Inaugural Maier Professor and Director of Addiction Sciences named


Daniel Langleben, M.D., a highly regarded addiction psychiatry specialist and a federally funded researcher with the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, has been named the inaugural Maier Professor and Director of Addiction Sciences at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

The professorship, the result of a $1.25 million gift from the Maier Foundation, will support the university’s efforts to address the opioid addiction crisis across the region and country. In addition, the position helps build a foundation for future expansion of the medical school’s offerings in graduate medical education, to include a fellowship in addiction medicine.

Marshall President Jerome A. Gilbert and Dean Joseph I. Shapiro made the announcement this morning at the university’s Drinko Library Atrium with community and state health care partners in attendance.

Gilbert said the addition of Langleben to Marshall’s faculty—he will join Marshall full-time in August— is pivotal in the university’s response to what has been termed one of the worst public health issues of our time.

“Dr. Langleben brings a breadth and depth of experience that will propel our university forward in the fight against all addictions, including the one of which we are now so keenly aware of—the opioid crisis,” added Gilbert. “Our collective thanks to the Maier Foundation for its dedication to our state’s higher education system, in particular Marshall University, and its vision for a better West Virginia.”

Langleben is a graduate of the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Medicine in Israel.  He completed a residency in psychiatry at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York and a fellowship in addiction psychiatry at the University of California-San Francisco.

“The addition of Dr. Langleben to our faculty allows for continued expansion of our existing clinical experience with cutting-edge molecular research,” Shapiro said. “By doing so, we will press forward in the quest to find answers to some of the most devastating illnesses, like addiction, plaguing our generation.”

Langleben is currently a professor of psychiatry at the Perelman School of Medicine and an attending psychiatrist at Penn Medicine and the Philadelphia VA Medical Center.  Board certified in psychiatry and neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, he also holds a special qualification in addiction psychiatry and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center.

An active researcher, Langleben has penned dozens of academic papers focused on the brain and multiple topics including heroin dependence, lying, attention deficit disorder and how the physical attributes of infants influences caretaking by adults. He is recognized internationally for developing a revolutionary technique for using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of lie detection.

Langleben has served on numerous academic and institutional committees as well as editorial positions with several academic publications.

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About the Maier Foundation

The Maier Foundation is a private, non-profit, charitable corporation for the furtherance of higher education in West Virginia and of higher education of West Virginia residents attending other colleges and universities.

The foundation was established 1958 as the Sarah and Pauline Maier Scholarship Foundation by William J. Maier Jr. in honor of his mother and wife. Maier, a West Virginia native who graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, bestowed the first gift on his alma mater, Harvard College, where a scholarship endowment was established to help others from West Virginia and Ohio. The foundation was renamed the Maier Foundation in 2003.

The Maier Foundation and its associated company, General Corporation, have graciously awarded Marshall University nearly $5 million in gifts, including the Latin Cup Awards & Scholarships, the William J. Maier Writing Awards, the Yeager Scholars Program, the Maier Clinical Research Professorship, and now the Maier Professor and Director of Addiction Sciences.