FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 30, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Mary Todd named executive director of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mary Todd, founding dean of the Honors College at Marshall University, has been named executive director of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, effective July 1.

Phi Kappa Phi, based in Baton Rouge, La., has chapters on nearly 320 select colleges and universities in the United States and the Philippines. It is the nation's oldest and most selective all-discipline honor society.

Todd came to Marshall in August 2009 and collaborated with the provost office, the college deans, department chairs and faculty to design the Honors College. An interim dean will be named soon, followed by a nationwide search for her replacement.

"It has been a joy to serve as founding dean of the Honors College these past three years," Todd said. "The College provides Marshall an infrastructure to bring together talented students and talented faculty, and offers opportunities to integrate academic excellence into the larger campus culture, whether through scholarship programs, residence life, the da Vinci lecture, or the annual honors convocation. I am grateful to the president and provost for their strong support of honors education and for the resources that made the founding of the Honors College possible."

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said the Honors College is well established, thanks to Todd's leadership.

"Dr. Todd did exactly what she was asked to do, and she did it very well," he said. "She not only led the process of establishing the Honors College, but she also was responsible for bringing a chapter of Phi Kappa Phi to Marshall. She is an outstanding leader who accomplished a lot in her three years here. We wish her nothing but the best with Phi Kappa Phi."

Todd becomes the first woman to lead Phi Kappa Phi, a 115-year-old organization, and only the 11th individual to hold the position since 1900.

"I look forward to working with her," said Diane G. Smathers, society president-elect and chair of the executive search committee. "Mary brings a wealth of experience and expertise to the role. She is a scholar, a leader, and a true public servant. I believe she has the strengths and vision needed to strategically move the society forward."

Todd was initiated into Phi Kappa Phi in 1993 at the University of Illinois at Chicago and later led a successful petition to bring a chapter of Phi Kappa Phi to Marshall. She has served as the primary contact for Phi Kappa Phi at Marshall since the chapter's inception in 2010.

Before joining Marshall, Todd served for five years as vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Ohio Dominican University.


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Monday April 30, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

5K Race to benefit medical mission trip to Honduras

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mission "M" Possible, a 5K race, is scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, May 12, with proceeds to benefit a medical mission trip to Honduras.

The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is teaming with Global Medical Brigades to send a group of physicians, nurses and medical students to Honduras in June. All proceeds from the race will go toward funding the trip and medications for patients in Honduras.

The race will begin at the center of Ritter Park, continue on North Boulevard to the Memorial Arch (7th Street West), then come back along the Ritter Park trail and finish in the center of the park. Pre-registration for the event is available at www.tristateracer.com. Race day registration is also available.

The medical mission trip to Honduras has become an annual event for Marshall School of Medicine students thanks to the generosity of Ken and Sharon Ambrose who have financially supported the project in honor of their late son Dr. Paul Ambrose, a 1995 graduate of MUSOM. Dr. Ambrose was killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in the United States.

For more information about the race contact Jacob Kilgore by phone at 304-634-2448 or Brent Kidd by phone at 304-544-4585. Kilgore and Kidd are third-year medical students serving as coordinators for this year's trip.

Donations for the trip may also be directed to Linda Holmes, Director of Development and Alumni Affairs, who can be reached by phone at 304-691-1711.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 27, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Dr. Deanna Mader selected to serve as College of Business interim dean

 HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A 20-year veteran and professor of marketing in Marshall University's College of Business has been chosen to serve as its interim dean, effective July 1.

Dr. Deanna Mader, who is currently interim associate dean and director of recruitment and retention for the college, is well known for her work with student groups consulting in the area of hands-on marketing for local businesses. She also is one of the university's first recipients of the Kermit McGinnis Endowed Professorship, which honors outstanding business professors at Marshall.

Mader's research in topics ranging from ethics to pedagogy and health care marketing to promotion management has been published in peer-reviewed journals and she has presented at national and international levels. She often serves as a consultant in the areas of health care, retail, entrepreneurship and promotion management.

"I am humbled, honored and extremely excited about being asked to serve the College of Business as interim dean," Mader said.  "I look forward to working with the university's faculty, staff, students, administrators, as well as our business community to move us forward.   My philosophy is that we are all part of a larger team and it will take all of us working together to reach our potential.  And what potential we have!"

Mader replaces the current dean, Dr. Chong Kim, who is retiring June 30. A national search to fill the dean's position will be conducted.

Additionally in July, three other business professors will take on interim leadership roles in the college.

Dr. Margie McInerney, a professor of management specializing in human resource management and negotiations, has been selected to serve as an interim associate dean. McInerney received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University's College of Business Administration and has taught at Marshall University for more than 25 years.  Prior to teaching, she worked as a bank examiner for the U.S. Treasury Department Comptroller of the Currency.  McInerney is currently the division head of the Management, Marketing and Management Information Systems Department in the College of Business.

 

 Dr. Jacqueline Agesa, an associate professor of finance, has been chosen to serve as an interim associate dean. Agesa received her Ph.D. in economics in 1996 from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and was a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1999-2000. She came to Marshall in 2000 and was named the Richard D. Jackson Professor of Economics in 2008. One year later, she successfully completed the Postdoctoral Bridge to Business Program, Finance Track, at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Agesa currently teaches courses in finance and risk management and insurance.

Dr. Fred H. Mader, a professor of marketing, has been selected to serve as the interim division head of the Management, Marketing and Management Information Systems Department in the College of Business. Mader has been with Marshall University for 20 years teaching professional selling, supply chain logistics and marketing management. Prior to coming to Marshall, he was a member of the faculty at the University of Louisville. Mader holds an M.S. in Economic Geography from Western Kentucky University, and both an M.B.A. and a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. This is his second appointment as interim division head.

 

 

 

 
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Friday April 27, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall advertising majors take honors in district competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Advertising majors from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University won second place overall and "Best Presenter" earlier this month in the District 5 American Advertising Federation's National Student Advertising Competition in Akron, Ohio.

The 14-member team of the advertising capstone class proposed a campaign to increase awareness of Nissan among multicultural millennials.  Judges ranked their campaign plans book and presentation second among the 10 schools participating. The students' work will be entered into "wildcard" consideration for a spot in the national competition.

The judges named Danielle Pierce, one of the five presenters on Marshall's team, as the "Best Presenter" from among all of the students who performed.

James Chamberlain, president of Marshall's AAF chapter and senior account executive on the campaign project, said, "We are thrilled that our team's hard work and passion were recognized on Saturday, and we are looking forward to having the opportunity to compete for the wildcard. We are also especially proud of Dani for receiving the presenter award."

During the semester the classmates researched Nissan's problems, divined insights, proposed a media plan, wrote campaign strategies, created a campaign theme and prepared advertising and marketing communications samples. Their decisions and strategies were condensed into a 32-page "plans book" that was scored by judges in mid-March followed by a 20-minute live presentation before a panel of advertising professionals in April. They competed against 10 other colleges and universities from the American Advertising Federation District 5, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

Janet Dooley, associate professor of advertising, said the project more than merited the distinction. "The students in this class were dedicated to the point of spending their entire spring break on campus honing their proposals," she said.

The National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) is governed by the American Advertising Federation in Washington, D.C. Each year the federation solicits national sponsors who prepare a "real world" case study outlining a current advertising challenge. This year Nissan asked students to recommend tactics to reach multicultural 18-29-year-olds.

Judges for the competition were Jeremy Schwartz, Executive Creative Director, EDC partners + napier, Rochester, N. Y., Joseph Mayernik, Creative Camp Counselor, StormFrog, Rochester, N. Y., and Gary Melliere, Brand Manager, Goodyear Tire and Rubber, Cleveland/Akron, Ohio.

Ohio University placed first and Cleveland State took third in the District 5 event. Regional competitions are conducted each spring in 15 districts throughout the U.S. Winning teams and a wildcard team advance to the national level.

Marshall team members are:

James Chamberlain, a senior from Huntington

Sara Katey Ellis, a senior from Ceredo

Kristyn Francisco, a senior from Catawba, Va.

Alexandra Frerich, a senior from Vienna, W.Va.

Danielle Goodman, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

Ashley Hesson, a senior from Proctorville, Ohio

Sarah Lake, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

Madison Lavender, a senior from Huntington

Samantha Linthicum, a senior from Parkersburg, W.Va.

Danielle Pierce, a senior from Barboursville

Brenden Trimble, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

Andrea Rectenwald, a senior from Hurricane, W.Va.

Hannah Vickers, a senior from Danville, W.Va.

Jessica Watts, a senior from Wayne

 

For more information, contact James Chamberlain by e-mail at chamberlain9@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 27, 2012
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall picks up national award for family medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University has received a family medicine "Top Ten" award from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) for being one of the nation's top schools in the percentage of graduates entering family medicine residencies.

Based on a three-year average ending in October 2011, AAFP reports 16.8 percent of Marshall medical school graduates have chosen family medicine residencies.  The average places the school as number six in the country.

"Marshall's school of medicine has consistently found itself in this top ranking because we are committed to educating students about the importance of primary care and more specifically, family medicine," said Dr. John Walden, chair of the department of Family and Community Health.  "We have long been aware of the critical nature of educating doctors for rural America and remain steadfast in our efforts to promote this very important specialty."

Dr. Sarah Chouinard, president of the West Virginia Academy of Family Physicians and a 1998 graduate of Marshall's medical school, echoed Walden's assessment.

"Family docs are THE key players in our nation's ability to reform our healthcare system. With the changing business of medicine to include technology and quality-driven outcome measures, we need well-educated, engaged family docs to be present in our communities,"Chouinard said. "Marshall trained me to be a family doctor who understands the value in serving our rural West Virginia communities."

The awards were presented during a ceremony today (April 27) at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in Seattle.   The Top Ten Awards were created more than a decade ago by the AAFP to promote the goal of having more U.S. medical school graduates become family medicine physicians.


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Friday April 27, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall students excel at statewide research competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University student researchers captured prizes in an oral presentation competition held last Friday and Saturday in conjunction with the joint West Virginia Academy of Science annual meeting and the biennial STaR (Science, Technology and Research) Symposium.

 

Brittany M. Whited, a senior mathematics major from Hurricane, received first place in the undergraduate student category for a presentation about her project to create graphs used to simulate changes in the pattern of plant stem curvature. She received a cash prize of $750. Her project was supported by the university's Undergraduate Mathematical Biology Research program, which is funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF).

 

Irfan A. Khan, who is pursuing a master's degree in biomedical sciences, was recognized with second place in the graduate student category for his talk about his work to develop a microfluidic cell culture system that could eventually lead to improved portable systems for testing water toxicity. Khan, who is from Huntington, received a $500 prize. His research was also funded by NSF.

 

Whited and Khan were among more than 120 undergraduate and graduate students from across the state who entered the competition by submitting abstracts describing their research and findings. Students could choose to either display posters or give 15-minute oral presentations at the conference, which was held on the campus of West Virginia State University in Institute.

 

Whited thanked Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Scott Sarra, professor of mathematics, for their support during the year-long project.

 

"This research has really taken me out of my mathematical comfort zone, as I've been learning all about numerical analysis methods the crux of my research as I go," she said. "It probably has been the most challenging part, but was definitely rewarding. I've loved being able to apply mathematics to life sciences, a wonderful joining of two of my interests."

 

Whited added that presenting research is important for a student's professional development for a couple of reasons.

 

She said, "One, it forces you to try and simplify all this work you've been doing, making it accessible to those without prior knowledge. This helps internalize the ideas and methods you're using.

 

"Second, it really brings a great sense of pride to see how far you've come and to show it to other people. It's easy to lose sight of the progress you've made when you're working on it every day."

 

Whited also acknowledged her research partner Kate Chuchiak, a junior environmental science major from Wellsburg, as well as student researcher Don Silver for his previous work on the project.

 

Khan said the recognition is rewarding for him on several levels.

 

"I have worked so many hours and conducted so many experiments to get a single piece of data I could confidently present to an audience, it means a lot to me," he said.

 

Khan added that English is a second language for him, so presenting at the conference also gave him confidence.

 

"I didn't want to present in this conference, but my advisor Dr. Bin Wang insisted. She is awesome!" he said. "I have learned English just by watching English movies. So, winning this award means a lot more to me than it may to someone else.

 

"I have always had trouble presenting my research to an audience who may not have a lot of relevant experience and this conference was a testing ground. I think every student should present their research in every conference possible."

 

Khan said the most exciting thing about his research project was learning to use confocal laser scanning microscopy in the university's Molecular and Biological Imaging Center.

 

He acknowledged microscopy technician David Neff for helping him learn the fine details of optical and electron microscopy, saying, "He has helped me perfect my research methods just by being critical. I am also very grateful to him for sacrificing many of his hours just to help me through the complex experiments."

 

Kahn also thanked Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of the College of Science, "for supporting me from the very beginning of my days in Marshall University."

 

The conference the first time the two organizations have held a joint meeting drew more than 350 faculty members, researchers, students, policymakers and members of the state's high-tech business community.

 

The event marked the 87th annual meeting of the West Virginia Academy of Science and the fourth biennial STaR Symposium. The theme of last week's joint conference was "Innovation:  Concept to Commercialization." The program featured sessions about biotechnology start-ups; private and government support; research funding opportunities; and how to make the transition to the private sector.

 

For more information, including a complete list of student researchers and abstracts describing their projects, visit www.wvresearch.org.

 

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Friday April 27, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Student-produced 'Up Late' show plays its swan song live Saturday night

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five years and 140 shows later, Marshall University's student-produced late night talk show will come to an end Saturday.

"Up Late" has featured student musical acts, governors and athletes, actors and comedians like Pauley Shore and Andy Dick, as well as television personalities like Jamie Oliver and, most recently, the venerable Larry King.

The finale will air live at 11 p.m. Saturday on Comcast Channel 25 and streaming video will be available at www.marshall.edu/uplate. Plus, there will be a live behind-the-scenes camera in the control room showing the students producing the show. 

"The run of this show has been an exciting and life-changing event that has truly been the most enjoyable time in my life," said instructor Jamie LoFiego, who is also the show's host. "It will be difficult to say goodbye to 'Up Late'; however, I am very excited to see what our creative students come up with next."

"Up Late" spawned from an Introduction to Video Production class taught by LoFiego, who also works with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and is hosted by LoFiego and a variety of student co-hosts. The program has a late-night show quality and features interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and, of course, comedy. Comedy bits aside, the class includes lecture, course work as well as studio time.

"It's been a blast, but now it is time for a new core group of students to step up and create something they can call their own," LoFiego said. "With the foundation and the following that we have created in the past five years, I truly believe whatever the students come up with will be a success."

He said the show not only exposed students to great talent and stars, it gave them hands-on production experience that puts them ahead of others just getting their start in the field.

"There is no way I can single out one defining moment," LoFiego said. "But I am most proud of the role that students played in this show. It was not created for the comedy. It was created to give the students an opportunity to work as a crew to produce a television show. In our studio, they experienced far more than many students do in a regular college class."

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Photos: (Above) Up Late host Jamie LoFiego, left, talks with Larry King during a recent show. (Below) The staff of Up Late, including host Jamie LoFiego (in tie), poses for a photograph during the final season. Photos courtesy of Marshall University.


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Thursday April 26, 2012
Contact: Pat Dickson , University Communications, 304-746-1971

Dooley to lead School of Journalism on interim basis; Hollis named assistant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Janet Dooley has been named interim dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University, effective July 1.

Currently SOJMC's assistant dean, the Marshall University graduate and long-time faculty member will replace Dr. Corley Dennison, who was appointed associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies at Marshall last month. Dan Hollis, an associate professor, will succeed her as assistant dean.

"Professor Dooley's tireless dedication and contributions to the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, both as a faculty member and assistant dean, make her the ideal person to fill the interim dean's position," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. "I am looking forward to working with her as the School continues its commitment to excellence."

Dooley joined the MU faculty in 1979 and was named assistant dean in 2005. She has taught a full-range of journalism and mass communications classes with an emphasis on advertising and graduate courses.

"I'm delighted to be able to respond to this unexpected opportunity," Dooley said. "I'm a graduate of this program, and I've been working as a faculty member for over thirty years. I've witnessed a great deal of change, growth and progress, so it's a genuine honor to take on the responsibilities of dean."

Commenting on the appointment, Dennison said, "We are fortunate here at Marshall and in the J-School to have the breadth and depth of experience that Professor Dooley brings to the table. She will do an excellent job as interim dean in the coming year."

A Summa Cum Laude graduate of Marshall with a B.A. in journalism with a concentration in advertising sequence, Dooley received an M.S. in communications with an advertising concentration from the University of Tennessee. She studied International and Intercultural Communication at the University of Kentucky where she received a Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies.

Hollis, who grew up in southern Indiana, has an undergraduate degree from the University of Southern Indiana and an M.A. from the University of Kentucky. He joined the Marshall faculty in 1999.

Hollis has been honored for his creative video work which has won him numerous awards including National Broadcasting Society's First Place for Video News six years in a row. In addition, he's received a Telly Award, Communicator Awards, AVA Award and Videographer Award for his work on an eclectic range of topics running the gamut from Irish Road Bowling to Roller Derby to Zip lining and the Vandalia Gathering.

"I'm happy to serve in this role, and certainly want to thank all of my colleagues for the opportunity," Hollis said. "The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications has a long and storied history and to have the chance to participate in the leadership of it is very rewarding."

Both Dooley and Hollis have been honored by Marshall for their teaching and service. Both received the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award, Dooley in 2002 and Hollis in 2011. Hollis was the 2000-2001 recipient of the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award and Dooley was given a Distinguished Service Award in 2006.

"This should be an indication of just how much value the School of Journalism and Mass Communications puts on teaching," Hollis said, referring to both he and Dooley winning the Reynolds award. "We value it and it shows in all of our professors."


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Thursday April 26, 2012
Contact: Nancy Pelphrey, Coordinator of Alumni Activities,, 304-696-3134

Marshall to host 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet Saturday, April 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet will cap off Marshall University's Alumni Weekend Saturday, April 28, with a number of awards honoring alumni as well as four students. It will take place at 7 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

This year's Distinguished Alumnus award will be presented to Jeff S. Sandy, a 1979 B.B.A. graduate who is sheriff of Wood County and a retired special agent with the U.S. Department of Treasury. In connection with his work with the Treasury department, he was the Supervisory Special Agent in charge of the West Virginia office of the department's Criminal Investigation Division. An expert in investigating money laundering, he is a member of the Association of the Certified Fraud Examiners and has conducted training in the U.S and from Russia and other Baltic countries regarding his specialty.

In the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorism attacks, Sandy volunteered to work in nationwide counter-terrorism activities. He received an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Presidential Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force in 2002.

B. Scott Miller will receive the Community Achievement Award. An executive at several banking institutions, including one he helped found, Miller has been active in local community service wherever he has lived. He has served on the boards of directors for Jackson General Hospital, the Ravenswood Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson County Library, the Wood County Habitat for Humanity, the Mid Ohio Valley United Way and the Ravenswood High School Alumni Association. He also is active coaching youth in basketball, soccer, cross country and baseball. He graduated from Marshall in 1983 with a B.B.A. degree.

The four students to be honored are Tyson Gale, a senior exercise physiology major and member of the football team, who will receive the Cam Henderson Award; Andrea Booker, a junior criminal justice major, who will receive the Nate Ruffin Scholarship Award; Daniel Ricks, a junior music education major and member of Marching Thunder, who will receive a Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship; and Dorothy Cornwell, a junior nursing major and cheerleader, who also will receive a Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship.

The River Cities Alumni Club, based in the Huntington area, will be recognized as the alumni club of the year for the second straight year.

As a special highlight for the 75th anniversary of the banquet and Marshall University's 175th year, each academic unit, as well as the Marshall University Foundation, will recognize one of its alumni with an Award of Distinction. Following is a list of the recipients.

  • The College of Business will recognize Michael Gerber, a retired Certified Public Accountant with Hayflich & Steinberg, who continues to serve the firm as a consultant. A 1963 graduate of Marshall, he has served the college as a member of the advisory board for the division of accountancy and legal environment as well as the college's overall advisory board. He has served as an instructor for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program and on a number of civic group boards.

  • The College of Education will honor Carolyn Smith, a 1968 graduate in business education. She has been president and co-owner of Huntington Junior College since 1999. Under her leadership, the college has approximately 800 students, for whom it maintains an 80 percent placement rate of graduates. The college is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. She supports many local organizations, including Big Brothers and Big Sisters, Goodwill Industries and, of course, Marshall University.

  • The College of Fine Arts selected C. Donald and Sandra Soto Hatfield, both Marshall alumni, for the alumni of distinction award. The couple chairs the college's Dean's Council, which leads efforts to promote sustained interest in and support of the college. Active in the Huntington community, they have established several scholarships at Marshall, particularly in the fine arts. They have hosted several college events in their home.

  • The College of Information Technology and Engineering will recognize Douglas R. Hardman, who received his Bachelor of Engineering Science in 1970 and his M.B.A. in 1976, both from Marshall. A longtime employee of J. H. Fletcher & Co., he began as a design engineer in 1971, then moved up to Manager of Engineering, General Manager of Sales and Engineering, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, President, and now, since 2010, Chief Executive Officer. He is also a director of the National Mining Association in Washington, D.C.

  • The College of Liberal Arts selected Roger W. Simmons, a 1972 graduate of Marshall. He was a Special Agent with the U.S. Treasurer, Criminal Investigation Division until he retired in 1998. Over his 26-year career he received a number of awards from the U.S. Attorney's Office, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI for his work on joint criminal investigations. He continues to work part time as a contract employee of the FBI, and is involved with Marshall as a member of the John Marshall Society, the Heritage Society and the Big Green Club.

  • The College of Science will honor Dr. Paul Hill, a B.S. and M.S. degree graduate of Marshall, who serves as chancellor of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. He previously served as vice chancellor for science and research of the policy commision, at which he was responsible for $50 million in federal research funding and $76 million in state research investment. Prior to coming to the policy commission, he was executive director of the West Virginia Experimental Program to Simulate Competitive Research (WVEPSCoR). Hill has more than 25 years of experience in academic research, grant administration, public policy and management. He is active on numerous state and federal committees, boards and commissions.

  • The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications will recognize Joanne Jaeger Tomblin, who holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Marshall, as well as an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. As the wife of West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, she is the First Lady of West Virginia. She also is president of the Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College. She is involved in many state, local and regional committees and organizations including the Education Alliance as an executive committee and board member, the Logan Regional Medical Center board and College Completion Task Force, of which she is co-chair.

  • The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will honor Dr. Kevin Yingling, who is a 1978 bachelor's degree graduate of Marshall and a 1985 graduate of the medical school. Also a summa cum laude graduate of the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, he is currently serving as founding dean of Marshall's School of Pharmacy. Previously, he was chair of the department of internal medicine at Marshall. He has received a number of awards and honors, including the Laureate Award of the West Virginia Chapter of the American College of Physicians in 2010.

  • The Graduate School of Education and Professional Development selected Dr. Rebecca Goodwin for the award. She received her B.A. and M.A. from Marshall, then taught at the junior high school level in the Kanawha County Schools before serving as a vice principal and principal at schools in the county. She then moved to the central office of the Kanawha County Schools, first as Director for Administration and Instruction, then as Area Assistant Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction.

  • The Marshall University Foundation will honor John Underwood Sr. and Donna Underwood, both early retirees from divisions of the Mead Corporation in Dayton, Ohio. John Underwood served as vice president of human resources and labor relations for the company's paper division. Donna Underwood was the statistical process control production supervisor for the company's Lexis-Nexis Division. They are active with Marshall University as members of the Big Green and Marshall University Foundations and by participation in various fundraising campaigns. John Underwood is currently chair of the Marshall University Foundation Real Estate Committee.

A limited number of tickets are still available for the banquet. For information, call the alumni office at 1-800-MUALUMX or 304-696-3134.


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Wednesday April 25, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More than 1,500 to graduate from Marshall on May 5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University Saturday, May 5, in a pair of commencement ceremonies at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Marshall will conduct two commencements for the first time in its 175-year history. The 9 a.m. ceremony is for undergraduates, and a 2 p.m. ceremony the same day is for graduate students.

MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said the decision to split commencement into two events was made because the main commencement was lasting in excess of three hours. She said an increase in the number of doctoral candidates and other factors made the main ceremony too long.

"It's not unusual for an institution to have two ceremonies," Ferguson said. "I think everyone is excited about the change. We're hoping that neither ceremony will last more than a couple of hours."

Among the 1,508 students receiving degrees are 960 undergraduates, 484 graduate students and 64 from the School of Medicine. The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2012 graduates only. Ferguson said she expects about 600 undergraduates and 200 graduate students to take part in their respective ceremonies.

Ferguson said 373 students will graduate with honors. Seventy-seven will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 101 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 188 cum laude (3.3 to  3.59). Two students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and five receiving associate degrees will graduate with honors.

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

During the morning ceremony, Marshall will recognize its graduating honor students. Based on tentative grade point averages, 11 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect GPAs.

Those 11 students are: Tiffany Renee Bell of Wake Forest, N.C.; Kirsten Alyssa Carter of Thurman, Ohio; Lindsay N. DiFatta of Lusby, Md.; Ian Keller Ferrell of Union Bridge, Md.; Grayson Lynn Forlines of Bluefield, W.Va.; Kayla Marie Johnson of Gallipolis, Ohio; Kristin E. McKinney of Culloden, W.Va.; Keith Edward Pearson of Point Pleasant, W.Va.; Chelsea Rachelle Sanders of Greer, S.C.; Erin L. Shaver of Huntington, and Amy D. Whitt of Barboursville.

Marshall will not have a featured speaker at either ceremony, although President Stephen J. Kopp will deliver remarks.

Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events:

Thursday, April 26

5:15 p.m., Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing graduation reception, West Virginia Farm Museum

Friday, April 27

4:30 p.m., Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony, sponsored by Student Affairs, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

6:13 p.m., End-of-year celebration with MU Greeks, Memorial Student Center lobby

7 p.m., Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Thursday, May 3

7 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, South Charleston High School, 1 Eagle Way, South Charleston

7 p.m., College of Education hooding ceremony, Marshall University Foundation Hall

Friday, May 4

11 a.m., ROTC Commissioning Ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Room

11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

3:30 p.m., College of Business pinning ceremony, Christ Temple Church

4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

4:30 p.m.., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, Heiner's Study Room

5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

6 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications spring graduates banquet, Foundation Hall

7 p.m., College of Health Professions nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church

7 p.m., School of Medicine Investiture, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

Saturday, May 5

9 a.m., Marshall University's 175th commencement ceremony for undergraduates, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

Immediately following morning commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

Immediately following morning commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms

2 p.m., Marshall University's 175th commencement ceremony for graduate students, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

5 p.m., College of Science hooding ceremony, Smith Hall 154

4:30 p.m., Forensic Science graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

Main commencement notes

  • Each commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web. The link will be available on the main MU website: www.marshall.edu.

  • Marshall will recognize graduates with military service by issuing a special red, white and blue cord to be worn at commencement. It is the university's way of paying respect  to members of the United States armed forces and graduates of the ROTC program.

  • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremonies for purchase at $20 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). In addition, orders will be accepted at the arena May 5. The MU Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

  • Marshall will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium or across from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. for the 9 a.m. ceremony and at noon for the 2 p.m. ceremony. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.

  • Legacy Photographics will take photographs of the graduates, then send proof information to graduates using e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.


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Tuesday April 24, 2012
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Distinguished MU alumna to speak at Honors Convocation; nearly 200 students to be recognized for academic achievement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Staci Provezis, senior communication and evaluation coordinator in the Office of the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, will return to Marshall University Friday, April 27, as the featured speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation.

 

Provezis earned bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Marshall in 1993 and 1995.

 

"A tradition of the event is the invitation to an alumna/alumnus to return to speak to the students," said Dr. Mary Todd, dean of Marshall's Honors College. "We look forward to having Dr. Provezis back on campus as a distinguished graduate."

 

The convocation, part of Marshall's 18th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center and is free to the public. It will be followed by a public reception.

 

Nearly 200 students will be recognized for academic achievement by their colleges and departments.

 

"The annual honors convocation is the only university-wide recognition of undergraduate academic excellence, and as such is a celebration of Marshall student success," Todd said.

 

Provezis previously was a project manager and research analyst for the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment. Her current work focuses on communication, accreditation and evaluation-related matters in higher education. She is a frequent presenter at higher education conferences, most often on her research on student learning outcomes assessment.

 

Provezis earned her Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where as a graduate assistant she worked for Stanley O. Ikenberry, president emeritus of the university, who served as her dissertation director.

 

Twice a recipient of the William Chandler Bagley Doctoral Scholarship, she has also been recognized for excellence in entrepreneurial leadership. While a student at Marshall, Provezis was an active member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority and a tutor in the writing center.


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Marshall engineering students grab attention of other schools during competition at Virginias Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For centuries, canoes have been constructed using a variety of materials such as wood, aluminum and fiberglass. But recently, 28 Marshall University civil engineering students designed and constructed a vessel made of concrete and took home several honors as they competed with 14 other engineering schools in a series of unique engineering challenges.

It was all part of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Virginias  Conference held this year at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., which featured a series of 11 competitions.

"This was the first time our students competed as an official member of the Virginias Conference and they grabbed the attention of all the other schools," said Jeff Huffman, MU's faculty adviser for the student chapter of SAME-ASCE (Society of American Military Engineering-American Society of Civil Engineers).

Members of the student chapter took first place in the concrete canoe final product and oral presentation categories and their canoe placed second overall.

The team earned another first place for aesthetics in steel bridge construction.  It was awarded first place for fashioning a bowling ball out of discarded cigarette filters and left-over concrete from the canoe.  Marshall placed third in the T-shirt competition with a design by student Rachel Hager that conceptualized the building of Marshall University's engineering department.

In other competitions, students designed and built a recycled mini-golf hole using discarded trash that was provided to them, and others coagulated and flocculated duck pond water for quantity and quality evaluation in the environmental competition.

When asked by one of the competition judges how Marshall University's chapter generated such large enthusiasm and participation among its students. Student member Eli McWhorter summed it up by saying, "Because we care."

Work on the concrete canoe began in October 2011 with concrete mix designs and testing through January 2012.   A total of 12 mix designs were tested before the final mix used in the canoe was obtained.  Students also had to design and build a mold for casting the canoe along with a curing chamber which enclosed the canoe for 19 days before it was stained.

Marshall students competed in nine of the 11 categories offered.

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Photo: Marshall University civil engineering students gather for a photo with a concrete canoe they  designed and constructed. In a series of unique engineering challenges during  the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Virginias  Conference held this year at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., the students took home several honors, including first place in the concrete canoe final product and oral presentation categories. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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Monday April 23, 2012
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Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Wednesday, April 25, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Camilla Brammer.

Three people will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Dr. Shawn Schulenberg, Political Science, junior recipient among all faculty

  • John Van Kirk, English, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business

  • Dr. Frank Gilliam, Biology, senior recipient in the fields of Science and Technology

Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Advisor of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisors. They are:

  • Dr. Ron Childress, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, from the South Charleston campus

  • Dr. Kim DeTardo-Bora, associate professor, Criminal Justice/Criminology, from the Huntington campus

Winners of the Distinguished Service Awards, which honor three people, will be announced Wednesday at the General Faculty Meeting.

Marshall also is recognizing 21 retiring faculty who have a combined 521 years of service. They are:

  • Dr. Roger L. Adkins, professor, Finance/Economics, 31 years of service

  • Dr. Ramchandra G. Akkihal, professor, Finance/Economics, 42 years of service

  • Dr. Richard J. Bady, professor, Physics/Physical Science, 26 years of service

  • Dr. Franklin L. Binder, professor, Biological Sciences, 40 years of service

  • Dr. Bob S. Brown, professor, Management/Marketing/MIS, 30 years of service

  • Dr. Dan K. Evans, professor, Biological Sciences, 37 years of service

  • Dorothy Fike, associate professor, Clinical Lab Sciences, 17 years of service

  • Dr. Theodore P. Haddox Jr., associate professor, Obstetrics/Gynecology, 22 years of service

  • Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean, College of Business, 35 years of service

  • Dr. Michael L. Little, professor, Biological Sciences, 37 years of service

  • Dr. William P. Marley, professor, School of Kinesiology, 18 years of service

  • Dr. David L. Porter, professor, Pathology, 7 years of service

  • Dr. Katharine M. Rodier (deceased), professor, English, 16 years of service

  • Dr. Frances Simone, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, 26 years of service

  • Dr. Jean Edward Smith, professor, John Deaver Dinko Academy, 12 years of service

  • Dr. Michael E. Sullivan, professor, Special Education, 25 years of service

  • Dr. William E. Triest, professor, Pathology, 11 years of service

  • Robert W. Williams, Librarian III, Health Science Library, 16 years of service

  • Dr. Nancy M. Wilson, professor, Elementary/Secondary Education, 21 years of service

  • Dr. Robert A. Wilson, professor, Psychology, 34 years of service

  • Dr. Edward H. Woods, professor, Communication Studies, 18 years of service

Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as announced last week, are:

  • Dr. Daniel Holbrook, associate professor, History, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

  • Steven Barnett, professor, Music, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

  • Dr. Tina J. Cartwright, assistant professor, Education; Dr. Whitney Douglas, assistant professor, English;

  • Dr. Michael Householder, assistant professor, English, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award.

A reception to honor the award-winning faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center after the meeting.


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June Harless Center to induct three into Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, Lloyd G. Jackson II and Gen. Robert H. "Doc" Foglesong will be inducted into the Harless Hall of Fame Tuesday, May 1, at Marshall University.

The induction ceremony will take place during the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development's 10th annual Harless Hall of Fame dinner. It starts at 6 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

The ceremony is a time to show appreciation and give recognition to those people who have been identified as outstanding contributors to West Virginia's educational system with special focus on the rural areas of the state. 

Inductees into the Hall of Fame typically include one teacher, one administrator and one business/educational partner or organization that has provided exemplary leadership to ensure the success of the education of all students in West Virginia.

Rockefeller is chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, and chairman of the Health Care Subcommittee on Finance; Jackson is a member of the West Virginia Board of Education and former chairman of the Senate Education Committee; and Foglesong heads a scholarship program in West Virginia called the Appalachian Leadership and Educational Foundation and established the Appalachian Leadership Honors Program.

A showcase of the Harless Center's work and the presentation of the Hallie Harless Distinguished Teacher Award will also be part of the night's events. This year's awardee is Dan Gottron, a social studies teacher at River View High School in  McDowell County.

In addition, Dr. James Denova, vice president of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, will be recognized for his exemplary vision and unwavering support of West Virginia educational initiatives.

The mission of the June Harless Center, part of the College of Education, is to provide leadership in educational initiatives for West Virginia educators and students, providing educators and families of rural West Virginia with a support system that addresses educational problems, sustains school improvement and provides positive growth in all educational factors.  The June Harless Center has ongoing projects with many counties in the state providing support and professional development. 

For more information, contact Dr. Stan Maynard, executive director of the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, by phone at 304-696-6221, or by e-mail at maynard@marshall.edu.


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First Service Learning Symposium set for April 26 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Service Learning program will conduct the inaugural Service Learning Symposium from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, April 26, in the Drinko Library Atrium (room 301) on the Huntington campus.

Representatives of at least 15 community agencies will be attending, including those from United Way, Big Brother/Big Sisters and the Huntington Area Food Bank, along with faculty who are currently teaching courses with service learning designations and their students.

Faculty participants will highlight service learning experiences and projects, while community organization participants will provide faculty with the needs of their individual organizations.

Pam Holland, director of Marshall's program, said the symposium highlights the collaboration that is present among community agencies, faculty and students.

"This is a showcase of how MU assists the community while simultaneously assisting students in the development of their knowledge and skills in their chosen discipline," Holland said.

For more information, contact Holland by phone at 304-696-2985.


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Sunday April 22, 2012
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Open forum at Marshall to focus on Trayvon Martin situation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Theta Omega chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Inc., sorority at Marshall University will host an open forum to further discuss the Trayvon Martin situation Monday, April 23.

Rachel Coaxum with Theta Omega said the event, which starts at 9:13 p.m. and takes place in Corbly Hall room 268 on the Huntington campus, is part of Delta Week for the sorority. The theme for Delta Week is "Making Changes with Distinction," and the theme for the forum is "Stand Your Ground for Change."

Coaxum also said the forum is a follow-up to a recent rally on Marshall's Memorial Student Center plaza co-sponsored by Delta Sigma Theta and Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.

Martin was the 17-year-old who was shot and killed in Orlando, Fla., in late February, by a man who was performing volunteer neighborhood watch duties.


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Friday April 20, 2012
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Marshall students to receive Kente cloths at ceremony next Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement will take place at 5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 26, at Marshall University.

The event, presented by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse on Marshall's Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will begin with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans, faculty and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

The keynote speaker will be Mary E. Clark, who holds dual roles at Marshall, both as the coordinator of the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) in the Office of Multicultural Affairs and as the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development's Minority Faculty Fellow.

"We take pride once again to bring to our campus and community the richness of this historically significant celebration," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs. "The Kente ceremonial tradition, with its roots centuries ago in West Africa, recognizes an individual for his/her extraordinary accomplishments and brings to us the spirit of this event."

The ceremony takes place each spring for African and African American students who graduated from Marshall University during the winter and those slated for graduation in May or during the coming summer school term.

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

Cooley said the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events in which Marshall's African and African American students can participate.

The following woven cloths will be awarded during the Donning of Kente celebration: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow for all participants and those in attendance.


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Friday April 20, 2012
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Trio of pharmacy educators joins faculty at Marshall University School of Pharmacy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three new faculty members have been hired at the School of Pharmacy at Marshall University, Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the school, announced today.

"We are thrilled to welcome our new educators to Marshall," Yingling said. "We continue to build an excellent pharmacy program at Marshall University and the addition of these new faculty members is certainly an asset."

Chris Gillette, Ph.D., who received his doctoral degree from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, will serve as an assistant professor of pharmacy administration. He completed his bachelor's and master's degrees at High Point University in North Carolina.

Gillette received a $30,000 grant for his dissertation topic, "The effect of risk and side effect communication on asthma medication adherence," and will teach provider-patient communication.

In addition, two clinical professors have joined the faculty. They will serve as clinical pharmacists in internal medicine and cardiology at St. Mary's Medical Center and will also teach students in their areas of expertise and on clinical rotations.

James "Aaron" Sizemore, who completed his doctor of pharmacy degree at the University of Kentucky in 2011, is finishing a pharmacy residency at Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center in Danville, Ky.

Justin Williams, who completed his doctor of pharmacy degree at West Virginia University in 2011, is finishing a pharmacy residency at St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, N.Y.

The Marshall University School of Pharmacy will welcome its inaugural class in August 2012.

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Photos: Extensive renovations continue in the Robert W. Coon Medical Education Building, where the Marshall University School of Pharmacy is located. The School will welcome its inaugural class in August 2012. The photos are of a future conference room, located just inside the main entrance, and a hallway on the first floor. Marshall University photos by Rick Haye.


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Friday April 20, 2012
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Marshall supporters can vote on the university's official tartan design

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University is encouraging the MU community to be involved in choosing the next symbol for the university - its official tartan design.

Marshall administrators have been working with Collegiate Tartan from Greensboro, N.C., as it  produces an official tartan design for the university. After evaluating many possible designs from the company, Marshall has narrowed the choices to four.

These four designs are now available on the Marshall website for a public vote that will determine the favorite. To view the designs and vote, visit www.marshall.edu/tartanvoting. Voting runs through Friday, May 4, on the website.

The tartan design will be used on a variety of licensed merchandise. Collegiate Tartan produces many different items from Christmas ornaments to scarves. The merchandise will be available at a variety of local retailers.

For more information, persons may contact Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, by phone at 304-696-3490, or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Thursday April 19, 2012
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Marshall University fans can buy special badges for Greenbrier Classic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans and supporters who purchase special weekly admission badges to this summer's Greenbrier Classic can benefit the Marshall University Foundation under the Greenbrier Classic's Badges for Charity program.

The Greenbrier Classic is an official PGA Tour event which takes place July 2-8 at the Old White Course in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. Last year, the Classic was designated the "Best in Class Tournament on the PGA TOUR" by the PGA TOUR itself.

The Marshall University Foundation will receive 30 percent of the proceeds of all badges purchased on its behalf. The badge costs are: $159 for the Weekly Grounds Badge (increasing to $189 May 1), $285 for the Benefactor Badge, $495 for the Alumni Badge and $5,000 for the Clubhouse Badge.

The Weekly Grounds Badge provides tournament admittance for the entire week, parking and tickets to the 2012 Greenbrier Classic Concert Series. This year's concerts at the West Virginia State Fair fairgrounds feature Toby Keith and Lionel Ritchie at 9 p.m. July 4, Rod Stewart and Fray at 7:30 p.m. July 6, and Bon Jovi at 8 p.m. July 7.

The Benefactor Badge provides tournament admittance for the entire week, parking, access to special hospitality and tickets to the concerts.

The Alumni Badge provides admittance for the entire week, parking, access to special hospitality and tickets to the concerts. Marshall University coaches and alumni athletes will make special appearances during the week.

The Clubhouse Badge provides admittance for the entire week, parking, access to The Greenbrier Clubhouse and Slammin' Sammy's with unlimited food and beverage, in addition to all Benefactor and Alumni hospitality venues, and tickets to the concerts.

To purchase badges, visit www.greenbrierclassic.com and click on the link for "Badges for Charity" under the Tickets tab, or the MU Alumni Association site at www.Herdalum.com, or the Greenbrier Classic Official Tournament Shop at the resort.


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Dr. Daniel Holbrook selected as Outstanding Faculty Award winner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Daniel Holbrook, an associate professor of history at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2011-2012.

Holbrook will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Marshall's Center for Teaching and Learning announced the Hedrick Award and two others honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Steven Barnett, professor, Music, and director of bands

  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Tina J. Cartwright, assistant professor, Education; Dr. Whitney Douglas, assistant professor, English; Dr. Michael Householder, assistant professor, English

Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Daniel Holbrook came to Marshall in 1997 as director of the Regents Bachelor of Arts Degree Program. He has been teaching in Marshall's history department since 2003.

"Dan is a fantastic colleague who gives enormously of himself to students, to colleagues, and to Marshall University," said Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, an associate professor of history at MU.

Holbrook received his Ph.D. in history in 1999 from Carnegie Mellon University. He specializes in the History of Technology, and teaches in that field as well as in Public, Local, U.S. and World History.

Holbrook is a strong believer in collaborative learning.

"Faculty and students must both do their very best to accomplish any learning goals," he said. "Not every student is alike. Not every class is alike. Likewise, not every course is alike; large introductory courses and small graduate seminars by their very nature require different approaches, techniques and attitudes.

"Thus, my philosophy of teaching: I do what works, to the best of my ability, depending on the course, its content and format, and the individuals - separately and collectively - that make up the class. This is the essence of collaborative learning; we are in it together." 

Dr. David Mills, a professor of history at Marshall, said Holbrook is "an organized, demanding and dynamic lecturer."

"His students come early, stay engaged throughout class and are well prepared," Mills said. "His classes employ the latest technologies (movie clips, PowerPoints, Internet resources of various types), but his classroom enthusiasm and energy are what makes for a dynamic learning environment. Put simply, Dan is an excellent instructor offering a very wide spectrum of courses at our institution."

Holbrook said he has high expectations for his students.

"I cannot think of more than two students out of the couple thousand I have taught at Marshall who are not capable of high-quality college work, if they are willing to make the effort," Holbrook said. "Being open, honest, forthright, and clear about expectations, while understanding that students have lives sometimes filled with multiple challenges - treating them like human beings, not customers - is my main thrust."
 

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Steven Barnett came to Marshall in 2003 from the University of Mississippi, where he was assistant professor of music and assistant director of bands. At Marshall, he is director of bands and coordinator of music education.

Dr. David Castleberry, associate dean in Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said Barnett is a valued member of the department of music.

"Through his teaching, ongoing creative activity, and service in so many ways, he makes a positive difference in the life of our university, community and profession," Castleberry said.

Barnett has been teaching music for 33 years, dating back to his days as assistant band director at Pearl High School in Pearl, Miss.

"I love it and I am dedicated to the improvement in the quality of music education in the schools for future generations," he said.

Barnett has received numerous awards and honors during his career. Among those are: College Band Directors National Association - West Virginia state representative, since 2009; Marshall College of Fine Arts Snowshoe Institute award winner, spring 2011; recipient of MU College of Fine Arts Community Service Award, 2006; and president of Conference USA Band Directors Association,  2008-2009.

"Being a teacher here at Marshall, as well as being director of bands and coordinator of music education, I have the opportunity to teach many students and age groups," Barnett said. "It is most gratifying when I can meet a student in middle school or high school, recruit them to come to Marshall, teach them how to become a teacher while at Marshall and witness their success as a teacher after they graduate.

"I am a very lucky person and feel very blessed to have had the opportunity to touch so many lives over the years."
 

Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Tina J. Cartwright has been an assistant professor in Marshall's College of Education since August 2007. During that time, she has impressed her colleagues with her work ethic and her desire to always improve.

"Dr. Cartwright has always strived to improve her teaching, research and service since the first day she arrived," said Dr. George Watson, chair of the School of Education. "She goes beyond the normal duties of faculty and seeks out opportunities to bring new concepts, ideas, grants and other things to our college to help students become better teachers."

Cartwright said her teaching philosophy centers on the idea of "Learn by doing," particularly pertaining to teaching. She approaches the classroom with an enthusiasm that she feels is infectious.

"Depending upon the class that I am teaching, I try to provide support for those students who are hesitant about the content and those students who love their content but may rely too heavily upon one primary teaching method," she said. "These two very different groups of students need support in very different ways."

Katie McDilda, an adjunct instructor at Marshall, nominated Cartwright for the Pickens-Queen award.

"Initiated by Tina, MU students partner with Cabell County teachers who participate in science summer academies and continue this working relationship during their student teaching assignment," McDilda said. "Tina also uses materials that teach integration of math and literacy/reading/language arts. Instead of a traditional text, Tina also supplements with journals and classroom resources published by National Science Teachers' Association. Students have said that they appreciate the variety of resources and the confidence to use them when they start to teach."

Dr. Whitney Douglas has been an assistant professor of English at Marshall since 2008. She not only teaches a lot of writing courses, but she also asks students to do a substantial amount of writing in non-writing courses "to discover and explore ideas as well as to present ideas.

"First and foremost, I want students to become invested in and take ownership over their writing," Douglas said.

She also teaches the spirit of inquiry. "I want students to see that asking questions is just as important - if not more so - than finding answers."

Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the English department, said Douglas has done "extraordinary work" with the graduate students who enroll in Douglas's ENG 640 class in preparation for their own teaching.

"Her work in the training of these young teachers is an institutional contribution beyond measure," Hill said.

In a letter of support, Dr. Kateryna Schray, an English professor at Marshall, described Douglas as someone who allows students to take risks. She recalled "a great burst of energy" among Douglas' students when they were taking part in one particular exercise during class. "It was time for class to end but no one moved," Schray said.

The majority of Douglas' students believe they have learned from her classes suggesting, she said, that the issues of enthusiasm, intellectual challenge and inquiry "are working together productively to create a classroom environment conducive to learning."

Dr. Michael Householder came to Marshall in fall 2010 after seven years at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. He is an assistant professor of English.

Householder said he wants his students to feel confident that their ideas have value in the world. "All of my classes, regardless of level or topic, are an exercise in understanding intellectual activity as a kind of ongoing conversation," he said.

He said self-belief, which is earned through the hard work of reading, thinking, writing and debating about sophisticated ideas, is important for the students. "Even if a student of mine never takes another English class, I want her or him to leave my classroom knowing that the skills acquired there are applicable everywhere they go."

In teaching, Householder uses peer conferencing, which he calls his most effective technique, to achieve the learning outcomes of his courses. "It combines the best of peer review and instructor conferences and somehow in the process not only doubles the effectiveness, but increases it exponentially," he said.

Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the English department, described Householder as "an inspiring professor" who "has worked magic in the classroom."

Dr. Susan Gilpin, associate dean in the Honors College, has worked closely with Householder in planning and teaching HON 290, the first-semester Yeager seminar he currently teaches with  Dr. Jamie Warner and herself.

"In spite of his constant challenge to their performance and as high as he sets the bar, he is extraordinarily compassionate and the first among us to recognize when a student needs a little less pressure and a little more encouragement," Gilpin said.

In the classroom, Gilpin said, Householder is "a master teacher."

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Photo: Dr. Dan Holbrook, the Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2011-2012, teaches class at Marshall University. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

 
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President Kopp says Marshall one of the region's best educational values

Board approves 'fiscally responsible yet affordable' tuition rates for 2012-13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - At today's meeting of the institution's Board of Governors, Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp said the university continues to provide one of the region's best higher education values, especially with respect to the diverse opportunities it offers students and its focus on meeting the needs of today's students and employers.

"Marshall University provides exceptional value, something we take great pride in because it is so important for families who have to make tough financial decisions each day," Kopp said. "Earning a college degree is the single-greatest investment a person can make in his or her future. Unfortunately, today our students and their families are bearing an increasingly heavier burden of the real cost of a college education."

Kopp highlighted a study released April 3 by the Demos public interest group that suggests that reduced state investment in higher education the past two decades has shifted the costs to students. As a result, students have to pay a lot more for a college degree necessary for getting a good job and entering the middle class, according to the report.

Kopp's comments came before the Board of Governors voted to approve a tuition and fee increase of $141 per semester for all full-time undergraduate resident students for fiscal year 2012-13.

Per-semester tuition and fee increases of $285 for metro students and $225 for non-resident students also were approved. Per-semester tuition and fees for students in the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were increased $302 for resident students and $702 for non-resident students.

The board, meeting in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, approved an average room and board increase of $145, bringing the total increase in tuition, room and board to $286 per semester for West Virginia students living on campus.

"Each year, our Board of Governors faces the challenge of keeping tuition affordable, while also balancing the budget with either flat or reduced state and federal funding on the horizon," said Kopp. "We want to continue to keep open the door to higher education, particularly for West Virginians, and that is certainly a factor our board members considered as they look at the state's budgetary challenges forecasted for 2014 and beyond."  

Board of Governors Chairman Verna K. Gibson added, "This board is committed to a strategic and principled approach to fiscal management, and we are pleased that through prudent planning and responsible spending, we have been able to weather the national economic downturn relatively unscathed so far.

"To avoid dramatic increases in the near future due to continuing reductions in public funding, however, we felt this modest increase in tuition was necessary. Looking down the road, we will continue to aggressively explore all avenues to continue to manage costs and keep a college education within reach for the students we serve. Sustained enrollment growth and utility conservation initiatives are just two of the ways we are looking at meeting the significant budgetary challenges we will face in the coming years."

"Resident" refers to West Virginia students; "metro" refers to students who reside in Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence, Meigs, Pike or Scioto counties in Ohio, or in Boyd, Carter, Elliott, Floyd, Greenup, Johnson, Lawrence, Martin or Pike counties in Kentucky; and "other non-resident" refers to all other non-West Virginia students.


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Jackson competition winner to perform solo recital April 22

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Andrew O'Neal of Huntington, winner of this year's Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition, will present a solo recital at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

O'Neal is a first-year graduate student in trombone performance and received his bachelor's degree in music education from Marshall last year. According to Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the Department of Music, the Jackson competition is the department's most prestigious award.

"Competitors need to prepare 15 minutes of music, eight of which is performed in the first round of the competition," Pappas said. "Once this round is completed, the three judges choose their top-rated performers to play the remainder of their concert during the second and final round. After this round, the judges choose a winner. From a musical standpoint, the preparation for the competition and the urgency of performing well in each round is paramount to success in the competition."

O'Neal said his family members all play instruments as well. He started with the trombone in 6th grade with the band because of his sisters' positive experiences, he added, but his father was a huge influence on his musical career.

"The biggest factor was hearing my dad play his horn," O'Neal said. "He goes through a warm-up practice session every day; rarely does a day go by he doesn't play. Every member of my family has memorized his warm-up routine. Looking back, as a child, I think this is why I went into music--first, because every boy who has a good father wants to grow up to be like him, and second, everyone needs a passion. I think I saw from a very young age that he was passionate about music, and I thought maybe that's what I could do, too."

O'Neal, whose parents are both Marshall graduates, said being in a family of musicians has helped him prosper in many ways.

"That fact that everyone else in my family does some type of music has only reinforced what I do," O'Neal said.

"When I made the decision my senior year of high school to major in music education in college, it would have been very easy for my parents to have steered me toward a more concrete and profitable career path, but they, and the rest of my family, have done nothing but support me the entire way."

Dr. Michael Stroeher, professor in the Department of Music, said O'Neal has studied trombone with him since he was in high school.

"He is an outstanding musician as a solo performer and as an ensemble member," Stroeher said. "Even before he became a graduate assistant he was a leader and a positive role model for the younger trombonists, and he is an excellent teacher. I think one of the factors that put him over the top in this competition was the expressiveness in his playing, his communication with the audience--not to mention accuracy, good sound, rhythmic precision and all those other technical things."

For O'Neal, the instruction he received from Stroeher is invaluable.

"I'm pretty excited about the recital," O'Neal said. "For some people, recitals are stressful and nerve-racking, but I love playing the trombone and I love being able to play for an audience, especially one of family and friends -- they judge less!"

"The music department has well prepared me for something like this," he said. "Over my years here, I've been trained in the basic fundamentals of music as well as taught how to perform. Dr. Stroeher has done wonders bringing me up from the level of trombonist I used to be to the level that can competently put on a recital."

Pappas said this competition is a showcase of all the talent they have in the Department of Music.

"We challenge our students to become the best musicians they can be," Pappas said. "The preliminary and final rounds of this competition are a testament to that preparation and the high level of music-making that is found throughout our applied studios and our department. In any given year, there are a number of students who could win the competition."


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Dr. Wael Zatar named dean of CITE at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Wael Zatar, who served as interim dean of Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) the past 8 months, has been named permanent dean of the college, effective May 1.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, said a national search was conducted and Zatar emerged as the best person for the position from a pool of highly qualified candidates.

"Dr. Zatar met all the characteristics we were looking for," Ormiston said. "We are confident he will lead the college to new levels of achievement and success. I look forward to working with Dr. Zatar as he facilitates the development and growth of the college."

Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science, chaired the search committee. He said the committee received 32 applications for the position, including several that were very strong.

"In fact, we were so impressed with the applications that we received, we interviewed 11 people by telephone before deciding who would be invited for campus interviews," Somerville said. "In the end, our task was to forward the names of the top candidates to President Stephen Kopp and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Ormiston.

"Dr. Zatar's name was on the final short list because of his truly impressive research record, his extensive experience with industry, his impeccable reputation in his discipline, and the professionalism that he displayed during the search process. Throughout the process we saw evidence that he would work hard on behalf of Marshall University, and be a strong and effective advocate for the College of Information Technology & Engineering. I am very pleased with the decision."

Zatar has been at Marshall since 2006. He previously served at the University of Kentucky and West Virginia Tech.

"It's a great honor and a privilege to be chosen dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering," Zatar said. "As interim dean I learned a lot and now I am ready to hit the ground running."

Zatar said he improved his knowledge about the administrative side of the university and how to move promising initiatives forward. He said he has received strong support from Kopp and Ormiston.

"I share my vision with their vision," he said of university administrators. "CITE houses one of the fastest growing programs in the university and I will make sure to put every possible effort to continue CITE's momentum. I want to advance the college in a way that will match the university mission. I feel well positioned to pursue the CITE mission for educating our students and for graduating professionals who could participate in the economic development of our state and the region."

Zatar received both his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering from Cairo University in Egypt, and his Ph.D., also in civil engineering, from Saitama Universityin Japan. He has conducted state-of-the-art research for 23 years and has established strong partnerships and liaisons with funding agencies, industry and research institutions.

Zatar's research interests include bridge management, construction materials, highway testing standards, advanced experimental destructive and non-destructive testing techniques, reinforced and prestressed concrete, ultra high performance concrete, fiber reinforced polymer composite bridges, green and sustainable highway structures, health monitoring of transportation infrastructure systems, structural repair and retrofit, and specialized rehabilitation systems.

He has 155 technical publications and has written a number of book chapters addressing concrete structures.

At Marshall, he taught Engineering Materials, Structural Analysis, Structural Steel Design and Reinforced Concrete Design. He received numerous Awards from national and international civil engineering organizations. In 2009, Zatar received the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute Distinguished Young Educator Achievement Award.

He held memberships in 24 professional organizations, including the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Transportation Research Board, American Concrete Institute, and Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute. He Held 27 offices in professional organizations, 10 appointments in 10 national organizations and 10 appointments in regional organizations. He is a member of 31 national committees.


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The DesignGroup of Columbus next featured speaker in Marshall University Lunch and Learn Sustainability Lecture Series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Experts on sustainability from DesignGroup of Columbus will deliver the next presentation in Marshall University's Lunch and Learn Sustainability Lecture Series Thursday, April 19, beginning promptly at noon.

The hour-long lecture will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, 519 John Marshall Dr.

The presentation is titled: "Sustainability: The Triple Bottom Line" and will address the questions of what is meant by sustainability, and how does it benefit society? Focusing on architectural design and building construction, topics such as energy efficiency, indoor environmental quality, as well as use of resources will be discussed.

DesignGroup is a professional design firm with offices in Columbus, Ohio, and Covington, Ky., with sustainable design projects scattered throughout the United States. DesignGroup professionals provide services in architecture, interior design, planning and programming, graphics, sustainable design, Building Information Modeling and LEED Program Management.

Aetna Building Maintenance and Marshall University have teamed up to launch a monthly lecture series to address sustainability topics to benefit organizations in the region. Topics will include energy management and conservation, green cleaning, lighting retrofits, recycling, alternative energy, water harvesting, storm water management, and LEED certification. All lectures in the series are free and open to local and tri-state businesses and organizations, but pre-registration is required. To register, go to www.marshall.edu/sustainability.

Typically, more than 40 area businesses are represented at the luncheon.


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MU professor Burnis Morris to speak at Woodson fundraising banquet

 HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Prof. Burnis Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor in the MU School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will be the keynote speaker at the 20th annual Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc., fundraising banquet Saturday, April 21.

The banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Proceeds will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

Morris, the Carter G. Woodson Professor at Marshall since 2003, recently finished a year as the John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow at Marshall. During that time, he studied Woodson's career and relationship with the African American press from 1915 to 1950 - a period that began with Woodson's founding of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History and ended with his death.

Morris received a West Virginia Humanities Council fellowship in 2011 for his study of Woodson. He has served as head of the Journalism Division at Marshall since 2006. He is a member of the Marshall University Faculty Senate and its Executive Committee, chair of the Journalism and Mass Communications Diversity Committee and former chair of the Faculty Senate's Student Conduct and Welfare Committee.

Morris, a native of Laurel, Miss., came to Marshall from the University of Mississippi. He was the first Samuel S. Talbert Lecturer, a special honor in memory of the second chair of the Department of Journalism who died while Morris was a student in his class in the 1970s.

Morris has led a national effort to improve news coverage of tax-exempt institutions. He is the author of "Nonprofit News Coverage: A Guide for Journalists."

Music for the banquet will be provided by and Michael Sidoti and local talent. Tickets for the event are available for a donation of $30. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at 740-894-5772; Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at 304-525-5651; or Karen Nance, secretary, at 304-736-1655.

The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass  High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.


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Conference room in Byrd Biotechnology Science Center named for late biochemistry professor

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A conference room located in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center at Marshall University has been named in honor of the late Frederick J. Lotspeich, Ph.D., who was the founding chair of the School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry. Lotspeich served as the chair from 1977 until 1991.

For 35 years, Lotspeich served medical education in West Virginia, beginning as an assistant professor of biochemistry at the West Virginia University Medical Center in 1956 and then joining the Marshall faculty in 1977.

Following his death in 1994, the School of Medicine dedicated a reading room at the Robert W. Coon Medical Education Building at the Huntington VA Medical Center in Lotspeich's honor.

Additionally, in memory of Lotspeich, his wife Kay created the Dr. Frederick J. Lotspeich Scholarship in Biomedical Sciences.

This year the scholarship was awarded to Wood County native M. Allison Wolf, a doctoral student working with Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, an associate professor in the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Lotspeich was a native of Keyser. He graduated with his bachelor's and master's degrees from West Virginia University and completed a doctorate at Purdue University.

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Photo: Kay Lotspeich, left, and Dr. Richard Niles, chair of biochemistry and microbiology at Marshall, pose beside a portrait of the late Frederick J. Lotspeich during a ceremony today in the conference room in the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center named in Frederick J. Lotspeich's honor. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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British research expert to visit Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The deputy director of the United Kingdom's National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) will speak at Marshall University Wednesday and Thursday, April 18 and 19, about the significance of innovative research methods, community studies and collaborative research.

Dr. Graham Crow, from the University of Southampton, will give presentations and facilitate workshops at both the Huntington and South Charleston campuses on topics dealing with methodological innovation and its significance, shifts in the scholarly meanings of community, developing research methods across disciplinary boundaries and democratizing social research. Crow is currently working on projects on methodological innovation and on "missing data" in social science research.

Since 2006, Crow has been deputy director of the center, which forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council's strategy to improve the standards of research methods across the country's social science community. The Centre was established in April 2004 with funding from the Council to provide more strategic integration and coordination of its investment in research methods.

Crow's visit to Marshall University is sponsored by the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, College of Liberal Arts, Graduate Humanities Program, and Department of Sociology and Anthropology. However, it was a Marshall professor's invited visit to the U.K. last year, sponsored by the NCRM, that led to Crow's visit here.

"My work over there last year led to collaboration on several projects that will hopefully continue to foster a strong connection between Marshall University, the University of Southampton, and the NCRM," said Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of Marshall's Graduate Humanities Program, and author of numerous books and articles on collaborative research, including the award-wining book, The Other Side of Middletown: Exploring Muncie's African American Community.

"What's happening in the U.K. is fascinating. Put simply, several universities are working to create more sustained collaborative research relationships between students, faculty and local communities. As funding for teaching and research is increasingly attached to demonstrating societal value and relevance, community-based and collaborative social research is rising in significance."

Lassiter said that the change in how financial support is dispersed in the U.K. will also change how academic disciplines are taught in universities and how students learn to do research, including those models of research involving students in community-based research.

"Dr. Crow can give us a unique look at the impact across all disciplines, the challenges of demonstrating value and relevance and the importance of innovation in research," Lassiter said.

Crow, a professor of sociology, studied philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford, and was awarded a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Essex for research into the rural class structure of Britain. He has worked at Southampton since 1983 researching and teaching in various areas including sociological theory, comparative sociology, the sociology of family and community, research methods, and the sociology of disability.

His publications are concerned with issues in all of these areas, and his latest book, Stepfamilies, is co-authored with Graham Allan and Sheila Hawker. He has served as co-editor of both Sociological Research On-line and the journal Sociology. Crow also was lead organizer of the NCRM's Research Methods Festivals in 2008 and 2010.

For more information on Crow's scheduled talks, go to: http://www.marshall.edu/wpmu/graduatehumanities/innovativemethods/


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Marshall student group organizes Earth Day activities for Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Parks and Recreations Organization for Students (PROS) will present a celebration of Earth Day 2012 on the Huntington Campus from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 18.

The event marks the 42nd anniversary of Earth Day, which brings people around the world together to celebrate the planet. Helping the PROS group with the event are the MU Sustainability Department, Student Environmental Action Coalition and Marshall Student Environmental Action Coalition.

"The university is pleased to partner with students to make this day an eye-opener for our entire Marshall University community," said Margie Phillips, sustainability manager for Marshall.

Events will be located inside the Memorial Student Center, on the student center plaza and on Buskirk Field.

There will be educational displays and interactive exhibits for the entire community, according to Angela Kargul, a senior Natural Resource and Recreational Management major from Redhouse, W.Va. Kargul is also the president of PROS.

"We need to take a more active role in the growing Green Movement and be the leaders of future generations," Kargul said. "Good stewardship of the earth is what we want to encourage in others with this event and in all that we do."

She said the group has worked in conjunction with other student groups and Marshall officials this semester to plan a lot of fun and interesting activities for Earth Day.

"We all can do something to help, even if it seems too small to make a difference," Kargul said. "A thousand baby steps toward change equals a huge step forward for the environment."

Displays and exhibits cover a variety of topics including community gardens, healthy lifestyle strategies, recycling, tree planting, camping and outdoor ethics, backyard habitats, raised gardenbeds, bicycling programs, energy-saving strategies, knot-tying demos, live animal displays and much more.

Members of PROS are committed to community service, Kargul said. Aside from the Earth Day event, they sponsor recycling drives to raise money for activities like outdoor adventures including whitewater rafting, camping, climbing and other activities - all activities that are a part of their future career focus.

For more information, contact the MU Sustainability Department at 304-696-2992.


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Maier Award winners announced in ceremony at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Winners of the Maier Awards, sponsored annually by the Maier Foundation Inc., and hosted by Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, were announced today at a ceremony in the Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions were recognized during an awards ceremony. Brad Rowe, president of the Maier Foundation, was on hand to help present the awards.

The Maier Latin Cup Awards were established in 1979 by William J. Maier Jr., father of former Maier Foundation President Ed Maier, to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.

A high school graduate at the age of 16, Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the state. He credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

The Maier Latin Cup Awards celebrate publicly the best high school Latin students in West Virginia. They are administered by Marshall's Department of Classics.

Also, Marshall's Department of Classics sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation. This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1972 by William J. Maier Jr., in honor of his father. These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall.

Here are the winners of this year's Latin and writing awards.

Maier Latin Sight-Translation Contest

Latin I

First place: Colin Kelly, Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Second place: Dakota Moss, Cabell Midland. Teacher: Gail Lewis

Latin II

First place: Andrew Perry, Cabell Midland. Teacher: Gail Lewis

Second place: Alec Reed, Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Latin III

First place: Taylor Cunningham, Cabell Midland. Teacher: Gail Lewis

Latin IV

First place: Mac McClure, Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Villa-Sella

Maier Latin Cup Awards Competition

First place: Titus Willis, Covenant High School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Second place: Sarah Nix, Covenant High School. Teacher: Lois Merritt

Third place: Molly Beese, Charleston Catholic High School. Teacher: Ginny Cook

Maier Latin Scholarship Recipient

Kimberly E. Hughes, the Latin major with the most outstanding academic record of the 2011-2012 academic year

William J. Maier Writing Awards
First-Year Non-Research

First place: Tyler Bonnett, Physics, Crab Orchard, Ohio. Power, Persuasion, and a Chance for Agency. Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Householder

Second place: Hannah Smith, English, Parkersburg, W.Va. Are You Feeling Superior? Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Hill

Third place: Katie Kramer, Economics, Naples, Fla. I've got the power: How Individuals Can Exercise Power and Persuasion as Agents. Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Householder

First-Year Research

First place: Benjamin Coleman, Chemistry, Milton, W.Va. Sex, Love, and Sparkly Vampires. Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Welch

Second place: Matthew Mullins, Psychology, Hurricane, W.Va. The Cost of a Life: The Struggle Up Capitol Hill for Bone Marrow Donation. Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Carpenter

Third place: Megan DiDomenico, Undecided, Follansbee, W.Va. #technology: What's on Your Mind? Faculty mentor: Prof. J.E. Smith

Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose

First place: Kristin McKinney, Secondary Education and English, Culloden, W.Va. Political Intrigues of 'Sonnet 25.' Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Moore.

Second place: Derek Frasure, English Literature and Religious Studies, Argillite, Ky. Signifying Nothing: The Masquerade of Masculinity in Macbeth. Faculty mentor: Prof. E. Taft

Third place: James Baker, English: Literature, Moundsville, W.Va. Mary White Rowlandson: An Anomalous and Autonomous Puritan Woman. Faculty mentor: Prof. M. Householder

Graduate Non-Fiction Prose

First place: Mitchell Lilly, English, Beckley, W.Va. The Re(a)d Death of Poe: Authorial Dissolution in Edgar Allan Poe's The Mask of the Red Death. Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Young

Second place: Rajia Hassib, English, Charleston, W.Va. 'Savagery and Fine Words:' Performing Gender in J.M. Synge's The Playboy of the Western World. Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Young

Third place: Kelly Broce, Teaching/English, Huntington. 'Righting' the Body: Feminism and Sexual Allegory in Wei Hui's Shanghai Baby. Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Van Kirk

Poetry

First place: Renee Gibbs, English, Logan, W.Va. Quiet in a Crowd. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Stringer

Second place: Sarah Abbott, English/International Affairs/Political Science, Charleston, W.Va. Beccamorti. Faculty mentor: Prof. R. Peckham

Third place: Glenna Cavender, Visual Art, Charleston, W.Va. Peg Puzzle. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Stringer

Creative Non-Fiction

First place: Delaney McLemore, English, Philomath, Ore. The Strangest of Places. Faculty mentor: Prof. R. Peckham

Second place: Samir Abdel-Aziz, English, Huntington. Lessons My Father Taught Me. Faculty mentor: Prof. R. Peckham

Third place: Whitney Naylor-Smith, English, Hurricane, W.Va. Rush. Faculty mentor: Prof. R. Peckham

Fiction

First place: Rajia Hassib, English, Charleston, W.Va. Quilting. Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Van Kirk

Second place: Chris Brewer, English, Chapmanville, W.Va. Small Things Happen. Faculty mentor: Prof. J. Van Kirk

Third place: Brenda Skeens, RBA, Chesapeake, Ohio. Green Bird. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Stringer

Multimedia

First place: Erika Tharp, Secondary Education/English, Washington, W.Va. Flashcards. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Carey

Second place: Kaley Fulks, Secondary Education/English, Jackson, Ohio. How to Survive Sixth Grade. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Carey

Third place: Ian Ferrell, Secondary Education/English, Union Bridge, Md. Pixels and Atoms. Faculty mentor: Prof. A. Carey

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Photos: (Above) Kimberly Hughes is congratulated by Brad Rowe after receiving the Maier Latin Scholarship. (Below) Kristen McKinney is congratulated by Brad Rowe after taking first place in the Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose category. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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MU cheerleaders finish best-ever third in nationals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's cheerleading squad posted its best finish in school history this week in the National Cheerleaders Association Collegiate Cheer Championship in Daytona Beach, Fla.

Marshall placed third among 17 schools competing in the Coed intermediate division. Fourteen of MU's 20 cheerleaders competed in the college cheer nationals for the first time. Competition took place Thursday and today.

Marshall overcame early adversity to record the third-place finish. Two small falls and a dismount ruled illegal left MU 12th going into today's challenge cup. Of the eight teams in the challenge cup, Marshall placed first and advanced back in to the finals. The squad placed first in the finals, giving it an overall third-place finish among the 10 teams in the finals.

"I couldn't be more proud of how this team stuck together through the extra round of competition," Coach Duane Nutt said. "After our falls on day one, we didn't miss another skill the second and third performances. I'm proud of the kids on this team and how they represented Marshall."

James Madison University finished first and the University of Michigan was second.

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Photo: Marshall's cheerleaders pose for a photo in Daytona Beach, Fla., where they posted their best finish in school history in the NCA Collegiate Cheer Championship.

 
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Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Dzwonek named associate dean of medical education

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - Dr. Brian Dzwonek, an educator with international experience, has been named associate dean of medical education at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, Dr. Robert C. Nerhood, interim dean, announced today.

"We are thrilled to have Dr. Dzwonek join us at Marshall," Nerhood said. "His experience with developing, maintaining and evaluating curriculum for medical students will be extremely beneficial to our program at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine."

The senior associate dean for medical education, Dr. Aaron McGuffin, said Dzwonek is a welcome addition to the medical education team.

"Dr. Dzwonek brings with him an expertise in medical education that will greatly benefit students, faculty and administration," McGuffin said. "His presence will strengthen our mission to produce compassionate and competent physicians prepared to take on the challenges of medicine."

Dzwonek will be responsible for oversight of the medical education program that includes curriculum improvement, development and implementation; assessment and improvement of pedagogy; and assessment and improvement of medical education evaluation methods. In addition, he will assist in faculty development and student assessment.

"I am excited about joining the team and look forward to working with the faculty, staff and students as we build an even more dynamic and innovative curriculum," Dzwonek said.

Dzwonek most recently served in Singapore as deputy director for medical education research and evaluation at Duke-National University of Singapore (Duke-NUS) where he oversaw curriculum and faculty development as well as education technology.

Prior to his affiliation with Duke-NUS, Dzwonek was the associate director of educational service at the Sanford School of Medicine at the University of South Dakota in Sioux Falls.

Dzwonek has a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, as well as a doctorate in educational administration with an emphasis on adult and higher education from the University of South Dakota.

He started with the medical school April 2.


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Thursday April 12, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Two dining halls at Marshall offering 'Meatless Monday' entrees April 16

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Sustainability Department, in conjunction with Sodexo Dining Services, is offering up "meatless" meal selections from 4 to 7 p.m. this coming Monday at Harless Dining Hall and Towers Marketplace on the Huntington campus.

Margie Phillips, director of sustainability for Marshall, said the idea to encourage a vegetarian meal Monday, April 16, comes from an international campaign launched by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for a LivableFuture.

"The idea is pretty simple," Phillips said. "We want to encourage people to give up meat just one day per week for better personal health and better health of the planet."

Phillips said that Monday's experiment is in partnership with Student Health Services and Sodexo Dining Services, whose management has pledged to make a monetary donation to the Huntington Food Bank for every student who participates in Meatless Monday at Marshall.

"We're going to gauge the interest of students and see how it goes on Monday. If interest is high, we will explore continuing this healthful and environmentally friendly option for our student body," Phillips said.

The menu for Meatless Monday at Marshall includes two types of pasta, three vegetarian sauces - Alfredo, cheese, and marinara, salad, sauted zucchini, green beans and garlic bread. The Pizza & Grill Stations will be open for students who choose not to participate.

Going meatless one day a week may reduce the risk of chronic preventable conditions like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity, Phillips said.

"It can also help reduce your carbon footprint and save precious resources like fresh water and fossil fuel," she added.

The Marshall University Sustainability Department is committed to maximizing the conservation of energy resources, preserving and improving the environment, and developing strategies to bring all areas of the Marshall community together in a united effort to reduce the university's environmental impact on local, state and global communities.

The department is partially funded by a "Student Green Fee" that is utilized to help the university educate its constituents, conserve water and energy, reduce waste and incorporate green technologies and materials into its planning and operations.


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Thursday April 12, 2012
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Marshall University Forensic Science Center completes analysis of untested sexual assault kits for New Orleans PD

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Center has completed a project that eliminated the New Orleans Police Department's untested sexual assault kits, and two convictions already have been obtained.

In a press conference Tuesday, it was announced that the Marshall University Forensic Science Center's nationally accredited forensic DNA laboratories conducted analysis of 833 sexual assault cases from the New Orleans Police Department.

The results from these DNA tests already have begun to help law enforcement solve violent sex crimes in their efforts to secure justice for the victims and their families.

The project has yielded 78 hits in the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) with seven of those being national hits. A CODIS hit links either a DNA profile from a forensic case to another case or to an offender profile. These hits provide investigative leads to law enforcement officers to follow.

New Orleans Police Department Commander Paul Noel said he anticipates that over the next two years a lot of sexual assault cases that Marshall's Forensic Science Center tested will be adjudicated as they follow up on the CODIS hits produced. Noel said the next step in the criminal justice process is to conduct investigations to follow up on the results of the DNA testing. He also noted that the New Orleans Police Department no longer has untested sexual assault kits because they are shipped to the Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory every two weeks.

"We could not have gotten this done without this project," Noel said. "We could have gotten to it, but it would have taken years." Noel was in charge of criminal investigations which included the sex crimes unit when the project was developed and was instrumental in the implementation of the project at the New Orleans Police Department.

The Marshall University Forensic Science Center and the Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory each received a certificate of appreciation from the National Institute of Justice for the assistance provided to the New Orleans Police Department and for providing justice to victims of sexual assault in New Orleans. The certificates were presented by Mark Nelson, the program manager who administered the project. Alyson Saadi, Technical Leader for the Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory, accepted the certificate and made remarks on behalf of the agency.

The National Institute of Justice organized the collaborative effort between the Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory, the New Orleans Police Department and the Marshall University Forensic Science Center. The purpose of the project was to help eliminate the New Orleans Police Department's untested sexual assault kits and to develop best practices. This project and others the National Institute of Justice is funding and evaluating will help other agencies with similar issues understand the problem and offer potential solutions. The project was conducted for about one year.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of Marshall's Forensic Science Center, said the project is an example of how successful federal, state and local agencies can work together to solve problems.

"Lots of cities and states are facing the same problem of untested sexual assault kits, but the New Orleans Police Department not only addressed it in a proactive manner, but they were transparent about the situation and took the initiative to solve the problem," Fenger said.

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina flooded the New Orleans Police Department's Crime Laboratory, destroying its DNA laboratory, equipment and significant amounts of documentation of criminal cases. The Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory subsequently began processing the laboratory work submitted by the New Orleans Police Department.

The Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory played a pivotal role in the project by working all current sexual assault cases for the New Orleans Police Department, allowing the Marshall University Forensic Science Center to concentrate on the older cases. They also reviewed all testing done, entered profiles obtained into the National DNA Database (CODIS), and searched for hits. The Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory is a model crime laboratory which has a very low or no DNA backlog due to efficiency programs they instituted over the past two years, programs which enabled them to offer assistance to the New Orleans Police Department.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and Teri Booth, Community Relations Assistant/Office Manager for U.S. Congressman Nick J. Rahall, were guest speakers at the event. U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller conveyed his remarks and lauded the efforts of the Forensic Science Center and collaborating agencies through a DVD presentation.

Because this project was so successful, the Marshall University Forensic Science Center will be starting another project with the Detroit Police Department.

The event also recognized the re-accreditation of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center's DNA laboratories as ISO 17025 conformant for biological screening and as a DNA databasing, forensic casework and parentage testing laboratory. Accreditation by the American Association of Blood Banks for parentage testing also was renewed.

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Photo: National Institute of Justice Program Manager Mark Nelson, center, presents Dr. Terry W. Fenger (left) with a certificate of appreciation for the Marshall University Forensic Science Center's work on the sexual assault kit project and for providing justice to victims of sexual assault in New Orleans. Alyson Saadi (right) of the Louisiana State Police Crime Laboratory also received a certificate from Nelson for their work on the sexual assault kit project. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

For a video report on the April 10 event, go to http://www.youtube.com/herdvideo.


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Choral concert to feature works of Evan Mack

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chorus' annual spring concert will take place at 8 p.m. Friday, April 13, at Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Robert Wray, director of the University Chorus, said this year is very special because the chorus will be doing a piece written for the students of Marshall University.

"The composer, Dr. Evan Mack, was an artist in residence three or four years ago in the MU College of Fine Arts," Wray said. "It was during his time here that he gave me a work to look at for University Chorus to possibly perform, 'Langston Hughes' Dream of Freedom.' Our performance was the premiere of the work in its entirety. For that premiere, Dr. Mack visited campus many times to listen to and work with University Chorus. After his time with us, he decided to write a song dedicated to the students of Marshall University entitled 'The Fountain.' "

Ethan Bartlett, a freshman music major, said he prepares for the concert by practicing the pieces in the practice rooms or on the stage to get a feel for the performance before the big night.

"I chose to continue performing in University Chorus because I like it so much," Bartlett said. "I'm very excited for the performance; I'm ready to get it started. There are a lot of beautiful pieces."

Wray said University Chorus is open to all Marshall students, regardless of major. Of the 72 students currently enrolled, 35 are students majoring in something other than music.

Kate Yeager, senior Elementary Education major, said she likes University Chorus because it's a fun, positive way to get involved on campus.

"Being a non [music] major, it's a little bit of extra time on your schedule, but it's definitely worth it," Yeager said. "It's one of the best experiences you could have on Marshall's campus."

The concert on April 13 will also include the Marshall University Chamber Choir under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry. They will be performing a work commemorating the Upper Big Branch mine disaster.


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Alumni Weekend is April 27-28 at Marshall University

This year's event celebrates '175 years of your success!'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate Alumni Weekend 2012 Friday and Saturday, April 27 and 28, with a variety of special events culminating with the 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet.

This year's Alumni Weekend celebrates 175 years of alumni and student success. The banquet, during which distinguished Marshall alumni and friends are honored, will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 28, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

"Springtime is a time of renewal," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs. "I hope to see many Marshall alumni back on campus to renew old friendships, share memories and witness the incredible growth of their beloved alma mater. We have planned a spectacular Alumni Weekend filled with a variety of entertaining events and we hope to see many new as well as many familiar faces! If you are an alumnus of Marshall University and you've never been back for Alumni Weekend, this is a fantastic year to do it!"

Below is a brief look at some of the events planned for Alumni Weekend 2012. All events, even complimentary ones, require an RSVP.

Friday, April 27

  • Alumni and friends are invited to take an entertaining look back at Marshall University by attending a presentation by the university archivist. Attendees can take a stroll through Marshall's history and learn about successes and challenges that brought it to where it is today. The presentation is from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Light refreshments and cash bar will be available.

Saturday, April 28

  • All alumni and friends of Marshall University are invited to a complimentary pre-lunch reception sponsored by the Heritage Society. The reception is from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center. Walking tours of the facility also will be available.

  • This year's Class Luncheon will honor the Golden Anniversary of the Class of 1962. The cost of this reservation-only event is $20 per person. Alumni and friends will have an opportunity to connect with fellow classmates and hear from university administrators about Marshall's progress since 1962.  Lunch is from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

  • The complimentary Green and White Spring Tailgate Party is a fun, festive pre-game gathering for alumni and friends. Remember Stewart's Hot Dogs?  Attendees can enjoy these and other refreshments under the big alumni tent! Tailgate begins at noon in the West Lot of Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Kickoff is at 2 p.m.

  • A champagne reception will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. on the plaza of the Memorial Student Center.

  • The 75th annual Alumni Awards Banquet will honor distinguished alumni and friends as well as special scholarship recipients. The cost is $75 per person and $140 per couple. Reserved tables are also available. Call the alumni office at 304-696-3134 for more information. The banquet begins at 7 p.m. in the Don Morris Room at the Memorial Student Center.

Sponsors of Alumni Weekend are Bank of America, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Creative Audio Visual Group, Jenkins Fenstermaker, Cabell Huntington Hospital and State Electric.

"The Marshall University Alumni Association would like to thank the sponsors of this year's event," Pelphrey said. "Their support allows us to continue to bring quality programs to our alumni."

Other Alumni Weekend activities include:

  • The College of Fine Arts hosts the 9th annual Empty Bowls event. Last year this event raised more than $15,000 for the Huntington Area Food Bank. Patrons pay $12 for a handmade ceramic bowl and a modest soup lunch; all proceeds go to the food bank. The cost of each $12 lunch will, in turn, provide 64 meals to the hungry. The event also includes a silent auction of donated items including MU memorabilia, gift cards and other items. Empty Bowls will be Friday, April 27 from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave.

  • Gallery 842 will feature a complimentary Master of Arts Student Exhibition on Friday, April 27, from noon to 6 p.m. at 842 4th Ave.

  • The Delta Upsilon Chapter of Delta Zeta Sorority is having a reunion during Alumni Weekend. Active members will host a reception in the chapter house on Saturday, April 28, from noon to 1:30 p.m. All members of the Delta Upsilon Chapter are invited. For more information and to make reservations, please e-mail dzmu2012@comcast.net or jensragan@yahoo.com.

For more information about Alumni Weekend 2012 or to make reservations, call 304-696-2901.


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Career Services to feature etiquette expert at upcoming dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Terri Thompson, an etiquette consultant and coach who started the companies Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking, will be featured at Marshall University Career Services' bi-annual Etiquette Dinner Tuesday, April 17.

The dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. in room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. All current Marshall students are encouraged to attend. However, juniors and seniors will be given preference. Doors open at 6 p.m. and professional dress is required.

During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, along with answers to any questions students might have.

"As students seek internships or begin their full-time careers, they may find themselves in situations where they are taken to dinner by company executives. Knowing proper business and dining etiquette can help make a stressful situation at least slightly more comfortable," said Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach at Career Services.

Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services' Center. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner. Cancellations must be made within 72 hours of the event to receive a full refund.

This spring will mark the fifth time Thompson has led the event. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

For more information, contact Career Services by phone at 304-696-2370 or by e-mail at career-services@marshall.edu.


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Monday April 9, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts,, 304-696-3296

Empty Bowls focuses on helping the hungry in the Tri-State

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.-- The annual Empty Bowls fundraiser, the Marshall University College of Fine Arts' biggest fundraiser, is just a few weeks away and organizers say they are concentrating on the needs of people in the Tri-State area.

The event will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday, April 27, at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. It is the local version of a national initiative in which the Tri-State area can experience a modest soup lunch. The lunch is $12 and participants can take home their one-of-a-kind ceramic bowls made by Marshall University ceramic students.

"Empty Bowls serves as a vehicle to increase awareness as to the issues of hunger and how important the issue of hunger has become in the last few years," said Scott Frasure, director of Development for Huntington Area Food Bank. "One out of four children, one out of six adults and one out of 10 seniors are at risk of hunger nationally, and those numbers are even greater here in our region."

"As the director of the Cridlin Food & Clothing Pantry I perceive the problem of poverty and the resulting hunger caused by poverty to be huge in our area," said Diana Van Horn, who is representing Christian Associates in planning the event.  "We have seen the demand for services at our pantry rise from 250 individuals per month to 400 individuals per month in the last eight months."

Christian Associates is in charge of obtaining soup, drinks and bread for the lunch served at the Empty Bowls event and providing volunteers to work the event.

The soups that will be served for the lunch are being donated by Bob Evans (on 3rd Avenue), Jim's Steak and Spaghetti House, O'Charley's, Pita Pit, Coach Bobby Pruett's Steakhouse, Sodexo, Central Christian Church, First United Methodist Church, First Presbyterian Church, Holy Spirit Orthodox Church, Fifth Avenue Baptist Church and Highlawn Presbyterian Church, among others.


There also will be bread donated by Jimmy John's, River & Rail Bakery, Logan's Roadhouse and O'Charley's. Pepsi Bottling is providing drinks, and Starbuck's at the Barboursville Kroger is providing coffee.


"The Huntington Area Food Bank is so much more than what you would typically think about a food bank," Frasure said. "While working with Marshall University's dietetics faculty we established a nutritional outreach program."


"We serve now what we believe to be more than 96,000 individuals," he added. "These people are often working people who need assistance due to food inflation, increased energy costs, unemployment or under-employment."


The Huntington Area Food Bank serves 12 counties of southern West Virginia, four counties in northeastern Kentucky and Lawrence County, Ohio, through its network of 260 agencies. HAFB is also affiliated with Feeding America, the nation's largest feeding organization, which comprises more than 200 member food banks serving 37 million people.


For more information on Empty Bowls, contact Jaye Ike at Marshall's College of Fine Arts by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University renews Athletic Director's contract through 2017

President: Hamrick an architect of positive change and growth for MU athletics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp has extended Athletic Director Mike Hamrick's contract with the university through June 2017.  Kopp said Hamrick's leadership has set a new standard for athletics at Marshall and that the veteran sports administrator has brought a high level of academic and fiscal accountability to the department since he was hired in 2009.

Hamrick has overseen a program that has placed increased emphasis on academic success and student athlete graduation, Kopp said. In the past year, Thundering Herd student athletes posted a graduation success rate (GSR) of 86 percent, which is four points higher than the national Division I institutional average of 82 percent and eight points higher than Marshall's own rate the year before. Five of Marshall's programs had 100 percent GSR scores.

"It's clear from the progress we're seeing with Marshall Athletics since he was hired as our Athletic Director that we made the right choice when we asked Mike and his wife, Soletta, to come back to Huntington," Kopp said. "I'm most proud of the results we're seeing in the classroom and with the caliber of student-athletes we are recruiting. The wins on the field and more fans in the seats are obviously a reflection of the quality of the program he is building here at Marshall. It's something I know all of the Herd Nation wants to see continue."

Hamrick also renegotiated a multimedia rights contract with IMG College, doubling Marshall's revenue share to $1.4 million per year, while also including state-of-the-art upgrades to the football stadium's scoreboard, video display and sound systems at no cost to the University. He also has overseen a $1.6 million renovation to the Henderson Center, which includes upgrades to the facility's sound and air-handling systems that will debut for the 2012-13 season.

Under Hamrick's leadership, memberships in the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, Marshall's primary athletics booster club, have nearly doubled, and membership in the "M Club," a society comprising former Marshall student-athletes, has tripled in three years.

In addition to hiring head football coach Doc Holliday and head men's basketball coach Tom Herrion, Hamrick targeted the "Football Enhancement Fund" to build the private support base of our Athletic Department. In 2011, Mike launched the Vision Campaign, a drive to raise $20 million for the construction of an indoor practice facility that includes a track, soccer stadium, student-athlete academic center, sports medicinal translational research center and a Marshall Hall of Fame atrium. The campaign is well under way with an architect selected for these projects with construction on the soccer stadium expected to commence later this year.

"I'm very much appreciative of the support that I've received from Dr. Kopp and the confidence he has shown in me," Hamrick said. "His vision for not just athletics, but the entire university, is something all Marshall alumni and supporters should value.

"As an alum, I do. The future is very bright for Herd athletics and I'm looking forward to continuing to be a part of it."

Kopp praised Hamrick's insight and experience as Marshall and Conference USA navigate the complex web of national conference realignment. "This is a time of unprecedented change in NCAA Division I athletics and I think Marshall and Conference USA are very fortunate to have someone with Mike's experience and skill on our side. He has been an architect of positive change and growth for our athletic programs since the day he began."

Hamrick played football at Marshall University from 1976 to 1980, and received his bachelor's degree in education from Marshall. He earned a master's degree in sports administration from Ohio University in 1981.

Before joining Marshall, Hamrick was director of athletics at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and East Carolina University. He also has been AD at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, assistant AD at Illinois State and assistant AD at the University of Kansas.


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Marshall percussion ensemble to perform Thursday, April 12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Percussion Ensemble will give a concert at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 12, in Smith Recital Hall on the university's Huntington campus. The group, under the direction of Steven Hall, faculty coordinator of percussion at Marshall, will perform selections ranging in style from ragtime to Caribbean steel drum music.

"This performance is a fantastic opportunity to hear a wide variety of interesting and exotic percussion music played by a talented and dedicated group of university students," Hall said.  The repertoire includes a marimba ensemble arrangement of the choral piece "Water Night" by Eric Whitacre; a steel drum  composition,  "Bailando La Soca;" Ney Rosauro's Marimba Concerto No. 2; and several ragtime xylophone tunes. Featured students include Mike Cochran, Anna Maria Firth and Amanda Young.  

Hall said the percussionists in the ensemble are primarily music education and performance students specializing in percussion at Marshall. The ensemble is open to any MU student with percussion experience.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call the Department of Music at 304-696-3117 or e-mail Hall at hallj@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 6, 2012
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Career Services to host part-time job and internship fair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will host Job-A-Palooza, a job and internship fair for summer and part-time positions, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 11, in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus. The event is open to all Marshall students, faculty and alumni.

"Career Services does this event once a semester," said Debby Stoler, assistant director of development outreach at Career Services. "Recruiters love it because they find lots of candidates for their seasonal or permanent part-time jobs, and students love it because they can connect with around 20 companies at one time without the formality of a Career Expo."

Around 20 employers are expected to attend Job-A-Palooza. A continually updated list of registered employers is available at www.marshall.edu/career-services.

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to bring resumes and their best networking skills to the fair. For tips on how to talk with employers or to have their resume reviewed, they should stop by Career Services.  No appointment is necessary.

Anyone having questions about the event may contact Debby Stoler in Career Services by phone at 304-696-6679, or by e-mail at stolerd@marshall.edu; or the Career Services front desk by phone at 304-696-2370 or by e-mail at career-services@marshall.edu.  


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Thursday April 5, 2012
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center,, 304-691-8961

MU Forensic Science Graduate Program becomes first in the nation to achieve accreditation in digital forensics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Forensic Science Graduate Program is the first and only academic program in the nation to achieve accreditation in the area of digital evidence through the Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission.

At a press conference Tuesday, Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of Marshall's Forensic Science Center, announced the news of the academic accreditation in digital forensics and the establishment of the Paul H. and Dixie O. Nicely Scholarship Fund, the first scholarship fund that has been set up for the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program and its students.

Fenger said accreditation in digital forensics is important because it recognizes that Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program has met established standards as a high quality academic program, and it distinguishes the program nationally in the area of digital evidence.

Fenger said there is a shortage of individuals trained in the field of digital evidence investigation.

"Digital forensics is an area of specialization," Fenger said. "Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program recognized the need for digital forensic examiners and responded by developing an educational track to address this need."

U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, and Teri Booth, Community Relations Assistant/Office Manager for U.S. Congressman Nick J. Rahall, were guest speakers at the event.

The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program is a two-year master's degree program. It has four areas of emphasis: DNA analysis, forensic chemistry, crime scene investigation and digital forensics.

In January 2005, Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program became one of the first forensic science academic programs in the country to achieve accreditation. The Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission's accreditation of Marshall's program covered all areas except digital forensics. Standards for evaluating academic curricula in digital forensics had not been developed at the time.

The Paul H. and Dixie O. Nicely Scholarship Fund for the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program was founded by Tammy White, Esq., in honor of her parents. Portraits of Paul and Dixie Nicely were unveiled at the event, and they will be on display at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center.

The scholarship is for West Virginia and metro-area students with high academic performance and financial need. Guidelines for applying for the scholarship are still in development.

Fenger said he hopes the scholarship will encourage students from West Virginia to apply to Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program and seek opportunities for higher paying jobs and a career in this exciting and important field.

Fenger recognized the Nicely family for identifying the need to provide financial support to forensic science students and taking the initiative to create the scholarship. "The family has followed the development of our programs for many years, and they understand the value of forensic science and the impact it has on the greater good in society," he said. "The family wanted to help support our students so they can help make a difference in our communities."

Donations to this scholarship fund may be made to:

Paul H. and Dixie O. Nicely Scholarship Fund

c/o The Marshall University Foundation

519 John Marshall Dr.

Huntington, W.Va. 25703

Contributions should be designated to the Paul H. and Dixie O. Nicely Scholarship Fund.

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Photos: (Above) U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin positions a cell phone in a radio frequency isolation box in preparation for cell phone examination at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center's Digital Forensics Investigative Unit. Analysis of digital evidence conducted at the center aids in criminal investigations in partnership with the West Virginia State Police. Computer Forensics Specialist Chris Vance explains how digital evidence from cell phones is retrieved. (Below) The portrait of Paul H. Nicely is unveiled at a ceremony announcing the Paul H. and Dixie O. Nicely Scholarship Fund for the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program. From left to right: Dr. Terry W. Fenger, MU Forensic Science Center Director; Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall University President; Tammy White, Esq., daughter of Paul and Dixie Nicely; Dixie O. Nicely and U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Thursday April 5, 2012
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Five to be inducted into Marshall's Business Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five successful business leaders, including a former interim Marshall University president, an outgoing dean and three CEOs, will be inducted into MU's Business Hall of Fame on Tuesday, April 17.

The induction reception and ceremony will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.  The celebration will begin with a reception at 6:15 p.m. and an awards ceremony at 7 p.m.

This year's inductees are Michael J. Farrell, managing member with Farrell, White & Legg PLCC and a former interim president of Marshall; Lynne M. Fruth, president and chairman of the board of Fruth Pharmacy; Dr. Chong W. Kim, dean of Marshall's College of Business and owner of Master Kim's Tae Kwon Do School; Clarence E. Martin, chief executive officer and chief financial officer of State Electric Supply Company; and Joseph L. Williams Jr., chairman and CEO of BASIC Supply Company Inc., director of First Sentry Bank and director of Energy Services of America.

The Hall of Fame honors those in the business community who have outstanding records of long-standing achievement in their career fields.  It is the most distinguished honor granted by the College of Business.

Following this year's ceremony, the Hall of Fame will have 85 members, dating back to the first inductions in 1994. Here is a brief look at each of the new inductees:

Michael J. Farrell graduated from the Marshall University College of Business in 1969. He has had a distinguished career as a lawyer, higher education leader and businessman. As a student at Marshall, he played the university mascot "Marco" and served as student body president.

Farrell has served as managing member of the firm now known as Farrell, White & Legg PLLC during its 17-year existence. He currently is serving his second term with Marshall's Board of Governors. In 2005, he served as interim president of Marshall University.

 

Lynne Morrow Fruth graduated magna cum laude from West Virginia University with a degree in education and plans for a career in public education and coaching. During the 1980s she found her niche in education - working with the most difficult and challenging children.

Fruth completed her master's degree in education in 1995 at Marshall. She was elected chairman of the board of the company business, Fruth Pharmacy, in May 2009, and began full-time employment at Fruth that summer. The company maintains a workforce of about 650 employees.

Chong W. Kim, Ph.D., who was born in northern China but grew up in Seoul, came to Marshall in 1977. He served as head of the Management, Marketing and MIS divisions for 24 years, and currently is dean of the College of Business. He will retire this summer.

A Taekwondo 9th degree black belt, Kim opened Master Kim's Tae Kwon Do School in Huntington in 1984. He taught Taekwondo in the Adjutant General Korean Army School before he came to the U.S. in 1968. Currently, he is serving as the national vice president for the U.S. Taekwondo Grandmasters Society and chairman of the selection committee of the society's Hall of Fame.

Clarence E. Martin, a 1967 Marshall graduate, was hired as controller at State Electric in 1972, became chief financial officer in 1977 and was named chief executive officer in 1994. When he began working at State Electric, there were two branches of the company Huntington and Dunbar with a total of 41 employees. Today, the business has grown to 42 branches in six states, with more than 700 employees.

Martin is also executive vice president of Service Wire Company, a worldwide manufacturer of wire and cable, and executive vice president of Arthur's Enterprises, which was formed in 1986 to provide organizational structure for the continued growth of State Electric and Service Wire. The combined entities employ more than 850 people in eight states.

Joseph L. Williams Jr., a former member of Marshall's Board of Governorsreceived his bachelor's degree in finance from Marshall University in 1978. He serves as chairman and chief executive officer of Basic Supply Company Inc., which he founded in 1977, and is on the board of directors of Energy Services of America Corp. 

Williams was one of the organizers and is a director of First Sentry Bank in Huntington. He was chairman, president and chief executive officer of Consolidated Bank & Trust Co. in Richmond, Va., from 2007 until it merged with Premier Financial Bancorp Inc. in 2009.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU cheerleaders to perform routine on campus before heading to nationals

MU cheerleaders to perform routine on campus
before heading to nationals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's cheerleading squad will perform for the local public this  weekend in an open house before heading to the nationals next week in Daytona Beach, Fla.

The Thundering Herd squad will perform its national routine for the local audience at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 7, in Gullickson Hall on the Huntington campus. Admission is free. The National Cheerleaders Association championships are April 11-15. Twelve women and seven men will compete for Marshall. 

Marshall performs in the intermediate coed division.


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Wednesday April 4, 2012
Contact: Teresa Buckland, Development and Operations Manager, Marshall University CEGAS, 304-696-3568

October event to celebrate state's mining enterprise

Nominations being accepted for 'Because of You' awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This fall, representatives of West Virginia's mining industry will gather at the 2012 Miners' Celebration to recognize everyone who contributes to the enterprise.

The conference will be held Oct. 4-5 at Tamarack in Beckley.

"West Virginia's mining industry depends upon thousands of individuals in many different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the conference planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every one of these people whether they are miners, safety engineers, environmental professionals, equipment suppliers, community leaders or teachers contributes to each ton of coal produced.

"It is because of them the mining industry is successful. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved in what we call our state's mining 'ecosystem.'"

Szwilski said the program will kick off with registration and a reception at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4. At the reception, the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present several awards including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.

On Friday, Oct. 5, the program will continue with a full day of presentations focusing on all aspects of the mining industry. In addition, "Because of You" awards in more than a dozen categories will be presented to honor miners, engineers, safety and environmental professionals, community leaders, manufacturers, suppliers and educators for their contributions to the mining industry in West Virginia. Nominations for the awards are being accepted through June 1.

The Miners' Celebration is being presented by the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; National Coal Heritage Area; United Mine Workers of America; West Virginia Coal Association; and West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

The cost of the conference is $100. Registration is open through Sept. 21.

For more information about the conference or how to nominate someone for the "Because of You" awards, or to register online, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas.


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Monday April 2, 2012
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Marshall plays host to Tulsa Oct. 6 in 2012 homecoming game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will play its 2012 homecoming football game Saturday, Oct. 6, against Conference USA foe Tulsa at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Kickoff time has not yet been determined.

Homecoming activities will take place all week on campus and in the community leading up to the football game.

Marshall is coming off a 7-6 season that included a 20-10 victory over FIU in the Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl. Tulsa was 8-5 last season, including a 24-21 loss to BYU in the Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl. Tulsa defeated Marshall during the regular season, 59-17.


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Sunday April 1, 2012
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Internationally recognized paleobiologist selected as Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, associate professor of Biological Sciences at Marshall University,has been selected as the 2012-2013 Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Academy Fellow, according to Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the academy.

O'Keefe is known internationally for his work as a paleobiologist and most recently for a discovery that earned him publication in the esteemed journal Science. He is an acknowledged world expert on Mesozoic marine reptile paleontology and also has published research on primitive reptiles, Pleistocene mammals and extinction and evolutionary theory.

"The Drinko Fellowship is a great honor, and I am gratified to receive it," O'Keefe said. "Previous Drinko Fellows have a long record of exceptional scholarship and I will do my best to add to it. This fellowship is very timely as I work to launch a research effort in Chile. The support of the Drinko Academy will enable success in this project and I look forward to a productive year in the southern hemisphere."

Appointed annually, the Fellow receives a generous stipend, a reduced teaching load, and other financial and clerical support for two academic years to undertake research projects and other scholarly pursuits.

O'Keefe will present the results of his work to the university community at a symposium next spring during Marshall's annual Celebration of Academics.

O'Keefe came to Marshall in the fall of 2006, and has been an associate professor since 2010. Since joining the faculty, O'Keefe has published 10 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals, many co-authored with graduate and undergraduate students.

In August 2011, O'Keefe was the lead author on a paper on plesiosaur reproductive biology published in Science. His work with co-author Luis Chiappe of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is a significant advance in the understanding of these animals.

Headlined "Sea Monster Had a Bun in the Oven," the article about his research received widespread coverage in the popular press. A multitude of media outlets interviewed O'Keefe about his research, which was on display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in California in August 2011. The BBC, CNN, local and statewide news organizations, National Geographic, U.S. News & World Report, as well as various international press, covered the publication of his research.

"Dr. O'Keefe's research has garnered the attention of his scholarly peers, the top-tier journal, Science, the popular press, and now, the John Deaver Drinko Academy," Gould said. "Without a doubt, Dr. O'Keefe certainly has earned the title of Distinguished John Deaver Drinko Fellow. His research and ability to communicate it endearingly to the masses has brought positive attention and academic acclaim to Marshall University. He plans to use his time as a Drinko Fellow working on a special project in Chile and we cannot wait to learn what he discovers this time."

O'Keefe teaches human anatomy, introductory biology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, various graduate seminars, and is chair of the Graduate Program Committee for the Department of Biological Sciences. He has advised five successful master's candidates and currently has four graduate students working in his lab.


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