FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 31, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University classes resume today, except those offered at Beckley Center



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University classes will proceed as normal today, except for those offered at the Erma Byrd Higher Education Center in Beckley. Marshall joins Bluefield State College and Concord University in canceling classes at the Beckley Center due to severe weather. 

Marshall offers courses at its main campus in Huntington, and branch campuses in South Charleston, Point Pleasant, Teays Valley and Beckley. 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 31, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sociology & anthropology speaker series continues Nov. 7 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Richard J. Chacon, an associate professor of anthropology at Winthrop University, will speak on Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the Shawkey Dining Room of the Memorial Student Center (2E28) on Marshall University's Huntington campus.  The presentation and discussion will run from 4 to 6 p.m. 

 

Chacon's presentation, part of the speaker series of Marshall's department of sociology & anthropology, is titled "Conservation or Resource Maximization?  Analyzing Subsistence Hunting Among the Achuar of Ecuador." 

 

In this presentation, Chacon will discuss findings from his extensive anthropological fieldwork experience among the indigenous peoples of South America in which he has employed methodological and theoretical approaches that range from those basic to the biological and health sciences to studies of the role played in natural resource use by particular systems of belief and associated ritual practices.

 

Chacon will examine whether observed behavior among the Achuar (and other indigenous groups of the Americas) can be attributed to Western contact as well as ethical issues raised by his findings.

 

Chacon has conducted anthropological investigations throughout Latin America, documenting the subsistence patterns and belief systems of the Yanomam of Venezuela (known by many as the "Fierce People" through a book of that name by the anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon), the Yora of Peru and the Achuar (Shiwiar) of Ecuador. He has also examined ritual violence among the Otavalo and Cotacachi Indians of Highland Ecuador.

 

His publications include: The Ethics of Anthropology and Amerindian Research: Reporting on Environmental Degradation and Warfare (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), New York: Springer (2012);  North American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), Tucson: University of Arizona Press (2007); Latin American Indigenous Warfare and Ritual Violence (Eds., R. Chacon and R. Mendoza), Tucson: University of Arizona Press (2007); and The Taking and Displaying of Human Body Parts as Trophies by Amerindians (Eds., R. Chacon and D. Dye), Springer: New York (2007).  

 

Chacon's presentation is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be served.

 

For more information, contact Dr. Brian A. Hoey at hoey@marshall.edu.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 30, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall classes canceled Tuesday in South Charleston, Teays Valley and Beckley due to weather

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's South Charleston campus is closed today due to a weather-related power outage, so all classes offered there are canceled and employees should not report to work. 

 

Classes provided by Marshall at Beckley's Erma Byrd Higher Education Center and at the Teays Valley Center in Putnam County are canceled today due to the winter storm. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 30, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall classes canceled Tuesday in South Charleston, Teays Valley and Beckley due to weather

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's South Charleston campus is closed today due to a weather-related power outage, so all classes offered there are canceled and employees should not report to work.

Classes provided by Marshall at Beckley's Erma Byrd Higher Education Center and at the Teays Valley Center in Putnam County are canceled today due to the winter storm.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 29, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University breaks ground for engineering complex

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University officials, joined by special guests Art and Joan Weisberg and other friends and supporters of the university, broke ground today on a $50 million engineering complex on the Huntington campus.

Construction will begin this week on the 145,000 square-foot, four-story Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex. The facility, which will be one of the largest academic buildings on campus when completed, will be located on Third Avenue between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

 

Construction of the complex is expected to take about 28 months. 

 

Weisberg is president of Arthur's Enterprises, which this past summer made a large gift pledge to the Marshall University Foundation to help pay for the complex.

 

"Today truly is another significant day in the history of Marshall University," President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We are thrilled that Art, Joan and other members of the Weisberg family could join us for this wonderful celebration of this very significant investment in the future of Marshall University, to which they have supported so earnestly. We are very proud and honored that this spectacular building will bear the Weisberg family name."

 

Weisberg's reason for supporting Marshall's engineering program, which now has about 600 students,  is simple: "I love Huntington and I know this gift will make a lasting difference," he said when the gift was announced.

 

President Kopp said interdisciplinary and inter-professional education will be enhanced through the opportunities afforded through the addition of this building.

 

"This new applied engineering complex will move Marshall University and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) majors to the forefront in terms of the quality and caliber of facilities available to support and advance STEM education - especially in new fields of engineering," he said. "The interdisciplinary and integrated learning environments will foster collaborative research and inter-professional education that previously was not available to the University. The idea that you can link engineering with other disciplines in this building is very powerful."

 

Sen. Robert H. Plymale, chairman of the Senate Education Committee, was the lead sponsor of legislation in 2004 that led to the restart of Marshall's engineering program. He said today's groundbreaking proves just how far the program has come in a few short years.

 

"My congratulations to Dr. Kopp and the Weisberg family for recognizing and committing to this project, and its importance to Marshall, the state of West Virginia and the entire country," Plymale said. "I respect the Weisbergs so much and Dr. Kopp for his commitment to seeing this through. This is a defining moment for Marshall University."

 

Plymale said bringing engineering back to Marshall took years of hard work.

 

"It's one of the most satisfying projects I've been involved in," Plymale said. "It's one that I've worked on literally for 20 years."

 

Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the new complex "will not only provide facilities for substantial development of engineering areas like mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and bioengineering, but will enhance our capabilities in specific engineering sub-disciplines such as environmental engineering, transportation engineering and structural engineering as well.

 

"The complex will be the home for all our undergraduate and graduate programs and will essentially give us the opportunity to grow and expand into some areas that are important to the region," he continued. "The completion of the complex will enable us to have state-of-the-art instructional and research facilities and will likely result in significant enrollment increases in all our programs. Undergraduate programs such as engineering, computer science and safety technology are expected to encounter significant expansions."

 

The need for more engineers is on the rise, Zatar said. He said engineers saw a 12 percent growth in hiring demand in September, with more than 184,000 job postings online. And, he said, the national unemployment rate for recently graduated undergraduate engineering students dropped from a little over six percent in 2009 to two percent in 2011.

 

Zatar said projects today are requiring more highly skilled professionals and the nationwide shortage of engineers is evident. He added that engineering and computer science graduates are in high demand and earn salaries above the national average. In fact, he said, engineering graduates have received the highest compensation for graduates from four-year programs.

 

"Professional societies such as the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Society of American Military Engineers are excited to see the resurgence of the engineering program at Marshall University because it will assist in leading our nation into the future," he said. 

 

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, said the impact of the new building will be profound and felt long into the future.

 

"The engineering program will now have a state-of-the-art physical space in which to grow and thrive," Maher said. "In addition, research at Marshall will be immensely enhanced by the proximity of high-tech facilities and faculty along the Third Avenue corridor. Researchers in engineering will now be closer to colleagues in medicine, pharmacy, chemistry, biology and physics, and the offices of the research corporation will be more convenient to the campus community. Marshall's already considerable strengths in collaborative, multidisciplinary research will be taken to new levels by this forward-looking investment."

 

The completion of the engineering complex means Marshall will have added more than $100 million in academic facilities on the north side of Third Avenue from Hal Greer Boulevard to the parking garage across from Cam Henderson Center in just a little over eight years.  The Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center opened in 2006, and the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories opened in 2008.

 

The construction firm BBL Carlton of Charleston will build the engineering complex. The design firms are Bastian & Harris Architects from Charleston and Hastings & Chivetta Architects from St. Louis.

 

-------------------------------

Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, center, leads a ceremonial groundbreaking marking the start of construction of the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex. The event took place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Pictured are, from left, A. Michael Perry, Louis Weisberg, Sen. Robert Plymale, Joan Weisberg, Dr. Kopp, Dr. Wael Zatar, Dr. Chuck Somerville, Dr. John Maher and Chuck Moore. (Below) Joan Weisberg listens as her husband, Arthur Weisberg, speaks to the audience during today's ceremonial groundbreaking at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Construction on the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex begins this week. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday October 26, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia DEP contracts with MU Geography Department to employ student interns to convert paper mine maps to GIS format

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) has sub-contracted with Marshall University's Geography Department to employ student interns to convert paper mine maps to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database format.

The contract for the GeoMine project is actually a renewal of a previous contract that lasted from December 2011 to September 2012. The current contract, which provides an additional $129,000 in funding from the WVDEP, runs through December 2013.

 

"This is a feather in our cap," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "Our Department of Geography offers an outstanding education that allows students to learn both the political-economic-historical perspective of geography as well as the powerful tools used to create complex maps using GIS technology."

 

Dr. James M. Leonard, a geography professor and director of the Geography Department GIS Lab, said the contract has so far employed 12 different undergraduate and graduate students. He said the GeoMine project is a joint venture among several federal agencies, notably the U.S. Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation, and Enforcement and several state-level environmental protection agencies, including the WVDEP.

 

"The project goal is to create a Geographic Information Systems database for monitoring and regulating coal mining in Appalachia," Leonard said. "I expect additional students to be hired as the needs of WVDEP may require.  One hundred percent of the funding has gone to students."


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Friday October 26, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Yeager Symposium focuses on 'Emerging Threats to National Security;' Pulitzer winner Laurie Garrett to speak on bioterrorism

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Laurie Garrett, a nationally known, award-winning author, lecturer and political analyst, will speak on "Bioterrorism: The Modern Peril," at Marshall University Monday, Nov. 5, at the 26th annual Yeager Symposium.

 

Garrett, who has won the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism, the Peabody Broadcasting Award and the George C. Polk Award for Reporting, is senior fellow for global health with the Council on Foreign Relations. She will speak at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

 

The first part of the symposium, titled "The New Terror: Emerging Threats to National Security," will take place Tuesday, Oct. 30.  Dr. Jason Morrissette, a political science professor at Marshall, will speak on "The Politics of Fear: Domestic and Lone-Wolf Terrorism in the U.S." His presentation starts at 7 p.m. in  room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

 

Yeager Scholars Shaina Taylor and Rikki Miller, co-chairs of the symposium, said Garrett was their first choice to be the speaker on bioterrorism.

 

"Her body of work is outstanding from any point of view," Taylor said. "Rikki and I worked tirelessly to bring her to Marshall, and we were overjoyed when we received her confirmation. What makes Garrett so special, though, is not only her lengthy list of accomplishments but her ability to present dense scientific material in a way that is both accessible and easy to understand."

 

Garrett was one of three scientific consultants on the Warner Bros. film "Contagion." She is the author of multiple books, including The Coming Plague, Betrayal of Trust and I Heard the Sirens Scream.

 

Morrissette's expertise is in World Politics, Conflict and Security, Post-Soviet Politics and Environmental Politics. He was one of three faculty members who received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2010.

 

"We really wanted to showcase some of Marshall's own talent," Taylor said. "He is extremely knowledgeable on the topic, and his lecture style is very much engaging." 

 

Taylor and Miller, both seniors, said they wanted to select a topic for the lecture series that had as much broad, interdisciplinary appeal as possible.

 

"Finding a way to fuse politics and biology was not always necessarily easy or evident to us in the early stages of the planning process, but we eventually settled upon the umbrella concept of terrorism in the 21st Century, which allowed us to feature speakers on domestic and lone-wolf terrorism as well as bio-terror," Taylor said. "We felt that this topic not only had broad appeal, but that it also spoke to many fears and anxieties relevant to the American people today."

 

Both events are free to the public. A book signing will follow Garrett's presentation.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 25, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall Opera Theatre to present 'Amahl and the Night Visitors' Nov. 9 and 10



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Opera Theatre, together with the Sanctuary Choir of Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church, will present the beloved seasonal opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors,"  at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, and 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10,  at Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church at 513 10th St. in Huntington.

The one-act opera by composer Gian-Carlo Menotti is one of the most popular operas in the repertoire and has been enjoyed by audiences around the world, said Linda Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall University and director of the opera. Its story of the power of love delivers a potent message in today's world. Amahl, a poor crippled shepherd boy, and his mother receive a brief visit from the Three Kings who are on their way to see the newborn Christ child. When Amahl is miraculously cured, he joins the kings in their journey to celebrate the new child's birth.

"We are pleased to feature two young Huntington singers, Majesty Hill and Ethan Proctor, who will share the part of Amahl," Dobbs said. "We also welcome Marshall alumna and adjunct professor Marlayna Maynard who will sing the Mother."

The cast also includes Marshall University vocal students, including Sean Price, Robert Nunez and Sean Link, who portray the kings. They are joined by dancers directed by Ella Hay from the Art Center School of Dance. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 25, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Maniacs, SGA co-hosting tailgate before MU plays UCF



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Maniacs and the Marshall University Student Government Association are co-hosting a tailgate Saturday before the Thundering Herd's home football game with UCF.

The tailgate is located just outside Joan C. Edwards Stadium, on the practice football field next to the weight room. The tailgate festivities run from 4 to 7 p.m., and the game kicks off at 8:04 p.m.

The tailgate is sponsored by Fat Patty's and will be staffed by Sodexo. The first 100 students attending receive a free burger from Fat Patty's.

Fat Patty's also is offering 300 wings with three different flavors. Sodexo is catering more than 200 hot dogs and two side dishes, and cold beverages will be served.

All Marshall University students are encouraged and allowed to attend as long as they can provide their student I.D. cards and a valid "901" number to the staff hosting the event. Admission is free.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 24, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word does well against nationally ranked teams

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Thundering Word speech and debate team finished third in a two-day combined team sweepstakes event at West Chester University near Philadelphia the weekend of Oct. 13-14.

 

Several nationally ranked teams competed, including George Mason University and Lafayette College. Other teams competing were Bowling Green State University, West Chester University, St. Joseph's University, Cedar Crest College, James Madison University, Northern Virginia Community College, Nassau Community College, Suffolk Community College and Lincoln University.

 

On Saturday, during the alumni portion of the swing tournament, Marshall was sixth in the team sweepstakes competition. Individual finalists included:

  • Christian Adams, a junior psychology/pre-med major from Ona, W.Va., was sixth in Poetry Interpretation and sixth in Prose Interpretation.
  • Victoria Ledford, a sophomore chemistry/pre-med major from Burnsville, W.Va., was sixth in Communication Analysis.
  • Taryss Mandt, a freshman University College student from Arlington, Va., was sixth in Programmed Oral Interpretation and fourth in Informative Speaking.

During the Honors portion of the swing tournament on Sunday, Marshall finished in third place in the team competition. Individual standouts included:

  • Ledford placed second in Communication Analysis, second in Persuasion and fifth in Duo Interpretation with Adams. Adams also placed fifth in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Mandt placed third in Programmed Oral Interpretation and third in Informative Speaking.
  • Erin Jorden, a freshman history education major from Wheeling, W.Va., was third in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Josh Gainer, a junior political science major, placed sixth in Poetry Interpretation.

The week before the West Chester event, Marshall sophomore Matt Osteen, competing for the Thundering Word, was the champion of both tournaments in a two-day debate tournament at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa.

Osteen, a bio-chemistry/pre-med major from Jefferson, W.Va., was Marshall's lone debater. In addition to his two championships, he was awarded the third-best speaker award at both tournaments, helping Marshall place third in the two-day competition.

 

Marshall Coach Danny Ray said the tournament is considered one of the most competitive in the nation.


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Wednesday October 24, 2012
Contact: Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Autism Society board to meet at Marshall University this weekend, 304-696-2332

Autism Society board to meet at Marshall University this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Autism Society of America has selected the West Virginia Autism Training Center and Marshall University's Huntington campus as the site for its fall board of directors meeting, which will take place Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27.

"The board of directors is honored to convene this weekend at Marshall University, an institution highly regarded as a national leader supporting students with autism," said Jim Ball, executive chairman of the Autism Society Board of Directors. "The Autism Society commends Marshall University on its many years of positive work, including supporting the society's initiatives to make college more accessible for those on the spectrum. West Virginia also has special significance as the home state of Ruth Sullivan, the first president of the Autism Society, who has given so much of herself to the organization and its cause for the last 47 years."

The Autism Society, the nation's leading grassroots autism organization, exists to improve the lives of all affected by autism. This is accomplished by increasing public awareness about the day-to-day issues faced by people on the spectrum, advocating for appropriate services for individuals across the lifespan, and providing the latest information regarding treatment, education, research and advocacy.

"We are excited to welcome the Autism Society board of directors to Marshall University and honored to have been selected as the site for their fall meeting," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center.  "We will have the opportunity to provide the board with presentations about our work with families and educators of individuals with autism spectrum disorders throughout our state. We will also highlight our College Support Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome, which has become a national model for universities throughout the United States."

The West Virginia Autism Training Center was established by the West Virginia Legislature in 1983 and housed at Marshall University. Since that time, the center has served more than 2,500 West Virginians with autism spectrum disorders and their families, educators and others significant in their lives. A variety of resources and services are offered statewide, including a direct service intervention model called Family Focus Positive Behavior Support. The mission of the center is to provide support to individuals with autism spectrum disorders as they pursue a life of quality.

The Autism Society board will meet at the West Virginia Autism Training Center conference room in Old Main, room 315, at 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. There will be a reception that Friday from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the John Marshall Room at the Memorial Student Center. The board meeting will continue its meeting at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center. The public is welcome, Becker-Cottrill said.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Grant to support mine safety research at Marshall University


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) at Marshall University is receiving $96,306 from the U.S. Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration to support mine safety research.

 

Researchers at CEGAS will use the grant funds over the next year to develop a computer program to perform mine ventilation network planning calculations. The program will simulate a mine's ventilation system and its response to altered conditions, including external influences such as temperatures and internal influences such as mine fires.

 

The CEGAS researchers plan to incorporate the program into a virtual mine safety training academy to produce realistic mine emergency response exercises.

 

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, will serve as the principal investigator on the grant. He will be supported by research associates Dr. Jack Smith, who also serves as co-principal investigator, and Justin Chapman, as well as IT services manager Mark Lewis.

 

"This program, which we call VFIRE, will be a unique educational and training tool," Szwilski said. "Using the Internet, students and trainees will be able to log into a virtual underground mine from anywhere. They will be able to perform realistic mine emergency response exercises in collaboration with other participants, while interacting with a simulated ventilation system. We are confident VFIRE will be an innovative product that will have numerous applications including mine safety and training."

 

The grant is being awarded through the Brookwood-Sago program, which provides education and training within the mining industry. The funding is used to develop and implement training and related materials for mine emergency preparedness, as well as for the prevention of accidents in underground mines.

 

"We can never over-emphasize the importance of training, especially in the area of mine emergency response," said Joseph A. Main, assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health, when the awards were made last month. "These grants enable organizations that are dedicated to mine safety to develop programs that may one day save miners' lives."

 

The Brookwood-Sago program was established through a provision in the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006. The grants were named in remembrance of 13 men who died in two explosions at the Jim Walter Resources Inc. No. 5 Mine in Brookwood, Ala., in 2001, and 12 men who died in an explosion at the Sago Mine in Tallmansville, W.Va., in 2006.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University launching DegreeWorks

Program enables students, faculty to easily view students' academic progress

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is in the process of launching DegreeWorks, a degree-auditing and tracking tool to be used by both faculty and students.


The program is currently available to all faculty and academic advisors and will be available to students through their myMU account starting Wednesday, Oct. 24.


Students are encouraged to stop by the Memorial Student Center between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday to learn more about the program and how to use it. Students who visit the information table during that time can register to win an iPad or free books for the spring semester (up to a $500 value).


DegreeWorks is used to track students' academic achievement based on the requirements for his or her selected major as determined by the Marshall University course catalog.


Using DegreeWorks, students and faculty can easily view the students' academic progress toward a degree, review the requirements already completed, and use the provided information to plan out the remaining requirements to complete a degree at Marshall University.


Dr. Corley Dennison, associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies, said the program is easy to use and will assist students with class registration.


"DegreeWorks allows students up to the minute tracking on the path to graduation," Dennison said. "With a couple of mouse clicks, students will see the courses they've taken and the classes they need to take."


DegreeWorks provides students with information that helps them focus on academic goals and how to achieve them. The program also includes a feature to help students who are considering changing majors.


To learn more about DegreeWorks, visit www.marshall.edu/degreeworks or contact the Student Resource Center.


Starting Wednesday, Oct. 24, students can log in to DegreeWorks and begin using its reporting and auditing capabilities. To do so, students should log in to myMU, and click on the DegreeWorks link on the Student Information tab.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall senior new president of National Student Council for SAME

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nathan S O'Kane, a Marshall University senior from Alexandria, Va., is the new president of the National Student Council for the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME). 

 

"It's an honor, absolutely," O'Kane said of being elected in January of 2012 and taking office as president at the beginning of the 2012 fall semester. "I'm very proud to do this. It feels good to represent Marshall University."

 

SAME is the premier professional military engineering association in the United States, facilitating interaction between the public and private sectors to enhance engineering support to national security.

 

Its membership comprises more than 20,000 leaders representing the uniformed military services as well as numerous government agencies, nonprofit associations, academic institutions and private-sector firms.

 

O'Kane, who will graduate from Marshall next May with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.S.E.), said SAME has 49 student chapters, with representatives from each region of the continental United States. The national student chapter membership has reached about 750.

 

At a student chapter workshop earlier this month in St. Louis, representatives from the different regions discussed successes of student chapters and challenges they face. They agreed on the idea of creating an annual report "to measure the student chapters' health," O'Kane said. Also, student chapters can now earn the honor of "distinguished chapter," he said.

 

"That's something to strive for," O'Kane said. "We got a lot done. Most importantly, we came up with a way of measuring the health of the student chapters. None of the chapters are the same. This has to do with the big picture and how close they are following the strategic plan developed by SAME."

 

Jeff Huffman, an assistant professor of engineering at Marshall and faculty adviser for the student chapter of SAME-ASCE (a dual chapter involved with both the Society of American Military Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers), said O'Kane has a "high energy level."

 

"Nathan energized our MU student chapter as president in 2011-2012 and I am positive that he will do the same for the National Student Council of SAME," Huffman said.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 23, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall, RCBI host roundtable discussion to celebrate Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge awards

University to partner in federal jobs initiative


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and its Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI) hosted a roundtable discussion focused on spurring job growth in regional economies. Marshall was selected to host the event, which was convened by U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, because the university and RCBI are key players in one of two West Virginia projects recently selected for funding through the federal Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge.

 

At the roundtable held at the RCBI facility in Huntington, Rahall, officials from Marshall and representatives from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration (EDA), the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development joined local businesses to discuss how federal investments in southern West Virginia can facilitate economic growth and job creation in the region.

 

Officials joining Rahall for the roundtable included Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president, Marshall University; Matt Erskine, acting assistant secretary for economic development, U.S. Department of Commerce; Earl Gohl, federal co-chairman of the Appalachian Regional Commission; Bobby Lewis, state director, rural development, U.S. Department of Agriculture; and Keith Burdette, secretary, West Virginia Department of Commerce.

 

Rounding out the panel were representatives of RCBI, Concord University, TechConnect West Virginia, the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve, Carbon Fiber Composites, Collaborative for the 21st Century, the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the West Virginia Community Development Hub and the National Capital Investment Fund. The moderator was Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research.

 

Panel participants addressed a number of topics, including the network of partnerships that will carry out the Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge projects, the state of entrepreneurship and how the grants will advance other economic development activities in the region.

 

The two West Virginia projects funded through the Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge include the Southern West Virginia Rural Jobs Accelerator, which will receive $717,985 in federal funds, and the West Virginia Value Chain Cluster Initiative, which was awarded $815,000. The West Virginia initiatives were two of 13 funded from a national pool of 62 applicants.

 

In the Southern West Virginia Rural Jobs Accelerator, the Marshall University Research Corporation and RCBI are partnering with TechConnect West Virginia, the Concord University Research and Development Corporation, and the National Capital Investment Fund on an effort to create new jobs in southern West Virginia. The partners will use the grant funding to concentrate on the expansion of manufacturing and tourism by providing technical assistance, workforce development, entrepreneurism support and a wealth of collaborated resources in Fayette, Logan, McDowell, Mercer, Mingo, Monroe, Raleigh, Summers and Wyoming counties.

 

The second award, for the West Virginia Value Chain Cluster Initiative, is a statewide project that will expand the business and financial capacity of four regional food-related "value chain clusters." It will deliver a comprehensive and integrated set of hands-on technical assistance and coaching services that will further strengthen management, operational and financial expertise of the clusters. The primary objective is to support the clusters' ability to increase capacity and extend their impact and the long-term sustainability of their value chains.

 

The Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge is an interagency collaboration combining the resources of the EDA, the USDA, the ARC and the Delta Regional Authority into one funding opportunity focused on regional approaches to rural economic growth. The competition was established last summer to bring greater federal attention and collaboration to the needs of rural communities and spur job creation and economic growth in rural regions across the country.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 22, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cyber safety summit takes place Oct. 30 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is sponsoring a free cyber safety summit beginning at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30, according to John Sammons, assistant professor of Integrated Science and Technology and director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

 

The summit will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse and the Memorial Student Center  on the Huntington campus from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is for adults, college students and younger students aged 12-14.

 

During the sessions, participants can learn how to prevent cyber bullying, keep themselves and their families safe online, handle the dangers of social media, keep their information and computers safe and identify scams. In addition, they can find out how and why criminals target them and more.

 

The event is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Science & Technology, the FBI, and the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

 

To reserve a seat, e-mail sammons17@gapps.marshall.edu.


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Monday October 22, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Biomedical sciences doctoral students take top awards at regional conference


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two biomedical sciences doctoral students from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine captured first place in both categories of a research competition held earlier this month in conjunction with the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference.

 

They were among more than 40 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows from Marshall, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky and Ohio University competing at the conference, which was held Oct. 12 at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at Charleston Area Medical Center.

 

Marshall biomedical sciences Ph.D. candidate Johannes Fahrmann received first place in the oral presentation category of the competition for a presentation about his research to explore the effects of omega-3 fatty acids in late stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

 

Rounak Nande, who is also a doctoral student in the university's biomedical sciences program, was awarded first place in the poster category for a poster describing his project to help develop a delivery system for targeted gene therapy to improve the treatment of prostate cancer.

 

Fahrmann said the conference was a valuable experience and he hopes to continue his involvement with the event in the future.

 

"The conference was aimed at networking, collaborations and showcasing the research being conducted by students at the attending universities," he added. "I was given the honor and privilege to represent Marshall University through an oral presentation describing my cancer research, and was very pleased to receive the overall award. Neither the award nor the conference itself could have come to fruition without the dedicated work of the organizing committee, which included our own graduate student Allison Wolf."

 

He also expressed appreciation to his faculty mentor, Dr. Elaine Hardman, Marshall professor of biochemistry and microbiology.

 

Hardman praised Fahrmann's work, saying, "Johannes is an outstanding senior graduate student who will do well in research. The presentation he made was completely his own work he developed the idea, wrote a grant, obtained the funding to do the work and has excellent results. His work has clear clinical relevance and, we hope, will apply to enhancing cancer therapy in the near future. He is a leader in the department and an outstanding role model for the younger graduate students. I am delighted with his success and to have him for a student."

 

Nande said of the experience, "I, too, felt privileged to take part in the first-ever ARCC conference put together by the four universities. I would like to thank my mentor at Marshall, Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, and my collaborators from the Tri-State Regional Cancer Center in Ashland, Ky., Dr. Michael Gossman and Dr. Jeffrey Lopez, for having confidence in me to present our research."

 

Claudio, who is an associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology and director of the McKown Translational Genomics Research Institute, said he was pleased with Nande's success at the conference and emphasized the potential importance of the student's research.

 

"A major challenge for effective gene therapy is the ability to specifically deliver nucleic acids and potentially toxic gene products directly into diseased tissue. This system Ron helped develop in our lab allows for the specific delivery of smart biological drugs to diseased tissues using the blood stream. The advantage of this technique is that the therapeutic viruses are released in a concentrated manner in the diseased tissue, eliciting an enhanced therapeutic effect while minimizing complications," added Claudio.

 

Two additional Marshall graduate students, Kristeena Ray and Sarah Mathis, were selected as winners in their categories of the poster competition Ray for a poster showcasing her research into the role of epigenetics in endometriosis-associated pain and Mathis for a poster describing her work to help develop a test that could make possible individualized chemotherapy treatments. Ray works in the lab of Dr. Nalini Santanam, Marshall professor of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology. Claudio serves as Mathis's faculty mentor.

 

The conference was organized and hosted by the four institutions with the goal of expanding the field of cell biology research and fostering interactions among scientists at the universities in the Ohio Valley/mid-Appalachian region. In addition to the oral and poster presentations, the program featured keynote speaker Dr. Vinay Pathak, a senior investigator in HIV drug resistance at the National Cancer Institute, and networking opportunities for more than 80 students and faculty members who participated in the program. The conference was funded through a grant from the American Society for Cell Biology.

 

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Photo:  Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine biomedical sciences Ph.D. students Johannes Fahrmann, standing, and Rounak Nande, seated, captured first place in their respective categories at a research competition held earlier this month in conjunction with the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference. Fahrmann won the oral presentation category and Nande took first place in the poster category. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Monday October 22, 2012
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Storyteller, educator among those recognized with 'Because of You' awards for contributions to coalfields heritage



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A retired miner who travels the state telling schoolchildren about the early days of the industry and the coordinator of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College's mine management program were among nine people recognized earlier this month with "Because of You" awards for significant contributions to the state's coalfields heritage. The awards were presented as part of the 2012 Miners' Celebration held Oct. 4 at Tamarack.

Those honored at the celebration included (with links to YouTube videos about each honoree shown at the ceremony) Bill Alderman, assistant professor and coordinator of the mine management program at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College (Educator of the Year Award); John W. Brown III, former president of Brown Equipment and Machine (Equipment Innovation Award - posthumous); Chuck Farmer, president of Rouster Wire Rope and Rigging (Equipment Innovation Award); Clarence Martin, chief executive officer/chief financial officer of State Electric Supply Company (Management Professional Award); Kenneth Perdue, director of safety operations at Alpha Natural Resources (Safety Professional Award); Fred Powers, storyteller and retired miner (Community Involvement Award); Page Reed, owner of Emerald Marine Products Corporation (Engineering Award); Linda Raines Torre, owner of Decota Consulting Company Inc. (Women in Mining Award); and Art Weisberg, owner and founder of State Electric Supply Company (Community Investment Award).

McDowell County native and bestselling author Homer Hickam, who wrote "Rocket Boys" and other memoirs about growing up in the mining community of Coalwood, also was on hand to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award. The program concluded with a salute to the community effort to build a memorial to the victims of the Upper Big Branch mine disaster. The monument, which stands along state Route 3 in Whitesville, was dedicated in July.

Approximately 200 representatives of the state's mining industry gathered for the conference, which also highlighted successes in coalfield community development.

The Miners' Celebration was a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; Strategic Solutions LLC; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

Sponsors included Marshall University, State Electric Supply Co., the West Virginia Division of Energy and West Virginia Executive. Contributors were Alpha Natural Resources, Brickstreet Insurance, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP and The State Journal.

For more information about the 2012 Miners' Celebration or the "Because of You" awards, contact Dennis Jarvis at 304-696-3506.


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Friday October 19, 2012
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall University Forensic Science professor presents research at international meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program, presented research results at the International Symposium of Fire Investigation Science and Technology (ISFI 2012) meeting at the University of Maryland, College Park, Oct. 15-17.

 

ISFI 2012 was the fifth presentation of this biennial professional symposium emphasizing the application of modern fire science and technology to fire investigations and analyses.

 

ISFI 2012 accepted more than 60 papers covering the entire spectrum of fire investigation science and technology. Fire investigation scientists and experts from 10 countries across four continents presented papers. The international gathering was organized by the National Association of Fire Investigators (NAFI).

 

Rankin's presentation is based on research by Dana Greely, MSFS (May 2012) who is currently working as a trace evidence chemist for the Hamilton County Coroner's Office in Cincinnati, Ohio.  At the Tri-State  Fire Academy in Huntington, Greely and Bob Sullivan, Certified Fire Investigator for the Cabell County Prosecutor's Office, performed a number of control burns of gasoline and kerosene on carpet resulting in "pour patterns" sometimes found at fire scenes where such liquids were used as accelerants.  Her subsequent measurement of the residual liquids in the burned carpet has overturned the "traditional wisdom" about where to best sample pour patterns at a fire scene. 

 

Greely previously presented her research at a meeting of the West Virginia Chapter of the International Association of Arson Investigators in the fall of 2011 and at the American Academy of Forensic Science in Atlanta last February.  "Her presentation in the fall 2011 led to an opportunity to do a full scale burn of a house in Parkersburg used for fire training," Rankin said.  Results of that full scale burn confirmed the smaller scale tests at the West Virginia Fire Academy in Huntington and are included in the presentation at the ISFI 2012 meeting.

 

This research was supported by the cooperative agreement "Interpretation of Ignitable Liquid Residues in Fire Debris Analysis: Effect of Competitive Adsorption, Development of an Expert System and Assessment of the False Positive/Incorrect Assignment Rate," project number 2010-DN-BX-K272 through the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The project is slated to continue through 2013.  Five Marshall graduate students currently are participating in the project along with Dr. Nicholas Petraco, an associate professor at the City University of New York.  Rankin is the principal investigator of the project.


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Friday October 19, 2012
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Marvin L. Stone Library at Marshall rededicated



School of Journalism celebrates opening of Marvin L. Stone Reading Room

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marvin L. Stone Library at Marshall University was rededicated today during a ceremony in The Parthenon student newspaper newsroom on the Huntington campus. 

 

The highlight of the rededication was a ribbon cutting that marked the official opening of the Marvin L. Stone Reading Room, which is now located inside the newsroom. Terry Stone, Marvin Stone's widow, was on hand to cut the ribbon.

 

"He would be so proud," Terry Stone said of her late husband as she addressed the crowd.

 

Stone was a 1947 Marshall alumnus, graduating from the School of Journalism. He was best known as Editor-in-Chief of U.S. News & World Report, and had a career in journalism that spanned 40 years.

 

The Marvin L. Stone Reading Room has many items on display, including some of his papers and personal items. Those include letters from Presidents Jimmy Carter, George Bush and Ronald Reagan, and press credentials that gave Stone access to many major events. Students can access Stone digital archives from the reading room.

 

The Parthenon newsroom was packed with students, staff, faculty and guests, including Marvin L. Stone's cousin, Michael Clark, and his daughter, Jamie Stone, for the ribbon cutting. The reading room formerly was used by journalism broadcast students for editing. 

 

"The students are curious about the room back here," said Dr. George Arnold, a former MU journalism professor and colleague of Stone's. "They want to know more about Marvin Stone."

 

And they will, said Janet Dooley, interim dean of the School of Journalism.

 

"We, as professors, can tell the stories, but here, with gifts from the Stone family and several items lent from the (Marvin) Stone collection ( in the Drinko Library), we're surrounded by only a few of the markers of his career and life. His legacy becomes very real and tangible to visitors."

 

Terry Stone said her husband was very dedicated to Marshall.

 

"I think it was the fact that he learned so much and he was appreciated so much, even as a student," she said. "He was a typical newsman and I reveled in the fact that he knew people, helped people and did what he wanted to do. It just made me very proud of him."

 

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Photo: Terry Stone cuts the ribbon to officially open the Marvin L. Stone Reading Room at Marshall University. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University. 


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Friday October 19, 2012
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Celebration of Octubafest includes two events on Huntington campus



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University Tuba and Euphonium Studio will present solo performances to kick off the annual celebration of Octubafest.  The first of two events will be held at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, in the Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Marshall's Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, "Tubonium," will perform a concert with an array of Halloween-themed compositions to celebrate TUBAWEEN!  This year the program will feature a combined ensemble including Marshall University Department of Music students and faculty, local high school students and community members. Everyone is invited to attend and enjoy the festive costumes, decorations and free candy.  There will be "kid-friendly" activities and costumes are welcome.  The concert will be at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29, in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus.

 

"This year's tuba/euphonium ensemble is the largest in the history of the university," said Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba. "Along with their high school guests the ensemble will feature nearly 30 tuba and euphonium players in full Halloween costume.  Be sure to come early for candy and the legendary pumpkin chocolate chip cookies!"


Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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Thursday October 18, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Countdown to Commencement is Nov. 7-8 at Marshall University



Graduates can take care of pre-commencement responsibilities in central location

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct Countdown to Commencement from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 7 and 8, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

 

The purpose of Countdown to Commencement is to assist those participating in this year's winter commencement, set for 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16, at Cam Henderson Center, in preparation for the event. It is designed to assist graduates in communicating with campus administrative offices in a central location.

 

"Countdown to Commencement has  proven to be very popular among our graduates, both in the winter and the spring," said MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson. "With everything in a central location, it saves them a lot of running as they take care of those pre-commencement responsibilities. We encourage everyone who plans to take part in the December ceremony to come by on November 7th or 8th."

 

Winter commencement is for July, August and December 2012 graduates.

 

The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement:

 

Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diploma; confirm commencement participation; obtain commencement instructions; receive recognition cords for military service or ROTC; pick up honor cords and tassels (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to ask any questions related to commencement.

 

Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their caps and gowns, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings, graduation announcements and much more. They also can order personalized graduation announcements at this time.

 

Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2012 rings. All rings are on sale and priced as low as $169 for women and $189 for men.

 

Classic Photography - Cap and Gown portraits will be taken. There is no sitting fee, no obligation to purchase and free proofs will be available within 24 hours of the sitting.

 

Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

 

Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

 

Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career paths. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for JOBTRAX (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

 

Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan counseling interviews.

 

Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about federal student loan consolidation programs.

 

Campus ID Office - Issues regarding students' HigherOne accounts or Points accounts may be resolved.

 

Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.

 

For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Thursday October 18, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall student broadcaster twice named national finalist

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Leannda Carey, a student broadcaster with WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, was twice named a national finalist in the 2011 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the categories of radio sports reporting and radio in-depth reporting, respectively.

The awards were presented at the recent SPJ Convention and National Journalism Conference at the Marriott Harbor Beach Resort in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists.  WMUL-FM Station Manager Leannda Carey twice received recognition in the SPJ's National Mark of Excellence Contest for her work and that is no small accomplishment," said  Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

"These national finalist awards are further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications."

The national finalist award-winning entry in radio sports reporting 4-year college/university category from Marshall was:

 "The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Carey, a graduate student from Wellsburg. It was broadcast during the Marshall vs. Ohio University football pre-game show in Athens, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011.

The national finalist award-winning entry in radio in-depth reporting 4-year college/university category from Marshall was:

"Minding the Meters:  Huntington Municipal Parking Board," written and produced by Carey. It was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, April 28, 2011.

Overall there are 39 categories for print, radio, television and online journalism in the SPJ National Mark of Excellence contest.  There were approximately 4,000 entries from schools across SPJ's 12 regions in the contest.  SPJ has been presenting the Mark of Excellence Awards since 1972.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Weekend at Marshall features marching festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host the Tri-State Marching Festival Saturday, Oct. 20. Band performances begin at 11 a.m. in Joan C. Edwards Stadium on Marshall's Huntington campus. Stadium gates will open at 10:15 a.m.

According to Marshall's band director, Steve Barnett, this is the largest band festival of its kind in this part of the country. Bands from West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and Virginia have been separated into categories based on the number of performers.

Marshall's Marching Thunder will also perform an exhibition at the conclusion of the performances at approximately 9 p.m.

Admission to the festival is $5 per person of school age and up. Public parking will be available for $2 in the south end of the west stadium parking lot until the lot is full. After that, patrons may park in the garage on Third Avenue and any other available spaces near the stadium.

"The Tri-State Marching Festival is a tremendous opportunity to showcase Marshall University," Barnett said. "We expect to bring more than 10,000 to the stadium, many of whom are prospective college students, with their parents."

The event is sponsored by Marching Thunder and Kappa Kappa Psi, the band honorary fraternity.


Click to view schedule.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First Unity Walk Celebration expected to draw hundreds of MU students



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Hundreds of Marshall University students are expected to gather on the Huntington campus on Wednesday, Oct. 24, to take part in the first We Are Family! Unity Walk Celebration.

Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said the event was created to give all Marshall students the opportunity to come together to celebrate their unity and the fact that they are all part of the same "family," and to recognize their individual differences.

"We all rejoice and celebrate being a part of the Marshall family," Cooley said. "I don't know of any other university where students have as much pride and exhilaration about their university as Marshall University students. We recognize that with the massive amount of students and the large number of organizations, we are all part of the same family, but we have never come together to celebrate together. We've never celebrated as a family."

That's the goal - to celebrate as a family - of Cooley and the Center for African American Students' Programs, the Student Government Association, Student Affairs, Greek Affairs, the Athletic Department and Residence Services, all of which are sponsoring the event.

"We want to increase and instill more pride in who we are," Cooley said. "We are all Marshall."

The Unity Walk Celebration begins at 6 p.m. at or near the Memorial Student Center plaza. Students who are not affiliated with any organization will meet on the plaza. Students from organizations will meet in groups in a line expected to extend from Buskirk Field to Old Main to Drinko Library to Corbly Hall. Cooley is expecting more than 500 students to participate.

A DJ on the plaza will "crank up," Cooley said, the song "We Are Family," which will be the cue for the student organizations to begin walking toward the plaza, where they will meet up with the other students. Many will be carrying banners, Cooley said, and each group will have its own chant.

"They'll arrive here on the plaza and we will have celebratory music," Cooley said. Each group will have a designated speaker, who will talk for 30 seconds. The students will then be treated to food and drinks. 

Cooley said all student organizations, including all athletic teams, are expected to be represented.

Faculty and staff are invited to participate, as are Marshall alumni in the community. Cooley said he already has received requests to conduct the event as part of homecoming activities beginning next year.
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Wednesday October 17, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University International Festival celebrates diversity

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Tri-State's international community is diverse and growing. From students to professionals, people from all over the globe now call our region home. On Saturday, Nov. 3, local residents will have a new opportunity to learn more about the traditions and foods of other cultures.

 

Marshall University's International Festival, now in its 49th year, will take things to a new level when the event moves to the Big Sandy Superstore Arena after outgrowing its previous location on Marshall University's Huntington campus. International restaurants from the Tri-State area will join the event featuring sample size portions of their cuisine for festivalgoers.

 

The festival is open to the public from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 3 and is free of charge to enter. Food tickets will be available for purchase, allowing guests to sample a variety of dishes from all around the world.

 

More than 400 international students and members of the Tri-State community representing 60 countries will set up displays about their native cultures, dress and music.

 

"This is a great step forward for a long-running Marshall event," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs.

 

Music and dance from many different countries and cultures will also be featured, including Middle Eastern music and dance by TarabRaqs and Latin music by Comparsa!.

"We're using all the genres to engage with the world without having to leave Huntington," Egnor said.

 

Sponsored by FoodFair Supermarkets, the Marshall University International Festival is partnering with Cabell County Schools and Mountwest Community and Technical College to expand the festival and provide a memorable experience for all ages, including children and families.

 

Participating restaurants include: The Original Hibachi Japanese Steakhouse; El Ranchito - Authentic Mexican Restaurant; Crumpets & Tea (British menu); Mama Rosa's (Mediterranean menu); Nawab Indian Cuisine; Wonderful Chinese Restaurant; Thai House Restaurant; The Red Door - A Gathering Place . . . (Ciao Bella Healthy Italian); La Famiglia - A Southern Italian Deli and Marshall Dining by Sodexo.

 

For more information about the festival and more about the participating restaurants, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.


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Wednesday October 17, 2012
Contact: Haven Campbell, Marketing & Event Graduate Assistant, 304-696-2370

Career Services to feature etiquette expert at upcoming dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its biannual etiquette dinner, featuring etiquette consultant Terri Thompson, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, in Memorial Student Center room BE5, located on the lower level.

During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, and answer any questions students might have.

All current Marshall students are encouraged to attend. However, juniors and seniors will be given preference. Professional dress is required.

Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services Center. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner. Cancellations must be made within 72 hours of the event to receive a full refund.

This fall will mark the seventh time Thompson has attended the event. Thompson is an etiquette coach and reinvention expert who started the companies, Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

For more information, contact Career Services by phone at 304-696-2370 or by e-mail at  career-services@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Cycling Club plans Spin-a-thon for Daniel Hughes



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Cycling Club will host a Spin-a-thon at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25.

The Spin-a-thon will consist of three 30-minute spin classes (7 to 7:30 p.m., 7:45 to 8:15 p.m., and 8:30 to 9 p.m.) and will be instructed by Stephanie Vlahos. The proceeds from the event will go to benefit Daniel Hughes, a local teen who was hit by a dump truck while riding his bike to class on The Ohio State University campus.

The cost is a minimum $10 donation per bike, per class, and there are 24 bikes available per class. For specific details and registration information, visit the Facebook event page "MUCC Spin-A-Thon for Daniel Hughes" or email Corey Clark at marshalluniversitycyclingclub@gmail.com.

 Related websites are: 


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Application process begins for Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -
Applications are now being accepted for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the spring 2013 semester, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Students who received a Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver for fall term, 2012, are not eligible for a waiver for spring 2013.

  • Deadline for the applications is Friday, Nov. 9. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition/dates.html.
  • Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for spring 2013 by Friday, Dec. 7, in order to receive a waiver. Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Dec. 7 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.
Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/tuitionwaivers.asp. Completed waiver applications must be submitted in person or by U.S. Mail. Faxed or e-mailed applications will not be accepted.

For more information, contact the Graduate College office at 304-696-6606.


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Tuesday October 16, 2012
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Two University of Cincinnati writers to read from their work at MU



HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Novelist Chris Bachelder and Danielle Cadena Deulen, a poet and essayist, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18, in Smith Hall 154 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The readings, part of the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series at Marshall, are free to the public and will be followed by book signings.

Bachelder is a novelist, e-book pioneer and frequent contributor to the publications McSweeney's Quarterly Concern and The Believer. Born in Minneapolis, Minn., he grew up in Christiansburg, Va.

Bachelder received his M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Florida at Gainesville. His novel Lessons in Virtual Tour Photography was McSweeney's first e-book, which earned more than 45,000 downloads by 2004.

Bachelder is best known for his scrapbook-style novels, Bear v. Shark (2001) and U.S.! (2006). His fourth and most recent book, Abbott Awaits, was published in 2011 at Louisiana State University Press. He currently lives in Ohio where he is an assistant professor of fiction in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Cincinnati.

Deulen's collection of poems, Lovely Asunder, won the Miller Williams Arkansas Poetry Prize and was published with the University of Arkansas Press in 2011. Her memoir, The Riots, published with University of Georgia Press in 2011, won the 2010 AWP Prize in Creative Nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2011 Grub Street National Book Prize in Nonfiction, and won the 2012 Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) New Writers Award.

Formerly, she was a Jay C. and Ruth Halls Poetry Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her poetry and essays have appeared in such journals as The Utne Reader, The Missouri Review, The Iowa Review, Smartish Pace, and The Indiana Review.

Deulen received her M.F.A. in Creative Writing from George Mason University and her Ph.D. in English from the University of Utah. She currently lives in Ohio where she is an assistant professor of poetry in the Graduate Creative Writing Program at the University of Cincinnati. 
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Monday October 15, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lots to close for construction of new engineering complex at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As construction begins soon at Marshall University on the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, a 145,000 square-foot, 480-foot long facility, parking adjustments will be necessary for MU students, faculty and staff, James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety, said today.

 

"For more than two years, we've been planning for the relocation of parking spaces that will be lost due to the construction of the Weisberg Engineering Complex," Terry said. "That's why we built the 6th Avenue Parking Facility before this construction begins. 

 

"Often, with progress comes some inconvenience. We ask for understanding and patience as our community has to alter their campus parking habits. While a construction project of this magnitude will change the face of our campus, we do have enough parking locations to accommodate our students, faculty, staff and visitors."

 

In all, about 150 spaces on F Lots between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on the north side of Third Avenue will be closed beginning the evening of this Friday, Oct. 19. Also, the first five rows of spaces at the east end of the general lot on the north side of Commerce Avenue - formerly home to  Weiler Steel - will be used for staging during construction, leaving 250 spots open on that lot.

 

Terry said other parking options include the new 411-space parking garage on 6th Avenue where people can park for 50 cents an hour. Employees, if they wish, can pay $40 a month to park in the garage. The west lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium can be used, or people may upgrade their permits and park in the Third Avenue garage across from Cam Henderson Center.

 

Thundering Herd fans have been tailgating for years on the F Lots before Marshall football games. They, too, will be asked to find a new home to tailgate. Marshall has three home games remaining this season: Oct. 27 vs. Central Florida, Nov. 3 vs. Memphis and Nov. 17 vs. Houston, all Saturdays.

 

"We understand the importance of this new facility, and that a lot of people will need to alter their game-day routines in the name of progress," said Mike Hamrick, Marshall's Director of Athletics. "But, we have the greatest fans in the country. If they want to continue tailgating, I'm sure they'll seek out and find a new place somewhere in the vicinity of the stadium. We appreciate everyone's cooperation."

 

Tailgaters could move to the general lot across Commerce Avenue, the lot on the west side of the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories, or a lot on the south side of Sixth Avenue.

Construction on the $50 million facility is expected to take 28 months, meaning it is projected to open in early 2015.


Click on map to view in larger PDF format.


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Monday October 15, 2012
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police receive United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police today received a United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice for their collaborations on digital forensics, DNA testing and investigations.

 

U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin presented the award to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and West Virginia State Police Col. C.R. "Jay" Smithers at the 2012 U.S. Attorney's Law Enforcement and Victim Assistance Awards Ceremony at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

The award was given in recognition of the noteworthy partnership and collaboration between the Marshall University Forensic Science Center and the West Virginia State Police.

 

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, and Cpl. Robert J. Boggs, a Digital Forensics Investigator with West Virginia State Police, were also present for the presentation of the award.

 

Goodwin said, "The West Virginia State Police and Marshall University Forensic Science Center's unique partnership has not only brought justice to countless crime victims, but it's allowed law enforcement to identify and apprehend criminals using innovative technology. I am proud to present the United States Attorney's Award for Innovation in Justice for their outstanding work."

 

The annual awards ceremony, hosted by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of West Virginia, recognizes commendable service of federal, state and local law enforcement officers, as well as other leaders who have made significant contributions on behalf of the criminal justice system in the state.

 

"This is a very significant milestone in Marshall's history," Kopp said. "To be recognized along with the elite law enforcement agencies for the work we do to assist law enforcement in solving crimes is a testament to just how powerful and how advanced our Forensic Science program is here at Marshall University. We're one of a kind and I'm very proud of what they do. The work our folks do on behalf of local, state and national law enforcement is very, very important in solving crimes that would be most likely unsolvable."

 

Smithers said the West Virginia State Police partnership with Marshall University's Forensic Science Center is invaluable.

 

"This collaborative effort in a university setting allows us to take advantage of high tech tools, software and innovative thinking," Smithers said.  "The field of digital forensics is constantly changing and our partnership with Marshall University allows for better opportunities to detect, investigate and successfully prosecute those involved in criminal activities."

 

Fenger said the partnership between the West Virginia State Police and Marshall's Forensic Science Center has developed over a 20-year period.  "We have developed a working relationship that addresses the needs of the West Virginia population in the areas of public safety, but it also benefits the students of the Forensic Science graduate program because they get to observe how law enforcement handles criminal investigations, and they get to interact with working professionals," he said.

 

Fenger added that the award is important to Marshall's Forensic Science Center because it recognizes the hard work and dedication of its staff in all facets of the organization.

 

Boggs said the partnership between Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police is a model of true success and real world benefits to both the university and state police. "More importantly, I believe the benefits to the citizens of West Virginia are what really stand out in this collaboration," he added.

 

"Efforts at the West Virginia State Police Digital Forensics Unit (housed at the Forensic Science Center) have led to the prosecution of many types of people and crimes, especially those who choose to victimize the ones we cherish the most in society, our children," Boggs said. "In my opinion, that alone is a success directly realized by the partnership between Marshall University and the West Virginia State Police."

 

Boggs said being able to perform digital forensics is a very complicated task. "Having a law enforcement investigative element placed inside an academic institution provides a chance to combine resources and efforts to do real good for the public," he said. "Digital forensics changes very rapidly, and having access to academic resources from professors and graduate students as well as access to the best hardware and software really makes a difference when investigating, and ultimately having a successful prosecution."


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Friday October 12, 2012
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Marshall's 6th Avenue parking facility fully operational beginning Oct. 17



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's new Sixth Avenue parking facility will become fully operational at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17, James E. Terry, director of public safety, said today. 

The 411-space garage has been open since the start of the fall semester, but not fully operational because of what Terry called "unexpected technical issues" that have since been resolved.
Hours of operation will be from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Monday through Friday, and entry will be from the 6th Avenue entrance. The entrance at the 5-1/2 alley will be closed. Because overnight parking is prohibited, all vehicles must be removed by 11 p.m. The facility is closed and secured from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Weekend hours will be based on need and special events.

The fee for parking in the facility is 50 cents an hour, cash only, and will be collected when the driver leaves the facility.  The lost ticket fee is $5.


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Thursday October 11, 2012
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University biomedical sciences students to co-host conference in Charleston

National Cancer Institute senior investigator to be guest speaker


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine biomedical sciences students, in collaboration with students from West Virginia University, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University, will host the first Appalachian Regional Cell Conference in an effort to expand the field of cell biology research in the region.


The conference is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. this Friday, Oct. 12, in Charleston at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at Charleston Area Medical Center, and is funded by a grant from the American Society for Cell Biology.


"The goal of this scientific meeting is to foster interactions among students at four universities within the Ohio Valley/mid-Appalachian region: West Virginia University, Marshall University, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University," said M. Allison Wolf, one of the conference organizers and a graduate student at Marshall. "An annual, regional meeting of students from these peer institutions will generate unique benefits emerging from a larger gathering of students, including stimulating professional networking and discovering common research interests that may lead to future collaborations and sharing of resources."


Dr. Richard Niles, senior associate dean for research and graduate education, praised the students for their efforts to coordinate the initiative.


"This is an outstanding opportunity for our graduate students to gain valuable experience in organizing and dealing with the logistics of running a scientific conference," Niles said.  "It will also develop their peer networking skills, which will become important for whatever career path they choose.  I am very proud of Allison for taking on this organizational task despite her demanding Ph.D. research activities."


The conference will feature keynote speaker Dr. Vinay Pathak, a senior investigator with the National Cancer Institute, whose area of study includes research on projects relating to HIV drug resistance.


For more information contact Allison Wolf at 304-696-3576.


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Marshall Recreation Center to host 4th annual Haunted Rec event to support Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is inviting kids to get ready to get active in a spooky Halloween setting as it hosts the 4th annual "Haunted Rec" event from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23. The event is free and open to the public.

The recreation center is partnering with the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's Young Professionals Committee to encourage kids to be active through the Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative.

 

The goal of the Healthy Kids, Healthy WV initiative, a program created by Generation WV, is to use the members of young professionals organizations to inspire communities across the state to make environmental changes that will reverse the current rise in childhood obesity rates. Community members can come to "Haunted Rec," the Huntington area's Healthy Kids, Healthy WV event, for entertainment and education, and leave with message points and motivation to make a difference in the community.

 

At "Haunted Rec" kids can take on an opponent as they tackle the haunted obstacle course which will include howling hurdles, creepy ladder drills, horrifying hula hoops, bone-chilling box jumps and much more. By popular demand, the Rec Center is also bringing back the Haunted House. The spooky house is full of surprises lurking around every corner.

 

All participants will be able to take part in the Rec's "Eat This Not That" challenge with a spooky, Halloween twist. They can test their food knowledge and make the most healthful choices as they decide what to eat and what to avoid.

 

Every participant will leave the Rec with a goody bag full of treats, not tricks! Participants are asked to wear costumes.

 

For more information call Marshall Recreation Center Assistant Director Michele Muth at 304-696-2943 or e-mail pallante1@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 10, 2012
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Tennessee professor to speak at MU on 1824 'election gone wrong'

Daniel Feller, Ph.D., is second speaker in Amicus Curiae fall lecture series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Daniel Feller, Ph.D., the Betty Lynn Hendrickson Professor of History at the University of Tennessee, will be the featured speaker Tuesday, Oct. 16, in the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University.

Feller's lecture, titled The People's Will Denied? Backroom Politics And The Election Of 1824, is the second in the Amicus Curiae fall 2012 series. It starts at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's Huntington campus, and is free to the public.

Feller will discuss the presidential election of 1824, which was decided in the U.S. House of Representatives, where John Quincy Adams was elected president, despite not having won the popular vote.  His discussion will focus on issues relevant to the current political environment while applying lessons learned from that contested election.

"It will be fun to talk about an 'election gone wrong' that happened long enough ago to allow us to be entertained while learning about how and why the U.S. President came to be chosen by the House of Representatives and the political context that led to and resulted from the situation," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy. "We are particularly lucky to have Dan Feller to teach us.  He is not only an award-winning history professor, he is also the director of the University of Tennessee's Center for Jacksonian America.  Dr. Feller was the senior academic adviser for the PBS documentary Andrew Jackson:  Good, Evil and the Presidency, and he brings extraordinary depth to what promises to be an entertaining and educational discussion."

Feller also is the editor and director of The Papers of Andrew Jackson. His book, The Jacksonian Promise, 1815-1840, was published in 1995.

The Amicus Curiae (Friend of the Court) series is sponsored by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, and supported by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

For more information on Feller's appearance at MU, contact Proctor at 304-696-2801.

 


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Graduate College to sponsor Graduate School Fair Oct. 24

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Graduate College will sponsor a Graduate School Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24, for college students, teachers and other working professionals who are considering a graduate program at Marshall.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

"This is a great opportunity for people to learn about the graduate educational opportunities here at Marshall and talk directly to representatives from graduate programs across the university," said Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. "We'll also have information on how to apply to graduate school and on what financial support options are available."

Marshall University has 48 master's degree programs, seven doctoral degree programs and 33 graduate certificate programs, Spindel said.

For further information, contact the Graduate College by phone at 304-696-6606 or by e-mail at graduatecollege@marshall.edu.


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MU assistant professor to discuss importance of including women in process of rebuilding, creating sustainable peace



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Anara Tabyshalieva, an assistant professor in Marshall University's department of history, will speak from noon to 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26,  in the Drinko Library auditorium (room 402) on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Tabyshalieva will discuss her new book, a volume she co-edited with Albrecht Schnabel, called Defying Victimhood: Women and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding.  Published this year by the United Nations University Press, the book affirms the importance of including women in the process of rebuilding and creating sustainable peace after war. 

Too often, this collection of comparative case studies and country studies shows, women are marginalized in this process, thereby subverting the possibilities for sustainable peace.  By "defying victimhood," the authors affirm, women can become activists, peace builders and full participants in rebuilding political, economic, and social and security structures. 

Tabyshalieva's talk is part of the Women's Studies Faculty Colloquium series.  It is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will follow.

For more information, contact Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, director of Women's Studies, by e-mail at rensenbrink@marshall.edu, or by phone at 304-696-2955.


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Tuesday October 9, 2012
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Benefit concert to assist Marshall University music staff member



HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A group of music faculty members from Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will perform a benefit concert at 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, at Fellowship Baptist Church for Beverly McKinney, the school's administrative assistant, who is battling brain cancer.

The Violauta Duo, made up of Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flute, and Dr. Julio Alves, guitar, will be joined in the concert by their wives, violinist Kristen Alves and soprano Linda Dobbs, with all proceeds going to McKinney to assist with mounting medical costs.

Julio Alves said after getting past the shock of McKinney's diagnosis, he wanted to do something to help.

"This concert is our way to support Beverly and to honor her for all she has done for each one of us at our department," Alves said. "We invite everybody from our community to attend the recital and to help us raise funds for Beverly."

The concert will begin with the Violauta Duo playing "Gran duetto concertante, Op. 52" by Mauro Giuliani, "Pavane" by Gabriel Faure and two movements from "Suite Buenos Aires" by Maximo Diego Pujol. After a short intermission, the second part will feature the four performers in different chamber music combinations. First, Linda Dobbs and Kristen Alves will perform music by Howard Boatwright ("Soldier, Soldier" from Two Folk Song Settings), followed by Julio and Kristen Alves playing an arrangement of Massenet's "Meditation" from Thais. Two trios will conclude the program: Linda Dobbs and the Violauta Duo performing Saint-Saens' "Une flute invisible," and Kristen Alves and the Violauta Duo interpreting the second divertimento by G. Kummer and Libertango by A. Piazzolla.

"Making music with colleagues is always a pleasure and the pleasure is doubled when it's helping a dear friend," Wendell Dobbs said.

Julio Alves emphasized how beloved McKinney is to his family.

"Beverly is loved very much by our family," he said. "Our girls love her and always look for her when they go to Marshall, or to the ballet studio where she taught piano, and especially at church. This sudden change in her life has taken us all by surprise ... Since music is such an important part of her life as well as ours, we decided to honor her by performing this recital. Although the recital will help with some medical expenses, my primary reason for performing it is to bless her and lift her up in this challenging time. I want to give her some extra happiness in return for all the joy and love she has given our family."

Donations may also be sent to the Marshall University School of Music and Theatre, c/o Ruby Dean, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, W.Va. 25755.

For more information, contact Jaye Ike by phone at 304-696-3296 or by e-mail at jaye.ike@marshall.edu. Fellowship Baptist Church is located at 3661 U.S. 60, Barboursville, W.Va. 25504. For directions, persons may phone 304-736-8006.

----------------

Photo: Julio Alves, Kristen Alves, Linda Dobbs and Wendell Dobbs will give a benefit concert Oct. 14 to assist music staff member Beverly McKinney with medical expenses.


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Tuesday October 9, 2012
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Marshall graduate pledges $300,000 for Medical School scholarships


Don Blankenship honors mother by naming gift in her memory

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Donald L. "Don" Blankenship, a 1972 Marshall University graduate, has generously committed $300,000 over a three-year period for scholarships at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

 

Blankenship made the pledge in honor of his mother, Nancy Marie McCoy, who passed away in 1995. The first $100,000 gift was received in early September.

 

"The demographics of southern West Virginia mean that there will be a continuing and increasing need for high quality local doctors," Blankenship said. "I am fortunate to be able to contribute in a small way toward fulfilling this need, while at the same time honoring my mother's memory, helping my alma mater, and helping these gifted students to achieve their dreams of becoming doctors."

 

Ten second-year medical students who meet the financial scholarship requirements and exhibit high academic achievement will each receive $10,000 to help defray the cost of medical school tuition. The awards will be renewed for each student annually for two years, pending satisfactory academic progress.

 

The students chosen to receive the awards are:

 

  • James T. Buchanan, Jr., Chester, W.Va.
  • Rudolf Burcl, Huntington, W.Va.
  • John M. Davitt, Washington, D.C.
  • Aaron M. Dom, Wellersburg, Pa.
  • Jessica A. Layne, Milton, W.Va.
  • Andrew S. Martin, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Joseph V. Russo, Huntington, W.Va.
  • Jonathan S. Seibert, Harrisburg, N.C.
  • Stephanie L. Taylor, Cumberland, Md.
  • Adam J. Van Horn, Huntington, W.Va.

 

"We are grateful to Mr. Blankenship for his support of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and specifically his commitment to helping our students," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs. "His generous gift will go a long way in assisting our students achieve their dreams."

 

Don Blankenship is a recipient of Marshall University's Distinguished Alumnus Award, and he was inducted into the College of Business Hall of Fame in 1999. Additionally, he was the recipient of the West Virginia Society of CPAs' 2002 Outstanding Member in Business and Industry award.


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Monday October 8, 2012
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MU professor named Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University professor has been named the  first recipient of the Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year Award established by  the West Virginia Section of the  American Society of Civil Engineers (WVASCE).

Dr. Richard McCormick, a professor of engineering in the  College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE),  received the award at the WVASCE's annual meeting, which was held recently at Hawk's Nest State Park.

McCormick was nominated by his dean at Marshall University, Dr. Wael Zatar, who also is president of the WVASCE. Dr. William Pierson, professor and chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science, and Dr. Betsy Dulin, former dean of CITE and currently a professor of engineering, provided letters of support for him.

The ASCE award may be presented annually to a tenured faculty member in an engineering school in West Virginia who is a resident at the time of the nomination and a member of the WVASCE.

After knowing McCormick for nine years, Zatar said, "As the dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall University, I am really proud to have someone with the character, attitude, and professionalism of Dr. McCormick.  Talking about an outstanding professor, educator, colleague and friend, I was very fortunate to have Dr. McCormick assisting and encouraging me over the years. He is certainly among those civil engineering professors who have shaped the industry and the economy of this region." And, according to Zatar, McCormick has devoted his life to "strengthening the education of civil engineering students, providing a very positive impact on the civil engineering students, providing a very positive impact on the civil engineering profession, and enhancing the quality of life in West Virginia."

Prior to coming to Marshall McCormick spent many years at West Virginia University Institute of Technology, where he served in a variety of roles as a faculty member, department chair, interim executive vice president and vice president for academic affairs, Zatar said. Dulin was one of McCormick's  students at WVUIT before they later became colleagues at Marshall.

"Like many engineering students who went before and followed after me, I benefitted from his guidance and his example, and his ability not only to teach the required material but to mentor, advise and inspire," Dulin said. "As his colleague and former dean, I have continued to be impressed by his work ethic, his dedication to student success, and his ability to 'get things done' even when faced with roadblocks or problems of various sorts."

In addition, she said, McCormick's "character, attitude and approach to his work, his colleagues, and - first and foremost - his students,  has remained unchanged."

Pierson and McCormick have been colleagues at both WVUIT and Marshall  and,  according to Pierson, "There is no doubt that Dr. McCormick is one of the most gifted and effective professors of civil engineering that I have known."  For example, he pointed out that McCormick received the highest student rating of all undergraduate engineering professors during the spring 2011 semester results that are consistent with other evaluation cycles.  Another proof of McCormick's teaching effectiveness is the overall performance of MU engineering students on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam, Pierson said.

"Our average passing rate on the FE exam has been above 83 percent, which is above the national average of about 75 percent over the same time period," Pierson said.  "This success is, in my opinion, due in large part to the quality of the educational experience provided by Dr. McCormick in key foundation courses."

"I am very honored to be named the recipient of the first WVASCE Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year award." McCormick said.  "I was also humbled to read the very nice comments submitted by my colleagues in support of my nomination.  I have had many students go on to very successful careers in civil engineering, largely through their own hard work and dedication, and I am happy that I have been able to play a small part in their success."
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Dr. Nader G. Abraham named vice dean for research at School of Medicine

 International researcher brings NIH grants and team of researchers to medical school

Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., Dr. H.C., FAHA, an internationally-recognized researcher in the field of obesity and vascular disease, has been named the inaugural vice dean for research at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., Dr. H.C., FAHA, an internationally-recognized researcher in the field of obesity and vascular disease, has been named the inaugural vice dean for research at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, President Stephen J. Kopp and Dean Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., announced today.

Several members of Abraham's research team will begin their official duties on Nov. 1, with the entire research operation in place in early 2013.

Abraham currently serves as chairman and professor of the department of physiology and pharmacology at the University of Toledo College Of Medicine. He is also affiliated with New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., The Rockefeller University in New York and University of Catania in Italy.
 
"Dr. Abraham brings to Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine exceptional experience and a proven track record in advancing successful grant-funded research. Put simply, he is a research catalyst," Kopp said. "He is especially adept in fostering clinical translational research and building successful interdisciplinary research teams, attributes that will be of great benefit to our entire university. He most certainly will complement our efforts to expand applied research activities that yield commercially-viable discoveries."

"This is a great day for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and Marshall University. Dr. Abraham is one of the preeminent biomedical researchers in the world, and his joining our faculty raises our profile immediately," Shapiro said.

He continued, "Dr. Abraham has the unique and remarkable ability to energize and inspire others. This is illustrated by the group of scientists that will be coming with him. Recruiting any of these individuals on their own would be considered a terrific accomplishment for our school. I truly believe that Dr. Abraham is a key recruitment that will give Marshall University a significant leap forward toward becoming a premier biomedical research institution."

Widely recognized for his research on vascular disease, which is a prelude to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases including hypertension, stroke, diabetes and obesity, Abraham and his team of researchers specifically study heme oxygenase, the most potent anti-oxidant gene in the human body. The team's research also includes ways to speed up the implementation of laboratory findings into clinical therapeutic strategies for patients, i.e., translational medicine.
 
"I'm very excited about joining the faculty at Marshall University," Abraham said. "I will be focusing on translational research projects in collaboration with the clinical departments, which will be an exciting experience for our medical students. I very much enjoy working with outstanding clinicians with little basic science experience and seeing them evolve into translational researchers. Truly, Marshall offers a unique opportunity to achieve these goals."

Abraham is currently the principal investigator on two National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants focusing on stem cells-heme oxygenase, hormonal regulation of blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. Over his 30-year-plus career, Abraham has served as principal investigator or co-investigator on grants or projects totaling more than $17.3 million. As project leader for a program project in pharmacology, he has worked on five grants with total NIH funding of more than $60 million, bringing his total career grant support to more than $77 million.

Several career highlights for Abraham include the following leadership positions:

  • 1996, chairman of the Society of Hematology and Stem Cells;
  • 2000, chairman of the 1st International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, New York;
  • 2002, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Italy;
  • 2005, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Japan; and
  • 2007, chairman of the International Conference on Heme Oxygenase, Poland.

Over his career, Abraham has received dozens of awards including the following:

  • National Institute of Health, Research Career Development Award;
  • Dr. David M. Ovitz Lecturer Award, University of Calgary, Canada;
  • Distinguished Professor Award, University of Saskatoon, Canada;
  • Dean's Distinguished Award for Stem Cell Research, University of Catania, Italy;
  • Honorary doctoral degree in Pharmacy, University of Catania, Italy;      
  • Dean's Distinguished Award, New York Medical College, New York; and
  • Honored Professorship, Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science.

He has served as an invited lecturer internationally, including in China, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Copenhagen, Czech Republic and Poland. He is the author or co-author of more than 300 original articles and has mentored numerous postdoctoral and graduate students.  He is a Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Abraham brings to the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine a team of researchers including the following individuals:

  • G. Drummond, Ph.D., a former associate professor at Rockefeller University and an expert in heme oxygenase who pioneered the use of metalloporphyrins to inhibit bilirubin production, and has more than 20 years of clinical trial experience in preventing jaundice in newborn infants.
  • D. Kim, Ph.D., a researcher in human stem cells;
  • K. Sodhi, M.D., a researcher in hypertension associated with obesity and diabetes;
  • S. Monu, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow who works on the expression of an endogenous antioxidant;
  • M. Maheshwari, a doctoral student; and,            
  • M. Choi, a lab assistant.

Abraham earned his Ph.D. in 1976 from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He spent his postdoctoral fellowship at The Rockefeller University, where he discovered and isolated the rat and human heme oxygenase gene responsible for the over-production of bilirubin in newborn infants, which manifests as jaundice. In early 1982, he developed inhibiters of heme oxygenase for the prevention of jaundice with his mentor Dr. A. Kappas, former vice president of The Rockefeller University and physician-in-chief.

In 1977, he became an associate scientist at New York Medical College in New York. He initiated the college's first program project on heme oxygenase in 1985. During his time there, he was promoted to the rank of professor with tenure in medicine in 1993.

Abraham was named a visiting professor of medicine at New York University in 1993, at which time he also continued his affiliation with The Rockefeller University as a visiting scientist.
In 1996, he re-joined New York Medical College as a professor in the departments of pharmacology and medicine and also served as director of the stem cell and gene therapy program.

In 2009, while maintaining affiliations with both the New York Medical College and The Rockefeller University, Abraham was named chairman and professor of the department of physiology and pharmacology at the University of Toledo College of Medicine.  During his tenure as chair of the department at Toledo, NIH and pharmaceutical support increased from $2.5 million to more than $7 million in less than four years. 


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Monday October 8, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

6th Avenue entrance, exit of new garage to be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 6th Avenue entrance to and exit from Marshall University's new parking garage will be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to construction, said James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety.

 

Terry said the garage's entrance and exit off the 51/2 alley and Elm Street will be open.

 

The garage, located at 6th Avenue and Elm Street, opened in August.


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Saturday October 6, 2012
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall, Dixon Hughes Goodman open new SmartRoom

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives of Marshall University and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP cut a ribbon to celebrate the opening of the DHG SmartRoom, the most technologically advanced room in the College of Business Thursday in Suite 106 of Corbly Hall on the university's Huntington campus.

"We wanted the experience to be more than just a name on a plaque," said Rick Slater, Managing Partner of DHG. "As we've witnessed big changes in business and technology, our partners have become even more passionate about making an impact on campuses across our footprint."

"We can't thank DHG enough," said Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the College of Business at Marshall. "This new facility will serve our faculty and students very well."

Marshall received a gift of $150,000 from the certified public accounting firm of Dixon Hughes Goodman, designated toward renovation of room 106 of Corbly Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus, in May. The room, now known as the Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP SmartRoom, features a 24-inch, multi-touch Smart Podium Display from Smart Technologies; dual 80-inch LED flat-panel displays; and high-density wireless services. In addition, the room is furnished with new seating and tables with capacity for 58 students, as well as updated lighting controllable by zones.


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Photos: (1) Cutting the ribbon to officially open the Dixon Hughes Goodman SmartRoom are from left, Lance West, Marshall Foundation Vice President for Development; Bob Simpson, partner at DHG, who also teaches at Marshall; Norman Mosrie, partner at DHG and president MU College of Business advisory board; Rick Slater, managing partner at DHG; Matt Turner, chief of staff at Marshall University; and Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the MU College of Business. (2) Dr. Deanna Mader, interim dean of the MU College of Business, describes the advanced features of the DHG SmartRoom. (3) Marshall University senior Jonathan Austin thanks Dixon Hughes Goodman on behalf of his fellow students. Photos by Tyler Kes.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

6th Avenue entrance, exit of new garage to be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 6th Avenue entrance to and exit from Marshall University's new parking garage will be closed Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to construction, said James E. Terry, MU's director of public safety.

Terry said the garage's entrance and exit off the 5-1/2 alley and Elm Street will be open.

The garage, located at 6th Avenue and Elm Street, opened in August.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Effect of 'Don Quixote' on Dostoevsky and his works topic of lecture to be delivered by Marshall Prof. Slav N. Gratchev

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Prof. Slav N. Gratchev will deliver a lecture titled Cervantes and Dostoevsky: Crossing the Boundaries of Space and Time, at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

In his presentation, Prof. Gratchev will examine how Cervantes' classic novel, Don Quixote, affected Dostoevsky and his great works, specifically Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and Brothers Karamazov. His lecture is being presented by Marshall's College of Liberal Arts.

 

Gratchev is an assistant professor of Spanish at Marshall University. He received his first M.A. in Saint Petersburg, Russia and his second M.A. at the University of Alverta, Canada. He received his Ph.D. at Purdue University. The main area of his research is Spanish Literature of Renaissance and Baroque combined with a keen interest in Spanish Cinema.

 

"We are very fortunate to have Professor Gratchev in our department of modern languages as he brings considerable skill in teaching languages and foreign literature," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts. "His broad ranging interest in literature helps us understand the evolution of the novel as an art and a window into minds of others."

 

Gratchev's lecture is free to the public.


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Friday October 5, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Forensic Science Center to host lecture for honors students on criminal behavior

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and College of Science will conduct a special lecture, "Nature versus Nurture," sponsored by the Honors College for its students at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center.

The lecture will cross-examine whether traits of human behavior are inherited or learned and whether humans may have genetic tendencies toward deviant or criminal behavior. Guest speakers Michael Farrell, Esq., and the Honorable Paul Farrell will talk about their experiences in the legal system from a criminal behavior perspective.

This presentation is part of a semester-long Honors course co-taught by Dr. Wendy C. Trzyna, associate professor of microbiology in the department of biological sciences in the College of Science and Dr. James Sottile, professor of educational psychology in the College of Education.

Throughout the course, Dr. Trzyna presents information from the Human Genome Project and discusses inherited traits while Dr. Sottile presents a different viewpoint based on his expertise in behavioral psychology and how traits are learned.

Trzyna said this course explores the contributions of genetics and environmental components to learning and motivation and other complex behavioral traits, such as aggression, intelligence, addiction, talents and many others. "The long standing debate of "nature vs. nurture" is even more relevant today as much more information has become available through the completion of the Human Genome Project," she said.

Undergraduate students from the Honors College and graduate students from the Forensic Science Master's Degree program will attend the event. Honors College students are from the following areas of study: business, engineering, computer science, biology, chemistry, dietetics, fine arts, education and exercise science.

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim dean of the Honors College, said it is the newest college at Marshall with nearly 600 students enrolled, and it is still growing. Admission to the college is by invitation only and is based on standardized test scores and grade point averages. The Honors College is not a degree-granting college so students are also enrolled in a degree-granting college for their major of study. Each honors student is required to take a minimum of two honors seminar courses that are interdisciplinary.

The "Nature versus Nurture" lecture is one in a series in the honors seminar course "Genetics and Learning." This semester students will also have the opportunity to isolate and test their own genomic DNA for a specific genotype related to athleticism.  

Trzyna said it is important that students at Marshall see that there is a vast resource of knowledge and experience throughout the Huntington community. "We are extremely fortunate that some of these individuals are willing to give of their time for the education of our students," she said.

The Honorable Paul T. Farrell currently serves as Chief Judge of the 6th Judicial District. He was appointed to the bench in February 2011 by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin following a 33-year legal career including five years as a federal prosecutor, eight years as an assistant Cabell County prosecutor and 15 years as a civil defense attorney with the firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, PLLC. During his career as a lawyer, he was recognized by the Best Lawyers in America in the field of medical malpractice defense.

Michael J. Farrell is a litigator who has devoted most of his career to the defense of claims against product manufacturers, health care providers and lawyers. His most prominent criminal defense trial involved former West Virginia Governor Arch A. Moore, Jr. He has served on West Virginia Higher Education Boards since 1998 and currently is completing his 10th year on the Marshall University Board of Governors. In 2005, he was the interim president of Marshall University.

He has been a frequent lecturer for continuing legal education programs presented to West Virginia judges, lawyers and other groups of professionals. In 2012, the Best Lawyers in America recognized him as one of the 10 best lawyers in West Virginia. Chambers USA, a London-based rating agency, and the International Who's Who of Product Liability Defense Firms, has accorded him comparable honors. He is an elected member of the prestigious American College of Trial Lawyers. He has published numerous articles in professional journals.

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Thursday October 4, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming continues at Marshall with events, activities;

Picnic on the Plaza is Friday, parade and football game are Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University continues 2012 homecoming activities Friday and Saturday with the theme of "Remember the Past, Thunder into the Future."

Highlighting Friday's events is the Picnic on the Plaza, the first official event of the homecoming weekend, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  The picnic on the Memorial Student Center plaza will feature music, games, prizes and free lunch.

The two major homecoming events on Saturday are the homecoming parade at 11:30 a.m., and the Thundering Herd's football game with the University of Tulsa at 3:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

About 75 units will participate in the parade, which begins at the intersection of 8th Street and 4th Avenue in downtown Huntington. It  heads east on 4th Avenue to 12th Street, where it turns right. It then turns left on 5th Avenue and finishes at 20th Street.

Art Weisberg, a Huntington philanthropist and president of Arthur's Enterprises, will be the grand marshal in the parade.

Float judges will be stationed on the balcony of the Memorial Student Center on 5th Avenue and the parade judges will be on the porch of the Elks Club on 4th Avenue.

A complete list of Marshall's 2012 homecoming activities can be found at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/RELEASE/2012/pr092812.htm.


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Wednesday October 3, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Partial Thundering Word squad has 'remarkable success' at WKU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word, the school's speech and debate team, took fourth place in combined sweepstakes and enjoyed some individual success last weekend in the Fall Forensic Fiesta at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky.

Coach Danny Ray said his team enjoyed "remarkable success" in its first tournament of the season. Only about one-third of the team took part and the competition included some of the nation's top teams, such as Western Kentucky University, the University of Alabama, Ball State University and Rice University.

Here is a look at some of Marshall's performances:

 

         Victoria Ledford, a sophomore chemistry/pre-med major from Braxton, W.Va., placed fourth in Persuasion, seventh in Rhetorical Criticism, and fourth in Duo Interpretation with Christian Adams, a  junior biomedical sciences major from Ona, W.Va.

 

         Taryss Mandt, a University College student from Arlington, Va., and last year's high school national champion in Oral Interpretation, was the top novice in Programmed Oral Interpretation and Informative Speaking.

 

         Matthew Osteen, a sophomore biochemistry major from Jefferson, W.Va., was the third top novice speaker in Lincoln-Douglas Debate, going 2-2 in his first debate competition ever.

 

         Eric Newfeld, a junior psychology major from Barboursville, W.Va., competed in both Extemporaneous Speaking and Impromptu Speaking.

 

Marshall's debaters travel to Lafayette College this weekend and the entire team will travel to West Chester, Pa., Oct. 12-13.


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Tuesday October 2, 2012
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming court announced at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The field of candidates for Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall has been narrowed to six after Marshall University announced its homecoming court today in the Memorial Student Center.

Homecoming 2012, with a theme of "Remember the Past, Thunder into the Future," began Monday and runs through Saturday.

Christina Caul-Jackson, coordinator for student involvement, said the three candidates for Miss Marshall are:

  • Casey Adams, a senior biology major from Huntington

  • Andrea Celorio, a senior international business and finance major from Guadalajara, Mexico, now living in Poca, W.Va.

  • Leslie Thomas, a senior biology major from Montgomery, W.Va.

The three candidates for Mr. Marshall are:

  • Rusty Sartin, a junior nursing major from Kermit, W.Va.

  • Stephen "J.R." Sheppard, a first-year exercise physiology graduate student from Delbarton, W.Va.

  • Zachary Morris, a junior public relations major from Montgomery, W.Va.

Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall will be crowned during halftime of Marshall's homecoming football game Saturday against the University of Tulsa. Kickoff is at 3:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Numerous homecoming-related events are scheduled throughout the week. To view the schedule, visit http://www.marshall.edu/pressrelease.asp?ID=2851.

One event not on the schedule is WMUL-FM's annual Car Bash, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday on Buskirk Field. Cost to bash a minivan painted in Tulsa's colors (old gold, royal blue and crimson) is $1 for two minutes. The remains of the minivan will be hauled on a trailer in the homecoming parade, which starts at 11:30 a.m. Saturday in downtown Huntington.


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Tuesday October 2, 2012
Contact: Kimberly White, Marshall University Women's Studies Advisory Committee, , 304-696-6115

Meet the Candidates and voter registration event is Thursday, Oct. 11, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Women's Studies and the Women's Center at Marshall University are hosting a Meet the Candidates event and voter registration drive from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center located on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

 

The purpose of the forum is to give students and community members the opportunity to meet the candidates who are running for governor, attorney general, house of delegates in the 16th and 17th districts, county commissioner, assessor, mayor of Huntington, Cabell County magistrate and Huntington City Council to discuss the economic, civic, commercial, cultural, industrial and educational interests of the area.


The League of Women Voters will register eligible voters and representatives from the Republican, Democrat, Mountain and Libertarian parties and will sponsor tables with candidate information, party platforms and suggestions for how to get involved this election year.

 

The open forum will allow candidates to introduce themselves to members of the audience, and after introductions, candidates will be on hand to chat directly with students and members of the community.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information contact Kim White at 304-696-6115.


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