Marshall study shows that cerium oxide may be useful for the treatment of sepsis


Research into treatment for sepsis, one of the world’s major health problems, is underway at Marshall.

An article on the study, “Therapeutic Potential of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Peritonitis Induced by Polymicrobial Insult in Sprague-Dawley Rats,” will appear in a future issue of Critical Care Medicine.

It is available online now at http://journals.lww.com/ccmjournal/Abstract/publishahead/Therapeutic_Potential_of_Cerium_Oxide.97161.aspx.

Peritonitis, an infection of the abdominal cavity, sometimes leads to sepsis, also known as blood poisoning.  Sepsis kills more people on an annual basis than prostate cancer, breast cancer, and AIDS combined and is the number one of killer of critically ill patients and infants.

The research studies at Marshall have demonstrated that nanoparticles of cerium oxide, widely used as a polishing agent and as an additive to increase fuel efficiency, may be useful for the treatment of sepsis. The data in the study by Dr. Eric R. Blough, Dr. Nandini D.P.K. Manne colleagues at the  Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems indicate that cerium oxide nanoparticles improve animal survivability following a severe polymicrobial episode in the laboratory rat.

Blough,  professor at the  School of Pharmacy, said the study could potentially lead to development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of sepsis.

The research was supported with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, grant DE-PS02-09ER09-01.