scientifically sophisticated."

He added that the University of Charleston collaborated on the grant proposal and at least one of that institution's faculty members will be using the instrument in his research. The UC faculty member also will travel to Marshall's Huntington campus to perform measurements on his students' lab samples, bringing students with him as funds allow.

Kolling noted that the nearest EPR spectrometer is currently located several hours from Marshall.

"The drive alone creates a significant hurdle," he said. "The complication of transporting temperature-sensitive materials, along with the loss of at least a day due to travel, significantly hampers our research. We are looking forward to having the equipment here, where we can have ready access."

Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science, praised Kolling's efforts to secure the grant, saying there are also benefits from the synergistic effect of having the device.

Somerville said, "The availability of this equipment will bring together faculty from different departments and different institutions with greater frequency, increasing the likelihood that collaborations will develop. These collaborative interactions are good news for the region's entire scientific community."

Dr. John Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, said the equipment will provide a tremendous boost to the university's research infrastructure and educational programs.

"With the growing emphasis on interdisciplinary research, it is important that we continue to add tools that can be used in a broad range of studies," Maher added. "Having access to instrumentation like this spectrometer is becoming vital not only for performing cutting-edge research but also for training the next generation of scientists. Congratulations to Dr. Kolling and his co-investigators for this significant award. We applaud the immense effort and teamwork that produced it."

Kolling's co-investigators on the grant included Dr. Michael Castellani, professor and chairman of Marshall's Department of Chemistry; Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry and director of the university's Molecular and Biological Imaging Center; Dr. Nalini Santanam, associate professor of pharmacology and coordinator of the cardiovascular, obesity and diabetes research cluster at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine; and Dr. Xiaoping Sun, associate professor and coordinator of the chemistry program at the University of Charleston. Kolling added that Drs. Xiaojuan Fan and Maria Babiuc-Hamilton, assistant professors of physics, also contributed to the grant proposal by suggesting the use of the EPR spectrometer in the development of new semiconductors and in physics teaching laboratories, respectively.


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Monday August 27, 2012
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Successful Week of Welcome helps freshmen get ready for college careers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 1,750 Marshall University freshmen experienced the WOW factor last week on the Huntington campus. They learned about college life during the Week of Welcome (WOW), and today the Class of 2016 began the process of learning a lot more with the start of fall classes.

"They've been given a great deal of information and advice to digest that will help them not only in the first few days of their college lives, but throughout the next four years," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. "It was a very educational and - hopefully - fun week for the students, and we believe they are eager to get started."

Among the many highlights of the week, Ormiston said, were the President's Freshman  Convocation at Cam Henderson Center, the group photo taken in the circle outside the Drinko Library, and the support the students received from their families.

The family picnic on Wednesday was a huge success. Cheryl King, operations manager with Sodexo, said the estimated 2,200-2,300 students and their families consumed about 1,800 hamburgers and 2,300 hot dogs during the 90-minute event. The Marching Thunder, the largest band in MU history with 330 members, performed on Buskirk Field and the group Jabberwocky performed on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

"We've gotten really good feedback about the picnic and other activities," said Dr. Corley Dennison, associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies.

MU President Stephen J. Kopp spoke at the Convocation, along with Ormiston, head football Coach Doc Holliday, head men's basketball Coach Tom Herrion and student body President Ray Harrell Jr.  In his address to the freshmen, Dr. Kopp explained the importance of obtaining a college degree, and urged them to finish what they start. He also talked about the power of preparation, the importance of reading and the merits of hard work..

Entering college, he said, represents "an unparalleled chapter in your life."

"You each stand at the defining moment of your life," he said. "We believe in you; hopefully, you believe in yourself."

Dennison said 1,745 students registered for UNI 100 Freshman First Class this fall. Some 1,600 took part in the convocation. UNI 100 is an integral part of Week of Welcome. It is an introduction to academic structures and expectations of college life, and literally is the first class most freshmen will take at Marshall. Successful completion of the course earns one hour of elective credit.

Because they were concerned with the freshmen remaining in large groups during Week of Welcome, Marshall officials changed the format this year. Instead of keeping them in their large college groups, they divided them into UNI 100 classroom sessions of anywhere from 25 to 40 students. In all, there were 57 sessions.

"We were concerned about the large groups and we tried to address that," said Sherri Stepp, director of University College. "I think the new format worked."

Marshall also added 80 volunteer peer mentors to assist session facilitators this year. The mentors were all Marshall students, mostly undergraduate.

"The peer mentors assisted the facilitators and added credibility to what the facilitators were saying," Dennison said. "Plus, the mentors will send e-mails to students this week, making sure everything is ok and to see if they need anything."

Through Tuesday, students can get help finding their classes and other useful information from MU staff and students stationed under a green tent on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

Photos: (Above) Hundreds of freshmen and their families took part in the Week of Welcome Family Picnic Wednesday, Aug. 22, on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Photo by Tyler Kes/Marshall University. (Middle) Trombone players from the Marching Thunder perform Wednesday, Aug. 22, during the family picnic on Buskirk Field. (Below) Marshall freshmen wearing matching t-shirts representing their colleges listen to a speaker Thursday, Aug. 23, during the President's Freshman Convocation at Henderson Center. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday August 24, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New parking facility ready for Marshall students, employees; numerous upgrades made over the summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students reporting to Marshall University's Huntington campus for the start of fall classes on Monday, Aug. 27, will have new parking from which to choose.

A $7 million, six-story parking facility located on Sixth Avenue next to the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center will be open and ready for business. The garage has 411 spaces and two elevators, and payment will be 50 cents an hour for employees, students and guests. Employees also have the choice of paying a flat fee of $40 a month.

About 40 metered spaces from the surface lot used for staging the garage project will be available as well.

"This new parking facility will help commuter students and guests on campus," said Jim Terry, Marshall's director of public safety. "We are looking forward to implementing this kind of operation for the first time on our campus. We think a lot of people will take advantage of these new spaces."

Terry said the entrance to the garage Monday, Aug. 27, through Wednesday, Aug. 29, will be off John Marshall Drive and the 5 alley. Beginning on Thursday, the 30th, the main entrance on 6th Avenue will be open.

All that week, Aug. 27-31, parking in the new facility will be free. Prices go into effect after Labor Day. The garage will be open from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. each Monday through Friday, with no overnight parking. It will be closed on weekends, although that could change depending on demand.

The facility is brightly lit and energy efficient and has 50 cameras and 12 emergency phones. It is one of many projects at various levels completed this summer - some on campus, some off - by Marshall University. Some of the major ones include:

  • Extensive renovations to the Robert W. Coon Education Building at the Huntington VA Medical Center in Spring Valley, now the home of Marshall's School of Pharmacy. The $8.9 million overhaul resulted in a cutting-edge, technology-enabled learning environment and research facility. A ribbon cutting celebrating the school's opening took place Aug. 14.

  • Abatement and demolition of Memorial Field House on Fifth Avenue to make room for a new Marshall University soccer complex, which will open in 2013. Cost was $616,000. Marshall's men's team will play most of its home matches this fall in Charleston and Hurricane, while the women will play home matches at Cabell Midland, Huntington and Hurricane high schools.

  • Renovations of 40 classrooms in Corbly, Harris and Smith halls on the Huntington campus. Technology upgrades were made, new furniture, white boards and podiums were purchased, and many rooms were painted and received electrical upgrades. Total cost was $442,000.

  • Installation of a new sound system at Cam Henderson Center, home of Marshall men's and women's basketball and volleyball. The system, installed by Newtech Systems Inc., from Ashland, Ky., for $405,000, is a vast improvement to the old one, and is audible in all areas of the arena. Also, alterations to the air ventilation system will make the arena more comfortable.

  • Replacement of multiple rooftop air handling units and other work, such as replacing multiple exhaust fans, at the Twin Towers residence halls for $741,000.
    HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) renovations at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center for $1,537,000.

  • Lobby renovations at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in downtown Huntington for $165,000.

  • Various concrete replacement projects at Joan C. Edwards Stadium for $37,000.

Numerous other summer projects - some large, some small - were completed, such as replacing the sidewalk at Gullickson Hall for $26,500 and converting the former auditorium on the second floor of Old Main to office space for $240,000.

Many landscaping projects were completed during the summer, and repairs and upgrades were made in many buildings.  In Jenkins Hall, room 101 was painted and received new carpeting; in Corbly Hall, automatic doors were replaced; in Old Main, central heat and air conditioning were added in three rooms on the third floor. In Henderson Center, old lights were replaced in the concourse; and, trees were removed near Corbly Hall. Off campus, the site of the 1970 Marshall plane crash in Kenova was spruced up.

Also, Marshall's residence halls received an upgrade in wireless connectivity, HVAC units and carbon monoxide detectors.

A major and required project was the installation of the carbon monoxide detectors in all residence halls that use gas.  Holderby Hall received 15 detectors, Twin Towers East 31, Twin Towers West 31, Buskirk Hall  nine, First Year Residence Hall North 11 and First Year Residence Hall South 11. Total cost of this project was more than $61,000.

The John Marshall Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center underwent a $125,000 renovation this summer. Among the improvements are new flooring, upholstery, countertops, equipment and cabinets.

New vertical banners now hang from the front of the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center on the corner of 5th Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard. The green and white Welcome Center banners are highly visible to traffic from all directions approaching the intersection.

"They're so large and dynamic, they will help people locate us more easily," said Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment at Marshall. "It's been easy for people to go past us and not realized they missed us. These new banners will help people find us a lot more easily."

---------------

Photos: (Above) Marshall's new six-story parking facility, which has 411 spaces, will be open in time for the start of the fall semester Monday, Aug. 27. (Middle) The land where the Veterans Memorial Field House stood is the future home of Marshall University's soccer complex. The field house was demolished this summer. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University. (Below) New banners hang from the front of the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center at Marshall University, making the building much more visible to visitors. Photo by Dave Wellman/Marshall University.


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Thursday August 23, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University sponsors regional biotechnology conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is one of the organizers of the 10th annual Ohio Valley Affiliates for Life Sciences (OVALS) conference to be held Oct. 1-2 in Louisville, Ky.

With the theme "Meeting Health Care Challenges through Technology and Novel Approaches," this year's conference will bring together the region's research institutions, federal agencies, industry, investors and service providers to discuss biotechnology innovation and commercialization opportunities.

The target audience includes university researchers, technology transfer professionals, corporate scientists, business development professionals, state and local economic development officials, attorneys, investors and entrepreneurs.

According to Amy Melton, assistant director of the Technology Transfer Office at the Marshall University Research Corporation, the conference provides a forum for exposure to the thinking of national leaders, opens up strategic dialogues and expands opportunities for networking.

"Anyone interested in commercialization of biotechnology, collaboration opportunities and creating economic impact is encouraged to attend," she said. "The topics on the agenda really complement Marshall's strengths in biotech research and focus on innovation."

She said the this year's conference program will focus on partnership opportunities for commercialization of medical devices, the realities of raising capital for start-up companies in today's environment, and recent changes in patent law and how the changes will affect the patent process in the U.S.

OVALS is a collaborative effort of the University of Cincinnati, University of Louisville, University of Kentucky, Marshall University, Ohio University, BioOhio, Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, CincyTechUSA and Edison Biotechnology Institute.

Additional conference sponsors include Fox Rothschild LLP, Stites & Harbison PLLC and Viksnins Harris & Padys PLLP.

For more information and registration information, visit www.ovalsgroup.org.


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Wednesday August 22, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New students can get acquainted with community, Marshall organizations Saturday at fourth annual RecFest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 80 businesses and organizations will showcase their names and services to Marshall University students and community members at the fourth annual RecFest Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus.

The event, sponsored by Chase Bank, will take place from noon to 3 p.m. on the center's basketball court space. All freshmen and returning students, along with faculty and staff, are invited to check out the options available to them both on campus and in the Huntington area.

"RecFest is one of the last activities of the Week of Welcome," said Michelle Muth, the rec center's assistant director of marketing and memberships. "It's a good way for the students, especially freshmen and those from out of town, to get introduced to the community."

Muth said there will be many giveaways at RecFest, including an iPad 2. Other prizes and giveaways include TOMS shoes, gift baskets, gift cards, coupons, free samples of products and free food. The first 250 people entering RecFest receive free water bottles, and  at one booth, prizes will be awarded to the person who comes closest to guessing how much money is in a jar.

For musical entertainment, country singer Devin Hale will perform from noon to 2 p.m.

Week of Welcome begins today (Wednesday, Aug. 22) and fall classes start Monday, Aug. 27. The Week of Welcome Family Picnic is from 5 to 6:30 p.m. today at the Memorial Student Center plaza and Buskirk Field.


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Wednesday August 22, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall homecoming parade set for 11:30 a.m. Oct. 6; interested participants can sign up now

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2012 Marshall University homecoming parade, sponsored by the Student Government Association and the Marshall University Alumni Association, will take place at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 6, in downtown Huntington, SGA President Ray Harrell Jr. said today.

Harrell said participants will begin lining up at 10:30 a.m. at designated locations along 8th Street and 4th Avenue, and the parade will begin an hour later. Marshall plays host to Tulsa at 3:30 p.m. that day at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in the homecoming football game.

The theme of this year's homecoming is "Happy 175th, Marshall! Remember the Past - Thunder Into the Future."

Persons or organizations wanting to participate in the parade are invited to apply online at www.marshall.edu/sga.  For general inquiries, please contact Adam Fridley at adam.fridley@live.marshall.edu or by phone at 304-688-8811.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 21, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy,, 304-691-1713

Five new academic scholarships established at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

Faculty and alumni contribute to assist students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five new scholarships have been created for medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, courtesy of several different benefactors. One of the scholarships is geared toward medical students who plan on careers in specific areas of medicine. All five scholarships will benefit students who have demonstrated financial need.

Two of the new scholarships are being created by the faculty and staff of the Department of Orthopaedics, under the direction of Dr. Ali Oliashirazi, chairman of the department.

The Department of Orthopaedics Third Year Medical Student Scholarship will be awarded to a third-year student who has an interest in orthopaedic medicine, excels academically and has a demonstrated financial need.   The Department of Orthopaedics Fourth Year Medical Student Scholarship will be awarded to a fourth-year student who has maintained a 4.0 GPA during medical school and also has a financial need.

A third scholarship has been endowed by Dr. Monica A. Valentovic, professor of Pharmacology, in honor of her parents.  The Edward and Anne Valentovic Memorial Scholarship is named in memory of Valentovic's parents, who lived and worked most of their lives in Cleveland, Ohio. The scholarship will be awarded to a third- or fourth-year medical student who has been involved with research either at the undergraduate level or while in medical school.  Preference will be given to a student who has done or is currently involved in research with a full-time faculty member in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology.

"It is thrilling to work with individuals who are committed to helping our students in whatever ways are needed," said Linda Holmes, director of Development and Alumni Affairs.  "Dr. Oliashirazi and Dr. Valentovic are both incredible, dynamic professors and for them to take this extra step to help students financially speaks volumes about their sincere desire to see our students and our School of Medicine succeed."

Holmes said two other scholarships have been established through the generous support of a JCESOM alumnus and the grateful family of a recent graduate. They are the Janssen Scholarship for the School of Medicine, created by Dr. Eric W. Janssen, Class of 1986, and the Sekar Family Scholarship, created by Dr. Chandra S. Sekar.

The Janssen Scholarship was created in memory of Eric Janssen's parents, Mr. Fred L. and Mrs. Louis J. Janssen. The recipient of the award will be a first-year medical student who has a financial need.  The award is renewable for all four years pending satisfactory academic progress.

The Sekar Family Scholarship was created in honor of Dr. Chandra S. Sekar's son, Dr. Krish D. Sekar, Class of 2012, in memory of his late wife, Hema Sekar, and to show appreciation to the School of Medicine for his son's  medical education.    The award will be given to a first-year student and is renewable based on normal academic progress.

The five endowed scholarships will help defray annual tuition expenses for the student recipients.

For more information on the scholarships contact Linda Holmes at 304-691-1711.


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Monday August 20, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

MU Choral Union accepting new members

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Choral Union is looking for interested singers to join the group for the 2012-2013 season.

This fall, the choir will join with the West Virginia Symphony Chorus to present performances of Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Midnight Mass for Christmas." The combined choirs will perform in Huntington Thursday, Nov. 29, and in Charleston Friday, Nov. 30.

"We combined the two choruses last year for our Haydn-Beethoven performances and the results were hugely successful," said Dr. David Castleberry, director of choral activities at Marshall and director of the West Virginia Symphony Chorus, who will conduct the performances. "The singers enjoyed the collaboration so much that we decided to put the choirs together again this fall."

"The Midnight Mass is a charming work, based on French Noels that are woven into the choral textures of this marvelous liturgical work," Castleberry said. "It is a delightful, evocative piece that will appeal to singers and audiences alike."

Will Murphy, who is completing a master's degree in music at Marshall, will prepare the Choral Union for these joint performances. 

Rehearsals will begin on Tuesday evening, Aug. 28, and take place each Tuesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. in Smith Music Hall, Room 150. Music will be available for purchase at rehearsal. No audition is necessary, but previous musical experience is helpful. For further information, please contact the Marshall School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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Friday August 17, 2012
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Coordinator of Marketing and Branding,, 304-696-3490

Green Fridays business contest returns at Marshall

Fans can show their support for Marshall's Thundering Herd
and become a Green Fridays Winning Business

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is encouraging employees at all Tri-State Area businesses to show their Marshall spirit this fall by wearing green as MU kicks off another series of Green Fridays.

Businesses can qualify to participate if they register for the Green Fridays business contest and their  employees wear Marshall gear every Friday. They could win  a Marshall package of four tickets to a Herd football game, public recognition and other special prizes.

Beginning Monday, Aug. 20, businesses can register by visiting www.marshall.edu/greenfridays. Registration is open throughout the campaign and is needed only once.

On selected Fridays throughout football season, one business will be chosen as the Green Fridays Winning Business. The winner will be selected from those that qualify for the contest. Prizes will be delivered to the winning business.

Also, a group photo will be shown on the video boards during Marshall's home football game the next day in recognition of the winning business.

Businesses are encouraged to send photos of their groups participating in the contest to weargreen@marshall.edu.

Prizes will be awarded the Friday before all six home games. The dates are Sept. 7 and 14, Oct. 5 and 26, and Nov. 2 and 16.

For more information, persons may contact Mallory Jarrell by phone at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday August 16, 2012
Contact: James E. Casto, Associate Director of Public Information, RCBI,, 304-781-1670

RCBI part of nation's first Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute

Federal grant will foster innovation, growth of region's manufacturers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia's Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI) is a partner in a major federal investment that will establish the nation's first Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute under the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI).                                                           

The new initiative, which will receive $30 million in federal funds, is designed to connect industry, universities, community colleges, federal agencies and states together to jumpstart manufacturing innovation and foster the nation's economic growth. RCBI's Advanced Manufacturing Technology Centers will be key components of this initiative. With a 50/50 match, the three-year project totals more than $60 million.

The new initiative was announced today in Youngstown, Ohio, by Gene Sperling, the President's National Economic Council Director; Rebecca Blank, the Acting U.S. Secretary of Commerce; Frank Kendall, Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, and Brett B. Lambert, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy.

"RCBI is pleased to join with 40 dynamic partners for this extraordinary opportunity," said Charlotte Weber, RCBI Director and CEO. This regional team includes major universities such as Carnegie Mellon, Penn State, the University of Akron, Youngstown State and Kent State; businesses; community and technical colleges; research facilities and government agencies. The National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM) will serve as the lead for the Ohio, West Virginia and Pennsylvania regionally concentrated team.

"This federal funding renews our fight for American manufacturing jobs and serves as a significant national stamp of approval for RCBI.  As part of this new multi-state workforce and industry hub, RCBI is helping chart a new direction for the workhorse of the American economy, our manufacturing industry," said Rep. Nick Rahall, D-W.Va.

"RCBI brings its proven technology, tools and talent to a larger table to help train America's next generation of manufacturing workers for a greater competitive edge in the global marketplace," Rahall said. "Some current trends show American manufacturers are returning their operations to our shores. RCBI's training and operational capabilities in flexible manufacturing, especially in the promising additive manufacturing process I have watched in operation, provide extra incentive to reinvest in West Virginia workers."

"Additive manufacturing has the potential to reduce start-up costs and speed up prototyping," said Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin. "It presents a great opportunity for this country's manufacturing sector. This is an enormous opportunity for West Virginia to create new jobs, expand the innovative manufacturing strength of our country and enhance the future of our citizens. It demonstrates strong confidence in West Virginia, our capability to innovate and the ability of our workforce to prepare for today's more technological workplace. We commend the collaborative approach that RCBI and its many partners took to apply for and win this award. That same teamwork will enable our public, private and educational sectors to combine our strengths to successfully carry out this multi-dimensional program."

The purpose of this new institute will be to accelerate the development, integration, evaluation and exploitation of efficient/rapid/flexible additive manufacturing technology for commercial manufacturing. With that goal in mind, the partners will conduct extensive outreach to businesses for the open exchange of additive manufacturing information, design tools, shared manufacturing equipment options, demonstration, process improvement and energy/cost efficiency.

"West Virginia has a strong history of manufacturing and developing new technologies, and it's only appropriate that our state continues to help lead the way with a groundbreaking new program to guarantee that America is making the best, most innovative products, and putting more people back to work.  I applaud the Obama Administration for putting together such an innovative, forward looking program," said Sen. Jay Rockefeller. D-W.Va.  

"Over the past two years, I have convened several manufacturing roundtables with West Virginia workers and business owners, held three Congressional hearings - including one in West Virginia - on the future of manufacturing, and introduced or supported a dozen bills that would help create jobs and boost manufacturing in the state - including bills to train American workers in emerging manufacturing fields and help American manufacturers stay competitive, and others to end tax breaks for companies that send jobs to foreign countries.  We can't sit and watch American jobs get shipped overseas.  With this new institute, and help from the four key West Virginia partners, we can work to keep our manufacturing center competitive and bring jobs back to the United States."

"The people of West Virginia and I believe that now is the time to start rebuilding America by creating good American jobs right here at home, and I am pleased that this project will take a step in that direction," said Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., who is the cosponsor of the Rebuild America Jobs Act. "We need to take advantage of regional opportunities to work together to save and create good jobs in the manufacturing sector. I've been proud to support countless efforts to help this important industry and will continue to work with leaders on both sides of the aisle to address the loss of manufacturing jobs and our trade imbalance. I've always said that West Virginians are some of the hardest working people in the world, who can compete with anyone in the world - as long as the playing field is fair."

"The proven expertise of RCBI and the resources that this grant will provide are a powerful combination in terms of promoting the development of innovative and expansive applications of additive manufacturing technology," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "RCBI and Marshall have a rich history of strong collaborations that have advanced business solutions, which have fostered businesses growth and economic development. The new opportunities provided by RCBI's additive manufacturing technology capabilities continue to fuel our robust partnership and inspire tremendous pride."

"RCBI will be a key player in this partnership because our centers provide the region's manufacturers - small and large - with a unique set of offerings of shared manufacturing equipment availability, additive manufacturing expertise and 3D design technology," Weber said. "With our Design Works labs in Charleston and Huntington and our Advanced Composites Technology & Production Center in Bridgeport, RCBI is a valuable resource for the region's business and industry to access affordable design and production options in additive manufacturing technology."

Utilizing its statewide Advanced Manufacturing Technology Centers and skilled instructors, RCBI will leverage its extensive education and training programs to provide degree and certification programs, workforce training and on-the-job training that are specific to additive manufacturing. RCBI also will participate in the development of "cradle to career" additive manufacturing educational programs for STEM students K-12 through college.

In addition to RCBI, West Virginia is represented by other strong partners in this new initiative. FMW Composite Systems Inc., of Bridgeport, W.Va., brings a wealth of resources - state-of-the-art equipment, facilities, composites expertise and an ongoing drive for research and innovation.  Touchstone Research Laboratory in Triadelphia, W.Va., has a history of research and development that has made it a top 100 leader in innovation for the past four years. All involved will work closely with the National Energy Technology Lab in Morgantown.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 14, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Pharmacy Ribbon-Cutting to be Streamed Live at 1 p.m.

Today's School of Pharmacy ribbon-cutting ceremony on the campus of the VA Medical Center will be streamed live beginning at 1 p.m.

The link will be operational tomorrow just prior to the start time and is located at:

https://new.livestream.com/marshallu/pharmacyribbon


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 14, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall celebrates opening of School of Pharmacy program

Ribbon-cutting ceremony for newly renovated space attracts hundreds

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - After more than two years of planning, designing and renovating, the Marshall University School of Pharmacy officially opened its doors with a ribbon-cutting ceremony today at the school in Spring Valley.

Some 200 guests, including Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Congressman Nick J. Rahall, II, and Sen. Robert H. Plymale, attended the ceremony at the Robert W. Coon Education Building, located on the Veterans Affairs Medical Center campus in Wayne County.  Eighty students will begin preparation for their pharmacy careers when classes start Monday, Aug. 20.

"As our population ages, the need for pharmacists in hospitals, outpatient care centers, nursing homes and rural health clinics will continue to escalate," Gov. Tomblin said. "At the same time, our pharmacists are on the front line in the war on drugs, and I'm grateful that Marshall will prepare these soon-to-be pharmacists to serve our communities in every capacity their careers may encounter."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the opening of the program signals the beginning of a new era of health care and health care education for West Virginia.

"For decades, our School of Medicine has educated physicians who deliver state-of-the-art medical care to West Virginians and patients across America and the globe, regardless of whether they reside in large cities or rural communities," Kopp said.  "The establishment of the Marshall School of Pharmacy fosters the pursuit of a similarly dedicated mission.   In just four short years, the first cohort of Marshall pharmacy students will graduate. They will be well-prepared to deliver quality pharmaceutical care and counseling across the health care continuum for all sectors of our society."

Kopp praised founding dean Dr. Kevin Yingling and his colleagues for designing the program, which in the spring received pre-candidate accreditation status from the Accreditation Council on Pharmacy Education.

"I am very grateful to Dr. Yingling and his leadership team for their hard work in establishing a dynamic and well-conceived pharmacy program that will educate future pharmacists," he said.  "The need for pharmacists, particularly in West Virginia, is great as is evidenced in study after study including statistics from a 2010 report by the Pharmacy Manpower Project.   Our program, which provides an affordable public option for West Virginians, will certainly help meet that projected need."

Marshall's School of Pharmacy has established education agreements with dozens of health care providers and community pharmacies throughout West Virginia and the tri-state region where students will receive their experiential education.  Locally, hospital partners include Cabell Huntington Hospital, St. Mary's Medical Center, Kings Daughter's Medical Center,  River Park Hospital, Mildred Mitchell Bateman Hospital, the VA Medical Center, Pleasant Valley Hospital, Charleston Area Medical Center (CAMC),Thomas Memorial Hospital, St. Francis Hospital and CAMC-Teays Valley.

"The opening of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy marks another significant advancement in meeting the health care needs of our region," said Edward H. Seiler, Director of the VA Medical Center.  "VA staff are looking forward to our partnership with Marshall's newest academic enterprise."

Today's event also showcased the Coon Education Building, which has more than 76,000 square feet of space and recently underwent a nearly $9 million transformation.

"I am extremely pleased with the facility and what it offers our students," said Yingling.  "From the design of the technology-enhanced classrooms that feature SMART technologies to the common study spaces and patient simulation areas, our students have access to top-of-the-line educational opportunities.   They will certainly benefit from a facility that contains areas of learning, research and pharmacy practice all in one building."

The Coon building was built in the late 1970s to house Marshall's School of Medicine, but with construction of the Marshall University Medical Center, the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, many of the medical school classes moved to the new downtown facilities.   Edward Tucker Architects Inc., of Huntington, designed the building's overhaul and M.I.R.C. Construction Services of Scott Depot served as general contractor.

--------------------

Photos: (Above) From left, Sen. Robert H. Plymale, Congressman Nick J. Rahall, II, Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, School of Pharmacy Dean Kevin Yingling and Edward H. Seiler, director of the VA Medical Center, cut the ribbon today during a ceremony signifying the opening of Marshall's School of Pharmacy in Spring Valley. (Below) Earl Ray Tomblin addresses the big crowd gathered today at the School of Pharmacy for a ribbon cutting. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

View complete photo gallery.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 10, 2012
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist,, 304-696-6397

Marshall University public relations students and alumni honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Public relations students and alumni of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) have earned awards from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) -West Virginia chapter.

The 2012 PRSA-West Virginia Chapter Crystal Awards Gala took place earlier this summer at the Edgewood Country Club in Charleston. The event honored exceptional public relations campaigns and tactics from 2011.

Marshall students and alumni took home 11 different awards in June including five Crystal Awards, three honorable mentions, the Best in West Virginia Award and individual honors.

Assistant Professor of Public Relations Dr. Terry Hapney Jr. said he is proud of his students and their accomplishments.

"They worked very hard to research, plan, communicate and evaluate successful public relations campaigns for River Valley Child Development Services and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University," Hapney said. "Not only did their clients and I believe they were successful in accomplishing their goals in an excellent fashion, public relations professionals statewide also believed that. That's what these awards signify."

Marshall students in the spring 2011 public relations campaign management classes won Crystal Awards for both campaigns on which they worked.

Stacie Fonner, a member of a 2011 public relations campaign management class, said she was honored to be part of the public relations program.

"These awards are just a small symbol of the great achievements of our program," Fonner said. "The school of journalism prepares students to enter the world of PR, or in my case, the world of law. I have been complimented for my interview, editing and writing skills and have been able to propel my career because of this great undergraduate program."

The Trivia-4-Tots campaign benefitted River Valley Child Development Services and won awards in the External Communications Campaign and Media Release 500 Words or Less categories.

The Make Your Mark, Leave Your Legacy campaign benefitted the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and won awards in the Logo and Direct Mail categories. 

The students also received honorable mentions for two posters and a special issue publication for the Trivia-4-Tots campaign.

Kaylin Adkins, Marshall public relations alumna and current marketing coordinator for the United Way of the River Cities, won a Crystal Award and the top honor, Best in West Virginia Award, for her work on National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.

"It was an immense honor to also receive the Best in West Virginia award for the campaign," Adkins said. "I am involved with a multitude of great initiatives, collaboratives and programs in my position. I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to create and implement the public relations plan that targeted an important issue in today's society."

Many Marshall public relations graduates also work at agencies throughout the state that were honored during the awards gala, Hapney said.

Marshall alumna Rachel Coffman took home the Outstanding Young Professional of the Year award. Coffman is currently an account executive at TSG Consulting and is known for her work with social media and public relations campaigns in general.

Kim Harbour, Marshall alumna and current director of marketing and communications for the West Virginia Department of Commerce, took home the Practitioner of the Year Award. Harbour has won numerous awards over the years, including the 2011 Best in West Virginia Award and Best in Show Award at the PRSA- East Central District Diamond Awards earlier in the year.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 8, 2012
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Coordinator of Marketing and Branding,, 304-696-3490

Marshall fans encouraged to pledge their allegiance to the Thundering Herd by registering on espn.com/collegecolorsday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As a participant in the inaugural Pledge Your Allegiance for College Colors Day spirit competition, Marshall University is asking for fan support to help win the prestigious College Colors Day Spirit Cup and $10,000 toward the general scholarship fund.

By visiting www.espn.com/collegecolorsday, fans can register to pledge their allegiance to Marshall as the school with the most college spirit and loyal fan base. All registrants are entered to win weekly $50 gift cards from ESPN Shop and one of two grand prizes, including a $500 college shopping spree at ESPN Shop.

The website-based rivalry competition, which includes 165 participating colleges and universities, is an element of this year's 2012 College Colors Day celebration. It will run through the entire month leading up to College Colors Day on Aug. 31. Throughout the competition, standings will be tracked nationally, as well as by conference.

College Colors Day is an annual celebration dedicated to promoting the traditions and spirit that embody the college experience by encouraging fans across America to wear their favorite college or university apparel throughout the day on Friday, Aug. 31. It also is the kickoff for Marshall University's annual Green Fridays campaign. Fans are encouraged to wear green every Friday throughout football season to show their Marshall spirit.

The inaugural national spirit competition is presented by The Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), a division of IMG College, and NCAA Football.

Fans also are encouraged to share the Pledge Your Allegiance for College Colors Day competition through Facebook.

About The Collegiate Licensing Company
CLC is a division of global sports and entertainment company IMG. Founded in 1981, CLC is the oldest and largest collegiate trademark licensing agency in the U.S. and currently represents nearly 200 colleges, universities, bowl games, athletic conferences, The Heisman Trophy and the NCAA. The mission of CLC is to be the guiding force in collegiate trademark licensing and one of the top sports licensing firms in the country. CLC is dedicated to being a center of excellence in providing licensing services of the highest quality to its member institutions, licensees, retailers and consumers. Headquartered in Atlanta, CLC is a full-service licensing representative, which employs a staff of more than 80 licensing professionals who provide full-service capabilities in brand protection, brand management, and brand development. For more information on CLC, visit: www.clc.com or www.imgworld.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 31, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine features dual-degree program with emphasis on research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, today announced revitalization of a research-focused dual-degree program at the School of Medicine.

The M.D./Ph.D. program has existed at Marshall since 1992, but operated on an ad hoc basis as students expressed interest.

The revised M.D./Ph.D. program is a seven-year commitment that allows students to graduate with both degrees, preparing them for careers in patient care and medical research.  

"The School of Medicine is positioned to offer students interested in medical research an enriching experience that combines traditional medical education with laboratory research in an effort to develop new treatments for their patients," Shapiro said.   "The field of biomedical research is exploding with opportunity and we are thrilled to offer this degree option to our students."

Dr. Richard Niles, senior associate dean for research and graduate education, says most of the students interested in the dual-degree program are interested in careers in academic medicine.

"Students exploring careers in research and medicine have historically found themselves having to choose one field or the other," he said.  "This option allows them to pursue dual goals, combining their desire to help others through both clinical and research experiences."

Niles says students interested in pursuing the combined degree will check off the corresponding box on their American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) application.  When Marshall receives the applications, they will be flagged for review by a subcommittee consisting of members of the medical school admission committee and the graduate studies committee which, in turn, will make admissions recommendations.

Additional application information is available at www.musom.marshall.edu/md-phd/


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Monday July 30, 2012
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center,, 304-691-8961

Marshall University professors bring forensic science to high school scientists at West Virginia Youth Science Camp

  HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University faculty brought forensic science to high school student scientists from across West Virginia attending the West Virginia Youth Science Camp last Thursday at the Cedar Lakes Conference Center near Ripley.

 

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, and John Sammons, an assistant professor in Marshall's Integrated Science and Technology Department, were invited to address the students as visiting scientists at the 2nd Annual West Virginia Youth Science Camp. The summer camp began Sunday, July 15, and ended Saturday, July 28.

 

Fenger's interactive presentation involved placing the students in the role of Sherlock Holmes to assess whether evidence found at a crime scene was from the victim, a possible perpetrator of the crime or someone not related to the crime scene. "It was a pleasure interacting with such inquiring, bright young individuals," he said.

"I explained that crime today is being facilitated more and more with technology," Sammons said. "It's not just identity theft and child pornography. Traditional crimes such as robbery, burglary and murder also generate digital evidence."

The West Virginia Youth Science Camp is made possible through a partnership between the National Youth Science Foundation and the West Virginia Department of Education. The two-week program offers lectures, hands-on directed studies by visiting scientists and educators and outdoor activities.

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 27, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University purchasing agent earns CPPO credential

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Yetta S. Meadows, a purchasing agent at Marshall University, was recently notified by the Universal Public Procurement Certification Council (UPPCC) that she has earned recognition from the UPPCC by receiving the Certified Public Procurement Officer (CPPO) credential.

Meadows was among 57 professionals who successfully completed the CPPO examination held May 7-19, 2012. Established in 1964, this prestigious certification is an outstanding honor for individuals employed in the public procurement profession and is an asset to their specific division of governmental administration.

"Yetta pursued and accomplished this on her own accord," said Stephanie Smith, director of purchasing at Marshall. "This is another step in the right direction for the office of purchasing's goal for pursuit and maintenance of purchasing proficiency."

To date 2,125 procurement professionals have achieved this accomplished status. To become certified as a CPPO, candidates must demonstrate through an application process that they meet specific requisites established by the UPPCC, including formal education, procurement related coursework/training, public purchasing experience and functional management experience.

A comprehensive written examination is required to confirm the candidate's mastery of the body of knowledge for public procurement professionals. The CPPO certification recognizes only those professionals who have fulfilled these prescribed standards of competency in public procurement.

Ron Bell, CPCM, President of the National Association of State Procurement Officials (NASPO), said, "These designations signal that the individual is not only highly trained in the procurement field but is serious in executing her responsibility to protect the public trust. Congratulations to every individual who earns this distinction."

Other West Virginia CPPO-certified 2012 recipients are David R. Tincher,  director of the West Virginia State Purchasing Division, and Roberta Wagner, a buyer supervisor at the West Virginia State Purchasing Division.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 26, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Free seminar to focus on intellectual property in health care and life sciences

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.- The Marshall University Technology Transfer Office will present a free program about intellectual property and patent protection in the health care and life sciences setting from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, Aug. 10, in the Board Room of Cabell Huntington Hospital, 1340 Hal Greer Blvd., Huntington.

The program will begin with an overview of the main areas of intellectual property law (patent, trademark and copyright) and will continue with a focus specifically on patent protection in the health care and life sciences setting. The program will cover not only the requirements for obtaining a patent, but also will include discussions about ownership of inventions; the distinction between a patent application and publication of research; the differences between inventorship and authorship; preserving patent rights in health care and academic settings; and issues to consider when patenting surgical and diagnostic methods.

The seminar will be led by attorney Terry Wright of the firm Stites & Harbison PLLC in Louisville, Ky. He is one of 16 registered patent attorneys at the firm and is a member of the Intellectual Property and Technology Service Group. His practice focuses on patent‐related aspects of intellectual property, including patent drafting, patent prosecution, and counseling clients about infringement, validity and patentability.

Wright has a background in life sciences and experience with academic research in the areas of cardiovascular biology, molecular and cellular biology, pharmacology and biotechnology. He counsels companies and university technology transfer/licensing offices regarding strategies for protecting patent‐based intellectual property.

The program is free but reservations are requested. Send reservations totto@marshall.edu. For more information, contact Amy Melton at 304-696-4365.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 19, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall scientist awarded NIH grant for lung cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University faculty member has been awarded a three-year, $426,000 grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to further her lung cancer research.

Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology in the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, will use the grant to continue her work to determine if the nutritional agent capsaicin the active ingredient in chili peppers can improve the anti-cancer activity of the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in patients with small cell lung cancer.

Dasgupta received the funding through the National Cancer Institute's Academic Research Enhancement Award program. The program supports research projects in the biomedical and behavioral sciences that strengthen the research environment of the institution and expose students to research. Her co-investigator is Dr. Monica Valentovic, a professor in the same department.

"Small cell lung cancer is characterized by a high rate of growth, early metastasis and a dismal survival rate," said Dasgupta. "Although chemotherapy works well initially in these patients, they often relapse quickly and become unresponsive to chemotherapy. Since the preliminary data in our laboratory shows that capsaicin manifests anti-cancer activity in this type of cancer, we are hopeful our studies under this new grant may lead to new treatments."

She continued, "I am thrilled to receive this funding and I am grateful to a lot of people who have been instrumental in our success to this point. My collaborator Dr. Valentovic is a fabulous scientist to work with. I am also grateful to all the members of my lab for their hard work and dedication."

Dasgupta also acknowledged the support of the chairman of her department, Dr. Gary Rankin, and acknowledged Dr. Marcia Harrison and the MU-ADVANCE program, which she says made it possible for undergraduate students to work in her lab. MU-ADVANCE is a National Science Foundation-funded program to help increase the number of female science and engineering faculty at the university.

Dasgupta says she believes her proposal was selected for funding at least in part because the grant program's focus on student research made it a good match for her lab. Undergraduates working in her lab have a track record of receiving research grants, authoring publications and presenting their findings at international conferences.

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, congratulated the researchers, saying, "NIH grants are extraordinarily competitive, and I applaud Drs. Dasgupta and Valentovic for having a successful application. They are doing vital research that may very well have a positive impact on human health in the not-so-distant future. In addition, the grant will allow them to continue to give students hands-on, meaningful research opportunities in the lab."

In addition to receiving the new NIH funding, Dasgupta recently was notified that her grant from the Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute has been renewed for an additional two years. The renewal, which extends the original three-year award, makes the total grant worth nearly $550,000. That grant is funding Dasgupta's study of how nicotine, the active component in cigarette smoke, facilitates the progression of lung cancer. Valentovic is also the co-investigator on that award.

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Photo: Marshall University researchers Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, left, and Dr. Monica Valentovic have received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to further their work to determine if capsaicin the active ingredient in chili peppers can improve the anti-cancer activity of a common chemotherapy drug in patients with small cell lung cancer. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.     


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 18, 2012
Contact: Homer Preece, Director, Mid-Ohio Valley Center,, 304-674-7201

'Get Your Career On Track' at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center July 24

POINT PLEASANT, W.Va.--Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center (MOVC) in Point Pleasant will host an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 24.

"We want students to consider Marshall University as a whole," said Homer Preece, director of the MOVC."We want to provide information on all programs that are being offered, whether it is here at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center or in Huntington or South Charleston. Information will be provided on both graduate and undergraduate programs."

Representatives from Marshall University will be available to answer questions and assist with the applications process, enrollment, financial aid and educational planning.

"Attendees will be able to meet with the experts from both the Huntington and South Charleston campuses," Preece said. "They will be able to speak with people concerning the different majors that Marshall University offers and, of course, we will have people on hand to discuss everything from the admission process to financial aid."

MOVC delivers core courses and specialized programs of study through daytime and evening time periods that meet the needs of accelerated high school students, traditional college age students and those adults who have chosen to return to school.

MOVC offers three complete master's degree programs, two complete bachelor's degree programs and multiple undergraduate and graduate-level courses in various academic areas. Currently, MOVC is serving the following high schools with College Courses in the High Schools: Hannan High School, Mason County Career Center; Point Pleasant High School and Wahama High School.

Information will also be available for online classes, the Regents Bachelor of Arts program and much more.

"Come and get your 'Career on Track' in a very informal setting," Preece said."The time is scheduled for 5 to 7 p.m.,although we will stay as long as people are here."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 18, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy,, 304-691-1713

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine class of 2014 excels on national exam

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, today announced that 64 members of the Class of 2014 have passed the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1, marking a 100 percent pass rate for Marshall students taking the test. 

The national exam is taken at the end of the second year of medical school and students must pass in order to continue into the third year of training.  

"I am thrilled with our students' outstanding performance on Step 1. They have put in hours and hours of studying and are deserving of our praise for this historical accomplishment," Shapiro said. "I also want to publicly commend our dedicated faculty and staff for their service and commitment to the medical school and our students."

Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education Dr. Aaron McGuffin congratulated class members for their exceptional performance, which included a mean score of 227. This score is higher than the 2011 national mean, which was 224. The 2012 national mean will be released later this year.

McGuffin said, "This is a tribute to their hard work and dedication in concert with the excellent teaching provided by our basic science and clinical faculty. We at the medical school are privileged to be a part of continuing to produce the best and the brightest students for tomorrow's physician workforce."

The United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is a multi-part professional exam.  All three steps of the USMLE exam must be passed before a physician with an M.D. degree is eligible to apply for an unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 16, 2012
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

State of the University to be presented in Washington, D.C. tomorrow

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will give an update on the state of the university tomorrow in Washington, D.C.

Approximately 200 persons are expected to attend what has become an annual event, including the West Virginia congressional delegation and staff as well as Washington-area alumni and other supporters. The program is designed to highlight the university's progress and to showcase the impact federally funded research projects have in West Virginia.

Kopp is expected to discuss the new construction that is now under way in Huntington, including the parking facility on 5th Avenue, the soccer facility on the site of the Veterans Memorial Field House, the new Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Complex, and the visual arts center on the Stone and Thomas site. He will also address Marshall's record enrollment over the past two years, the financial condition of the university and private fundraising efforts.

Kopp will be joined by Director of Athletics Mike Hamrick, Head Football Coach Doc Holliday, and Men's Basketball Coach Tom Herrion, all of whom also will make remarks.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 13, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Run for the Kids supports MU's Department of Communication Disorders

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jule Huffman's Run for the Kids, a 5K Run/Walk that supports a program in Marshall University's Department of Communication Disorders, will take place at 8 a.m. Saturday, July 21, in Huntington.
 
 Proceeds from the event directly support the Scottish Rite Childhood Speech and Language Program at Marshall. Specifically, the funding supports a clinical position within the MU Speech and Hearing Center.
 
 The Run for the Kids will take place on a 3.1-mile course that starts on Veterans Memorial Boulevard in downtown Huntington. It then goes west to First Street, south on First Street to Fifth Avenue, east on Fifth Avenue to Hal Greer Boulevard, north on Hal Greer Boulevard to Third Avenue, then west on Third Avenue to Veterans Memorial Boulevard where the race started.
 
 Entry fee is $20 through July 15, then $25 through race day. The first 200 pre-registered participants will receive a t-shirt.
 
 More information on the Run for the Kids and a registration form can be found at http://www.tristateracer.com/raceinfo.php?RaceID=337.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 13, 2012
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

Two from MU receive Blackboard Catalyst Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University staff members have been named winners of a Blackboard Catalyst Award for Exemplary Course Program.

 

Dr. Lori Ellison, assistant professor of Counseling in the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, and Paula Kaplan, Instructional Designer in Instructional Technology/Online Learning  and Libraries, received the award, which honors members of the community who design and develop innovative courses that represent the best in technology and learning. 

 

Ellison and Kaplan were honored alongside 37 other Exemplary Course Program winners during the BbWorld, Blackboard's annual user conference, which took place July 10-12 in New Orleans. 

 

Blackboard is a global leader in enterprise technology and innovation solutions with the aim of improving the experience of millions of students and learners around the world.  Blackboard's solutions allow thousands of higher education and K-12,  professional, corporate and government organizations to extend teaching and learning online, facilitate campus commerce and security, and communicate more effectively with their communities.  

 

Part of the annual Blackboard Catalyst Awards program since 2000, the Blackboard Exemplary Course Program Award highlights technologically rich, well designed and instructionally sound  courses that showcase best practices for those who use them.   More than 151 entries were evaluated in a rigorous peer-review process by more than 250 faculty and instructional designers.  Submissions were judged on course design, interaction, collaboration, assessment and learner support.

 

"Designing and teaching an online course titled Death and Grief Counseling presents unique challenges," said Kaplan, "but Lori and I were able to translate her personal engaging style of teaching into a highly interactive and effective online course in part by incorporating some of the new collaboration tools available in Blackboard Learn 9.1 such as wikis.  Working with Lori was a great pleasure, and I am truly honored to be recognized with her for this award."

 

And, Ellison added, "I'm so proud and happy the work Paula and I did has been recognized in this way. I have learned a lot about effective online teaching in my time here at Marshall and I'm grateful for the endorsement of our work.  I am most grateful to Paula for her help and my students who made this course a truly special learning experience for all."

 

"We applaud the Blackboard Catalyst Award winners and their accomplishments," said Ray Henderson, Chief Technology Officer and President of Academics for Blackboard.  "Their work represents some of the most innovative thinking in education today, and offers great models for how technology can help shape an improved education experience.  We congratulate the award winners for their leadership, creativity and passion that is clearly evident in their work."  


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 12, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Health Science and Technology Academy (HSTA) summer institute kicks off Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 110 ninth-grade students from throughout West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 15-20 to take part in the annual Health Science & Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

The students will be joined by eight HSTA teachers, four field site coordinators and Marshall faculty and staff in the "Fun With Science" summer institute, according to David Cartwright, director of the event.

"The HSTA students we will serve will be exposed to a variety of hands-on science experiences," Cartwright said. "They will learn while enjoying being involved in experiments, simulations and activities. We at Marshall University will have the wonderful opportunity to expose these young people to our outstanding programs, such as professional health, allied health, science and engineering."

HSTA is a highly successful academic and enrichment initiative designed to encourage high school students to enroll in college and pursue degrees in the health sciences. The program has paid off well for Marshall. Cartwright said that of the 150 HSTA graduates last year, about 50 are enrolled at Marshall.

"This statewide program chiefly aspires to enroll African American youth to offset the disparity of African Americans as professionals in related fields of study, while also targeting low-income and first-generation students," Cartwright said.

Aaron McGuffin, Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said the HSTA program is important to the futures of the participating students and to Marshall University.

"The HSTA program is an essential outreach program for the School of Medicine as we continually seek to encourage the best and brightest students from throughout West Virginia to consider becoming West Virginia's physicians of tomorrow," McGuffin said.

Cartwright said several new health-related features are planned this year. One of the best, he said, is a Mobile Science Lab, a hands-on science laboratory in which an experiment to determine how caffeine affects the heart rate in a Zebra fish is conducted. The lab is set up in a semi-truck, which will be parked on campus near the Science Building Monday and Tuesday, July 16-17.

Also new this year are simulated laparoscopy surgery, a heart and suture lab, a safety engineering lab and the Montserrat Emergency Experience, in which students make up an emergency team on the "Island of Montserrat," which is hit first by a hurricane, then by a volcano.

Students in the School of Medicine will be involved as well. According to Jo Ann Raines, SOM senior program coordinator, fourth-year medical students will help teach two workshops in the heart and suture lab.  They include a suturing workshop and a heartbeat workshop.  Students will use pigs' feet to practice suturing and be introduced to Harry the Simulator for the heartbeat workshop.

"This is a wonderful outreach opportunity for the School of Medicine because it allows our medical students to interact with younger students who might be considering a career in medicine and also helps our fourth-year students earn credit for an academic medicine elective," Raines said.

The HSTA students will learn how to maintain a healthy lifestyle by using correct eating habits. They also will take part in numerous evening activities, such as bowling, Zumba, yoga, visits to the Marshall Recreation Center, dancing or going to a movie, and by participating in the Amazing Race, an activity based on the TV show of the same name.

The annual kickoff dinner for the "Fun With Science" summer institute is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 15, in Memorial Student Center Room BE 5 on the Huntington campus. Ann Chester, director of the HSTA program in West Virginia, will be among those delivering remarks.

Marshall is presenting the institute in collaboration with West Virginia University. HSTA was started in 1994 by WVU with 45 students from two counties. It now averages around 800 students enrolled in the program each year from 26 counties throughout the state.

For more information, contact Helen Bonham at 304-696-4672.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 12, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-746-1989

Allied Logistics establishes $50,000 engineering scholarship to honor legacy of Dick Smith

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Allied Logistics announced today it has established a $50,000 engineering scholarship and paid summer internship at Marshall University in honor of Dick Smith, who passed away Feb. 17 at the age of 87.

Key to the growth and success of Huntington-based Allied Logistics, Smith was an accomplished engineer by training, a businessman and an innovator. He touched many lives, including that of Allied Logistics chairman and president Lake Polan III, who considered Smith a close friend and mentor.

"Dick had a gentle demeanor and quiet manner that hid his brilliant mind, outstanding negotiating skills and steely determination to succeed," said Polan. "He was truly self-effacing, deeply religious and devoted both to his family and mine. I am in many ways a product of his upbringing, along with the legacy left by my own father, Lake Polan Jr."

Smith worked in the management of Polan Industries during the 1960s. In the 1970s, he launched Allied Realty's warehousing business. He later became president of Allied Warehousing, leading its transition from a grocery distribution center to a focus on the chemical industry. Under Smith's leadership, Allied Warehousing established multiple locations, launched its transportation business and began engaging in toll services for its industrial customers. 

Marshall University welcomed the scholarship announcement funded through a $30,000 investment this year and $20,000 in 2013 as a way for Smith's legacy to continue to drive local and regional innovation. The scholarship recipient is expected to be announced this summer.

"They say that family is the tie that binds. That is certainly the case with the Polans," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc. "Their family has been a part of the Marshall University and Foundation family for many years, serving in a number of key roles on our board of directors.

"We are deeply grateful to the Polans for this significant engineering scholarship commitment, their continued support and leadership, and their dedication to the betterment of our entire region."

Today's announcement comes on the heels of Allied Logistics' and Allied Realty Company's $100,000 donation last January to support the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, which promotes economic development and entrepreneurial activity in West Virginia by funding commercially viable bioscience research at Marshall University and facilitating potential partnerships with outside companies. Allied Realty Company has given a total of $350,000 to the Marshall University Foundation for the institute since 2008, which, with the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund matching program, results in a doubling of the benefit to Marshall of $700,000.

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ABOUT ALLIED REALTY 

Allied Realty Company is the corporate hub for a full-service global logistics business with more than 2.5 million square feet of commercial, manufacturing and distribution holdings in downtown Huntington, Kenova, Nitro and Parkersburg; Paris, Ky.; and Waynesboro and Harrisonburg, Va.
 

ABOUT ALLIED LOGISTICS

Allied Logistics, operating originally as Allied Warehousing Services Inc., entered the warehousing business in 1970 when its parent company, Allied Realty Company (founded in 1922), acquired a 100,000-square-foot, multi-floor warehouse. The company has grown to operate more than 2 million square feet of public and contract warehousing with nine facilities in the central and western areas of West Virginia and western Virginia. As the company grew, Allied Logistics was created to consolidate many of the services of the companies that had preceded it, including Allied Transportation Services Company, Reo Distribution Services and Allied Processing Services. For more information, visit alliedlogistics.com.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 12, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall investigators to help lead Research Challenge Fund projects for energy, cancer studies

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Researchers at Marshall University are among the lead investigators on two projects to be funded through the state's Research Challenge Fund, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission announced today.

Marshall faculty members Drs. Thomas Wilson, Richard Niles and Donald Primerano will help direct the projects one to develop better electronics and the other to learn more about cancers affecting West Virginians. The projects began this month and will be conducted in cooperation with researchers at West Virginia University (WVU). Each project will receive a total of $1,350,000 over the next five years.

The Research Challenge Fund was established by the state legislature in 2002 to provide seed money for new research. Projects funded through the program support the creation of research centers and start-up businesses, and foster economic development and work force advancement.

Announcing the awards, Dr. Paul L. Hill, the commission's chancellor, said, "The primary goal of the Research Challenge Fund is to sponsor innovative research at our colleges and universities while improving the institutions' ability to compete for federal and private funding on the national level."

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, said, "Marshall University is pleased to have been selected to receive funding through this important program. The Research Challenge Fund is one of the state's largest investments in research and innovation, and the application process is always quite competitive. The fact that our investigators are integral to two of the projects announced today speaks volumes about the quality of research being done at Marshall. I look forward to watching these projects develop over the coming years."

The funding to create a Center for Energy Efficient Electronics at Marshall and WVU will be used to investigate and develop devices that will lead to next-generation electronics that are smaller, faster and more energy efficient than current technology allows. The principal investigators on the project are Wilson, who is a professor of physics at Marshall; Dr. David Lederman, a professor of physics at WVU; and Drs. Alan Bristow, Mikel Holcomb and Tudor Stanescu, associate professors of physics at WVU.

According to the investigators, there is strong interest in the research community in the concepts of spintronics and magnonics, where spin degrees of freedom and magnetic excitations are used for information storage and processing. Spintronics and magnonics are expected to result in electronic devices that are faster and use substantially less power than current electronics because spin and magnetic excitation currents do not dissipate nearly as much energy as charge currents.

"In my lab at Marshall, I will be probing the effects of applying uniaxial stress to the magnonic devices to adjust their frequencies," said Wilson. "This proof-of-concept experiment will permit us to determine whether it is feasible to use strain to fabricate THz magnonic devices for ultrafast communication applications."

The second research project will further develop and expand the West Virginia Cancer Genomics Network to involve Marshall, WVU and Charleston Area Medical Center. Network partners will develop a genetic database for cancers with a higher incidence in West Virginia. Researchers will use the data in studies and clinical trials funded by federal and/or private grants and to help develop start-up biotechnology companies. Principal investigators for this study are Niles, who is a professor and chairman of Marshall's Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology; Primerano, who is a professor of biochemistry and microbiology at Marshall and the director of the university's Genomics Core Facility; Dr. William Petros, a professor of biochemistry at WVU; and Dr. Todd Kuenstner, the director of pathology at Charleston Area Medical Center.

Niles said, "We started the Cancer Genomics Network several years ago with money from the federal stimulus, to collect genetic information about cancers that have a high prevalence in West Virginia namely lung, colorectal and ovarian cancers, and acute myeloid leukemia. Through this award, along with our network partners at WVU and CAMC, we'll be working to identify new diagnostic/prognostic markers and new targets for cancer therapy."

Primerano added, "At our Genomics Core Facility, we will be sequencing and analyzing the tissue samples collected through the network, allowing us to gain information critical to understanding, preventing and treating cancer in future patients."

The grants announced today are the third round of Research Challenge Fund awards made since the program began. According to the Higher Education Policy Commission, the first round a state investment of $8.4 million produced more than $20 million in external funding, helped create five startup companies and led to 10 patent applications. Results from the second round of grants, awarded in 2007, are being analyzed and will be reported to the governor and legislature by the end of the year.

More information about the Research Challenge Fund program and other research initiatives is available at www.wvresearch.org.

-----------------

Photos: Drs. Thomas Wilson (above), Richard Niles (middle) and Donald Primerano (below).


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Wednesday July 11, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Advance only tickets on sale now for Marshall University's 15th annual Paint the Capital City Green rally

CHARLESTON - Tickets are on sale for the 15th annual Paint the Capital City Green celebration coming to Charleston Embassy Suites on Thursday, Aug. 23.

Thundering Herd fans will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp as well as key members of this year's team as they talk about the future of Marshall University football. Fans will also enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder.Festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7:30 p.m.

Advance only tickets are $50 and must be purchased by close of business on Thursday, Aug. 16, to be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win admission and hotel accommodations for two to an away game. For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu.

The event, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.


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Wednesday July 11, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University sponsoring regional forum on geohazards impacting transportation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Engineers, geologists and transportation planners from across the region will gather at Tamarack in Beckley from July 31 through Aug. 2 for the Appalachian States Coalition for Geohazards in Transportation's 12th Annual Technical Forum, "Geohazards Impacting Transportation in the Appalachian Region."

Coordinated by Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), this year's forum is hosted by the West Virginia Department of Transportation.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director, is the chairman of the coalition.

"It is an exciting prospect to work with federal, state and private entities to share best practices on the prevention and remediation of geological problems that affect transportation throughout the Appalachian region," he said. "We encourage anyone with an interest in this topic to join us for what promises to be an excellent program."

Members of the nationally recognized coalition meet annually to share information about research developments and projects related to rock falls and landslides along highways, seismic activity and hazard-prone areas impacting the region's transportation infrastructure. The topics of risk assessment and emergency response also will be covered at the forum.

This year's event will include a pre-conference field trip to the New River Gorge National River and the catwalk under the New River Gorge Bridge, and a visit to the Bluestone Dam. The visit to the dam is being organized by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntington District.

Szwilski said the forum and field trip will be of interest to geologists, geotechnical engineers, environmental scientists, planners and others interested in geohazards.

Coalition members represent the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Corporation, the Federal Highway Administration, and the departments of transportation and state geological surveys in Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.

For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas or contact Szwilski at szwilski@marshall.edu or 304-696-5457.


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Wednesday July 11, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs DIrector, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Scholarship created in honor of retiring Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine administrator

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - James "Jim" J. Schneider retired from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in June, but his service to the school will live on through the creation of an endowed scholarship in his name.

The scholarship, known as the James "Jim" J. Schneider Endowed Scholarship, will be awarded to an entering first-year student chosen by the School of Medicine scholarship committee in conjunction with the Marshall University Financial Aid office.

"Jim was a steady and effective leader during the School of Medicine's expansion to the Marshall University Medical Center in the 1990s," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs with the School of Medicine.   "He also guided several other multi-million dollar School of Medicine building projects.  The formation of this scholarship is quite fitting because of Jim's commitment to our students for so many years."

Schneider served the School of Medicine and University Physicians & Surgeons, Inc., for 21 years, finishing his career as the senior associate dean for finance and administration and executive director, respectively.

Anyone wanting to make a gift to the Schneider scholarship may contact Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.


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Friday July 6, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to house about 275 power line workers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is housing about 275 out-of-state utility workers brought in by Appalachian Power to help the company restore power following last week's record-breaking storm that damaged electrical infrastructure across much of the Mid-Atlantic.

The workers are staying in three of the four Marshall Commons residence halls on the Huntington campus tonight and Saturday night, said Dr. Karen Kirtley, senior vice president for administration.

Kirtley said Appalachian Power contacted Marshall for availability when the large number of workers brought in for the recovery created a lodging need well beyond the capacity available at area hotels and motels. Marshall's Huntington campus has had power since last Saturday, although the university did suffer about $95,000 in damage and its South Charleston and Point Pleasant, W.Va., campuses were closed on Monday due to power outages.

"Our Huntington campus has been fortunate to have power throughout this week, so President Kopp has offered our facilities and any assistance we can give to the state and local emergency services," Kirtley said. "We have been on standby to house local elderly residents; however, Appalachian Power quickly restored power to the high-rise housing facilities and thus far our residence halls have not been needed for that purpose.

"We are glad to be available for Appalachian Power and its workers. I know they are working long days in this remarkable heat to get all of us back up, so we will do what we can to help."


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Friday July 6, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Incoming freshmen participate in Marshall University's free English and math summer workshops

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Incoming freshmen at Marshall University are fast-tracking their college success during the Summer Bridge Program, a pair of free workshops designed to give new students the fundamentals they need for college success.

Approximately 100 freshmen wrapped up the first session today and more than 100 already are signed up for the second session, which begins July 23. That session is still accepting interested students.

Dr. Rudy Pauley, Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies, said the program's first session went well and that participants felt it was worth giving up some free summer days to sharpen their skills.

"This program is all about our commitment at Marshall to student success and the participants seem to really want to work hard to excel," Pauley explained. "We have faculty working with new students with the idea that if we can make them stronger in math and English before they even officially step foot on our campuses, we are helping them ensure success in college and beyond."

Session Two will run from July 23 through Aug. 2. Classes will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday on the Huntington, South Charleston and Point Pleasant (Mid-Ohio Valley Center) campuses. The Summer Bridge Program is free to incoming freshmen who have been admitted to Marshall for the fall of 2012, have paid their enrollment deposit and meet workshop entry guidelines.

Seating for Session Two is limited and registration is required. For more information, call 304-696-3646 or e-mail recruitment@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday July 3, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Japan Outreach Initiative program director to help chaperone 23 local high school students' 2-week visit to Japan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty-three students and recent graduates from three local high schools will travel to Japan for a two-week study tour beginning Sunday, July 8.

In addition to the students, two chaperones - Azusa "Hanah" Yamada and Miho Egnor - will make the trip. Yamada is Japan Outreach Initiative program director at Marshall University, and Egnor is a Spanish teacher at Huntington High School and wife of Clark Egnor, Marshall's executive director of the Center for International Programs.

Twelve students from Huntington High School, 10 from Cabell Midland High School and one from Fairland (Ohio) High School will make the trip.

The purpose of the two-week visit to Japan is to promote understanding about the current situation in that country and recovery efforts after the earthquake and tsunami that occurred on March 11, 2011. It also will encourage greater understanding between the youth of Japan and the United States and foster long-term and ongoing interest in one another by providing firsthand experiences with the culture of the other.

"Earlier this year, the College of Liberal Arts hosted the presentation of the documentary, Wave: Restart from the Rubble, a film that showed the aftermath of the devastating earthquake that crippled the region in March, 2011," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "All who saw the film were greatly moved by the will and determination of those who had lost everything to retain their dignity and restore their community. Now, students from Cabell County and Lawrence County, Ohio, will be greeted with open arms by members of a Japanese community who welcome our students as guests in their country."

The trip is a new initiative by the Laurasian Institution in partnership with the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership. The project is called Kizuna (Bonds of Friendship) and provides for a fully funded, two-week study tour to Japan.

The Laurasian Institution is a non-governmental, not-for-profit organization founded in 1990. It offers a variety of international and cross-cultural education programs in which people of different cultures meet, learn and gain a greater understanding of one another.

"We want the students to establish friendships, ongoing relationships," Yamada said. "We don't want them to stop the relationships when they leave."

The trip will include travel to both the Kanto and Kansai areas where the students will have an opportunity to volunteer in a community affected by the tsunami and earthquake.

The students also will experience a three-day homestay while in Japan. Each student will stay in the home of a Japanese family for three days, witnessing and learning the traditional way of life in Japan. Next spring, as part of the new program, 23 students from Japan will visit the Huntington area, and while here will also participate in a three-day homestay.

Yamada said two of the 23 students making the trip will be attending Marshall in the fall, majoring in Japanese. Here is a list of students making the trip to Japan:

Huntington High : Deloris Brown, Joseph Fisher, Emily Kingery, Allison Albers, Emily Murray, Kathryne Murphy, Kiersten Oldham, Drew Thompson, Kelsey Vallance, Zackariah Pate, Clare Loftus and Kate Colclough

Cabell Midland: Lance Black, Nathaniel Napier, JamieThompson, Caitlyn Adkins , Katarina Criddle, Jackson Berezo, Mickey Crisp, Kiri Black, Kara Hancock and Montana Richardson

Fairland High School: Molly Mcilvain


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Monday July 2, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

South Charleston campus, Mid-Ohio Valley Center to reopen Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's South Charleston campus and the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant will reopen Tuesday with classes taking place as scheduled.

As of 4 p.m. today, power had been restored at both sites. The power had been off at the South Charleston campus and Mid-Ohio Valley Center since Friday's storm.

Rudy Pauley, Associate Vice President for Outreach and Continuing Studies at Marshall, said anyone with questions should contact their supervisor.


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Sunday July 1, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington campus open Monday; South Charleston, Mid-Ohio Valley closed

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Huntington campus is fully functional and will be open for business as usual Monday, July 2, despite suffering some minor damage in Friday's storm. Summer classes will operate as scheduled, unless instructors have notified students otherwise.

However, the South Charleston campus and Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, both of which are still without power, will be closed Monday for safety reasons. Employees in South Charleston and Point Pleasant should contact their supervisors for further instruction about whether they have essential duties and should still report to work, or if they should work from home or an alternate location. Classes offered at those campuses have been postponed until power can be restored.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the physical plant and buildings and grounds crews did remarkable work ensuring the damage at the Huntington campus was minimized and getting everything up and running again.

"They and the contractors they've worked with deserve tremendous credit and our thanks for the quick recovery," Kopp said.

Huntington employees should report to work as normal. Those unable to report to work due to a power outage at their home are asked to contact their supervisor for further instruction.


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Thursday June 28, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Researchers at MU study the effects of metabolic syndrome on skeletal muscle adaptation

Research from Drs. Arnold, Blough published in Science & Sports

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Collaboration between two Marshall University associate professors resulted in findings that were published in Science & Sports, a publication of the French Society of Sports Medicine. The research was about the effects of metabolic syndrome on skeletal muscle adaptation.

 Dr. Eric Arnold, from  Marshall's School of Physical Therapy, and Dr. Eric Blough, from the School of Pharmacy, worked together on the project.

Metabolic syndrome, also known as syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome, is one of the fastest growing health problems in the United States with more than one of every three adults suffering from the disorder, according to Arnold and Blough.

They also said that over the next two decades, the incidence of metabolic syndrome is projected to increase to epidemic levels in both the industrialized and developing worlds. Patients with metabolic syndrome typically are obese, suffer from insulin resistance and exhibit elevations in blood sugar and lipid levels.

"It's important to assemble a team of experts from various health professions and scientific disciplines, to address the complexity of type 2 diabetes," Arnold said. "That's what it is all about, working together to research and discover an optimal therapeutic strategy for this chronic disease. Collaboration is important." 

 Marshall's researchers have been using the obese Zucker rat (Leprfa) which models many of the characteristic features of metabolic syndrome seen in humans to examine how the disorder may affect the ability of their skeletal muscles to adapt to an exercise stimulus.

"Because exercise is almost always prescribed as a treatment modality for these patients, we need to understand how skeletal muscles of someone with metabolic syndrome may respond to exercise if we ever want to optimize the therapeutic treatment of this disease," Arnold said.

Their research, titled "Insulin resistance does not inhibit the ability of the mechanical overload to induce hypertrophy in the Obese Zucker Rat (Leprfa) plantaris muscle," was published in April.

Significant findings provided evidence that metabolic syndrome did not impair the ability of the rat fast twitch plantaris muscle to experience hypertrophy when exposed to muscle overload  as reflected by increases in myofibrillar protein content and increases in muscle fiber cross-sectional area.

"This finding is pretty interesting given that previous work by our group has shown the muscle adaptation in the slow twitch soleus muscle is impaired with metabolic syndrome," Blough said. "This study, along with our other work, suggests that metabolic syndrome may affect different muscle types differently. This adds a level of complexity that I don't think others have shown in the past and may have important implications in the design of exercise intervention programs." 

For more information, call Arnold at 304-696-5615 or Blough at 304-696-2708.

 

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Photos: Drs. Eric Arnold (above) and Eric Blough (below) collaborated on a study that was published in Science & Sports.


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Thursday June 28, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

HEPC approves new contract for Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission today approved a new five-year contract for Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp during a special meeting at its offices in Charleston.

Marshall's Board of Governors, during its regular meeting June 18, approved the new contract proposal and then submitted it to the HEPC for approval, which came today.

"The leadership of President Kopp continues to transform Marshall into an institution recognized for excellence and innovation," said board chairman Verna Gibson. "We are confident his vision and plans for the coming years will continue the current momentum."

Incoming board chairman Dr. Joe Touma said Kopp realizes the importance of strong leadership in accomplishing the University's goals.

"President Kopp has attracted and retained talented and strong leadership in critical areas with a focus on enhanced student achievement while advancing new degree programs that prepare our students for careers in a rapidly changing global economy," Touma said.

Board vice-chairman John Hess, also chairman of the board's finance committee, said Kopp has made wise financial decisions since arriving at Marshall seven years ago.

"The financial health of the university has continued to improve, ruled by record freshman enrollment and strong fiscal management," he said. "We are even more excited and committed to what we can achieve under his continued leadership."

Effective July 1, Kopp's salary will increase from $275,000 a year, plus additional compensation of up to $50,000 a year from private sources, to $390,000 a year. Upon favorable completion of a formal written performance evaluation as required by the HEPC, and due in or about October 2013, Kopp's salary will increase to $430,000, effective July 1, 2014. He also would be eligible for regular salary increases as adopted by the Board of Governors for non-classified employees. On June 30, 2017, the board will grant Kopp tenure in the College of Science at the rank of professor.

"Jane and I discovered the true meaning of home here at Marshall University and in the Huntington community," Kopp said. "We are honored to have had the privilege of serving Marshall these past seven years, and look forward to many more years of dedicated work to advance the progress of our great University. At the same time, while we believe we have made significant progress in helping move the University forward, we know there is a lot more work to do and we are committed to doing it. I thank the members of the Higher Education Policy Commission, our Board of Governors, and the Marshall University community for their continued confidence and support."

Kopp was named MU's 36th president on June 15, 2005. If he remains as president for the entire length of the contract, he will become one of the longest serving presidents in Marshall history with 12 years of service. Only Stewart H. Smith at 22 years (1946-1968) and Lawrence J. Corbly at 19 years (1896-1915) served longer terms. Morris Shawkey served 12 years (1923-1935).

Under Kopp's leadership, Marshall has expanded on numerous fronts, most obviously in its physical plant, but also academically. Since 2005, MU has completed more than $200 million in capital projects, with another $114 million in ongoing or upcoming projects.

Academically, several new high demand majors or programs have been launched since 2005. Two of those are debuting this year. The first class of 29 students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program began classes on May 21, and the first class of up to 80 students in the Doctor of Pharmacy program begins in August.


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Wednesday June 27, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Doctor of Pharmacy program granted Precandidate accreditation status

Status is a major step toward Marshall receiving accreditation


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Marshall University's Doctor of Pharmacy program has been granted Precandidate accreditation status by the Accreditation Council For Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Board of Directors, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

The Precandidate status is a major step toward Marshall receiving full accreditation. This status authorizes the School of Pharmacy to enroll its inaugural class, which will begin this fall. The first class is expected to total up to 80 students.

To reach its decision, the ACPE board reviewed the report of an evaluation team, documenting the findings from a comprehensive on-site evaluation.

"This achievement is a momentous one, one that is on the level approaching that of the founding of the School of Medicine," Kopp said. "It should be a source of great pride for all who care about Marshall and the future of those we serve."

The Precandidate accreditation term granted for the Doctor of Pharmacy program extends until June 30, 2013. A comprehensive on-site evaluation for consideration of advancing the Doctor of Pharmacy program from Precandidate to Candidate accreditation status will be scheduled during the academic year 2012-2013. The accreditation process consists of three steps culminating with graduation of the first class and adherence to all ACPE accreditation standards.

"The faculty and staff of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy have been working diligently to develop an outstanding curriculum and educational program," said Kevin Yingling, R.Ph., M.D., inaugural dean of the School of Pharmacy. "We are excited to begin educating this fine next generation of talented pharmacists, here at Marshall University."

Kopp said that during conversations with ACPE representatives, they made it very clear that they are not accrediting new pharmacy schools with any regularity and only the ones that meet their stringent standards earn this status.

"We have met those standards and will continue to do so," Kopp said.

Marshall's School of Pharmacy is located at the Robert W. Coon Education Building on the grounds of the Huntington VA Medical Center in Spring Valley. An ongoing $9.3 million renovation project on the building will result in a 76,000 square-foot learning, research and pharmacy practice facility. Work is on schedule for the building to open in time for the start of the fall semester.

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted unanimously in December 2009 to approve the awarding of the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. It is estimated that nearly 40 new high-paying faculty and staff positions will be created at the school within the first four years, and the school is expected to generate more than $150 million in regional economic impact.

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) accredits Doctor of Pharmacy programs offered by Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy in the United States and selected non-US sites. It is located at 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503, 312/644-3575; FAX 312/664-4652, website www.acpe-accredit.org.


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Tuesday June 26, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University interdisciplinary teams to present research at national pharmacy conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Interdisciplinary teams of researchers representing four areas at Marshall University have had their abstracts accepted for the July 2012 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meeting in Kissimmee, Fla.

The teams include faculty researchers and students from Marshall's School of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems.   Their research includes the following projects:

  • "Assessment of outcomes from use of a standardized behavioral interview within the candidate recruiting process."  Researchers include Robert Stanton, Ph.D.; Kimberly Broedel-Zaugg, Ph.D.; and H. Glenn Anderson, Ph.D. - all three faculty with the School of Pharmacy.   The project reviews the validity of faculty scoring that occurs during a standard candidate interview.

  • "Reasons students choose pharmacy as a career."   The research team includes Broedel-Zaugg, and colleagues and students from Ohio Northern University and the University of Louisiana at Monroe.   The goal of the research is to identify the factors that motivate students to choose pharmacy as a career and to determine if there are differences in factor choice between groups of students at different universities.

  • "Acetaminophen Reduces Lipid Accumulation and Improves Cardiac Function in Obese Zucker Rat."  The research team includes Eric Blough, Ph.D., faculty-School of Pharmacy; Paulette Wehner, M.D., faculty-School of Medicine; and Nandini Manne, a doctoral fellow in the School of Medicine.  Additional team members include Miaozong Wu, Ph.D.; Ravi Arvapalli; Cuifen Wang, Ph.D.; and Satyanarayana Paturi,D.V.M, who are all with the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems and the Department of Biological Sciences.   The project looked at the effect of acetaminophen consumption on obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  • "Protective Effect of Acetaminophen on Renal Dysfunction in Obese Zucker Rat."  Research team includes Wang, Blough, Arvapalli, Paturi, Manne and Wu.    The study's data suggests that chronic acetaminophen ingestion is associated with improved kidney structure and function in the obese Zucker rat.

The meeting is scheduled for July 14-18.


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    Friday June 22, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL students receive 14 more awards, finish year with 107

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received five first-place awards and nine honorable mentions during the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2011 broadcast journalism awards ceremony  Saturday, June 16, at the Appalachian Power Park in Charleston.

    With the addition of these 14 awards, the WMUL-FM student broadcasters surpassed 100 awards for the second consecutive year with 107 for the 2011-2012 academic year. The total includes 32 first-place awards, 37 second-place awards, two third-place awards and 36 honorable mention awards. Since 1985, WMUL-FM student broadcasters have won 1,243 awards.

    Among the first-place award-winning entries was the category Outstanding News Operation, won by WMUL-FM's Newscenter 88 team for the fifth time since 1985. Leannda Carey, a graduate student from Wellsburg, W.Va., was the news director for the spring semester.

    The other four first-place individual award-winning entries in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2011 broadcast journalism awards were:

    Best Enterprise Reporting

    "Graffiti on Campus," by Josie Landgrave, a sophomore from Huntington, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, April 1, 2011.

    Best Interview

    "Campus Concern," with host Adam Cavalier, a 2011 master's degree graduate from Montgomery, who interviewed Marshall President Stephen Kopp on this campus public affairs talk program.  The program was broadcast Monday, Feb. 21, 2011.

    Best Regularly Scheduled Sportscast

    "Herd Roundup," with hosts Adam Cavalier and Aaron Payne, a senior from Winfield, broadcast Friday, April 29, 2011.

    Best Sports Play-By-Play

    Marshall versus Memphis men's basketball game at Cam Henderson Center, broadcast Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011. Members of the FM 88 sports team calling the game were basketball play-by-play announcer Robert Iddings, a 2011 graduate from St. Albans; color commentator Dave Traube, a graduate student from Beckley, and engineer Tyler Kes, a junior from Burnsville, Minn.

    The nine honorable-mention, award-winning entries were:

    Best Website

    WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2011 webmaster for WMUL-FM Online was Tyler Kes.

    Best Regularly Scheduled Newscast

    "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011. The students who participated in the newscast were Adam Rogers, a junior from Charleston, producer; Leannda Carey, anchor; Aaron Payne, anchor; and Jeremy Johnson, a senior from Smithsburg, Md., sports anchor.

    Best Public Service Program

    "Minding the Meters:  Huntington Municipal Parking Board," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, April 28, 2011.

    Best Anchor Or Anchor Team 

    "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with news anchor Adam Cavalier, broadcast Friday, April 1, 2011.

    Best Talk Show

    "Campus Concern," with host Adam Cavalier, who interviewed Dr. Corley Dennison, dean,  about the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications on this campus public affairs talk program. The program was broadcast Friday, March 4, 2011.

    Best Host

    "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Cavalier, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2011.

     

    Outstanding Sports Operation

    The FM 88 sports team; sports director for the spring semester 2011 was Robert Iddings, and sports director for the fall semester 2011 was Adam Rogers.

    Best Sportscaster

    "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Rogers, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2011.

     

    Best Sports Special


    "Marshall Football 2011 Season Preview" was written and produced by hosts of the program Jeremy Johnson and Will Vance, a junior from Charleston, along with reporters James Roach, a senior from Richwood, Aaron Payne, Adam Rogers and Jarrod Clay, a junior from Barboursville.  The "Marshall Football 2011 Season Preview" was broadcast and also was made available online before the Marshall 2011 season opener at West Virginia University, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the university competed with commercial and noncommercial radio stations from throughout the state.

    "Winning the Outstanding News Operation, Best Enterprise Reporting award, Best Interview award, Best Regularly Scheduled Sportscast award, and Best Sports Play-by-Play award is an outstanding accomplishment considering that the students are competing with broadcasting professionals across West Virginia," Bailey said.

    "Overall, this commendable effort helps to build upon another successful year by the volunteer student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt school of Journalism and Mass Communications from state, regional and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations."

    For more information, contact Bailey at 304-696-2294.

     ---------------------------

    Photos: (Above) Leannda Carey was the spring news director for WMUL's Newscenter 88 team that was the first-place winner in the category Outstanding News Operation. (Below) WMUL students display the five first-place plaques they received in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2011 broadcast journalism awards ceremony at Appalachian Power Park. Standing on the upper ledge, from left in the front row, are Jessica Patterson, Laura Hatfield, Ashley Killingsworth and Marcus Constantino. From left in the back row are Leannda Carey, Adam Rogers and Will Vance. On the lower ledge, from left are Aaron Payne, Tyler Kes and Ashleigh Hill. Photos by Dr. Chuck G. Bailey.

     
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 22, 2012
    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Marshall University professor is appointed to national controlled substance committee

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program, has been named as a core committee member of the newly formed Advisory Committee for the Evaluation of Controlled Substance Analogs (ACECSA). 

    The mission of the committee is to recommend minimum standards for the evaluation of non-controlled substances being considered as analogs of controlled substances.  Its main objective is to establish a working definition of "analog" and related terms within the scope of forensic drug analysis.

    The Federal Analog Act, 21 U.S.C. 813, is a section of the United States Controlled Substances Act which allowed any chemical "substantially similar" to a controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II to be treated as if it were also listed in those schedules, but only if intended for human consumption. In other words, the similar substances cited in the act are often called analogs or designer drugs. 

    "The problem is that the act does not define what 'substantially similar' means from a scientific standpoint," Rankin said.  "Frequently, federal legislation and state legislation like that in West Virginia and other states resort to listing specific compounds.  The manufacturers of products like 'Spice' or 'bath salts' substitute a similar compound which is not listed for those that are."  

    Rankin said designer drugs are "designed" to beat the United States Controlled Substances Act. "The simple definition of a designer drug is that it has the same drug activity as a controlled substance but is chemically different enough so it is not currently restricted," he added. Even though often labeled as "not for human consumption," the actual intended use is to be smoked or ingested to achieve a high.

    The development of scientific criteria for determining if a new compound is an analog will aid in the control of these potentially dangerous compounds, while permitting legitimate research for new pharmaceutical products, Rankin said.

    The committee is currently made up of 19 members representing local, state, federal, academic and private forensic laboratories.  Rankin is chair of the Subcommittee on Literature Support which seeks to bring together published scientific evidence on the effects and synthesis of these compounds.  He also serves as Recording Secretary until February when the next meeting will be held in conjunction with the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in Washington, D.C.


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    Thursday June 21, 2012
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

    Tri-State Arts Association to open exhibition tomorrow evening

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-two artists from the Tri-State Arts Association will showcase 60 pieces of their artwork at Gallery 842 in an exhibition that will open Friday, June 22, with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

    Gallery 842, located at 842 4th Ave., is a collaboration between Marshall University and the Huntington community. Gallery director John Farley said that patrons can expect to see many types of work.

    "This eclectic exhibition presents a cross-section of exciting work being made by our own Tri-state artists," Farley said. "Painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, ceramics and mixed media pieces will be displayed. Providing a venue for local artists to display and sell their work has been and remains a key component of G842's mission, and is a crucial part of our ongoing efforts to elevate the profile of the arts in this region."

    For local artist J. Bird Cremeans, who helped organize the exhibition, this is an opportunity for the organization to gain some exposure and share their work with the community.

    "It is always a huge honor when the Tri-State Arts Assocation is invited to collaborate with other artists and organizations," Cremeans said. "I'm happy to see our members display their artwork in a venue that is open to the public and it really helps the club to have all this artwork seen by new eyes. We really are thankful for this opportunity."

    The show will remain in Gallery 842 until July 27. Hours are noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, contact Farley by e-mail at galleries@marshall.edu.


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    Wednesday June 20, 2012
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    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine names physician as first Maier Clinical Research Professor

    Long-time dementia researcher tapped for inaugural program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Shirley M. Neitch, professor of internal medicine and chief of geriatrics at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, has been named the inaugural Maier Clinical Research Professor.

    The professorship will support interdisciplinary translational research investigating the causes, management and treatment of dementia.

    "It is a tremendous honor to be named as the first Maier Professor," Neitch said. "I've been able to do some small research projects before, but this will allow me, with the help of many dedicated colleagues, to pursue more in-depth clinical research projects, which will have significant impact on the lives of persons with dementia."

    Neitch said the first goal is to complete a genetics study of a family whose affected members develop symptoms at a very young age, in their late 20's.   The next step, she added, will be to pursue treatment options.

    Dr. Larry D. Dial, chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine, applauded Neitch's efforts to find answers about a disease that affects thousands of West Virginians.

    "This selfless gift from the Maier family will ensure that critical research support is available to talented individuals like Dr. Neitch who are the forefront of defining etiology of and therapies for dementia and other debilitating brain disorders," Dial said.

    The Maier Clinical Research Professorship was named in honor of Marshall University alumnus Edward "Ed" Maier, following his retirement from General Corporation, a real estate business owned by the Maier family.

    "I'm very gratified my family chose to honor me with the establishment of an endowed professorship at the School of Medicine," Maier said.   "We are pleased to help support research which will benefit future generations of West Virginians."

    General Corporation's gift of $1 million for establishment of the professorship was matched dollar for dollar by the "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund.  The fund was established in 2008 to serve as a catalyst for economic development across the state. The trust fund program allows Marshall to double private gifts that support expansions to research faculty and infrastructure in key areas linked to economic development, health care and job growth.

    ----------------------------

    Photos: (Above) Dr. Larry Dial Jr., chair of the Department of Internal Medicine, presents a plaque to Dr. Shirley Neitch today after she was named the first Maier Clinical Research Professor. (Below) From left, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Susan Maier, Dr. Shirley Neitch and Ed Maier pose for photographers during a ceremony today announcing Neitch as the first Maier Clinical Research Professor. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Monday June 18, 2012
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    Marshall celebrates opening of Physical Therapy program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - On May 21, Marshall University welcomed aboard the new School of Physical Therapy's inaugural class of 29 students at the St. Mary's Center for Education.

    Today, in a ribbon-cutting ceremony at that same location to celebrate the opening of the program, university officials showed the public, along with members of the Marshall Board of Governors, where those 29 students and future students will be pursuing their Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degrees.

    "I have to pinch myself every once in a while to make sure this lovely space is really ours to work in," said Dr. Penny Kroll, a professor and the school's chair. "I've never worked in such a well-appointed space with top of the line physical therapy equipment, audiovisual systems, classrooms and technology."

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said that the region has needed an accredited, entry-level physical therapy program for some time. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook through 2020, employment for physical therapists is expected to increase by nearly 40 percent for the decade, 2010 to 2020. This growth is much greater than the average for all occupations.

    The increasing demand for physical therapy services is expected to emanate largely from the aging "baby boomers" segment of our population. This generation of Americans is staying physically active later in life than previous generations have. Kopp said he expects that the state-of-the-art facility that has been established at the St. Mary's Center for Education combined with Kroll's leadership and her high quality faculty will enable Marshall to rapidly move to the forefront in producing therapists for our region and elsewhere, thereby preventing a serious access issue in this important patient services area.

    "Graduating quality professionals in the physical therapy field, as we will do beginning in May 2015, will benefit the entire tri-state region and the state," Dr. Kopp said. "I am very grateful to Dr. Kroll and her colleagues who have worked so tirelessly to establish this program and earn Candidate accreditation status. I would also like to acknowledge and thank St. Mary's Medical Center President and CEO, Michael  G. Sellards, for sharing our vision for this program and facilitating the renovation of this magnificent facility. Today is another major milestone for Marshall University."

    The revamped, new home of the School of Physical Therapy, located at 2847 5th Ave. in Huntington, will house approximately 120 students (40 students admitted annually for the three-year DPT program), as well as faculty and staff. The building previously housed Sears, and later, Big Bear.

    The DPT is an entry-level, 115-credit, lock-step clinical degree program for students who wish to pursue a career as a physical therapist practitioner, and who possess a baccalaureate degree and required prerequisite coursework. 

    Kroll said clinicians in the area have been supportive of the program since its approval in 2009.

    "They are delighted to see that we are up and running," she said. "They are looking forward to us producing graduates who can go out into the community and practice. We are so short of therapists."

    The School of Physical Therapy has achieved Candidacy for Accreditation status from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, and expects to gain full accreditation in May 2015. 

    Kroll said the need for physical therapists in West Virginia is great.

    "Clinicians tell me it takes them nine months to two years to fill a position," she said. "It is just tremendously difficult to find therapists. Obviously, there are lots of employment possibilities. And the mean salary for a therapist in West Virginia is $77,660. Our graduates will have the potential to make a very nice living."

    Kroll said most of the 29 students already in the program are from the Appalachian region, with most of those from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky. How did they hear about the program? "Mostly word of mouth," Kroll said.

    Beginning in mid-July, Marshall will be added to the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PT-CAS). Kroll said Marshall's name will appear when people apply to physical therapy schools. "The next group of students will be applying through that system," she said.

    One reason West Virginia needs more physical therapists is clear, Kroll said.

    "Part of the problem in West Virginia is the aging population," she said. "And that means more need for rehabilitation."

    The core faculty at the School of Physical Therapy include Dr. Eric Arnold, an associate professor; Dr. Yi-Po Chiu, an assistant professor; Dr. Neil Evans, an assistant professor; and Dr. Tamara Gravano, an assistant professor.

    ------------------------------

    Photo: Marshall University School of Physical Therapy students join with Dr. Michael Prewitt, left, Dr. Penny Kroll, center, Dr. Eric Tarr, second from right, and Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, right, in a ribbon cutting this afternoon, celebrating the opening of the school. Prewitt is dean of the College of Health Professions, Kroll is chair of the School of Physical Therapy, Tarr is president of the West Virginia Physical Therapy Association and Kopp is president of Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

     
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    Friday June 15, 2012
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    6th Avenue near Marshall reopens to traffic today

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The portion of 6th Avenue closed since May 23 to allow for continued construction of a new parking garage on Marshall University's Huntington campus reopens at about 6 p.m. today. 

    Sixth Avenue has been completely blocked in both lanes directly behind the new garage.

    "We want to thank the City of Huntington and everyone who normally drives in this area for their understanding and patience while the road was closed," said James E. Terry, Marshall's director of public safety. "We know it was an inconvenience and we appreciate everyone's cooperation which allowed for construction of the garage to continue."

    The garage is expected to be open in time for the start of fall classes on Aug. 27.


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    Thursday June 14, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-2038

    Ph.D. student to present diabetes research at conference next week

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University doctoral student will present her diabetes research next week at a conference focusing on the central nervous system.

    Aileen Marcelo, a Ph.D. candidate in the university's biomedical sciences program, will present a poster at the Barriers of the Central Nervous System Gordon Research Conference and will give a talk at the conference's student seminar. The conference and seminar will be held June 16-22 at Colby-Sawyer College in New London, N.H.

    The conference will bring together clinical and basic scientists who are at the forefront of research into the system of regulatory interfaces between the blood and brain. This system is essential to brain function and has a major impact on the course and treatment of many neurological conditions, including stroke, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.

    Although there is considerable scientific evidence implicating diabetes as a major risk factor for many central nervous system diseases, there have been few studies investigating the effects of diabetes on this blood-brain barrier. Marcelo's research project, "The Role and Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) at the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) in a Rat Model of Diabetes," explores this connection.

    She works in the lab of Dr. Richard Egleton, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    Marcelo recently received one of eight Summer Thesis Research Grant Awards presented to outstanding graduate student researchers at Marshall. Each award provides $500 to cover the cost of expenses associated with thesis research. Award recipients were chosen on the basis of the quality and significance of their thesis research, the likelihood that the research will eventuate in a completed thesis and justification of the need for support. Funding for the awards was provided by the Marshall University Research Corporation.


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    Tuesday June 12, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall announces 7th Annual West Virginia Brownfields Conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) and the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall have announced that the 7th Annual West Virginia Brownfields Conference will be held Sept. 5-6 at The Resort at Glade Springs in Daniels.

    The annual statewide conference, attended by more than 150 people, is hosted by the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall, in conjunction with the Northern Brownfields Assistance Center at West Virginia University, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and the West Virginia Development Office.

    The program combines educational sessions with networking opportunities for anyone involved in efforts to reuse abandoned or underutilized contaminated land. Brownfields may have potential environmental impairments but often have significant prospects for business, housing or recreational redevelopment.

    The event is intended for local and regional economic development representatives, environmental consultants, educators, land-holding companies, environmental attorneys and environmental regulators. A total of 7.5 hours of LED Continuing Education Credits is available for attendees.

    Highlights of this year's event will include a keynote address by Randy Huffman, cabinet secretary for the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), as well as presentations by the Chemical Alliance Zone, TechConnect West Virginia, the West Virginia National Guard, Hatfield-McCoy Trails, Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, the West Virginia Division of Energy's Office of Coalfield Community Development, the EPA Region III Brownfields Program and the DEP's Division of Land Restoration.

    The Brownfields Assistance Centers at Marshall and West Virginia University were created in 2005 to secure and administer federal brownfields funding and assistance programs, and to provide training and technical assistance, and grant writing, site assessment and remediation services.

    Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS and the Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall, said, "This conference continues to attract attendance from a wide variety of organizations and entities seeking solutions to the redevelopment of their brownfield properties. By locating the conference in southeastern West Virginia for the first time, we are furthering our commitment to providing quality information, service and outreach to all areas of the state."

    Szwilski added that CEGAS is encouraging student participation in this year's conference by offering a limited number of sponsored registrations for college students and high school seniors interested in local economic development, community revitalization or the environmental aspects of redeveloping brownfields. Interested students should contact Dennis Jarvis at 304-696-3506 for more information.

    Exhibitor space and sponsorship opportunities also are available.

    For more information or to register for the conference, visit www.wvbrownfields.com.


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    Friday June 8, 2012
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    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine physicians issue reminders for preventive care

    National Men's Health Week is June 11-17

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to bring awareness to men's health issues, health care providers around the country, including physicians at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, are encouraging men to focus on the importance of early detection and wellness initiatives during National Men's Health Week June 11-17.

    "As we approach Father's Day, it's a perfect time to remind men of the importance of taking care of their bodies," said Dr. Larry D. Dial Jr., chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at the School of Medicine. "Generally speaking, men tend to ignore their health until something goes wrong.  This national public awareness campaign helps highlight preventive health care and how men can live longer and healthier lives."

    Prevention and early detection activities include well-known screenings for cholesterol and blood pressure, but Dial says there are screenings for other health issues available as well.

    "Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a bulging in your abdominal aorta, the largest artery in your body," he said.  "Men between the ages of 65 and 75, currently, or previously a smoker, should talk to their doctor or nurse about being screened for the condition.   An AAA has the potential to burst, which can cause dangerous bleeding and even death." 

    According to Dial, national recommendations for prostate screenings have recently changed and men should consult with their physicians for updated information.

    Additional preventive health care measures include becoming and staying physically active, eating healthfully, limiting alcohol consumption and managing stress effectively.

    Dr. William A."Skip" Nitardy, a Marshall physician who specializes in both internal medicine and pediatrics, says National Men's Health awareness week is also a great time for adolescent males to schedule an appointment for a checkup.

    "It's important for teenage boys to continue to see their physicians for annual assessments of weight, height, blood pressure and vaccinations," he said.  "But equally important, the appointment gives the physician an opportunity to discuss personal safety issues like helmet and seat belt usage and screen for alcohol consumption and other risk-taking behaviors associated with adolescents."

    National Men's Health Week is part of National Men's Health Month, an initiative passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton.  


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    Friday June 8, 2012
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, (304) 696-3296

    Jazz-MU-Tazz music camp starts June 18; closing performance is June 23

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host its 14th Jazz-MU-Tazz festival, a jazz camp for high school students, June 18 to 23 on the Huntington campus. The camp will culminate with a concert performance at 5 p.m. Saturday, June 23, at Pullman Square.

     

    This year, in addition to MU faculty, Jazz-MU-Tazz boasts guest trumpeter Rob Parton, a highly regarded jazz performer, educator and bandleader. One of the most established jazz musicians in the Chicago area, Parton has performed with the Chicago Symphony, Tony Bennett, Frank Sinatra Jr., Mel Torm, the Beach Boys, Celine Dion, Natalie Cole, Carrie Underwood and others.

     

    Students who attend Jazz-MU-Tazz participate in rehearsals, discussion forums and jam sessions. Throughout the week, they perform in big bands and combos while learning about jazz improvisation, history and theory.

     

    Dr. Sean Parsons, a music faculty member at Marshall, said the concert at Pullman Square will include the young musicians and MU's jazz band as well.

     

    "The Pullman Square audience will have the opportunity to hear many of the finest young musicians in West Virginia performing jazz and Latin standards," Parsons said. "The Jazz-MU-Tazz high school ensemble will be followed by the Marshall University 12.0 Jazz Ensemble, and both are joined by acclaimed jazz musician Rob Parton."

     

    For more information, contact Parsons by e-mail at parsons@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-6459.

     


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    Thursday June 7, 2012
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    Marshall University receives large gift pledge for Engineering Complex

    Huntington philanthropist Art Weisberg says gift will help growth of entire region

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington-based company Arthur's Enterprises has made a large gift pledge to the Marshall University Foundation, which will help build the university's new, advanced Applied Engineering Complex, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

    The all-new academic facility will have more than 141,000 square feet of classroom, laboratory, office and special applications spaces that will have a transformative effect on the College of Information Technology and Engineering and science-related disciplines, Kopp said. Construction is expected to begin in October.

    Art Weisberg, president of Arthur's Enterprises, said he is making the significant gift because he understands how important Marshall University is to the future of Huntington and the surrounding region. "This area has tremendous potential to grow. My goal is to help it happen," Weisberg said.

    "By providing financial resources to help Marshall grow in engineering and related disciplines, it will not only help my business develop and prosper but it also assists the growth of the greater Huntington area and the entire state. I love Huntington and I know this gift will make a lasting difference."

    The Weisberg family has been very supportive of Marshall University and, with their financial assistance, has greatly contributed to the successful re-establishment of Marshall's engineering degree program, which was re-launched in 2006. Engineering is now one of the fastest-growing majors at Marshall. The modern engineering laboratory facility on 3rd Avenue, which was dedicated in August 2008, bears the Weisberg family name.

    The Applied Engineering Complex will be located between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on 3rd Avenue in Huntington. With approval from the Marshall University Board of Governors, the engineering complex also will bear the Weisberg family name.

    Weisberg said he continues to support Marshall because he believes in the leadership provided by President Kopp. "Dr. Kopp is a true visionary leader who delivers on his promises. I strongly endorse his bold initiatives and accomplishments," Weisberg said.

    Kopp said the Weisberg family's generosity and foresight have created dramatic changes on Marshall's campus and in the Huntington community. They have had the foresight to recognize that the region and the nation require more professionals in engineering, mathematics and the sciences to remain competitive in the global economy. Marshall University is responding by expanding its capabilities in these academic areas.   

    "Art Weisberg understands the power of true philanthropy to transform a community, a university like Marshall and the impact that has on the generations of students who come through our leading-edge programs," Kopp said. "He is a leader and we should celebrate this incredible man for what he is doing to change lives and provide opportunities for the people of our city, our state and our region."

    Verna Gibson, chairwoman of the Marshall University Board of Governors, expressed her appreciation to the Weisbergs for their continued leadership in the community and generosity to Marshall. "It is not surprising that such committed and outstanding individuals share Dr. Kopp's vision for unprecedented academic achievement and economic growth that will benefit our region and state for generations," Gibson said.

    Dr. Joseph B. Touma, a longtime Marshall supporter and benefactor, and incoming chair of the Marshall University Board of Governors, praised the Weisberg gift.

    "This remarkable gift by Art Weisberg is another act of his generosity, vision and philanthropy for our community and region," Dr. Touma said. "What the Weisbergs are doing allows Marshall University to realize their dream of excellence and building the engineering school of the future.

    "Dr. Kopp's leadership and the hard work of Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, are to be commended because they proved to Art and Joan that they can make their dreams come true. I am deeply moved by and appreciative of my good friends Art, Joan and the Weisberg family."

    About the Applied Engineering Complex

    The Applied Engineering Complex will house six different academic components and programs:

    • College of Information Technology and Engineering including divisions of engineering, computer science, applied science and technology

    • Mechanical, Electrical Engineering and Bioengineering Research Laboratories

    • Departments of Mathematics and Computational Science

    • Computer Modeling and Digital Imaging/Simulation Resource Facility

    • Transportation Research Center

    • Marshall University Research Corporation

     

    About Art Weisberg and the Weisberg Family of Companies

    Art Weisberg is the founder of State Electric Supply Company, a retail-wholesale distributor of electrical and electronic supplies with showroom and warehouse facilities. State Electric has evolved and grown into one of America's top and best known electrical distributors with more than 40 locations in six states.

    A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Weisberg graduated from City College of New York with a degree in electrical engineering. He took a job with Halstead Industries to build a steel mill in New Haven, W.Va.  On completion of the job, he went in to business for himself.  He supplied small hardware and general stores from the back of his truck. 

    Under the corporate umbrella of Arthur's Enterprises, Weisberg established a specialty wire manufacturing company, Service Wire, Inc., in 1968. Service Wire offers an expanding line of products to customers around the world.

    In addition to his business success, Weisberg received the Charles D. Scott Distinguished Career Award from the American Wire Industry, and the "Citizen of the Year" award from the Huntington Herald-Dispatch. He and his wife, Joan, were named to the Marshall University College of Business Hall of Fame and, in 2008, Art and Joan were both conferred Marshall's honorary Doctor of Humane letters degree, the highest recognition provided by the university.

    ------------------

    Photos: (Above) Art Weisberg; (Below) Architect's rendering of the Applied Engineering Complex.


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    Monday June 4, 2012
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    Gilman Scholarships enable three MU students to study abroad

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University students have received a 2012 Gilman International Scholarship to study abroad this fall. Two of the students will be studying in Japan and one will be studying in Korea.

    The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program is a very limited, federally funded scholarship for study abroad. It provides scholarships to U.S. undergraduates with financial need, including students from diverse backgrounds and students going to non-traditional study abroad destinations.

    The Marshall students receiving the scholarships are Justin Roach, a junior from Coal Grove, Ohio; Evan Donnelly, a senior from Worthington, Ky.; and James Kiger, a senior from Wheeling, W.Va.

    "We are really excited to see three of our students receive the Federal Gilman Award," said Ryan Warner, study abroad advisor at Marshall. "All three of our students who received this award greatly deserve this scholarship and will put the money towards the cost of their semester abroad."

    Roach studies in the College of Liberal Arts and is majoring in Japanese. He received the Gilman Award of $5,000. Roach will be studying one academic year (2012-2013) in Osaka, Japan, at Kansai Gaidai University through Marshall's partner exchange program.

    Donnelly is an applied mathematics major and a psychology minor, and also studies Japanese. He received the Gilman Award of $8,000 and will be studying one academic year (2012-2013) in Tokyo, Japan, at Toyo University through Marshall's International Student Exchange Program (ISEP).

    Kiger is a double major in music and Japanese. He received the Gilman Award of $5,000. Kiger will be studying one academic year (2012-2013) in Daegu, South Korea, at Kyungpook National University though Marshall's partner exchange program. 

    Warner  said the students will be required to do a service project upon their return to Marshall that correlates with their time studying abroad. He also said Roach, Donnelly and Kiger are the only students from West Virginia to have received the 2012 Gilman Scholarships.

    "The state of West Virginia is considered an 'un-represented' area of the United States for Study Abroad and it is wonderful to see students not only from the state, but from Marshall University, receive this award," Warner said. "This past fall we hosted the Gilman Workshop here at Marshall and many schools from Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia attended the workshop.

    "I truly believe this put our students and Marshall University in the spotlight for the Gilman Scholarship Program created by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in the U.S. and the U.S. Department of State. Students must be receiving the Federal Pell Grant to be eligible for the scholarship."


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    Monday June 4, 2012
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    Marshall University medical student selected for position with national medical association

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alexandra E. Norcott , a rising fourth-year student at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, has been selected to serve a one-year term as a student ambassador with the American Medical Association (AMA) Foundation.

    "My participation with the AMA Foundation will allow me to better understand the funding side of community service programs," Norcott said. "Thus far, my participation has been solely on the development and executive side of community service, so this position will allow me a different focus."

    Norcott will be traveling the country over the next year educating physicians about the goals of the AMA Foundation and how their charitable gifts can help support free clinics, scholarship grants and other service-oriented projects.

    The Vienna, Va., native is considering a career in either internal medicine or obstetrics/gynecology.  Dr. Marie Veitia, associate dean for student affairs, says Norcott's selection to the national panel is impressive.

    "Since she began medical school in 2009, Ms. Norcott has shown a great deal of dedication to the mission of the AMA at a local, state and national level," Veitia said.   "She has tremendous promise as a leader and I look forward to learning more about what she will accomplish in her new role."

    The AMA Foundation works to maximize the philanthropic impact of the medical community by uniting and organizing physicians across the country for various projects. Norcott will attend her first national meeting as an ambassador later this summer.


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    Friday June 1, 2012
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    LoCascio named interim dean of Marshall's Honors College

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Nicki LoCascio, associate dean of the Honors College at Marshall University, has been named interim dean of the College, Provost Gayle Ormiston announced today.

    LoCascio replaces Dr. Mary Todd, founding dean of the Honors College, who has accepted the position of Executive Director of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation's oldest scholarly honor society. A nationwide search for a permanent dean will begin this fall.

    "I'm looking forward to the challenges of continuing Dr. Todd's good work," LoCascio said. "The Honors College has raised our profile and I don't want to see the momentum lost."

    LoCascio has worked closely with Todd the past three years.

    "Dr. Todd served as founding dean of the Honors College, and in doing so established the institutional structure for the College, and developed the guidelines for the future of the College," Ormiston said. "I look forward to Dr. LoCascio continuing the development begun by Dr. Todd. We are very fortunate to have her available to us to serve in this very important role."

    LoCascio agreed that Todd did an excellent job of "pulling the Honors College together."

    "She's incredible. I've seen the effort she has put into it," LoCascio said.

    As associate dean in the College, LoCascio's role currently consists of advising students, program administration and program assessment.

    She is a member of The American Association of Immunologists, the Society for College Science Teachers and the National Science Teachers Association. At Marshall, she teaches Principles of Biology and Honors Seminars.

    LoCascio earned a B.S. in history and biology from Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in immunogenetics from the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.


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    Thursday May 31, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Study explores gene therapy 'cocktail' for feline fibrosarcoma

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of researchers led by a Marshall University faculty member has found that a gene therapy "cocktail" may hold the key to treating feline fibrosarcoma an aggressive type of cancer that affects thousands of cats in the U.S. each year. Current therapies for the disease are often ineffective for long-term tumor eradication.

    The research was conducted by Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, associate professor in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and the Departments of Biochemistry and Microbiology and Surgery at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and colleagues from the McKown Translational Research Institute at the school of medicine, the university's Department of Biology, the Martin Veterinary Clinic in Ashland, Ky., and the University of L'Aquila in Italy.

    According to Claudio, there are two types of feline fibrosarcomas. The most common type has been linked to the use of vaccines administered to prevent rabies and feline leukemia, and occurs at the site of the injection. The second type appears to occur spontaneously, without any known external cause.

    The study at Marshall focused on the more rare, non-vaccination site fibrosarcomas, which have been found to be associated with genetic alterations. It seemed a natural fit for Claudio, whose research focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the growth of cancers to help develop new strategies for treatment.

    "Gene therapy, which we study in my lab, uses genetic and cell-based technologies to treat disease," he said. "Essentially, we were able to develop a cocktail of adenoviruses carrying functional therapeutic proteins that can be used to eliminate this deadly disease."

    Claudio pointed out that more studies need to be done to determine if his lab's findings could also be applicable to cases of vaccine-induced fibrosarcomas.

    The research was published yesterday in the journal PLoS ONE. The full article, "Targeting a newly established spontaneous feline fibrosarcoma cell line by gene transfer," is available online at http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0037743.

    Claudio is in Italy this week to present three invited lectures about his research. He will be speaking at the National Cancer Institute and the CEINGE Institute in Naples, and at the meeting "Fragment of history:  Seminar on the oral medicine of the past and of the future" in Sorrento.

     

    For more information, contact Claudio at claudiop@marshall.edu or 304-696-3516.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 31, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Five from Marshall participating in Japanese Summer Camp

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be well represented in the West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE) Language Leaper Japanese Summer Camp Program next month in Huntington.

    The free camp is designed to teach children the Japanese language and culture through fun, interactive and hands-on sessions with native speakers. It takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily June 18-22 at Guyandotte Elementary School. The camp is open to Cabell County elementary students entering grades 1-5 this fall.

    The camp is presented by the WVDE  in partnership with Cabell County Schools. It is funded by those two organizations, as well as by grants from Toyota Motor Manufacturing West Virginia and Nippon Tungsten.

    Azusa Yamada, Japan Outreach Initiative (JOI) program coordinator at Marshall, and Ikuyo Kawada, a Japanese instructor at MU, will join with current Marshall students Meagan Rose Hairston and Taeko Matsumoto, and recent graduate Jasmine Calloway-Woodard at the camp.

    Mami Itamochi, international education coordinator with the WVDE and a coordinator of the summer camp, said at least 50 students will take part. That was to be the maximum number, but Itamochi said 36 students are on a waiting list and they hope to be able admit some of them.

    At the camp, instructors will teach culturally authentic songs, dances, games and arts.  An authentic Japanese lunch will be provided daily free of charge.

    "Our goal is to expose the students to different cultures, to open their eyes to something else," Itamochi said. "They will learn the Japanese culture, language and customs."

    She said in previous camps, including a Chinese camp in Morgantown, the children were quite interested in learning. "It's always nice to work with those students," she said.

    Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts (COLA), said the camp is a very good collaboration between COLA and local schools.

    "We are seeing more Japanese companies who find West Virginia to be an ideal place to do business and West Virginia companies who find business opportunities in Japan," Pittenger said. "As such, it is important that we all learn more about the Japanese people and their great history and culture."  

    For further information contact Itamochi  at mitamochi@access.k12.wv.us or Debbie Nicholson  at dlnichol@access.k12.wv.us or 304-558-0200.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday May 29, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Service Awards Luncheon set for May 31 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 28th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, May 31, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. The Employee of the Year will be named during the luncheon.

    To be eligible for awards employees must have completed 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 years of service to Marshall University by May 1, 2012.

    The following is a list of university staff members who will receive awards:

    For 10 Years of Service:  Angela Akers, James Booth, Diana Bradley,  Pam Early, Gary Hall, Donald Hill, Nancy Holley, Kevin Irvin, Michael King, Dawn Kirtner, Sherrie Knapp, Mary Layne, Mary Love, Donna May, Dorothy McGraw, Amad Mirzakhani, Fred Mullins, Karen Mullins, Amy Saunders, Bonnie Scott, Dave Wellman, Rich Worner and Yanzhi Wu.

    For 15 Years of Service:  Terry Anderson, Sharon Booth, William Carter, Perry Chaffin, Steve Cotton, Joseph Davis, Brenda Harlow, Brad Helton, Lisa Hughes, Linda Jefferson, Dena Laton, Bindu Mannan, Leah Tolliver and John Winters.

    For 20 Years of Service:  Deborah Carder-Deem, Betty Cook, Denver Cooper, Cathy Cover, Robert Easthom, Harold Hall, Katherine Hetzer, Carolyn Quinlan, Judy Rogero and James Schneider.

    For 25 Years of Service:  Barry Beckett, Constance Berk, Billy Black, Patricia Carman, Charles Cook, Larry Dillon, Pierre "Pete" Divers, Lela Hardy, Stanley Harper, Sharlee Henry, Jamie Henry, Fran Jackson, Carla Lapelle, Leonard Lovely, Kelli Mayes, Michael McGuffey, Kenneth McSweeney, Melody Murphy, Charles Racer, John Richardson and Kelly Webster-Fuller.

    For 30 Years of Service: Nina L. Barrett, Linda Birchfield-Modad, Sharon Gates and Jerry Stowasser.

    For 35 Years of Service: David Arigan, Edward Dzierzak, Linda Holmes, Jack Shafer, Gary Stone and Judy Watters.

    For 40 Years of Service:  Judith Olson.

    Retirees:  Pamela Bowen, Donald Damron, Julia Dickens, Deborah Dorsey, Joe Feaganes, Sharlee Henry,  Frances Hensley, Selma Johnson, Judy Little, Bertha Lovely, Beverly McCoy, Judy Ross, James Schneider, John Stepp, Joseph Taylor and Shelia Wiley.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 25, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall announces solar panel installation and education project at University High School

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) and the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall are continuing their ongoing partnership with the West Virginia Division of Energy (WVDOE) Office of Coalfield Community Development with a project to install a solar panel system at University High School in Morgantown.

    The venture will be the second of its type undertaken by the partners, who have been working over the past year to demonstrate renewable energy applications on former surface-mined properties. Earlier this year, they installed a similar solar panel system at Mount View High School in Welch.

    Brownfields Assistance Center Project Coordinator George Carico has been assisting the WVDOE with locating sites where solar panels could be installed for demonstrating this type of renewable energy. He says University High School is located on a reclaimed surface mine site with extensive "sky-view" well situated for a solar panel array system. 

    The system will consist of approximately 24 panels with a total rated output of 6 kilowatts, mounted awning-style directly onto the school's south-facing gymnasium wall. It should be installed this summer.

    Carico said that like the installation in McDowell County, the Morgantown project will provide both renewable solar energy to the school and an educational component for students. The system will include real-time monitors to evaluate system performance, and the results will be incorporated into science-based classroom projects.

    "There continues to be a great deal of interest in renewable energy from solar panels," he added. "There are many challenges while this technology is still evolving, with initial system cost and the rate of financial return being the largest hurdles. This system will help people understand the various aspects both good and bad of utilizing this type of energy. At University High School, the students, teachers, parents and community will be getting hands-on knowledge. We'll be educating a wide variety of people."

    Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director, said this project demonstrates the assertive approach Marshall is taking to evaluate renewable energy resource potential across West Virginia. "Along with our other ongoing solar, wind and biomass initiatives with the WVDOE, the project at University High School shows we're taking a significant role in assessing energy resource potential on surface-mined lands. We're pleased to be a key player in this valuable venture."

    A total of $55,000 in federal, state and county funding is being provided for the project, including $45,000 from the Appalachian Regional Commission, $5,000 from the Monongalia County Board of Education and $5,000 from the WVDOE. Additional educational support is being provided by the West Virginia University Department of Chemistry.

    -----------------------------

    Photo: The solar panel system at University High School will be similar to this one installed earlier this year at Mount View High School in Welch. The University High School panel will be mounted awning-style directly onto the school's south-facing gymnasium wall.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 25, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL students again do well in national contests

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, have enjoyed another banner semester in national competition this spring, receiving  67 awards in seven contests and bringing their total for the 2011-2012 academic year to 93, with one contest remaining.

    Of the 93 awards, 27 are for first place, 37 for second place, two for third place and 27 for honorable mention. Results of one more contest - the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's Statewide Awards - will be announced in June.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said WMUL student broadcasters have now won 1,229 awards since 1985.

    Since January, WMUL students have received:

    • 10 awards in the International AVA Awards 2011 competition in January.

    • 15 awards in the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 21st Annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 49th Annual Audio/Video Production Awards competition in March.

    • One award during the National Broadcasting Society Professional Audio/Video Production competition in March.

    • Seven awards in the 2011 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Mark of Excellence Contest for Region Four in the four radio categories.

    • Student Audio competition in April.

    • 13 awards in the 18th Annual Communicator Awards 2012 Audio Competition in late April.

    • 18 awards in the Hermes Creative Awards 2012 Competition.

    For a complete list of the 67 awards presented to WMUL students since January, go to http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2012/pr052412.htm.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 25, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Sam Stanley Memorial Scholarship established by MU Foundation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has established a scholarship in honor of the late Sam Stanley, who filled several positions at Marshall during a long career that ended when he retired from the Big Green Foundation in 2010. 

    The endowed fund, known as the Sam Stanley Memorial Scholarship, will be awarded to a full-time student(s) in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications with first preference going to students majoring in Radio/TV Production and Management or Sports Journalism.

    Stanley was a two-time graduate of Marshall, earning a B.A. in Liberal Arts in 1965 and a master's in Journalism in 1980. He had worked, off and on, at MU since the 1970s, when he was Sports Information Director.

    "We are humbled to be able to honor one of our own, and to have the response of the people, some whom I've never met, is wonderful," said Kristi Arrowood, director of Foundation Development and Strategic Programs with the MU Foundation. "Sam was always promoting Marshall. He was, to a lot of people, the face of Marshall."

    Required funds were raised for the endowment, Arrowood said, thanks to a grassroots effort led by School of Journalism graduates and Thunder Club members. Word spread fast, she said, as they used Facebook, e-mails and the Thunder Club newsletter to reach potential contributor

    "To date, we have 25 people who have contributed, with a significant donation from Donna and Selby Wellman, who was his Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) fraternity brother," Arrowood said. "And, Todd Marcum (a Marshall graduate and Thunder Club member) was instrumental in getting the fundraising started."

    Stanley's wife, Sue, said she was a little surprised that the scholarship was established so quickly.

    "But, Sam had an awful lot of friends who knew his love for Marshall," she said. "It's wonderful for him to be remembered by his Marshall friends, and to get it done this quickly and to know that he will be continually recognized."

    In addition to working in Sports Information and with the Big Green, Stanley also worked with the MU Alumni Association in the 1990s, serving as assistant vice president for alumni relations. He also worked for The Herald-Dispatch and the former evening paper, the Huntington Advertiser, for many years.

    For more information or to contribute to the scholarship fund, contact Arrowood by phone at 304-696-3505, or via e-mail at arrowoodk@marshall.edu.

    --------------------------

    Showing his pride in Marshall University, Sam Stanley proudly drove a green automobile, complete with Marshall flags.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 25, 2012
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

    MU's Summer K-12 Program still accepting students

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Students in grades 5 and up still have time to enroll in Marshall University's month-long Summer K-12 Program in Charleston. The program is designed to provide children under 18 with activity-based learning experiences in writing, reading and math, according to Dr. Joyce Meikamp, director of Clinical and Field Based Experiences at Marshall.

    Students will explore "In Your Own Back Yard" and have an opportunity to become involved in hands-on activities.  The program will take place at Stonewall Jackson Middle School June 18 through July 19, running from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily.  Each student will be scheduled for an orientation session on either June 13 or June 14 from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.   Assessment and counseling services will also be available. The program includes breakfast and lunch starting June 25.

    The program utilizes supervised graduate students in clinical experiences leading to certification or licensure in special education, school counseling, school psychology and literacy education.   The cost for each child is $100.  Some scholarships are available on a need basis. As this is a full inclusion program, both regular and special education students are encouraged to apply.

    Additional information can be obtained by contacting Meikamp by phone at 304-746-1983 or at jmeikamp@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 24, 2012
    Contact: Kelly Sweetman, Director, Office of Military and Veterans Affairs,, 910-381-5891

    MU presents Military Child awards to children at St. Joseph Catholic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Military and Veterans Affairs presented Military Child awards to three children of active duty service members currently stationed in Huntington today at St. Joseph Catholic School. The presentation was made during the school's year-end awards ceremony.

    Kelly Sweetman, director of the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs at Marshall, said  she hopes today's presentation at St. Joseph was the first of many to come. She said MU plans to expand the program into other area schools next year.

    The medals presented to the students were donated by B.J. and Cindy Chadduck from MilitaryWives.com.

    ------------------

    Photo: From left, Father Dean Borgmeyer joins Maj. Roy Ramey from Marshall University ROTC; St. Joseph Catholic School students Elija Brown, Kali Brown and Madison Nekvinda; and her father, Capt. Kristopher Nekvinda, for a photograph after the three students were presented with Military Child awards today by Marshall's Office of Military and Veterans Affairs. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

     
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 21, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Application process under way for Fall 2012 Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted through Friday, July 27,  for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver Program for Fall 2012, according to Dr. Donna Spindel,  dean of the Graduate College. The scholarship program provides tuition assistance for a limited number of Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

    Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.

    The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Students who received a Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver for Summer 2012 are NOT eligible for a waiver for Fall 2012. Student waivers have a maximum value of $750 to cover the cost of up to three credit hours for graduate coursework. Faculty/staff employee benefit waivers are available to all full-time faculty/staff employees of Marshall University and cover the complete cost of up to three credit hours for graduate coursework (with the exception of required fees). The waiver does not cover online courses.

    Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by email at the close of the application period. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at  www.marshall.edu/bursar.

    Award recipients must be registered for graduate courses for the Fall 2012 term by Friday, Aug. 10, in order to receive a waiver.  Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Aug. 10 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

    Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at  www.marshall.edu/graduate/tuitionwaivers.asp.

    Persons with questions may call the Graduate College at 304-696-6606.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 21, 2012
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

    MU student headed for Turkey to study Turkish language

    CL.S. Scholarship enables Mary Harper to study abroad for several weeks

     SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University senior has been awarded a U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship that will allow her to spend several weeks this summer in Turkey studying the Turkish language.

    Mary Harper, a resident of South Charleston, W.Va., who is majoring in International Affairs at Marshall, will travel in June to Turkey's capital city, Ankara, where she will spend seven weeks in intensive language institutes.  The CL.S. program is part of a government effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and  mastering critical foreign languages.

    Harper, the daughter of Rich and Peggy Harper of South Charleston, was one of approximately 575 undergraduate and graduate students nationally who received a CL.S. scholarship to study abroad.

    "She's an outstanding International Affairs major with a critical mindset and a truly international spirit," said Dr. Jason J. Morrissette, director of the International Affairs program at Marshall. "She's passionate about her studies and exceptionally dedicated to experiencing the world.  She's very deserving of this opportunity and I'm certain that her time in Turkey will contribute significantly to her future endeavors."

    Harper says her interest in the Turkish language stems from  her friendship with an international student from Turkey with whom she was paired in Marshall's language program, Learning English for Academic Purposes (LEAP).

     

    "We were paired as conversation partners and I was tutoring her in English but when I saw the effort she was putting in to learn English I decided to learn Turkish as well from her," Harper said.  Her interest was so great Harper accompanied her friend, Ezgi  Karakus,  and several other Turkish students to their home country last summer where she spent several weeks visiting sites in the Istanbul/Izmir area.

               

    "I'm really excited about this opportunity," Harper said.  "If it weren't for this scholarship there wouldn't be a way for me to receive any formal language training in Turkish."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 18, 2012
    Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center,, 304-691-8961

    Third annual Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference to be hosted by Marshall University Forensic Science Center

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Center will host the third annual Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference (AIDE) May 21-25  to provide training in digital forensics and evidence recovery, electronic discovery and information security.

    Booth Goodwin, United States Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, will make opening remarks at 9 a.m. Monday, May 21. His presentation will focus on digital evidence as the "new frontier" in prosecution.

    The conference will offer a wide array of training for professionals and students in the fields of law, digital forensics, law enforcement and information security. The conference runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, May 21, and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day through Friday, May 25.

    John Sammons, an assistant professor in Marshall's Integrated Science and Technology Department, is the director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence. "Anyone who works with digital evidence, whether they are a lawyer, a police officer, or an information security professional, must keep pace with technology," he said. "This is our third annual conference. The needs for training and the threats are just as great, if not greater than when we started. Technology is evolving so quickly that we must take advantage of every opportunity to increase our knowledge and grow our skill sets."

    Sammons said the conference offers a wide array of great speakers from the FBI, US Secret Service, Marshall University, Purdue University, several law firms, the West Virginia Prosecuting Attorneys Institute, the West Virginia State Police, information security firms and many more.

    Continuing education credits are available for law enforcement, attorneys and information security professionals. First responder certification will be offered on digital evidence.

    Registration fees are free for current AIDE members, $50 for nonmember professionals, and $20 for students, and are due the first day of attendance.

    To register for the conference or to learn more, please visit the AIDE website at http://www.appyide.org/Events/2012/AIDE2012.htm

    Sponsors for the event include Jackson Kelly PLLC Attorneys at Law; Spilman, Thomas & Battle, PLLC; Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC Attorneys at Law; Syngress Publishing; Marshall University Forensic Science Center; Marshall University Department of Integrated Science and Technology, and Marshall University Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology; 304Geeks and InfoSec Daily Podcast.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 18, 2012
    Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Local foundation creates second scholarship for Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

    Huntington Clinical Foundation pledges support

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington Clinical Foundation has pledged $40,000 to create a scholarship for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. The scholarship will provide a $10,000 award for an entering first-year medical student for each of the next four years.

    "This is the second scholarship created for the School of Medicine by the Huntington Clinical Foundation and we are exceedingly appreciative of their generosity," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs.  "Helping medical students achieve their dream of becoming a physician is a noble endeavor and we salute the Huntington Clinical Foundation for their commitment to medical education."

    Dr. Ken Wolfe, a trustee with The Huntington Clinical Foundation, and Jim Morgan, secretary-treasurer, say the local private foundation supports scientific research and scholarships.

    "The Huntington Clinical Foundation, which is funded by the Switzer Trust, has the mission to provide funds to help improve medical care and education in West Virginia," Wolfe said. "Helping Marshall's medical school attract the best and brightest students is an excellent example of the goal of our foundation and should pay significant dividends to our region in the future."

    "The trustees are pleased to be able to fulfill the object of the foundation in providing this medical education scholarship," Morgan said.  "The efforts will benefit the entire region."

    The scholarship, known as the Huntington Clinical Foundation Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Expendable Scholarship, will be awarded to an entering first-year student chosen by the School of Medicine Scholarship Committee in conjunction with the Marshall University Financial Aid Office.

    The Huntington Clinical Foundation created the first expendable scholarship for medical students in 2010.  An expendable scholarship is one that does not accrue interest and can only be awarded based upon the available balance.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 18, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Part of 6th Avenue near Marshall to close for more than three weeks to allow for continued construction of parking garage

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Part of 6th Avenue near Marshall University will be closed from May 23 through June 15 to allow for continued construction of a new parking garage on the Huntington campus.

    Sixth Avenue will be completely blocked in both lanes directly behind the new garage. "Local Traffic Only" signs will be placed on each end of the closure at Hal Greer Boulevard and at 17th Street. Residents who have off-street parking in these areas will be allowed in. No on-street parking will be allowed.

    "We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate everyone's cooperation during this time," said James E. Terry, Marshall's director of public safety. "We ask that everyone plan ahead and choose an alternate route when in this area."

    In addition, John Marshall Drive will be closed from the alley behind the Marshall University Foundation Hall to 6th Avenue. Elm Street will be closed from 6th Avenue to the alley located between 6th and 7th avenues. The alleys will remain open.

    Pedestrian traffic will also be diverted from the area due to overhead lifting and construction materials and equipment.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 17, 2012
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications,, 304-746-1989

    Marshall University offers incoming freshmen free English and Math workshops this summer

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Incoming freshmen can fast-track their college success during free summer workshops at Marshall University. The Summer Bridge Program consists of two sessions of workshops designed to give incoming students the fundamentals they need for college success. English and math classes will be taught by full-time faculty.

    "The academic and career success of our students is of primary importance to us," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs. "Our Summer Bridge Program is one way we can ensure that we are giving our newest students the leg up they need to be prepared for the rigors of college before classes even start."

    Session One will run from June 25 through July 6 (with no meeting on July 4). Session Two will run from July 23 through August 2. Classes will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday on the Huntington and South Charleston campuses and at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant. The Summer Bridge Program is free to incoming freshmen who have been admitted to Marshall for the fall of 2012, have paid their enrollment deposit and meet workshop entry guidelines.

    Seating is limited and registration is required. For more information, call 304-696-3646 or e-mail recruitment@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday May 15, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall School of Physical Therapy reaches first accreditation milestone

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University's new School of Physical Therapy has achieved Candidacy for Accreditation status from the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; accreditation@apta.org), according to Dr. Penny Kroll, the school's director. 

    Candidacy is the pre-accreditation stage of the entire accreditation process and is required prior to implementation of the professional/technical phase of the physical therapy program. The program can now move toward full accreditation in three years.

    "Having achieved candidacy, the program can now matriculate the 28 students admitted to the inaugural Class of 2015," Kroll said. "We look forward to welcoming them on May 21."

    The school is located at the St. Mary's Educational Center at 29th Street and 5th Avenue, Kroll added. The facility will have sufficient space to house an approximate total of 120 students (40 students admitted annually for the three-year Doctor of Physical Therapy Program), as well as faculty and staff. 

    The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program is an entry-level, 115-credit, three-year, lock-step clinical degree program for students who wish to pursue a career as a physical therapist practitioner, and who possess a baccalaureate degree and required prerequisite coursework. 

    ###


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday May 15, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall professor to share kidney research in China

     HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor will be in Beijing this week to present his research at BIT's 5th World Cancer Congress and to meet with colleagues at a leading university.

    Dr. Gary O. Rankin, professor and chairman of the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, will be at the conference to give a talk about his work to study how a substance found naturally in red wine can reduce some of the harmful effects of a commonly used anti-cancer drug.

    According to Rankin's study conducted in cooperation with colleague Dr. Monica A. Valentovic, resveratrol, a natural component of red wine, grapes, blueberries and peanuts, can reduce toxicity to the kidney caused by the chemotherapy drug cisplatin. The work is funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

    "Dr. Valentovic and I are using a human kidney cell line to look into the protective effects of resveratrol," said Rankin. "We have found that the compound's powerful antioxidant properties may be important in helping to protect the kidney from cisplatin's harmful effects."

    Also at the conference, Rankin will help lead a scientific session, "Cancer rehabilitation, nutrition and management of cancer related complications."

    Before the meeting in Beijing, Rankin has been invited to visit the School of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China, to give a seminar about his work in the field of chemical-induced injury to the kidney. He will describe how an agricultural fungicide, dimetachlone, which was developed in Japan and manufactured in China, causes kidney damage. He also will be presenting some of the work he and Valentovic have done on the protective effects of resveratrol on cisplatin toxicity.

    Rankin will be accompanied on the trip by Dr. Yi Charlie Chen, an associate professor of biology at Alderson-Broaddus College in Philippi.

    Both Rankin and Chen are lead researchers in the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence a federally funded program to help build biomedical research expertise across the state. Rankin is the principal investigator of the project and Chen is on the steering committee.

    For more information, contact Rankin at 304-696-7313 or rankin@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 14, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Harless CREATE Satellite to hold year-end celebration

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development in the College of Education at Marshall University will have a year-end celebration showcasing Harless CREATE Satellite projects Thursday, May 17.

    The event will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.  

    Featured projects include the GigaPan Outreach Project, Arts and Bots, Hear Me and Message From Me. In addition, a new WaterBot project will be introduced.

    GigaPan enables students to take panoramic images of their communities and activities and share them with peers across the world. Arts and Bots is a customized robot designed to integrate technology, literature and history through the use of art supplies, circuit boards, lights, motors and sensors. Hear Me seeks to amplify kids voices using media and technology to create a world where kids are heard, acknowledged and understood, thereby giving them the power to inspire change in their lives, communities and the world.

    WaterBot is a citizen scientist project that prototypes a low-cost, easy and mobile method to monitor water quality, empowering communities, educators and children to monitor their watershed systems.

    The Harless CREATE Satellite grant, which was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, provides rural Appalachian schools continuous and seamless access to technologies, educational resources and ideas generated at the CREATE Lab in Pittsburgh. In addition, it enables teachers to integrate cutting edge technology into existing curriculum. 

    Schools showcasing projects are from the Marshall University Professional Development Partnership Schools and include the Early Education STEM Center; Huntington High; Kellogg, Guyandotte and Ceredo elementary schools; and Beverly Hills, Milton and Barboursville middle schools, as well as Cherry River Elementary in Nicholas County, Beverly Elementary in Randolph County and South Point High School in Ohio.

    This event is free and open to the public and anyone interested is encouraged to attend.  For more information, contact Carrie-Meghan Quick at quickblanco@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/harless


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    Friday May 11, 2012
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Marshall University, Aetna invite businesses, individuals to free lunch lecture on rainwater harvesting, stormwater control

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An expert on rainwater harvesting from Green City Resources of Cincinnati, Ohio, will deliver the next presentation in Marshall University's Lunch and Learn Sustainability Lecture Series Tuesday, May 22, beginning at noon.

    Rose Seeger will give the free hour-long lecture that will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, 519 John Marshall Dr. Lunch is complimentary, but an RSVP is required. To register, go to www.marshall.edu/sustainability.

     

    Seeger, co-owner of Green City Resources, is a vegetated roof specialist, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Accredited Professional, and a  Building Design and Construction and American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association Accredited Professional.  She works in the commercial field on vegetated roofs, irrigation and commercial/residential rainwater harvesting systems.

     

    Green City Resources is a Cincinnati-based stormwater management company specializing in the design, installation and maintenance of vegetated roofs, bioretention, rainwater harvesting and sustainable landscape design.

     

    Some of the company's designs include:

     

    • The new American Red Cross Headquarters: bioretention, native landscape, monarch way station and green roof, which won Business Couriers "Best Design" award;

    • Brazee Street Studios: bioretention and native landscape, which won the AIA Committee on the Environment Sustainability award; and

    • Rothenberg's Rooftop Teaching Garden, the first-ever Cincinnati public school rooftop garden

    Seeger also is a representative for the United States Green Building Council's Sustainable Site Committee, an adjunct professor for the Cincinnati State Horticulture Department teaching Stormwater Management and a National Center for Construction Education and Research instructor.

     

    Aetna Building Maintenance and Marshall University have teamed up to launch a monthly lecture series to address sustainability topics to benefit organizations in the region. Topics will include energy management and conservation, green cleaning, lighting retrofits, recycling, alternative energy, water harvesting, storm water management, and LEED certification. All lectures in the series are free and open to local and tri-state businesses and organizations, but pre-registration is required.

    Typically, more than 40 area businesses are represented at the luncheon.


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    Thursday May 10, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation,, 304-746-1964

    Biology professor secures grant to save state's primary natural history collection

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thanks to the work of a Marshall University biology professor, the nation's largest museum collection of mammals, amphibians and reptiles from West Virginia will be preserved for future generations.

    Dr. Suzanne G. Strait has been awarded a $373,256 grant from the National Science Foundation to re-curate and modernize the West Virginia Biological Survey Museum, which is housed in the university's College of Science. Her colleague Dr. Thomas K. Pauley, also a professor of biology, is co-investigator on the grant.

    The museum is located in the Science Building and comprises more than 21,000 specimens amassed over 70 years. According to Strait, nearly every species described in West Virginia is part of the collection, including many of those listed as federally endangered or at risk.

    Strait says that over the next two years, the grant will allow researchers to buy new cabinets, containers and freezers for storing and preserving the specimens.

    "This natural history collection from West Virginia is larger than that of any other museum in the country, and it is truly a unique resource to be developed for training the next generation of biologists who will study Appalachia's animals," said Strait. "It is in urgent need of new equipment and curation to ensure its survival, so we were quite pleased to get this award."

    She added that the grant also will help build a new facility for storage of tissue collections for genomic studies, digitize all archival data and develop an electronic database. The database will be placed online to make it available to researchers worldwide.

    "In addition to re-housing the specimens, we'll be scanning all the field notebooks, maps and slides in the museum," she said. "One of the things that makes our collection remarkable is that we have, in some cases, 40 years worth of natural history records from the same mountain in West Virginia. That's extraordinarily rare, so getting all these records digitized and available online will really put us on the map."

    Strait said the College of Science has agreed to replace the facility's heating and cooling system as part of the renovation, providing better temperature and humidity controls for the storage area.

    Additional plans include showcasing some exhibits in the hallways of the Science Building so the museum will be more visible, and developing outreach activities for elementary and secondary schools.

    "Hardly anybody knows we have this important collection at Marshall, so a large part of what we want to do during this renovation is get the word out that the museum is here and available for researchers to use," she said.

    Students will begin working next week to move the collection out of the museum so the renovations can begin.

    Strait has been teaching human anatomy at Marshall since 1993. In addition, she has taught systematics, mammalogy, museum curation and UNI 101. She previously completed another project, also funded through NSF, to develop an interactive 3-D image library of fossil specimens. That museum is available online at www.paleoview3D.org.

    Pauley, who teaches ornithology and herpetology, has conducted herpetological studies in West Virginia since the 1960s. He and his graduate students maintain the museum's amphibian and reptile collection.

    He plans to retire next year, another reason Strait said the renovation project is urgent.

    She added, "Although Dr. Pauley is retiring, we're fortunate that he'll be staying on as emeritus to continue researching and curating the collection. It is imperative we get all the information about the collection that is in his brain into a format that will be accessible by future researchers. It's going to be a busy year."

    For more information, contact Strait at (304) 696-2425 or straitho@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday May 10, 2012
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Marshall University honors outstanding student leaders

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Student Affairs honored several outstanding student leaders recently during its annual Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony.

    Steve Hensley is Marshall's dean of students. He said the university has been recognizing its young leaders in this ceremony for 20 years.

    "Our college years are often when we see the first embers of leadership beginning to burn bright in people," Hensley said. "They become passionate and empowered and they learn they can make a difference - not only here in the Marshall University community but also the world beyond. Whether it's rallying for the university to become more environmentally sustainable or making a difference in the lives of our students living on campus as a resident adviser, there are a multitude of ways our students exhibit leadership. We are extremely proud of the way they step up."

    Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, presented the Outstanding Leader Award to Kayla Johnson, a senior from Gallipolis, Ohio, who majored in French education, English education and English literature. The distinction goes to a student who has brought honor and prestige to Marshall University through selfless acts of leadership.

    Johnson came to Marshall in the fall of 2008 as John Marshall Scholar. She carried a 4.0 grade point average while her leadership involvement included stints in the Student Government Association, French Club, Honor Student Association, Residence Hall Association, Cabell County Young Democrats, College of Education Advisory Board, Forensics Union and the Thundering Word Speech and Debate Team, through which she earned 11 individual championship titles and more than 80 individual forensics awards in competition.

    Notably, Johnson spent time in France as a Fulbright Scholar in the Franco-American Teachers-in-Training Program.

    Other outstanding leadership awards winners include:

    • The Outstanding Service to Marshall University Award recognizes a student who has shown strong leadership through innovation, motivation, initiative and perseverance. This year's recipient is Ashley Clark, a senior from Ona, W.Va., who majored in political science, international affairs and Spanish. Clark founded the Marshall University chapter of the student organization, Amnesty International and also was selected as finalist for the prestigious Truman Scholarship, making her the first Marshall student in 35 years to earn that distinction.

      \The Dean's Award honors the person who has made significant contributions to enhance the student experience at Marshall University. This year's recipient is Amanda Branch, a senior biomedical sciences major from Mineral Wells, W.Va. Branch is a John Marshall scholar, PROMISE recipient, member of the Honors College, and has made the Dean's List every semester. Her activities include student government, Student Activities Planning Board and Alpha Chi Sigma, the professional chemistry fraternity. Branch also served as president of the Marshall Maniacs.

      The Joe Stone Award for Leadership in Student Government Association, named in honor of a professor who served as adviser to SGA for more than 30 years, recognizes the individual who has worked to advance the efforts of SGA. This year's recipient is Paul Williams, a senior management major from Butler, N.J. Williams has served as president of Sigma Phi Epsilon, a senator in SGA, president of the Order of Omega and as treasurer of the Marshall Maniacs. He was the campaign manager and chief of staff for Marshall's student body president and was integral in a variety of campus-wide initiatives including fundraising for Logan County flood victims, establishing a local food pantry and peer mentoring.

      The Senior Leadership Award recognizes the involvement and accomplishments of outstanding senior leaders who have not only demonstrated their commitment to enhancing the quality of life on Marshall's campus, but have also shown outstanding potential for future achievement. This year's recipient is Lauren Kemp, a senior sociology major from Pittsburgh, Pa. She has been committed to sustainability issues at the university and beyond since her freshman year having served on the Greening Marshall Committee, in the bike loan program and in the Community Service work study program. Kemp won the Sierra Student Coalition award in 2009, served as president of MU's Student Environmental Action Coalition, promoted recycling on campus and was instrumental in the campaign for a Green Student Fee, which brought about a Sustainability Department at MU.

      The Outstanding Greek Man and Woman awards go to members of the Greek-letter community who have demonstrated exemplary leadership both within sorority and fraternity life and among the greater university community.

      • Derek Ramsey, a junior biology major from Lewisburg, W.Va., was honored this year. He is a member of the SGA representing the College of Science and has served as president of Alpha Sigma Phi, the university's Chapter of Excellence winner. He has maintained a 3.9 grade point average and completed nearly 200 hours of community service in the past two years.

      • Whitley Mayo, a senior forensic chemistry major from Gallipolis, Ohio, also was honored. She is a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., and is the immediate past chapter president. She is also the president of the National Pan Hellenic Council, a member of the Society of Black Scholars, Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society, Alpha Chi Sigma Chemistry Fraternity, Order of Omega, and president of Black United Students. Mayo also was recently honored with the Women of Color Student Award, as well as the Greek Week Most Valuable Player Award.

    • The Honor College Outstanding Service Award is presented to three seniors who have provided exemplary service to the Honors College during their undergraduate careers. The award went to John Hurley, a senior biomedical sciences major from Portsmouth, Ohio, Amy Moses, a senior health care management major with a minor in Spanish from Parkersburg, W.Va., and Kelli Myers, a junior health care management major from Kitts Hill, Ohio.

    • The John Marshall Emerging Leaders Institute honor goes to students who have developed skills and competencies essential for effective leaders with an emphasis in four areas: leadership, scholarship, service and character. Recipients include Laura Good, a senior biomedical sciences major from Charleston, W.Va.; Jerrod Justice, a senior biomedical sciences major from Mineral Wells, W.Va.; and Kyle Mushet, a senior nursing major from Wellsburg, W.Va.

    • The Leader in Diversity Contributions Award recognizes a student who exemplifies the ideal of campus diversity. This year's recipient is Ammar Haffar, a senior biomedical sciences major from Scott Depot, W.Va.

    • The Resident Adviser of the Year Award goes to advisers who exemplify leadership in the area of Housing and Residence Life and have gone above and beyond in their support and dedication of students. Recipients include Danielle Henderson of Twin Towers West and Ryan Kerns of First Year South.

    • The Graduate Leadership Award recognizes graduate students who are involved on campus and have exceeded in demonstrating balancing work, school and life. This year's recipient is Jacob Hensel, a graduate student in sports administration from Wheeling, W.Va., who serves as graduate assistant in the Athletic Department.

    • The Freshman Leadership Award recognizes a first-year student who has taken the initiative to get involved in student organizations while adjusting to new surroundings and has shown potential as a leader and potential for future contributions to campus life. This year's recipient is Lauryn Corey, a freshman advertising major from Ashland, Ky.

      ----------------

    Photo: Marshall University's Office of Student Affairs and Student Government Association honored several outstanding student leaders and student organizations recently during its annual Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony.


     


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    Thursday May 10, 2012
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Exceptional student organizations honored at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association honored several outstanding student organizations and their members recently during the annual Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony.

    The awards were presented by Student Body President Ray Harrell Jr.

    • The Student Club/Organization of the Year distinction recognizes a club or organization that has continually made significant contributions to its own membership, the student body, and the Marshall University community through programming, educational opportunities, and/or service projects. This year's recipient is the Japan Club, one of the largest and most active organizations at MU. Beginning in May of 2011, the club coordinated many fundraising events after the devastating earthquake in Japan and raised more than $10,000 to donate to the Japan Red Cross Society. The club sponsored many events this year, including a welcome picnic, performances and showcases of Japanese culture at the International Festival, a Japanese bake sale and a viewing of a documentary detailing the earthquake in Japan.

    • The Most Outstanding New Student Organization award is given to a newly formed organization in recognition of outstanding contributions to the campus and student body. This organization will have addressed a need or community issue that had not previously been supported. This year's recipient is the Pre-Veterinary Club. Members have hosted a shelter drive to give proceeds to local animal shelters, volunteered at these shelters and local animal hospitals and are planning a future educational events. Most notably, the organization represented Marshall University for the first time at the American Pre-Veterinary Medical Association's National Symposium.

    • The Outstanding RSO Service Award honors the club or organization that has made sustained contributions to Marshall University and the city of Huntington in the area of community service. This year's recipient is Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity, Beta Delta chapter. In total, the brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi dedicated 1,053 hours of their time to community service efforts this year. Notable projects and partnerships include: Links for LiveStrong, Rocking for a Cure, Habitat for Humanity and the American Red Cross. Also, they volunteered with the Contact Rape Crisis Center, the Ronald McDonald House and Cabell Huntington Hospital. They raised $1,500 for American Cancer Society during a Greek Week competition. In addition, Alpha Sigma Phi was recently named the Chapter of Excellence at Marshall University.

    • The President of the Year Award is given to a president of a recognized student organization who demonstrates exemplary leadership and has a positive influence on, not only the membership of his/her club or organization, but the campus as a whole. This year's recipient is Ryan Hatfield of Pi Kappa Phi, Zeta Pi chapter. Hatfield is a senior history major from Huntington. He served as president of the Pi Kappa Phi chapter during its founding and national chartering. He is also the treasurer of The Order of Omega and is involved in a myriad of other leadership organizations.

    • The Outstanding New Member award goes to a new student member who has contributed outstanding ideas and service to that organization and has had a positive influence on the group. This individual will have a demonstrated dedication to organizing activities and has actively worked to improve Marshall University and the greater Huntington community. This year's recipient is Elisha Hassan, a Huntington freshman and Student Government Association senator. Hassan co-authored election rules, established a "Senate Apprenticeship" program on campus to encourage first semester freshmen to get involved with SGA, joined the Gamma Beta Phi Honors Society, served as secretary on the Freshman Council, was initiated into Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, founded the Student Advocates for Legislative Advancement and carried a 4.0 grade point average.

    • The Community Service Club of the Year Award is given to a student organization whose mission is based on the tenet of community service. Continually, this club selflessly gives time and energy to service projects throughout the academic year. This year's recipient is the Gamma Beta Phi Society, which participated, organized, or contributed to more than 55 philanthropic events including "Read Aloud West Virginia"; a variety of charitable 5k runs and walks; a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day; collecting hats, scarves and bandanas for Heavenly Hats; and donating school supplies to the Golden Girl group home.

    • The Most Improved Club/Organization Award goes to the student organization that has shown significant improvement and increased contributions to the Marshall community by membership growth, programs or contributions to the student body. This year's recipient is Delta Zeta Sorority, Delta Upsilon chapter. Its fall pledge class consisted of 29 women, the largest pledge class of all the sororities. It improved its cumulative grade point average. The sisters of Delta Zeta won Greek Week and Greek Sing and raised nearly $7,500 to benefit Relay for Life.

    ----------------

    Photo: Marshall University's Office of Student Affairs and Student Government Association honored several outstanding student leaders and student organizations recently during its annual Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
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    Wednesday May 9, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Eleven undergraduate researchers awarded stipends for summer studies

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven undergraduate students at Marshall University have been selected to receive the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellowship which provides each student with a $4,000 stipend and supplies for their research.

    Marshall University has participated in the SURE program since 2005. The program is funded through the West Virginia Research Challenge Fund, and is administered by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research. SURE participants conduct their research during a 10-week time period which this year will begin May 14 and conclude July 27.

    "We want students to know how strongly Marshall supports undergraduate research," said Dr. Mike Norton, chemistry professor and director of the SURE program. "This is the time when these young minds start utilizing their research skills in preparation for graduate school."

    The following students have been awarded SURE Fellowships for summer 2012. They are listed with their hometown, class ranking, field of study, project title and research faculty mentor.

    • Samantha Adkins of Huntington; senior; psychology; Physiological Characteristics of Academic Success in College Students; Dr. Massimo Bardi

    • Caleb Calvary of Columbus, Ohio; junior; chemistry; Synthesis and Characterization of an Ionic Charge-Transfer Salt; Dr. Michael Castellani

    • Arrin Carter of Rocky Gap, Va.; sophomore; chemistry; Development of a Biological Matrix for Neural Stem Cell Guidance and Differentiation; Dr. Elmer Price

    • James Collins of Fort Gay; senior; chemistry; Evaluation of the Effect of Carnosine on Cytochrome C Glycation and Analysis of Cytochrome C Glycation Sites by Mass Spectrometry; Dr. Leslie Frost

    • Courtney Hatten of Wayne; senior; chemistry; Thermal Decomposition of Aldehydes to Yield Pyrolysis Products; Dr. Laura McCunn

    • Abigail Hayes of Wheeling; senior; biomedical science; Functional Neuroanatomy and Behavior in the Central Nervous System of Crayfish; Dr. Brian Antonsen

    • Catherine Higgins of Montgomery; senior; chemistry; Development of a Method to Manipulate Movement of Actin Bundles Within a Hybrid Microfluidic Device; Dr. Scott Day

    • Deborah Moore of Huntington; senior; microbiology; Analysis of Isolated Stains in Varying Environments with Electrophoretic Karyotyping and Transcription Survey; Dr. Wendy Trzyna

    • Robert Mwangi of Nakuru, Kenya; senior; integrated science and technology; Detection of e-DNA of Asian Carp; Dr. Elizabeth Murray

    • Anthony Stephenson of Ironton, Ohio; senior; biochemistry; Effect of Glycerol Availability on the Production of Triacylglycerols in Chlorella vulgaris; Dr. Derrick Kolling

    • Chunji Yin of Yanji, China; senior; molecular and cellular biology; Kiss1 mRNA levels in mPOA and ARC of the Female Rat Brain; Drs. Simon Collier and David Mallory

    For more information visit www.marshall.edu/SURE, or contact Norton at 304-696-6627 or norton@marshall.edu.


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    Tuesday May 8, 2012
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    New 'SmartRoom' in Corbly to be named for Dixon Hughes Goodman accounting firm

     

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has received a gift of $150,000 from the certified public accounting firm of Dixon Hughes Goodman, designated toward renovation of room 106 of Corbly Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. The announcement was made today by Rick Slater, managing partner of the firm.

    "Our students today can expect the very latest in technology when they make the move to Marshall University from high school," said Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp. "We are committed to advancing powerful learning experiences for our students both within and outside the classroom. We're deeply thankful to Rick Slater, Dixon Hughes Goodman, and our other loyal alumni, who see the need for infrastructure investment on our campuses and help make these cutting-edge tools available to both students and faculty. Ultimately, our students are the greatest beneficiaries of these investments and the capabilities they provide."

    "Our goal is to make this the most technologically advanced room in the College of Business," Slater said in making the announcement. "By starting this project, we hope to make this room a model for even more SmartRooms in Corbly."

    The room, which will be known as the Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP SmartRoom, will feature a 24-inch, multi-touch Smart Podium Display from Smart Technologies; dual 80-inch LED flat-panel displays; and high-density wireless services. In addition, the room will be furnished with new seating and tables with capacity for 58 students, as well as updated lighting controllable by zones.

    Slater said his firm's continuing investment in Marshall University reflects the firm's desire to ensure that the university is able to attract top talent in the fields of accounting and business.

    ----------------

    Photo: Rick Slater (second from right), managing partner of Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP, presents a symbolic oversize check to Marshall University representatives Lance West, vice president for development (left); Matt Turner, chief of staff; and Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean of the College of Business. At right is Norman Mosrie, CPA with Dixon Hughes Goodman and president of the Marshall College of Business advisory board. Photo by Rick Haye.


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    Monday May 7, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Lose the Training Wheels Camp at Huntington High teaches individuals with disabilities to ride two-wheel bicycles

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the second consecutive year, Marshall University's School of Kinesiology is hosting a Lose the Training Wheels Camp July 16-20 at Huntington High School. The program teaches participants with disabilities how to independently ride a two-wheel bicycle.

    Lose the Training Wheels is a national organization that works with local organizations to host camps in individual communities. Staff members travel the country conducting the camps, and have an average success rate of more than 80 percent. Participants attend one 75-minute session each day for five consecutive days.

    Dr. Gregg Twietmeyer, assistant professor of kinesiology at Marshall, said the benefit is two-fold: one, participants can learn the joys of riding a bike, which can lead to increased self-esteem and confidence; and two, Marshall students, who volunteer as spotters for the riders, get to see firsthand the important role of physical activity and play in human well-being and culture.

    "We're really hoping to expand enrollment this year by getting more campers from Kentucky and Ohio, as well as from Charleston, West Virginia," Twietmeyer said.

    To be eligible to register for the camp, participants must be at least 8 years old and have a diagnosed disability. They must have a minimum inseam of 20 inches, weigh less than 220 pounds and be able to walk without assistive devices. Teens and adults may participate as well.

    Registration fee is $100 and some scholarships are available. For more information on registration or volunteering, visit www.marshall.edu/lttw.

    For more information on the camp, call Twietmeyer at 304-696-2938 or Dr. Jarod Schenewark, assistant professor of kinesiology, at 304-696-2937.

    Individuals interested in helping to defray the costs of the camp through financial donations may contact Rick Robinson, director of development with the Marshall University College of Health Professions, at 304-696-7081.


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    Monday May 7, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    June Harless Center to offer summer camps

    June Harless Center to offer summer camps

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of the College of Education at Marshall University, is offering summer camps on the Huntington campus for students entering pre-K through 5th grade.   The theme for the camps this year is Exploring S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics).

    Four weeks of camps will be offered for students.

    ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS!

    WHO:             Students entering 2nd and 3rd grades

    WHEN:           Monday, June 4 - Thursday, June 7

    WHERE:        Marshall's Huntington campus

    COST:             $150 per child

     

    ARTS AND BOTS: EXPLORING ROBOTICS AND THE ARTS!

    WHO:             Students entering 4th and 5th grades

    WHEN:           Monday, June 11 - Thursday, June 14

    WHERE:        Marshall's Huntington campus

    COST:             $150 per child

     

    BEE-BOT INTO BEGINNING ROBOTICS!

    WHO:             5-year-olds entering kindergarten and 5-6 year-olds entering 1st grade

    WHEN:           Monday, July 23 - Thursday, July 26

    WHERE:        MUEE STEM Center, Corbly Hall 118

    COST:             $80 per child

     

    PRE-BOTTING: PRE-K READINESS CAMP

    WHO:             3*-and-4-year-olds entering pre-K and 4-and-5-year-olds returning to pre-K

    WHEN:           Monday, July 30 -Thursday, Aug. 2

    WHERE:        MUEE STEM Center, Corbly Hall 118

    COST:             $80 per child

    * Child must be 4 by Jan. 1, 2013

     

    All camps will run from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday, and lunch will be provided.  For more information regarding summer camps, contact Holly Moore at miles10@marshall.edu or 304-696-2945.  Or, visit www.marshall.edu/harless/summercamps to obtain enrollment information.


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    Friday May 4, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Researcher presents at scientific conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Philippe Georgel, a professor of biological sciences at Marshall University, recently traveled to San Antonio to present his research at the 20th International Analytical Ultracentrifugation Conference.

    The biennial conference is focused on research done using a specific laboratory technique to characterize the size, shape and interactions of molecules and macromolecules in solutions. Analytical ultracentrifugation is widely used in molecular biology, biochemistry and polymer science.

    Georgel studies the effects of chromatin the combination of DNA and proteins that make up the contents of the nucleus of a cell on nuclear functions. His conference presentation focused on his use of a new method called Quantitative Agarose Gel Electrophoresis, or QAGE. QAGE allows for analysis of structure and composition of nucleo-protein complexes, and is complementary to the use of analytical ultracentrifugation.

    The research Georgel presented was a collaborative effort among his group at Marshall; Dr. James Denvir, associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine; and Dr. Stuart Lindsay and Dr. Qiang Fu from Arizona State University.

    Georgel has already been invited back to present at the 2014 conference, which will be held in Japan.

    For more information, contact Georgel at georgel@marshall.edu or 304-696-3965.

    ----------------------

    Photo: Dr. Philippe Georgel recently traveled to San Antonio to present his research at the 20th International Analytical Ultracentrifugation Conference. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Thursday May 3, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Students recognized at international scientific meeting

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University students received special recognition for their research at this year's international Experimental Biology conference held April 21-25 in San Diego.

     

    M. Allison Wolf, a biomedical sciences doctoral candidate from Parkersburg, received first place in her group in a poster competition held as part of the conference's Diet and Cancer mini-symposium. The mini-symposium was funded by the American Society of Nutrition.

     

    Wolf's presentation focused on her research on the anticancer effects of isothiocyanates a natural compound extracted from cruciferous vegetables on head and neck cancer. Her work shows the compound both inhibits head and neck metastasis and greatly increases sensitivity to chemotherapy in therapy-resistant head and neck cancers. Wolf works in the lab of Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, an associate professor in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and the departments of Biochemistry and Microbiology and Surgery at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

     

    Wolfe said she gained a great deal from the experience of attending the program and presenting her work.

     

    "I really enjoyed this conference, particularly the Nutrition and Cancer Research Interest group, because it allowed me to be surrounded by people in my field," she said. "Discussing my research with others also interested in or working on isothiocyanates gave me some promising future directions to pursue."

     

    In addition, Aaron M. Dom, a first-year medical school student from Wellersburg, Pa., was invited to do a special oral "blitz" presentation about his research on how a synthetic drug called MG624 can prevent new blood vessel growth in small cell lung cancer and could potentially serve as a therapy for the disease. Dom was invited to present by the Blood Vessel Club of the American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP). ASIP held its annual meeting in conjunction with the Experimental Biology conference. The club sponsors the short oral presentations to present exciting new vascular biology research and to give audience members an opportunity to provide feedback and suggestions about the research.

     

    Dom, who is the president of the medical school's Class of 2015, did the research in the lab of Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacol­ogy, Physiology and Toxicology.

     

    He said of the experience, "Our lab is honored that I was selected to present at this special session, and we were excited to share some of the work that we are doing here at the medical school. Experiences like these in both helping with this research and in presenting at and attending a conference of this size have helped me gain a greater appreciation for research in medicine." 

     

    Nearly 14,000 scientists and exhibitors representing academic institutions, government agencies, non-profit organizations and private corporations attend the annual Experimental Biology meeting to share information about recent developments in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pathology, nutrition and pharmacology.

     

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    Photo: Biomedical sciences doctoral candidate M. Allison Wolf works in the new translational genomic research institute at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. Wolf recently won first place in a research poster competition at the international Experimental Biology conference. (Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.)


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    Wednesday May 2, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Nomination deadline approaches for Miners' Celebration 'Because of You' awards

    October event to salute those who contribute to state's mining ecosystem

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The nomination deadline is fast approaching for awards to honor those who contribute to the state's coal mining enterprise.

    "Because of You" awards in more than a dozen categories will be presented as part of the 2012 Miners' Celebration to be held Oct. 4-5 at Tamarack in Beckley.

    According to conference organizers, representatives of the state's mining industry will gather at the event to recognize miners, engineers, safety and environmental professionals, community leaders, manufacturers, suppliers and educators for their contributions to the mining industry in West Virginia. Nominations for the awards are being accepted through June 1.

    "West Virginia's mining industry depends upon thousands of individuals in many different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the conference planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every one of these people whether they are miners, safety engineers, environmental professionals, equipment suppliers, community leaders or teachers contributes to each ton of coal produced.

    "It is because of them the mining industry is successful. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved in what we call our state's mining 'ecosystem.'"

    Szwilski said the program will kick off with registration and a reception at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4. At the reception, the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present several awards including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.

    On Friday, Oct. 5, the program will continue with the "Because of You" awards and a full day of presentations focusing on all aspects of the mining industry.

    The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

    The cost of the conference is $100. Registration is open through Sept. 21.

    To nominate someone for the "Because of You" awards or to register for the conference, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas.


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    Tuesday May 1, 2012
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall University Graduate College announces thesis grant recipients

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight Marshall University graduate students will receive Summer Thesis Research Grant Awards this year, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the graduate college.

    Each award provides $500 to cover the cost of expenses associated with thesis research. Award recipients were chosen on the basis of the quality and significance of the thesis research, the likelihood that the research will eventuate in a completed thesis and justification of the need for support. Funding for these awards is provided by the Marshall University Research Corporation.

    Here are the students' names, departments, research topics and faculty advisers:

    • Timothy James Brust, Biological Sciences, Seasonal Dietary Variations of the Queen Snake, Dr. Thomas Pauley, adviser.
       
    • Christina Byrd, Biological Sciences, Ontogenetic state of a juvenile polycotylid plesiosaur (Sauropterygia: Plesiosauria) and its implications for plesiosaur growth and reproduction, Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, adviser.

     

    • Josh Corrie, Biological Sciences, Functional Morphology of Elongated Vertebrae in Basilosaurus to Interpret Aquatic Locomotion Patterns, Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, adviser.

     

    • Mark DeBlois, Biological Sciences, Plesiosaur Flipper Hydrodynamics and Ecomorphology, Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, adviser.

     

    • Amy Fiedler, Biological Sciences, Movement and Habitat Use in the Eastern Snapping Turtle, Dr. Thomas Pauley, adviser.

     

    • Aileen Marcelo, Biomedical Sciences, The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Diabetes, Dr. Richard Egleton, adviser.

     

    • Abby Sinclair, Biological Sciences, The Use and Effects of Road-rut Pools Among Amphibians, Dr. Thomas Pauley, adviser.

     

    • Heather Sprouse, Sociology, Social Dissent and Spirituality: Creating New Cultural Narrative through Intentional Social Support, Dr. Kristi Fondren, adviser.

     


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    Monday April 30, 2012
    Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    5K Race to benefit medical mission trip to Honduras

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mission "M" Possible, a 5K race, is scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, May 12, with proceeds to benefit a medical mission trip to Honduras.

    The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is teaming with Global Medical Brigades to send a group of physicians, nurses and medical students to Honduras in June. All proceeds from the race will go toward funding the trip and medications for patients in Honduras.

    The race will begin at the center of Ritter Park, continue on North Boulevard to the Memorial Arch (7th Street West), then come back along the Ritter Park trail and finish in the center of the park. Pre-registration for the event is available at www.tristateracer.com. Race day registration is also available.

    The medical mission trip to Honduras has become an annual event for Marshall School of Medicine students thanks to the generosity of Ken and Sharon Ambrose who have financially supported the project in honor of their late son Dr. Paul Ambrose, a 1995 graduate of MUSOM. Dr. Ambrose was killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the United States.

    For more information about the race contact Jacob Kilgore by phone at 304-634-2448 or Brent Kidd by phone at 304-544-4585. Kilgore and Kidd are third-year medical students serving as coordinators for this year's trip.

    Donations for the trip may also be directed to Linda Holmes, Director of Development and Alumni Affairs, who can be reached by phone at 304-691-1711.

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    Dr. Mary Todd named executive director of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mary Todd, founding dean of the Honors College at Marshall University, has been named executive director of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, effective July 1.

    Phi Kappa Phi, based in Baton Rouge, La., has chapters on nearly 320 select colleges and universities in the United States and the Philippines. It is the nation's oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society.

    Todd came to Marshall in August 2009 and collaborated with the provost office, the college deans, department chairs and faculty to design the Honors College. An interim dean will be named soon, followed by a nationwide search for her replacement.

    "It has been a joy to serve as founding dean of the Honors College these past three years," Todd said. "The College provides Marshall an infrastructure to bring together talented students and talented faculty, and offers opportunities to integrate academic excellence into the larger campus culture, whether through scholarship programs, residence life, the da Vinci lecture, or the annual honors convocation. I am grateful to the president and provost for their strong support of honors education and for the resources that made the founding of the Honors College possible."

    Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said the Honors College is well established, thanks to Todd's leadership.

    "Dr. Todd did exactly what she was asked to do, and she did it very well," he said. "She not only led the process of establishing the Honors College, but she also was responsible for bringing a chapter of Phi Kappa Phi to Marshall. She is an outstanding leader who accomplished a lot in her three years here. We wish her nothing but the best with Phi Kappa Phi."

    Todd becomes the first woman to lead Phi Kappa Phi, a 115-year-old organization, and only the 11th individual to hold the position since 1900.

    "I look forward to working with her," said Diane G. Smathers, society president-elect and chair of the executive search committee. "Mary brings a wealth of experience and expertise to the role. She is a scholar, a leader, and a true public servant. I believe she has the strengths and vision needed to strategically move the society forward."

    Todd was initiated into Phi Kappa Phi in 1993 at the University of Illinois at Chicago and later led a successful petition to bring a chapter of Phi Kappa Phi to Marshall. She has served as the primary contact for Phi Kappa Phi at Marshall since the chapter's inception in 2010.

    Before joining Marshall, Todd served for five years as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Ohio Dominican University.


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    Marshall picks up national award for family medicine

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University has received a family medicine "Top Ten" award from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) for being one of the nation's top schools in the percentage of graduates entering family medicine residencies.

    Based on a three-year average ending in October 2011, AAFP reports 16.8 percent of Marshall medical school graduates have chosen family medicine residencies.  The average places the school as number six in the country.

    "Marshall's school of medicine has consistently found itself in this top ranking because we are committed to educating students about the importance of primary care and more specifically, family medicine," said Dr. John Walden, chair of the department of Family and Community Health.  "We have long been aware of the critical nature of educating doctors for rural America and remain steadfast in our efforts to promote this very important specialty."

    Dr. Sarah Chouinard, president of the West Virginia Academy of Family Physicians and a 1998 graduate of Marshall's medical school, echoed Walden's assessment.

    "Family docs are THE key players in our nation's ability to reform our healthcare system. With the changing business of medicine to include technology and quality-driven outcome measures, we need well-educated, engaged family docs to be present in our communities,"Chouinard said. "Marshall trained me to be a family doctor who understands the value in serving our rural West Virginia communities."

    The awards were presented during a ceremony today (April 27) at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in Seattle.   The Top Ten Awards were created more than a decade ago by the AAFP to promote the goal of having more U.S. medical school graduates become family medicine physicians.


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    Friday April 27, 2012
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall students excel at statewide research competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University student researchers captured prizes in an oral presentation competition held last Friday and Saturday in conjunction with the joint West Virginia Academy of Science annual meeting and the biennial STaR (Science, Technology and Research) Symposium.

     

    Brittany M. Whited, a senior mathematics major from Hurricane, received first place in the undergraduate student category for a presentation about her project to create graphs used to simulate changes in the pattern of plant stem curvature. She received a cash prize of $750. Her project was supported by the university's Undergraduate Mathematical Biology Research program, which is funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF).

     

    Irfan A. Khan, who is pursuing a master's degree in biomedical sciences, was recognized with second place in the graduate student category for his talk about his work to develop a microfluidic cell culture system that could eventually lead to improved portable systems for testing water toxicity. Khan, who is from Huntington, received a $500 prize. His research was also funded by NSF.

     

    Whited and Khan were among more than 120 undergraduate and graduate students from across the state who entered the competition by submitting abstracts describing their research and findings. Students could choose to either display posters or give 15-minute oral presentations at the conference, which was held on the campus of West Virginia State University in Institute.

     

    Whited thanked Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Scott Sarra, professor of mathematics, for their support during the year-long project.

     

    "This research has really taken me out of my mathematical comfort zone, as I've been learning all about numerical analysis methods the crux of my research as I go," she said. "It probably has been the most challenging part, but was definitely rewarding. I've loved being able to apply mathematics to life sciences, a wonderful joining of two of my interests."

     

    Whited added that presenting research is important for a student's professional development for a couple of reasons.

     

    She said, "One, it forces you to try and simplify all this work you've been doing, making it accessible to those without prior knowledge. This helps internalize the ideas and methods you're using.

     

    "Second, it really brings a great sense of pride to see how far you've come and to show it to other people. It's easy to lose sight of the progress you've made when you're working on it every day."

     

    Whited also acknowledged her research partner Kate Chuchiak, a junior environmental science major from Wellsburg, as well as student researcher Don Silver for his previous work on the project.

     

    Khan said the recognition is rewarding for him on several levels.

     

    "I have worked so many hours and conducted so many experiments to get a single piece of data I could confidently present to an audience, it means a lot to me," he said.

     

    Khan added that English is a second language for him, so presenting at the conference also gave him confidence.

     

    "I didn't want to present in this conference, but my advisor Dr. Bin Wang insisted. She is awesome!" he said. "I have learned English just by watching English movies. So, winning this award means a lot more to me than it may to someone else.

     

    "I have always had trouble presenting my research to an audience who may not have a lot of relevant experience and this conference was a testing ground. I think every student should present their research in every conference possible."

     

    Khan said the most exciting thing about his research project was learning to use confocal laser scanning microscopy in the university's Molecular and Biological Imaging Center.

     

    He acknowledged microscopy technician David Neff for helping him learn the fine details of optical and electron microscopy, saying, "He has helped me perfect my research methods just by being critical. I am also very grateful to him for sacrificing many of his hours just to help me through the complex experiments."

     

    Kahn also thanked Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of the College of Science, "for supporting me from the very beginning of my days in Marshall University."

     

    The conference the first time the two organizations have held a joint meeting drew more than 350 faculty members, researchers, students, policymakers and members of the state's high-tech business community.

     

    The event marked the 87th annual meeting of the West Virginia Academy of Science and the fourth biennial STaR Symposium. The theme of last week's joint conference was "Innovation:  Concept to Commercialization." The program featured sessions about biotechnology start-ups; private and government support; research funding opportunities; and how to make the transition to the private sector.

     

    For more information, including a complete list of student researchers and abstracts describing their projects, visit www.wvresearch.org.

     

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    Friday April 27, 2012
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Student-produced 'Up Late' show plays its swan song live Saturday night

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five years and 140 shows later, Marshall University's student-produced late night talk show will come to an end Saturday.

    "Up Late" has featured student musical acts, governors and athletes, actors and comedians like Pauley Shore and Andy Dick, as well as television personalities like Jamie Oliver and, most recently, the venerable Larry King.

    The finale will air live at 11 p.m. Saturday on Comcast Channel 25 and streaming video will be available at www.marshall.edu/uplate. Plus, there will be a live behind-the-scenes camera in the control room showing the students producing the show. 

    "The run of this show has been an exciting and life-changing event that has truly been the most enjoyable time in my life," said instructor Jamie LoFiego, who is also the show's host. "It will be difficult to say goodbye to 'Up Late'; however, I am very excited to see what our creative students come up with next."

    "Up Late" spawned from an Introduction to Video Production class taught by LoFiego, who also works with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and is hosted by LoFiego and a variety of student co-hosts. The program has a late-night show quality and features interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and, of course, comedy. Comedy bits aside, the class includes lecture, course work as well as studio time.

    "It's been a blast, but now it is time for a new core group of students to step up and create something they can call their own," LoFiego said. "With the foundation and the following that we have created in the past five years, I truly believe whatever the students come up with will be a success."

    He said the show not only exposed students to great talent and stars, it gave them hands-on production experience that puts them ahead of others just getting their start in the field.

    "There is no way I can single out one defining moment," LoFiego said. "But I am most proud of the role that students played in this show. It was not created for the comedy. It was created to give the students an opportunity to work as a crew to produce a television show. In our studio, they experienced far more than many students do in a regular college class."

    ----

    Photos: (Above) Up Late host Jamie LoFiego, left, talks with Larry King during a recent show. (Below) The staff of Up Late, including host Jamie LoFiego (in tie), poses for a photograph during the final season. Photos courtesy of Marshall University.


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    Dr. Deanna Mader selected to serve as College of Business interim dean

     HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A 20-year veteran and professor of marketing in Marshall University's College of Business has been chosen to serve as its interim dean, effective July 1.

    Dr. Deanna Mader, who is currently interim associate dean and director of recruitment and retention for the college, is well known for her work with student groups consulting in the area of hands-on marketing for local businesses. She also is one of the university's first recipients of the Kermit McGinnis Endowed Professorship, which honors outstanding business professors at Marshall.

    Mader's research in topics ranging from ethics to pedagogy and health care marketing to promotion management has been published in peer-reviewed journals and she has presented at national and international levels. She often serves as a consultant in the areas of health care, retail, entrepreneurship and promotion management.

    "I am humbled, honored and extremely excited about being asked to serve the College of Business as interim dean," Mader said.  "I look forward to working with the university's faculty, staff, students, administrators, as well as our business community to move us forward.   My philosophy is that we are all part of a larger team and it will take all of us working together to reach our potential.  And what potential we have!"

    Mader replaces the current dean, Dr. Chong Kim, who is retiring June 30. A national search to fill the dean's position will be conducted.

    Additionally in July, three other business professors will take on interim leadership roles in the college.

    Dr. Margie McInerney, a professor of management specializing in human resource management and negotiations, has been selected to serve as an interim associate dean. McInerney received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University's College of Business Administration and has taught at Marshall University for more than 25 years.  Prior to teaching, she worked as a bank examiner for the U.S. Treasury Department Comptroller of the Currency.  McInerney is currently the division head of the Management, Marketing and Management Information Systems Department in the College of Business.

     

     Dr. Jacqueline Agesa, an associate professor of finance, has been chosen to serve as an interim associate dean. Agesa received her Ph.D. in economics in 1996 from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and was a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1999-2000. She came to Marshall in 2000 and was named the Richard D. Jackson Professor of Economics in 2008. One year later, she successfully completed the Postdoctoral Bridge to Business Program, Finance Track, at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Agesa currently teaches courses in finance and risk management and insurance.

    Dr. Fred H. Mader, a professor of marketing, has been selected to serve as the interim division head of the Management, Marketing and Management Information Systems Department in the College of Business. Mader has been with Marshall University for 20 years teaching professional selling, supply chain logistics and marketing management. Prior to coming to Marshall, he was a member of the faculty at the University of Louisville. Mader holds an M.S. in Economic Geography from Western Kentucky University, and both an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. This is his second appointment as interim division head.

     

     

     

     
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    Marshall advertising majors take honors in district competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Advertising majors from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University won second place overall and "Best Presenter" earlier this month in the District 5 American Advertising Federation's National Student Advertising Competition in Akron, Ohio.

    The 14-member team of the advertising capstone class proposed a campaign to increase awareness of Nissan among multicultural millennials.  Judges ranked their campaign plans book and presentation second among the 10 schools participating. The students' work will be entered into "wildcard" consideration for a spot in the national competition.

    The judges named Danielle Pierce, one of the five presenters on Marshall's team, as the "Best Presenter" from among all of the students who performed.

    James Chamberlain, president of Marshall's AAF chapter and senior account executive on the campaign project, said, "We are thrilled that our team's hard work and passion were recognized on Saturday, and we are looking forward to having the opportunity to compete for the wildcard. We are also especially proud of Dani for receiving the presenter award."

    During the semester the classmates researched Nissan's problems, divined insights, proposed a media plan, wrote campaign strategies, created a campaign theme and prepared advertising and marketing communications samples. Their decisions and strategies were condensed into a 32-page "plans book" that was scored by judges in mid-March followed by a 20-minute live presentation before a panel of advertising professionals in April. They competed against 10 other colleges and universities from the American Advertising Federation District 5, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

    Janet Dooley, associate professor of advertising, said the project more than merited the distinction. "The students in this class were dedicated to the point of spending their entire spring break on campus honing their proposals," she said.

    The National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) is governed by the American Advertising Federation in Washington, D.C. Each year the federation solicits national sponsors who prepare a "real world" case study outlining a current advertising challenge. This year Nissan asked students to recommend tactics to reach multicultural 18-29-year-olds.

    Judges for the competition were Jeremy Schwartz, Executive Creative Director, EDC partners + napier, Rochester, N. Y., Joseph Mayernik, Creative Camp Counselor, StormFrog, Rochester, N. Y., and Gary Melliere, Brand Manager, Goodyear Tire and Rubber, Cleveland/Akron, Ohio.

    Ohio University placed first and Cleveland State took third in the District 5 event. Regional competitions are conducted each spring in 15 districts throughout the U.S. Winning teams and a wildcard team advance to the national level.

    Marshall team members are:

    James Chamberlain, a senior from Huntington

    Sara Katey Ellis, a senior from Ceredo

    Kristyn Francisco, a senior from Catawba, Va.

    Alexandra Frerich, a senior from Vienna, W.Va.

    Danielle Goodman, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

    Ashley Hesson, a senior from Proctorville, Ohio

    Sarah Lake, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

    Madison Lavender, a senior from Huntington

    Samantha Linthicum, a senior from Parkersburg, W.Va.

    Danielle Pierce, a senior from Barboursville

    Brenden Trimble, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

    Andrea Rectenwald, a senior from Hurricane, W.Va.

    Hannah Vickers, a senior from Danville, W.Va.

    Jessica Watts, a senior from Wayne

     

    For more information, contact James Chamberlain by e-mail at chamberlain9@marshall.edu.


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    Dooley to lead School of Journalism on interim basis; Hollis named assistant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Janet Dooley has been named interim dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University, effective July 1.

    Currently SOJMC's assistant dean, the Marshall University graduate and long-time faculty member will replace Dr. Corley Dennison, who was appointed associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies at Marshall last month. Dan Hollis, an associate professor, will succeed her as assistant dean.

    "Professor Dooley's tireless dedication and contributions to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, both as a faculty member and assistant dean, make her the ideal person to fill the interim dean's position," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. "I am looking forward to working with her as the School continues its commitment to excellence."

    Dooley joined the MU faculty in 1979 and was named assistant dean in 2005. She has taught a full-range of journalism and mass communications classes with an emphasis on advertising and graduate courses.

    "I'm delighted to be able to respond to this unexpected opportunity," Dooley said. "I'm a graduate of this program, and I've been working as a faculty member for over thirty years. I've witnessed a great deal of change, growth and progress, so it's a genuine honor to take on the responsibilities of dean."

    Commenting on the appointment, Dennison said, "We are fortunate here at Marshall and in the J-School to have the breadth and depth of experience that Professor Dooley brings to the table. She will do an excellent job as interim dean in the coming year."

    A Summa Cum Laude graduate of Marshall with a B.A. in journalism with a concentration in advertising sequence, Dooley received an M.S. in communications with an advertising concentration from the University of Tennessee. She studied International and Intercultural Communication at the University of Kentucky where she received a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies.

    Hollis, who grew up in southern Indiana, has an undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana and an M.A. from the University of Kentucky. He joined the Marshall faculty in 1999.

    Hollis has been honored for his creative video work which has won him numerous awards including National Broadcasting Society's First Place for Video News six years in a row. In addition, he's received a Telly Award, Communicator Awards, AVA Award and Videographer Award for his work on an eclectic range of topics running the gamut from Irish Road Bowling to Roller Derby to Zip lining and the Vandalia Gathering.

    "I'm happy to serve in this role, and certainly want to thank all of my colleagues for the opportunity," Hollis said. "The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications has a long and storied history and to have the chance to participate in the leadership of it is very rewarding."

    Both Dooley and Hollis have been honored by Marshall for their teaching and service. Both received the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award, Dooley in 2002 and Hollis in 2011. Hollis was the 2000-2001 recipient of the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award and Dooley was given a Distinguished Service Award in 2006.

    "This should be an indication of just how much value the School of Journalism and Mass Communications puts on teaching," Hollis said, referring to both he and Dooley winning the Reynolds award. "We value it and it shows in all of our professors."


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    Contact: Nancy Pelphrey, Coordinator of Alumni Activities,, 304-696-3134

    Marshall to host 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet Saturday, April 28

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet will cap off Marshall University's Alumni Weekend Saturday, April 28, with a number of awards honoring alumni as well as four students. It will take place at 7 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    This year's Distinguished Alumnus award will be presented to Jeff S. Sandy, a 1979 B.B.A. graduate who is sheriff of Wood County and a retired special agent with the U.S. Department of Treasury. In connection with his work with the Treasury department, he was the Supervisory Special Agent in charge of the West Virginia office of the department's Criminal Investigation Division. An expert in investigating money laundering, he is a member of the Association of the Certified Fraud Examiners and has conducted training in the U.S and from Russia and other Baltic countries regarding his specialty.

    In the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorism attacks, Sandy volunteered to work in nationwide counter-terrorism activities. He received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Presidential Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force in 2002.

    B. Scott Miller will receive the Community Achievement Award. An executive at several banking institutions, including one he helped found, Miller has been active in local community service wherever he has lived. He has served on the boards of directors for Jackson General Hospital, the Ravenswood Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson County Library, the Wood County Habitat for Humanity, the Mid Ohio Valley United Way and the Ravenswood High School Alumni Association. He also is active coaching youth in basketball, soccer, cross country and baseball. He graduated from Marshall in 1983 with a B.B.A. degree.

    The four students to be honored are Tyson Gale, a senior exercise physiology major and member of the football team, who will receive the Cam Henderson Award; Andrea Booker, a junior criminal justice major, who will receive the Nate Ruffin Scholarship Award; Daniel Ricks, a junior music education major and member of Marching Thunder, who will receive a Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship; and Dorothy Cornwell, a junior nursing major and cheerleader, who also will receive a Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship.

    The River Cities Alumni Club, based in the Huntington area, will be recognized as the alumni club of the year for the second straight year.

    As a special highlight for the 75th anniversary of the banquet and Marshall University's 175th year, each academic unit, as well as the Marshall University Foundation, will recognize one of its alumni with an Award of Distinction. Following is a list of the recipients.

    • The College of Business will recognize Michael Gerber, a retired Certified Public Accountant with Hayflich & Steinberg, who continues to serve the firm as a consultant. A 1963 graduate of Marshall, he has served the college as a member of the advisory board for the division of accountancy and legal environment as well as the college's overall advisory board. He has served as an instructor for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program and on a number of civic group boards.

    • The College of Education will honor Carolyn Smith, a 1968 graduate in business education. She has been president and co-owner of Huntington Junior College since 1999. Under her leadership, the college has approximately 800 students, for whom it maintains an 80 percent placement rate of graduates. The college is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. She supports many local organizations, including Big Brothers and Big Sisters, Goodwill Industries and, of course, Marshall University.

    • The College of Fine Arts selected C. Donald and Sandra Soto Hatfield, both Marshall alumni, for the alumni of distinction award. The couple chairs the college's Dean's Council, which leads efforts to promote sustained interest in and support of the college. Active in the Huntington community, they have established several scholarships at Marshall, particularly in the fine arts. They have hosted several college events in their home.

    • The College of Information Technology and Engineering will recognize Douglas R. Hardman, who received his Bachelor of Engineering Science in 1970 and his M.B.A. in 1976, both from Marshall. A longtime employee of J. H. Fletcher & Co., he began as a design engineer in 1971, then moved up to Manager of Engineering, General Manager of Sales and Engineering, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, President, and now, since 2010, Chief Executive Officer. He is also a director of the National Mining Association in Washington, D.C.

    • The College of Liberal Arts selected Roger W. Simmons, a 1972 graduate of Marshall. He was a Special Agent with the U.S. Treasurer, Criminal Investigation Division until he retired in 1998. Over his 26-year career he received a number of awards from the U.S. Attorney's Office, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI for his work on joint criminal investigations. He continues to work part time as a contract employee of the FBI, and is involved with Marshall as a member of the John Marshall Society, the Heritage Society and the Big Green Club.

    • The College of Science will honor Dr. Paul Hill, a B.S. and M.S. degree graduate of Marshall, who serves as chancellor of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. He previously served as vice chancellor for science and research of the policy commision, at which he was responsible for $50 million in federal research funding and $76 million in state research investment. Prior to coming to the policy commission, he was executive director of the West Virginia Experimental Program to Simulate Competitive Research (WVEPSCoR). Hill has more than 25 years of experience in academic research, grant administration, public policy and management. He is active on numerous state and federal committees, boards and commissions.

    • The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications will recognize Joanne Jaeger Tomblin, who holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Marshall, as well as an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. As the wife of West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, she is the First Lady of West Virginia. She also is president of the Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College. She is involved in many state, local and regional committees and organizations including the Education Alliance as an executive committee and board member, the Logan Regional Medical Center board and College Completion Task Force, of which she is co-chair.

    • The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will honor Dr. Kevin Yingling, who is a 1978 bachelor's degree graduate of Marshall and a 1985 graduate of the medical school. Also a summa cum laude graduate of the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, he is currently serving as founding dean of Marshall's School of Pharmacy. Previously, he was chair of the department of internal medicine at Marshall. He has received a number of awards and honors, including the Laureate Award of the West Virginia Chapter of the American College of Physicians in 2010.

    • The Graduate School of Education and Professional Development selected Dr. Rebecca Goodwin for the award. She received her B.A. and M.A. from Marshall, then taught at the junior high school level in the Kanawha County Schools before serving as a vice principal and principal at schools in the county. She then moved to the central office of the Kanawha County Schools, first as Director for Administration and Instruction, then as Area Assistant Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction.

    • The Marshall University Foundation will honor John Underwood Sr. and Donna Underwood, both early retirees from divisions of the Mead Corporation in Dayton, Ohio. John Underwood served as vice president of human resources and labor relations for the company's paper division. Donna Underwood was the statistical process control production supervisor for the company's Lexis-Nexis Division. They are active with Marshall University as members of the Big Green and Marshall University Foundations and by participation in various fundraising campaigns. John Underwood is currently chair of the Marshall University Foundation Real Estate Committee.

    A limited number of tickets are still available for the banquet. For information, call the alumni office at 1-800-MUALUMX or 304-696-3134.


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    Wednesday April 25, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    More than 1,500 to graduate from Marshall on May 5

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University Saturday, May 5, in a pair of commencement ceremonies at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Marshall will conduct two commencements for the first time in its 175-year history. The 9 a.m. ceremony is for undergraduates, and a 2 p.m. ceremony the same day is for graduate students.

    MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said the decision to split commencement into two events was made because the main commencement was lasting in excess of three hours. She said an increase in the number of doctoral candidates and other factors made the main ceremony too long.

    "It's not unusual for an institution to have two ceremonies," Ferguson said. "I think everyone is excited about the change. We're hoping that neither ceremony will last more than a couple of hours."

    Among the 1,508 students receiving degrees are 960 undergraduates, 484 graduate students and 64 from the School of Medicine. The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2012 graduates only. Ferguson said she expects about 600 undergraduates and 200 graduate students to take part in their respective ceremonies.

    Ferguson said 373 students will graduate with honors. Seventy-seven will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 101 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 188 cum laude (3.3 to  3.59). Two students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and five receiving associate degrees will graduate with honors.

    Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

    During the morning ceremony, Marshall will recognize its graduating honor students. Based on tentative grade point averages, 11 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect GPAs.

    Those 11 students are: Tiffany Renee Bell of Wake Forest, N.C.; Kirsten Alyssa Carter of Thurman, Ohio; Lindsay N. DiFatta of Lusby, Md.; Ian Keller Ferrell of Union Bridge, Md.; Grayson Lynn Forlines of Bluefield, W.Va.; Kayla Marie Johnson of Gallipolis, Ohio; Kristin E. McKinney of Culloden, W.Va.; Keith Edward Pearson of Point Pleasant, W.Va.; Chelsea Rachelle Sanders of Greer, S.C.; Erin L. Shaver of Huntington, and Amy D. Whitt of Barboursville.

    Marshall will not have a featured speaker at either ceremony, although President Stephen J. Kopp will deliver remarks.

    Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events:

    Thursday, April 26

    5:15 p.m., Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, West Virginia Farm Museum

    Friday, April 27

    4:30 p.m., Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony, sponsored by Student Affairs, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

    6:13 p.m., End-of-year celebration with MU Greeks, Memorial Student Center lobby

    7 p.m., Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    Thursday, May 3

    7 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, South Charleston High School, 1 Eagle Way, South Charleston

    7 p.m., College of Education hooding ceremony, Marshall University Foundation Hall

    Friday, May 4

    11 a.m., ROTC Commissioning Ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Room

    11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

    3:30 p.m., College of Business pinning ceremony, Christ Temple Church

    4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

    4:30 p.m.., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, Heiner's Study Room

    5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

    6 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications spring graduates banquet, Foundation Hall

    7 p.m., College of Health Professions nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

    7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church

    7 p.m., School of Medicine Investiture, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

    Saturday, May 5

    9 a.m., Marshall University's 175th commencement ceremony for undergraduates, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    Immediately following morning commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

    Immediately following morning commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms

    2 p.m., Marshall University's 175th commencement ceremony for graduate students, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    5 p.m., College of Science hooding ceremony, Smith Hall 154

    4:30 p.m., Forensic Science graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

    Main commencement notes

    • Each commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web. The link will be available on the main MU website: www.marshall.edu.

    • Marshall will recognize graduates with military service by issuing a special red, white and blue cord to be worn at commencement. It is the university's way of paying respect  to members of the United States armed forces and graduates of the ROTC program.

    • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremonies for purchase at $20 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). In addition, orders will be accepted at the arena May 5. The MU Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

    • Marshall will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium or across from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. for the 9 a.m. ceremony and at noon for the 2 p.m. ceremony. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.

    • Legacy Photographics will take photographs of the graduates, then send proof information to graduates using e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.


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    Tuesday April 24, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Distinguished MU alumna to speak at Honors Convocation; nearly 200 students to be recognized for academic achievement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Staci Provezis, senior communication and evaluation coordinator in the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, will return to Marshall University Friday, April 27, as the featured speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation.

     

    Provezis earned bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Marshall in 1993 and 1995.

     

    "A tradition of the event is the invitation to an alumna/alumnus to return to speak to the students," said Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College. "We look forward to having Dr. Provezis back on campus as a distinguished graduate."

     

    The convocation, part of Marshall's 18th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center and is free to the public. It will be followed by a public reception.

     

    Nearly 200 students will be recognized for academic achievement by their colleges and departments.

     

    "The annual honors convocation is the only university-wide recognition of undergraduate academic excellence, and as such is a celebration of Marshall student success," Todd said.

     

    Provezis previously was a project manager and research analyst for the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment. Her current work focuses on communication, accreditation and evaluation-related matters in higher education. She is a frequent presenter at higher education conferences, most often on her research on student learning outcomes assessment.

     

    Provezis earned her Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where as a graduate assistant she worked for Stanley O. Ikenberry, president emeritus of the university, who served as her dissertation director.

     

    Twice a recipient of the William Chandler Bagley Doctoral Scholarship, she has also been recognized for excellence in entrepreneurial leadership. While a student at Marshall, Provezis was an active member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority and a tutor in the writing center.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday April 24, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall engineering students grab attention of other schools during competition at Virginias Conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For centuries, canoes have been constructed using a variety of materials such as wood, aluminum and fiberglass. But recently, 28 Marshall University civil engineering students designed and constructed a vessel made of concrete and took home several honors as they competed with 14 other engineering schools in a series of unique engineering challenges.

    It was all part of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Virginias  Conference held this year at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., which featured a series of 11 competitions.

    "This was the first time our students competed as an official member of the Virginias Conference and they grabbed the attention of all the other schools," said Jeff Huffman, MU's faculty adviser for the student chapter of SAME-ASCE (Society of American Military Engineering-American Society of Civil Engineers).

    Members of the student chapter took first place in the concrete canoe final product and oral presentation categories and their canoe placed second overall.

    The team earned another first place for aesthetics in steel bridge construction.  It was awarded first place for fashioning a bowling ball out of discarded cigarette filters and left-over concrete from the canoe.  Marshall placed third in the T-shirt competition with a design by student Rachel Hager that conceptualized the building of Marshall University's engineering department.

    In other competitions, students designed and built a recycled mini-golf hole using discarded trash that was provided to them, and others coagulated and flocculated duck pond water for quantity and quality evaluation in the environmental competition.

    When asked by one of the competition judges how Marshall University's chapter generated such large enthusiasm and participation among its students. Student member Eli McWhorter summed it up by saying, "Because we care."

    Work on the concrete canoe began in October 2011 with concrete mix designs and testing through January 2012.   A total of 12 mix designs were tested before the final mix used in the canoe was obtained.  Students also had to design and build a mold for casting the canoe along with a curing chamber which enclosed the canoe for 19 days before it was stained.

    Marshall students competed in nine of the 11 categories offered.

    ----------------------------------

    Photo: Marshall University civil engineering students gather for a photo with a concrete canoe they  designed and constructed. In a series of unique engineering challenges during  the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Virginias  Conference held this year at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., the students took home several honors, including first place in the concrete canoe final product and oral presentation categories. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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    Monday April 23, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Wednesday, April 25, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

    The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Camilla Brammer.

    Three people will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

    • Dr. Shawn Schulenberg, Political Science, junior recipient among all faculty

    • John Van Kirk, English, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business

    • Dr. Frank Gilliam, Biology, senior recipient in the fields of Science and Technology

    Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisors. They are:

    • Dr. Ron Childress, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, from the South Charleston campus

    • Dr. Kim DeTardo-Bora, associate professor, Criminal Justice/Criminology, from the Huntington campus

    Winners of the Distinguished Service Awards, which honor three people, will be announced Wednesday at the General Faculty Meeting.

    Marshall also is recognizing 21 retiring faculty who have a combined 521 years of service. They are:

    • Dr. Roger L. Adkins, professor, Finance/Economics, 31 years of service

    • Dr. Ramchandra G. Akkihal, professor, Finance/Economics, 42 years of service

    • Dr. Richard J. Bady, professor, Physics/Physical Science, 26 years of service

    • Dr. Franklin L. Binder, professor, Biological Sciences, 40 years of service

    • Dr. Bob S. Brown, professor, Management/Marketing/MIS, 30 years of service

    • Dr. Dan K. Evans, professor, Biological Sciences, 37 years of service

    • Dorothy Fike, associate professor, Clinical Lab Sciences, 17 years of service

    • Dr. Theodore P. Haddox Jr., associate professor, Obstetrics/Gynecology, 22 years of service

    • Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean, College of Business, 35 years of service

    • Dr. Michael L. Little, professor, Biological Sciences, 37 years of service

    • Dr. William P. Marley, professor, School of Kinesiology, 18 years of service

    • Dr. David L. Porter, professor, Pathology, 7 years of service

    • Dr. Katharine M. Rodier (deceased), professor, English, 16 years of service

    • Dr. Frances Simone, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, 26 years of service

    • Dr. Jean Edward Smith, professor, John Deaver Dinko Academy, 12 years of service

    • Dr. Michael E. Sullivan, professor, Special Education, 25 years of service

    • Dr. William E. Triest, professor, Pathology, 11 years of service

    • Robert W. Williams, Librarian III, Health Science Library, 16 years of service

    • Dr. Nancy M. Wilson, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, 21 years of service

    • Dr. Robert A. Wilson, professor, Psychology, 34 years of service

    • Dr. Edward H. Woods, professor, Communication Studies, 18 years of service

    Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as announced last week, are:

    • Dr. Daniel Holbrook, associate professor, History, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

    • Steven Barnett, professor, Music, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

    • Dr. Tina J. Cartwright, assistant professor, Education; Dr. Whitney Douglas, assistant professor, English;

    • Dr. Michael Householder, assistant professor, English, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award.

    A reception to honor the award-winning faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center after the meeting.


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    Monday April 23, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    June Harless Center to induct three into Hall of Fame

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, Lloyd G. Jackson II and Gen. Robert H. "Doc" Foglesong will be inducted into the Harless Hall of Fame Tuesday, May 1, at Marshall University.

    The induction ceremony will take place during the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development's 10th annual Harless Hall of Fame dinner. It starts at 6 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

    The ceremony is a time to show appreciation and give recognition to those people who have been identified as outstanding contributors to West Virginia's educational system with special focus on the rural areas of the state. 

    Inductees into the Hall of Fame typically include one teacher, one administrator and one business/educational partner or organization that has provided exemplary leadership to ensure the success of the education of all students in West Virginia.

    Rockefeller is chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, and chairman of the Health Care Subcommittee on Finance; Jackson is a member of the West Virginia Board of Education and former chairman of the Senate Education Committee; and Foglesong heads a scholarship program in West Virginia called the Appalachian Leadership and Educational Foundation and established the Appalachian Leadership Honors Program.

    A showcase of the Harless Center's work and the presentation of the Hallie Harless Distinguished Teacher Award will also be part of the night's events. This year's awardee is Dan Gottron, a social studies teacher at River View High School in  McDowell County.

    In addition, Dr. James Denova, vice president of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, will be recognized for his exemplary vision and unwavering support of West Virginia educational initiatives.

    The mission of the June Harless Center, part of the College of Education, is to provide leadership in educational initiatives for West Virginia educators and students, providing educators and families of rural West Virginia with a support system that addresses educational problems, sustains school improvement and provides positive growth in all educational factors.  The June Harless Center has ongoing projects with many counties in the state providing support and professional development. 

    For more information, contact Dr. Stan Maynard, executive director of the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, by phone at 304-696-6221, or by e-mail at maynard@marshall.edu.


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    Monday April 23, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    First Service Learning Symposium set for April 26 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Service Learning program will conduct the inaugural Service Learning Symposium from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, April 26, in the Drinko Library Atrium (room 301) on the Huntington campus.

    Representatives of at least 15 community agencies will be attending, including those from United Way, Big Brother/Big Sisters and the Huntington Area Food Bank, along with faculty who are currently teaching courses with service learning designations and their students.

    Faculty participants will highlight service learning experiences and projects, while community organization participants will provide faculty with the needs of their individual organizations.

    Pam Holland, director of Marshall's program, said the symposium highlights the collaboration that is present among community agencies, faculty and students.

    "This is a showcase of how MU assists the community while simultaneously assisting students in the development of their knowledge and skills in their chosen discipline," Holland said.

    For more information, contact Holland by phone at 304-696-2985.


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    Sunday April 22, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Open forum at Marshall to focus on Trayvon Martin situation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Theta Omega chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc., sorority at Marshall University will host an open forum to further discuss the Trayvon Martin situation Monday, April 23.

    Rachel Coaxum with Theta Omega said the event, which starts at 9:13 p.m. and takes place in Corbly Hall room 268 on the Huntington campus, is part of Delta Week for the sorority. The theme for Delta Week is "Making Changes with Distinction," and the theme for the forum is "Stand Your Ground for Change."

    Coaxum also said the forum is a follow-up to a recent rally on Marshall's Memorial Student Center plaza co-sponsored by Delta Sigma Theta and Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.

    Martin was the 17-year-old who was shot and killed in Orlando, Fla., in late February, by a man who was performing volunteer neighborhood watch duties.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday April 20, 2012
    Contact: Maurice Cooley, Director, Center for African American Students' Programs,, (304) 696-5430

    Marshall students to receive Kente cloths at ceremony next Thursday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement will take place at 5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 26, at Marshall University.

    The event, presented by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse on Marshall's Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will begin with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans, faculty and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

    The keynote speaker will be Mary E. Clark, who holds dual roles at Marshall, both as the coordinator of the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) in the Office of Multicultural Affairs and as the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development's Minority Faculty Fellow.

    "We take pride once again to bring to our campus and community the richness of this historically significant celebration," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs. "The Kente ceremonial tradition, with its roots centuries ago in West Africa, recognizes an individual for his/her extraordinary accomplishments and brings to us the spirit of this event."

    The ceremony takes place each spring for African and African American students who graduated from Marshall University during the winter and those slated for graduation in May or during the coming summer school term.

    The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

    Cooley said the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events in which Marshall's African and African American students can participate.

    The following woven cloths will be awarded during the Donning of Kente celebration: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

    African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow for all participants and those in attendance.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday April 20, 2012
    Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine,, 304-691-1713

    Trio of pharmacy educators joins faculty at Marshall University School of Pharmacy

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three new faculty members have been hired at the School of Pharmacy at Marshall University, Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the school, announced today.

    "We are thrilled to welcome our new educators to Marshall," Yingling said. "We continue to build an excellent pharmacy program at Marshall University and the addition of these new faculty members is certainly an asset."

    Chris Gillette, Ph.D., who received his doctoral degree from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, will serve as an assistant professor of pharmacy administration. He completed his bachelor's and master's degrees at High Point University in North Carolina.

    Gillette received a $30,000 grant for his dissertation topic, "The effect of risk and side effect communication on asthma medication adherence," and will teach provider-patient communication.

    In addition, two clinical professors have joined the faculty. They will serve as clinical pharmacists in internal medicine and cardiology at St. Mary's Medical Center and will also teach students in their areas of expertise and on clinical rotations.

    James "Aaron" Sizemore, who completed his doctor of pharmacy degree at the University of Kentucky in 2011, is finishing a pharmacy residency at Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center in Danville, Ky.

    Justin Williams, who completed his doctor of pharmacy degree at West Virginia University in 2011, is finishing a pharmacy residency at St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, N.Y.

    The Marshall University School of Pharmacy will welcome its inaugural class in August 2012.

    -------------------------------

    Photos: Extensive renovations continue in the Robert W. Coon Medical Education Building, where the Marshall University School of Pharmacy is located. The School will welcome its inaugural class in August 2012. The photos are of a future conference room, located just inside the main entrance, and a hallway on the first floor. Marshall University photos by Rick Haye.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday April 20, 2012
    Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marketing and Branding Coordinator,, 304-696-3490

    Marshall supporters can vote on the university's official tartan design

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University is encouraging the MU community to be involved in choosing the next symbol for the university - its official tartan design.

    Marshall administrators have been working with Collegiate Tartan from Greensboro, N.C., as it  produces an official tartan design for the university. After evaluating many possible designs from the company, Marshall has narrowed the choices to four.

    These four designs are now available on the Marshall website for a public vote that will determine the favorite. To view the designs and vote, visit www.marshall.edu/tartanvoting. Voting runs through Friday, May 4, on the website.

    The tartan design will be used on a variety of licensed merchandise. Collegiate Tartan produces many different items from Christmas ornaments to scarves. The merchandise will be available at a variety of local retailers.

    For more information, persons may contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, by phone at 304-696-3490, or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday April 19, 2012
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University fans can buy special badges for Greenbrier Classic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans and supporters who purchase special weekly admission badges to this summer's Greenbrier Classic can benefit the Marshall University Foundation under the Greenbrier Classic's Badges for Charity program.

    The Greenbrier Classic is an official PGA Tour event which takes place July 2-8 at the Old White Course in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Last year, the Classic was designated the "Best in Class Tournament on the PGA TOUR" by the PGA TOUR itself.

    The Marshall University Foundation will receive 30 percent of the proceeds of all badges purchased on its behalf. The badge costs are: $159 for the Weekly Grounds Badge (increasing to $189 May 1), $285 for the Benefactor Badge, $495 for the Alumni Badge and $5,000 for the Clubhouse Badge.

    The Weekly Grounds Badge provides tournament admittance for the entire week, parking and tickets to the 2012 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series. This year's concerts at the West Virginia State Fair fairgrounds feature Toby Keith and Lionel Ritchie at 9 p.m. July 4, Rod Stewart and Fray at 7:30 p.m. July 6, and Bon Jovi at 8 p.m. July 7.

    The Benefactor Badge provides tournament admittance for the entire week, parking, access to special hospitality and tickets to the concerts.

    The Alumni Badge provides admittance for the entire week, parking, access to special hospitality and tickets to the concerts. Marshall University coaches and alumni athletes will make special appearances during the week.

    The Clubhouse Badge provides admittance for the entire week, parking, access to The Greenbrier Clubhouse and Slammin' Sammy's with unlimited food and beverage, in addition to all Benefactor and Alumni hospitality venues, and tickets to the concerts.

    To purchase badges, visit www.greenbrierclassic.com and click on the link for "Badges for Charity" under the Tickets tab, or the MU Alumni Association site at www.Herdalum.com, or the Greenbrier Classic Official Tournament Shop at the resort.


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    Dr. Daniel Holbrook selected as Outstanding Faculty Award winner

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Daniel Holbrook, an associate professor of history at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2011-2012.

    Holbrook will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

    Marshall's Center for Teaching and Learning announced the Hedrick Award and two others honoring four faculty members. They are:

    • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Steven Barnett, professor, Music, and director of bands

    • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Tina J. Cartwright, assistant professor, Education; Dr. Whitney Douglas, assistant professor, English; Dr. Michael Householder, assistant professor, English

    Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

    Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

    This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

    Dr. Daniel Holbrook came to Marshall in 1997 as director of the Regents Bachelor of Arts Degree Program. He has been teaching in Marshall's history department since 2003.

    "Dan is a fantastic colleague who gives enormously of himself to students, to colleagues, and to Marshall University," said Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, an associate professor of history at MU.

    Holbrook received his Ph.D. in history in 1999 from Carnegie Mellon University. He specializes in the History of Technology, and teaches in that field as well as in Public, Local, U.S. and World History.

    Holbrook is a strong believer in collaborative learning.

    "Faculty and students must both do their very best to accomplish any learning goals," he said. "Not every student is alike. Not every class is alike. Likewise, not every course is alike; large introductory courses and small graduate seminars by their very nature require different approaches, techniques and attitudes.

    "Thus, my philosophy of teaching: I do what works, to the best of my ability, depending on the course, its content and format, and the individuals - separately and collectively - that make up the class. This is the essence of collaborative learning; we are in it together." 

    Dr. David Mills, a professor of history at Marshall, said Holbrook is "an organized, demanding and dynamic lecturer."

    "His students come early, stay engaged throughout class and are well prepared," Mills said. "His classes employ the latest technologies (movie clips, PowerPoints, Internet resources of various types), but his classroom enthusiasm and energy are what makes for a dynamic learning environment. Put simply, Dan is an excellent instructor offering a very wide spectrum of courses at our institution."

    Holbrook said he has high expectations for his students.

    "I cannot think of more than two students out of the couple thousand I have taught at Marshall who are not capable of high-quality college work, if they are willing to make the effort," Holbrook said. "Being open, honest, forthright, and clear about expectations, while understanding that students have lives sometimes filled with multiple challenges - treating them like human beings, not customers - is my main thrust."
     

    Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

    This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

    Steven Barnett came to Marshall in 2003 from the University of Mississippi, where he was assistant professor of music and assistant director of bands. At Marshall, he is director of bands and coordinator of music education.

    Dr. David Castleberry, associate dean in Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said Barnett is a valued member of the department of music.

    "Through his teaching, ongoing creative activity, and service in so many ways, he makes a positive difference in the life of our university, community and profession," Castleberry said.

    Barnett has been teaching music for 33 years, dating back to his days as assistant band director at Pearl High School in Pearl, Miss.

    "I love it and I am dedicated to the improvement in the quality of music education in the schools for future generations," he said.

    Barnett has received numerous awards and honors during his career. Among those are: College Band Directors National Association - West Virginia state representative, since 2009; Marshall College of Fine Arts Snowshoe Institute award winner, spring 2011; recipient of MU College of Fine Arts Community Service Award, 2006; and president of Conference USA Band Directors Association,  2008-2009.

    "Being a teacher here at Marshall, as well as being director of bands and coordinator of music education, I have the opportunity to teach many students and age groups," Barnett said. "It is most gratifying when I can meet a student in middle school or high school, recruit them to come to Marshall, teach them how to become a teacher while at Marshall and witness their success as a teacher after they graduate.

    "I am a very lucky person and feel very blessed to have had the opportunity to touch so many lives over the years."
     

    Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

    Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

    Dr. Tina J. Cartwright has been an assistant professor in Marshall's College of Education since August 2007. During that time, she has impressed her colleagues with her work ethic and her desire to always improve.

    "Dr. Cartwright has always strived to improve her teaching, research and service since the first day she arrived," said Dr. George Watson, chair of the School of Education. "She goes beyond the normal duties of faculty and seeks out opportunities to bring new concepts, ideas, grants and other things to our college to help students become better teachers."

    Cartwright said her teaching philosophy centers on the idea of "Learn by doing," particularly pertaining to teaching. She approaches the classroom with an enthusiasm that she feels is infectious.

    "Depending upon the class that I am teaching, I try to provide support for those students who are hesitant about the content and those students who love their content but may rely too heavily upon one primary teaching method," she said. "These two very different groups of students need support in very different ways."

    Katie McDilda, an adjunct instructor at Marshall, nominated Cartwright for the Pickens-Queen award.

    "Initiated by Tina, MU students partner with Cabell County teachers who participate in science summer academies and continue this working relationship during their student teaching assignment," McDilda said. "Tina also uses materials that teach integration of math and literacy/reading/language arts. Instead of a traditional text, Tina also supplements with journals and classroom resources published by National Science Teachers' Association. Students have said that they appreciate the variety of resources and the confidence to use them when they start to teach."

    Dr. Whitney Douglas has been an assistant professor of English at Marshall since 2008. She not only teaches a lot of writing courses, but she also asks students to do a substantial amount of writing in non-writing courses "to discover and explore ideas as well as to present ideas.

    "First and foremost, I want students to become invested in and take ownership over their writing," Douglas said.

    She also teaches the spirit of inquiry. "I want students to see that asking questions is just as important - if not more so - than finding answers."

    Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the English department, said Douglas has done "extraordinary work" with the graduate students who enroll in Douglas's ENG 640 class in preparation for their own teaching.

    "Her work in the training of these young teachers is an institutional contribution beyond measure," Hill said.

    In a letter of support, Dr. Kateryna Schray, an English professor at Marshall, described Douglas as someone who allows students to take risks. She recalled "a great burst of energy" among Douglas' students when they were taking part in one particular exercise during class. "It was time for class to end but no one moved," Schray said.

    The majority of Douglas' students believe they have learned from her classes suggesting, she said, that the issues of enthusiasm, intellectual challenge and inquiry "are working together productively to create a classroom environment conducive to learning."

    Dr. Michael Householder came to Marshall in fall 2010 after seven years at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. He is an assistant professor of English.

    Householder said he wants his students to feel confident that their ideas have value in the world. "All of my classes, regardless of level or topic, are an exercise in understanding intellectual activity as a kind of ongoing conversation," he said.

    He said self-belief, which is earned through the hard work of reading, thinking, writing and debating about sophisticated ideas, is important for the students. "Even if a student of mine never takes another English class, I want her or him to leave my classroom knowing that the skills acquired there are applicable everywhere they go."

    In teaching, Householder uses peer conferencing, which he calls his most effective technique, to achieve the learning outcomes of his courses. "It combines the best of peer review and instructor conferences and somehow in the process not only doubles the effectiveness, but increases it exponentially," he said.

    Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the English department, described Householder as "an inspiring professor" who "has worked magic in the classroom."

    Dr. Susan Gilpin, associate dean in the Honors College, has worked closely with Householder in planning and teaching HON 290, the first-semester Yeager seminar he currently teaches with  Dr. Jamie Warner and herself.

    "In spite of his constant challenge to their performance and as high as he sets the bar, he is extraordinarily compassionate and the first among us to recognize when a student needs a little less pressure and a little more encouragement," Gilpin said.

    In the classroom, Gilpin said, Householder is "a master teacher."

    ---------------------------

    Photo: Dr. Dan Holbrook, the Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2011-2012, teaches class at Marshall University. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

     
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    President Kopp says Marshall one of the region's best educational values

    Board approves 'fiscally responsible yet affordable' tuition rates for 2012-13

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - At today's meeting of the institution's Board of Governors, Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp said the university continues to provide one of the region's best higher education values, especially with respect to the diverse opportunities it offers students and its focus on meeting the needs of today's students and employers.

    "Marshall University provides exceptional value, something we take great pride in because it is so important for families who have to make tough financial decisions each day," Kopp said. "Earning a college degree is the single-greatest investment a person can make in his or her future. Unfortunately, today our students and their families are bearing an increasingly heavier burden of the real cost of a college education."

    Kopp highlighted a study released April 3 by the Demos public interest group that suggests that reduced state investment in higher education the past two decades has shifted the costs to students. As a result, students have to pay a lot more for a college degree necessary for getting a good job and entering the middle class, according to the report.

    Kopp's comments came before the Board of Governors voted to approve a tuition and fee increase of $141 per semester for all full-time undergraduate resident students for fiscal year 2012-13.

    Per-semester tuition and fee increases of $285 for metro students and $225 for non-resident students also were approved. Per-semester tuition and fees for students in the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were increased $302 for resident students and $702 for non-resident students.

    The board, meeting in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, approved an average room and board increase of $145, bringing the total increase in tuition, room and board to $286 per semester for West Virginia students living on campus.

    "Each year, our Board of Governors faces the challenge of keeping tuition affordable, while also balancing the budget with either flat or reduced state and federal funding on the horizon," said Kopp. "We want to continue to keep open the door to higher education, particularly for West Virginians, and that is certainly a factor our board members considered as they look at the state's budgetary challenges forecasted for 2014 and beyond."  

    Board of Governors Chairman Verna K. Gibson added, "This board is committed to a strategic and principled approach to fiscal management, and we are pleased that through prudent planning and responsible spending, we have been able to weather the national economic downturn relatively unscathed so far.

    "To avoid dramatic increases in the near future due to continuing reductions in public funding, however, we felt this modest increase in tuition was necessary. Looking down the road, we will continue to aggressively explore all avenues to continue to manage costs and keep a college education within reach for the students we serve. Sustained enrollment growth and utility conservation initiatives are just two of the ways we are looking at meeting the significant budgetary challenges we will face in the coming years."

    "Resident" refers to West Virginia students; "metro" refers to students who reside in Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Pike or Scioto counties in Ohio, or in Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Floyd, Greenup, Johnson, Lawrence, Martin or Pike counties in Kentucky; and "other non-resident" refers to all other non-West Virginia students.


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    Jackson competition winner to perform solo recital April 22

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Andrew O'Neal of Huntington, winner of this year's Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition, will present a solo recital at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    O'Neal is a first-year graduate student in trombone performance and received his bachelor's degree in music education from Marshall last year. According to Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the Department of Music, the Jackson competition is the department's most prestigious award.

    "Competitors need to prepare 15 minutes of music, eight of which is performed in the first round of the competition," Pappas said. "Once this round is completed, the three judges choose their top-rated performers to play the remainder of their concert during the second and final round. After this round, the judges choose a winner. From a musical standpoint, the preparation for the competition and the urgency of performing well in each round is paramount to success in the competition."

    O'Neal said his family members all play instruments as well. He started with the trombone in 6th grade with the band because of his sisters' positive experiences, he added, but his father was a huge influence on his musical career.

    "The biggest factor was hearing my dad play his horn," O'Neal said. "He goes through a warm-up practice session every day; rarely does a day go by he doesn't play. Every member of my family has memorized his warm-up routine. Looking back, as a child, I think this is why I went into music--first, because every boy who has a good father wants to grow up to be like him, and second, everyone needs a passion. I think I saw from a very young age that he was passionate about music, and I thought maybe that's what I could do, too."

    O'Neal, whose parents are both Marshall graduates, said being in a family of musicians has helped him prosper in many ways.

    "That fact that everyone else in my family does some type of music has only reinforced what I do," O'Neal said.

    "When I made the decision my senior year of high school to major in music education in college, it would have been very easy for my parents to have steered me toward a more concrete and profitable career path, but they, and the rest of my family, have done nothing but support me the entire way."

    Dr. Michael Stroeher, professor in the Department of Music, said O'Neal has studied trombone with him since he was in high school.

    "He is an outstanding musician as a solo performer and as an ensemble member," Stroeher said. "Even before he became a graduate assistant he was a leader and a positive role model for the younger trombonists, and he is an excellent teacher. I think one of the factors that put him over the top in this competition was the expressiveness in his playing, his communication with the audience--not to mention accuracy, good sound, rhythmic precision and all those other technical things."

    For O'Neal, the instruction he received from Stroeher is invaluable.

    "I'm pretty excited about the recital," O'Neal said. "For some people, recitals are stressful and nerve-racking, but I love playing the trombone and I love being able to play for an audience, especially one of family and friends -- they judge less!"

    "The music department has well prepared me for something like this," he said. "Over my years here, I've been trained in the basic fundamentals of music as well as taught how to perform. Dr. Stroeher has done wonders bringing me up from the level of trombonist I used to be to the level that can competently put on a recital."

    Pappas said this competition is a showcase of all the talent they have in the Department of Music.

    "We challenge our students to become the best musicians they can be," Pappas said. "The preliminary and final rounds of this competition are a testament to that preparation and the high level of music-making that is found throughout our applied studios and our department. In any given year, there are a number of students who could win the competition."


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    Dr. Wael Zatar named dean of CITE at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Wael Zatar, who served as interim dean of Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) the past 8 months, has been named permanent dean of the college, effective May 1.

    Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, said a national search was conducted and Zatar emerged as the best person for the position from a pool of highly qualified candidates.

    "Dr. Zatar met all the characteristics we were looking for," Ormiston said. "We are confident he will lead the college to new levels of achievement and success. I look forward to working with Dr. Zatar as he facilitates the development and growth of the college."

    Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science, chaired the search committee. He said the committee received 32 applications for the position, including several that were very strong.

    "In fact, we were so impressed with the applications that we received, we interviewed 11 people by telephone before deciding who would be invited for campus interviews," Somerville said. "In the end, our task was to forward the names of the top candidates to President Stephen Kopp and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Ormiston.

    "Dr. Zatar's name was on the final short list because of his truly impressive research record, his extensive experience with industry, his impeccable reputation in his discipline, and the professionalism that he displayed during the search process. Throughout the process we saw evidence that he would work hard on behalf of Marshall University, and be a strong and effective advocate for the College of Information Technology & Engineering. I am very pleased with the decision."

    Zatar has been at Marshall since 2006. He previously served at the University of Kentucky and West Virginia Tech.

    "It's a great honor and a privilege to be chosen dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering," Zatar said. "As interim dean I learned a lot and now I am ready to hit the ground running."

    Zatar said he improved his knowledge about the administrative side of the university and how to move promising initiatives forward. He said he has received strong support from Kopp and Ormiston.

    "I share my vision with their vision," he said of university administrators. "CITE houses one of the fastest growing programs in the university and I will make sure to put every possible effort to continue CITE's momentum. I want to advance the college in a way that will match the university mission. I feel well positioned to pursue the CITE mission for educating our students and for graduating professionals who could participate in the economic development of our state and the region."

    Zatar received both his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering from Cairo University in Egypt, and his Ph.D., also in civil engineering, from Saitama Universityin Japan. He has conducted state-of-the-art research for 23 years and has established strong partnerships and liaisons with funding agencies, industry and research institutions.

    Zatar's research interests include bridge management, construction materials, highway testing standards, advanced experimental destructive and non-destructive testing techniques, reinforced and prestressed concrete, ultra high performance concrete, fiber reinforced polymer composite bridges, green and sustainable highway structures, health monitoring of transportation infrastructure systems, structural repair and retrofit, and specialized rehabilitation systems.

    He has 155 technical publications and has written a number of book chapters addressing concrete structures.

    At Marshall, he taught Engineering Materials, Structural Analysis, Structural Steel Design and Reinforced Concrete Design. He received numerous Awards from national and international civil engineering organizations. In 2009, Zatar received the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute Distinguished Young Educator Achievement Award.

    He held memberships in 24 professional organizations, including the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Transportation Research Board, American Concrete Institute, and Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute. He Held 27 offices in professional organizations, 10 appointments in 10 national organizations and 10 appointments in regional organizations. He is a member of 31 national committees.


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    The DesignGroup of Columbus next featured speaker in Marshall University Lunch and Learn Sustainability Lecture Series

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Experts on sustainability from DesignGroup of Columbus will deliver the next presentation in Marshall University's Lunch and Learn Sustainability Lecture Series Thursday, April 19, beginning promptly at noon.

    The hour-long lecture will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, 519 John Marshall Dr.

    The presentation is titled: "Sustainability: The Triple Bottom Line" and will address the questions of what is meant by sustainability, and how does it benefit society? Focusing on architectural design and building construction, topics such as energy efficiency, indoor environmental quality, as well as use of resources will be discussed.

    DesignGroup is a professional design firm with offices in Columbus, Ohio, and Covington, Ky., with sustainable design projects scattered throughout the United States. DesignGroup professionals provide services in architecture, interior design, planning and programming, graphics, sustainable design, Building Information Modeling and LEED Program Management.

    Aetna Building Maintenance and Marshall University have teamed up to launch a monthly lecture series to address sustainability topics to benefit organizations in the region. Topics will include energy management and conservation, green cleaning, lighting retrofits, recycling, alternative energy, water harvesting, storm water management, and LEED certification. All lectures in the series are free and open to local and tri-state businesses and organizations, but pre-registration is required. To register, go to www.marshall.edu/sustainability.

    Typically, more than 40 area businesses are represented at the luncheon.


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    MU professor Burnis Morris to speak at Woodson fundraising banquet

     HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Prof. Burnis Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor in the MU School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will be the keynote speaker at the 20th annual Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc., fundraising banquet Saturday, April 21.

    The banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Proceeds will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

    Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor at Marshall since 2003, recently finished a year as the John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow at Marshall. During that time, he studied Woodson's career and relationship with the African American press from 1915 to 1950 - a period that began with Woodson's founding of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and ended with his death.

    Morris received a West Virginia Humanities Council fellowship in 2011 for his study of Woodson. He has served as head of the Journalism Division at Marshall since 2006. He is a member of the Marshall University Faculty Senate and its Executive Committee, chair of the Journalism and Mass Communications Diversity Committee and former chair of the Faculty Senate's Student Conduct and Wel