All 2004 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 21, 2004
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students claim four Communicator Awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received four awards in the Communicator Awards 2004 Audio Competition. The winners were named last month in Arlington, Texas.

Students were honored with one Crystal Award of Excellence, one Award of Distinction and two honorable mention awards. This is the seventh year for this competition to include an audio component for judging.

The Communicator Awards come from a national awards organization that recognizes outstanding work in the communications field. Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry. There were 923 entries in The Communicator Awards 2004 Audio Competition.

The prestigious Crystal Award of Excellence is presented to those entrants whose ability to communicate makes them the best in their field. About 13 percent of the entries won this award. The Crystal Award of Excellence winners are listed on The Communicator's web site www.communicator-awards.com.

The Award of Distinction is given for projects that exceed industry standards in production or communication skills. About 10 percent of the entries won this award. An Honorable Mention certificate was granted to those entries that meet the high standards of the industry.

Winners of The Communicator Awards come from radio stations, production facilities, advertising and public relations agencies, corporate communications departments, government entities, technicians, narrators, writers, and other professionals associated with the production of audio broadcasts and materials.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced some of the best sports programming, promo productions and documentaries in the country," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall, and faculty manager of WMUL-FM. "I am proud of the honor this Award of Excellence, Award of Distinction and the honorable mentions awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University. This success demonstrates to our student staff that dedication and hard work do pay off in the end."

The Crystal Award of Excellence winning entry was in the Student Produced Radio Sports Event category:

  • WMUL-FM's live broadcast of the 2004 Capital Classic: Marshall University versus West Virginia University men's basketball game played at Charleston Civic Center Coliseum in Charleston, W. Va., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2004. The students calling the game which was broadcast over 88.1 in Huntington were basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford; W.Va.; color commentator Travis Smith, a recent graduate from Charles Town, W.Va.; statistician Heather Berry, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.; statistician Angela Bradley, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.; and engineer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va..

The Award of Distinction winning entry was in the Student Produced Radio Documentary category:

  • "The Fight for Right: Same Gender Marriage" was written and produced by Christina Riffle, a recent graduate from Dunbar, W.Va. The documentary was created for JMC 273 Practice in Radio, Tuesday, May 4, 2004.

The honorable mention award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the Student Produced Radio Sports Event Promo and Sports Event categories:

  • "Battle for the Bell," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotional Announcement rotation from Monday, Oct. 4, 2004 through Saturday, Oct. 9, 2004, written and produced by Alex Reed, a senior from Virginia Beach, Va.
  • WMUL-FM's broadcast of Marshall versus No. 9 Ohio State University football game played at the Horseshoe in Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2004. The students calling the game, which was broadcast over 88.1 in Huntington, were football play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Alex Reed, a senior from Virginia Beach, Va.; and engineer Brandon Millman, a sophomore from Huntington.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 20, 2004
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Farrell identifies priorities heading into interim presidency

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Interim President Michael J. Farrell doesn't officially take over at Marshall University until Jan. 1, but he already has identified six priorities that will be the focus of his limited term.

Farrell was chairman of the MU Board of Governors academic committee before resigning on Friday, Dec. 17, to accept the position of interim president. In responding to inquiries following his appointment, Farrell identified six of his priorities as interim president. They include:

  • Promoting the academic agenda of the university better so that potential students from both West Virginia and out of state will select Marshall University because of its high quality faculty, safe campus, small classes and reasonable tuition.
     
  • Developing new friends for the university through an outreach program to Kanawha County and all of the other counties in Southern West Virginia. That way, our citizens can meet and personally have contact with Marshall students and faculty and appreciate the quality of the university's faculty and students.
     
  • Actively supporting the biotechnology and related research projects that will form and are essential to the economic growth of the City of Huntington, the Advantage Valley and the State of West Virginia. Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, currently under construction, is projected to open in August 2006.
     
  • Intensifying the efforts to secure funding for an on-campus student health and wellness center, which Marshall students overwhelmingly support.
     
  • Working with fellow gubernatorial transition team members and Governor-elect Joe Manchin, as well as the incoming Legislature, to further their understanding of Marshall's contribution to the State of West Virginia. With adequate funding, the quality and quantity of Marshall's potential will increase greatly.
     
  • Making the Marshall president position America's most attractive and irresistible opportunity for potential full-time candidates.
  • The board voted unanimously to name Farrell, a Huntington attorney, as interim president. He replaces Dr. Dan Angel, who is retiring, effective Dec. 31.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday December 17, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Board of Governors names Farrell interim president

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Michael J. Farrell, a Huntington attorney and former member of Marshall University's Board of Governors, today was named interim president of the university, effective Jan. 1, 2005.

    The Board of Governors, during a meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing, selected Farrell with a unanimous 15-0 vote. He was approved by West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission member Terry Sammons, who was authorized by the state governing group to review the appointment and act on its behalf.

    "I'm gratified by the confidence the Board of Governors has shown in asking me to assume this position," Farrell said. "I look forward to serving the interests of the faculty, staff and students during this interim period."

    Farrell will serve for the duration of the search process for a permanent president, which is expected to take about six months.

    During today's meeting and before the board approved Farrell, he resigned from the Board of Governors, which allowed him to accept the position of interim president. He is not eligible to be a candidate for the permanent position of president.

    "Mike is an excellent choice to be the interim president," said A. Michael Perry, chairman of MU's Board of Governors. "He has tremendous background and experience in academic affairs, having served on the Board of Regents and Board of Trustees and most recently on the Board of Governors. He is a longtime supporter of Marshall University and he has the support of the administrative staff at Marshall."

    Perry said the board is very appreciative that Farrell, a distinguished attorney with Huntington law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., has agreed to take a sabbatical from the law firm for the duration of the interim presidency and serve at significant personal expense. He will be paid $10,000 a month during his presidency.

    The board also determined that a search and screening committee for a new president will consist of its 15 members, along with Higher Education Policy Commission members Terry Sammons and Mike Garrison, Marshall faculty senate president Larry Stickler and Jan Fox, who is vice president for information technology at Marshall.

    The board members are Gary Adkins, Letitia Neese Chafin, Verna K. Gibson, John G. Hess, Menis E. Ketchum, Virginia King, Brent A. Marsteller, A. Michael Perry, Robert L. Shell, Jr., William Smith, Gary G. White, Joseph L. Williams, James M. Sottile, Sherri Noble and Seth Murphy. Perry and Ketchum, a vice chair of the board of governors, will serve as co-chairs of the search committee.

    Farrell had been a member of the Marshall Board of Governors since appointed by Gov. Bob Wise on July 7, 2003. He previously served on the board from 2001 to 2002, when he was vice-chairman. His most recent term was scheduled to end June 30, 2007.

    Farrell replaces Dr. Dan Angel, who in November announced his resignation, effective Dec. 31. Angel served five years at Marshall's helm.

    The Board of Governors is totally responsible for conducting the search for a new president, both procedurally and financially. This will be Marshall's first presidential search since the creation of the Board of Governors in 2001.

    Previously, the Institutional Board of Advisors served as the search and screening committee. The group that conducted the search when Angel was hired consisted of 22 people, including11 lay members and representatives of faculty, administration, staff and students.

    A consultant firm likely will be hired to assist in the search. In 1999, the firm of Korn/Ferry International was hired to aid the search committee in finding a new Marshall president. The board authorized Ketchum and Perry to request proposals from several consultant firms before one is chosen.

    Michael J. Farrell

    Following graduation from Marshall University, Michael J. Farrell served as an officer in the United States Army and was honorably discharged as a First Lieutenant in 1971. At that time, he entered West Virginia University College of Law. During law school, his Jessup International Moot Court team won the national and world championships. In the world championship round, his team represented the United States and defeated Great Britain. He also served as senior class president and became the first Marshall student body president to be elected to membership in MOUNTAIN, the ranking Honorary at West Virginia University. He graduated from the College of Law in 1974 with a Doctorate in Jurisprudence.

    During his legal career, Farrell has been deeply involved in educational and academic endeavors at many levels. He has published two book chapters, four nationally published law review articles and a major nationally published monograph. He has published dozens of other educational articles for use by his students at various judicial, legal, medical, dental, civic and public service seminars. In both 2003 and 2004, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals invited Farrell to be a featured educational speaker at its annual Spring Judicial Conference. He has taught dozens of other educational seminars in the areas of employment law, medical malpractice, product liability and trial practice. He has been recognized both as a Person Injury Defense Lawyer and Business Law Litigator in each of the recent editions of the Best Lawyers in America book.

    He presently holds two clinical appointments to the faculty of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. These appointments are as a clinical associate professor in the departments of surgery and family medicine. These academic appointments were bestowed in recognition of his 15 years of presenting mock trials and seminar lectures, without compensation, to the students, faculty and staff of the Marshall University School of Medicine.

    In 1999, Gov. Cecil Underwood appointed Farrell to serve as a member of the University System Board of Trustees, a board that governed West Virginia University, the Osteopathic Medical School and Marshall University. In 2000-01, Gov. Underwood appointed Farrell to be a member of the newly created West Virginia Higher Education Interim Governing Board.

    Farrell was elected vice chairman of that board and served as acting chairman when illness prevented the participation of the chairman. The governance responsibilities of this board were broader that the Board of Trustees in that it governed West Virginia's 14 state colleges in addition to Marshall University, West Virginia University and the Osteopathic Medical School.

    In addition to serving as vice chairman of the West Virginia Higher Education Interim Governing Board in 2000-01, Farrell served as chairman of the Academic Affairs Committee of that board. During this same period of time, Farrell was elected and served as vice chairman of the Marshall University Advisory Board. When Marshall University received the legislative authority to form its first Board of Governors in 2001, Farrell was appointed by Gov. Underwood and thereafter elected as its vice chairman of the board. Gov. Wise appointed Farrell again to the Marshall University Board of Governors in July 2003. In November 2004, Farrell was appointed by Governor-Elect Joe Manchin to serve on his transition team as a member of the Higher Education Subcommittee. Farrell served as a member of the 2004 Marshall University Board of Governors and chairman of the Academic Affairs Committee until today.

    Farrell has served the interests of Marshall University and public education in his capacity as a lawyer. Between 1992 and 1995, he served as a West Virginia Special Assistant General for the Marshall University Stadium litigation. He successfully prosecuted the malpractice case against the architect of the stadium that produced the fund of money to construct the bowl end of the stadium.

    Beginning in 1998, Farrell responded to the request by the West Virginia State Board of Education to serve again as a West Virginia Special Assistant Attorney General and represent it in the litigation that involved the constitutionality of the level of funding provided to public education. Farrell's efforts contributed to the resolution and dismissal of this case, generally referred to as the "Recht Decision," in 2004, 29 years after the case was filed.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday December 15, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL wins seven grand prize awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received seven grand prize awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho Region 2 Student Electronic Media Production Competition awards ceremony last month in Knoxville, Tenn.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall, and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the NBS/AERho Region 2.

    The states of Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Michigan and the District of Columbia comprise the NBS/AERho Region 2.

    "It is quite an accomplishment to win seven grand prizes in the NBS/AERho Region 2's 2004 awards audio competition," Bailey said. "This is another outstanding performance by our students. Winning always speaks well for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

    The National Broadcasting Society has more than 1,500 student and professional members with chapters on more than 100 college campuses. Founded in 1943, NBS has a mission to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media. Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000. Alpha Epsilon Rho, the national honorary society, is composed of members selected from NBS.

    WMUL's grand prize award winning entries were:

    NEWS/SPORTS/FEATURE SEGMENT - "Stranger with a Camera," written, produced and edited by Melanie Chapman, a senior from Stollings, W.Va., broadcast during "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2003.

    NEWS/FEATURE PACKAGE - "Laura Bush Visits the Mountain State," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, broadcast during "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 8" Friday, Nov. 7, 2003.

    PUBLIC AFFAIRS/INTERVIEW PROGRAM - "The Tipton-Murphy Report," with hosts of the program Richard Tipton, a senior from Ona, W.Va., and Seth Murphy, a junior from Flemington, W.Va. The program's engineer was Mike Stanley, a sophomore from West Hamlin, W.Va. This political talk program was broadcast Thursday, Oct. 7, 2004.

    NEWS/SPORTS PROGRAM - "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," anchored by Ben Hunt, a senior from Pikeville, Ky.; Jen Smith, a sophomore from Huntington; and Brandon Millman, a sophomore from Huntington; broadcast Friday, Oct. 1, 2004. Reporters featured within the newscast were Scott Hall, a senior from Stephens City, Va.; Barry Hatfield, a sophomore from Belfry, Ky.; and Terry Bartley, a freshman from Foster, W.Va.

    COMMERCIALS/PROMOS/PSAS - "Battle for the Bell," an in-house promotional announcement, broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotional Announcement rotation from Monday, Oct. 4, 2004 through Saturday, Oct. 9, 2004, written and produced by Alex Reed, a senior from Virginia Beach, Va.

    DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM - "The Fight for Right: Same-Gender Marriage," was written and produced by Christina Riffle, a recent graduate from Dunbar, W.Va. The documentary was created for JMC 273 Practice in Radio Tuesday, May 4, 2004.

    SPORTS PLAY-BY-PLAY - WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus 9th-ranked Ohio State University football game played in Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2004. The students calling the game, which was broadcast over 88.1 in Huntington, were: football play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Alex Reed, a senior from Virginia Beach, Va.; and engineer Brandon Millman, a sophomore from Huntington.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday December 14, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall professor awarded Fulbright Scholar grant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Victor Fet, professor of biological sciences at Marshall University, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to do research at the Institute of Zoology in Sofia, Bulgaria during the 2004-2005 academic year, according to the U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

    Dr. Fet will conduct research in animal evolutionary biology in collaboration with Bulgarian zoologists.

    The Marshall professor is one of about 800 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad to some 140 countries for the 2004-05 academic year through the Fulbright Scholar Program. Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program's purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

    A noted expert on scorpions, Dr. Fet's research examines the various aspects of their evolution, genetics, biogeography and taxonomy. He was one of the authors of the recently published Catalogs of the Scorpions of the World, a "yellow page" book listing about 1,300 species and 170 genera of the existing scorpions in addition to 100 fossil species.

    Dr. Fet's scholarly work has taken him all over the world, where he has conducted research for both field and museum work. In 2001-02, the National Geographic Society sponsored his expedition to Central Asian deserts to study scorpions there. In recent years, his research has taken him to Mexico, Pakistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Bulgaria, Greece, Austria, Slovenia and New Zealand. In addition, he worked with scorpion collections in the natural history museums on England, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Russia and Bulgaria and he has studied collections from dozens of other museums.

    His Fulbright work will focus on conducting research and investigating the historical formation and evolution of Bulgarian fauna through genetic diversity analysis of geographic populations applying modern DNA technique to the model animal group of scorpions.

    While in Bulgaria, Dr, Fet will collect animal specimens from natural habitats in the Balkan mountains and will collaborate with Bulgarian specialists to gain ecological information and guidance to the field sites. He will provide assistance and training experience for Bulgarian zoologists in the techniques of collection and analysis of DNA that are pertinent to the studies.

    Recipients of Fulbright Scholar are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday December 10, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    KERA will air 'Ashes to Glory' before bowl game

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In response to requests by Herd Nation and other members of the Marshall University family, Dallas/Fort Worth public television station KERA will broadcast "Ashes to Glory" at 10 p.m. (CST) Wednesday, Dec. 22.

    The broadcast will precede the PlainsCapital Fort Worth Bowl on Thursday, Dec. 23, and will serve to acquaint PBS viewers in Texas with the legendary traditions of Marshall football. The Thundering Herd plays Cincinnati at 6:30 p.m. EST in the Fort Worth Bowl.

    The Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex has a population of 5,222,000, making it the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States. KERA consistently ranks as one of the most-watched PBS stations in the country.

    "Ashes to Glory" is a video documentary profiling the 1970 Marshall air disaster and the rebirth of the Thundering Herd football program. The film, which debuted in 2000, is provided to public television stations free of charge by its producers, Deborah Novak and John Witek. It already has appeared on 56 PBS stations nationwide.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday December 9, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Harless Dining Hall architects receive Merit Award

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The architects who designed Marshall University's Harless Dining Hall have been presented with a Merit Award for achievement in architecture by AIA West Virginia, a chapter of The American Institute of Architects.

    The architects for the dining hall, which opened in January of this year, were Bastian & Harris Architects of Charleston, W.Va., along with Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Architecture & Engineering in Washington, D.C. The general contractor was Neighborgall Construction Company of Huntington, and Marshall University owns the facility.

    The dining hall was part of a $40 million project that included a 1,000-space parking garage and the first new on-campus housing in more than 30 years. Total cost of the housing/dining facility was $28 million.

    "We're certainly honored on behalf of the architects, but also for the entire design team, for the contractor and for the facilities planning department," said John Harris of Bastian & Harris. "This was truly a team effort. It has been a tremendous project for us."

    Harris said Marshall challenged the architects to create a "wow" factor at the location on 5th Avenue in Huntington, yet keep the project within budget.

    "To have done it all within budget, and to be recognized by our peers in having done that is truly an honor," Harris said.

    The dining hall is a single story steel frame and masonry structure that features a 24-foot tall, green tinted glass curtain wall overlooking the pedestrian terrace. Food service provides for seven individual stations of varying food types. The main dining area seats about 350 people.

    Mike Meadows, director of facilities planning and management at Marshall, said this is the first time a particular building at MU has been recognized with a Merit Award.

    "This building probably will not only receive regional recognition, but national recognition as well," Meadows said.

    Architects from the Chicago area selected the Harless Hall from among 28 entries for a design award. Winston Baker, Marshall's director of residence services, accepted the award Nov. 20 at the American Institute of Architects West Virginia Design Awards ceremony at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Charleston.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday December 8, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Chadwick urges Herd fans to wear green during 'Jam the Cam'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University women's basketball coach Royce Chadwick is urging Thundering Herd fans to wear green Sunday during Jam the Cam IV at Cam Henderson Center.

    Marshall (3-2) plays the University of Kentucky (4-3 before its home game Friday with Charleston Southern) at 2 p.m. Sunday. The goal of Jam the Cam is to break the Mid-American Conference single-game attendance record of 5,660.

    "We not only want to break the attendance record, but we also want the Kentucky players and fans who attend to see what dedicated, great fans we have at Marshall," Chadwick said. "We play our best basketball in front of big crowds, and seeing all that green in the stands will motivate us that much more. As Coach Pruett said, 'Don't be seen without your green!' "

    Chadwick was referring to Marshall football coach Bobby Pruett, who joined in a campaign this fall to persuade Herd fans to wear green during MU football games. The campaign worked as thousands of MU fans wore green to Herd football games throughout the season.

    Jam the Cam is sponsored by St. Mary's Medical Center, which purchased a significant allotment of tickets to assist Marshall in its final attempts to break the MAC attendance record. The Herd moves to Conference USA next season.

    Complimentary tickets to the game, courtesy of St. Mary's, are available at Glenn's Sporting Goods in Huntington and Summit Sporting Goods in Ashland, Ky.

    The first 500 fans in attendance will receive a commemorative Jam the Cam IV t-shirt, sponsored by Pepsi. At halftime, employees from St. Mary's Medical Center and Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital in Ashland will compete in a brief basketball game.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday December 7, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall receives one of largest gifts ever from an individual; estate of Bliss Livingston Charles leaves $2.8 million

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced it has received one of the largest individual gifts in its 167-year history.

    The estate of Bliss Livingston Charles, a former Certified Public Accountant and Attorney at Law in the Huntington area, left Marshall $2.8 million. Charles, though not a graduate of the university, was a great fan and strong supporter of Marshall. He was 92 years old when he died on June 21, 2003 - one year after he retired.

    The gift was announced at the Drinko Library during a ceremony in which a plaque displaying Charles' name was unveiled. It will be added to the Pathway of Prominence on Marshall's campus. The Pathway, which now has 15 members, honors those who have given $1 million or more to Marshall.

    "This is a remarkable gift," said Glen Kerkian, Senior Vice President for Development at Marshall. "Not only is this a substantial amount, but the nature of the gift will allow the university greater latitude in its funding of worthwhile projects. Clearly, Mr. Charles had great foresight as to the impact of Marshall University on this region."

    A. Michael Perry, Chairman of Marshall's Board of Governors and longtime friend of Charles, praised him as "a true community person."

    "Even though Bliss was not a graduate of Marshall, he realized the importance of the university, not only in the education of students, but in its economic and cultural benefits for the community," Perry said.

    Charles was born Oct. 7, 1910, in West Union (Adams County), Ohio, a son of Olen G. and Nellie Miller Charles. He graduated from Huntington High School in 1928, then briefly attended Marshall College. He enrolled at the University of Illinois, from where he graduated in 1932. Charles also was a 1953 graduate of the Ohio State University College of Law. He was admitted to the West Virginia Bar Association in 1954.

    During World War II, Charles served as Chief Accountant at the T. & T. Ammunition Plant located in Point Pleasant, W.Va.

    An avid golfer, he was a member of Guyan Golf and Country Club. He also was a member of the B.P.O. Elks 313 and was a Kentucky Colonel.

    Longtime close friend Kyle Meabon said she and Charles attended many community functions, enjoyed Charles' country retreat and loved to travel.

    "He was a conservative and hard-working man," Meabon said. "Mr. Charles would be proud that his wishes have been carried out and his contribution will be of great benefit and appreciated by Marshall University."

    Perry and Menis Ketchum, also a member of the Board of Governors, initiated the university's recognition of Charles.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday December 2, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    UNT Health Science Center president to speak at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ronald R. Blanck, president of the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, Texas, will be the guest speaker Dec. 7 as Celebrity Series II continues at Marshall University.

    Blanck, a retired Lieutenant General in the U.S. Army, speaks at 2 p.m. in the Booth Experimental Theater at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. His presentation, titled "Technology and the Future of Healthcare," is free to the public.

    The Celebrity Series features higher education experts from around the country. Dr. Don Brown, former Commissioner of Higher Education for Texas, spoke at Marshall in November.

    As president of the North Texas Health Science Center, Blanck oversees a growing academic health center that includes the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and School of Public Health.

    More than 190 full-time faculty and 300 volunteer community physicians work with nearly 1,000 students who are training to be osteopathic physicians, researchers, public health officers, physician assistants and other health professionals.

    A graduate of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blanck is board certified in internal medicine. He joined the UNT Health Science Center in August 2000 after retiring from the U.S. Army.

    Blanck began his military career in 1968 as a medical officer and battalion surgeon in Vietnam. He retired 32 years later as the Surgeon General of the U.S. Army and commander of the U.S. Army Medical Command - with more than 46,000 military personnel and 26,000 civilian employees throughout the world.

    During his distinguished military career, Blanck served as commander of the Walter Reed Medical Center North Atlantic Region Medical Command and director of professional services and chief of Medical Corps Affairs for the U.S. Army Surgeon General.

    Other assignments included assistant chief of the General Medicine Service in the Department of Medicine at Walter Reed, assistant dean of student affairs at the Uniformed Services University School of Medicine and chief of the Department of Medicine at Brooke Army Medical Center.

    Blanck's military honors include Distinguished Service Medals, the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star and Meritorious Service and Army Commendation Medals.

    He continues to be consulted as an advisor on bio-terrorism issues and an expert in preparing the medical community to respond to mass casualty incidents or those involving weapons of mass destruction.

    In addition to his many speaking engagements and advisory positions, Blanck now chairs task forces on bio-terrorism for both the Texas Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday November 29, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL receives Broadcast Best of Show award for fifth time

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received the Broadcast Best of Show award for the fifth time at the 83rd annual national College Media Convention/2004 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) College Annual Competition ceremony.

    The ceremony took place Sunday, Nov. 7, 2004, at the Marriott Renaissance Nashville Hotel in Nashville, Tenn.

    WMUL-FM's Broadcast Best of Show award-winning entry was "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," a 30-minute newscast Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2004. It was edited by Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va. The students who participated in the newscast were:

    Krystle Nichols, sophomore, East Bank, W.Va., (producer); Alex Reed, senior, Virginia Beach, Va., (news anchor); Melanie Chapman, senior, Stollings, W.Va., (news anchor); Jay Playburn, junior, Huntington, W.Va., (weather anchor); Matt Bradberry, senior, Huntington, W.Va.; (sports anchor).

    Vince Payne, graduate student, Hansford, W.Va., (reporter); Deven Swartz, freshman, Philippi, W.Va., (reporter); Jeremy Edwards, freshman, Scott Deport, W.Va., (reporter); Kristin Houghton, senior, Inwood, W.Va., (reporter), Troy Dunn, St. Albans, W.Va., (reporter), and Dave Wilson, St. Mary's, W.Va., (reporter).

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the campus radio station competed with other broadcasting stations from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the 83rd Annual National College Media Convention.

    The Best of Show competition is open only to publications and media outlets that send student delegates to the national convention. The competition is divided into eight newspaper categories, two yearbook categories, two magazine categories, and one broadcast category. The broadcast category was for radio only and was offered for only the fifth time in 2004 to recognize excellence among broadcasting attendees. The entries were evaluated for general excellence, but emphasis was placed on reporting and leadership as expressed through content.

    "This is an honor for WMUL-FM and all the student broadcasters featured on the Best of Show entry," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday November 22, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Two join Marshall University in fund raising capacities

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mandilyn (Mandy) J. Hart has joined the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and Rebecca McPhail Samples has joined the MU Office of Development, Glen Kerkian, senior vice president for development and executive director of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., announced today.

    Hart is the new Director of Planned Giving. She is responsible for overseeing the development and administration of planned gifts for the university.

    Samples is the new Director of the Annual Fund. She is responsible for operations pertaining to the university's annual fund, including the Phon-a-thon, direct mail and matching gifts programs, stewardship for donors and identification of potential donors.

    "I am so pleased with the caliber of professionals we have been able to attract to Marshall," Kerkian said. "Rebecca and Mandy are proven advancement leaders who have returned to West Virginia for the quality of life here. The effect of their presence on our development team will be immediate."

    Prior to joining the Foundation, Hart served as an Estate and Trust Advisor for the accounting firm of Hayflich & Steinberg, assisting clients in achieving their estate planning goals as well as their charitable giving goals. She also has served as a bank trust officer and manager for several banks in the tri-state area.

    Hart has attained the professional designation of Certified Trust and Financial Advisor from the Institute of Certified Bankers. She is a graduate of Cannon Trust School and its Advanced Trust School. She has a degree in accounting from the University of Kentucky.

    Hart is the president-elect for the KYOWVA Planned Giving Council, and past officer and current member of the Greater Huntington Estate Planning Council. She serves as Secretary of the LEAVE A LEGACY® West Virginia Program. In addition, Hart is the president of the board of directors for the TEAM for West Virginia Children, an organization whose mission is in the prevention of child abuse.

    Hart resides in Ashland, Ky., with her husband, Nevada, who is president of Hart 2 Heart Productions, a music recording studio. Mandy is a frequent speaker to not-for-profit organizations on the topic of gift planning and philanthropy.

    Samples previously was director of development at the University of Charleston, where she planned and implemented a $1.5 million annual fund campaign, reaching 133 percent of the university's goal. She previously was development and grant research manager and interim director of development for the YMCA of Greater Cleveland.

    She is a 1996 graduate of West Virginia University Institute of Technology with a bachelor's degree in history and government.


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    West Virginia Wireless to extend cost benefits, support Marshall University through new partnership

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and its wireless partner, West Virginia Wireless, today announced the launch of a new affinity program that allows Marshall alumni, staff, faculty and students to save money and support Marshall University indirectly by becoming a new West Virginia Wireless customer.

    With its "Marshall Alumni and Friends" offer, West Virginia Wireless will make a financial contribution for new activations of service and subsequent monthly contributions to support the Marshall University Alumni Association. The offer is available with any rate plan or promotional offer at West Virginia Wireless' nine retail locations and more than 40 authorized dealers throughout the region, including the company's newest locations at the Huntington Mall and inside the Marshall University Bookstore on the Huntington campus.

    In fall 2005, West Virginia Wireless will complete the final phase of the Marshall University's Mobile Alternative for Residents on Campus (MARC) wireless initiative, a campus-wide expansion of cellular service that will serve nearly 2,300 student residents on the Huntington campus. The project has served as a national model, making Marshall one of the first major universities in the nation to provide wireless telephone services to all of its student residents.

    "Today's announcement further enhances the strong relationship that Marshall University shares with West Virginia Wireless. Through this unique offer, Marshall alumni, students and friends can enjoy the benefits of West Virginia's newest and fastest growing wireless provider while supporting the institution," said Tom Harris, president of the Marshall University Alumni Association. "Through affinity partnerships with leading companies such as West Virginia Wireless, we allow the members of the Marshall University community to enjoy the benefits of quality services while providing generous support to Marshall University and its alumni programs."

    "West Virginia Wireless is dedicated to giving back to the communities which we serve. We are very pleased with the partnership we have forged with Marshall University, which has allowed us to offer cutting edge programs such as the MARC Wireless Initiative and unique affinity program," said Dennis Bloss, West Virginia Wireless General Manager. "The Marshall Alumni and Friends partnership, along with our MARC initiative, on-campus location and athletic sponsorships, will ensure that we touch all who are involved with Marshall University. Whether you're a fan, friend, student or graduate, Marshall and West Virginia Wireless have something unique to offer you. We are very pleased to partner with Marshall University in these unique and forward thinking partnered efforts."

    About West Virginia Wireless

    West Virginia Wireless was established in 2002 to provide residents in West Virginia with reliable wireless service and superior customer service. The company provides wireless service in the greater Charleston, Huntington, Beckley, Princeton, Bluefield and Ashland areas, offering the largest local and national GSM coverage area. West Virginia Wireless offers uncomplicated service plans designed to enhance the unique lifestyle of each customer. For more information about West Virginia Wireless, visit www.westvirginiawireless.com.


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    WMUL students receive three finalists awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received three finalists awards in the 83rd Annual National College Media Convention/2004 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards ceremony.

    The event took place Friday, Nov. 5, 2004, at the Marriott Renaissance Nashville Hotel in Nashville, Tenn.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

    He said the contest, which is in its third year, is sponsored by the CBI, which administers the contest in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

    "It is an honor to be a finalist in three out of the 12 radio categories sponsored by these prestigious organizations," Bailey said. "Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations.

    "This performance is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students. I am proud of our broadcasting students who continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be excellent representatives for Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities."

    The finalist award winning entries were:

    • Best Radio DJ Aircheck: "On the Air with Clay Daniels" was an on-air airshift broadcast over WMUL-FM Wednesday, May 19, 2004, written and produced by Daniel Clay Stimeling, a junior from Buckhannon, W.Va.
    • Radio News Reporting: "Laura Bush Visits the Mountain State," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior from Stollings, W.Va., broadcast during the "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, Nov. 7, 2003.
    • Sports play-by-play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Capital Classic: Marshall University versus West Virginia University men's basketball game at the Charleston Civic Center Coliseum in Charleston, W.Va., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2004.

    The students calling the game, which was broadcast over 88.1 back in Huntington, W. Va., were: basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Travis Smith, a recent graduate from Charles Town, W.Va.; statistician Heather Berry, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.; statistician Angela Bradley, a senior from Scott Depot; W.Va., and engineer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va.


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    High school students visit Marshall for Scholastic Journalism Program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixteen high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky recently received both journalism and college life experience by participating in the Scholastic Journalism Program (SJP) at Marshall University.

    This year's program was Oct. 26-28. High school journalism teachers and principals nominated the students, who were chosen on the basis of journalism involvement and achievements. The students who participated this year were:

    Kaylin Adkins, Huntington High School; Alyssa Bedekovich, Parkersburg Catholic High School; Claire Berlin, Lewis County High School; Josh Bush, Cabell Midland High School; Kim Freda, Lewis County High School; Cory Jackson, Huntington High School; Jessica McClung, Pikeview High School; Gillian Powderly, Parkersburg Catholic High School;

    Josh Powers, Wayne High School; Katherine Reasons, Huntington High School; Stephanie Riley, Chesapeake High School; Meredith Scaggs, Cabell Midland High School; Nick Smith, Buckhannon-Upshur High School; Victoria Taylor, Fairland High School; Bonnie Thomas, Bridgeport High School; Miranda Watson, Wayne High School.

    While at Marshall, the students attended classes, participated in student media activities, and stayed in the dormitories. College students from the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications served as mentors and introduced the SJP participants to many aspects of the university.

    The West Virginia Press Association and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications provide funding for the Scholastic Journalism Program.


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    Angel to retire as Marshall University president

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel told the MU Board of Governors today that he will retire, effective Dec. 31, 2004. Angel will turn 65 on Dec. 23.

    Board Chairman A. Michael Perry said the Board will name an interim president by Jan. 1, 2005. A search committee will be appointed to find a replacement for Angel, who has been at Marshall since Jan. 1, 2000. Hiring a new president could take as long as six months, Perry said.

    President Angel plans to take a six-month sabbatical, then return to Marshall in fall 2005 to teach. He will continue to teach for a year-and-a-half. Angel indicated that his decision to retire was based on both institutional and personal reasons.

    Institutionally, he noted that Marshall is at the mid-point of its 10-year strategic plan, "Owning the Opportunity." As Marshall revitalizes its plans for the future, Angel said he believes it would be highly desirable and beneficial to have someone at the helm who would be there for the next five to 10 years.

    On a personal note, Angel indicated that life as Marshall's president has been satisfying. Counting his service as president of colleges and universities in California and Texas and his six years as a state representative in Michigan, he said he has been in "high octane" public service leadership positions for 32 years.

    "It has been a privilege and an honor to serve as president of Marshall University," Angel said. "Patricia and I love Marshall University and we always will."

    The Board approved President Angel's request during its regularly scheduled meeting today at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

    "There is no doubt that Marshall University is better off because of Dan Angel's five years of dedicated service," Perry said. "The Angel era has been one of high yield. Marshall University has accomplished numerous milestone achievements in a very short time span: new student housing and parking, substantial federal funding, research advances, new doctorate programs and several new buildings. We appreciate Dan and Patricia and we wish them well."

    Perry said a reception for President and Mrs. Angel is being planned for December.

    Here is a copy of a letter Angel sent to Perry, and read to the board today:

     

    Dear Mike:

    "It is with mixed emotions that I inform you and the Marshall University Board of Governors that I will retire, effective December 31, 2004, as President of Marshall University.

    As you may know, I turn 65 on December 23. As I approach this milestone, Patricia and I look back on our achievements at Marshall University with gratitude and a great sense of accomplishment. Over these last five years, we have made enormous strides in our efforts to bring Marshall University to National Prominence. To list a few of our successes, during my five-year tenure as President, we have:

    • Added three new doctoral degree programs, compared to only one such program in the 163-year history of the University
    • Obtained funding for a state-of-the-art, $40 million Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center
    • Constructed a new $28 million on-campus student housing complex, as well as a $9 million, 1,000-space parking garage
    • Raised $82 million over five years through our Campaign for National Prominence, far outpacing the prior decade's fundraising total of $33 million
    • Added $1.2 million to our annual budget via equity adjustment in the state funding formula
    • Saved more than $1.8 million through bond refinancing
    • Received $58 million in federal funding for campus construction
    • Obtained $12 million in state Economic Development funding
    • Implemented a new family of University logos.
    • Co-edited four books (three with Mrs. Angel)

    I am proud of our work together at Marshall University. Looking back over my career, I am grateful for the opportunity to serve the cause of higher education for thirty-two years, including twenty-six years as a university president and six years as a State Representative in Michigan. Having given so much in this often-grueling field of public service, Patricia and I look forward to more time together as we pursue our personal and family interests.

    I will continue my service to Marshall University in the classroom and I look forward to returning to my roots there.

    I have enjoyed the privilege and honor of serving Marshall University as its President. It has been a great ride, and one of the most significant periods of achievement of my career.

    Patricia and I love Marshall University and we always will!

    Sincerely,

    Dan Angel


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    Jay Flippin Trio to perform Nov. 12 as MU jazz concert series continues

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University department of jazz studies will present the third program of the 2004 JAZZ@JOMIE Concert Series at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12, at the Jomie Jazz Forum.

    The Jay Flippin Trio will present a program of jazz standards that includes selections from its new CD, "By Request." The Jomie Jazz Forum is located directly across 5th Avenue from the Memorial Student Center. The performance will be broadcast by MU's public access television channel 25 on Adelphia Cable.

    Flippin played keyboards and bass in gospel, rock, soul, country, and folk groups beginning at age 10. He taught applied piano, theory, jazz studies, composition, arranging, and music history at Morehead State University for 33 years before retiring in 2000. Currently, he is teaching piano and jazz studies part-time at Marshall.

    Flippin's accomplishments include writing more than 1,500 arrangements for all media. He has been awarded a regional EMMY and has been nominated for a national EMMY. Joining him for this performance are drummer John Knight and bassist Bob Bryant.

    Admission is $10, and Marshall University students will be admitted free. Further information is available by contacting Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies, at (304) 696-2452. Or, call the music department office at (304) 696-3117.


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    Environmental Engineering project awarded to CEGAS by the US Army Corps of Engineers in Huntington

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) has received a two-year research award of $490,000 for an environmental engineering project that involves demonstrating a new groundwater remediation technology called "Well Injection Depth Extraction (WIDE)."

    Dr. Tony Szwilski, division chair and director of CEGAS, said the research award is from the US Army Corps of Engineers in Huntington, and the demonstration site is a former air force base near Columbus, Ohio.

    The project involves Marshall (CEGAS), West Virginia University, North Carolina State University and two small businesses. The objective of the research is to optimize the removal of jet fuel (free-product JP-4) from the groundwater under extraction operation through scale-up deployment of the WIDE technology, which was developed by NCSU.

    "This endeavor is another great example of the US Army Corps of Engineers working closely with Marshall University," Szwilski said. "Over the past decade CEGAS and CITE (the College of Information Technology) have developed a strong mutually beneficial partnership with the Corps on numerous significant engineering and information technology projects."

    More information on the project is available by calling Szwilski at (304) 696-5457.


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    Wednesday November 3, 2004
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    Research and Computing Forum at Marshall Nov. 8

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is host to a Research and Computing Forum on Monday, Nov. 8.

    The forum takes place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Marshall's Huntington campus in the Drinko Library Auditorium (Room 402). Forum details and agenda may be viewed online at http://www.marshall.edu/itc/research.

    Persons are asked to RSVP by calling (304) 696-3141 or via e-mail.


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    Wednesday November 3, 2004
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    High school counselors and principals to visit Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - High school guidance counselors and principals will visit with Marshall University students at the school on Wednesday, Nov. 10, during the third annual Principal-Counselor Conference, conducted by the Marshall University admissions office.

    The conference brings together more than 20 secondary school representatives from West Virginia and surrounding states. This year's conference, entitled "Helping Every Student," offers participants a variety of sessions to learn how to better prepare their students for college. The attendants also get to meet with their former students who are now attending Marshall.

    Conference participants will hear updates from support staff at Marshall, including financial aid, the Honors program, the International Education program and the Early Entry/Dual Credit program on campus. Representatives from each academic college will serve on a dean's panel.

    Counselors from the TRIO programs on campus will speak to the participants about the opportunities available to prospective college students through the TRIO programs and the group also will hear from MU students as part of a panel discussion on giving advice for the high school senior year. Danielle Fasick from American Education Services will speak about the Education Planner college preparation program.

    "We always enjoy hosting this conference because it allows us to discuss and share ideas in higher education with guidance counselors and principals," Craig Grooms, director of admissions, said. "We hope to have many Marshall students stop by to say hello to some familiar faces from their high schools."

    For more information about the conference, persons may contact the MU admissions office at (304) 696-3160.


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    Tuesday November 2, 2004
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    International Festival, Festival of Flags planned at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University kicks off International Education Week on Sunday, Nov. 14 with the 38th Annual International Festival.

    The festival, which is free to the public, takes place in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room from 3 to 6 p.m. This year's theme is "Living in a New World," and emphasizes the pressing need to understand other cultures in light of the current events in today's world.

    Currently, Marshall has 400 international students enrolled from more than 60 countries. The festival features exotic foods, traditional music and dance, and displays representing those countries and their cultures. All of this is provided by Marshall University international students and international community individuals and groups such as the Huntington Woman's International Club.

    MU offers events throughout the week to observe International Education Week, which is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of State to promote international awareness and international education skills.

    The West Virginia Secretary of Education and the Arts encourages all schools throughout the state to observe this occasion. Marshall partners with area schools, business and community organizations to sponsor the International Festival and International Educational Week.

    In addition to the International Festival, Marshall is host to the second annual Festival of Flags, which features a spectacular display of flags from all of the countries where the university draws international students or sends students to study abroad. This semester's festival features flags from more than 60 countries and regions of the world.

    A flag ceremony is planned for 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, in the Memorial Student Center lobby with a flag hanging conducted by student leaders. The Festival of Flags is sponsored by the Department of Student of Affairs, the June Harless Center and the Center for International Programs.

    Marshall also has a Study, Teach and Travel Abroad Fair, which takes place in the student center lobby from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15 and Tuesday, Nov. 16.

    Dr. Clark M. Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs, said the Festival and the various international activities are the prefect opportunity for individuals to celebrate the tri-state area's rich diversity.

    "The International Festival allows the community to celebrate its multi-cultural heritage and showcases the many nationalities of those studying and teaching at Marshall University," Egnor said.

    All tri-state area residents are invited to attend the festival. For more information, persons may call Scott C. Hoppe, Director of the International Students and Scholars Program, at (304) 696-2379, email Hoppe, or visit the Marshall University Center for International Programs office in Old Main, room 320.


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    Annual Health and Social Services Fair planned for Nov. 8 at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services Center will be host to the annual Health and Social Services Fair from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday, Nov. 8.

    The fair, which will take place in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center, is designed for Marshall students and alumni in nursing and all health-related areas. All are welcome to attend and no pre-registration or fee is required.

    Forty-two recruiters, representing 36 organizations, will participate. Some of the participants include the Charleston Area Medical Center, Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati, King's Daughters Medical Center, River Park Hospital and Wellness Council of West Virginia. For the complete list of participants, visit the Career Services Web site at www.marshall.edu/career-services.

    Recruiting Coordinator Patricia Gallagher said students and alumni should bring plenty of resumes and dress for success. Gallagher said persons may visit the Web site to become familiar with the participants attending the fair.

    For more information, contact Gallagher at (304) 696-2371 or visit the Career Services Web site.


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    Friday October 29, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, Director of Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall Faculty Receive $727,000 in Research Challenge Grants

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel today joined research leaders and faculty to accept two West Virginia Research Challenge Grant totaling $727,300 to assist with project that will stimulate regional biotechnology development.

    The grant awards, presented by West Virginia Secretary of Education and the Arts Kay Goodwin, are from State Research Challenge Grant funding that has been derived from a percentage of video lottery proceeds. This funding method, approved during the 2004 Regular Session of the West Virginia Legislature, is estimated to generate Research Challenge Grant funds that will exceed $4 million this year.

    "Today's grant presentations recognize the true strength of Marshall University. Our talented and dedicated faculty are discovering new and innovative approaches and applications every day for research that is being conducted and developed on our campus," Angel said. "We appreciate the efforts of Gov. Bob Wise, Secretary Goodwin, Sen. Bob Plymale and many other important members of the Legislature who made this commitment to support research at our state universities. These funds represent an investment that further enhances Marshall University's efforts to evolve as a researcher leader, building a powerful economic engine to power our state and region's future."

    Two Marshall researchers, Dr. Richard Niles and Dr. Mike Norton, received the grant awards for projects that are currently in development at Marshall University.

    Dr. Niles, professor and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the School of Medicine, received a $399,300 Research Challenge Grant that will be used to strengthen Marshall's cancer research program. The funds will help establish the basic research component of the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Marshall University Medical Center. The $19 million facility, currently under construction at Cabell-Huntington Hospital and the Marshall University Medical Center, is slated for completion next fall.

    Dr. Michael Norton, a professor of chemistry in the College of Science, received a $328,000 Research Challenge Grant to continue research and development work on the innovative Vandalia Project. The project, initiated last year by a group of entrepreneurial Marshall students and faculty, focuses on development of a process, with patent pending, by which DNA fragments can be amplified quickly, easily and in large quantities.


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    Three to be inducted into Harless Hall of Fame

    Huntington, W.Va. - Marshall University's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development will honor three new Hall of Fame inductees at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 30, in the Ed Grose Suite in the Harless Dining Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University.

    The inductions of David Ice, Lydia McCue and Robert H. Plymale will bring the number of Hall of Fame inductees to 9.

    The Hall of Fame inductees are chosen for their significant contributions to enhancing education in West Virginia, particularly in rural areas. Each inductee made an impact in one of three categories: administration, teaching or business partnerships.

    Overview of Inductees

    David Ice

    A graduate of Sistersville High School, Ice attended Ohio Valley College and received his bachelor's degree in social science from Harding University in Searcy, Ark. He attended graduate school at the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies and West Virginia University.

    Ice is currently Grant Development Officer and Special Assistant to the President at Marshall University. He has served as Cabinet Secretary and Senior Program Coordinator for the West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts, Research Associate to the West Virginia Legislature's Joint Committee on Education and as a consultant to the West Virginia House of Delegates' Committee on Education. Ice spent 20 years teaching at Parkersburg High School in Parkersburg, W. Va. Ice has also served on the Board of Directors of several non-profit organizations such as the WV Historical Education Foundation and WV Humanities Council. He currently serves on the Tri-State Literacy Board and the WV Rehabilitation Foundation Board.

    Among the many honors he has received are the Distinguished West Virginian Award, bestowed by Gov. Underwood in 2001, and the Ohio Valley College Alumni of the Year Award in 2000.

    Lydia McCue

    McCue who was born in Fairmont, W.Va., graduated from Rivesville High School and attended Fairmont State College as well as The Ohio State University.

    Throughout her career McCue has been a pioneer in improving education in West Virginia and throughout the United States. Her many accomplishments include establishing the Putnam County High School Task Force, which implemented higher graduation standards, policy changes that promoted academic success, block scheduling, career portfolios and other reforms. She organized four national School Improvement District Leadership Conferences. McCue has also acted as a consultant for school improvement in several other states. She has researched and written staff development modules to be used for nationwide training in school improvement efforts. She also designed and implemented such statewide student projects as the West Virginia Social Studies Fair and State Youth Government Program.

    Currently she is the Executive Assistant to the State Superintendent of Schools for the West Virginia Department of Education. She also serves as the Director of Middle Childhood and Adolescent Education.

    Robert H. Plymale

    State Senator Robert H. Plymale, is currently serving his third four-year term in the West Virginia Senate. Presently, Senator Plymale is Chariman of the Senate Education Committee and a ranking member of Senate Finance.

    Sen. Plymale is currently employed by the Nick J. Rahall Appalachian Transportation Institiute in Huntington, W.Va. He also has served on various public and community organizations such as the board of directors for Huntington Museum of Art, the Ceredo-Kenova Middle School LSIC, the Ceredo Elementary School PTO and the Wayne County Economic Development Authority.

    He is a graduate of Ceredo-Kenova High School and received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Marshall University. Sen. Plymale and his wife Jennifer have three children.

    Photos available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html

    For more information on the Harless Hall of Fame, persons may call Stan Maynard, Director of the June Harless Center, at (304) 696-2890.


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    Distinguished author to read from her work Nov. 4 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Distinguished author Shirley Geok-lin Lim will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, in the Shawkey Room of Marshall University's Memorial Student Center.

    A poet, critic, and fiction writer, she is the author of 11 books and received the 1997 American Book Award for non-fiction.

    Lim was born in Malacca, Malaysia and came to the United States in 1969 as a Fulbright and Wein International Scholar. The first of her four collections of poems, Crossing the Peninsula (1980), received the Commonwealth Poetry Prize. She also is the author of three books of short stories and a memoir, Among the White Moon Faces (1996), which received the American Book Award.

    Lim co-edited The Forbidden Stitch: An Asian American Wome's Anthology, which received the 1990 American Book Award. Her work has appeared in journals such as New Literary History, Feminist Studies, Signs, MELUS, ARIEL, New Literatures Review, World Englishes, and American Studies International. She also has published two critical studies, including Writing South East/Asia in English: Against the Grain (1994).

    Bill Moyers featured Lim in a PBS special on American poetry, "Fooling with Words," in 1999, and again on his new program "Now" in February. A recent Visiting Scholar at MIT and a holder of many teaching awards, she has served as chair of Women's Studies and currently is professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

    More information is available by calling MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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    Tuesday October 26, 2004
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    Celebrity Series II to Start Nov. 2

    Marshall University's Celebrity Series will return for 2004-2005 beginning Nov. 2. Celebrity Series II, an in-depth look at national trends in higher education, will feature eight speakers from across the nation. This group, who are all decision makers in American higher education, will share their thoughts as to where universities need to be headed and how institutions can get there.

    Dr. Don Brown, the first speaker in the series, will be on Marshall's Huntington campus Tuesday, Nov. 2 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Dr. Brown is the executive director of the foundation for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and a former commissioner for higher education in Texas. Dr. Brown will be speaking about how state institutions can meet higher demands with less funding, and specifically how institutions in Texas have handled this situation.

    The second speaker in the series will be Dr. Ronald Blanck, president of the University of North Texas Health Science Center. Dr. Blanck will be on campus Tuesday, Dec. 7 from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre. Dr. Blanck will provide a look into the health needs of the country and advances in health research. Dr. Blanck will also give insights on what the Marshall University School of Medicine is doing with these health needs and advances in research.

    "The Celebrity Series is a rewarding experience for people in the community," Dan Angel, Marshall University president, said. "It helps us to think about the future at Marshall and to push toward our goals." President Angel said the series will also aid in Marshall's 10-year plan, which has been in effect for five years. "We want to see what changes are in store for higher education," Angel said. "This will allow us to revise the next five years of our plan to meet new goals."

    Celebrity Series II will continue with six more speakers throughout the spring semester. All events are free and open to the public.


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    Tuesday October 26, 2004
    Contact: Steve Barnett, Director of Athletic Bands, (304) 696-2317

    Marching Thunder To Welcome High School Bands

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Marching Thunder will showcase the talents of some of the finest high school musicians from the region when more than 1,000 student musicians from a four-state area converge Saturday on Joan C. Edwards Stadium for Marshall's annual High School Band Day, during the Thundering Herd's 2:30 p.m. matchup with Central Florida.
    Bands from 17 high schools will join the Marching Thunder for a halftime performance that will include the popular rock hit, "Crazy Train," and a patriotic medley of "This Is My Country" and "God Bless America."

    "This is a wonderful opportunity for Marshall University to have many fine high school students, band directors and parents on campus," said Steve Barnett, director of athletic bands. "We look forward to having these groups here and extending to them true Marshall Hospitality."

    Bands from the following high schools will perform with the Marching Thunder during Saturday's game: West Virginia: Calhoun County, Gilbert, Greenbrier West, Liberty-Raleigh, Mount Hope, Oak Hill, Parkersburg South, Ravenswood, Rock Hill, Summers County, Tolsia; Ohio: Rock Hill, Symmes Valley; Kentucky: East Carter, Fairview, Glenwood; Virginia: Fort Chiswell.

    On Saturday, Nov. 6, the Marching Thunder will again host the region's largest high school marching band competition, the Tri-State Marching Band Festival, beginning at 11:30 a.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

    The festival will feature 27 high school bands from West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia. Bands will compete in three classifications, with the final band performances slated for 7:30 p.m. The Marching Thunder will perform for fans at 7:45 p.m., with an awards ceremony to immediately follow and conclude the day's activities.

    Bands from the following high schools throughout the region are scheduled to perform: West Virginia: Beckley Woodrow Wilson, Cabell Midland, Guyan Valley, Hamlin, Huntington, Liberty-Raleigh, Magnolia, Nitro, Princeton, Richwood, Shady Spring, South Charleston, Spring Valley, Wahama, Wayne, Williamstown; Ohio: Hannibal River, Pomeroy Meigs, Minford, South Point; Kentucky: Boyd County, East Carter, Greenup County, Lawrence County, Raceland-Worthington, Sheldon Clark; Virginia: Richlands.

    Tri-State Band Festival admission is $5 per person, free for children ages 5 and under. Parking charge for spaces in the West Stadium lot is $2.

    For more information on the Marching Thunder, call (304) 696-2317 or visit www.marshall.edu/band.


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    Friday October 22, 2004
    Contact: Keith Spears, Vice President of Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

    Marching Thunder to provide live soundtrack for new game-day feature

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 240 members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder will play an integral role in the introduction of a new game-day feature at Marshall's homecoming football game Saturday with Buffalo, providing the soundtrack for a unique and historic journey highlighting the Thundering Herd's rich football tradition.

    The video presentation, developed by the Office of University Communications and Department of Athletics with production assistance from WSAZ Television and Marshall Instructional Television Services, will be accompanied by the Marching Thunder's live performance of a special musical arrangement written by Steve Barnett, director of athletics bands, specifically for this project.

    It will take place shortly before the 4:30 p.m. kickoff at Joan C. Edward Stadium.

    "It's no easy task to synchronize a video presentation with a live music performance by a 240-member band. The Marching Thunder, under the direction of Steve Barnett, was up to the challenge and has done an incredible job in helping to capture the spirit of this project through this musical effort," said Keith Spears, vice president of communications and marketing. "Given the time element handed to Steve to develop a score for this project, this, in itself, is an unbelievable feat."

    Barnett's arrangement includes elements of the Marshall fight song, "Sons of Marshall," the official state song of West Virginia, "West Virginia Hills," and "America The Beautiful," establishing a musical legacy that stirs the pride of Marshall's students, alumni, faithful fans and friends.

    "Our band members are excited about the challenge of playing live music that is accompanying a feature on the HerdVision video board," Barnett said. "I was honored to respond to the challenge of developing a musical arrangement that embraces the spirit of Marshall University, honors our past and rallies our fans to look forward to the future success of Marshall football and the university. We look forward to our performance on Saturday and the reaction of the fans to this new staple of the Marching Thunder's pre-game performances at Joan C. Edwards Stadium."

    The Marching Thunder's performance will feature soloist Jeremy Wellman, a music education major and graduate of Spring Valley High School in Wayne County.


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    Thursday October 21, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Parent and Family Weekend one of largest in Marshall history

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 600 people will be at Marshall University Saturday, Oct. 23, to participate in Parent and Family Weekend 2004.

    Parent and Family Weekend 2004 will be one of the largest in Marshall history with 577 people attending. The event gives students' parents and families a chance to see what is going on with the university and to learn some of Marshall's plans for the future.

    "It is a great opportunity to spend time with students and parents in a social setting," Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, said. "It gives us the chance to get feedback from the parents about their concerns and to find out what students' perspectives are of the university."

    The day begins with the parent and family brunch at 10:30 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. President Dan Angel will give a "State of the Campus" presentation and entertainment will be provided by Marshall University theater students. Tickets are $10 each for parents and family members. Student tickets are free.

    A pre-game tailgate takes place at Herd Village on Walter "Lefty" Rollins Field from 2 to 4 p.m. The tailgate is free and refreshments will be served.

    The day concludes as Marshall takes on Buffalo in the homecoming football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium at 4:30 p.m. Tickets for the game may be reserved by calling 1-800-THEHERD.

    More information is available by calling Marshall University Student Affairs at (304) 696-6422.


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    Thursday October 21, 2004
    Contact: Keith Spears, Vice President of Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

    Marshall to introduce and establish new game-day feature prior to Saturday's homecoming contest

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fans are encouraged to arrive early Saturday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium for Marshall University's homecoming football game with Buffalo to witness the establishment of a new game-day feature.

    Shortly before the 4:30 p.m. kickoff, Marshall will introduce a special video and musical presentation that chronicles the proud history and rich tradition of the Marshall football program.

    The presentation, developed by the Office of University Communications and Department of Athletics with production assistance from WSAZ Television and Marshall Instructional Television Services, will be shown on the HerdVision video board during pre-game activities, just before the Thundering Herd players take the field.

    "The video is a nostalgic and historic look at one of the nation's greatest sports stories - the incredible rise of the Marshall football program," said Keith Spears, vice president for communications and marketing. "Prior to each home game, Marshall fans will be able to relive the highs, the lows, and magic Thundering Herd moments with this presentation."

    "Many other major college programs - including Georgia, Oklahoma, Alabama, Penn State and Nebraska - use similar presentations to energize home crowds just prior to kickoff on college football game days," Spears said. "Marshall University and its fans have an incredible story to tell. The passion and spirit associated with Marshall football and the university is conveyed in a very unique fashion with this project, which will quickly become one of the university's great athletic traditions."

    Coach Bob Pruett said he hopes Herd fans are planning to be at the stadium in time to see the video, which will be accompanied by the Marching Thunder's live performance of a special musical arrangement written by Steve Barnett, director of athletics bands, specifically for this project.

    "Our team thinks this presentation is awesome," Pruett said. "It tells the story of how we got here. I know the fans will want to see this. They need to see this."

    Narrated by Bos Johnson, award-winning news journalist and retired Marshall professor, the two-minute, twenty-second presentation includes video footage provided by WSAZ, Witek and Novak, Marshall University Libraries and individuals from the Huntington area.


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    Wednesday October 20, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, , (304) 746-2038

    Drinko Academy recognized as one of nation's top programs

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John Drinko Academy for American Political Institutions and Civic Culture at Marshall University has been recognized as one of the nation's top free institution programs by The Association for the Study of Free Institutions and Free Societies (ASFIFS).

    The Drinko Academy was recognized among institutions at 11 colleges and universities throughout the nation as programs offering worthwhile models for prospective program architects, according to the ASFIFS Web site, www.freestudies.org.

    Other programs and institutions receiving recognition include: the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs, Ashland University, Ashland, Ohio; The Center for Economic and Policy Education, St. Vincent College, Latrobe, PA; Center for Freedom & Western Civilization, Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y.; Gerst Program in Political, Economic and Humanistic Studies, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.; LeFrak Forum and the Symposium on Science, Reason and Modern Democracy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Mich.; McConnell Center for Leadership Studies, University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky.; The Salvatori Center, Claremont McKenna College, Claremont, Calif.; Wilson Center for Leadership in the Public Interest, Hampden-Sydney College, Hampden-Sydney, Va.; and the W.O. Farber Center for Civic Leadership, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, S.D.

    "It is truly a great honor and distinction for the Drinko Academy and Marshall University to be recognized alongside institutions of higher learning that are the caliber of Princeton University and Duke University," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the Drinko Academy Center.

    "In this day of divisiveness and polarization, it's even more important to support institutions that enhance the public sense of shared values. We need more institutions such as the Drinko Academy and organizations such as ASFIFS that stress what we hold in common rather than what separates us as a people."

    Established in 1994 through the generous support of John Deaver Drinko, a 1942 Marshall graduate and senior managing partner of Baker & Hostetler, one of the nation's largest law firms, and his wife, Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, the Drinko Academy is devoted to enhancing public understanding of American institutions and the responsibilities of citizens to their society, particularly our sense of shared values and common purpose.

    Based in Princeton, N.J., ASFIFS encourages research and discussion on an interdisciplinary basis, encompassing political science, history, constitutional scholarship, philosophy, and economics, as well as other scholarly communities less traditionally focused on freedom, such as psychology, anthropology, education, and religion.

    ASFIFS knits together scholars and programs sharing an interest in, and an appreciation of, free institutions, but also possessing the critical capacity to seek an understanding of the costs of freedom, the forces which work to unravel it, and why free institutions and free societies have failed to take strong root in much of the world.

    For more information on ASFIFS and its model programs, visit www.freestudies.org.


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    Wednesday October 20, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Longtime entertainment industry executive to serve as grand marshal of MU homecoming parade, meet with students and faculty

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tom Skeeter, chief executive officer of the Sound City Entertainment Group, Inc., and a 35-year veteran of the entertainment industry, will serve as the grand marshal of Marshall University's homecoming parade Saturday, Oct. 23.

    Skeeter, a 1956 Marshall graduate, will lead the parade that kicks off at noon at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena and ends at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. He will attend several homecoming events and will meet with Marshall students and faculty.

    As part of his itinerary, he will be a guest on a homecoming radio show at the Erickson Alumni Center beginning at 8:45 a.m. Friday. He will meet with students and faculty at 10 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's Booth Experimental Theatre, and will attend a noon journalism school fundraiser at 12:30 p.m. After lunch with graphic arts students, he will be given a campus tour by Jenn Gaston, president of MU's Student Government Association. Skeeter will be on hand for a series of game-day activities.

    Skeeter's company, the Sound City Entertainment Group, owns and operates the legendary Sound City Recording Studios as well as the Sound City Center Soundstage that provides world-class production facilities and services to outside client companies. Skeeter integrated the Sound City Entertainment Group to include Carman Productions Inc., a subsidiary entertainment management and production company. Skeeter has served as president of Carman Productions since 1970.

    After graduating from Marshall with a Bachelor of Science degree in business management, Skeeter gained early business experience working in sales and management with the National Cash Register Company. He later served as vice president of the Daniel Boone Corp., a holding company located in Charleston, W.Va.

    During his long entertainment career, Skeeter and Carman Productions managed and guided the careers of many notable recording artists and actors including Rick Springfield, Richard Carpenter of The Carpenters, actor Greg Evigan of "My Two Dads and "BJ and The Bear," country recording artist Gus Hardin and pop recording artist Danny Wilde. Carman Productions helped develop and produce Stevie Nicks and Lindsay Buckingham before they joined Fleetwood Mac.

    Carman Productions became active in filming television special productions including two specials for the Showtime cable network: Live and Kickin', starring Rick Springfield, and Star Spangled Country Party, starring Alabama, Waylon Jennings and Hank Williams, Jr. The company recently completed principal photography on a low-budget rock and roll horror movie entitled Backstage Pass.

    Sound City Recording Studios has been a leader in recording and production since 1969. Producing credits run the gamut from Fleetwood's "Fleetwood Mac" in the early 1970's to Nirvana's "Nevermind" in 1991 and current songs from Summer 2004's blockbuster soundtracks for Spider Man II and Shrek II. According to the Summer 2002 issue of Spin Magazine, five of the top 40 metal albums of all times were recorded there. Sound City Recording Studios have recorded music for some of the most successful recording albums in the world, and are credited with more than 80 Gold and/or Platinum albums with worldwide sales in excess of 130 units.

    Longtime residents of Southern California, Skeeter and his wife Joan recently celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary. Skeeter served for three years on the board of directors of Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars.


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    Tuesday October 19, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL plans second annual car bash for Friday at Buskirk Field

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's campus radio station, WMUL-FM 88.1, will conduct its second annual Homecoming Car Bash Friday at Buskirk Field on MU's Huntington campus.

    The bashing of a 1984 Buick Century takes place from 12:30 to 4 p.m. and is open to the public. For one dollar, "bashers" will have 60 seconds to bash the car with a sledgehammer. This year's theme is "Bash the Bulls." Marshall plays Buffalo at 4:30 p.m. Saturday in its homecoming game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

    Thundering Herd mascot Marco will be the first to bash the car, which was donated by Steve Taylor of Taylor's Iron and Metal in Huntington. Graingers Industrial Supply of Huntington is donating the sledgehammers, and U-Haul of Huntington is donating the car trailer that will be used to tow the bashed Buick during Saturday's homecoming parade, which starts at noon at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Buskirk Field is located in the middle of campus between the Science Hall and the Memorial Student Center. More information is available by calling Troy Dunn at (304) 542-4874.


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    Tuesday October 19, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Spring Hill Elementary students to visit Marshall's campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Community and Technical College will sponsor "Kids at College Day" for Spring Hill Elementary students Monday, Oct. 25 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    The students will begin their day at college at 10:30 a.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. Presentations will be made by Marshall football coach Bob Pruett and representatives from various academic divisions and departments in the community college.

    AKA Sorority will present a "Step Show" for the students at 12:35 p.m. followed by a campus tour.

    About 100 students in third through fifth grades were selected by Spring Hill Elementary to participate in the event. The purpose of "Kids Day at College" is to allow young students to see what college is about and to expose them to the various programs in the Community and Technical College.

    "Many of these children have never been on a college campus before and we want them to see that college is the way to success," William Redd, Social Justice Coordinator and professor in the Community and Technical College, said. "We also want them to see that the Community and Technical College has many exciting programs to offer."

    More information is available by calling Redd at (304) 696-3009.


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    Tuesday October 19, 2004
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, Director of Communications, (304) 691-1713

    Full-time weight-loss surgeon joins Marshall medical faculty

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Dr. D. Blaine Nease has joined the faculty of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine as chief of bariatric surgery. He also is medical director of the Cabell Huntington Hospital Center for Surgical Weight Control.

    Previously in private practice in Portsmouth, Ohio, and in southern California, Nease most recently was medical director of laparoscopic bariatric surgery at Garden Grove (Calif.) Hospital and Medical Center. He also worked closely with the Alvarado Surgical Associates, a group that includes Dr. Alan Wittgrove, who performed the world's first laparoscopic gastric bypass. In laparoscopic surgery, surgeons work through tiny incisions, reducing patient discomfort and recovery time.

    "I made a career decision to leave private practice and enter the academic setting, and I wanted to move back to southern Ohio where I could be closer to family," he said.

    Born in Atlanta, Nease was raised in southern Ohio and received his M.D. degree from Ohio State University. He completed his internship and residency in general surgery at the University of South Florida, where he also received extensive training in advanced laparoscopic and bariatric surgery. He is certified by the American Board of Surgery and is a member of the American Society for Bariatric Surgery and the American Society for Bariatric Physicians.

    Nease is the only surgeon in the Tri-State region to devote 100 percent of his practice to weight-loss surgery. He also is one of the few weight-loss surgeons in the United States to use laparoscopic techniques for all four major types of weight-loss surgeries: adjustable gastric banding, gastric bypass, the duodenal switch and revisions of previous bariatric surgeries.

    As a consultant, he has helped provide training in laparoscopic bariatric surgery to surgeons throughout the country. He is one of 12 surgeons nationwide to serve on the Bariatric Surgical Review Committee for the American Society for Bariatric Surgery. In that role, he is helping to set standards for Centers of Excellence in weight-loss surgery.

    A veteran of more than 450 laparoscopic weight loss surgeries and many open procedures, Nease puts a strong emphasis on patient preparation and follow-up support.

    "This surgery is not an easy way out for patients; it gives them a tool," he said. "That tool will be responsible for one-third of a patient's potential weight loss. It's imperative patients also make appropriate lifestyle changes in eating habits, which gives them another one-third of their potential weight loss, and daily exercise and fitness, which will allow them to achieve the other one-third.

    "Because I grew up with a father who was morbidly obese, I have empathy and sympathy for the struggles patients have had," he said. "I also am very candid in making sure they understand their responsibility and how important it is for them to take ownership of the process."

    At a minimum, the preoperative workup includes nutritional and psychological evaluation and education, as well as medical evaluation and testing. Following surgery, there are continued dietary education programs to help patients make the necessary lifestyle changes.

    "I tell patients this is not just surgery; it's a new way of life," Nease said. He finds patients are receptive to his candor and his practice's strong emphasis on treating all patients with empathy and dignity. While he was practicing in California, patients from New Jersey, Alaska, Michigan, Ohio, Texas and New Mexico traveled to him for surgery, most of them based on their contact with his previous patients.

    More information about his practice, including comments from patients, is available on his Web site, http://yourobesitycare.com.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 15, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU professor, student participate in NATO ASI in Bulgaria

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University professor Ashok Vaseashta and MU graduate student Nora Gao were in Sozopol, Bulgaria in September to participate in the NATO Advanced Summer Institute, "Nanostructured and Advanced Materials for Applications in Sensor, Optoelectronic and Photovoltaic Technology."

    Marshall and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences served as hosts of the event, which ran from Sept. 6 through Sept. 17 at the Guest House "Izgrev." Vaseashta, a professor in MU's College of Science, served as the ASI director for NATO countries.

    Gao was one of three students from West Virginia selected to participate and present her work at the institute. The others were Andrew Woodworth and Jarrod Schiffbauer from West Virginia University.

    Vaseashta said the ASI meetings serve as a launch pad for international collaboration for joint proposals and projects. The meeting in Sozopol, he said, succeeded in achieving that goal.

    "Many participants indicated they plan to collaborate in future experiments, prepare joint research proposals and network with subject-matter experts in many special topics," Vaseashta said.

    The scientific event was funded by NATO and jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF); TUBITAK in Turkey; INVOTAN in Portugal; the Ministry of Industries in Greece; the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences; Marshall University, Kansas State University and Seki Technotron Corporation of Tokyo, Japan.

    Ninety-one participants from 23 countries covering North America, Western and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Japan and Thailand were selected to attend the meeting under guidelines provided by the NATO secretariat in Brussels.

    Twelve invited lecturers, known for contributions in their fields, presented 36 hours of lectures covering basics of nanostructured and advanced materials for sensor, optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications. The lectures covered topics such as fundamentals of nanostructured materials, their applications in chemical-biological sensors, future generations of electricity and fuel cells, and integration with future generation integrated circuits.

    Additionally, 10 focused seminar sessions and 65 posters were presented by scientists, educators and students from various universities and research laboratories.

    Vaseashta delivered three lectures: 1, Characteristics of Nanostructured Materials from Applications Point of View; 2, Carbon Nanotubes Based Sensors and Devices; and 3, Field Emission in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Vaseashta teamed with other presenters on four posters. They were:

    • "Unique Applications Of Carbon Nanotubes In Medical Imaging, Biosensors And Vaccine Delivery;" other presenter, Anna R. Lemon;
    • "Growth And Characterization Of Nanocrystalline Diamond And Carbon Nanotubes By Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition;" other presenter, Tarun Sharda;
    • "Ideal Nanodevices On Base Of 2d Superconducting Nanotubes Crystals;" other presenters, V. V. Pokropivny and A.V. Pokropivny;
    • "Nanoporous Silicon And Carbon Nanotube Based Devices For Bio-Molecular Detection;" other presenters, Arzum Erdem, Joseph Irudayaraj and Nora Gao.

    "My greatest satisfaction was to see how well students, scientists and educators from geographically different locations received each other and benefited from the exchange of information on one of the most important areas of current research," Vaseashta said. "For Nora, it was a great experience and exposure to the latest technology, application of classroom learning to real-life applications, developing international contacts for future research, and a symbol displaying involvement in research by Marshall University students."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 15, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Fun-Filled Week of Activities To Highlight "The Final MAC Attack" - Homecoming 2004

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's students, alumni and friends are encouraged to show their "Green" pride and support "The Final MAC Attack" in celebration of 2004 Homecoming Week, Oct. 18-23.

    "Homecoming is always an exciting week of activity for our campus community, our alumni and friends. We look forward to seeing Marshall's pride displayed boldly and proudly by our students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends throughout the week," said Lance West, vice president for alumni development.

    West noted that the Marshall University Alumni Association is particularly excited to again share this great tradition with the parents and families of Marshall students, through the scheduling of Parents Weekend to coincide with Homecoming. For more information on Parents Weekend activities, call (304) 696-6422 or e-mail student-affairs@marshall.edu.

    The traditional highlight of Homecoming Week is Saturday's Marshall football game - a 4:30 p.m. Mid-American Conference matchup with Buffalo at Marshall University Stadium.

    The schedule of events for Marshall Homecoming 2004 on campus and throughout the university community is as follows:

    Monday, Oct. 18

    • Office decorations with each university office being asked to decorate to promote Homecoming's "The Final MAC Attack" theme. Prizes will be awarded to the best-decorated offices.
    • 8 p.m. Student Talent Show, hosted by Comedian Kyle Cease, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center (MSC). This event is sponsored by the Student Activities Programming Board.

    Tuesday, Oct. 19

    • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Student government blood drive, Marco's, Memorial Student Center.
    • 7 p.m. Marshall vs. Western Michigan women's volleyball match, Cam Henderson Center.

    Wednesday, Oct. 20

    • 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Student government blood drive, Marco's, Memorial Student Center.
    • 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Third annual "Thunder Into Mason County" Homecoming Celebration, hosted by the Tri-County Marshall Alumni Club, Mid-Ohio Valley Regional Center, One John Marshall Way, Pt. Pleasant.
    • 5 p.m. Marshall vs. V.M.I. men's soccer match, Sam Hood Field.

    Thursday, Oct. 21

    • Noon Selection of Homecoming Court, MSC Plaza.
    • 1 p.m. Office Decoration Judging, campus offices.

    Friday, Oct. 22 - Green and White Day

    • 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Complimentary Coaches Breakfast, Erickson Alumni Center. Sponsored by WDGG-FM/Kindred Communications.
    • 6:30 p.m. Marshall Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Banquet, Don Morris Room, MSC. Tickets are $20 per person and available at the Marshall Ticket Office or Erickson Alumni Center. For information, call (304) 696-4373 or 1-800-THE-HERD.
    • 8 to 11 p.m. MUAA "Evening with Friends" alumni reception, Erickson Alumni Center. Tickets are $10 per person. For information, call (304) 696-2901 or (800) MU-ALUMX (682-5869).

    Saturday, Oct. 23

    • 9 a.m. 9th Annual 5K Alum Run, downtown Huntington and MU campus area. Sponsored by Marshall University Recreational Sports Office. Race day registration, $15 per person, begins at 7 a.m. Early pre-race registration, $10 per person. For information, contact Sharon Stanton at (304) 696-2943.
    • 9 to 10 a.m. Author's Brunch, featuring Confederate history bibliographer Jack Dickinson, Hoffman Room, Third Floor, Morrow Library. Following brunch, Dickinson will be signing copies of his book, "If I Should Fall in Battle: The Civil War Diary of James P. Stephens." For more information, call Yanzhi Wu at (304) 696-3201
    • 10 to 11:30 a.m. Reunion of former Student Government Presidents, Marshall Hall of Fame Café, 857 Third Avenue, Huntington. For more information, contact Jenn Gaston at (304)-696-6436.
    • 10:30 a.m. President's Parent & Family Brunch, Memorial Student Center. Cost is $10 per parent/family members. Student admission is free. For reservations of information, call (304) 696-6422.
    • 11 a.m. Greek Organizations Reception, MSC lobby. Sponsored by the Office of Student Activities and Greek Affairs, the Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National Panhellenic Council and Marshall University Alumni Association.
    • Noon Marshall Homecoming Parade, featuring Grand Marshall Tom Skeeter (Class of '56), downtown Huntington and MU campus area.
    • 1 to 3 p.m. - H.E.L.P. Program Parents Day and Homecoming for alumni and parents, Myers Hall.
    • 1:30 p.m. "Largest Greek Photo in Marshall History," featuring all past and present members of the Greek community at Marshall University, MSC Plaza. For information, call (304) 696-2283.
    • 2 to 4 p.m. - MUAA "Lunch Under The Tent" Tailgate Party at Herd Village. Tickets are $15 per person. For information, call (304) 696-2523 or (800) MU-ALUMX (682-5869).
    • 4:30 p.m. - Marshall/Buffalo football game, Joan C. Edwards Stadium.
    • 7:30 p.m. - River Cities Marshall Club post-game party and dinner/dance at Eagle Distributing Company Warehouse at 140 West 3rd Ave., featuring food from Outback Steakhouse, beverages and live dancing music from Stratus. Tickets are $25 each/advance, $30 at the door. Sponsored by the Eagle Distributing and Outback Steakhouse. For information, call (304) 696-2901 or (800) MU-ALUMX (682-5869).
    • 8 p.m. - Step Show, sponsored by the National Panhellenic Council, Cam Henderson Center . Tickets are $7 at the door. For more information, call (304) 696-2284.

     

    Additional Homecoming Events:

    The College of Nursing and Health Professions and the College of Information Technology and Engineering will host tents at Herd Village, prior to the Marshall/Buffalo football game. Tailgate festivities begin at 1:307 p.m. and are open to all alumni, students, friends, faculty and staff.

    The School of Journalism and Mass Communication will host a "J-Walk" Walk-A-Thon fundraiser on Friday, Oct. 22. For more information, call (304) 696-2360.

    Alpha Chi Omega will host a Homecoming/Founder's Day Celebration Brunch at the Chapter house at 9:30 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 23. For more information, contact Sheanna Smith at (304) 633-2441.

    Pi Kappa Alpha will host a reunion for 1950s-era friends during Homecoming weekend. For more information, contact event coordinator Betty Smith by e-mail at smith25705@aol.com

    The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is recognizing and celebrating reunion classes from 1984 (20 years), 1989 (15 years), 1994 (10 years) and 1999 (five years). The School of Medicine Alumni Association will host a 50s Sock Hop Reception from 8 to 11 p.m., Friday, Oct. 22, in the Grand Theatre of the Radisson Hotel. On Saturday, Oct. 23, the School of Medicine will host a pre-game tailgate party at Herd Village, beginning at 1:30 p.m. For more information, contact Jennifer Plymale at (304) 691-1182.

    MU Black Alumni Inc. will host its annual Homecoming weekend gathering in downtown Huntington at the Radisson Hotel. A registration/hospitality event will kickoff the festivities at 6 p.m., Friday, Oct. 22, at the hotel. The Annual Alumni Meeting and Continental Breakfast will be held at 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 23, at the Memorial Student Center. A Herd Village tailgate part will begin at 2 p.m., leading up to the Marshall/Buffalo 4:30 p.m. kickoff. A post-game dance & recognition event for distinguished alumni will be held from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. at the Radisson Hotel. For more information, contact Kevin McClain at (304) 696-5564 or (304) 523-8859.

    Lectures by Smithsonian Institution marine biologist Carole Baldwin and Marcella Kelly, assistant professor for the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Virginia Tech, highlight the 18th annual Society of Yeager Scholars Symposium Week, which begins Monday, Oct. 18, on the Marshall University campus. The symposium concludes with a dinner on Friday, Oct. 10. For more information, call (304) 696-2475.


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    Smithsonian marine biologist headlines 18th annual Yeager Symposium

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Smithsonian Institution marine biologist Carole Baldwin will speak at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 18 at Marshall University during the 18th annual Society of Yeager Scholars Symposium.

    Baldwin has titled her talk, which takes place in the Joan C. Edwards Experimental Theatre, "Journey to Earth's Inner Space." She plans to discuss the mysteries of ocean life and her research in the Galapagos Islands.

    A viewing of the IMAX film "Galapagos" precedes Baldwin's speech. It will be shown at 4:30 p.m. in Marco's, located in the basement of the Memorial Student Center.

    The theme of the 2004 Yeager Symposium is "Issues in Bioconservation." It runs through Thursday, Oct. 21, and all events are free to the public.

    Will Alexander, a Marshall Yeager Scholar Symposium co-chair, said everyone in the community is encouraged to attend the symposium and learn more about bioconservation.

    "I think we've got a nice lineup of speakers that people will want to come out and see," he said. "We have three speakers that will be talking about real exotic types of topics. The panel discussion on Thursday will bring the focus on local conservation issues like mountaintop removal and water quality."

    Marcella Kelly, assistant professor for the Virginia Tech Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, speaks at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 in the Experimental Theatre. She has titled her talk "Carnivore Conservation in Developing Countries: Jaguars in Belize, Central America," and she plans to present her research in tropical ecology and conservation and in predatory mammal research in Central America.

    Ron and Wendy Perrone, directors from the Three Rivers Avian Center (TRAC), will be accompanied by a half-dozen raptors for their program titled "Birds of Prey." They will be discussing their efforts in rehabilitation, conservation and protection of birds of prey at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20, in the Experimental Theatre.

    The Symposium concludes at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21, with a panel of local scientists, activists, industry workers, and government officials, also in the Experimental Theatre. The panel will discuss issues and efforts in biological diversity and conservation locally, nationally, and worldwide.

    Persons may send questions for the panel discussion to Alexander or Sydnee Smirl.


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    Marshall University, Charleston Area Medical Center among sponsors of International Conference on Healthcare Systems

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Charleston Area Medical Center are two of the sponsors of the Third International Conference on Healthcare Systems, which takes place Thursday, Oct. 14 through Sunday, Oct. 17 at the Embassy Suites in Charleston.

    More than 100 participants from nine countries and 20 states are expected to attend. This is the first time the conference has been held in the U.S. Previous conferences took place in 2000 in Queretaro, Mexico, and in 2002 in Ankara, Turkey.

    Dr. Ashish Chandra, a faculty member in Marshall University's Graduate School of Management, is the conference program chair and is coordinating the event.

    Other sponsors are the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of Evansville, University of Houston-Clear Lake, Monmouth University, Kings College and Charles E. Pettry, Jr., of Charleston.

    "This is the most successful conference of the three," said Chandra, who attended both of the previous ones. "We'll have over 50 institutions represented. This is a great way to contribute to the economy of this state. We also are doing things to showcase the state."

    In addition to the conference sessions, participants will have the opportunity to take bus tours throughout West Virginia to see the fall foliage.

    One of the goals of the conference, Chandra said, is to foster relationships between healthcare academics and practitioners of many countries. Past participants have included academicians, and professionals or students from fields such as health care administration, management, marketing, medicine, nursing, occupational/physical therapy, pharmacy, dentistry and education.

    Marshall University President Dan Angel and Dr. Sarah N. Denman, Marshall provost, along with Chandra, will take part in an opening and welcoming ceremony from 9 to 9:45 a.m. in Salon A and B on the first floor of the Embassy Suites. The keynote speech, "Visions: Building Healthy Communities," will be given by Dr. Paul T. Bruder from the University of Houston-Clear Lake, Texas.

    More information is available by calling Chandra at (304) 746-1964.


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    Richard Jackson to sign latest book at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumnus and Atlanta, Ga., banker Richard Jackson will sign copies of his latest book, Too Stupid to Quit: Banking and Business Lessons Learned the Hard Way, on Saturday, Oct. 23.

    The signing will take place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Marshall University Bookstore on the Huntington campus. The book, which chronicles the history and business practices of Atlanta banking during Jackson's career from the late 1960's to the early 1990's, is Jackson's third.

    Jackson, a 1959 Marshall graduate, said the book should be of interest and helpful to people who are interested in banking, management practices and leadership. It features insights on the "key movers and shakers" in the Atlanta area and the deals they consummated during Jackson's career.

    "I think everyone will find the management concepts interesting and it will also make people look at banking differently," Jackson said.

    Publication of Too Stupid to Quit was made possible through the sponsorship of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall. It will be utilized for text reference and instruction in Marshall's Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business.

    An online preview of the book on the Web site of its publisher, Authorhouse, describes Too Stupid to Quit as "a unique and creative treatise on the management process. Combing military tactics with business practices, the author provides an in-depth discussion and analysis of the principles, techniques, and lessons learned the hard way that were later utilized to build two successful financial organizations with unconventional and "out of the normal banking box" practices.

    "This is a well-documented book about Atlanta banking," said former Georgia Gov. Carl Sanders, who has served on several banking boards. "It's a good reference for business people interested in creative leadership, marketing, strategy and proven results."

    Since retiring in 1995 from his position as chief operating officer and vice chairman of First Financial Management Corporation in Atlanta, Jackson has authored Yesterdays Are Forever, A Rite of Passage through the Marine Corps and Vietnam War, and The Last Fast White Boy, a story about athletics at Marshall during Jackson's involvement in various sports during the 1950s.

    Jackson, currently Chairman of the Board with ebank Financial Services Inc. in Atlanta, said Too Stupid to Quit will have a strong appeal for bankers in general, neophyte managers and the seasoned professional. He said an abundance of practical business skills, strategy, tactics formulation and marketing techniques is presented in the book.

    Copies of the 256-page book may be purchased at the bookstore. Hardcover copies are $29.45 and paperback copies cost $19.45. It also may be purchased online at www.authorhouse.com/BookStore.


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    Distinguished author to read from his work at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Writer Gary Fincke, a poet, short story author, and memoirist, will read from his work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20, in Room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Fincke is the author of 12 books, most recently Sorry I Worried You, a collection of short stories from University of Georgia Press and winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award. His seventh poetry collection is Writing Letters for the Blind, winner of the Ohio State University Press award in poetry. His work has appeared in such major journals as Poetry, Harper's, The Southern Review, The Paris Review, American Scholar and Newsday.

    Fincke's work has been widely recognized and anthologized. He has won the George Garrett Fiction Prize and multiple Pushcart Prizes, and has been nominated for the National Book Award, PEN/Faulkner Award, and the National Book Critics Circle Award, among others. His non-fiction appears frequently in the annual Best American Essays, and he also is an award-winning teacher.

    Fincke directs the Writers' Institute at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania, where he is a professor of English and Creative Writing.

    His appearance, which is free to the public, is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts. More information is available by calling Marshall English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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    Marshall University Forensic Science Center receives federal funding through the President's DNA initiative

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Forensic Science Center will receive $520,000 in Justice Department funding to train forensic criminologists in a new DNA initiative. The funding recognizes the highly specialized training that Marshall provides to experts and students alike.

    Marshall President Dan Angel said the Forensic Science Center's service as a national resource for the forensic community quickens the university's strides towards national prominence.

    "I must add that without the foresight, leadership, and support of Senator Robert C. Byrd, Marshall University would not have been in a position to even compete for this award. Advancing Justice Through DNA Technology allows the Forensic Science Center to further expand its training infrastructure by utilizing its accredited DNA testing laboratory to assist the national effort to improve crime laboratories through DNA technology," Angel said.

    Terry W. Fenger, PhD., director of the Forensic Science Center, said many state crime laboratories need assistance and training to best utilize new DNA technologies that are helping to solve previously unsolved crimes. "The close association between academics and the DNA testing laboratory allows MUFSC to respond to the needs of forensic laboratories expeditiously," Fenger said.

    MUFSC will provide six week-long DNA laboratory training workshops on DNA extraction and analysis for human identification to 60 individuals in the forensic community. The National Institute of Justice will select individuals who work in crime laboratories and require training in forensic methods and techniques.

    Also, MUFSC will provide a help desk for advice and consultations after training is completed. The center's distance learning facility will be used for teleconferences for additional classroom and laboratory training sessions. MUFSC will lend equipment to crime laboratories that lack a telecommunications system to enable training sessions.

    The Forensic Science Center developed the training program in support of its role as one of four core members of the Forensic Resource Network, a program funded by the National Institute of Justice providing research, evaluation tools, and direct services to crime laboratories. Two other FRN members that received funding for training from the President's DNA Initiative were the National Forensic Science Technology Center and West Virginia University Forensic Science Initiative.

    The President's DNA initiative is a five-year, billion-dollar comprehensive federal initiative using DNA technology to strengthen and improve current federal and state DNA collection and analysis systems.

    The Forensic Science Center also consists of the Forensic Science Program, a two-year Master's degree program in Forensic Science and assists law enforcement in training and education to meet national standards and continuing education requirements. The center's laboratories for the WV Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) are ISO/IEC 17025 compliant as a testing and calibration laboratory and are accredited as a DNA databasing laboratory for its forensics work.


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    'Business Connections 2004' planned for Oct. 20 at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services and the Lewis College of Business are sponsoring "Business Connections 2004" from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

    The fair, which will take place in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center, is designed as a job fair for seniors and alumni and also an informational fair for all majors interested in business careers.

    In addition to employer displays, there also will be professional panel discussions throughout the day in the student center's Alumni Lounge. The one-hour panels are open to all students and will discuss the following topics:

    • 10 - 11 a.m.: Accounting
    • 11 a.m. - noon: Marketing
    • 1 - 2 p.m.: Management
    • 2 - 3 p.m.: Finance and Economics
    • 3 - 4 p.m.: Management Information Systems

    The day will conclude with a professional business dinner and pre-dinner socializer. The socializer will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge. Dinner will be from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Don Morris Room. Both are open to all students and faculty.

    The featured speaker for the dinner will be Richard Jackson, a 1959 Marshall graduate with a degree in marketing and retailing. Jackson will discuss the field of business in his speech, "Expectations and Potholes." Jackson is the author of "Too Stupid to Quit: Banking and Business Lessons Learned the Hard Way," "The Last Fast White Boy" and "Yesterdays are Forever, A Rite of Passage through the Marine Corps."

    Tickets for the dinner, which cost $25 for faculty and $20 for students, may be purchased by contacting Patricia Gallagher in Career Services at (304) 696-2371. Pre-registration is not required for the job fair. For more information and a list of participants, persons may contact Gallagher or visit the Career Services Web site, http://www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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    'Red, White, Black & Blue' authors, editor to speak at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The authors and editor of "Red, White, Black & Blue: A Dual Memoir of Race and Class in Appalachia," will give a presentation from 3 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 14 at Marshall University.

    The presentation is titled "Continuing the Conversation: Segregation in Appalachia Before and After Brown v. Board of Education." It takes place in the Memorial Student Center's Alumni Lounge and is free to the public.

    Faces of Appalachia, a National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant in support of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia, is sponsoring the presentation.

    Charleston, W.Va., natives William M. Drennen, Jr., and Kojo (William T.) Jones, Jr., wrote the book, which was published in January 2004. It was edited by Dolores M. Johnson, a professor of English at Marshall. Drennen and Jones grew up in the South Hills section of Charleston during the late 1940's and 1950's.

    "Bill and Kojo will talk about their experience in the mid 1950's when the schools integrated in Charleston," Johnson said. "They'll talk about what it was like, and reflect on that process. The whole book deals with how the integration process affected society and how it has made specific changes."

    As boys, Drennen and Jones played on the same Little League baseball team and experienced just one year together as schoolmates after the all-white Thomas Jefferson Junior High School was desegregated in 1955. After that, class, race and choice separated their life experiences for 45 years. In 1992, after both moved back to Charleston, they decided to work on a memoir of growing up through the trauma of desegregation.

    For more information on the presentation by Drennen and Jones, persons may call Linda Spatig at (304) 696-2875.


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    Marshall to join in personal computer recycling drive

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mission West Virginia, a nonprofit organization that refurbishes computers for churches and other nonprofit agencies, is partnering with Marshall University Green Computing Initiative and the Cabell County Solid Waste Authority to sponsor a personal computer recycling drive.

    Computers will be collected from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 16 at 20th Street and 3rd Avenue in Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium parking lot.

    According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), more than 2 million tons of electronics end up in landfills each year. Electronics contain a variety of hazardous metals, including mercury and cadmium that require special handling. Older computer monitors can contain four or more pounds of lead each. Electronic components also contain precious metals such as gold and copper that can easily be recycled.

    Acceptable items for the Green Computing Initiative include computers, scanners, printers, monitors, keyboards, mice, tape and disk drives and other peripherals. Mission West Virginia particularly needs working monitors to add to other systems.

    Televisions, copiers, cell phones or other household electronics unrelated to computers cannot be accepted. All working or repairable machines will be donated to Mission West Virginia, which places computer equipment with nonprofit organizations in West Virginia.

    Contributors will receive a receipt for a tax deduction for their donation. If the equipment must be disposed, as much of the machine as possible is reused or recycled, then the rest will be shipped to a vendor for recycling purposes in "an environmentally responsible manner."

    Residents are advised to scrub their hard drives and delete any private information before donating, reselling, or recycling computers. If a person is not knowledgeable about the procedure, the collection site will use a software program that will erase the hard drive. The collection service is free and open to household computers only. Businesses should call Mission West Virginia for recycling alternatives.


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    COFA 20th anniversary celebration begins Saturday with gala

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Fine Arts begins its 20th anniversary celebration with a fundraising gala Saturday, Oct. 9 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    Composer Michael Valenti, who has written the scores for five Broadway shows and 24 off-Broadway plays and musicals, is working with Marshall's students this week as they prepare to perform one of his operas Saturday.

    The student cast will perform "Beau Nash," a one-act chamber opera that premiered at Marshall and since has been performed by the Portland Chamber Orchestra, at 8 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. A cabaret performance by Christine Andreas, a Tony Award nominee and Broadway actress, also is planned during the gala.

    Tickets are $50 per person, and the gala is open to the public. Money raised from the gala supports scholarships and helps fund special student projects, according to COFA dean Don Van Horn. For more information or to make reservations, persons may call (304) 696-2787.

    A second performance to celebrate the 20-year anniversary is an orchestral concert that will take place next spring.

    "Beau Nash" is based upon the play by Constance D'Arcy Mackay and takes place on Christmas Eve 1750 in Bath, England. Mitchell Spurlock, a freshman music education major from Steubenville, Ohio, plays Beau Nash.


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    Angel plans State of the University address for Oct. 14

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel will discuss institutional accomplishments over the past five years, and look ahead to the future during his annual State of the University address next week.

    The address will take place Thursday, Oct. 14 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center during the fall General Faculty Meeting, which begins at 4 p.m. Angel's address is titled: "Acres of Diamonds: A Proud Past, A Prominent Future."

    Angel has been Marshall's president since January 2000. Shortly after his arrival, Marshall established its vision for the next decade with a strategic plan titled, "Owning the Opportunity: MU-2010." Angel's State of the University address will include a progress update midway through the 10-year plan.

    Other items on the meeting agenda include:

    • Introductions and announcements by Faculty Senate President Larry Stickler;
    • State of the Faculty address by Stickler;
    • Introduction of new faculty by college deans.

    The public is invited to attend the general faculty meeting and Angel's State of the University address.


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    Blake Collection bibliographer speaks Oct. 23 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jack Dickinson, bibliographer of the Roseanna Blake Confederate Collection in Marshall University's Morrow Library, will speak Saturday, Oct. 23 during a homecoming brunch.

    The brunch, free to the public, will take place from 9 to 10 a.m. in the Hoffman room of special collections on the third floor of the Morrow Library. Persons may contact Yanzhi Wu at (304) 696-3201 to make reservations. Seating is limited.

    Dickinson will recount the life of James P. Stephens, a soldier in the 7th Alabama Infantry, Confederate States of America. Dickinson discovered Stephens' manuscript diary while going through the library's collection.

    The diary, which was written between March 25, 1861, when the company left Centre, Ala., and March 26, 1862, when the company disbanded, is the only complete history of this military unit. The diary recounts daily life in a military camp, the thoughts and feelings of soldiers about their experiences and those of Southern forces and skirmishes against the Union fort at Pensacola, Fla. Clippings from newspapers and sketches of the camps also are included in the diary.

    The inscription in the front of the diary reads, "If I should fall in Battle I wish this book returned to my relatives at Centre, Cherokee County Alabama." Stephens' wish of his family receiving the diary had not been fulfilled so, with the encouragement and support of the John Deaver Drinko Academy and University Libraries, Dickinson worked to fulfill Stephens' wish.

    The diary and background notes, "If I should fall in Battle: the Civil War Diary of James P. Stephens," was published in 2003 and Dickinson was able to return the manuscript to Stephens' family.


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    Marshall University Forensic Science Center receives $3.3 million to assist forensic crime laboratories

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Forensic Science Center has received $3.3 million in funding secured by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., to provide assistance to forensic crime laboratories.

    Marshall President Dan Angel said the appropriation will provide opportunities for national outreach. "Marshall's impact on the forensic science community will be strengthened by the working relationships that will be forged with forensic laboratories within West Virginia and in other states," Dr. Angel said.

    The Forensic Science Center serves as a national resource for the forensic community as part of the Forensic Resource Network (FRN), a program funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) providing research, evaluation tools, and direct services to crime laboratories to improve their abilities to solve crimes.

    The Forensic Science Center will provide funding for the FRN's Community Support Initiative, a national effort to support training. Activities in support of the initiative include: providing services for forensic labs to change DNA analysis platforms; developing a forensic crime lab ethics toolkit; further development of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program; and expanding computer forensic training at Marshall Information Security and Digital Evidence Center (MISDE). Research includes continuing studies of analytical chemistry related to smokeless powders and gasoline residue individualization.

    Terry W. Fenger, Ph.D., director of the Forensic Science Center, said the center's role has expanded to support a national effort to improve and provide training to state and local crime labs.

    "The center's model working forensic laboratory will continue to provide assistance to forensic crime laboratories by utilizing its DNA lab and computer forensics lab in research and development, testing and evaluation, and model training," Fenger said.

    The Forensic Science Center will continue its long-term memorandum of understanding with the West Virginia State Police to provide DNA genotyping on convicted offenders for the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and quality assurance services.

    Sen. Byrd added the funding to the Fiscal Year 2004 Commerce, Justice, State Appropriations bill which was wrapped into a larger federal funding package. The legislation was signed into law in February. The funding is a cooperative agreement with the NIJ under the Community-Oriented Policing program.

    The Forensic Science Center includes the Forensic Science Program, a two-year master's degree program in Forensic Science, and assists law enforcement in training and education to meet national standards and continuing education requirements. The center's laboratory for West Virginia Combined DNA Index System is ISO/IEC 17025 compliant as a testing and calibration laboratory and is accredited by the NFSTC as a DNA databasing laboratory. In addition, the laboratory is accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks for parentage testing.


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    Smithsonian adds links to MU Libraries' Virtual Museum Exhibits

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is now part of the internationally renowned Smithsonian Institution's Digital Collections.

    Links to five MU Libraries' digital exhibits appear on the Smithsonian Institution Libraries Web site "Library and Archival Exhibitions on the Web." More than 3,000 library-related exhibits from more than 25 countries are listed and almost 20,000 people visit the site annually.

    "The Libraries at Marshall provide an information gateway leading to thousands of print and digital resources," MU Libraries dean Barbara Winters said. "We are pleased that we have been able to provide digital representations of our wonderful historical documents, and are doubly pleased that the Smithsonian has taken this move to promote our work in the international digital arena."

    Lisle Brown, Curator and Developer of the MU Virtual Museum, said that Marshall's participation in the project will allow its exhibits to gain a wider audience and the Library "to share in the growing trend of providing the public with access to primary-source documents through the World Wide Web."

    The Smithsonian links are to the following Marshall exhibits:

    • "1937 Flood, Huntington, West Virginia: A Visual Experience" presents a visual record of the great flood based on photographs and film taken by the US Army Corps of Engineers and private citizens.
    • "Buffalo Creek Flood, 1972" provides a chronology of the dam, and video, personal, and court accounts of the disaster following the dam's collapse.
    • "Camp Washington-Carver" focuses on the early history of the first African-American 4‑H club in the United States through the eyes of those who either worked there or enjoyed its facilities as children. Photographs, film, and oral history accounts are included.
    • "Old Main" shows the history from 1898 through 1907 of Marshall's landmark building in pictures, sketches, and stories.
    • "Cass, West Virginia History" tells the story of this historic timber community in an exhibit created by Drinko Fellow Dr. Robert Alexander.

    The Smithsonian Institution's site, found at: http://www.sil.si.edu/silpublications/online-exhibitions/online-exhibitions-intro.htm, features links to online exhibitions that have been created by libraries, archives, and historical societies.

    The Marshall University Libraries are creating two to three Web-based exhibits each year (all of which ultimately are expected to appear in the Smithsonian exhibit) and are currently working on:

    • An online exhibition catalog of the Wilbur E. Myers glass collection;
    • A visual and descriptive presentation of the papers of Nelson S. Bond, an MU alum from 1934 who had a successful career in television and radio script writing and is considered an important early figure in the field of science-fiction writing;
    • And, digital versions of the minute books of the Cabell County Board of Education from 1818 through 1850, which are of particular interest because they contain references to Marshall University and its beginnings.

    "Because of the World Wide Web, researchers and other interested persons can find information in our historical collections regardless of where they are," Winters said. "This information is now available to everyone at any time and any place. Our site, though new, has received almost 500 visits in the past month from the U.S., Africa, Australia, Asia, South America, Europe, and Oceania, by far more visits - from greater distances - than our patrons would have been able to make in person."

    The Marshall University Libraries' Virtual Museum can be viewed at http://www.marshall.edu/speccoll/virtualmuseum.asp.


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    $9.3 Million grant boosts research on nutrition-cancer link at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The National Institutes of Health has awarded Marshall University $9.3 million to study the link between vitamin A and several types of cancer.

    Six scientists from Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and one from the College of Science are collaborating in the five-year project. The lead researcher is Dr. Richard M. Niles, chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the medical school and also its acting associate dean for research and graduate biomedical education. The other researchers are Drs. Beverly Delidow, Kelley Kiningham, Maiyon Park and Laura Richardson of the School of Medicine. Dr. Michael Norton of the College of Science and Dr. Donald Primerano of the School of Medicine will be directors of core support services in imaging and genomics.

    The grant is a "milestone accomplishment," MU president Dan Angel said.

    "The size and substance of this new major grant continues Marshall University on its march toward national prominence," he said. "Our research capacity is being enhanced by the star power of researchers like Richard Niles as well as the considerable investment that we are making in science and technology. The synergy of talent and cutting-edge facilities is a winning combination, and we have just begun."

    The grant creates a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence within the School of Medicine's cancer research program. Three of the projects that make up the center will focus on melanoma, testicular cancer and neuroblastoma, a cancer of the nerve cells that primarily affects children. The fourth project will explore whether a gene that causes tumors in zebra fish has a cancer-causing counterpart in humans.

    Niles said the four projects will expand knowledge about how nutrition influences cancer. "There is increasing published evidence that many different types of cancer cells have defects in the metabolism of vitamin A and in essence find a way to escape from the important regulatory control that vitamin A exerts on the growth and normal functionality of cells," he said.

    The Marshall projects will look at how a group of nutrients (vitamin A and related compounds) called retinoids controls the actions of specific genes, causing them either to be switched on (expressed) or off.

    "In cancer, many activities are abnormal," Niles said. "We're dealing with a central, extremely important group of proteins that regulate the action of genes. If those genes don't function properly, they're either not expressed or expressed too much. Either way, it takes you down a path you don't want to go in terms of cell behavior." Cells might begin multiplying unchecked, for example, or fail to get the chemical signal needed to turn them into mature, specialized cells.

    The grant will expand Marshall's ability to use gene chip technology, Niles said. About the size of a microscope slide, a gene chip can contain more than 30,000 genes - the entire human or mouse genome. By using these gene chips, the researchers will be able to identify every gene whose expression is changed by substances such as vitamin A, which cause the tumor cells to stop growing and behave in a more normal fashion.

    Dr. L. Howard Aulick, vice president for research, said the grant represents a major step forward for Marshall.

    "I would like to think this grant is recognition that Marshall has the beginnings of a critical mass in basic cancer research, which is something we didn't have in the past," he said. "Now we've got it, we've been recognized for it, and we're going to do wonderful things with it. We're going to have people totally invested in cancer research.

    "One of the key reasons this was successful was because of Dick Niles and his recognized capabilities in cancer research," he added.

    Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., vice president for health sciences and dean of the School of Medicine, said that developing a critical mass in cancer research has been a major focus at the school for the past three years.

    "This grant, in conjunction with the $16 million grant received this summer, greatly accelerates our pace in developing modern biomedical research and state-of-the-art clinical services within our university," he said. "The Center for Biomedical Research Excellence will highly complement the developing Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center."


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    Friday September 24, 2004
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    Special telecast of Brown vs. BOE activities at Marshall University to run Saturday and Sunday on Channel 25

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will run a special telecast of the weeklong Brown vs. Board of Education commemorative activities, conducted at MU last week, on Saturday, Sept. 25 and Sunday, Sept. 26 on Adelphia Channel 25.

    David W. Johnson, Executive Director of Distributed Education Technology at Marshall, said the six programs will run throughout the weekend immediately following Marshall Headliners with President Dan Angel.

    Each program consists of a special showing of an episode of the PBS series "The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow" and is followed by a reenactment and panel discussion that examine the implications, influences, and progress of this momentous legal decision that affected society globally and regionally.

    The programs will run in sequence at 10:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. They will be rebroadcast at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 27 through Friday, Oct. 1. Information about the program can be found at http://www.marshall.edu.


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    Thursday September 23, 2004
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    Herd fans urged to wear green to home games

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and head football Coach Bob Pruett are urging Thundering Herd fans to wear green to home games, beginning with MU's Mid-American Conference football battle Wednesday, Sept. 29, with Miami University. Game time at Joan C. Edwards Stadium is 7 p.m.

    H. Keith Spears, vice president for communications and marketing at Marshall, said it appears many Herd fans have gotten out of the habit of wearing green on game day.

    "Several years ago when Marshall played basketball in the Southern Conference, the people of Asheville, N.C., often commented that the annual tournament was dominated by Marshall green," Spears said. "Where did all of this green go? We want, and need, a stadium full of green. Shirts, jackets, sweaters … whatever the choice of clothing, the color should be green."

    Spears said visits this year to Ohio State University and the University of Georgia, along with trips to Kansas State University and the University of Tennessee in 2003, revealed thousands of fans in large stadiums proudly wearing their school colors.

    "Marshall fans were engulfed in a sea of red at Ohio State and Georgia," Spears said. "Last year it was orange at Tennessee and purple at Kansas State. Big-name schools with winning records show their true colors by wearing them in public on game day."

    Pruett said he would love to see more than 30,000 Herd fans wearing green when MU plays Miami.

    "I check it every game. It's comforting to see where the green is," Pruett said. "If you're a true Marshall fan, you understand that God has to be a Marshall fan or he wouldn't have made the grass green and the trees green."

    The Marshall-Miami game will be televised nationally on ESPN2.

    "Occasionally Marshall has the opportunity to gain positive national recognition," Spears said. "In recent years, the most obvious way has been the national telecast of our football games. The game with Miami is another one of those opportunities. But we're not talking about wearing green just for this game, we want a sea of green for all games."


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    Thursday September 23, 2004
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    MU's Athletic Training program awarded continuing accreditation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Commission on Accreditation of Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) has awarded Marshall University's undergraduate Athletic Training education program full continuing accreditation for another five-year period.

    The recent peer review, which continues Marshall's accreditation through 2009, recognizes the program's compliance with the nationally established standards for athletic training education. The standards are established by CAAHEP as well as the American Academy of Family Physicians, The American Academy of Pediatrics, The American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and The National Athletic Trainers Association, Inc.

    The on-campus accreditation process included meetings with faculty, students and administrators along with a review of the curriculum for the program. The findings are then reported to the national board for approval of accreditation.

    "It's hard to get to the point to reach accreditation," Dr. Dan Martin, program director and assistant professor in athletic training, said. "It's pretty exciting to say the least."

    The accreditation also allows graduates of the program to take the national board exams for athletic training after graduation. Martin, who has been with the program since its first accreditation in 1984, said that without accreditation a program is not able to turn out athletic trainers. Graduates of an unaccredited school are not allowed to take the national board exam even with an athletic training degree.

    "The accreditation lets students and parents know that we meet the national guidelines and our students will get a quality education in the field," Martin said. "It moves us up a notch to be more competitive with other schools and allows us to recruit potential students."

    More information is available by contacting Martin at (304) 696-2412.


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    Tuesday September 21, 2004
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    Marshall faculty members to read from their work

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poets Katharine Rodier and Chris Green, both Marshall University faculty members, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30, in the Shawkey Room of Memorial Student Center. Their appearance is the first of the fall term for the MU Visiting Writer's Series, now in its 16th year.

    Dr. Green's work has appeared in such journals as Another Chicago Magazine and Artful Dodge. He also has published in such local papers as Midwifery Today and The Minnesota Parent. He has taught the writing of poetry to community roundtables, rural special-education students, third graders, convicts, and at Kentucky's Governor's School for the Arts. He also was also editor of Wind - Kentucky's oldest and longest running literary journal - from 1999 to 2003. He is an assistant professor of English at Marshall.

    Dr. Rodier's work has appeared in such literary journals as Poetry, The Antioch Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Poetry East, and The Black Warrior Review, and is forthcoming in Wild Sweet Notes II. She holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Virginia and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Connecticut. She directs the graduate program in English at Marshall where she is an associate professor.

    Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

    More information is available by calling Marshall English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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    Monday September 13, 2004
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    Sweatequity V planned for Sept. 25 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hundreds of students, faculty and staff will join together to clean and beautify Marshall University's Huntington campus during Sweatequity V, which begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 25 on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

    This will be the fifth year of Sweatequity Day, an event started by Marshall President Dan Angel in 2000. Outdoor tasks throughout campus, such as painting, picking up cigarette butts, removing gum from sidewalks, pulling weeds, washing windows and sweeping, are planned.

    Angel said Sweatequity Day is named in honor of former U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary George Romney, who arranged for HUD housing recipients to build equity in their homes through their labor rather than their cash.

    "The intent of Sweatequity Day is to have students establish ownership in Marshall University's campus," Angel said. "The program is designed for students to realize that Marshall is their campus and their home.

    Volunteers will work from 10:15 a.m. to noon. They will be treated to light snacks before starting to work, and a pizza party is planned after they finish.

    More information about Sweatequity V may be obtained by calling Steve Hensley, Dean of Student Affairs, at (304) 696-6423, or the Student Government Association office at (304) 696-6422.


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    Friday September 10, 2004
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    Combined enrollment up for MU, Community College

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Marshall Community and Technical College officials announced today that total enrollment for the University and the College has increased over last year.

    After the end of late registration and schedule adjustment, total enrollment is 14,896, an increase of 201 students over last year's combined enrollment. The total includes 12,789 students enrolled at Marshall University and 2,107 students enrolled at Marshall Community and Technical College, representing increases of 71 students and 130 students, respectively.

    "The increased enrollment indicates that our College is making higher education accessible to more West Virginians," said Vicki Riley, Marshall Community and Technical College President.

    While enrollment of West Virginia resident students has increased by 90 over last year to 12,179, the number of out-of-state students has increased by 111 to 2,717, a 4.2 percent increase over last year's count.

    "I think this shows Marshall is still a good value for out-of-state students," Marshall President Dan Angel said.

    Among the colleges and schools within the university showing enrollment gains are the School of Journalism and Mass Communications with a 3.8 percent increase to 405 students; College of Liberal Arts with a 2.9 percent increase to 2,002 students; the College of Health Professions with a 9 percent increase to 1,221 students; and the Graduate College with a 4.6 percent increase to 3,100 students.

    The College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) has increased its undergraduate enrollment 23.7 percent to 146, including a 39 percent increase in first-time students in the Computer, Safety, and Pre-engineering programs.

    "The new collaborative engineering degree with WVU Institute of Technology, which will be offered beginning in fall 2005, will assist in future growth for CITE in the area of engineering," said Sarah Denman, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Also increasing enrollment is the Regents Bachelor of Arts degree program, up 9.2 percent over last year to 310 students. The program allows the nontraditional adult student to return to college, and with the assistance of an advisor, create a program of courses that best fits individual needs.

    The University also has increased by 15 percent over last year the number of students living in residence halls to 2,077, according to Winston Baker, Director of Residence Services.

    "We have more students living in the halls now than we've had in my 11 years at Marshall University," Baker said.

    In the fall 2003 semester, the University added 500 beds to its options available to students when it opened Marshall Commons, a modern suite-style residence hall complex. The University received national television exposure last year for being one of the first schools in the country to replace the traditional wired telephones in residence halls with cellular telephones for each resident. The cost of the cellular telephones is included with room and board fees and includes unlimited minutes and nationwide long-distance.

    The University and College expect to add more than 1,500 additional students throughout the semester as off-campus and other special course students are registered. Other enrollment information, however, will not be available until after Oct. 15 when final data are due to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission and the West Virginia Community College Council.


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    Marshall Part-Time Job and Internship Luau Sept. 15

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and alumni looking for part-time jobs or internships will have the opportunity to meet with employers from the Huntington area on Wednesday, Sept. 15 at the school's annual Part-Time Job and Internship Luau.

    The fair, sponsored by the Marshall Career Services Center, is planned around a luau theme and food and prizes will be given away. It takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center.

    Students may meet with recruiters and discuss part-time job and internship opportunities. It also is a good opportunity for employers to talk with students about their industry and potential openings, according to Amber Bentley, student jobs coordinator with the Career Services Center.

    Twenty-five employers have registered and more are expected. Among them are Champion Industries, FDIC, Finish Line, Kmart, Simpson & Osborne, CPAs, Showshoe Mountain and WSAZ-TV.

    Pre-registration is not required. An up-to-date listing of participants is available by calling Bentley at (304) 696-6785 or visiting the Career Services Center's Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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    Thursday September 9, 2004
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    Angel to receive Outstanding College President Award

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel will receive the Outstanding College President's Award at the All-American Football Foundation's 64th Banquet of Champions Sept. 22 in Chicago.

    The banquet will take place at 6 p.m. at the Chicago Athletic Club, according to AAFF President Jimmie McDowell, who notified Angel of the award.

    The All-American Football Foundation, founded in 1994, is supported by 165 football colleges and universities nationwide. It is a nonprofit organization established to honor individuals for distinguished contributions to football in all phases of the game.

    "I'm honored to be receiving this award," Angel said. "This is a nationally prominent designation which speaks well for Marshall University."

    Banquets of Champions take place several times a year in selected cities where honorees are hosted and presented with plaques attesting to their contributions. The banquets raise scholarship funds that are presented to institutions attended by outstanding college seniors. The Foundation will award 11 Col. Earl (Red) Blaik leadership scholarships to 11 institutions across the country at the Sept. 22 banquet.

    Besides college presidents, some of the other honorees at Banquets of Champions are faculty athletic representatives, commissioners, associate commissioners, sports writers, sportscasters, high school coaches, unsung heroes, managers, trainers and legendary players.

    The honor is the fourth for Angel in the past couple of years. Others include:

    • Selection as a distinguished alumnus of the School of Liberal Arts at Purdue University in April 2003;
    • Selection as a distinguished alumnus by Wayne State University in December 2003;
    • Selection as a participant in the Oxford Roundtable in Oxford, England, in July 2004.

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    City, MU remember Brown v. Education with series of events

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington and Marshall Community Remembers: Brown v. Board of Education is a weeklong series of events that begins Monday, Sept. 13, at Marshall University.

    The events commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court case that changed the public school system in the United States. In 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled that "separate but equal" was not designed for public schools and required the desegregation of schools throughout the United States.

    Marshall University Multicultural Affairs, Academic Affairs and The Commission on Multiculturalism are sponsoring the events that are dedicated to the landmark civil rights decision.

    The week's keynote address features William H. Gray, III, former congressman and president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund and pastor of Bright Hope Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pa.

    Gray's speech, "With all deliberate speed: Brown 50 years later," takes place at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 15 in Smith Recital Hall. Remarks also will be made by Marshall President Dan Angel and Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs.

    Other events scheduled include:

    • Monday, Sept. 13, 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m., Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center - Program One, showings and discussions of the video, "Promises Betrayed (1865-1896);" sponsored by The Community and Technical College;
    • Monday, Sept. 13, 4:15 p.m., portrayal of Justice Thurgood Marshall by Joseph Bundy, founder and director of the Afro Appalachian Performance Company in Huntington;
    • Tuesday, Sept. 14, 15-minute intervals from 10 a.m. to noon, Drinko Library front outside atrium - public readings of historical texts and fiction regarding the African American experience; sponsored by the Graduate College;
    • Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2 to 3:15 p.m., Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center - Program Two, showing and discussion of the video, "Fighting Back (1896-1917);" sponsored by the Lewis College of Business;
    • Tuesday, Sept. 14, 4 to 6 p.m., Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center - Education before and after Brown, showing and discussion of the video "Partners of the Heart" about the life and work of Vivien Thomas, an African American who became an assistant to a white surgeon at Johns Hopkins University Hospital; sponsored by the College of Science
    • Wednesday, Sept. 15, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Shawkey Room, Memorial Student Center - Program Three, showing and discussion of the video, "Don't Shoot Too Soon (1917-1940);" sponsored by the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications;
    • Wednesday, Sept. 15, 4 to 6 p.m., Shawkey Room, Memorial Student Center - Panel Discussion, "The Huntington and Marshall Community Remembers: Brown v. Board of Education;"
    • Thursday, Sept. 16, 10:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center - Program Four, showing and discussion of the video, "Terror and Triumph (1940-1954);" sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts;
    • Thursday, Sept. 16, 3 to 4 p.m., Drinko Library front outside atrium - Public Readings, sponsored by the Graduate College;
    • Friday, Sept. 17, 11 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center - Program Five, showing and discussion of the video, "The Road to Brown (How desegregation came about - and why it matters);" sponsored by the College of Education and Human Services;
    • Friday, Sept. 17, 1:30 to 3 p.m., Drinko Library front outside atrium - Public Readings, sponsored by the Graduate College.
    • Betty Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs and co-chairperson of The Huntington and Marshall Community Remembers: Brown v. Board of Education, said all activities are free to the public.

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    Tuesday September 7, 2004
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    Marshall professor receives 'Outstanding Accounting Educator Award'

    Dr. Loren Wenzel, professor of accountancy and division head of the Division of Accountancy & Legal Environment at Marshall University, is the recipient of the West Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants' "Outstanding Accounting Educator Award" for 2004.

    Dr. Wenzel received the award on June 17, 2004, at the annual meeting of the West Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.

    Dr. Wenzel also will be the Society's nominee for the AICPA's "Lifetime Achievement in Accounting Education Award."

    Dr. Wenzel received his DBA in Accountancy from the University of Memphis. He has taught accounting at the university level since 1980 and joined the faculty of Marshall University in August 2000. He was appointed head of the Division of Accountancy & Legal Environment in the Lewis College of Business in January 2001.

    Under his leadership, a Beta Alpha Psi chapter was established at Marshall University and has achieved "Superior Chapter" status. The Division of Accountancy and Legal Environment also is undergoing many curriculum changes and is currently considering applying for separate accounting accreditation through the AACSB - the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

    Dr. Wenzel conceptualized and spearheaded the development of Business Career Connections Day at Marshall. Business Career Connections Day is an annual event held jointly by the Lewis College of Business and Career Services to inform Marshall students about career opportunities in business and connect them with potential employers.

    Dr. Wenzel founded the West Virginia Council of Accounting Educators in cooperation with the West Virginia Society of CPAs. The purpose of the Council of Accounting Educators is to bring accounting educators together with nationally prominent speakers to discuss ways to improve accounting education in West Virginia and the region.

    Dr. Wenzel maintains active memberships in the American Accounting Association, the Academy of Accounting Historians, the West Virginia Society of CPAs (associate member), the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (associate member) and the Ohio Valley Accountants' Association, and has served as program director and president of the West Virginia Council of Accounting Educators.


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    Tuesday September 7, 2004
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    Marching Thunder to perform with Ohio State band

    The Marshall University Marching Thunder will perform on the Ohio Stadium field with the Ohio State University Marching Band on Saturday, Sept. 11, at halftime of the MU-OSU football game. Kickoff is at 3:30 p.m.

    The two bands will perform together in a tribute to September 11. They each will form a USA on the field and play a special arrangement of "America the Beautiful" in front of an expected crowd of 101,000.

    "This is one of those experiences that is priceless," Steve Barnett, director of MU athletic bands, said. "Our students will never forget something like this."

    Marshall's 240-member band also will perform during a pre-game show called The Skull Session at St. John's Arena at 1:30 p.m. About 20,000 people are expected to attend.

    The band then will perform at Ohio Stadium during the pre-game show where it will play game-day music, including the Marshall fight song. During the post-game show, the band will play classic rock music, one of its home game halftime shows.

    "OSU has a classy organization very much like what we are striving to be here at Marshall," Barnett said. "We really appreciate OSU and the relationship that we are building with them by working together on this project."


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    MU 2004-2005 jazz concert series begins Friday, Sept. 10

    The inaugural performance of the 2004-2005 Jazz@Jomie Concert Series at Marshall University takes place at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 10, the MU Department of Music announced today.

    In response to a community need for a regular jazz performance venue, members of the MU Jazz Studies Program and lovers of Jazz in the Tri-State area will present a concert each month in the Jazz Forum in the Jomie Jazz Center.

    The Mark Zanter Trio will be featured in the upcoming concert. Guitarist Zanter has been a featured performer at the Marshall University Jazz Festival and at Jazz-MU-Tazz, Marshall's summer Jazz Festival.

    Mark Zanter, an active composer/performer, has received commissions from the UIUC Creative Music Orchestra, CU Symphony, the American Composers forum, the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, and numerous soloists. He has appeared as a composer and performer on WILL, IPR, Second Sunday concerts, on WVPN In Touch With The Arts and WCHS.

    Zanter's works are published by Les Productions d'OZ and have been performed nationally and internationally at festivals such as MUSIC '98 (Cincinnati Conservatory) June in Buffalo, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts.

    Admission to the concert is $5 and Marshall University students are admitted free. Tickets are available at the door and seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    For further information, persons may contact Ed Bingham, Director of Jazz Studies, at (304) 696-2452.


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    Thursday September 2, 2004
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    Marshall University ranked as a 'Top School'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is ranked as a "Top School" among all southern master's universities in the latest "America's Best Colleges 2005" published by US News and World Report.

    The university received the distinction of being named a "top public master's university" in the south, ranking 13th, and is ranked 43rd among all public and private schools in the category.

    The university also ranks 16th (tied) among the southern group of schools and is tied for seventh among public master's universities in the south in Peer Assessment. US News' Peer Assessment is a rating of schools in the opinions of presidents, provosts and deans of admissions from other master's universities in the southern region.

    "I'm proud that Marshall is thought of so highly by the leaders of these other schools," Marshall President Dan Angel said.

    The US News and World Report has become one of the premier rankings of colleges and universities and utilizes data in 15 areas related to academic excellence to arrive at a composite weighted score for each school.

    For the 2005 edition of the report, US News and World Report ranked 1,362 colleges and universities in 10 categories including national universities, liberal arts colleges, masters's universities in four regions, and comprehensive colleges in four regions. The "Master's Universities - South" category contains 132 schools, including 73 public institutions.

    "The outstanding faculty of our institution continues to provide students with a top-quality educational experience that serves them well now and will continue to do so in the future," said Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall.


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    Wednesday September 1, 2004
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    HealthyHuntingon.org Marathon receives official certification by USATF

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The USA Track and Field organization (USATF) has given approval for the 26-mile, 385-yard course to be used on Sunday, Nov. 14 in the HealthyHuntington.org Marathon that begins and ends at Marshall University.

    Race director Tom Dannals said the official certification is significant in a number of ways. "If a world record is set in our race, it counts officially," Dannals said. "If someone runs fast enough to qualify for the Boston Marathon in our race, they qualify because our race course is certified."

    Dannals said the certification took about 30 hours of measurements and documentations using a Jones Counter on a bicycle which records about 15,000 clicks per mile to make it accurate.

    The race will start at 8 a.m. on 3rd Avenue near the overpass that connects Marshall's parking garage and Cam Henderson Center, and it will end on James F. Edwards Field at MU's Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

    So far, Dannals said, more than 100 people have signed up to run the marathon, with another 200 expected to do so. "We're predicting 300 marathoners, 100 relay runners and 200 walkers, but we'll take a lot more if they sign up," he said.

    Entry fees are as follows:

    • Marathon: $30 if entry forms are postmarked by Oct. 1, $35 if postmarked by Nov. 1, and $40 after Nov. 1;
    • Marathon relay: $20 per runner if entry forms are postmarked by Nov. 1, $25 per runner after Nov. 1;
    • Half-Marathon (13.1 miles) walk: $20.

    Dannals said he hopes the race attracts lots of walkers. Co-workers could walk together, or families could do the same, he said. All participants, walkers and runners, will receive medals.

    Among the runners entered are some from Canada and California, and a world-class runner from Morocco has been invited, Dannals said.

    "We're not sitting back and having Huntington be part of the poor health that is seen here in this region," Dannals said. "This is how to combat it. Everyone who tries to lose weight and is mystified by the poor or inconsistent response to diet over time needs to know that exercise is the key."

    Entry forms and more information are available at www.HealthyHuntington.org. Further information is available by emailing Dannals at president@healthyhuntington.org.


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    Tuesday August 31, 2004
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    WVU Tech Engineering Degree to be available on Marshall University's campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to increase student access to engineering throughout the Advantage Valley region, West Virginia University, Marshall University and WVU Institute of Technology have partnered to offer an undergraduate engineering degree on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    "This degree model demonstrates effective collaboration among West Virginia's colleges and universities. Sharing resources and expertise allows the partners to provide greater access to engineering education for the citizens of West Virginia," said Dr. Sarah N. Denman, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Marshall.

    Through the partnership, WVU Tech and WVU will provide junior and senior civil engineering courses to Marshall students that will supplement Marshall's existing freshman/sophomore undergraduate engineering program. Many courses will be available on Marshall's Huntington campus, and some will be available on MU's South Charleston campus.

    Courses will be offered in accordance with Tech's current civil engineering curriculum, which has long been accredited by the national Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Marshall students who successfully complete the curriculum will earn a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from WVU Tech.

    "We are thrilled to have the opportunity to work with WVU and WVU Tech to meet the demand for this type of program from our current and future students," Denman said. "In addition, Marshall is excited to be a part of increasing the availability of engineering to larger numbers of students at a time when the national engineering community is concerned about filling the ranks of engineers in the near future."

    Dr. Gerald Lang, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research at West Virginia University, said WVU is pleased to be a part of the collaboration.

    "All students in southern West Virginia will have the advantage of access to a Civil Engineering degree through this partnership which offers courses leading to a four-year degree in all three locations," Lang said.

    "We are very excited to be able to expand our program availability, especially at a time when all of higher education is facing serious financial challenges," added WVU Tech interim President Dr. Galan Janeksela.

    Although Marshall's four-year degree program in engineering was discontinued in 1970, freshmen- and sophomore-level courses common to most fields in engineering have remained available. Until now, students needed to transfer to other institutions to complete the final two years of their engineering programs.

    The freshman/sophomore program also will remain available to students interested in other fields of engineering. Marshall is currently working through the campus and state-wide approval process associated with offering its own undergraduate engineering degree program in the near future.

    The first junior-level courses in civil engineering at Marshall University will be offered in fall 2005, making the degree program available for current Marshall freshmen and sophomores, in addition to students entering Marshall in fall 2005 and beyond. WVU Tech and Marshall plan to make scheduling and registration for the program and courses a one-step process for students.

    For more information, persons may contact the dean's office of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering at (304) 696-5453, or cite@marshall.edu. Or, contact Tech's Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering at (304) 442-3161. Updates on program development and availability will be available at www.marshall.edu/cite.


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    Monday August 30, 2004
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    Welcome reception planned at MU for new African American students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs is sponsoring its annual Harambee, an informal welcome reception for all African American freshmen and transfer students.

    Harambee begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 1, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus. The event is open to all students and organizations.

    Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said Harambee is Swahili for "let's pull together." The reception is to recognize and celebrate the new black students on campus as they prepare for the coming year.

    "We want the students to feel welcome and enjoy Marshall," Cooley said.

    Cooley said he hopes many MU administrators, faculty members, deans, coaches and athletes will attend Harambee. Last year, he said, the entire Marshall women's basketball team attended. In all, about 90 new students took part in last year's event, and Cooley hopes for at least 150 this year. Marshall has about 275 new black students this year, he said.

    More information on the event is available by calling Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday August 30, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Four to join Marshall University Business Hall of Fame

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four local men will receive Marshall University's highest honor for achievement in business this fall when they are inducted into the institution's Business Hall of Fame.

    The inductees are: Richard A. "Dick" Muth, president of Muth Lumber Company, Inc.; Glenn W. Hall, retired partner of Somerville and Company; James C. "Jim" Hamer of Jim C. Hamer Company, Inc., and Charles R. "Charlie" Neighborgall III, president and CEO of Neighborgall Construction Company.

    The induction ceremony takes place at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 12, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. It will be preceded by a formal reception at 6:30 p.m. There will not be a dinner this year.

    Proceeds support the Marshall University Lewis College of Business. For more information or to purchase tickets, persons may contact Lana Egnatoff at (304) 696-3319 or Mary Copley at (304) 696-2316.

    Muth, Hall, Hamer and Neighborgall will be inducted into the Hall of Fame in recognition of their success in business and for demonstrating the highest standards of public service and ethical performance.

    For the past two years, the Hall of Fame induction ceremony has taken place in Charleston. In future years, the event will alternate between Huntington and Charleston. The Lewis College of Business undergraduate programs are located on the Huntington campus and the Graduate School of Management is located on the South Charleston campus.
    Here is a brief look at each inductee:

    • Richard A. "Dick" Muth is president of Muth Lumber Company, Inc., in Ironton, Ohio. He is a native of Huntington, where he graduated from St. Joseph's High School and attended Marshall University. Muth and his brother, Tim, purchased Muth Lumber and Kiln Drying from their father, William Muth Jr., in March 1984, forming Muth Lumber Company, Inc., in Kenova. They moved to a larger parcel of land in Ironton, Ohio, in 1987. The company has grown sixfold since the move. Muth has won many awards, including Lawrence County (Ohio) Businessman of the Year in 2001. He was an Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year finalist in 1998. Muth is a member of the John Marshall Society.
    • Glenn W. Hall is a retired partner with Somerville and Company in Huntington. A native West Virginian, he grew up in Ceredo, W.Va., graduating from Ceredo-Kenova High School. After serving in the 85th Fighter Wing of the 20th Air Force in the South Pacific during World War II, he returned to the Tri-State and enrolled at Marshall College, graduating in 1949. In 1954, Hall became a CPA and joined Somerville and Company, a CPA firm, in Huntington. Hall, the youngest of the original partners, practiced at Somerville for 36 years. He has been active on many community boards, and is a member of the John Marshall Society. In 2003, the City of Ceredo honored Hall with Volunteer of the Year award.
    • James C. "Jim" Hamer reestablished the family wood products business in 1976, three years after it was sold by his father, JP Hamer, thus realizing a lifelong dream. Hamer was born and still lives in Kenova, W.Va., and he is a Ceredo-Kenova High School graduate. Since 1976, the company has grown from a small single circular sawmill operation to a multi-location company with operations to manufacture more than 80 million board feet. The company's products are sold to the global market, and Jim C. Hamer Co. is known and respected world wide for their high quality. For many years, Hamer and his family have been major contributors to Marshall University.
    • Charles R. "Charlie" Neighborgall III is president and CEO of Neighborgall Construction Co. He is a native of Huntington, graduating from Christchurch School in Christchurch, Va., where he was salutatorian. He started working with Neighborgall Construction Co., the family business, when he was only 14, carrying water to the workmen. He gradually moved up the company ladder, assuming his current position in 1983. His company has built many structures in Huntington, including the recently completed Harless Dining Hall and student housing project at Marshall University. Neighborgall is a 1967 cum laude graduate of Marshall.

    Note: Photos of the new inductees are available for use by the media at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


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    Thursday August 26, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU Alumni Association plans 'follow the Herd' tailgate at OSU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tickets for the Marshall University Alumni Association's "follow the Herd" tailgate party, which is sponsored by Appalachian Power and coincides with the Thundering Herd's football game with Ohio State University Sept. 11 in Columbus, Ohio, are on sale now.

    Tickets cost $10 in advance and $15 at the door, and cover admission to the tailgate only. Food and beverages, which will be catered by the Marshall Hall of Fame Café, will be sold separately.

    Marshall plays Ohio State at 3:30 p.m. at Ohio Stadium. The tailgate party runs from 11 a.m. through 9 p.m. at the River Watch Towers on Lane Avenue near the stadium.

    "This is going to be a tailgate party no Herd fan wants to miss," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs. "Even if you don't have a ticket to the game, you'll want to experience the excitement of one of Marshall's largest tailgate parties ever before one of our biggest games ever. And, you might even win tickets to the game!"

    Tailgate tickets may be purchased in advance at the Marshall Hall of Fame Café in Huntington and the Buckeye Hall of Fame Café in Columbus; through Ticketmaster outlets in Huntington (304) 523-5757 or Columbus (614) 431-3600, or at ticketmaster.com.

    The tailgate party will feature live entertainment before and after the game, and it will have a big screen TV on which the game will be shown. Herd fans that don't have tickets to the game are encouraged to buy tickets to the tailgate. Pelphrey said five pair of game tickets will be given away during the tailgate party.

    The Marshall pep band and cheerleaders will perform during the party, WDGG-FM "The DAWG" will broadcast live, and fans will have a chance to win other prizes.

    For more information, persons may call the alumni association at (304) 696-5869 or (800) 682-5869.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday August 26, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Herd Village returns this year with a new twist

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University football enthusiasts can start their game days early again this season at the Herd Village tailgate party, where they also may purchase many of their game day needs.

    For the first time, Herd Village's major sponsor, Marshall University Bookstore, will be set up in the tailgate area to sell everything green and white from shirts to pom-poms.

    "Herd Village is a fun place for Marshall fans to gather before every Herd game," Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs, said. "We are thrilled that the Marshall Bookstore has agreed to be our sponsor this year along with radio stations The Planet 92.7 and 93.7 The DAWG."

    Herd Village is located on the infield of Walter "Lefty" Rollins Track next to Cam Henderson Center. Block ticket discounts, catering and tent rental arrangements can be made through the Marshall University alumni office.

    All profits from Herd Village help fund scholarships for a Marshall band member and a cheerleader.

    Home games for the 2004 season are Troy State, Sept. 4, 4:30 p.m.; Miami (Ohio), Sept. 29, 7 p.m.; Buffalo, Oct. 23, 4:30 p.m.; Central Florida, Oct. 30, 2:30 p.m.; and Western Michigan, Nov. 20, 4:30 p.m.

    For more information or to reserve a space, persons may contact the alumni association at (304) 696-3134 or (800) 682-5869.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday August 25, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Miss Julia' author to speak at luncheon for supporters of libraries at Marshall, WVU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ann B. Ross, author of the Miss Julia series and a former instructor of literature at the University of North Carolina at Asheville, will be the featured speaker at the second annual author luncheon for supporters of the libraries at Marshall University and West Virginia University.

    The event is at noon Thursday, Sept. 9 at the Embassy Suites in Charleston. Lunch will be served, followed by a presentation by Ross and then a book signing. Admission is $12 at the door, or $8 for Friends of the Library.

    "(WVU Libraries) Dean Frances O'Brien and I heard a speaker at a library meeting last year and decided that our fiction-loving Friends groups would enjoy her talk. That led to the first joint luncheon of the groups, in the spring of 2003," said Barbara Winters, dean of the Marshall University Libraries. "Since it was such an enjoyable event, we decided to make it an annual one."

    This time, guests will learn from Ross, whose books include Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind, Miss Julia Takes Over, Miss Julia Throws a Wedding, and Miss Julia Hits the Road, and the latest contribution, Miss Julia Meets Her Match.

    O'Brien and Winters say they believe their guests will enjoy hearing from Ross. Winters was immediately drawn to Ross upon discovering her in a book group.

    "She is a marvelous mixture of old-fashioned propriety with a dose of feminism and panache. Every character in the series is endearing - well, most of them, at any rate," Winters said. "Readers simply fall in love with Miss Julia."

    Still, for some, the most interesting part of the story is the partnership between WVU and Marshall.

    Collaboration, though, is nothing new for O'Brien and Winters. The two play active roles in the West Virginia Library Association and visit the Legislature each year to fight for funding for libraries around the state.

    "West Virginia is a small state so it only makes sense for the two largest universities to work together," O'Brien said. "We share an academic mission, and we both are struggling with enhancing our collections and resources in the midst of budget concerns.

    "Finances have been a chief issue everywhere. Across the nation, state colleges and universities and their libraries have been hit hard by the sluggish economy. With smaller portions of the state coffers being directed toward higher education, private support has become even more critical to bridge the gap."

    Winters and O'Brien hope to use the luncheon to convey their appreciation.

    "The amount of information - both print and electronic - is growing at a phenomenal rate. The cost to libraries for purchasing that information is increasing much faster than the Consumer Price Index," Winters said. "Donations help us maintain and build upon our current resources."

    More information is available by calling Winters at (304) 696-2318.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 24, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU music professor receives grant from ASCAP

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music professor Mark Zanter has been selected to receive a 2004-2005 grant from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). This is the fourth consecutive year that Zanter has received the award.

    The awards are given to assist and encourage ASCAP composers as well as support the growth and development of the nation's and educational institution's musical future.

    "This is a valuable service for concert music," Zanter said. "It is very difficult for people wanting to write concert music to earn a living so the program provides worthwhile recognition for composers of concert music."

    Awards are granted by an independent panel of judges who evaluate the prestige value of each writer's compositions and recent performances in areas not surveyed by the society.

    The panel of judges included: Peter Filichia, drama critic for the (Newark) Star Ledger; Peter Keepnews, a journalist specializing in jazz and popular culture; Melinda Newman, West Coast bureau chief of Billboard; Pat Prescott, veteran radio personality who is host of the morning show on KTWV ("The Wave") in Los Angeles; Michael Morgan, conductor of the Oakland-East Bay Symphony Orchestra; H. Robert Reynolds, professor emeritus at the University of Michigan; and Steve Smith, classical music critic for Time Out New York.

    More information is available by calling Zanter at (304) 696-2482.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday August 20, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Fall semester begins Monday at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Predicting Marshall University's enrollment for the fall 2004 semester, which begins Monday, Aug. 23, is not easy, and the final numbers won't be in for some time. But one prediction is easy - the pace at Marshall and in Huntington is about to pick up drastically.

    Pedestrian and automobile traffic near MU's Huntington campus already has increased with the beginning earlier today of Welcome Weekend 2004, which brought many new students and their families to Marshall for three days of activities heading into the start of school. An estimated 2,500 people - not counting the 240-member Marching Thunder - attended the traditional Welcome Weekend family picnic this afternoon on Buskirk Field and the Memorial Student Center Plaza.

    "Its always exciting to see the students come back," said Sarah Denman, Marshall's Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. "It's exciting for the students, the faculty and staff. It picks up the pace and makes it a lot of more exciting around here. It reminds us of why we're here."

    By 8 a.m. Monday, when the first classes of the semester begin, the changes will be evident. Students will flock to nearby surface parking spots, all of which have been reserved, according to Jim Terry, Director of Public Safety at Marshall. As of late this afternoon, fewer than 100 spaces remained in the school's 1,009-space parking garage.

    Terry said MU police officers will be visible Monday as they assist students in their quest to find particular parking lots or areas. Those without permits will be directed to other areas, such as meter parking on nearby streets.

    Those who purchased a parking permit and mailed their payment in recently, but too late to receive the permit in the mail, may pick the permit up at MU's Department of Public Safety from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday. The Department of Public Safety is located inside the Welcome Center at 5th Avenue and 18th Street. Garage permits may be purchased at the bursar's office in Old Main. More information on parking is available by calling (304) 696-6406.

    Terry cautioned motorists to drive slowly around Marshall's campus because many students will be walking to and from classes at all hours of the day. "We don't want anyone hitting our kids," he said.

    Marshall's enrollment has consistently stayed above 16,000 the past few years, reaching a record high of 16,551 in fall 2002. One reason for the high enrollment has been the PROMISE Scholarship, implemented in 2002 for West Virginia residents. Marshall currently has 702 new PROMISE scholars for the upcoming year.

    Frances Hensley, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, said Marshall has hired 45 new faculty for the 2004-05 school year. Marshall also has contracted with a new plagiarism prevention service, which students soon will hear a lot about.

    "It will make it easier for faculty to detect plagiarism," Hensley said. "Therefore, we hope it will decrease the incidences of plagiarism, especially on the Internet."

    Beginning Monday, volunteers from faculty and staff will be out on campus greeting students and helping them find their way around.

    Students who haven't been to campus since last spring will note significant progress in construction of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on 3rd Avenue. The $40 million building is scheduled to open in August 2006.

    Later in the fall, students will be able to go to the movies, new restaurants and even a comedy club without traveling far as Pullman Square opens in downtown Huntington. A three-day grand opening is planned for Nov. 18-20. The complex will include a 16-screen movie theater, currently under construction.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday August 18, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marching Thunder grows to 240 members

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Steve Barnett likes what he sees - and hears - from the Marshall University marching band as eight-hour-a-day summer practices continue.

    "The band is really kickin,' " said Barnett, MU's second-year director of athletic bands. "We're young but we don't sound young."

    The 2004-05 Marching Thunder has 240 members, which many believe is the highest number in school history. The band grew from 160 members in 2002 to 198 last year. In 2001, according to Barnett, it had about 100 members.

    The band, bolstered by a larger and improved horn section, will perform in public Friday, Aug. 20, during the annual Welcome Weekend Kick-Off Family Picnic on Buskirk Field and the Memorial Student Center plaza. It will practice at 3:30 p.m. at Lefty Rollins Field, then move over to Buskirk and the plaza at 4:30 p.m.

    Its first official performance will be at Marshall's season-opening football game Sept. 4 against Troy State at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Kickoff is at 4:30 p.m.

    Of the 240 members, 100 are new, Barnett said. He praised members of the Marshall music department for their recruiting efforts, and said his own experience directing several all-county or region bands in West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky, along with judging contests this year has paid off.

    "In my 30-year knowledge of the Marshall marching band, 240 members would be the largest enrollment we've had," said Ben Miller, a professor of music at MU. "We are quite pleased with all of the efforts Mr. Barnett has put towards the band. Hopefully we can build on the enthusiasm and continue to build the band program."

    More information on the band is available by calling Barnett at (304) 696-2317.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 17, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Welcome Weekend 2004 expected to draw 2,500 to MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 2,500 new students and members of their families will take part in Welcome Weekend 2004 activities beginning Friday, Aug. 20, on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Ryan Helton, senior admissions counselor and on-campus events coordinator for Marshall's admissions office, said numerous activities are planned from 9 a.m. Friday through the evening of Sunday, Aug. 22. The first day of fall classes is Monday, Aug. 23.

    "Welcome Weekend is a great opportunity for students to get to know each other," Helton said. "We want the new students to be comfortable with their new surroundings and focus on personal relationships in the first few days. In the past, even though the weekend went very well, it wasn't conducive to 'Let's get together and make new friends.' That's our focus this year."

    The biggest event of the three days is the Welcome Weekend Kick-Off Family Picnic, which begins at 4:30 p.m. Friday on the Memorial Student Center plaza. MU President Dan Angel will greet the new students and their families, and the Marching Thunder, under second-year director Steve Barnett, will perform.

    Here is the complete schedule of Welcome Weekend 2004 activities:

    Friday, Aug. 20

    9 a.m. - 4 p.m.: Welcome Weekend Check-In - MU Welcome Center, Memorial Student Center lobby, Marshall Commons plaza.

    9 a.m. - 4 p.m.: Move into the Residence Halls - Students will go to the front desk of their assigned residence hall, and public safety will direct parking for vehicle unloading. Student organizations will be available to help students move into the residence halls.

    11 a.m. - 1 p.m.: Stewart's Welcome Weekend Hotdog Social - Memorial Student Center plaza, sponsored by Stewart's Hotdogs.

    4:30 - 6:30 p.m.: Welcome Weekend Kick-Off Family Picnic - located on the Memorial Student Center plaza and Buskirk Field. Students will meet deans, departments and support staff, the Marching Thunder and Color Guard will perform, and President Dan Angel will greet the students and their families.

    4:30 - 6:30 p.m.: WMUL Live Remote - in conjunction with the Family Picnic.

    5 - 10 p.m.: 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament - sponsored by Alpha Sigma Phi, all students are welcome; outside on the basketball courts between Lefty Rollins Track and Twin Towers East. Equipment will be provided.

    7:30 - 9:30 p.m.: Sorority Parent/Student Information Night - All female students are welcome; located in Memorial Student Center Room 2W16.

    Saturday, Aug. 21

    9 a.m. - 11 a.m.: Continental Breakfast -- Memorial Student Center lobby.

    10 a.m. - 2 p.m.: Welcome Weekend Check-In - MU Welcome Center, Memorial Student Center lobby, Marshall Commons plaza.

    11 a.m. - 1 p.m.: Tennis Party - MU tennis courts. Students may bring their own racquet or use one provided by Marshall. All levels of play, from beginner to advanced.

    Noon - 1 p.m.: Papa John's Pizza Party, Memorial Student Center plaza.

    2 - 4 p.m.: Tie-Dye T-shirts - Buskirk Field (shirts provided).

    4 - 7 p.m.: Student Government Social, Memorial Student Center plaza. Food and fun with new students and their Student Government representatives.

    7 - 10 p.m.: Welcome Weekend Carnival, Memorial Student Center plaza. Events include:

    · HALO LAN Party sponsored by the Student Activities Programming Board, 8 p.m. - 10 p.m.

    · Music featuring The Beautiful Down & The Ones that Got Away

    · Popcorn, cotton candy, and snow cones available.

    Sunday, Aug. 22

    Noon - 2 p.m.: Interfraternity Council Picnic - Buskirk Field

    1 - 3 p.m.: Class Walk Through - students meet on Memorial Student Center plaza. Orientation leaders and MU Student Ambassadors will walk new students through their schedule.

    4 - 5:30 p.m.: Dinner Picnic -- Harless Dining Hall Commons Area, for residence hall students only (sponsored by Sodexho).

    6 - 8 p.m.: Brian Brushwood's Bizarre Magic - Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Saturday August 14, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Parthenon editors, writers win 12 WVPA awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Editors and writers with The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper, won 12 awards in the 2004 Better Newspaper contest of the West Virginia Press Association.

    The awards were announced and presented Aug. 7 at Snowshoe Mountain Resort. The contest was judged by press associations from the northeast United States.

    Marilyn McClure, faculty member and Parthenon adviser, said the 12 awards are double the highest number of awards won in past WVPA contests by the newspaper. In addition, she said, 40 Marshall alumni won awards for their work on newspapers throughout West Virginia.

    The Press Association said there was record participation this year with 3,102 entries. The Parthenon is in Division III, which consists of all daily newspapers in West Virginia with circulation under 15,000.

    Here are the awards won by Parthenon editors and writers:

    • Sports section, Thundering Herd Football Issue - first place, staff;
    • Lifestyle pages, "Fighting Incivility," second place, Beth Davis, from Jumping Branch, W.Va., in Summers County, former Parthenon Life! Editor;
    • Lifestyle feature, "Teacher's Pet," Alice Green, honorable mention, from Salem, W.Va., Doddridge County, former Parthenon columnist and reporter;
    • Lifestyle feature, "Torn from the Pages," Ryan Epling, second place, from Wayne County, former reporter;
    • Sports feature writing, "Ready for the Challenge," Jason McClure, honorable mention, from Charleston, former reporter;
    • Sports feature writing, "Before the Game Whistle Blows," Jamie Dempsey, third place, from Lenore in Mingo County, former wire editor;
    • Front page design, Oct. 28, 2003, Mike Andrick, first place, from Bridgeport, W.Va., Harrison County, former managing editor, Life! editor; photo editor;
    • Cartoon or drawing, "Belly from the Delly," Will Miller, second place, from Branchland, W.Va., former cartoonist;
    • Info Graphic, "Still Remembering," Mike Andrick, second place (9-11 anniversary);
    • News photo, "Please Let the Dogs Out," Mike Andrick, second place;
    • Photo essay, "Great American Ballpark," Matt Riley, third place, from Barboursville; former executive editor and sports editor;
    • Photo essay, "Recreation, Racing & Rain," Mike Andrick, first place.

    Former Parthenon reporter Tom Matthew Lockhart of Huntington won the Roy Owens Memorial Scholarship, one of the five the West Virginia Press Association Foundation awards annually.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 30, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    College Summit to conduct workshops at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - College Summit, a national comprehensive nonprofit program to improve the college-going rate, will conduct workshops Thursday, Aug. 5 through Sunday, Aug. 8 on Marshall University's Huntington campus for 30 students from eight high schools in Cabell, Wayne and Kanawha counties.

    "College Summit is a comprehensive program to improve the college-going rate and the college transition system for the entire community," said the organization's founder and C.E.O, J.B. Schramm. "College Summit helps to bring about a much-needed, systemic change in the college transition process for students."

    According to Schramm, College Summit, which is based in Washington, D.C., has grown rapidly in West Virginia, from a program serving two teachers and 10 students in 2001 to a program featuring five workshops and serving approximately 1,000 students from 19 schools in eight counties this year. In addition to the workshop at Marshall, sessions were also conducted this summer at West Virginia University, West Virginia State University, Concord University and the University of Charleston.

    Schramm said College Summit provides a comprehensive solution to the nationwide problem of talented students who don't continue their education.

    "College Summit is a comprehensive program to improve the college-going rate, from helping students and teachers manage the application process to providing students with trained managers who can lead the process," he explained. "Teachers are provided with the training and support needed to play the manager role for all students. Not only can students complete their college application using College Summit's on-line tools, but College Summit also provides teachers with an on-line application management tool to track all students' progress quickly and efficiently."

    For more information about College Summit, log onto the organization's Web site, www.collegesummit.com, or call College Summit West Virginia at (304) 926-3138. Schramm may be reached at (202) 965-1222.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 29, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall has 16 presentations at Statewide Technology Conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be well represented at the West Virginia Statewide Technology Conference Monday, Aug. 2, through Wednesday, Aug. 4, in Charleston.

    "Hands down, we'll have more presentations than any other agency or institution," said Jan Fox, Vice President for Information Technology. "And some of them will be national-level presentations."

    Fox said the conference brings together K-12 educators, state government, universities and the private sector into a unified technology conference. The event takes place at the Charleston Civic Center and the Clay Center.

    Fox said this is the first year for a combined conference involving the different agencies. The change was made, in part, for financial reasons, she said, and to give each agency the opportunity to see what others are doing.

    "Many times people don't know what's in their back yard," Fox said. "We have a broad spectrum of presentations. There will be some excellent information sharing."

    Twenty-two people from Marshall will take part in 16 presentations, beginning at 8 a.m. Monday and continuing through 11:50 a.m. Wednesday. The Marshall Community and Technical College, the MU Graduate College and the Marshall University School of Medicine also will be represented.

    More information on the conference is available at www.wvnet.edu/conference. Here is the complete list of Marshall participants and their presentations:

    Date/Time

    Title

    Person

    Location

    MONDAY

     

     

     

    8:00-12:00 am

    Adobe PhotoShop Elements 2.0

    Lisa Heaton, MUGC

    Clay Center

    4:30-6:20 pm

    Nanotechnology Education Across the Board

    Ashok Vaseashta, Dept. Physics

    Room 204

    4:30-5:20 pm

    PocketMedSchool

    Mike McCarthy,
    MUSOM

    Parlor C

    TUESDAY

     

     

     

    8:00-8:50 am

    Kicking E-Learning Up A Notch: Campus Benefits of Implementing WebCT Vista

    Matt Christian, CIT

    Room 204

    9-00-9-50 am

    A Closer Look at Distance Learning from Students

    Nega Debela. MUGC

    Parlor B

    9:00-9:50 am

    Web-Based Workforce Development: A Public Library Training Module

    Monica Brooks, Libraries
    Carol Parry, MCTC

    Room 204

    10:20-11-30 am

    Tapping Technology to Integrate Learning and Administrative Systems

    Terri Tomblin-Byrd, Computing Services

    Parlor C

    1:30-2:20 pm

    Transforming Technology into Jobs, The Response of Higher Education

    Cal Kent, IDEA

    Room 204

    1:30-2:20 pm

    Matching Online Instruction to the Infrastructure Used by Adult Learners

    Calvin F. Meyer, MUGC

    Room 103

    1:30-2:20 pm

    Moving to Cellular, Losing Revenue or Gaining Students

    Jan I. Fox, IT
    Arnold R. Miller, IT
    Joseph Whitt, Res. Serv.

    Parlor B

    3:34-4:30 pm

    Some Courses Do and Some Don't: Examining Appropriate Courses for Online Delivery in Higher Education

    Christine J. Schimmel, MUGC

    Room 204

    4:40-5:30 pm

    Wayne County Meets the Mummy

    Sharon Mullins - MU Community Schools

    David Johnson, Distributed Ed

    Room 206

    WEDNESDAY

     

     

     

    8:00-8:50 am

    Interactive Internet Robotics from City Traffic to Mars

    Linda Hamilton

    Room 2002

    10:00-10:50 am

    The Utilization of Online Course Training. Elementary/Middle School Teachers in Science Education

    Fred Pauley, MUGC
    Sherri Ritter, CIT

    Room 103

    10:00-10:50 am

    The UCS Orientation CD

    Chuck Elliott, Computing Services

    Room 203

    11:00-11-50 am

    On-Line Voting: Enhancing Our Portal

    Terri Tomblin-Byrd
    Gary Weis
    Computing Services

    Parlor C


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 23, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    HSTA Summer Program begins Sunday at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute begins Sunday, July 25 at Marshall University.

    HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for West Virginia high school students in grades nine through 12. With the recent addition of Cabell and Lincoln counties in November 2003, the program is now offered in 26 of the state's 55 counties.

    The summer institute is called Fun with Science and runs through July 30. It will bring 96 incoming high school freshmen from around the state to Marshall's campus for one week to learn that science is fun.

    During the institute, students will learn about genetics while solving a "Cold Case," using forensic evidence as is done on the TV show of that name. They will learn to use geographical information systems (GIS) and geographical positioning systems (GPS) while participating in "Geocaching," or treasure hunting, on a trip to Thurmond, W.Va.

    While in Thurmond, students also will study the history and culture of the coal mining areas of West Virginia, and they will discuss what they have learned in classes on multicultural history and diversity when they return to campus.

    Dr. Joseph Bragin, Dean of the College of Science, said HSTA aims to be both a learning experience, and very enjoyable.

    "While conducting the Cold Case investigation, students will actually solve a case and even hold a mock trial," Bragin said. "The trial will give the students an opportunity to develop their presentation skills.

    "Involving students in activities such as the Cold Case investigation relates course work to things they read about in the papers every day, and gets them interested in science," Bragin said.

    HSTA students are required to attend two summer institutes between their ninth- and 12th-grade years. This is one of several requirements participants must fulfill to complete the program.

    Stephanie Smith, HSTA Cabell/Lincoln local governing board chairperson, said once HSTA students are selected they remain in the HSTA program without reapplying.

    "Once students are in they are in," Smith said. "They just have to maintain their GPA and fulfill program requirements."

    The summer institute is a two-week program. Prior to the first week, from July 18 to 23, HSTA teachers from around the state prepared to teach the curriculum. During that week, teachers learned about the curriculum and how it should be taught. They discussed multicultural sensitivity and diversity issues, self-esteem building, motivational techniques, leadership development and study skills with an emphasis on how to incorporate these topics in the classes they teach.

    Currently, more than 700 students participate in HSTA , and nearly 500 HSTA graduates are attending higher education institutions in West Virginia for undergraduate, graduate and professional training utilizing HSTA tuition and fee waivers. Currently, 22 students who have successfully completed HSTA attend Marshall with tuition and fee waivers.

    The long-range goal of HSTA, which was established with 45 students from two counties in 1994, is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a post-secondary education in the health professions (medicine, nursing, dentistry and pharmacy, for example) and remain in West Virginia as primary care givers.

    More information about HSTA is available online at www.wv-hsta.org.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 21, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Six students selected as Erma Byrd Scholars at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six incoming freshmen from West Virginia have been selected as the latest class of Erma Byrd Scholars at Marshall University, Evelyn Pupplo-Cody, coordinator of the program, said today.

    The new Erma Byrd Scholars are: Shannon Renee Summers of Sistersville and Adam Oberdick of Wheeling, representing District 1; Marisa Rubio of Martinsburg and Megan Corley of Charles Town, representing District 2; and Jessica R. Brown of Beckley and Alexis Stewart of West Logan, representing District 3.

    Two Erma Byrd Scholars from each of the state's three congressional districts are chosen each year. The program was established in 1994 to honor Erma Byrd, wife of West Virginia's senior United States Senator, Robert C. Byrd.

    Mrs. Byrd has been instrumental in the distinguished career of her husband. Marshall University chose to establish the scholarship program to honor her contribution to West Virginia.

    The scholars were selected on the basis of an essay they wrote during the application process, their high school grade point average and two recommendations. They are required to maintain a grade point average of 3.5 while enrolled at Marshall. They also will have the opportunity, when schedules permit, to visit Washington, D.C., and meet with Senator and Mrs. Byrd.

    Erma Byrd Scholars are not limited to a particular field of study at MU. Current and past Erma Byrd Scholars have been majors in physics, chemistry, biology, English, history, integrated science and technology, communication studies, political science and teacher education.

    For more information, persons may contact Pupplo-Cody at (304) 696-3047.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 19, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU faculty, students to do research during annual Ohio River Run

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University will be one of four institutions participating in the annual Ohio River Run, a research expedition in which faculty and students collect data from the river's entire 981 miles.

    Ohio River Run 2004 begins Aug. 1 in Paducah, Ky., and ends Aug. 15 in Pittsburgh. Joining Marshall will be faculty and students from Thomas More College in Crestview Hills, Ky., the University of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky University in Highland Heights, Ky. Participants will travel aboard the 65-foot long Chattanooga Star Riverboat.

    The same four institutions participated in the past three Ohio River Runs, the first two of which covered half the distance. Last year's trek was the first to cover the entire 981 miles.

    During Ohio River Run 2003, Marshall's team of researchers, led by Dr. Chuck Somerville, a professor of biological science, and MU graduate student Lisa Smith, monitored density of culturable bacteria and Eschercheri coli, and the proportion of bacteria resistant to one or more antibiotics as indices of land/water use.

    This year, Marshall will be looking at two major groups of bacteria: 1), those that indicate fecal contamination; and 2), those that are antibiotic resistant. MU's crew includes five people, but no more than three at a time on the riverboat. They are Somerville, Smith, undergraduate Sydnee Smirl, graduate student Kathy Loughman and Andy Johnson, lab manager and a senior researcher in Somerville's lab.

    "It takes a huge amount of cooperation and coordination between the four schools," Somerville said of the river run. "I've gotten to know these folks from Thomas More College, the University of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky really well. Different institutions have different interests."

    A benefit of the collaborative research is the ability to create "layered data tests," Somerville said. Those tests result from four different samples being taken in the same location at the same time, he said.

    The riverboat is expected to dock at Huntington's Harris Riverfront Park at about 8 p.m. on Aug. 10, then leave early the next day on its way to Pittsburgh, Somerville said. More information on the river run is available by calling Somerville at (304) 696-2424.


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    Thursday July 15, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Motorists, pedestrians urged to use caution near site of biotechnology science center construction

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Steel erection at the site of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center at Marshall University begins at 6:30 a.m. Monday, July 19, Mike Meadows, director of facilities planning and management, said today.

    Because of the construction process involved in erecting the steel, Meadows is urging pedestrians and motorists in the area to use caution. The facility is under construction between 18th Street and 17th Street on the north side of 3rd Avenue, and the steel erection process likely will take about 12 weeks.

    Meadows said the right lane (north side) on 3rd Avenue near the site will closed at times, possibly one to two days a week during the 12 weeks as trucks unload steel for the project.

    Construction of the $40 million Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center is expected to continue for about two more years.


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    Thursday July 15, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Booth Scholars Program begins Sunday at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Booth Scholars Program, designed to prepare students to succeed in higher education, is coming to Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, July 18, through Friday, July 30.

    The purpose of the Booth Scholars Program is to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia to further their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education.

    Booth Scholars attending the summer program at Marshall are from Wayne County. In all, 90 high school students in grades 9 through 12 will take part in the program. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College, and Wayne County students, along with students from one Kentucky county and one in Virginia, took part.

    "They (Booth Scholars) will spend one to two weeks on campus participating in various math and science related activities, as well as cultural and ACT prep classes," said Brenda Napier, director of the program.

    The program begins at 3 p.m. Sunday with an ice cream social in the Ed Grose Suite of the Harless Dining Hall. A welcome and overview of the schedule follows at 4 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center.

    Napier said 26 freshmen will take part in the first week of the program. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the program the following Sunday, July 25. The majority of the 90 students, Napier said, plan to attend Marshall after graduating from high school.

    "The most important thing about the Booth Scholars Program is the exposure these students will get to college life," Napier said. "They will feel more like a college student being here on campus, and that feeling of what it's like on a college campus will remain with them."

    To qualify for the program, the students must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 and scored 60 or better on their SAT 9 tests.

    "These are very good students," Napier said.

    For more information about the Booth Scholars Program, persons may call Napier at (304) 696-5205 or contact her via email.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday July 13, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Bookwalter named faculty athletic representative for new configuration of Conference USA

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert B. Bookwalter, Marshall University's faculty athletic representative to the NCAA for the past two years, has been elected faculty athletic representative group chair for the new configuration of Conference USA.

    Bookwalter, who is beginning the third year of a four-year term as Marshall's faculty athletic representative, already has begun his duties with C-USA. He will preside over three meetings in the upcoming year as the league prepares to welcome six schools - including Marshall - to competition in 2005.

    "It's good for us and it's good for Marshall," Bookwalter said of his new role with C-USA. "The whole affiliation is good, they're happy to have us. I'm honored to have been chosen for this role and look forward, just as we do at Marshall, to promoting the best possible education for the student-athletes in Conference USA."

    Bookwalter, who was elected in May, said he stays in constant touch with the league office in Dallas as he prepares to preside over meetings in Dallas in October, in Charlotte, N.C., in March 2005 and in Destin, Fla., in May 2005. The first two meetings will involve items such as planning, reviewing bylaws and policies, and eligibility requirements.

    Besides Marshall, other new C-USA members are Rice University, Southern Methodist University, the University of Tulsa, the University of Central Florida and the University of Texas El Paso. They join East Carolina University, the University of Alabama-Birmingham, the University of Southern Mississippi, the University of Memphis, Tulane University and the University of Houston to form the 12-team league.

    Bookwalter is a native of San Jose, Calif., and has been teaching at Marshall for 17 years. He is a professor in the Communications Studies Department. He may be reached by calling (304) 696-2815.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 12, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Hess, Gibson, Chafin appointed to MU Board of Governors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three people have been appointed by Gov. Bob Wise to serve on Marshall University's Board of Governors, Wise announced last week.

    The new members, all of whom will serve four-year terms ending June 30, 2008, are John G. Hess of Barboursville, Verna K. Gibson of Sarasota, Fla., and Letitia Neese Chafin of Williamson, W.Va.

    The next board meeting is at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 14, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in Huntington. Hess, Gibson and Chafin will be sworn in at that time.

    "We're always delighted to have new enthusiasm and support for Marshall University," MU President Dan Angel said. "We're delighted with our three new members and look forward to working with them."

    Hess, an independent, replaces Stephen Haid, who resigned earlier this year. Gibson, a Republican, succeeds Carol Hartley, whose term expired June 30. And Chafin, a Democrat, succeeds Tom Wilkerson, whose term also expired June 30.

    The board now has 16 members. They include:

    • Terms ending June 30, 2005 - Virginia King, A. Michael Perry, Joseph L. Williams, Dr. James Sottile (faculty representative), Brandon Stevens (student representative) and Sherri Noble (classified staff council representative).
    • Terms ending June 30, 2006 - Robert Shell, Jr., Menis Ketchum and Gary G. White.
    • Terms ending June 30, 2007 - Michael J. Farrell, Gary Adkins and Brent A. Marsteller.
    • Terms ending June 30, 2008 - Verna K. Gibson, John G. Hess and Letitia Neese Chafin.
    • Ex-officio voting member - William Smith.

    Hess, a certified public accountant, is a member/partner with Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC, which has offices in Huntington, Beckley and Oak Hill, W.Va. He graduated from Marshall in 1973 with a BBA degree in accounting. Hess is a member of the Huntington Chamber of Commerce, the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

    "I'm really excited about being appointed to the Board of Governors," Hess said. "It is a wonderful opportunity to be involved in an institution I have great passion for. I'm honored and thrilled and feel very privileged."

    Gibson is nationally known for her career and leadership in the retail fashion clothing industry. She joined The Limited Stores as a merchandising trainee in 1971 and worked her way up the corporate ladder to become the president and CEO of The Limited Stores. She was the first woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company.

    Gibson is a member of the John Marshall Society and a former member of the Society of Yeager Scholars. She and her husband, Jim, are vice chairs of the Campaign for National Prominence. They support MU athletics, the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall and the H.E.L.P. Program. Gibson, too, is excited about joining the board.

    "Whatever I'm asked to do, I hope to do a very good job," she said. "I'm very proud to be part of the board and I hope we can keep the university moving in the positive direction it's currently moving in."

    Chafin is an attorney with her husband, Senate Majority Leader H. Truman Chafin, with the H. Truman Chafin Law Firm, PLLC, in Williamson, W.Va. She is a former employee of NCR Corporation as both West Virginia and national representative. Chafin graduated with honors from Marshall in 1986, and is a 1996 graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law. Chafin said she believes higher education is the answer to the economic problems facing West Virginia.

    "I'm very honored to be selected and excited about the opportunity to serve," she said of her appointment. "I'm looking forward to it, it's going to be challenging. I'm ready to roll up my sleeves and get to work."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 7, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Starting time changed for GHA Performance Expo

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The starting time for the Governor's Honors Academy Performance Expo, scheduled Friday, July 16 at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, has been changed.

    The expo begins at 7 p.m. and is open to the public. It previously was slated to start at 8 p.m.

    The Performance Expo features students showing off what they have learned, as it lends itself to performance, during their three weeks at the Governor's Honors Academy, according to Martha Woodward, Dean of the Governor's Honors Academy and Executive Director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence.

    The academy began June 27 and concludes July 18. In all, 163 rising high school seniors from West Virginia are participating, along with five students from Russia.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 2, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Upward Bound hosts annual Upward Bound Day

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from seven Upward Bound programs around the state are participating in Upward Bound Day at Marshall University Thursday, July 8.

    Upward Bound Day, an annual activity for students participating in Upward Bound Programs, is a day of athletically and academically stimulating events.

    Tori Wucher, program coordinator, said the day of events establishes a sense of camaraderie as well as competition among the students.

    "These events are a combination of physical activities as well as academic activities," Wucher said. "It's a great way for students in Marshall's program to meet students in other programs and learn about good sportsmanship at the same time."

    Upward Bound Day begins at 10:30 a.m. and concludes at 7 p.m. The day's activities include basketball, tennis, vocals, chess, oratory, football, volleyball, track, a math competition, swimming, billiards, ping pong, tug of war, a poster competition and an academic bowl. Awards will be presented for first and second place in each event.

    Wucher said this activity not only serves the students, but also acts as a recruitment tool for the university.

    "We are really showing off our campus, the cafeteria and the new residence halls," Wucher said. "This is a great way to show off our wonderful campus and help with recruitment."

    Schools participating in Upward Bound Day are Concord College, Davis and Elkins College, Marshall University, Potomac State College, Salem International University, West Virginia State University and West Virginia University Institute of Technology.

    More information about Upward Bound Day is available by contacting Wucher at (304) 696-2270 or by e-mail.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 2, 2004
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

    Marshall Medical School gets $16 million NIH research grant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The National Institutes of Health on Thursday awarded Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine a $16 million grant through which Marshall, as lead institution, will work in partnership with West Virginia University to support a research network made up of seven of the state's undergraduate colleges and universities.

    The 5-year grant is the largest NIH grant in Marshall history, according to Dr. L. Howard Aulick, associate dean for research for Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and vice president for research at MU.

    "This grant will increase the state's capacity to do competitive biomedical research," Aulick said. "It will bring new faculty and new technology to the participating schools, and it will give their students the opportunity to do front-line biomedical research on cardiovascular disease and cancer, which are huge issues for our state.

    "The medical schools at Marshall and WVU will predominantly play a mentor role, not only helping the schools improve their research capacity but also helping them learn the intricacies of research administration," he said.

    The new grant builds on efforts begun in 2001, when an NIH grant to Marshall allowed Marshall, WVU and other West Virginia colleges and universities to create a research network.

    "Through the West Virginia Biomedical Infrastructure Network, we have developed a program to help state undergraduate institutions train students and faculty in important biomedical research," said Dr. John Prescott, dean of the West Virginia University School of Medicine. "WVU and Marshall researchers, faculty and students from around the state are working together to test better drugs, therapies and preventive strategies for disease, many of which are prevalent in West Virginia. Our award from the National Institute of Health will allow us to continue to build on the network's initial successes, and help educate and prepare future West Virginia researchers."

    Dr. Gary O. Rankin, chair of Marshall's Department of Pharmacology, is the principal investigator for the project. In addition to Marshall and WVU, the participating schools are Fairmont State University, West Liberty State College, West Virginia State University, Wheeling Jesuit University, Bluefield State College, Alderson-Broaddus College and Shepherd University.

    "This grant will help the predominantly undergraduate colleges and universities advance to the point that they can successfully compete for research funds at the national level," he said. "It will provide increased opportunities for students in West Virginia to see good biomedical science research in action. By attracting good students into graduate biomedical sciences programs at Marshall and WVU, we can develop a better-trained workforce that will be a major asset in economic development for West Virginia."

    "This program reflects the vision we have for Marshall University as a lead institution for biomedical research in the region," said Marshall President Dan Angel. "We are pleased to work with colleagues at West Virginia University and throughout the state to bring about the kinds of projects that will lead to healthier lives for our citizens."

    "The accelerating pace of biomedical discovery is changing the way medicine will be practiced," said Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of the school of medicine and Marshall's vice president for health sciences. "In addition to this recent award from the NIH, Senator [Robert C.] Byrd has been very responsive to our visionary efforts to develop the infrastructure that will allow Marshall and West Virginia to benefit from this booming field. The Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center initiated by the medical school and the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center now under construction position us well for medical advances, educational excellence and economic development.

    "This $16 million is just the beginning," he added. "West Virginia can expect to see more tangible results in the future -- the very near future."

    The researchers participating in the grant, by institution, are:

    MU: Dr. Gary Rankin, Mike McCarthy, Dr. Elizabeth Murray, Dr. Don Primerano

    WVU: Dr. Jim Sheil, Dr. Charles Harris, Dr. Mark Reasor, Dr. Robert Griffith, Dr. Mary Davis

    Fairmont State University: Dr. Mark Flood, Dr. Albert Magro

    West Liberty State College: Dr. Robert Kreisberg, Dr. Jarrett Aguilar

    West Virginia State University: Dr. Robert Harris

    Wheeling Jesuit University: Dr. Robert Shurina

    Bluefield State College: Dr. Ethel Gordon


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday June 30, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Credit Fair/Open House is July 13 at Marshall Community College

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Community and Technical College (MCTC) is host to a Credit Fair/Open House on Tuesday, July 13, 2004 in the lower level of the Community and Technical College Building.

    Marshall employees are invited to drop in from 4 to 5 p.m. and the public is welcomed from 5 to 7 p.m.

    Marshall Community college staff will offer to evaluate for college credit previous work experience/certifications/college courses, military training, and continuing education courses. Visitors might discover that they are closer to earning a degree than they know.

    Refreshments will be provided, and parking is free at any campus lot or parking garage after 4 p.m. West Virginia residents may enter a drawing for the opportunity to be awarded a one-semester tuition waiver. For additional information, persons may call (304) 696-6282.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday June 22, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Kosins to perform with Bluetrane; show to be televised on Channel 25

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jazz singer and composer Kathy Kosins will be performing with Bluetrane, Marshall University's Faculty Jazz Ensemble, at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 23, at the Jomie Jazz Center. Admission is $5.

    The performance will be televised live on Adelphia Cable Channel 25. Kosins, a six-time American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers award winner, has been described as "one of the most alluring voices in Jazz" by the Chicago Tribune. She will be joining Bluetrane as part of the annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival.

    For more information, contact David W. Johnson, Executive Director of Distributed Education Technology at Marshall University, at (304) 696-6474.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 18, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU welcomes 168 high school seniors for Governor's Honors Academy

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will welcome 168 high school seniors, all but five of whom are from West Virginia, to its Huntington campus June 27-July 18 for the annual West Virginia Governor's Honors Academy.

    This is the third consecutive year Marshall is the academy host. The opening ceremony is at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, June 27, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. A. Michael Perry, Chairman of Marshall's Board of Governors, will deliver the keynote address.

    Also speaking during the opening ceremony will be Sarah Denman, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Marshall; Cheryl A. Keffer, coordinator of Gifted Education and Governor's Schools with the West Virginia Department of Education; Kay Goodwin, Cabinet Secretary for Education and the Arts in West Virginia, and Robert E. Brown III, Governor's Honors Academy resident director.

    "We are deeply honored to host the West Virginia Governor's Honors Academy for a third year," said Martha Woodward, Dean of the Governor's Honors Academy and Executive Director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence. "Having GHA on campus gives us the opportunity to showcase Marshall University and the Huntington community."

    More importantly, Woodward said, is the chance the outstanding students that participate in the academy are given to grow.

    "This is the first time many of them have been a part of an intense academic experience, indeed the first time they have been far from home," Woodward said. "GHA opens doors they never knew and leads them to think in different ways."

    The Governor's Honors Academy is an intensive learning experience that challenges the students' academic skills while enhancing and clarifying their post-secondary education goals. The program's mission is to help the students grow intellectually and creatively in a culturally diverse atmosphere.

    Intensive and broad based courses are offered in the following three categories: Mathematics, Science and Technology; Humanities; and Fine and Performing Arts. The students also will be taking some field trips, locally to the Huntington Museum of Art and A. Michael Perry's Heritage Farm and Museum. They also will spend two days in Washington, D.C., visiting various museums and monuments.

    The program annually selects two students, one boy and one girl, from each of West Virginia's 55 counties and then a state committee picks students at large that also qualify. This year, 53 counties are represented. Also, five students and one instructor from Russia will participate in the academy.

    To qualify, West Virginia students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or be in the top 10 percent in their class, score in the 90 percentile on a nationally normed test or be in the top 10 percent of the county. They also must have no grade below a C and be a resident of West Virginia or attend high school in West Virginia.

    The staff of instructors totals 17 along with Woodward and Delores Johnson, Assistant Dean of the Governor's Honors Academy. Five of the instructors are full-time Marshall professors. The Russian instructor is Nadia Kochkareva, and Yumiko Esail will teach Japanese language and culture.

    West Virginia students in the 2004 Governor's Honors Academy are listed below by county:

    • Barbour: Tim Wright, Amber Zambelli.
    • Berkeley: Jonathan Quigley, Sarah Pearson, Kristin Lemaster, Colleen Black, Jeremy Hansford.
    • Boone: Brad Price, Margaret Santonia, Amelia Jarrell, Kyle Estep.
    • Braxton: Brandon Foster, Tiffany Campbell, Laura Atkins.
    • Brooke: Ashley Berardi.
    • Cabell: Cassidy Lawson, Emily Asbury, Ginny Campbell, Brandon Anderson, Gregory Vallejos, Rachel Bailey.
    • Calhoun: Cynthia Wildfire.
    • Doddridge: Samantha Stefanov, Isaac Swisher.
    • Fayette: Laurel Ackison, Shane Dragan, Daphne O'Hara, Franklin Stone, Kevin Jones, John Pino.
    • Gilmer: Samantha Smith, Allison Butler, Amanda Duelley, Morgan Ames.
    • Grant: Sarah Cullers, Josh Taylor.
    • Hampshire: Craig Iser, Connie Asbury, Josh Wood.
    • Hancock: Michael Emery, Gina Denjen.
    • Hardy: Laura Kessel, Kevin Leatherman, Richard Hulver.
    • Harrison: Meghan Frum, Brittany Audia, Geneva Davis, Tiffany Alastanos, James Wise, Liam Davis.
    • Jackson: Kelsey Batten, Matthew McGrew, Ivy Crank.
    • Jefferson: Cara Vogler, Thomas Flanagan.
    • Kanawha: Aarzu Moghal, Chase Turner, Billy King, Morgan Yates, Karina Geronilla, Angela Carter, Nick DiCarlo, Allison Broadwater.
    • Lewis: Claire Berlin, Shea Garrison-Kimmel.
    • Lincoln: Allisun Browning.
    • Logan: Erin Long, Casey Woody.
    • Marion: Zachary Gouzd, Brandon Domico, Anna Simis, Rebecca Pyles, Sonni Pellillo.
    • Marshall: Brian Dalek, Dina Graves, Colby Mozingo, Megan Schubert.
    • Mason: Holt Barnitz, Emily Kayser.
    • McDowell: Brittany Addair, Kevin Richardson.
    • Mercer: Alexia Fernandez, William Hardy III, Jessica McClung, Kayla Williams.
    • Mineral: Sadie Green, Ryan Imperio, Seema Shroff.
    • Mingo: Amy Jones, Amy Newsome, Gregory Sammons, Kelly Trimble.
    • Monongalia: Johanna Collins, Nicole Shumiloff, Deepti Gupta, Tanya Klinkachorn, Jessica Duda, Lee Zaniewski, Yonina Hoffman.
    • Monroe: William Johnson, Jason Walters, Vanessa Wallace, Rachel Tingler.
    • Morgan: Jesse Potts.
    • Nicholas: Kevin Hanna, William Waters, Callie Thayer.
    • Ohio: Robert Tappe, Michael Wakim, Nevin Sharma, Anne Seabright.
    • Pendleton: Steven Redman, Jonie Nelson.
    • Pleasants: Kristin Milhoan, Mitchell Parlett.
    • Pocahontas: Danielle Holstine, Jonathan Burns.
    • Preston: Kristin Szilagyi, Andrew Cary
    • Putnam: Jason Van Meter, Morgan Chambers, Bennett Anderson, Margaret Cunningham.
    • Raleigh: Courtney Staton, Steven Richmond, Nick Yurick, Sarah Wilkinson, Alexandra Zsoldos, Rachel Romero.
    • Randolph: Michael Zorger, Amber Simmons.
    • Ritchie: Michael Hardbarger.
    • Roane: Heather Ramsey, A.J. Cooper.
    • Summers: Kimberly Eagle, Rebecca Eerenberg, Todd Willey.
    • Taylor: Ryan Mick, Elijah Flesher, Tonya Smith.
    • Tucker: Laura Smith, Dustin Mauzy.
    • Tyler: Elijah Richie, Samantha Moore, Broc Hissam, AnaRosa Stender.
    • Upshur: Jessica Lantz, Amanda Scott, Donovan Godwin.
    • Wayne: Matthew Price, Jessica Bergquist.
    • Webster: Conley Stout, Liz Short.
    • Wetzel: Kayla Poling, Michael Lemasters.
    • Wood: Drew Hicks, Matthew Cayton, Michael Hardman, Shaina Meyers, Nathan Dailey, Emily Rader, Audrey Hylton.
    • Wyoming: Jatanna Lester.

    The following students from Russia will participate in the academy: Vera Babenko, Evgeny Platonov, Edouard Potchivaline, Dmitri Jiovotnev, and Jouri Bourtsev.

    The Governor's Honors Academy was established in 1984 by Gov. John D. Rockefeller IV. Host schools have included West Virginia Wesleyan College, Shepherd College, Fairmont State College, West Virginia University, Concord College, West Virginia State College and Marshall. The GHA returns to Fairmont State in 2005.

    For more information on this summer's Governors Honors Academy, persons may contact Martha Woodward at (304) 696-2475 before it begins, or (304) 696-4802 once it starts.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 17, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU's Jazz-MU-Tazz features national artist Kathy Kosins

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's sixth annual Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival takes place Wednesday, June 23 through Friday, June 25 at the Jomie Jazz Center and the Ritter Park Amphitheater.

    This year's guest artist is six-time American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers award winner, Kathy Kosins.

    Kosins will be performing throughout the week alongside Bluetrane, Marshall University's faculty jazz ensemble, and in the finale with the students of the Jazz Band Camp.

    Here is the schedule:

    "Kathy Kosins with Bluetrane"

    • 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 23, Jomie Jazz Center, located across 5th Avenue from the Memorial Student Center. Admission is $5.

    "Jazz Jam Session"

    • 8 p.m. Thursday, June 24, Jomie Jazz Center. Admission is free.

    "Finale Concert"

    • 6 p.m. Friday, June 25, Ritter Park Amphitheater, Huntington. Admission is $5 per person, of $10 per family.

    Admission to the events is on a first-come, first-served basis. Seating in the Jomie Jazz Center is limited. For further information, email  Dr. Ed Bingham or call him at (304) 696-2452.


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    Thursday June 17, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Youth Technology Camp begins June 21 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - The first of three week-long selections of Youth Technology Camp 2004, conducted by the Marshall University Technology Outreach Center, begins Monday, June 21 at the Drinko Library on MU's main campus.

    Youth Technology Camp is for middle school age students. The camp not only will entertain the students, but also will assist them in advancing their computer skills and knowledge.

    "Youth Technology Camp 2004 will give aspiring middle school students the opportunity to share exciting high-tech adventures," said Kelli R. Mayes, Director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center. "In doing so, they will turn technology inside out and increase their science and computer skills, as well as their oral and written communication skills."

    Mayes said the camp is a fun-filled experience for students who will be in middle school this fall. The camp will provide hands-on exercises, using computers and real-life puzzles, which will help students excel in school, she said.

    "The creative one-week programs will engage students in fantastic activities they will not find anywhere else," Mayes said. "They will make new friends while improving their ability to think critically, solve problems, and work in teams."

    Youth Technology Camp class sizes are kept small to allow for personalized, individual attention. Class registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The following camp selections will be offered this summer:

    June 21-25, Excel with Computers: Students will have fun while improving their word processing skills, spreadsheet skills, and Internet safety skills. Campers will learn valuable skills using Microsoft Office and Excel.

    July 12-16, Presentation Pizzazz!: Campers learn how to spice up school projects and presentations using PowerPoint, Internet research, and digital photographs.

    July 26-July 30, Web Page Design: Students learn how to design, lay out, and create terrific looking Web pages using the popular authoring software program, Microsoft FrontPage.

    Campers should be entering middle school, grades 6-8, in the fall of 2004. Camp will take place from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday in Drinko Library Room 138. Campers will receive t-shirts, MU lanyards, and certificates of completion. Cost is $80 per student, per week, although a multiple class discount of 10 percent will be given.

    Persons interested in obtaining more information or registering for Youth Technology Camp 2004 may contact Kelli R. Mayes, Director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center, at (304) 696-3325 or via e-mail.


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    Thursday June 17, 2004
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

    Marshall, Walter Reed launch historic health care partnership Friday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Starting tomorrow, West Virginia patients who have diabetes will become the nation's first non-military patients to reap the benefits of disease management tools developed to keep America's fighting forces and their families in top form.

    The award-winning technology is being made available for civilian use through a three-way partnership initiated by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D W.Va. In the partnership, the Walter Reed Army Medical Center is providing its HEALTHeFORCES program, using the newest information technology to implement medical best practices, to the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health at Marshall. The Center for Rural Health will begin the HEALTHeWV program at the Marshall University Medical Center and rural clinics as pilot sites. The National Technology Transfer Center, in turn, will lay the groundwork for the program to be implemented at other sites in West Virginia and throughout the nation.

    "The HEALTHeWV program is a shining example of linking national advancements with local expertise to meet West Virginia's needs," Byrd said. "This collaboration between Walter Reed, Marshall University, and the NTTC will help to ensure that chronically ill patients, including those in some of the state's most medically underserved regions, will receive higher quality health care. The program will allow doctors to better treat the whole person, taking into account his or her full medical history, rather than one particular symptom or illness. I am pleased to have helped make this important initiative a reality."

    "The impact of the HEALTHeFORCES program on patient outcomes is remarkable," said Col. Jill S. Phillips of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The program, which has won national awards, has positive effects on both patient safety and disease outcomes, she said.

    Compared to national benchmarks, HEALTHeFORCES patients who have diabetes are far more likely to have appropriate testing and better test results, she said. Because the program ensures that critical annual tests are done, its patients rank higher than the benchmarked group on certain clinical measures. High risk hemoglobin A1c levels are improved 98 percent of the time, for example, compared to 68 percent of the time for the national group. Checks for kidney complications are done far more frequently in the HEALTHeFORCES group than in the benchmark group (95 percent vs. 52 percent); so are required blood lipid (fat) lab tests (99.7 percent vs. 72 percent).

    Similar positive outcomes have been shown for patients with heart disease and children with asthma, she said.

    "These positive indicators, consistently improving over the past 3 years, go hand in hand with published best practices, proving the effectiveness of this disease management program," Phillips said.

    Marshall is implementing the first component of the program Friday at the University Family Practice office at the Marshall University Medical Center. While waiting for their physicians, patients who have diabetes will use hand held computerized devices to respond to questions about their illness and any disease related physical and mental limitations they are experiencing that affect their daily lives. Their answers will help their doctors pinpoint areas that need special attention to improve the patients' quality of life and the management of their diabetes.

    Additional surveys will be added to focus on the care of patients with heart disease and chronic lung disease. As funds become available, Marshall also will begin deploying the technology to rural clinics in southern West Virginia by providing training and setting up the necessary technology and communication interfaces at the clinic sites.

    When fully deployed, HEALTHeWV will give providers disease specific tracking cards that display key information and help assure that care complies with clinical practice guidelines. An electronic clinic notes system will round out the program, improving physicians' access to patient information and speeding physician to physician communication.

    Diabetes was a natural choice for the program's first target, said Dr. Robert B. Walker of Marshall, noting that West Virginia's incidence of diabetes is 41 percent above the national average.

    "No disease stresses rural West Virginia families and health providers more than diabetes," Walker said. "Best care for diabetes requires attention to acute, chronic preventive and emergency care and special care for the eyes, skin, oral cavity, heart, kidneys, vascular system, feet and nervous system. Patients have extensive educational, nutritional and psychological needs. Special equipment, transportation to care and opportunities for exercise are critical. Management and coordination of all of these components of care is extremely difficult for rural health providers.

    "It is vital that a system is in place to treat these patients," added Walker, chairman of the Department of Family and Community Health and executive vice dean for the School of Medicine.

    "Gaps in services or care can create drastic outcomes blindness, loss of limbs, infections, and premature heart disease and stroke," he said. "HEALTHeWV provides a system to document, track and audit care while prompting the provider on key issues and allowing patients to participate more actively in their own health care."

    Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of the School of Medicine, said the program is an exciting example of technology transfer. "Once again, Sen. Byrd has demonstrated his uncanny ability to make connections that cross domains," he said. "It takes a true visionary to recognize that this technologically integrated system designed to meet the needs of millions of service people around the world also has such great potential to also address some of the most pressing needs of small rural health centers and their patients."

    Marshall takes pride in its role of working with Walter Reed and the National Technology Transfer Center to put that technology to use for West Virginians and other Americans, said President Dan Angel. "It's certainly an honor that Marshall's national level expertise in rural health and primary care has been tapped for this important project," he said. "Given our state's special problems with chronic diseases, it's fitting that our citizens will be the first civilians to gain access to this powerful disease management system for improving their health."


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    Wednesday June 16, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    University Physicians & Surgeons Inc. receives $440,000 grant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - University Physicians & Surgeons Inc. at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has been awarded a grant of $440,000 from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

    Under the direction of Richard Crespo, Ph.D., professor of family and community health with the School of Medicine, the funds are being used over a 30-month period (May 1, 2004 through Oct. 31, 2006) to support an effort to promote diabetes self-management in rural West Virginia. The grant was made under the Foundation's program, Advancing Diabetes Self-Management.

    "For us it's an opportunity to build on what we have been doing over the last six years with outcome monitoring in collaboration with a network of 22 rural health centers," Crespo said. "What we're doing with this project is piloting systems for integrating self-management into the clinic system of care and equipping patients with tools for self-management so we can diffuse that through the whole network of rural health centers we're working with."

    Crespo said communication is a key in promoting diabetes self-management in rural West Virginia. Specifically, the message is threefold: balance your plate, choose to move and kick the habit. Posters and informative brochures are among the many ways the message is communicated.

    The need for diabetes self-management, as it is for cardiovascular disease self-management, is high and getting higher in rural West Virginia - and in Appalachia in general, Crespo said.

    "Diabetes and cardiovascular disease are chronic and progressively debilitating," he said. "The percentage - or the burden - is higher in Appalachian. And that's the case among all racial and ethnic groups."

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, based in Princeton, N.J., is the nation's largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care. It concentrates its grantmaking in four goal areas: to assure that all Americans have access to quality health care at reasonable cost; to improve the quality of care and support for people with chronic health conditions; to promote healthy communities and lifestyles; and to reduce the personal, social and economic harm caused by substance abuse - tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs.

    More information on the grant is available by contacting Crespo at (304) 691-1193.


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    Wednesday June 16, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU President treated at Weston hospital, returns to Huntington

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel was treated for an undisclosed medical ailment at a Weston, W.Va., hospital and released earlier this afternoon.

    Angel was attending the West Virginia Leadership Conference at the Stonewall Jackson Resort and Conference Center in Lewis County, W.Va., where he became ill early Wednesday morning. He was transported to Stonewall Jackson Memorial Hospital shortly after 7 a.m., where he was treated in the hospital's emergency room and released.

    "Dr Angel awoke this morning to some pain and discomfort and sought a thorough examination at a local hospital. It was determined very early upon Dr. Angel's arrival at the hospital that this was not a life-threatening situation or a cardiac-related issue. He will consult with his regular physician upon his return to Huntington and looks forward to a speedy recovery," said Dr. H. Keith Spears, Marshall University vice president for communications.


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    Tuesday June 15, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall's SGA vice president resigns after two months in office

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - After only two months as Marshall University Student Government Association vice president for 2004-05, Joshua D. Cassidy has resigned from his position, effective June 19. He will be replaced by Chris Hickok, current student senate president pro-tempore.

    In his letter of resignation, Cassidy did not cite any particular reason for the move, but wrote, "This decision has not been an easy one to make, but the right choices are not always the easy ones."

    SGA president Jenn Gaston said she was upset by Cassidy's resignation, but respects his decision.

    "I sympathize with him and his family for (Cassidy) being a husband, father, full-time employee, student and fraternity brother," Gaston said. "Those are all very demanding personas."

    Gaston said she hadn't anticipated making a vice-presidential appointment during her administration. However, after considering the skills needed for the position, she said she knew Hickok was right for the position.

    Hickok, a junior business major from Beckley, said he is excited to take on his new role with SGA.

    "Jenn and I are already meshing well as a team, which points to good things for the not-so-distant future," Hickok said. "I am excited to see what things we can accomplish for the students together."

    Gaston said she is extremely confident that Hickok will do well. "He works great with our student senate and is an excellent example of a student leader," Gaston said.


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    Friday June 11, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WebCT again names Marshall Digital Content Leader

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the second consecutive year, Marshall University has been named a Digital Content Leader by WebCT, the world's leading provider of e-learning solutions for higher education.

    "Being named a Digital Content Leader for the second straight year is proof positive that the faculty at Marshall University is on the leading edge of instructional technology," said Matt Christian, Director of MU's Center for Instructional Technology.

    Marshall was selected by a Digital Content Leaders Advisory Committee based on the University's "e-learning mission, the ability to reach an extensive number of faculty with the message about digital content solutions, the vision for the role digital content solutions will play over the next few years, and dedication to moving the e-learning mission forward."

    "Our faculty is innovative and have adapted to the technology with tremendous spirit," Christian said. "It's exciting to see our faculty thrive in an era of new technology."

    Digital Content Leaders for 2004 will be formally announced at IMPACT 2004: The 6th annual WebCT User Conference July 11-15 in Orlando, Fla. The conference will include colleges and universities from more than 70 countries throughout the world. At the conference, Marshall's representatives will attend a panel discussion led by the WebCT Digital Content Leaders Advisory Committee.

    For more information regarding WebCT online learning at Marshall, persons may contact Matt Christian at (304) 696-7121 or via e-mail.


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    Wednesday June 9, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Upward Bound Program brings 60 students to MU campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixty high school students from Cabell, Wayne and Mingo counties in West Virginia will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, June 13 through Friday, July 23 to participate in the school's annual Upward Bound Program.

    The sophomores, juniors and seniors will receive a stipend and be housed in Marshall Commons. The federally funded program is for low-income or potential first-generation college students, of whom neither parent has completed a four-year college degree.

    The program has taken place at Marshall since 1972. This year's program begins with orientation for the students and parents on Sunday, June 13.

    "Over 60 percent of our program graduates are either still enrolled in college or have graduated after six years," Jackie Hersman, director of the Upward Bound Program, said.

    The students can earn one elective credit at their respective high school from courses taken during the program. The courses include math, science, study skills, performing arts, etiquette, PowerPoint, desktop publishing, career class, fitness and foreign languages. The students will be involved in sports, attend cultural and social activities, and travel to Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. Some will work in a department on campus.

    While in northern Ohio, students will go to Cedar Point Amusement Park in Sandusky, Ohio, visit the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland and tour the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. While in Columbus, students will visit the Columbus Zoo and the Center of Science and Industry (C.O.S.I.).

    More information on the Upward Bound Program is available by contacting Hersman at (304) 696-6846 or by email.


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    Wednesday June 9, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall professor writes book on Southeastern Indian art

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University art professor Susan C. Power has concluded a 10-year project with publication of a 254-page hardcover book she authored titled Early Art of the Southeastern Indians, Feathered Serpents and Winged Beings.

    The book, published by the University of Georgia Press and described in one catalog as "a visual journey through time," contains full color pictures of artifacts originating in the Archaic through the Mississippian periods - from thousands of years ago through 1600 A.D.

    "Susan Power offers us a rare opportunity to enter the art world of early southeastern Indians," said Lawana Trout, editor of Native American Literature: An Anthology. "She skillfully demonstrates how their art emerged over centuries within cultural and historical contexts."

    Power, who has taught at Marshall for 13 years, said the book's list price is $39.95 and it can be ordered online through companies such as Borders Books, Amazon.com and Wal-Mart. It also will be placed in different locations, such as museums, university libraries and archeology associations, and is available at the Marshall Bookstore, she said.

    "This was an absolute passion of mine," Power said of the book. "When I was in grad school at the University of Georgia, taking a pre-Columbian art history course, I became very curious about what existed in the southeastern United States - where I'd grown up - at that time. I started researching and wrote a master's thesis and dissertation, and I continued to research for the book. It required a lot of research."

    The pieces in the book were drawn from as far north as the Ohio River Valley and as far west as Oklahoma, and many areas in between. Power said the most complex works were linked to male (and sometimes female) leaders wearing bold ensembles consisting of symbolic colors, sacred media and richly complex designs.

    In the book, Power comments on the artists' subjects starting with small animals and insects, then expanding to humans and on through to supernatural combinations. She also discusses how a piece can function as a visual shorthand in local style and expression.

    The book offers "… a fresh view of the origins, context, language, and organization of Southeastern prehistoric art … (it is) a welcomed and much needed addition to the literature from a well-respected art historian," said David Dye, chair of the University of Memphis' department of Anthropology.

    Power said the University of Georgia Press is marketing the book not only in the United States, but in London, and to scholarly groups as well as the general public. She currently is on one-year sabbatical to finish two other books. One is on beads and beadwork of the early southeastern Indians, and the other is about Cherokee art history.

    "The University of Georgia Press has been absolutely terrific," Power said. "And, I'm so grateful to Marshall (for the sabbatical)."

    More information is available by e-mailing Power at power@susanpower.com, or by accessing her Web site at www.susanpower.com. She also may be reached by calling (304) 697-8732.


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    Tuesday June 8, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    New Student Orientation begins June 15

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The dreams of college life may become more of a reality to new Marshall University students when New Student Orientation begins June 15.

    During orientation, students and parents will be able to take part in many activities. These include presentations about campus public safety, financial aid, the new I.D. system, and various sessions about student life, computing services, commuting, registration and campus food.

    Sabrina Simpson, New Student Orientation coordinator/senior admissions counselor, said orientation is a great opportunity to learn more about the university and what it has to offer.

    "Students and parents will have the opportunity to tour campus and the residence halls," Simpson said. "We try to encourage them to see more of campus."

    Simpson said it is very important that all students attend orientation so they will know what to expect and be well prepared when classes begin in the fall.

    "We encourage all students to come to orientation because we take them through the steps and we get them acclimated to the registration process which will be very helpful in the fall," Simpson said. "Students also run the risk of not having the best selection of courses when they don't attend orientation."

    Students only need to remember a few things to prepare for their orientation. Simpson said all students must have a picture I.D. so they can obtain their Student I.D. Simpson also said students are encouraged to talk to someone they trust about college life.

    "We encourage new students to talk with friends and family already at Marshall University so they will know what to expect during their transition," Simpson said.

    She said the orientation process is just as important to parents as it is to students.

    "This may be the only time some parents see the campus, and we don't want them to get lost in the shuffle," Simpson said.

    The schedule for orientation is as follows:

    • June: 15-16, Outstanding Scholar Days; 17, transfer students; 18-19, any new students; 21-25, any new students
    • July: 19-23, any new students
    • August: 19, any new students

    Registration begins at 8 a.m. on all orientation days.

    For more information about New Student Orientation, contact Simpson at (304) 696-2354 or visit www.marshall.edu/orientation.


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    Monday June 7, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Application Process Begins for Graduate Fee Waivers

    Applications for graduate tuition waivers for Marshall University's fall term will be accepted through Friday, July 30 in the Graduate Dean's Office, 113 Old Main, on the Huntington campus and by the students' academic area offices on the South Charleston campus.

    Priority consideration will be given to faculty and staff of the state's public and private colleges and universities.

    Academic merit, which will be determined using grade point average and scores on required graduate admissions examinations, will be the major consideration in awarding the waivers that cover tuition. Students who receive waivers are responsible for paying student center and activity fees and some department specific fees.

    Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants.

    Students interested in being considered for a tuition waiver based on financial need criteria should contact the Graduate Dean's Office in Huntington or the Graduate Admissions Office in South Charleston.

    Students who previously held waivers must reapply to be considered for fall term waivers.

    Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by mail or email. Huntington campus students may pick up approved waivers in 113 Old Main beginning Friday, Aug. 13 and take them to the Bursar. Waivers not claimed by Friday, Aug. 20 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

    South Charleston campus students must be registered for fall classes by Friday, August 20, 2004 to receive the waivers and to have the payments posted to their accounts. Waivers for students who are not registered by August 20 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.


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    Monday June 7, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Bluetrane to perform during parade for pets at Ritter Park

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bluetrane, Marshall University's faculty jazz ensemble, will perform during Cause for Paws, a parade for pets, Saturday, June 19 at Huntington's Ritter Park.

    The sponsored walk, which begins with registration at 8:30 a.m. at the Ritter Park shelter, will benefit two local organizations - Little Victories Animal Rescue Group, which is planning to build a no-kill shelter, and Help for Animals, Inc., which provides low-cost spay-neuter services.

    Vicki Stroeher, a part-time instructor in MU's department of music and one of the event organizers, said activities run from 9:30 a.m. to noon. "People can walk alone or they can bring their pet to walk with them," Stroeher said of the parade.

    Entry fee is $10 for adults and $5 for children, and donations will be accepted. T-shirts will be given to all participants. Among the other activities during the event are a pet costume contest and pet toenail cutting. Pet vendors also will be on hand, and pet photos may be taken.

    Pre-registration runs through Saturday, June 12. Registration forms are accessible at www.littlevictories.net, and more information is available by calling (304) 526-9107.

    Performing for Bluetrane, beginning at about 10 a.m., will be Ed Bingham on saxophone, Marshall Onofrio on trumpet, Mike Stroeher on trombone, Jay Flippin on piano, Mark Zanter on bass and Ben Miller on drums. Several other Marshall faculty members are involved in the organization and running of the event.

    Bluetrane has been in existence since 1999. It played at the Showshoe Institute last summer at Snowshoe Mountain, and will return there in July. It also performed at the Buddy Rogers Jazz Festival in Dayton, Ohio, and will be running the jazz band camp during the annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival later this month.


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    Thursday June 3, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University Alumni Association partners with Liberty Mutual to save graduates money on auto, home insurance

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A diploma from Marshall University affords graduates many benefits, and a new partnership with Liberty Mutual adds insurance savings to that list.

    The Marshall University Alumni Association recently began an affinity program with the nation's eighth-largest auto and home insurer that makes the more than 90,000 Marshall alumni instantly eligible to receive an additional discount - up to 15 percent on auto and 5 percent on homeowners insurance. Discounts are available where state law and regulations allow, and may vary by state.

    "We are excited to begin a partnership with Liberty Mutual, and provide our alumni and friends of Marshall University services that can benefit them," said Marshall University Alumni Association President Tom Harris. "Liberty Mutual is a well-known, national company with a wonderful reputation for service."

    In addition to the premium discounts, the Marshall/Liberty Mutual program offers 24-hour claims reporting, 12-month guaranteed rates, the convenience of premium payment through direct-billing or automatic checking account deduction, and a dedicated customer phone number with extended sales and service hours.

    Interested alumni can enroll in Group Savings Plus® or obtain a no-obligation quote by visiting one of Liberty Mutual's 360 personal insurance sales offices across the U.S., or by calling 1 (800) 279-1387 in West Virginia, or 1 (800) 524-9400 out-of-state. Or, they may visit the Marshall Alumni Association Web site at www.marshall.edu/alumni/, and click on the marketplace link to access the Liberty Mutual Web site.

    "More than 300 alumni associations have recognized that a partnership with Liberty Mutual is a valuable addition to their member benefits, and we welcome the graduates of Marshall University into our Group Savings Plus® program," said Anne Herbster, Liberty Mutual vice president and manager, Affinity Marketing.

    Boston-based Liberty Mutual Group (www.libertymutual.com), a diversified international group of insurance companies, is the eighth-largest provider of personal insurance products in the U.S., including private passenger auto, homeowners, valuable possessions and personal liability.

    Liberty Mutual is an industry leader in group-sponsored voluntary auto and homeowners insurance programs, offering personal lines insurance through payroll deduction and direct billing to employees and members of more than 8,300 companies, credit unions and associations.


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    Wednesday June 2, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 545-1555

    Power outage forces closure of Marshall South Charleston campus, cancellation of evening classes

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Widespread power outages in the South Charleston area have forced the closure of Marshall University's South Charleston campus for the remainder of today, and the cancellation of today's evening classes in the Kanawha Valley.

    The campus is expected to resume normal operating hours on Thursday, June 3, according to Kemp Winfree, vice president for regional operations.


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    Tuesday June 1, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Service Awards Luncheon honors MU staff members

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ninety-three Marshall University staff employees and retirees will be honored at the 20th annual Service Awards Luncheon, scheduled from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, June 10, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Staff members who have completed 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 or 40 years of service will be honored. They include:

    15 years of service

    Raddar Atchely, Paula Brillhart, Lorna Browning, Terri Byrd, Dana Edmonds, Florence Harshbarger, Teresa Holschuh, Barbara J. Lanham, Barbara S. Lanham, Judy Little, Leslie Lucas, Linda McComas, Raleigh McSweeney, Tammy Moore, James Napier, Carolyn Roberts, Deandre Turner, Tony Waugh, Sandra White, Phyllis White-Sellards and Nancy Wooten.

    20 years of service

    Sherry Adkins, Tammy Aliff, Karen Baumgarner, Gregory Beach, Paul Benford, Karen Bledsoe, Alberta Bowyer, Tommy Burchell, Mary Curtis, Thomas Dorsey, Joyce Ellis, Elizabeth Graybeal, Jacquelyn Hersman, Carol Kilgore, Sandra Lloyd, William Lucas, Margaret McFarland, David McKenzie, Marty Newman, Terrence Olson, Chrystal Rowe, Sherry Salyers, Phillip Sergent, Johnny Walker, Barbara Williams and Jacqueline Woolfolk.

    25 years of service

    Lynette Boyes, Beverly Bunch, Katharine Coffey, Edward Dzierzak, James Faulkner, David Fenney, Rick Haye, Joann Jordan, Adrian Lawson, Faye Malone, Lynne Mayer, Judith Napier, Arissa Prichard, Barbara Roberts, Judith Russell, Allen Taylor, Lahoma Weekley, and Sara Wilson.

    30 years of service

    Carolyn Endicott, Patricia Gebhart, Delbert Harless, Charlene Hawkins, Frank Lambert, Susan Lewis, Lynn Mayfield, Vicki Navy, and Karl Shanholtzer.

    35 years of service

    Lois Fry.

    40 years of service

    Lola Stratton.

    Retirees to be honored include:

    Barbara Begil, Linda Blatt, Alberta Bowyer, Lynette Boyes, Kitty Carver, Shirley Dyer, Orville France, Lois Fry, K. Edward Grose, Bonnie Harris, Lucy Jackson, Paula Kelly, James Richendollar, Penny Smoot, Janet Turner, George Wales, and JoAnn Wetherall.


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    Friday May 28, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Writing camp at Marshall to explore the topic of race

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Being Black, Being White: What It's Like," a writing camp that will allow high school students to explore the topic of race, will be conducted July 19-23 on Marshall University's main campus.

    The camp is for students who want to develop their creative and leadership potential, improve their logic and communication skills, and enjoy the company of other students. It is sponsored by the Marshall University Writing Project, the Division of Multicultural Affairs and the College of Education and Human Services.

    Tuition for the program, scheduled from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. daily in Corbly Hall Room 467, is $45. Some scholarships will be available on the basis of need.

    National Writing Project consultants from the Huntington area will coordinate the activities. They include: Samuel Moore, a teacher and pastor who has years of experience working with people of all ages; Beth Darby, who started a teen book club at the Cabell County Public Library and is an experienced journal writer; Karen McComas, an associate professor of communication disorders who teaches computer applications for the Writing Project; and Edwina Pendarvis, a Marshall University professor of gifted education who taught in last year's summer writing camp.

    Since this year is the 50th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, which integrated public schools, this program will provide an opportunity for students to think, discuss, and write about what it means to be black or white - or both, or neither - in today's society, according to Pendarvis.

    In a relaxed, but stimulating environment, students will participate in a variety of activities, including creating dialogues, role-playing, interpretive reading, analyzing songs and film, story-telling, writing and illuminating personal journals (using watercolor and collage), writing poems and stories, blogging, and using the computer to share their writing with students in summer programs in other locations.

    So that all participants will have a chance to express their ideas and listen to others, a maximum of 20 students will be admitted to the program. To register or for further information, contact Dr. Pendarvis at (304) 696-2855.


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    Friday May 28, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Summer Learning Disabilities Program begins June 10

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. ­­­- The 24th annual Summer Learning Disabilities Program, a cooperative venture between Marshall University and Cabell County Schools, begins June 10 at Guyandotte Elementary School.

    The program is offered each summer to children who have learning disabilities and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Dr. Barbara Guyer, professor of special education and director of the Higher Education for Learning Problems (H.E.L.P.) program at Marshall, said the summer program seeks to improve basic skills and social skills of children in kindergarten to sixth grade.

    "We have the children in classes with no more than five students per class," Guyer said. "These classes focus on reading, reading comprehension, spelling, arithmetic, study skills and self-esteem."

    The program runs from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, concluding July 9. The cost is $170 for West Virginia residents, $190 for metro-area (selected local counties in Ohio and Kentucky) residents and $250 for non-residents. Some scholarships are available.

    Guyer said 75 to 100 students attend each summer and normally a significant improvement is seen in the children. "We always hope their basic skills will improve and usually students make a significant improvement in spelling and math," Guyer said.

    Applications for the Summer Learning Disabilities Program are due June 3. More information may be requested from Guyer at (304) 696-6317.


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    Thursday May 27, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Newest Yeager class includes 11 students from six states

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven students from six states make up the Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholars Class of 2008.

    The students will arrive on campus in August for the start of the fall semester. The program is named for U.S. Air Force Brigadier General (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Lincoln County, W.Va.

    The Yeager program is the only scholarship at Marshall for which students must compete against one another. Students must meet criteria set for the scholars and then, if they are picked, must participate in the interviewing process. The students are interviewed by teams made up of Marshall faculty and administrators, as well as community leaders.

    After receiving the scholarship, the students must maintain a rigorous course load, as well as a 3.5 GPA, and participate voluntarily in campus activities. The society also looks for students who have leadership potential.

    Martha Woodward, executive director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Marshall, said the selection process was as exciting as always. She said she has great expectations for the students who were chosen as the Brammer Class of 2008.

    "Each class generates excitement because they are so eager and ready to make us proud," Woodward said.

    The Class of 2008 is named for G. Robert "Bob" Brammer, a 1965 alumnus of Marshall University and member of the Society of Yeager Scholars Board of Directors, and his wife, Sylvia. The Brammers were selected for this honor based on their shared commitment to advancing the program's mission through leadership, advocacy and financial support.

    These students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Brammer Class of 2008:

    Megan Lynn Basham is the daughter of Connie and Danny Basham of Chesapeake, Ohio. Basham will graduate from Chesapeake High School where she has served on student council for three years and served as vice president twice. She also played volleyball and performed in the concert and marching bands. Basham won the Hugh O'Brien Leadership Award and other awards for English, Spanish, American History, Voice of Democracy and Marshall University SCORES Competitions. She was Quiz Bowl Captain and 2002 Quiz Bowl High Scorer. She is active in the community and has volunteered many hours as a hospital candy striper, and plans to become a physician. She also assists children with reading at a local library and elementary school.

    Karen Elizabeth Bohne is the daughter of Marianne and John Bohne of Rochester Hills, Mich. Bohne will graduate from Avondale High School where she has served as student council treasurer and yearbook editor. She also has written for the school and local newspapers and played volleyball, soccer and softball. Bohne has won superior ratings in choral and piano competitions and also has earned awards for theater and essay contests. She was named Outstanding Scholar in the Odyssey of the Mind and Michigan Future Problem Solving, she is a member of Who's Who and she is a National Merit Commended Scholar.

    Jacquelyn Hanna Bowen is the daughter of Anna and Emmett Bowen, III of Dunbar, W.Va. Bowen will graduate from South Charleston High School where she has served four years on the student council and was a member of the soccer and swim teams. She participated in the Science Fair and won the Air Force Award at the state level. Bowen sang in the show choir and did school TV announcements. She was a representative for Girls' State and the Hugh O'Brien Leadership Conference. Bowen is an active community volunteer and plans to pursue a career in medicine.

    Eric Scott Byrge is the son of Reva and Anthony Byrge, Sr. of Beckley, W.Va. Byrge will graduate from Woodrow Wilson High School where he was president of student government. He has won top awards at Math Field Day and on the Math and Science Quiz Bowl team. Byrge wrote for the local and school newspapers and played soccer and basketball. He served as an officer in the National Junior Honor Society and the Latin Club. He also has performed with the Street Actors Guild and was active in 4-H Club and his church. Byrge plans to attend medical school.

    Sarah Elizabeth Gutman is the daughter of Carolyn and Milton Gutman of Wheeling, W.Va. Gutman will graduate from Mount De Chantal Visitation Academy where she has captained the basketball, swim and tennis teams and also served on student government. She has earned a trip to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair three times and has won a variety of awards in the process. Gutman has studied art, theatre, music and dance for a number of years and has performed in musical productions. She achieved high scores on the AATG National German Examination and also volunteers for her church and community. Gutman is a National Merit Semifinalist and plans to major in biology in preparation for a career in medicine.

    Caitlin Richelle Haught is the daughter of Elizabeth and Richard Haught. She will be graduating from Appamattox County High School in Virginia where she has served on student council and won many forensics competions, including regional champion and placing at the state level. Haught has won awards in theater competitions and played volleyball and softball. She attended the Virginia Governor's School for the Visual and Performing Arts and Virginia Girls' State. Haught was selected for Who's Who and is active in a number of community and church activities. She is a National Merit Commended Scholar and plans to major in journalism and mass communications.

    Kelly Nicole Jackson is the daughter of Donna and Timothy Jackson of Rochester, N.Y. Jackson will be graduating from Churchville Chili Senior High School where she played basketball, ran track and captained the soccer team. Jackson also was the division soccer player of the year and will become a member of the MU soccer team. She performed in the chorus and the band and was a member of the National Honor Society and the National Foreign Language Honor Society. She competed in the Science Olympiad and twice won the Teachers' Choice Award in Science. She has volunteered with community children's soccer programs and with her church youth group. Jackson plans to major in journalism and mass communications.

    Joshua Aaron Lynn is the son of Darlene and Kevin Lynn of Millbrook, Ala. Lynn will graduate from Stanhope Elmore High School where he has served as an officer with student government for four years and wrote the student government constitution. He captained the Robotics Team that won three state championships, and he was selected to attend Alabama Boys' State and the Auburn University Chemistry and Physics Invitational. Lynn played trombone and baritone horn in the marching, concert and jazz bands. He was a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta Math Honorary, Excalibur Science Honor Society and the National Beta Club. He volunteered by speaking to organizations and providing after-school tutoring. Lynn plans to major in history and already has a start with many dual enrollment classes.

    Shannon Rae McKinney is the daughter of Dorcia and Rickey McKinney of Kenova, W.Va. McKinney will graduate from Spring Valley High School where she has served on student council every year since 1999 and served as senior class president. She played soccer and was a member of the National Honor Society, Science Quiz Bowl, Mu Alpha Theta Math Honorary and Who's Who. McKinney was a Regional Math Field Day winner and has earned the U.S. Air Force Mathematics and Science Award. She also has had poems selected for online publication and plays guitar and mandolin in a bluegrass band. McKinney plans to major in physics.

    Michael Jayson Price is the son of Cynthia and Jeff Price of Lewisburg, Ohio. Price will graduate from Tri-County North High School where he was a member of the golf and basketball teams. He also was a member of SADD, National Honor Society, Quiz Team, Science Club, Foreign Language Club and Drama Club. He has won numerous academic awards at his school and was selected for Who's Who, the National Honor Roll and the U.S. Achievement Academy. He is an Eagle Scout and a member of the Order of the Arrow, and he has been invited to attend a number of scout-sponsored leadership events. Price plans to major in biology and physics.

    Meghan Nicole Ward is the daughter of Frances and Frankie Ward of War, W.Va. Ward will graduate as valedictorian from Big Creek High School where she was a member of the cheerleading and softball teams. She was selected to attend the West Virginia Governor's Honors Academy, West Virginia Ambassador to the World Leadership Conference for the Hugh O'Brien Organization and West Virginia Girls' State. She earned the Concord College Book Award, Good Citizen Award, All-American Cheerleader Recognition and All-Tournament Team softball standing. Ward was the president of the Key Club, National Honor Society and Health Sciences and Technology Academy and she also was the sports correspondent for the Welch Daily News. She is an active volunteer for her community and her church. Ward plans to major in biology to prepare for medical school.

    Yeager Scholars receive a full scholarship that includes tuition and fees, room and board, a stipend for textbooks and supplies, study abroad experiences at Oxford University or elsewhere and a personal computer.

    Note: Photos of each of the 11 new Yeager Scholars are available for use by the media at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


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    Wednesday May 26, 2004
    Contact: Monica Brooks, Associate Dean of Libraries, (304) 696-6613

    Artistic handwriting demonstrations on display at Drinko Library

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two demonstrations of artistic handwriting are on display on the third floor of the John Deaver Drinko Library at Marshall University, thanks to the Huntington Calligraphers' Guild.

    The "Write Like an Egyptian" exhibit, assembled by the Guild in conjunction with the Huntington Museum of Art, shows members incorporating Egyptian symbols, scenes, and hieroglyphics into their calligraphy.

    The other exhibit, "For Letter and Verse," features poetry written by Marshall University faculty and students interpreted and brought to life through the calligrapher's art.

    Monica Brooks, Associate Dean of the University Libraries, said several students already have stopped to look at the various pieces displayed throughout the third floor.

    "We are delighted when we can provide a superb show like the Guild's in our library," Brooks said. "Our students, who are here to study, do research or homework, deserve a nice break in which they can enjoy the exhibit and learn a little about something new."

    Wanda Cummings, Project Coordinator for the Guild, made the traveling show available for the MU community's enjoyment.

    The exhibit runs through June. Visitors are invited to view the show during the Libraries' summer business hours, which are available by telephone at (304) 696-2320. For more information and a schedule of upcoming exhibits, contact Brooks at (304) 696-6613.


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    Wednesday May 26, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, , (304) 746-2038

    HADCO, Marshall University announce establishment of Biotech Alliance

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel and officials from the Huntington Area Development Council (HADCO) today announced the formation of The Biotech Alliance, a cooperative nonprofit venture that will play an integral role in the global marketing of biotechnology research and development at Marshall and throughout the Advantage Valley region.

    The Biotech Alliance will assist in the marketing and promotion of biotechnology developed at Marshall and aid in the development of new partnerships to support biotechnology research at the university.

    "Our overall commitment to biotechnology research and development is truly enhanced by today's announcement," said Mark Bugher, HADCO chairman. "The Biotech Alliance will serve as an effective marketing component to complement the investments we're making to develop biotechnology into the region's new economic engine."

    The Alliance also will assist in development of the $5 million Velocity Center as a potential location for the business innovations developed at Marshall. The 5,000-square-foot center will be constructed at KineticPark and house lab space for a high-tech business start-up.

    Sen. Robert C. Byrd has secured a $1 million federal appropriation for Velocity Center, with the rest of the money to come from private financing once tenants have been signed and the building is designed.

    "Through the development of a myriad of new research and development facilities and the shared vision of students, faculty, researchers and the region's economic stakeholders, HADCO and Marshall University are developing a blueprint for economic success," Angel said. "The Biotech Alliance will literally transition these major projects from the bricks and mortar stage to commercialization and production, benefiting the region through the development of new investments and high-wage jobs."

    Early next month, Biotech Alliance partners HADCO and Marshall will take another major step in their efforts to attract new biotech-related investment to the region through their joint participation in BIO 2004, the Biotechnology Industry Organization's (BIO's) annual convention.

    The BIO annual convention, June 6-9, 2004 in San Francisco, is the largest gathering of biotechnology leaders in the world, attracting more than 15,000 attendees and featuring more than 190 sessions, 1,000 speakers, and 1,200 exhibitors. BIO represents more than 1,000 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations in all 50 U.S. states and 33 other nations. BIO members are involved in the research and development of health-care, agricultural, industrial and environmental biotechnology products.


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    Wednesday May 26, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, , (304) 696-7153

    HADCO, Marshall University receive $25,000 state grant to aid biotech marketing efforts

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel and officials from the Huntington Area Development Council (HADCO) today were presented a West Virginia Local Economic Development Assistance Program grant for $25,000.

    The funds will assist The Biotech Alliance, a newly established cooperative nonprofit venture, in its global marketing of biotechnology research and development opportunities at Marshall and throughout the Advantage Valley region.

    "We thank Delegates Margarette Leach, Kevin Craig and Jim Morgan, Senator Bob Plymale and the members of the Cabell/Wayne state legislative delegation for their support of this effort," Angel said.

    The grant program, administered by the West Virginia Development Office, supports community enrichment projects that provide a better living environment or expand economic development opportunities.


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    Monday May 24, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    New scholarship opportunity now available at Marshall Community and Technical College

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A new $500 scholarship to the Marshall Community and Technical College, made possible by a gift from the State Credit Union, is available for fall 2004.

    The State Credit Union is a West Virginia, member-owned, not-for-profit, financial organization. Dr. Vicki Riley, president of the community college, recently accepted a $500 check from Chris Mallory, assistant CEO with the State Credit Union.

    "Access to a community college education just got a little easier, thanks to the generosity of the State Credit Union," Dr. Riley said. "They understand the financial needs of our students and we are grateful for their interest in supporting our community."

    For more information, persons may call the Marshall Community and Technical College at (304) 696-6282 or (800) 642-3437.


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    Friday May 14, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Community and Technical College associate professor to participate in Oxford Round Table in August

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mildred Battle, an associate professor in the General Studies Division of the Marshall Community and Technical College, will be in Oxford, England Aug. 8-13 to participate in the Oxford Round Table at St. Antony's College in the University of Oxford.

    Select individuals from throughout the world were invited to participate in the Round Table. The Round Table is made up of academics, attorneys, and policy makers from 40 nations to discuss and review developments in International Trade and the Environment.

    The title of the conference is "Regulating Sustainable Development: Adapting to Globalization in the Twenty-First Century." The Oxford Round Table's purpose is to inform and promote human advancements by studying and considering current issues that are facing national and international levels in business, mathematics, and science.

    Battle also has been selected to present a paper, "No Child Left Behind is in Doubt," during the five-day Round Table. The foundation of the Round Table is the assurance that this learning community will be composed of outstanding leaders, and provides a forum for better understanding of international trade, environmental, and technological advancements in the world.

    Earlier this month, Marshall President Dan Angel that he will participate in the Oxford Round Table for college and university leaders at St. Antony's College. That event is scheduled July 4-9.


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    Friday May 14, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    New documentary will tell Cam Henderson story

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ashes to Glory producers Deborah Novak and John Witek have begun researching the career of legendary Marshall College Coach Cam Henderson for a new hour-long public television documentary.

    Novak said pride in Marshall sports began with the "amazing wins" of the Henderson era. He coached Marshall football and/or basketball from 1935 to and 1955. Novak said she plans to recreate that distant age, when Marshall athletes traveled by train and thousands packed the C&O station to welcome them home from road games.

    Henderson is credited with developing the zone defense and fast break in basketball's early history, Novak said. One of the filmmakers' goals is to gain recognition for Henderson in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

    Novak said she and Witek are eager to talk to anyone who has memories of Henderson to share. They also would like to borrow any photos, memorabilia or film footage of the era. Film footage could include home movies, game films or broadcast footage of Marshall sports from the 1930s through the 1950s.

    Anyone who would like to contribute to the documentary may contact Witek and Novak at (304) 697-0681.


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    Wednesday May 12, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    State Diocesan Convention this weekend at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An estimated 350-450 people from throughout West Virginia will be on Marshall University's campus this weekend for the 127th annual Diocesan Convention of the Episcopal Church of West Virginia.

    Russell Alexander, a member of convention host St. John's Episcopal of Huntington, said the convention runs Friday, May 14, through Sunday, May 16. The purpose of the convention is for those attending to pray, worship and take part in educational forums, meetings and workshops dealing with issues of the diocese and the churches within the diocese.

    The state convention takes place once a year, Alexander said. Last year's event was in Weston, W.Va. Portions of this year's convention will take place at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, the Campus Christian Center, the Memorial Student Center and the Harless Dining Hall.

    More information on the convention is available by calling Alexander at (304) 617-0791.


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    Wednesday May 12, 2004
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    Marshall Business Dean to Join Pan-Pacific Business Association

    Dr. Chong W. Kim, Interim Dean of the Lewis College of Business at Marshall University, will be inducted as a Fellow of the Pan-Pacific Business Association on Thursday, May 27 in Anchorage, Alaska during the President's Luncheon of the Pan-Pacific Conference XXI: International Business and Global Project Management.

    "I am pleased for this honor, not only for me personally, but for what it represents to Marshall," Kim said.

    The Pan-Pacific Business Association selects one Fellow for the association each year based on the person's scholastic contributions to his/her field and for significant contributions to the association. During the last 21 years of the association's existence, 24 Fellows have been inducted into the association, including internationally known scholars such as Lyman Porter, Bob House, Fred Luthans, John Slocum, and Sang Lee.

    The basic goal of the PPBA is to provide a forum for scholars, executives and government officers within Pacific Rim countries to discuss important issues relating to a better quality of life in the region. Emphasis has been placed on more effective utilization of human resources, technology and multilateral economic activities across borders.

    PPBA's annual international conference has participants from more than 30 countries and has been held in such locations as Hawaii, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Australia, China, Malaysia, Canada, Thailand, New Zealand, Japan, Fiji and Chile.


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    Wednesday May 12, 2004
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    Bill Smith joins Marshall University Board of Governors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bill Smith, a Huntington resident and assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction in student services with Cabell County Public Schools, is the newest member of Marshall University's Board of Governors.

    Recent passage of Senate Bill 448 added the chair of the Board of Advisors of each administratively linked community college as an ex-officio voting member of the Board of Governors of the sponsoring institution.

    Smith has served as chair of Marshall's Community and Technical College's Board of Advisors for the past year. He participated in today's Marshall Board of Governors meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in Huntington.

    Smith is a two-time Marshall graduate, earning a B.A. degree in English and Speech in 1973, and a master's degree in English in 1976. He has been with Cabell County Schools since 1978.


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    Tuesday May 11, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Psychology department students receive awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five Marshall University Psychology majors who graduated this year were given awards by the Psychology department.

    Ashley Hunt of New Martinsville, W.Va., won two awards, while Sharon Barker of Huntington, Gerrod Negley of Williamson, W.Va., Lara Smith of Barboursville and Sabrina Lee of Cross Lanes, W.Va., won one apiece.

    Each of the awards is based on faculty nomination, according to Keith Beard, assistant professor and director of the Psychology Clinic.

    Hunt and Barker won the Outstanding Psychology Student award. This award is based on academic achievement, which includes being among the top three in terms of overall GPA, as well as GPA within the major. Other scholarly activity, such as publications or presentations, also is considered.

    Hunt, Negley and Smith won the Outstanding Research Achievement award. This award is given to the student or students who have a high GPA, and who have demonstrated the highest level of research activity through participation in faculty-directed research independent study, publications and presentations, or other activities relating to research.

    Lee won the Outstanding Service award, which is presented to the student who achieves a minimum GPA of 3.25, and has a demonstrated record of service. Activities considered in this category are participation in the Psi Chi and Psychology clubs, especially holding office and/or being an active participant in the planning and execution of the annual conference, or extracurricular activities which benefit the general public.

    For more information, contact Beard at (304) 696-2781.


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    Monday May 10, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall plans to change identification number policy

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Some 20,000 Marshall University students, faculty and staff will have one fewer thing to worry about when they return to school in the fall.

    Because of the potential for identity theft, which is one of the fastest growing crimes in America, Marshall is moving toward the use of a Generated ID Number instead of using the Social Security Number as an identifier to protect members of the university community, President Dan Angel said today.

    Identity theft occurs when a person steals personal information, including Social Security Number, credit card numbers, username and password, or other personally identifying information in order to fraudulently use the victim's credentials for illegal gain.

    Historically, most universities have used the Social Security Number as the identification number for students, faculty and staff. Angel said the identification number policy will impact many of Marshall's processes, "but it is critical that we protect all parties."

    "In the 2004 State of the State message, Governor Bob Wise addressed identity theft and the measures needed to protect our citizens," Angel said. "In order to make this proactive process, I assigned an oversight committee that represents the major stakeholders on the campus. It is chaired by Chief of Staff Layton Cottrill, who has operational responsibility for the policy."

    The policy will create new Marshall University ID numbers for all campus stakeholders who need an ID number and will be used for all purposes, except for those that require Social Security Number by law or regulation.

    The transition to the new identification number can provide a more secure environment with our every day business processes. The university is looking toward a proposed date of June 1 to complete this process.


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    Thursday May 6, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall President invited to Oxford summit

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Dan Angel will be in Oxford, England, July 4-9 to participate in the prestigious Oxford Round Table for college and university leaders at the University of Oxford's St. Antony's College.

    Angel will be one of 40 participants from around the world attending the five-day Round Table. Daily meetings will take place at the Rhodes House, which is the Oxford home of the Rhodes Scholars. A wide range of education leaders, such as ministers of education, university presidents and chancellors from many countries, will attend the Round Table.

    "It is a great honor and pleasure to be invited to attend the Oxford Round Table," Angel said. "I look forward to joining education leaders from around the world in discussing important and timely topics."

    Angel also has been selected to present a paper, "Legislative Tools for Tough Financial Times," during the Round Table. The forum of the Round Table provides educational leaders with an opportunity to consider policy issues in a collegial "think-tank" atmosphere.

    This year's agenda includes topics such as the global society and the changing nature of higher education; provision of educational opportunity and student migration; security in the face of potential acts of violence; government control and the status of institutional autonomy, effects of rising costs on access to higher education and performance, quality and institutional efficiency.

    Last year, institutions in Argentina, Canada, France, Georgia, Germany, India, Japan, Korea, Kuwait, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Philippines, South African, the United States and Venezuela were represented.

    Angel will be staying at St. Antony's College throughout the meeting. St. Antony's, which was founded in 1950, is one of 39 colleges that make up the University of Oxford.

    "It will be great to be back in England," Angel said. In 1997, he was named an Honorary Fellow of Rose Bruford College in London during a ceremony in the British House of Commons.


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    Thursday May 6, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU professor awarded Fulbright Scholar Lectureship

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. James Brumfield, a biological sciences and physical sciences professor at Marshall University, has been awarded the Fulbright Scholar Lectureship of the Fulbright Program, College of Science Dean Joseph Bragin said today.

    Brumfield was selected to lecture at the Kyrgyz-Russian National Slavic University and the Institute of Geology, Kyrgyz-Russian National Academy of Science in Biskek, Kyrgyz Republic. The lectureship is scheduled for this fall.

    He will lecture graduate courses on digital image processing science and techniques on researching in remote sensing, geographic information systems, global positioning systems and the Geobiophysical Modeling of Landslide Hazard Zones in the Kyrgyz Republic.

    Brumfield's host will be Dr. Apas Bakirov, Director of the Institute of Geology and Chairman of the Central Asia International Geology-Geophysical Association.

    Bragin said Brumfield's interest in the Kyrgyz Republic grew out of his talks on Geobiophysical Modeling in July 2002. His presentation to the 7th International Symposium on High Mountain Remote Sensing Cartography took place in Biskek, Kyrgyz Republic.

    "The Fulbright program has been one of the great triumphs of American foreign policy and exemplifies our country's best efforts to reach out to others around the world," Bragin said. "A Fulbright award is at once a recognition of Professor Brumfield's status in the community of geobiophysical scholars, an opportunity to establish a dialog with foreign colleagues that will benefit Marshall students and a means by which to spread the news about Marshall's academic programs to distant lands."

    The Fulbright program, which is overseen by The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State, is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of the 150 countries that participate in the program.

    Fulbright scholarship grantees are to establish open communication and long-term cooperative relationships in a way that they can enrich the educational, political, economic, social and cultural lives of countries around the world.

    Brumfield's grant is made possible through the funds that are appropriated annually by the U.S. Congress and by contributions from partner countries and the private sector.

    Brumfield will join 261,000 alumni of the program who eventually have become heads of state, judges, ambassadors, cabinet members, CEOs, university presidents, journalists, artists, professors and teachers. Fulbright alumni have been awarded 34 Nobel Prizes.

    More information is available by calling Bragin at (304) 696-3167.


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    Tuesday May 4, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University College of Science students to attend NATO Advanced Study Institute in Bulgaria in September

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students Nora Gao of Hurricane, W.Va., and Rebekah Lemon of Spencer, W.Va., have received grants to attend the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advanced Study Institute (ASI) this September in Sozopol, Bulgaria.

    The scientific institute, which runs Sept. 6-17, is titled, "Nanostructured and Advanced Materials for Applications in Sensor, Optoelectronic and Photovoltaic Technology." Dr. Ashok Vaseashta, Professor of Physics and Physical Sciences at Marshall and Director of the NATO ASI, secured the grant and will accompany Gao and Lemon in Bulgaria.

    Gao, a native of Syria, is a graduate student pursuing a master's degree in Biology. Lemon is a junior pursuing her undergraduate degree in Biology. They will present posters with Vaseashta at the ASI, which will be attended by more than 100 selected participants from throughout the world.

    Gao's presentation is titled, "Nanoporous Silicon and Carbon Nanotube Based Devices for Bio-Molecular Detection," and Lemon's is titled, "Unique Applications of Carbon Nanotubes in Medical Imaging, Biosensors and Vaccine Delivery." Students, faculty, and researchers from the eligible NATO partners and Mediterranean dialogue countries also will be presenting posters.

    "Dr. Vaseashta works hard to provide students with countless opportunities," said Gao, who plans to attend medical school after earning her master's degree. "I feel honored to be representing Marshall University and West Virginia in Bulgaria."

    Lemon, who presented a poster with Vaseashta at the March 2004 meeting of the American Physical Society in Montreal, Canada, also plans to attend medical school.

    In part, the objective of the ASI is to train participants in the scientific principles and technology of nanostructured and advanced electronic materials development, device configurations and their applications in chemical and biological sensors technology, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, microelectronics, and biotechnology.

    Gao is among five students from the United States to receive a National Science Foundation (NSF) travel grant to help fund the trip to Bulgaria. Students from West Virginia University, the University of Florida and Kansas State University also received the travel grant.

    Vaseashta said a tremendous amount of work is involved in organizing and preparing for the NATO ASI meeting. He is presenting three invited lecturers and five solicited publications with students.

    "The opportunity to represent Marshall University and the state of West Virginia to an international audience provides me with a motivating force," Vaseashta said. "Above all, I have received overwhelming support from Marshall University students, the College of Science Dean, Dr. Joseph Bragin, and President Dan Angel throughout the preparation of this scientific research event."

    Bragin congratulated Vaseashta for his success in supporting the students' foreign travel, and predicted the visit to Bulgaria will be "a stimulating and highly instructive opportunity for advanced study."

    "An advantage of such travel as you have provided these students is that Marshall graduates who are entrepreneurial and will try to develop economic opportunities in the state can use this foreign exposure to their advantage in tapping into the global economy," Bragin told Vaseashta.

    More information on the Advanced Study Institute is available by contacting Vaseashta at (304) 696-2755.


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    Tuesday May 4, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall's 167th commencement to be broadcast on local cable television and the Internet

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 167th commencement ceremony Saturday will be broadcast live in the Huntington area, as well as internationally on the university's World Wide Web site, Director of Communications Dave Wellman announced today.

    The ceremony will be broadcast live on Marshall's Educational Informational Channel (Channel 25) on the Adelphia Cable System in the Huntington area, as well as on the university's World Wide Web site. The broadcast will begin at 10 a.m. on. Those who wish to view a live video stream of the ceremony via the Internet may view it from a link from the university's home page at www.marshall.edu.


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    Monday May 3, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL students establish record with three more awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, capped a record-setting year by winning three awards during the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2003 broadcast journalism awards ceremony, conducted April 24 at the Charleston House Holiday Inn in Charleston.

    The two first-place awards and one honorable mention increased the students' total to 60 for the 2003-04 academic year. The total includes 30 first-place awards, five second-place awards, two third-place awards and 23 honorable mention awards.

    The two first-place award-winning entries were:

    • Best Documentary - "Old Main: A Living Tradition," written and produced by Trent Garnes, a recent graduate from Hurricane, W.Va., broadcast during "Aircheck" Monday, Oct. 20, 2003.
    • Best Sports Special - "The Ring is the Thing: The 2003 Marshall Football Season Preview," written and produced by Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va., Kourtney Bess, a junior from Belle, W.Va., and Daniel Clay Stimeling, a sophomore from Buckhannon, W.Va., broadcast before the season-opening football game against Hofstra Saturday, Aug. 30, 2003.

    The honorable mention award-winning entry was:

    • Best Regularly Scheduled Newscast - "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," anchored by Carletta Blake, a freshman from Gallipolis Ferry, W.Va., and Stimeling, broadcast Friday, Nov. 14, 2003.

    For more information on the awards, persons may contact Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, at (304) 696-6640.


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    Marshall again eclipses record with 2004 graduation class

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will again eclipse a milestone with the awarding of nearly 2,800 degrees, the most in school history, during its 167th graduation Saturday, May 8 at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    The total number of graduates betters the previous high of 2,656, set in 2003. Also, 87 students will graduate Summa Cum Laude (3.85 GPA or higher), which also is the most in school history. The previous high was 70, in 2002.

    Thirteen students will graduate with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. They are: Christopher D. Adams of Ashland, Ky.; Isabell Anderer of Sinsheim, Germany; Shawna K. Blaney of West Chester, Ohio; Jonathan R. Gilkerson of Wayne, W.Va.; Thomas D. Harris II of Poca, W.Va.; Luzy J. Jaime of Huntington; Benita R. Milam of Kenova, W.Va.; Thomas B. Payne of Owensboro, Ky.; Alisa L. Philabaun of Ironton, Ohio; Suzanne Sadat of Mount Hope, W.Va.; Laura J. Savory of Huntington; Poorani Sekar of Ames, Iowa; and, Lance P. Veeser of Wilson, Mich.

    A total of 513 undergraduate students are graduating with honors.

    MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said the tentative number of graduates this spring is 2,867, or 109 higher than the previous tentative record of 2,758 set in 2003. Marshall tentatively announced a record 2,758 graduates last year, but the actual number slipped to 2,656 after spring grades were compiled.

    The 2004 Commencement starts at 10 a.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. U.S. Congressman Nick Joe Rahall II will be the guest speaker. Four people also will receive honorary degrees. They are Burl Osborne of Dallas, Albin G. Wheeler of Springfield, Va., Robert E. Fox of Lexington, Ky., and Rahall, who lives in Beckley.

    Marshall President Dan Angel attributes the continuing trend of a record number of graduates and honor students to the dedication of the university's faculty and the students themselves, and the school's growing presence as an education leader and research-intensive institution.

    "If you look at the growth of Marshall University during the past decade, much of our success has to be attributed to our dedicated faculty and the quality of students that we are attracting," Angel said. "Marshall is committed to student success, and our continued trend of record growth in both the number of graduates and number of honors graduates is a clear validation of that mission."

    Because of limited parking in the downtown area, Marshall will provide shuttle service from campus to the arena prior to and immediately following commencement. Shuttle service will be available at university lots near the Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Welcome Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and Lot F, which is located across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall. Shuttle service will begin at 8:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals.

    The ceremony will be broadcast live on the Adelphia Cable System in the Huntington area, as well as on the university's World Wide Web site. The broadcast will begin at 10 a.m. on Marshall University's Educational Informational Channel (Channel 25). Those who wish to view the ceremony on the Web site may view it from a link from the university's home page at www.marshall.edu.


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    Thursday April 29, 2004
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    Shuttle service recommended to ease traffic congestion associated with Marshall's 167th commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University, in cooperation with the Tri-State Transit Authority, will again provide shuttle service for graduates and guests attending the university's 167th Commencement ceremony, which begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 8, at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Commencement attendees are encouraged to use this service, to help alleviate traffic congestion in the downtown area associated with the event and continuing construction on the adjacent Pullman Square retail and entertainment complex.

    Shuttle service will be available from university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Welcome Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and the Third Avenue parking area (Lot F) near Smith Hall. Shuttle service will begin at 8:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals. Immediately following commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.

    At the conclusion of separate ceremonies for the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Nursing and Health Professions (to be held at Big Sandy Superstore Arena immediately following the university commencement), shuttle service will return attendees of those ceremonies to campus.

    Commencement Shuttle Schedule

    Bus #2 - Performing Arts Center (across from the Memorial Student Center on 5th Ave.)

    Bus #3 - Welcome Center (5th Ave. and 18th St.)

    Bus #4 - Joan C. Edwards Stadium (20th St. Entrance)

    Bus #5 - F-Lot (Across from Smith Hall - 3rd Ave. & Hal Greer Blvd.)

    Shuttle buses will begin transport of graduates and guests to the Big Sandy Superstore Arena at 8:45 a.m., concluding at approximately 10:15 a.m. Following commencement, graduates and guests may board shuttles along 8th Street at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena for return to campus.


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    WMUL students continue winning tradition at SPJ contest

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, won several awards at the 2003 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Contest for Region 4. The awards were presented at the Region 4 Convention Saturday, April 17 in Columbus, Ohio.

    Region 4 consists of colleges and universities in West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan and western Pennsylvania, Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, associate professor of broadcasting in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said.

    Marshall students won two first-place awards, two second-place awards and one third-place award.

    "Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional or state level with other student-operated college radio stations," Bailey said. "WMUL-FM student broadcasters won all five of the radio awards presented in the two categories. This solid performance in SPJ's Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students."

    Kent State University was the 2003 sweepstakes winner for the Mark of Excellence Contest for Region 4 by having the most points for awards in newspaper, magazine, radio and television categories. Marshall won the runner-up position for the sweepstakes award. The University of Cincinnati finished in third place in the standings.

    Marshall's first-place award-winning entries in radio were:

    • Radio Documentary: "Music: A Tool for Professional Therapists," written and produced by Lenaia Mancini, a senior from Cincinnati, broadcast during "Aircheck," Monday, Nov. 24, 2003.
    • Radio Sports Reporting: "One More First: The 2003-2004 Marshall Women's Basketball Preseason Special," written and produced by Robert Harper, a graduate student from Hurricane; Jennifer Baileys, a sophomore from Mineral Wells; Travis Smith, a senior from Martinsburg, and Efren Creamer, a senior from Charles Town, broadcast before the season opening exhibition game against West Virginia Tech, Saturday, Nov. 1, 2003.

    The second-place award-winning entries in radio were:

    • Radio Documentary: "Old Main: A Living Tradition," written and produced by Trent Garnes, a recent graduate from Hurricane, broadcast during "Aircheck," Monday, Oct. 20, 2003.
    • Radio Sports Reporting: "The MAC Report," written and produced by Alex Reed, a junior from Virginia Beach, Va., broadcast Friday, Sept. 12, 2003.

    The third-place award-winning entry in radio was:

    • Radio Sports Reporting: "Marshall Volleyball Weekend Swing," written and produced by Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, broadcast during the sports segment of the "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Oct. 3, 2003.

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    Fox, Osborne, Rahall, Wheeler to receive honorary degrees May 8 during Marshall's commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four individuals who not only have excelled in their professions, but given decades of strong support to Marshall University, will receive Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degrees May 8 during MU's 167th commencement ceremonies at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    The addition of 2004 honorees Robert E. Fox of Lexington, Ky., Burl Osborne of Dallas, U.S. Congressman Nick J. Rahall, II of Beckley, W.Va., and Albin G. Wheeler of Springfield, Va., brings to 152 the number of Marshall's honorary degree recipients.

    "Marshall University is proud to honor these four extraordinary individuals with honorary degrees," MU President Dan Angel said. "They all are highly respected in their professions and all have strong ties to Marshall University. Their leadership and accomplishments, on state, national and international levels, is truly remarkable."

    Commencement begins at 10 a.m. and Rahall, who represents West Virginia's Third District, will be the guest speaker.

    Here is a brief look at each honorary degree recipient:

    Robert E. Fox

    As a pioneer in oil and natural gas exploration and production, Fox, a petroleum geologist and engineer, served with many organizations throughout the world. As a generalist with these organizations, he oversaw all aspects of ideas from their beginnings into their development as viable operations in many developing and established petroleum provinces of the world, including Libya, Pakistan, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and the United States.

    In 1986, Fox received the honorary Doctor of Science degree from Heriod-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, in recognition of his work in the North Sea and his contribution to the university as a member of its Offshore Engineering Institute's Board of Governors.

    Burl Osborne

    One of American journalism's great figures, Osborne gained national prominence by directing the remarkable turnaround of the Dallas Morning News. He joined the paper as executive editor in 1980 following a 20-year career with The Associated Press in which he eventually became managing editor of the AP's worldwide news operation.

    As circulation at the Morning News climbed at an amazing rate, Osborne rose through the ranks nearly as fast, rising to president only five years after arriving in Dallas. As one competitor from the Dallas Times Herald noted at that time, "He just beat us black and blue." Under the stewardship of Osborne, who has been described as a newspaperman through and through, the Morning News won six Pulitzer Prizes for journalistic achievement.

    Nick J. Rahall, II

    As a national leader in the development of federal policies relating to transportation, and infrastructure, energy and the environment, Congressman Rahall has distinguished himself as a leader for change and progress in the Appalachian Region during his nearly 30-year tenure in the United States Congress.

    A tireless fighter for the people of West Virginia, he has helped secure millions of federal dollars for projects that have enhanced community and economic development in southern West Virginia and throughout the region. Through his leadership in Washington, Congressman Rahall has been instrumental in positioning Marshall University as a national transportation research leader.

    Albin G. Wheeler

    A much decorated soldier in the U.S. Army, Wheeler, a retired Major General, spent more than 41 years in the military before ending his remarkable career as a Quartermaster soldier in 1991. During his long and distinguished military career, General Wheeler was awarded numerous awards and decorations, including the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal and Army Commendation Medal with three Oak Leaf clusters.

    General Wheeler did tours of duty in both the U.S. and in Southeast Asia where he took on assignments in Laos, Thailand and the Republic of Vietnam. He later served in Germany as the commander of the Army/Air Force Exchange System-Europe.


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    Master's and doctoral hooding ceremonies scheduled for Marshall's South Charleston, Huntington campuses

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hooding ceremonies to honor master's and doctoral degree recipients will take place in Charleston and Huntington next week on separate days prior to Marshall University's commencement on Saturday, May 8.

    The Charleston ceremony takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 6, at the Charleston Civic Center Coliseum. In Huntington, the ceremony is set for 7 p.m. Friday, May 7, in the Jean Carlo Stephenson Auditorium at Huntington City Hall. Nearly 400 graduates are expected to attend the two ceremonies. Each graduate will be recognized individually when a faculty member presents a hood in a color indicative of the recipient's field of study.

    In addition, the following individuals will be honored for their contributions to Marshall University:

    Ashland Inc. Outstanding Graduate Advising Awards: Dr. R. Daniel Martin, Huntington campus, and Dr. Carolyn H. Suppa, South Charleston campus.

    An associate professor of Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation, Martin is recognized for his commitment to the students he advises (both graduate and undergraduate) and his overall contributions to the College of Education and Human Services. Suppa, associate professor of Counseling, is known for her willingness to mentor students through the graduate education process, as well as her many contributions to the Counseling program.

    Distinguished Graduate Student Alumnus Awards: Ted Obomanu, Huntington campus, and Carolanne Griffith Roberts, South Charleston campus.

    A 1982 graduate of Marshall's MBA program, Obomanu honed his business skills in the areas of retail, human resources, and the pharmaceutical industry before launching a business startup in the Raleigh/Durham, N.C., area in 1995. Within six years, Mantel Solutions, a staffing business, had grown into a $4.5 million firm. Obomanu's current business interests focus on real estate and healthcare staffing.

    A Charleston native, Roberts earned her M.A. in Humanities from Marshall University Graduate College (formerly West Virginia Graduate College) in 1984. After serving 11 years as Associate Travel Editor of Southern Living magazine, Roberts was appointed the Livings Editor in 1996 - a position in which she provides oversight for coverage of people and places through regular columns and 30 annual special sections. She recently was honored by the National Federation of Press Women and is a past recipient of the Southeast Tourism Society's Travel Writer of the Year award.

    For more information about the hooding ceremonies, call the Graduate College at (304) 696-6606.


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    Tuesday April 27, 2004
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    Marshall to offer Swahili, secondary Arabic this fall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Department of Modern Languages is offering two new courses in the fall 2004 semester.

    Swahili 101, the most widely spoken African language south of the Sahara, is sponsored by a Fulbright grant. The program will provide 12 credits total in the language over a two-year period.

    More than 50 million people in east and central Africa speak Swahili or Kiswahili, as it is called by speakers of the language. It is spoken in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The course, which is being taught by Ms. Stella Bashiru, a Fulbright scholar from Tanzania, will be offered from 10 to 10:50 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The course is not listed in the fall schedule. To register, those interested need the following information: MDL 280, Section 102, course reference number 4770, Corbly Hall Room 241.

    The course also will be taught in the Center for International Programs' Language Buffet and the Culture Capsule Program in the June Harless Center in the College of Education.

    The Modern Language Department also will offer secondary Arabic. The language was first offered at Marshall this past year and was well received by students, Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs, said. The course will be taught by Ms. Lama Hamoudi of Syria.

    Arabic is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. It is estimated that 200 million people speak Arabic as their primary language in 22 countries, from Morocco to Iraq and as far south as Somalia and the Sudan. Both Arabic and Swahili have been designated by the U.S. State Department as critical languages, the study of which is of strategic importance to our national security.

    "Our national deficiency in language and cultures is compromising our security interests," Egnor said. "It is vital that the students we are graduating from Marshall University are better prepared to work and live in a global environment that has become marked by serious and dangerous misunderstandings, miscommunications and conflict between cultures, particularly the Western and Muslim cultures."

    Egnor said there is a great demand for people who speak these languages now in our government, particularly the federal agencies, because of the importance of the languages to national security.

    "I think that by exposing our students to these critical languages, cultures through foreign language and study abroad programs, we take some small but positive steps towards peace," Egnor said.

    For more information, persons interested may contact Egnor at (304) 696-2465, or Dr. Maria-Carmen Riddel, chair of the Department of Modern Languages, at (304) 696-2742.


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    Monday April 26, 2004
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    TechTV To Feature Nationally Recognized MARC Wireless Initiative

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Mobile Alternative for Residents on Campus (MARC) wireless initiative, a campus-wide expansion of cellular service that will make Marshall one of the first major universities in the nation to provide wireless telephone services to all of its student residents, will be featured for a national audience on TechTV Tuesday evening, April 27.

    A production crew from TechTV's Washington, D.C. bureau visited the Huntington campus last week to tape the segment for the network's "Tech Live" program, which provides extensive coverage, in-depth analysis, and original features on breaking technology developments as they relate to market trends, entertainment, and consumer products.

    The MARC initiative is scheduled to be featured on Tuesday's edition "Tech Live," which premieres at 8 p.m. The program repeats at 11 p.m. and the following weekday at 10 a.m., 1 p.m., and 6 p.m. (all times Eastern).

    TechTV is currently available in nearly 40 million homes in the United States and distributes content to more than 70 countries. TechTV is available on the Adelphia Digital (channel 129) and Charter Communications (channel 40) cable systems in the Charleston-Huntington area and nationwide on DirecTV (channel 354) and Dish Network (channel 191).

    In March, Marshall and its wireless partner, West Virginia Wireless, announced a campus-wide expansion of the nationally recognized MARC pilot project that provided 500 wireless phones and service to students residing in the newly constructed Gibson, Haymaker, Wellman and Willis Halls. The project eliminated the need for traditional "landline" phones in the Marshall Commons housing complex, thereby providing students with a portable, flexible telecommunications alternative.

    Wireless telephone service will be expanded to Buskirk, Hodges, Holderby and Laidley Halls prior to the start of the Fall 2004 semester. This will add approximately 750 additional students to the MARC program. The MARC initiative will be completed campus-wide with expansion of wireless service to an additional 1,000 students residing in Twin Towers prior to the Fall 2005 semester.

    Marshall University has received nearly 100 inquiries from higher education institutions from throughout the nation about this successful project, including inquires from national technology leader M.I.T. The success of this program is part of a number of key technology initiatives at Marshall that are providing national prominence to the university as a leader in the use of technology applications and innovations. The MARC initiative has also received national attention from media outlets ranging from Associated Press to The Chronicle of Higher Education.


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    Thursday April 22, 2004
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    Marshall University Alumni Association unveils redesigned Web site

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The address of the Marshall University Alumni Association's Web site has not changed, but the contents have.

    Redesigning and upgrading the site, www.marshall.edu/Alumni, has been a priority for the Alumni Association, according to Lance West, Vice President for Alumni Development. The redesigned site premieres Friday, April 23.

    "With the expertise of Marshall's Information Technology (IT) department, the redesign is one that we are very proud of," West said. "Updating the site will remain a priority, and it will continue to be a wonderful tool for all visitors to use as a gateway to Marshall and the Alumni Association."

    West said the technology committee on the MUAA's board of directors, along with the entire board - including the Alumni Relations staff, played a vital role in the brainstorming and creation of the association's Web-based technology.

    "With tighter budgets and smaller staffs, the Internet is critical for the Alumni Association to stay connected with all who are interested in Marshall, i.e. prospective students, parents, current students, alumni, friends, faculty and staff," West said. "This site has been designed with all of these groups in mind, and we welcome input on how to keep the site fresh and exciting."

    One feature of the site is @ Marshall, which is the MUAA online newsletter. It currently is being sent to 22,000 email addresses each month. It features all aspects of the university, including academics, athletics, fundraising, student recruitment and campus activities. Human interest stories also are published in the online newsletter.

    "Based on the feedback we have received, the readers appear to really enjoy the human interest stories," West said.

    West said anyone who wants to receive the online newsletter may request it by sending his or her email address to Marshall@Association.edu.

    It is easy to stay connected with Marshall alumni and friends by registering with MU's online community through the Web site, West said. Users have access to many benefits, such as email for life, updating of records, submission of class notes, and communication with others. It is a free service and can be accessed now.

    The site also features E-postcards, which are designed with Marshall campus scenes, athletic events and seasonal photos, along with other special occasions on campus. The postcards are communication tools and may be used with e-mails.


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    Thursday April 22, 2004
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    Donning of the Kente recognizes graduating African American students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Center for African American Student Programs is sponsoring the Donning of the Kente at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 28. The ceremony, which takes place on Buskirk Field, recognizes all graduating African American students for their achievement.

    All undergraduate and graduate students who will graduate this spring or graduated in fall 2003 are invited at participate. The students will be presented with a certificate and the Kente cloth will be placed over their shoulders.

    Kente cloths have their roots in West Africa during the 17th Century. The cloths were traditionally given to great African leaders who attained great achievement and were only presented at times of symbolic meaning and rites of passage. The cloths are woven from a variety of colors of yarn to give each one a symbolic meaning.

    Maurice Cooley, director of African American Student Programs, said the ceremony is a sign of recognition and honor for students.

    "It is a great opportunity that all African American students, because of their great achievement, can be recognized like the kings and queens of Africa," Cooley said.

    Cooley said about 40 of Marshall's 60 graduating African American students will participate in the donning. Students may sign up to participate up to the day of the event. College deans, faculty, alumni and the community are invited to attend.

    For more information, persons may contact Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


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    Faculty meeting Thursday to honor award winners, retirees

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will honor seven individuals with 2003-04 Distinguished Service Awards Thursday, April 22, during the spring general faculty meeting at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    The meeting, which will include remarks from Marshall President Dan Angel and Faculty Senate President Larry Stickler, begins at 2 p.m. Four people also will be honored with 2003-04 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards.

    To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the institution and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

    Each of the Distinguished Service Awards winners will receive $1,000. They include:

    • Graduate College, Dr. Joyce East, professor, Education and Professional Development, 20 years of service;
    • Graduate College, Dr. Paul Leary, professor, Education and Professional Development, 35 years of service;
    • Journalism/Mass Communications, Dr. George Arnold, professor, Journalism, 35 years of service;
    • Lewis College of Business, Dr. Chandra Akkihal, professor, Finance and Economics, 36 years of service;
    • College of Liberal Arts, Dr. Bert Gross, professor, Communication Studies, 26 years of service;
    • College of Liberal Arts, Dr. Clair Matz, professor, Political Science, 34 years of service, awarded posthumously;
    • School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Dr. Hal Shaver, Dean and professor, 31 years of service in higher education, awarded posthumously.

    To be eligible for consideration for Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, a faculty member either must be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

    The 2003-04 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards will be given to:

    • Ashish Chandra, senior recipient for Sciences and Technology, Marketing/Management, 8 years of service.
    • Scott Sarra, junior recipient for all fields, Math and Applied Science, 3 years of service.
    • Richard Begley, Engineering, 15 years of service, and Tony Szwilski, Environmental Science and Safety Technology, 19 years of experience, team/joint recipients.

    As the senior faculty recipient, Chandra will receive $2,000. As the junior recipient, Sarra will receive $1,000. Begley and Szwilski will receive $1,000 apiece.

    Also Thursday, Marshall will recognize 13 retiring faculty who have a combined 337 years of service. They are:

    • Dr. Dean Adkins, Biological Sciences, 31 years of service;
    • Dr. George Arnold, Journalism and Mass Communications, 35 years of service;
    • Binni Bieler, Psychiatry, 23 years of service;
    • Dr. Bruce Brown, Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 25 years of service;
    • Dr. Ronald Crosbie, Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation, 36 years of service;
    • Dr. Earl Damewood, Management and Marketing, 15 years of service;
    • Dr. William Denman, Communication Studies, 37 years of service;
    • Dr. Protip Ghosh, Geology, 22 years of service;
    • Dr. Bernard Gillespie, Information Technology and Technology Management, 7 years of service;
    • Dr. James Hooper, Information Technology and Technology Management, 13 years of service;
    • Dr. Paul Leary, Leadership Studies at Marshall University Graduate College, 35 years of service;
    • Elizabeth Nordeen, English, 37 years of service;
    • Lenora Rogers, Nursing, 21 years of service.

    Other faculty to be honored Thursday are Dr. Barbara L. Nicholson, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Dr. Charles Somerville, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Jamie Warner, Nicki LoCascio and Lisa Thomas, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

    Dr. Steven Mewaldt, Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Professor of the Year for West Virginia, also will be honored.

    A reception in the performing arts center lobby will follow Thursday's meeting.


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    Tuesday April 20, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Nicholson wins Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara L. Nicholson, a member of the Marshall University Graduate College faculty since 1993, has been awarded the 2003-04 Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award at Marshall University.

    Dr. Frances Hensley, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, said the Hedrick Award winners receives $5,000, thanks to a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, who planned the graduate program at Marshall.

    Hensley also announced two other 2003-04 awards honoring four faculty members. Dr. Charles Somerville, an associate professor in the department of Biological Sciences, has been awarded the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award.

    Three professors have won the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award. They are Jamie Warner, an assistant professor in the department of Political Science; Nicki LoCascio, an assistant professor in the department of Biological Sciences, and Lisa Thomas, an assistant professor in the Communication Disorders department.

    The five award winners will be honored at the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. on Thursday, April 22, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    The Hedrick Award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years' teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

    The Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

    Each of the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award winners receives $1,000 stipends. The awards honor outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the Instructor/Assistant Professor rank and who have completed six or less years of service at Marshall are eligible.

     

    Hedrick Award

    Nicholson teaches in the Leadership Studies program of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development. She received her B.A. in education from Glenville State College, her M.A. in communication studies from West Virginia University, and her Ph.D. in the fields of rhetorical theory/philosophy and educational administration from Ohio University.

    She has been active as a visiting faculty member internationally, beginning with a semester at the Universidade Federale do Espirito Santo in Brazil in 1995 and a Fulbright fellowship at Stockholm and Uppsala Universities in Sweden in 1996. Her Fulbright was the first for the West Virginia Graduate College before its merger with Marshall. She also has lectured at St. Petersburg and Moscow Universities in Russia and in the Czech Republic, Northern Ireland, Scotland and, most recently, at Oxford University in England.

    She is well regarded by students as an outstanding teacher. Larry W. Poe, a former classmate of Nicholson's at Glenville and now one of her students in the Ed.D. program at Marshall, characterizes her as "a humane and intelligent woman who fills the role of the teacher/scholar to the highest and proudest degree."

    Other students echo these comments, while adding that Nicholson is extremely generous with her time. "Deep thoughts and invigorating conversation take time," said Dr. Judith A. Porter, a former student, "but Dr. Nicholson always stops what she's doing to take time for a student."

    In addition, Annette Rashid Gall, another student in the Ed.D. program, notes that Dr. Nicholson continues to support students after the semester ends. "She is not at this time my instructor," Gall says, "but she has offered books…articles…personal class notes. In short, (she) offers a level of customer service that inspires me."

    Nicholson's faculty colleagues concur with the students' comments. "She is an experienced and productive scholar and researcher who is making significant contributions to her department … the institution, and the broader educational and academic community," said Dr. Ronald B. Childress, Vice President for Graduate Studies at Marshall.

    Dr. Michael L. Cunningham, chair of the Leadership Studies program, said that Nicholson pays particular attention to the needs of the adult learner. "The course content is relevant to the needs of the learner, both as a student and as a professional," he noted. "Dr. Nicholson demonstrates a sense of humor, which helps provide a relaxed atmosphere for learning, which is essential to the adult learner."

    In addition to her teaching, Nicholson is well known as a researcher. Recent publications include articles or chapters in Educational Foundations, Adult Learning Methods, and Planning and Changing: An Education Leadership and Policy Journal.

     

    Reynolds Award

    Somerville, who has been at Marshall since 1997, said his specialty is microbiology - "the most exciting and important field of biology," he said.

    George Velasco, a graduate student in Biological Sciences, said Somerville is well-loved and respected by all faculty and students in the department.

    "He is very involved in both teaching and research," Velasco said. "Of all professors that I have ever dealt with in my academic career, Dr. Somerville has been the most approachable and available to his students. His passion for science and his dedication to quality research and mentoring are worthy of recognition and he is a continual contributor to the excellence of this university."

    Dr. Jeffrey D. May, Chair of the Promotion and Tenure Committee in the Department of Biological Sciences, said Somerville works tirelessly to engage students in meaningful research.

    "Dr. Somerville's accomplishments in teaching are exemplary," May said. "He has strongly contributed to teaching basic and service courses, as well as developing specialized upper-level and graduate courses in microbiology. As indicated by student evaluations and letters from his colleagues, Chuck is a superior teacher."

    Somerville has been nominated for and won many awards while at Marshall. He won the Marshall University Research Corporation award for Excellence in Sponsored Research in 1998, and the College of Science Merit Award and the Faculty Merit Award in 1998-99. He also won the Phi Eta Sigma Fabulous Faculty Award in 2001, and was named Researcher of the Year, MU Chapter of Sigma Xi, in 2002.

     

    Pickens-Queen Award

    Warner has been at Marshall two years. She says a major goal in each class she teaches is to create an environment where students feel free to open up and think in ways foreign to their usual modes of thought.

    "I believe that a critical, self-reflective attitude is crucial to every student's ability to make a difference in the world, regardless of major or career choice," Warner said.

    In observing one of Warner's classes, associate professor Judith Kullberg was impressed with Warner's ability to create a learning environment that she said transforms a collection of individuals with differing backgrounds and ability levels into a community of learners.

    Kullberg also applauded Warner's use of incentives in the classroom, such as "Random Fun Activities," or "RFAs." "The RFAs have fulfilled their intended purpose, because I have seldom seen students who are as familiar and comfortable with their texts as Jamie's students were," Kullberg said.

    Student Justin Lipscomb said he hopes to one day teach on the college level. "Much of how I intend to direct my courses comes out of my experience in her class," Lipscomb said of Warner. "She resembles the kind of teacher I would like to become.

    LoCascio said her teaching philosophy is built upon the essences of her own educational experience, and that respect is important in the classroom. "The instructor is responsible for maintaining an environment that is respectful of individual differences and free from the fear of embarrassment or humiliation," she said. "Treatment of students must be respectful and I expect to be treated in like fashion."

    LoCascio said she tries to show "honest enthusiasm" in the classroom. "At the end of the semester, it is my desire that students have accumulated biological knowledge, are capable of applying this information, have broadened their interests, focused their opinions and enjoyed the process," she said.

    Jennifer Waggoner, a student in one of LoCascio's classes in spring 2003, described LoCascio as "the best asset Marshall University contains."

    "Even though Dr. LoCascio's personality is THE BEST, it is coupled with a passion for the subject and adequate knowledge to teach it," Waggoner said. "Throw in her sense of humor, her creativity, her genuine concern for student education, her constant encouragement and her absolute desire to see all her students succeed and this professor cannot be beaten."

    Dr. Laura J. Jenski, professor and head of Biological Sciences, said LoCascio "embodies the high energy, creative, and responsible teacher that makes a real difference in students' lives." She said LoCascio is one of the few faculty qualified and experienced in instruction from introductory courses for majors and non-majors to specialized upper-level courses.

    Thomas started teaching full time at Marshall in fall 2002 in the Communication Disorders Department. She is a recognized expert in her area of expertise, voice disorders, according to Department of Communication Disorders Chair Kathryn Chezik.

    Thomas spent 10 years in clinical practice in a local hospital before coming to Marshall. "She brought with her to Marshall a reputation as a superb clinician," Chezik said.

    She said the switch from teaching patients in her clinical speech-language pathology practice to the challenge of teaching university students "was the greatest transition of my life."

    "My philosophy of teaching is one of critical reflection and application," Thomas said. "My philosophy of teaching speech-language pathology centers on my belief that students must make the connection between the classroom and the patient each day. I believe that real life - the future - must stare us (teacher and student) in the face each day and inspire us to learn and to question and to grow."

    Student Cortney Toppings had Thomas for two classes. "She teaches the class in a way that shows she really wants us to learn something," Toppings said of Thomas. "I came out of those classes with a head full of knowledge that I have actually retained. Ms. Thomas is extremely personable, caring and understanding."


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    Plymale to speak at Marshall Community College graduation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - State Senator Robert H. "Bob" Plymale will be the featured speaker at the Marshall Community and Technical College's graduation ceremony Friday, May 7. The 7 p.m. ceremony will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Plymale graduated from Marshall University and currently directs the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) in Huntington. RTI and Marshall Community and Technical College have partnered to provide transportation-related training in the areas of rail and waterways.

    Plymale was first elected in 1992 and currently is serving his third four-year term in the West Virginia Senate, where he also is chair of the Senate Education Committee. In that position, he has focused on strengthening the role of community colleges as a force in economic development.


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    Leslie Nielsen to Appear at Marshall Fundraiser April 24

    Internationally recognized movie and television star Leslie Nielsen will appear at a benefit dinner for Marshall University's theatre program Saturday, April 24 beginning at 5:30 p.m. before the Marshall Theatre's production of "To Kill a Mockingbird."

    "Leslie Nielsen is a great new friend for Marshall University," said Marshall president Dan Angel. "We are grateful for the time he is giving to our theatre students and program."

    Tickets for the event are $75 per person and may be reserved by calling Marshall's College of Fine Arts at 696-6433. The cost includes a reception, dinner, and a short presentation by Nielsen. Complimentary tickets to the theatre performance are also available to dinner attendees.

    A veteran of more than 100 motion pictures and more than 1500 television appearances, Nielsen turned his image inside out with a deadpan performance as the loopy doctor in the comic hit movie, "Airplane!" He also appeared on the TV series "Police Squad!" on which he originated the role of police Lt. Frank Drebin, which he recreated in Paramount Pictures release, "The Naked Gun," and in the sequels, "Naked Gun 2 1/2" and "Naked Gun 33 1/3: The Final Insult."

    Earlier in the day on April 24th, Nielsen will work with students and answer their questions in a format similar to the Bravo cable television network's series, "From the Actors Studio," in which a television or movie personality is interviewed and answers questions from acting students. At Marshall, Nielsen will be interviewed by Brandon McCoy, a senior theatre major from Wayne County, West Virginia.

    "As a student looking toward a career in show business, I appreciate the chance to work with and learn from a legendary performer," McCoy said.

    Further information on the dinner event is available by calling the Marshall College of Fine Arts at (304) 696-6433.


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    'Take Back the Night' rally planned for April 29 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Women's Center and Women's Studies plan to "Take Back the Night" Thursday, April 29. The sixth-annual event, which honors survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, rape, abuse and incest, takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

    "Take Back the Night" is an international rally and march organized in local communities to unify women, men and children against violence. "Take Back the Night" rallies and marches began in England to protest the fear that women encountered walking the streets at night.

    This year's events begins with a "Take Back the Night" information table at the Student Activities Programming Board's swap meet at the Memorial Student Center, from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    A rally to inform students about "Take Back the Night" takes place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Buskirk Field. A table fair will run from 4:30 to 8 p.m. at the Memorial Student Center.

    "Take Back the Night" continues with music starting at 5 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center Plaza. It lasts throughout the evening with speakers and "survivor time," which allows survivors of sexual assault, rape and domestic violence to share their experiences as part of the healing process.

    The evening concludes with a candlelight vigil at 8 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center Plaza.

    For more information, persons may contact the Marshall University Women's Center or Lorrie Burger at (304) 696-1713.


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    Marshall students invited to Spring Fling 2004 at Harless Dining Hall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - All Marshall University students are invited to celebrate spring and the end of the 2003-04 school year at a cookout and picnic Wednesday, April 21, at the Harless Dining Hall.

    The Marshall University Alumni Association and Marshall Dining Services are among the sponsors of Spring Fling 2004, which runs from 4 to 7 p.m. Students may use their meal plan, or pay $6.25, to eat during the event.

    Free popcorn and snow cones will be available, drawings for prizes will take place, and the group Texas Toney will provide music. Students must be present to claim their prizes.

    Spring Fling 2004 takes place on the Harless Dining Hall lawn, weather permitting. In case of rain, the event will be moved inside the dining hall.

    Other sponsors are A-Z Rental, George Smith, the Hatfield family, Marshall Bookstore, Pepsi Bottling Group, Stadium Bookstore, Marshall's Student Government Association, West Virginia Wireless and Wooten-Willis Insurance.

    For more information, persons may call (304) 696-3134.


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    Early Education Center's annual Art Show and Auction is April 21-24 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington residents can get a glimpse into the area's budding minds at Marshall University Early Education Center's annual Art Show and Auction, which is set for Wednesday through Saturday, April 21-24, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    The second floor of the Center will feature more than 30 paintings by children enrolled in Marshall University's laboratory preschool program. Inspiration for works comes from learning experiences the Early Education Center establishes to meet the needs of all children. Many of the canvas pieces reflect projects the children have completed over the past year related to Appalachia and transportation.

    "The success of the first Art Show and Auction has generated excitement among the campus community about what art truly is for young children," Clayton Burch, director of the center, said. "The families and staff of the Early Education Center place tremendous value on the arts to enhance child development. Children are always seeking an outlet for expression and the addition of canvases has been instrumental to art appreciation."

    Last year the art show raised more than $1,000 for the center. The money is used to purchase materials for the hands-on projects the children conduct. These projects included the construction of a child-size house, raising Ohio River fish, the care of baby West Virginia rat snakes and an exploration of local dining.

    Also, children have conducted in-depth investigations of local infrastructure and inter-modal transportation such as the relationship between bridges, rivers and highways with trucks, trains and barges.

    Community-related projects can be previewed at the center's Web site at www.marshall.edu/coehs/mueec

    The art show begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 21. At that time, attendees may view the artwork and begin placing silent bids on individual pieces. An open house will run from 1 to 3 p.m. April 21-22 to accommodate Marshall University faculty, staff and students.

    The grand finale viewing will be from 4 to 6 p.m. April 24. At that time, the highest bidders will be announced and they will receive their paintings. A trio of jazz musicians from Marshall's department of Music is tentatively scheduled to perform during the grand finale. Also, light refreshments and hors d'oeuvres will be provided.

    For more information, persons may contact Zak Richards with the Early Education Center at (304) 696-6301.


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    COLA Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference is Tuesday, April 20 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's fourth annual College of Liberal Arts Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference is scheduled from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Tuesday, April 20 in the Memorial Student Center and the Drinko Library.

    Registration will run from 7:30 a.m. to noon at the MSC entrance. Posters will be on display on the main level of the student center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    Dozens of student presentations, including the posters, will be on display throughout the day. Students will deliver papers, exhibit posters, or present their creative works in a series of concurrent panels.

    "The purpose of the conference is to showcase the academic and creative talents of our students," said Dr. David L. Kenley, a faculty member in the history department and conference co-director. "We hope the conference will be an intellectually stimulating experience that brings together the university community, parents, friends, alumni, and employers."

    This year more than 100 students will participate in the conference as presenters and panel chairs.

    "Each of the presenters is working with a faculty mentor to ensure the quality of their research and work," Kenley said.

    The keynote speaker is Dr. Les Standiford, Director of the Creative Writing Program at Florida International University. His presentation, "The Man Who Invented Florida: Revisiting the Concept of Robber Baron," will be delivered at 11 a.m. in the Shawkey Lounge of Memorial Student Center.

    "Last year's Liberal Arts Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference demonstrated in a clear and convincing way that undergraduates at Marshall University are heavily involved in exciting and valuable research," said Dr. Sarah Denman, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. "The students involved in this year's conference, and their faculty mentors, are to be congratulated for carrying on what I hope will be a long and satisfying tradition."

    Dr. Christina Murphy, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, said, "The range of ideas, topics and disciplines represented in this conference is broad and also is indicative of the scope of the Liberal Arts at Marshall University."

    And, Denman added, "It is clear that the work done by students reflects the influence of faculty members who are firmly committed to undergraduate research. This conference is thus a demonstration of the links between teaching and research."


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    Congressman Rahall to speak at Marshall commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - United States Congressman Nick Joe Rahall, II will be the keynote speaker for Marshall University's spring commencement. The university's 167th graduation exercise is set for 10 a.m. Saturday, May 8 at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Well known for his expertise in national policies relating to transportation, infrastructure, energy and the environment, Rahall has been a tireless fighter for the people of southern West Virginia. First elected in 1976, he currently is serving his 14th term and is the dean of the West Virginia Delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives.

    "Through his leadership in Washington, Congressman Rahall has been instrumental in positioning Marshall University as a national transportation research leader," MU President Dan Angel said. "His contributions to the betterment of Marshall University have helped to broaden the focus and scope of our academic and research efforts. We look forward to welcoming him home to the Marshall University community for this commencement address."

    In the area of transportation and infrastructure, Rahall is a national leader in the development of federal highway and transit legislation. A veteran of every federal highway bill since coming to Congress, Rahall was a key architect in the formulation of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (known as TEA 21).

    In that bill, he secured more dollars for designated highway projects than any other member of Congress and established the Rahall Transportation Institute (RTI), a consortium of five Southern West Virginia colleges, based at Marshall.

    Recently, Rahall helped RTI win designation as a National Maritime Enhancement Institute to enable the school to compete for federal grants related to a great number of maritime activities. This is one of only seven so-named universities in the nation, further advancing RTI's mission of "Building Jobs through Transportation" for West Virginia.

    Two weeks ago, Congressman Rahall accompanied U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta to Marshall's Huntington campus for a first-hand look at the research work being conducted at RTI.

    Numerous state and national organizations have recognized Congressman Rahall for his long record of outstanding and distinguished public service. A diverse group of organizations such as the Citizen's Coal Council, American Federation of Government Employees of West Virginia, Friends of the Earth, Sierra Club, American Road & Transportation Builders Association and the National Association of Home Care have recognized Rahall for his congressional efforts.


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    Kerkian named Executive Director of Marshall Foundation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Foundation, Inc. President Jay White and Marshall President Dan Angel today announced two significant moves regarding the future of the MU Foundation.

    First, Glen R. Kerkian, a veteran development leader at Ohio University the past 18 years, has been named Executive Director of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., effective June 1.

    Second, by virtue of a new relationship between the Foundation and the university, Kerkian also will serve as Marshall's Senior Vice President for Development. The Foundation not only will manage financial gifts to the university, but also will be responsible for helping to secure new funds. The Foundation thus assumes responsibility for Marshall's Campaign for National Prominence.

    Kerkian has been Assistant Vice President for Development and Campaign Manager at Ohio since 1998.

    "We are gaining an experienced and successful person of high caliber," Angel said. "I'm extremely pleased. Glen will be a major, positive addition to the Foundation, the university and the community."

    The Foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt educational corporation that, before this new relationship, received, managed and administered gifts on behalf of Marshall University. Part of Kerkian's role will be to head up the university's Campaign for National Prominence, which has a goal of raising $100 million by December 2005. Thus far, more than $78 million has been raised since the Campaign began in 2001.

    Under Kerkian's leadership, the Foundation will adopt guidelines governing fundraising activities that conform with several objectives, including:

    • Managing and directing the day-to-day operation of the Development staff, and establishing annual productivity targets for fundraising as a basis for annual evaluations for university and Foundation staff;
    • Integrating the university's fundraising expectations into weekly planning for the academic colleges, athletics and other related units;
    • Coordinating with the university's communication and marketing efforts;
    • Oversight of the university's alumni relations operation, via Vice President Lance West.

    As Campaign Manager in Ohio's Office of Development, Kerkian has played an integral role in the university's Bicentennial Campaign, the largest fund-raising effort in the institution's history. Targeted for completion later this year, the $200 million campaign will provide money for scholarships, endowed professorships, technological enhancements, innovative programs and capital improvements at Ohio.

    "Glen Kerkian's credentials are just what our search committee sought," said Vince Manzi, former president of the Marshall Foundation and chair of the search committee. "He has an excellent background in higher education and thoroughly comprehends the direction that a university like Marshall is destined to go."

    Throughout the course of the Campaign, Kerkian's duties as Assistant Vice President for Development and Campaign Manager at Ohio included:

    • Campaign planning for 33 development colleagues including production targets for four Directors of Development;
    • Recruitment and training of a 35-person volunteer campaign cabinet;
    • Formulating of strategies and measurement for attainment of $20-$40 million annually in charitable gifts;
    • Coordinating and staffing all leadership gift level visits for the President of the university and the Vice President for University Advancement.

    "With our proximity to Huntington, I have observed and admired the intensity that the Marshall community has for its University," Kerkian said. "I can't wait to become a champion for all the positive things that are happening here. This move just feels right for me.

    "I have been charmed by the good will of President Angel, the selfless dedication of both the Board of Governors Chair Mike Perry and Foundation Board Chair Jay White, as well as Vince Manzi and other members of the search committee. Starting with this team is a great formula to build on the successes already achieved at Marshall.

    "Educating adults is something we do better than anyone in the world. I am convinced that securing resources for higher education is of the utmost priority in this region and nationally. This is where I get my motivation and what keeps this work so fresh for me."

    At Ohio, Kerkian also has been an adjunct instructor in the College of Health and Human Services since 1994. He previously has served as Director of Development for Major Gifts and College Programs, Assistant Dean for Development, College of Communication, and Assistant Director, Office of Alumni Relations.

    "I'm very excited about the prospects of a united vision this individual's going to bring to the job," White said. "We like his enthusiasm and his passion for the job, and the fact that he's been with his previous institution for 18 years exhibits dedication to an institution and to a cause."

    Kerkian and his wife, Susan, live in Athens, Ohio, where she teaches kindergarten at West Elementary. They are the parents of one grown daughter, Annie.


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    Contact: Josh Ferguson, Co-Director LGBT Outreach, (304) 696-6623

    International recording artist and lecturer Skott Freedman to speak and perform at Marshall University Friday, April 16

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - International recording artist and lecturer Skott Freedman will perform and present a lecture entitled "Battling Bi-Phobia and Bringing Bisexuals Back to Both Communities" on Friday, April 16, 2004 at Marshall University.

    The lecture and performance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge of the Memorial Student Center. The event is sponsored by the Marshall University Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Outreach Office and Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs, and is free to the public.

    "We feel that Skott Freedman will be both informative and entertaining," said Josh Ferguson, co-director of the LGBT Outreach Office. "He combines his singing and performance on the piano with an interesting and important message concerning inclusion of bisexuals in both the heterosexual and homosexual communities. They often face ridicule and being outcasts from both communities and it's time to start learning more about acceptance."

    The event is designed to both entertain and educate the community surrounding issues of bisexuality. For more information about Freedman and his performance, persons may call the Marshall LGBT Outreach office at (304) 696-6623 or visit Freedman's Web site at http://www.skottfreedman.com


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    Ten elected to serve on MUAA Board of Directors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ten people were elected to the Marshall University Alumni Association Board of Directors in the organization's recent election.

    The new members, listed in alphabetical order, are: Suzanne Lynch Dickens, Roger S. Dyer, Olive Blankenship Hager, C. Jay O'Dell, Deborah England Prestera, Natalie Ray, Sam Stanley, Jack C. Trainor, Janis Winkfield and Robert E. Yost.

    The Board of Directors now has 50 members, including 30 elected directors, four who were appointed by the MUAA and 16 university constituency representatives. Each of the newly elected members will serve a three-year term, beginning July 1, 2004.

    "We're delighted to have had such a wonderful response from our active Marshall University alumni regarding this year's election," said MUAA President Tom Harris. "We look forward to having these people be part of our leadership team."

    In addition to Harris as president, other officers for the 2004-05 year are: Nancy Campbell, first vice president; Dr. James Harless, second vice president; Mike Graybeal, treasurer; and Sharon Porter, secretary.


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    Marshall Chemistry student to participate in Posters on the Hill

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - T. David Harris II, a Marshall University senior from Poca, W.Va., will be in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, April 20 to participate in the annual "Undergraduate Research Posters on the Hill" event.

    Posters on the Hill, sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research, will be presented in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill. Harris is the first Marshall student chosen to take part in the event.

    Harris, a Chemistry major, is one of 60 undergraduate students from throughout the country selected to present posters regarding research. His is titled, "Synthesis of Molecular Magnets." He already has presented the poster several times, most recently last week at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in Anaheim, Calif.

    "The reaction seems to be positive. This work definitely has a lot of potential in the computer industry," Harris said. "It could make electronic storage devices more efficient."

    Harris learned of the Posters on the Hill event from his Chemistry advisory, Dr. Michael Castellani. He then submitted an abstract of his work, filled out an application and was chosen to participate.

    Harris and the other students will take part in an orientation session from 8 to 10 a.m., then have free time to visit with their Congressional Representatives and Senators. Posters will be displayed from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

    For more information or to reach Harris, persons may call Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


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    Regional historian to speak at Woodson fundraising banquet

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Henry Robert Burke, a regional historian from Marietta, Ohio, will be the keynote speaker at the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc. fundraising banquet Saturday, April 17.

    The 12th annual banquet will take place at 6 p.m. at Four Seasons, located at 905 3rd Ave. in Huntington. Burke has titled his speech, "You have gifts that can change others' lives. How do you choose to use them?"

    Burke grew up in Washington County, Ohio, where Marietta is the oldest organized settlement in the Northwest Territory under the United States government. His writings and lectures focus on African-American history and Native American history.

    Proceeds from the banquet will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

    The foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African-American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.

    A reception will precede the banquet. Music for the evening will be provided by Charles Johnson.

    Tickets for the banquet are available for a donation of $25. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at (304) 894-5772, or Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at (304) 736-1655.


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    Contact: Jan Parker, Graduate Dean's Office, (304) 696-2816

    Deadline Nears for Summer Graduate Tuition Waivers

    Applications for a limited number of graduate tuition waivers for Marshall University's summer terms will be accepted through Friday, April 9, 2004, in the Graduate Dean's Office, 113 Old Main, on the Huntington campus and by the students' academic area offices on the South Charleston campus.

    Priority consideration will be given to faculty and staff of the state's public and private colleges and universities and to West Virginia residents. A small number of waivers will be awarded to nonresident students.

    Academic merit, which will be determined using grade point average and scores on required graduate admissions examinations, will be the major consideration in awarding the waivers that cover tuition. Students who receive waivers are responsible for paying student center and activity fees and some department specific fees.

    Up to three hours of waiver for graduate course work will be awarded to qualified applicants.

    Students interested in being considered for a tuition waiver based on financial need criteria should contact the Graduate Dean's Office in Huntington or the Graduate Admissions Office in South Charleston.

    Students who previously held waivers must reapply to be considered for summer term waivers.

    Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by email. Huntington campus students may pick up approved waivers in 113 Old Main beginning Friday, April 23, 2004, and take them to the Bursar. Waivers not claimed by Monday, May 3, 2004, will be assigned to others qualified applicants.

    South Charleston campus students must be registered for summer classes by Monday, May 3, 2004, to receive the waivers and to have the payments posted to their accounts. Waivers for students who are not registered by May 3 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.


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    Wednesday April 7, 2004
    Contact: Lynne Mayer, , (304) 696-6214

    Ashes to Glory Scholarship established at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has established the Ashes to Glory Scholarship, financed through a percentage of the proceeds from the sale of the DVD "Ashes to Glory" donated by Witek and Novak Inc., and by a gift from AEP-West Virginia and its employees.

    The scholarship recipient will be a graduating high school senior who is a participant in the Upward Bound Program. He or she must have a minimum 3.0 high school GPA and a minimum ACT score of 20, and have exhibited leadership and community service involvement.

    The student will be selected by the director of the Upward Bound Program at Marshall University, in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance. The award will be applied to educational expenses and may be renewed for up to a total of four years pending satisfactory academic achievement.

    "Ashes to Glory," a two-hour documentary produced by the Huntington-based Witek and Novak Inc. and West Virginia Public Broadcasting, was released in November 2000 to coincide with the 30th anniversary of the Marshall University football team's plane crash.

    The documentary, which won several national awards and a regional Emmy Award, traces Marshall's football team and its fans through the tragedy of the plane crash, the difficulty of rebuilding and onto its present-day rise to national prominence in college football.

    The documentary is now available on VHS and DVD. For more information, check out the "Ashes to Glory" Web site at www.wvpubcast.org/ashestoglory. More information about the Ashes to Glory Scholarship and the Marshall University Scholarship Program may be obtained by calling (304) 696-6214.


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    Tuesday April 6, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    First HealthyHuntington.org Marathon set for Nov. 14 in Huntington; race to begin, end at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first HealthyHuntington.org Marathon will be staged in Huntington on Sunday, Nov. 14 of this year, race director Dr. Tom Dannals said today.

    The 26-mile, 385-yard race will start on 3rd Avenue near the overpass that connects Marshall University's parking garage and Cam Henderson Center, and it will end on James F. Edwards Field at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The race begins at 8 a.m.

    Dannals, a family practice physician, said additional events include a half-marathon (13.1 miles) walk and relays of two or three people. The event is sponsored by Huntington YMCA and Huntington Internal Medicine Group (HIMG).

    "The emphasis on the whole event is good health," said Dannals, who also is president of HealthyHuntington.org. "What matters is you and me, the average person. This is all about good health, whether you're running the marathon, doing the relay or walking. HealthyHuntington.org is dedicated to bringing the concept of good health to Huntington. I don't want 'HealthyHuntington' to be an oxymoron."

    Numerous other activities, such as a health and fitness expo at Cam Henderson Center, are planned in conjunction with the marathon. More details will be announced throughout the year.

    Entry fees are as follows:

    Marathon: $30 if entry forms are postmarked by Oct. 1, $35 if postmarked by Nov. 1, and $40 after Nov. 1;
    Marathon relay: $20 per runner if entry forms are postmarked by Nov. 1, $25 per runner after Nov. 1;
    Half-marathon walk: $20.

    Entry forms are available at www.HealthyHuntington.org, and www.active.com. The first 200 marathon runners to sign up will receive a fleece pullover, and all other runners and all walkers will receive a long-sleeve T-shirt. Marathon finishers also will receive a medal and a finish certificate. Marathoners must be 16 years of age on race day, or 10 years of age or older on race day to run the relay.

    Dannals said he is hoping at least 300 marathoners, 200 relay runners and 500 walkers to participate.

    "It should be a real quality event," Dannals said. "We already have all 16 of the water stops planned, and all are manned. We're going to take the runners to the best sites of the city - Central City, down by the Ohio River, Ritter Park - and then finish at the stadium. People already are starting to put it on their calendars."

    Dannals said the race will be certified by USA Track and Field to be 26 miles, 385 yards so that it can be used as a qualifier for the Boston Marathon.

    More information is available by clicking on www.HealthyHuntington.org, or by emailing Dannals at president@healthyhuntington.org.


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    Award-winning poet to read from his work at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet James Harms will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 15, in Memorial Student Center room 2W16 at Marshall University.

    Harms is the author of four collections of poems, most recently Freeways and Aqueducts from Carnegie-Mellon University Press. He also is the author of Quarters and The Joy Addict. His work has appeared in such journals as Poetry, Denver Quarterly, Kenyon Review, The Antioch Review, The American Poetry Review, and many others.

    Harms has been awarded the PEN/Revson Foundation Fellowship, as well as grants from the West Virginia and Pennsylvania Art Commissions. At West Virginia University he has been named a Benedum Distinguished Scholar, The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Teacher, The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Researcher, and The Carnegie Foundation/CASE United States Teacher of the Year for West Virginia. He directs the creative writing program in the Department of English at West Virginia University.

    Harms' appearance, which is free to the public, is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts. For more information, contact Art Stringer in the Marshall English department at (304) 696-2403.


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    Tri-State Psychology Conference Thursday at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 13th annual Tri-State Psychology Conference takes place on Marshall University's Huntington campus Thursday, April 8. All events will be in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center.

    Students in the Marshall chapter of Psi Chi - the national honor society in psychology - and the Psychology Club are organizing the conference.

    In addition to the two student groups, support for the conference is coming from faculty and staff of the department of psychology, the North American Association of Masters in Psychology (NAMP), and the College of Liberal Arts, according to Dr. Pamela Mulder, associate professor of psychology.

    Approximately 25 posters, addressing such topics as developmental psychology and clinical psychology, will be on display. The public is invited to view the posters and attend the presentations.

    "Twenty-five people attended the first Tri-State Conference 13 years ago and now we typically host more than 300 guests representing seven or eight colleges and universities in four states," Mulder said. "We have received recognition as a regional research conference which provides students with their first opportunity to participate fully in a professional setting."

    The schedule of events includes:

    9 a.m. - Welcoming remarks from Dr. Sarah Denman, Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    9 a.m. to noon - Poster sessions with approximately 40 students participating.

    1 to 2:30 p.m. - Keynote speaker Jim Livingood, a psychologist with the U.S. Navy, will speak on issues of importance to master's level psychologists, and he also will discuss careers in the military and in homeland security for psychologists.

    3 to 5 p.m. - Six oral presentations will be given.

    In addition to Marshall participants, faculty and staff members are expected to attend from West Virginia University, the University of Charleston, Mountain State University, Concord College, Frostburg State University (Maryland), Morehead State University (Kentucky), Somerset Community College and the University of Rio Grande (Ohio).

    Admission to the conference is free. To register, e-mail Mulder at mulder@marshall.edu.


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    Friday April 2, 2004
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    Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist, William Raspberry, speaks at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Washington Post columnist William Raspberry, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Commentary in 1994, will speak at Marshall University on Wednesday, April 7.

    Burnis R. Morris, the current Carter G. Woodson Professor at Marshall, is a friend of Raspberry's and arranged the visit. Raspberry's 8 p.m. speech, which is free to the public, will take place in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theater at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    While at Marshall, Raspberry will interact and work with students in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, according to Corley Dennison, the School's interim dean. Dennison said Raspberry's points of view regarding diversity and good journalism will be of interest to the students and the community.

    "We think it will be good for the students; they'll learn from his experience," Dennison said.

    Raspberry has been a Post columnist since 1966. His intellect and warmly personal writing style have attracted a legion of admiring readers to his commentary on social and political issues. "Reading Raspberry's column is like having a conversation with an intelligent friend," one newspaper editor says.

    Raspberry grew up in the small Mississippi town of Okolona, which he likens to the one in "To Kill a Mockingbird." "We had two of everything there," he remembers, "one for whites and one for blacks." He followed a pre-ministerial curriculum at Indiana Central College and graduated with a B.S. in history in 1960.

    His newspaper career began with a summer job at the Indianapolis Recorder in 1956. His duties there as reporter, photographer and editor inspired him to join The Washington Post in 1962, after serving two years in the Army. At The Post, he was hired as a teletype operator, and quickly advanced to general assignment reporter, copy editor and assistant city editor.

    His coverage of the 1965 Watts riot in Los Angeles earned him the Capital Press Club's "Journalist of the Year" award, and in 1967 he received a Citation of Merit in Journalism from Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo., for distinction in improving human relations.

    The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) gave Raspberry its 1994 Lifetime Achievement Award. "Raspberry's clarity of thought and his insistence on speaking the truth as he sees it - even when others disagree - have kept his column fresh, unpredictable and uncommonly wise," cited NABJ. "His work has won him ... the respect of readers all over America."

    Raspberry's column first ran in 1966 in the local section of The Post. In 1971, his column was moved to the paper's op-ed page. Raspberry continued to comment on issues of education, crime, justice, drug abuse and housing, but added a national dimension. Syndication by The Washington Post Writers Group began in 1977.

    Raspberry's commentary now appears in more than 100 newspapers. It often addresses the latest ideas and proposals for answers to social dilemmas: "I don't enjoy celebrating problems. I talk about problems with a view to inching toward solutions," he says.

    In 1997, Raspberry was named one of the top 50 most influential journalists in the national press corps by the Washingtonian magazine. Raspberry is among "but a handful of journalists (with) the power to introduce new ideas and give them currency," the magazine said. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Professional Journalists.

    Georgetown University, in honoring him with a doctoral degree in 1984, said Raspberry "has shown us what we are, but has also shown us what we might be." He has been awarded honorary doctorates by 25 educational institutions.

    Raspberry teaches at Duke University, serving in the Knight Chair in Communications and Journalism. He and his wife, Sondra, a teacher at Trinity College, reside in Washington, D.C. They have three children.

    Dennison said Raspberry's appearance at Marshall is sponsored by the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the Office of Multicultural Affairs and Provost Sarah Denman.


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    New Marshall Student Government Association leaders to be inaugurated April 6 at MU President's home

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Newly-elected Marshall University Student Government Association President Jennifer Marie Gaston and Vice President Joshua Dain Cassidy will be inaugurated in a ceremony Tuesday, April 6 at the home of President and Mrs. Dan Angel.

    The Angels' home is located at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington, and the event begins at 6 p.m.

    Gaston and Cassidy received 955 of 1,884 votes cast during the March 9-10 SGA election, easily outdistancing two other teams of challengers.


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    Thursday April 1, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Two MU parking lots, portion of 6th Avenue to be closed Friday during Bush visit

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will close two parking lots Friday in conjunction with President Bush's visit to campus.

    James E. Terry, Director of Public Safety at Marshall, said the employee and student lots located east and west of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center will be closed Friday. Also, 6th Avenue between Hal Greer Boulevard and 17th Street will be closed, beginning at 9 a.m.

    President Bush is scheduled to take part in a conversation on job training shortly before noon Friday at the performing arts center.


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    Tuesday March 30, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Second annual Marshall Academic Expo offers information, fun and prizes

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students can explore various career fields and opportunities during the second annual Marshall Academic Expo, Thursday, April 1 in the Don Morris Room at the Memorial Student Center.

    The 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. event is designed to encourage undecided students to choose a major, to assist students who wish to change a major, to inform students interested in graduate education opportunities, and to provide students with important information about their academic careers. Faculty representatives from the university's colleges and departments will be available to meet with students on an individual basis.

    In addition to academic displays and exhibits, representatives from several university departments will be on hand to share information with students, including the Drinko Library, Center for Academic Excellence, ROTC, tutoring center, computing services, career services, financial aid, student activities, student affairs and student support. Musical entertainment will be provided by the Irish band and African drumming classes from the Music Department of the College of Fine Arts.

    Free cotton candy, snow cones, peanuts and popcorn will be available for attendees, as well as refreshments. Several prize giveaways will be conducted, including seven (7) $100 credits for the Marshall University Points Card and a one semester book "loan" from the Marshall University Bookstore.

    For more information, contact Michelle Duncan, University College director, at (304) 696-7038, or Sarah Stough, Expo coordinator, at (304) 696-7039.


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    Monday March 29, 2004
    Contact: Dr. Chuck Bailey, WMUL-FM, (304) 696-2294

    WMUL-FM student broadcasters capture top honors at 2004 National Broadcasting Society conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, achieved a new level of national prominence during the recent National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho awards in Miami Beach, Fla., with Marshall student broadcasters earning 27 of the 45 awards in this year's competition.

    Student broadcasters from WMUL received 12 grand prize honors and 15 honorable mention awards during The National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 13th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 39th annual Audio/Video Production Awards, held March 13, 2004, at Miami's Sheraton Colony Square Hotel.

    "It is a tremendous accomplishment to win a dozen grand prizes out of the 19 total recognized in the audio scriptwriting, audio production, and overall Web site categories in the National Broadcasting Society's competition in a single year," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, associate professor of broadcasting in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

    "This is a dominating performance by our radio students. Winning speaks well for Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

    National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has a membership of more than 1,500 students and professionals with chapters on 86 college campuses. The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943 and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media. Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from NBS chapters.

    During the past decade, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communication and WMUL-FM have established a national reputation for excellence with an outstanding record of achievement in national competition. Since 1994, WMUL-FM student broadcasters have earned 119 National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho awards, including 64 grand prizes and 55 honorable mention awards.

    The grand prize award winning entries in scriptwriting were:

    • Audio Documentary Program Script: "Old Main: A Living Tradition," written by recent graduate Trent Garnes of Hurricane, W.Va.; and,
    • Audio Comedy Program Script: "Roosevelt Bias Christmas Spectacular," written by juniors Victor Imperi and Michael Valentine, both of Huntington.

    The grand prize award winning entries in production were:

    • Audio News Package: "Laura Bush visits the Mountain State," written and produced by senior Melanie P. Chapman of Stollings, W.Va.;
    • Audio Feature Package: "Stranger with a Camera," written and produced by Chapman;
    • Audio News Program: "5 p.m. edition of Newscenter 88, Sept. 29, 2002," anchored by graduate student Vince Payne of Hansford, W.Va., sophomore Emily Ingle of Barboursville, W.Va., and senior Jamie Dempsey of Lenore, W.Va, and produced by junior Kourtney Bess of Belle, W.Va.;
    • Audio Commercial/Promo/Public Service Announcement: "W-M-U-L Car Dealer," written and produced by sophomore Daniel Clay Stimeling of Buckhannon, W.Va.;
    • Audio Drama Program: "Dr. Love," written and produced by recent graduate Kevin Justus of Ashland, Ky.;
    • Audio News/Sports/Feature Program: "5 p.m. edition of Newscenter 88 (Sports segment), Nov. 5, 2003," anchored by junior Alex Reed of Virginia Beach, Va.;
    • Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program: "Sportsview, Marshall University Women's Basketball Team, Nov. 5, 2003," written and produced by Vince Payne;
    • Audio Sports Package: "Marshall Moves On, March 11, 2003," written and produced by Payne;
    • Audio Sports Program: "The Ring Is The Thing - The 2003 Marshall Football Season Preview," written and produced by Payne, Bess and Stimeling; and,
    • Audio Sports Play-by-Play Programming: "Marshall vs. Northern Illinois women's basketball, March 8, 2003." Announcers were graduate student Robert Harper of Hurricane, W.Va., and senior Travis Smith of Martinsburg, W.Va.

    The honorable mention award entry in scriptwriting was:

    • Audio Drama Program Script: "Dr. Love," written by Kevin Justus.

    The honorable mention award entries in production were:

    • Audio News Program: "5 p.m. edition of Newscenter 88, Sept. 22, 2002," anchored by Payne, Ingle, Dempsey, freshman Shane Irwin of Huntington, and produced by Bess;
    • Audio Public Affairs/Interview Program: "Campus Concern: Free Speech versus Morality," written and produced by Stimeling;
    • Audio Documentary Program: "Old Main: A Living Tradition," written and produced by Garnes, and "9/11: Where Are We Now?," written and produced by Stimeling;
    • Audio News/Sports/Feature Program: "5 p.m. edition of Newscenter 88 (Sports segment), Nov. 12, 2003," anchored by Payne with reporters Harper and Imperi;
    • Audio Sports Package: "Marshall Moves To Conference USA, Nov. 5, 2003," written and produced by Reed, and "Marshall University Volleyball Recap," written and produced by Payne and sophomore Jennifer Pierce of Louisville, Ky.;
    • Audio Sports Program: "The MAC Report, Sept. 12, 2003," written and produced by Reed, and "One More First: The 2003-04 Marshall Women's Basketball Preseason Special," written and produced by Harper, Smith, sophomore Jennifer Bailey of Mineral Wells, W.Va., and senior Efren Creamer of Charles Town, W.Va.;
    • Audio Sports Play-by-Play Programming: "Marshall vs. Tennessee football, Sept. 6, 2003," with announcers Payne, Smith and Reed, and "Marshall vs. Morehead State men's basketball,
    • Nov. 29, 2003," with announcers Payne, Harper and statisticians Baileys, Imperi and senior Scott Hall of Stephen City, Va.;
    • Audio Music/Variety/Special Program or Segment: "The Rat and the Duck," written and produced by Imperi;
    • Audio Comedy Program or Segment: "Unsolved Mysteries," and "Everybody Loves Nigel," both written and produced by Imperi and Valentine.

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    'To Kill a Mockingbird' runs April 21-24 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Christopher Sergel's "To Kill a Mockingbird," adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, will be presented next month by the Marshall University Theatre Department.

    "To Kill a Mockingbird," directed by Jack Cirillo, concerns a young girl's struggle to understand the people in a small town in Alabama during the 1930s. The struggle comes about because her father, Atticus Finch, is a lawyer who defends a wrongfully accused young African American man against a white prosecutor.

    The show runs at 8 p.m. daily Wednesday, April 21, through Saturday, April 24, in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Tickets go on sale at the Marshall University Theatre Box Office, located at the performing arts center, April 10, and are priced as follows:

    Marshall students and retired faculty, free
    Adults, $12
    Children, senior citizens and Marshall faculty and staff, $10
    Group rates also are available.

    For more information, call Clara Crisp, Program Assistant II in the Theatre Department, at (304) 696-7184. Or, call the box office at (304) 696-2787.


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    Award-winning actress Jane Alexander featured speaker at Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jane Alexander, an award-winning actress and former chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), will be the featured speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation Friday, April 2, at Marshall University.

    The event, which begins at 7 p.m. and is free to the public, is one of the highlights of the 10th annual John Deaver Drinko and Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Celebration of Academics, which takes place Thursday, April 1, Friday, April 2 and Sunday, April 4 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    The Honors Convocation is an awards and recognition ceremony for Marshall's outstanding honors students, and precedes Alexander's appearance.

    The Celebration of Academics begins at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 1 with the John Deaver Drinko Symposium, which also is free to the public. Dr. W. Edwin Bingham, Drinko Fellow, professor of music and director of jazz studies at Marshall, will be the guest speaker. His topic will be "Reflections from the Bridge: Observations of the Creative Process." A Marshall faculty member is featured each year during the Symposium.

    "This year, we are featuring and showcasing the faculty and the performing arts in our Symposium and Convocation," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the Drinko Academy. "I can think of no one better than Jane Alexander as our speaker at the Convocation."

    The Celebration of Academics concludes Sunday, April 4 with the premier of a documentary on Chief Justice John Marshall entitled John Marshall: Citizen, Statesman and Jurist. The hour-long film is a biography of Marshall University's namesake and was produced by the Drinko Academy at Marshall. It begins at 3:30 p.m. and is free to the public.

    Preceding the documentary at 2:30 p.m. is the 11th Scholarship Honor Reception, which recognizes donors and contact persons of private scholarships at Marshall, and those who have received their scholarships. The reception is in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    Alexander appeared in numerous stage, film and television productions in the 1960s, '70s and '80s. Among her most notable films were All the President's Men in 1976, Kramer vs. Kramer in 1979, and Glory in 1989. Her television credits include Eleanor and Franklin in 1976 and its sequel, Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years in 1977. She won an Emmy for Playing for Time in 1980.

    Overall, Alexander received six Tony, four Academy and five Emmy nominations.

    In 1993, while appearing on Broadway in "The Sisters Rosensweig," Alexander was nominated chairperson of the NEA, the federal agency that oversees public funding for the arts. She was confirmed without challenge by the U.S. Senate in September 1993, thus becoming the first actor to hold the position customarily given to administrators.

    Alexander toured the country to promote arts education. She organized Art 21: Art Reaches Into the 21st Century, a national conference on the arts and the role of artists in society, in April 1994. She resigned as chairperson of the NEA in 1997.

    "We're really delighted that someone of Jane Alexander's stature is coming to Marshall University," said College of Fine Arts dean Don Van Horn. "We look forward to any opportunity there might be for our students to interact with her. She obviously has a strong voice in the arts and arts education. Having her come here means a lot to the College of Fine Arts."

    Here is the schedule of events the public is invited to attend during the Celebration of Academics:

    Thursday, April 1

    2 p.m., The John Deaver Drinko Symposium, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Dr. W. Edwin Bingham, Marshall University professor of music, speaks on the topic, "Reflections from the Bridge: Observations of the Creative Process." A reception follows.

    Friday, April 2

    7 p.m., The Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Jane Alexander, award-winning actress and former chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts, speaks on the topic, "Arts and Minds." A reception follows.

    Sunday, April 4

    3:30 p.m., premiere of the documentary, "John Marshall: Citizen, Statesman and Jurist," Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.


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    Friday March 19, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Spring Jobs Fest at Marshall attracts more than 60 employers

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 60 employers are expected to participate in the annual Spring Jobs Fest Wednesday, April 7 in Marshall University's Don Morris Room.

    The fair is scheduled from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and is open to all Marshall students and alumni, regardless of major.

    "This is an excellent opportunity to meet with a large number of organizations about entry-level and career positions, as well as summer, intern and part-time opportunities," said Patricia G. Gallagher, recruiting coordinator with Marshall's Career Services Center.

    Among the employers participating are BB&T, Bureau of the Public Debt, Cedar Point Amusement Park, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, PAX TV, Pepsi, Rite Aid Corp., and the West Virginia Division of Personnel.

    Gallagher said pre-registration is not required, but participants are advised to dress professionally and bring plenty of resumes. The complete list of participants is available by contacting Gallagher at (304) 696-2371, or by visiting the Career Services Center Web site at www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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    Thursday March 18, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Mom's Turn to Learn' Arrives Monday, March 29

    Women who want to start or return to college are invited to a program offered by Marshall University March 29, according to Dr. Susan Jackson, professor of art and coordinator of the women's studies program at the university. "Mom's Turn to Learn" is offered free of charge.

     "We've put together the essentials for women who want to get started on a degree from Marshall," Jackson said. "They can get information on admissions and financial aid, get a tour of the Huntington campus and the Drinko Library, and perhaps even sit in on a class or two."

    Participants can select from a morning session, beginning at 9 a.m. and including lunch at 12:30 p.m., or an evening session, beginning at 5:30 p.m. with dinner. Campus tours and class visits will take place in the afternoon for attenders of either session.

    Rebecca Coffman, now a student at Marshall, participated in the program last year. "Going to Mom's Turn to Learn last year made going back to school a lot easier," she said. "People like Taella Hill made me realize that I could do it, and she has been willing to help me with anything I have a problem with or don't understand."

    Jennifer Reynolds echoed those sentiments. "I had the desire to return to school; however I was apprehensive because I didn't know where to get started. I had been out of college for nine years and knew that things had changed. The Mom's Turn to Learn seminar gave me all the information and support I needed to make coming back to school happen . . . Everyone involved understood the help that I needed."

    The full schedule for the day is as follows:

    Morning Session:

    - 9-10 a.m. - Memorial Student Center - pick up parking permit, register, coffee and snacks

    - 10-11 a.m. - Formal information program on admissions and financial aid

    - 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Informal question-and-answer session with past and present nontraditional students

    - 12:30 p.m. - Lunch provided

    Optional Afternoon Activities:

    - 2-5 p.m. - Campus and library tours, class visits, etc.

    Evening Session:

    - 5:30-6:30 p.m. - Pick up parking permit, register, dinner provided at Holderby cafeteria

    - 6:30-7 p.m. - Mini tour of campus

    - 7-8 p.m. - Formal information program on admissions and financial aid

    - 8 p.m. - Informal question-and-answer session with past and present nontraditional students

    Persons who want more information on the session may contact the Marshall Women's Studies office by phone at (304) 696-3643, or by e-mail at womenstudies@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday March 18, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Visiting scientists to take part in mini-symposium at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting scientists from several institutions will take part in a mini-symposium, Frontiers in Life Science: From DNA to Organism, on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, March 29 beginning at 10 a.m. in room 402 of the Drinko Library.

    The symposium is part of the Visiting Scientist Seminar Series in which research-based faculty recruit established mentors to come to Marshall to present areas of their work. It is being organized by Marshall's department of Biological Sciences and is sponsored by the National Science Foundation's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and the Yeager Scholars program. The presentations are open to the public.

    The symposium will promote the use of research as an essential tool for education at Marshall, according to Dr. Philippe Georgel, assistant professor of Biological Sciences.

    "We have had the privilege of getting internationally recognized scientists to accept our invitation," Georgel said. "The topics covered during the various seminars will broadly reflect the interests of the various Biological Sciences hosts. The participants will present cutting-edge investigation on molecular and cell biology, genetics, and physiology."

    The schedule of presenters and their institutions includes:

    10 a.m. - Dr. Richard Niles, Retinoid Nuclear Receptors, Marshall University School of Medicine

    11 a.m. - Dr. Laurinda Jaffe, Signal Transduction, University of Connecticut Health Center

    2 p.m. - Dr. Donald Thomason, "MAPK-dependent solute transport in mammalian skeletal muscle," University of Tennessee Memphis

    3 p.m. - Dr. Paul Adler, "Planar Polarity in the Drosophila Wing," University of Virginia

    4 p.m. - Dr. Ken van Holde, "Chromatin Modeling and Remodeling," Oregon State University


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    Friday March 12, 2004
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    Governor's Summit on Alcohol Use in Higher Education planned for April 5 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Governor's Summit on Alcohol Use in Higher Education will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, April 5 in Marshall University's Memorial Student Center. Registration is at 8 a.m.

    Representatives from West Virginia Alcohol Beverage Control, Governor's Highway Traffic Safety, the Prevention Resource Network and campuses and campus communities from around the state will participate in the summit.

    The annual summit began last year as a way for colleges around the state and the Alcohol Beverage Control Administration to discuss ways to reduce high risk drinking on college campuses and in their communities.

    "It is a great opportunity for campuses and their communities to come together and learn about effective strategies for a variety of alcohol abuse issues," Carla Lapelle, associate dean of student affairs, said.

    "We want to get together and discuss ways for campuses to reduce alcohol abuse," said Amy Saunders with MU student health education programs.

    Those interested in registering to attend may contact Saunders at (304) 696-4800. The event is free and lunch will be provided. Free parking also will be provided in Marshall's parking garage located across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center.

    "We encourage students and anyone in the Huntington area who is interested in substance abuse prevention to attend," Lapelle said.

    Program highlights for the summit include:

    Keynote Presentation: Wanna Keep Your Right Mind? EVALUATE!
    Betty Straub, Evaluator, Developer, and Grant reviewer for U.S. Department of Education.

    Building Prevention Partnerships to Address the Consequences of High-Risk Drinking in Fraternities and Sororities
    Geof Brown, North American Interfraternity Conference

    Building and Sustaining Campus Coalitions for Environmental Change
    Jerry Anderson, The Educational Development's Center for College Health and Safety

    Incorporating Evidence-Based Approaches into Your Current Prevention Efforts
    Jerry Anderson, The Educational Development's Center for College Health and Safety

    Impacting Underage Alcohol Use Through Prevention "You have a voice; make it heard."
    Kelli Jo McNemar, Director, Underage Drinking and Social Marketing, West Virginia Prevention Resource Network

    DUI Treatment and the College Student
    Gerry Schmidt, Chief Operations Officer at Valley HealthCare System

    Facilitating Individual Pathways to Harm Reduction and Risk Prevention
    Mike Kuba, Director of Counseling at WV Wesleyan

    The Medical Model for Higher Education Groups
    John Spraggins, Director of the WVU Student Assistance Program

    Law Enforcement's Prevention Efforts: Two Programs that are Making a Difference Chief Jim Terry, Scott Balou, Angela Howell, Marshall University Police Department

    Alcohol Beverage Laws, Rules, and Regulations
    Dallas Staples, Director of Enforcement, WVABCA
    Bill Adkins, Enforcement Duty, WVABCA

    Sexual Assault and Alcohol Abuse: How Close is the Connection?
    Deborah Strouse, WVU Sexual Assault Prevention Educator and Resource Coordinator

    Screening and Brief Intervention for Alcohol Problems among College Students Treated at the WVU Hospital Emergency Department
    Arshadul Haque, Research Instructor at the Center for Rural Emergency Medicine

    "Fact or Fiction" - An Interactive Peer Education Program
    Robin Tabor, West Virginia State Mental Health Counselor
    and the Peer Educators at West Virginia State

    Students Speak
    Facilitated by Robin Tabor from West Virginia State

    Using Evaluation to Improve Programs
    Betty Straub, Evaluator, Developer, and Grant reviewer for U.S. Department of Education

    Evaluating Peer Education and Other "Ineffective" Tier IV Programs
    Betty Straub, Evaluator, Developer, and Grant reviewer for U.S. Department of Education


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    Wednesday March 10, 2004
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    Marshall University dedicates Harless Dining Hall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Businessman and philanthropist James H. "Buck" Harless of Gilbert, W.Va., today joined Marshall University President Dan Angel and the institution's Board of Governors in dedicating the Harless Dining Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

    Harless, Chairman of the Board of International Industries, Inc., in Gilbert, took a tour of the 19,000 square-foot facility and had lunch in the building that honors him for his significant contributions to and longtime support of academics and athletics at Marshall. He then joined in a ribbon cutting, signifying the opening of the dining hall.

    "We are honored to celebrate the many important contributions of a true friend of Marshall University in Buck Harless," Angel said. "Buck has contributed his time, money and expertise to this institution for many years. We could never fully express our appreciation of the Harless family for the many ways they have supported the growth of Marshall University."

    The Board of Governors conducted its regularly scheduled meeting today, beginning at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in downtown Huntington, and concluding in the dining hall's Ed Grose Suite.

    The dining hall, which opened for business in January, is part of a $40 million project that included a 1,000-space parking garage and the first new on-campus housing in more than 30 years. The four residence halls opened last fall. Total cost of the housing/dining facility was $28 million.

    The dining hall is a single story steel frame and masonry structure that features a 24-foot tall, green tinted glass curtain wall overlooking the pedestrian terrace. Food service provides for seven individual stations of varying food types. The main dining area seats about 350 people, and the Ed Grose suite can seat about 75 for a lecture, or about 50 for a banquet.

    A Logan County, W.Va., native, Harless started his career as a miner at Red Jacket Coal Co. after graduating from high school. He later gave up mining to become a part-owner and manager of a sawmill. Through smart investments, he became a major entrepreneur with significant holdings in mining, timber and manufacturing.

    Harless was one of the first contributors to Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars, and he also endowed the B.C. McGinnis Jr. Scholarship Fund for students from 11 southern West Virginia counties. The Buck Harless Student Athlete Program, supported by Harless' financial contributions, provides numerous support services to student-athletes.

    In 1999, Harless and his late wife, June, opened the Larry Joe Harless Community Center in Gilbert. The center, named for their late son, houses a regional learning center and electronic branch of Marshall's Drinko Library.

    The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development, located on Marshall's campus, was named for Harless' late wife.

    Throughout his career, Harless has won many prestigious awards and been honored many times. Among the awards are six honorary doctor's degrees, including one from Marshall University in 1979 that recognized his involvement in programs to improve health care for people of southern West Virginia.

    Some of Harless' other honors include: Coal Man of the Year in 1976, West Virginian of the Year in 1983, Lifetime Achievement Entrepreneur of the Year in 1993, induction into the Marshall University Business Hall of Fame in 1994, and Public Citizen of the Year by the West Virginia Bar Association in 1998.


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    Wednesday March 3, 2004
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    Marshall Psychology Clinic to conduct smoking reduction clinic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Psychology Clinic will conduct a smoking reduction clinic March 11 through April 29. Agnes Hornich, a doctoral-level graduate student, will conduct the sessions.

    The sessions run from 7:30 to 9 p.m. every Thursday, except for the week of spring break (March 14-21), in Harris Hall, Room 449. Persons may register by calling (304) 696-2772 and leaving a message for Hornich (option 2).

    The clinic will address such issues as strategies for maintaining a long-term healthy life and strategies to cope with relapse, because many people who have quit smoking experience several periods of relapse before reaching their goal. An emphasis also will be placed on setting up an environment for success.

    The clinic also will teach a variety of skill-building techniques since many individuals smoke in order to make up for lack of skills in other areas. These skills include: effective stress reduction, thought challenging, communication skills training, social skills building and assertiveness training.

    "Typically, individuals do not risk their health by smoking for no reason," said Dr. Keith Beard, director of the Psychology Clinic. "Individuals are more likely to become successful in their reduction of smoking if they learn how to get the needs met by smoking satisfied through healthier strategies."

    Beard said the smoking cessation clinic is being offered in a timely manner. "Since the Department of Health recently banned smoking in numerous public places, it is suspected that many people who have been smoking will now have one more reason to stop," Beard said.

    Hornich said a group setting is a great way to help people with the skills needed to stop smoking.

    "Social support significantly increases the chances of successful smoking cessation or reduction," Hornich said. "This type of group therapy is ideal for individuals who may have struggled to quit smoking alone."

    Anyone interested in attending the clinic must register by Monday, March 8. The clinic's one-time fee of $10 will be refunded to those who attend all sessions.


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    Wednesday March 3, 2004
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    Author Elsa Barkley Brown to speak as part of Marshall's celebration of Women's History Month

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Scholar and author Elsa Barkley Brown will give a presentation March 11 as part of the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies.

    The lecture, entitled "What's Class Got to Do with It? Inserting Labor into a History of Black Women's Social and Political Activism," will take place at 7 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center at Marshall University.

    The Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies, sponsored by the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, is part of Marshall University's celebration of Women's History Month.

    Brown is associate professor of history and women's studies and an affiliate of Afro-American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is co-editor (with Thomas C. Holt) of the two-volume Major Problems in African-American History (2000) and (with Darlene Clark Hine and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn) the two-volume Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia (1993).

    Professor Barkley Brown's articles have appeared in Signs, Feminist Studies, History Workshop, Sage, Public Culture, and The Journal of Urban History. She twice has been awarded the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Publication Prize for the best article in African-American Women's History.

    She also has won the A. Elizabeth Taylor Prize for best article in southern women's history, the Martin Luther King Jr. Prize for best article in African-American History, and the Anna Julia Cooper Award for Distinguished Scholarship in Black Women's Studies. A past president of the Southern Association for Women Historians, Professor Barkley Brown currently serves on the Executive Committee and Council of the American Studies Association.


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    Tuesday March 2, 2004
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    Construction on Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center begins Tuesday, March 9; parking areas will be affected

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Construction on Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, expected to take about 30 months, begins on Tuesday, March 9.

    The science center will be located west of Marshall's new parking garage, on the north side of 3rd Avenue, directly across from the Science Building. Construction means several changes affecting parking areas on 3rd Avenue will be made.

    The changes are:

    The Student Parking lots located between 17th Street and 18th Street will be closed permanently, beginning the weekend of March 6-7. Students who normally park on the 3rd Avenue lots will need to utilize the stadium parking lot or other available student lots.
    The employee lot located between Elm Street and 17th Street will be sectioned in half to be used for construction staging. Entry will only be available from the Elm Street side of this lot. A new traffic pattern will be established for Monday, March 8. Once construction is complete, the full employee lot between Elm Street and 17th Street will again be available for employee parking.
    The parking meters on both employee lots located on 3rd Avenue will be removed so displaced employees from the lot used for construction staging will have available parking. The meters will be re-installed once construction is complete.

    James E. Terry, Director of Public Safety at Marshall, said police officers will be on site to assist with the changes.

    "Planning for this construction project has been ongoing since the fall in an effort to minimize inconvenience to our employees and students," Terry said.


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    Monday March 1, 2004
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    MU and West Virginia Wireless Partner To Expand Technology Initiative

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and its wireless partner, West Virginia Wireless, today announced a campus-wide expansion of Marshall's Mobile Alternative for Residents on Campus (MARC) wireless initiative. Upon completion of the expansion project, Marshall will become one of the first major universities in the nation to provide wireless telephone services to all of its student residents.

    The expansion builds on the success of a nationally recognized pilot project that has provided 500 wireless phones and service to students residing in the newly constructed Gibson, Haymaker, Wellman and Willis Halls. Started in the Fall of 2003, the project eliminated the need for traditional "landline" phones in the Marshall Commons housing complex; thereby, providing students with a portable, flexible telecommunications alternative.

    Work will begin this summer to expand this same wireless service to Buskirk, Hodges, Holderby and Laidley Halls for the Fall 2004 semester. This will add approximately 750 additional students to this program. The completion of MARC's second phase will leave only two resident halls - Twin Towers - remaining with traditional landline telephone service for residents. The MARC initiative will be completed campus-wide with expansion of wireless service to an additional 1,000 students residing in Twin Towers prior to the Fall 2005 semester.

    "Today's announcement brings another 'MARC' of distinction and National Prominence for Marshall University. This project demonstrates a bold, strategic technology step for the institution and its students while providing more personal security, connectivity and peace of mind to parents and friends reaching students when they're away from their dormitories," said Marshall President Dan Angel. "We're pleased to be partnering with West Virginia Wireless as national leaders in this transition to a wireless residential campus."

    Marshall University has received nearly 100 inquiries from higher education institutions from throughout the nation about this successful project, including inquires from national technology leader M.I.T. The success of this program is part of a number of key technology initiatives at Marshall that are providing national prominence to the university as a leader in the use of technology applications and technology innovations.

    "West Virginia Wireless is proud to be a partner with Marshall University in this nationally recognized technology project," said Dennis Bloss, West Virginia Wireless General Manager. "The success of this project showcases how our company's leading-edge GSM technology and our local customer service adds value to our customers - whether they are large or small."

    About West Virginia Wireless

    West Virginia Wireless was established in 2002 to provide residents in West Virginia with reliable wireless service and superior customer service. The company provides wireless service in the greater Charleston, Huntington and Ashland areas utilizing GSM, the world's leading wireless technology, and will expand coverage to the Beckley and Bluefield markets in the coming months. West Virginia Wireless offers uncomplicated service plans designed to enhance the unique lifestyle of each customer. For more information about West Virginia Wireless, visit www.westvirginiawireless.com.


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    Thursday February 26, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Authors of 'Red, White, Black & Blue' at Marshall March 2

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charleston natives and authors William M. Drennen Jr. and Kojo (William T.) Jones Jr. will visit Marshall University at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 2.

    The authors will be at the Marshall University Bookstore, which is located on 5th Avenue and John Marshall Drive, to discuss and sign their new book, "Red, White, Black & Blue."

    Both men grew up in the South Hills section of Charleston, but lived with one key difference. Drennen's parents were white and wealthy and Jones was born into a middle-class black family.

    In 1992, Drennen and Jones decided to work together on a memoir of "growing up through the turmoil and anguish of desegregation." Their goal for the book was to foster an understanding between their distinct lifestyles both for themselves and for future generations.

    In telling the stories of their Appalachian upbringings in homes less than a mile apart and their uses of the English language, they share memories and common meanings. The book reveals significant cultural connotations that transform standard American English into two different languages, which renders interracial communication problems.

    The memoir was edited by Dolores M. Johnson, professor of English at Marshall.

    For more information on the authors' visit to Marshall, persons may contact Joe Vance, operations manager of the Marshall Bookstore, at (304) 696-3622.


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    Wednesday February 25, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    City attorney to speak at Marshall's Diversity Breakfast

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Herbert Henderson, a Huntington attorney and social and civil rights activist, will be the guest speaker Friday, Feb. 27, at Marshall University's fourth annual Diversity Breakfast in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    The breakfast, presented by Marshall's Black United Students in collaboration with several other campus groups, begins at 7:30 a.m. The Diversity Breakfast was created three years ago with the intent of promoting campus harmony and unity.

    Maurice R. Cooley, Marshall's Director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said about 280 people, including nearly 100 Marshall students, are expected to attend. Nearly every seat in the room has been reserved, he said. Cooley said those attending will hear "a very dynamic speaker" in Henderson.

    "Herbert Henderson has a long and rich history in diversity and African American history and social justice," Cooley said. "He's also a Marshall supporter."

    The Diversity Breakfast program includes a musical repertoire by international students, a vocal and piano piece by African American students, and other activities, Cooley said.

    More information on the breakfast is available by calling Fran Jackson, Program Assistant II with the Center for African American Students' Programs, at (304) 696-6705.


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    Wednesday February 25, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Award-winning poet reads from her work March 4 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Mary Ann Samyn will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 4, at Marshall University.

    The event, free to the public and sponsored by the English department and the College of Liberal Arts, will take place in the Memorial Student Center, room 2W16.

    Samyn is the author of three collections of poems, including "Inside the Yellow Dress" from New Issues Press, and "Captivity Narrative" from Ohio State University Press. Her work also has appeared in such journals as "Field," "Denver Quarterly," "Kenyon Review," "The Ohio River Review" and "Virginia Quarterly."

    Samyn has won many awards, including the Emily Dickinson Prize from the poetry Society of America and a creative artist grant from ArtServe Michigan. Her work also has been anthologized in "American Poetry: The Next Generation." She has served as poetry director for the journal, "Controlled Burn," and is teaching in the MFA Writing Program at West Virginia University.

    More information is available by contacting English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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    Tuesday February 24, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Committed to Christ Campus Ministries sponsors 'Praisefest 2004'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The fifth annual College Praisefest sponsored by Committed to Christ Campus Ministries at Marshall University takes place March 5-7 at Marshall University and 20th Street Baptist Church, which is located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 20th Street.

    "Praisefest 2004" showcases college choirs and performing arts groups from Marshall, Wright State University, Columbia University, Stonybrook University, Johns Hopkins University, St. Louis Citywide Mass, Bradley University and West Virginia State College.

    The conference also includes seminars geared toward college students and young adults.

    "Praisefest's main goal is to lift the human spirit through the medium of music and to educate and empower young people through seminars relevant to this next generation of leaders," said Nicole Yancey, president and founder of Committed to Christ Ministries.

    "What we offer at Praisefest is unique because Praisefest is a conference created and run completely by young people. It is our hope that all people regardless of their age, race or religious background will come out and join the celebration."

    "Praisefest 2004" begins at 8 p.m. Friday, March 5 with a praise and worship service at 20th Street Baptist Church. Seminars are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday in Marshall's Smith Hall.

    A concert featuring the college choirs and performing arts groups takes place at 6 p.m. Saturday at 20th Street Baptist Church. The conference concludes at 10:30 a.m. Sunday with a worship service in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Admission is free to the public. More information is available by contacting Committed to Christ Ministries at (304) 525-1360 or (304) 417-6190, or via email at committed2christministries@yahoo.com.


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    Tuesday February 24, 2004
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    Nobel Peace Prize recipient at Marshall University for Women History Month celebration

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jodi Williams, an advocate around the world for peace and human rights, and one of only 10 women to have received the Nobel Peace Prize, speaks at Marshall University on Tuesday, March 2.

    Williams' appearance is presented by the Women's Center at Marshall and is part of the Women History Month celebration that continues throughout March. Williams speaks at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge (room 2W16), and the event is free to the public.

    Williams is only the third woman from the United States to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She is founding coordinator of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), and has overseen its growth to more than 1,300 non-governmental organizations in more than 85 countries.

    The ICBL has worked with governments, United Nations (UN) bodies, and the International Committee of the Red Cross in campaigns such as the one that achieved an international treaty banning antipersonnel landmines during the diplomatic conference held in Oslo, Norway, in September 1997.

    Williams now serves as Campaign Ambassador for the ICBL, speaking on its behalf around the world in various forums, including at the UN, the European Parliament, and the Organization of African Unity.

    Prior to beginning the ICBL, Williams worked for 11 years to build public awareness about U.S. policy toward Central America. From 1986 to 1992, she developed and directed humanitarian relief projects as the deputy director of the Los Angeles-based Medical Aid for El Salvador, and in that capacity she developed a network of hospitals in 20 cities across the United States that donated medical care to Salvadoran children wounded in the war in that country.

    Williams has a master's degree in International Relations from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, a master's degree in teaching Spanish and English as a Second Language from the School for International Training of Vermont, and a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Vermont.

    More information on Williams' visit to Marshall is available by calling Leah Tolliver at the MU Women's Center at (304) 696-3112, or via email at wcenter@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday February 19, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU Language Bank to help meet increasing translation needs

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As the Huntington/Charleston/Tri-State region welcomes increasing numbers of immigrants, the need for a free and accessible language interpretation and translation resource becomes especially important for government and nonprofit agencies.

    Responding to this need, Marshall University's Center for International Programs, in cooperation with the International Women's Club of Huntington and the Cabell-Huntington Health Center, has established the Marshall University Language Bank, a group of volunteers that is on-call to help translate or interpret for local government agencies and nonprofit organizations serving residents with limited English proficiency.

    Anyone who speaks, reads or writes a language other than English may help by becoming a Marshall University Language Bank volunteer.

    Agencies who wish to take advantage of this service must be a nonprofit or public agency registered with the Marshall University Language Bank. Clients for the Language Bank may include school districts, social service organizations, county health departments, homeless shelters, women's shelters, and food banks.

    The Language Bank will provide free language assistance 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Situations for volunteering might include helping the manager at the domestic violence shelter with a client who just turned up at the shelter in the middle of the night; helping a school counselor who needs to let a parent know that his or her child is ill and needs to go home; or helping an agency to educate the different immigrant communities about disaster preparedness or medical emergencies in their own languages.

    The Language Bank will not provide free assistance for all cases. Translation or interpretation services for legal, medical and business transactions may be offered for a fee to be negotiated between the client and Marshall University. Profits from these services and donations from the community will be used to support the volunteer services offered by the Language Bank.

    Anyone interested in becoming a volunteer translator may visit the Center for International Programs, Old Main 320, to pick up a registration form.


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    Thursday February 19, 2004
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    Ceremony planned to recognize opening of new WMUL studio

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's student-run public radio station, WMUL 88.1 FM, is changing its image and unveiling a new digital studio.

    As of Jan. 1, 2004, WMUL's on-air image and slogan became "The Cutting Edge." Now, the station is having a ceremony to recognize the opening of the NewsCenter digital production studio that has been in development for five years.

    A brief ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place at 4 p.m. Monday, Feb. 23 at the WMUL-FM studio complex, located in Communications Building Room 201. Light refreshments and tours of the studio will be provided, followed by a regularly scheduled edition of NewsCenter 88.

    The NewsCenter 88 digital studio will be used to produce a live daily newscast at 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, as well as specialty programs such as documentaries, public affairs programs, feature programs, radio dramas and comedy shows.

    The digital studio includes a Wheatstone D-600 digital console, which was provided by the university. The new console was purchased after a long search for the best console that would meet the radio station's current and future needs.

    Dr. Charles Bailey, associate professor of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of the radio station, said the new studio will provide even greater opportunities to Marshall students.

    "If you're attempting to learn a media profession, you must have the technical facilities available with which to work and gain experience," Bailey said. "I think aspiring journalists could not ask for any more than what will be available to them in the new WMUL-FM NewsCenter."

    More information is available by calling Bailey at (304) 696-2294.


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    Monday February 16, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Paul Robeson Stamp to be unveiled Feb. 23 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Unveiling of the Paul Robeson 2004 Black Heritage Commemorative U.S. Postage Stamp will take place in a 6 p.m. ceremony Monday, Feb. 23, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the main campus of Marshall University.

    The unveiling, a tribute to Black History and Robeson's contributions in American history, is one of numerous events at Marshall celebrating Black History Month. It will be conducted by members of the Marshall and Huntington communities, along with U.S. Postal Service representatives.

    Marshall University's office of multicultural affairs and the U.S. Postal Service are sponsoring the event, and the public is invited to attend.

    "The Unveiling of the Black Heritage Stamp honoring Paul Robeson gives visibility and recognition to a great American," said Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall. "He added vast richness to my life and to millions of others at home and abroad."

    The Paul Robeson Stamp is the 27th in the Postal Service's Black Heritage Series of stamps. Born in 1898, Robeson was a renowned actor, singer, activist and athlete who is remembered not only for his prodigious talents as a performer, but also for his tireless and uncompromising commitment to civil rights and social justice.

    As a singer, Robeson helped establish African-American spirituals as a legitimate American art form, and became well known for performing folk songs around the world.

    As an activist, Robeson was an outspoken participant in labor and peace movements. He was opposed to colonialism in Africa and worked to assist African liberation movements. He also supported the Allied war efford during World War II. In 1945, the NAACP awarded him the prestigious Spingarn Medal.

    Robeson died on Jan. 23, 1976, at the age of 77. In 1978, he was honored by the United Nations for his opposition to apartheid in South Africa, in 1995 he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, and in 1998 he received a Grammy for Lifetime Achievement.

    Cleckley will be among several people speaking during the stamp unveiling. Among the others are Maurice Cooley, Director of the Center for African American Students' Programs at Marshall; Paul DuPont, Senior Manager of Post Office Operations in Charleston; David Roach, superintendent of Cabell County Schools, and Dr. Ervin Griffin, West Virginia State Community and Technical College provost.

    Special music will be performed by Cooley, Cabell County Schools assistant superintendent William Smith, and John D. McCoy. Handouts and door prizes will be provided by the U.S. Postal Service, and a reception will follow the program.


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    Monday February 16, 2004
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    Blood drive planned this week at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An American Red Cross blood drive will take place at Marshall University from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 18-19.

    The drive will be in the Campus Christian Center, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street. Students, faculty, staff and the community are welcome to donate. Students who participate will receive a voucher to pay for one Marshall parking ticket.

    For more information about the blood drive, persons may contact Amy Saunders, coordinator for the Student Health Education Program, at (304) 696-4800.


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    Friday February 13, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Two Marshall sophomores honored by Gov. Wise for their efforts in Vandalia Project

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University students were among those honored by Gov. Bob Wise for their outstanding scientific achievements at the first annual Research Day at the Capitol Feb. 9.

    The students, Derek Gregg of Moatsville, W.Va., and Justin Swick of Chesapeake, Ohio, both sophomores majoring in Integrated Science and Technology, were presented with certificates of achievement recognizing their efforts in regard to the Vandalia Project.

    The innovative Vandalia Project was initiated last year by a group of entrepreneurial Marshall students and faculty. Gregg and Swick are working with faculty members Dr. Elizabeth Murray, Dr. Michael Norton, and Dr. Herbert Tesser on the project.

    "We're very proud of the progress these students have made in a relatively short amount of time," said Norton, professor of Chemistry. "It's been a learning experience for all of us."

    Assisted by WV EPSoR (West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research), the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance (NCIIA) and an HEPC Research Challenge Grant, Vandalia Biotechnology is on the path to establishing itself as a force in the biotech industry.

    Over the past year, Vandalia has developed a process, with patent pending, by which DNA fragments can be amplified quickly, easily and in large quantities. While DNA is currently amplified in several ways, this new method allows mass production in a way that has not yet been seen.

    NOTE: A photo of Swick and Gregg accompanied by Gov. Wise is available for use by the media at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


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    Thursday February 12, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Psychology Clinic to conduct parenting classes

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Psychology Clinic is offering a program this spring on parenting, Dr. Keith Beard, director of the clinic, announced today.

    Parenting classes run from 6:30 to 8 p.m. beginning Monday, March 8 and continuing at that same time each Monday for six weeks in Harris Hall Room 449. The class will not meet on Monday, March 15, because of spring break.

    Cost to register is a one-time fee of $10, which will be refunded if the parent attends every session. To sign up for these classes, persons may call the Psychology Clinic at (304) 696-2772 and press option 2 to leave a message for Adrienne Bean. The deadline to register is Monday, March 1.

    Bean, a second-year graduate student in the psychology doctoral program (Psy.D.) at Marshall, will run the sessions.

    "This program will be beneficial for all parents," Bean said. "Many different topics will be discussed to help better some of their parenting skills."

    A few topics that will be addressed include behavioral techniques (such as reinforcement and discipline), emotional issues, divorce, learning styles, family interactions, personality and socialization. Parents are welcome to offer suggestions for any other area that they would like information on, as well.

    Beard said the program basically will target issues related to children from two to eight years of age, because adolescent issues often are somewhat different.

    "This type of program can be beneficial to all types of care givers," Beard said. "Children don't come with instruction manuals and parents often feel like they must know how to handle every situation that may occur with their children. This program will give care givers a chance to learn some ways that have been scientifically studied to deal with various problems that their child may experience."

    Beard also said the classes will allow for care givers to realize that they are not alone in dealing with their parenting concerns and they will be able to obtain support from other group members.

     


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    Author Yolanda Young keynote speaker for Women of Color Program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Yolanda Young, author of the award-winning memoir, On Our Way to Beautiful, will be the keynote speaker for the annual Marshall University Women of Color Program which is scheduled to begin at noon, March 4, in the Alumni Lounge of the Memorial Student Center.

    An attorney, Young is a graduate of Howard University and Georgetown University Law Center. Her column appears in USA Today.

    As part of the program, Women of Color awards will be presented with a book signing and reception to follow.

    The event is being coordinated by Fran L. Jackson of the Center for African American Students Programs; Leah Tolliver, Director of the Women's Center; Taella Hill, Coordinator of the School of Extended Education; Lisa Allen, of Student Development; and Marshall graduate student, LaRhonda Johnson.

    The program is free and open to the public. Vendors and displays will be set up in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center throughout the day.

    For additional information, contact Jackson at (304) 696-6705, or Tolliver at (304) 696-3112.

     


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    Eleven Marshall University students to participate in Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol Feb. 26

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven Marshall University students will be among 48 from colleges and universities throughout West Virginia participating Thursday, Feb. 26, in the first West Virginia Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston.

    The goal is for the students, by presenting posters and talking with the legislators, to show what they are doing in a variety of disciplines, said Marshall chemistry professor Michael Castellani, organizing committee chair.

    "This event is designed to showcase the kinds of activities college students around the state do outside of the classroom as part of their education," Castellani said. "Many of the posters present projects that could have a positive impact on our economic development, some involve the study of the state's environment, and several examine living and working in West Virginia."

    Undergraduate Research Day runs from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the upper rotunda of the capitol between the House and the Senate chambers.

    Students who were hopeful of participating in Undergraduate Research Day applied online. Next, their applications were examined by a committee and those chosen to take part were notified.

    The following is a list of the 11 Marshall students, their disciplines, their research posters to be presented and their advisors:

    • Jill Cox, Cassandra Eikey and Natalie Osborne (Psychology) - "The Extent, Rate, and Severity of Intimate Partner Violence in a Rural Sample of Young Adults." Dr. Sarah Lewis, advisor.
    • Taine Duncan (Psychology) - "Attachment, Happiness, and Psychopathology." Dr. Marc A. Lindberg, advisor.
    • Anna Fauber, Clifton Strange and Cortney Scott (Psychology) - "Dress Codes in Huntington Area High Schools: Are They Equally Enforced Among Social Groups?" Dr. Christopher LeGrow, advisor.
    • T. David Harris II (Chemistry) - "Synthesis of Molecular Magnets." Dr. Michael P. Castellani, advisor
    • Ashley Hunt and Anna Fauber (Psychology) - "Spirituality and Resilience in Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: An Investigation of Coping." Dr. Sarah Lewis, advisor.
    • Jessica Slash (Psychology) - "Parent Perceptions of Early Intervention Programs." Dr. Marianna Footo Linz, advisor.
    • Quan Yuan (Physics) - LabView program for Deconvolution of Phonon Flux from Superconducting Edge Bolometer Signal." Dr. Thomas Wilson, advisor.

    Charles Somerville, a Marshall biology professor and member of the organizing committee, said Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol is important because it gives state legislators a chance to see the fruits of their investments in higher education.

    "We hope that the folks at the capitol will be as proud of these students as we are," Somerville said. "We hope they will see that college and university budgets do more than pay for operations and salaries - they are creating the future of West Virginia."

    Castellani said the students' research projects show how higher education in West Virginia is training them to enter society, to think about problems relevant to society, and to attempt to address those problems.

    Other colleges and universities represented during Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol include: Alderson-Broaddus, Bethany, Davis & Elkins, Glenville State, Salem-International, Shepherd, the University of Charleston, West Liberty, Wheeling-Jesuit, West Virginia State, West Virginia University and West Virginia University-Tech.

     


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    Marshall Community and Technical College sponsors Bassmaster University Feb. 21-22

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bassmaster University, a program started 31 years ago to educate America's bass fishermen, will be in Huntington later this month offering two days of angling instruction.

    Five top professionals, including Guido and Dion Hibdon - the only father and son to win the Bassmaster Classic, will share their expertise Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 21-22, at the Radisson Hotel Huntington. Bassmaster University is sponsored by the Marshall Community and Technical College.

    Other instructors include Denny Brauer of Camdenton, Mo., who is bass fishing's all-time leading money winner; Greg Hawk of Vandalia, Ohio, and Rich Rauber of Camarillo, Calif.

    Bassmaster University covers mainstream techniques such as plastic worms, crankbaits, topwater, flipping and pitching, and spinnerbaits. It also covers lesser-known techniques such as fishing the floating worm, finesse fishing and electronics, as well as advanced techniques for catching bass from mid-lake structure and when they suspend.

    Classroom instruction begins at 8 a.m. and participants will attend 12 different workshop sessions during the two days. Activities recess at 3 p.m. both days, but participants are invited to attend a "Think Tank" question and answer session with instructors until 3:30 p.m.

    Enrollment fee is $99. Spouses and children under 16 may attend for $50 with a full-paying adult.

    Here is a brief look at each instructor:

    • Denny Brauer, Camdenton, Mo. - 1998 Bassmaster Classic champion; 1993 Megabucks champion; 1993 Superstars champion; 1987 BASS Angler of the Year; 18-time Bassmaster Classic finalist; Host of the ESPN series "Bass Class;" bass fishing's all-time money winner with more than $1.5 million.
    • Dion Hibdon, Stover, Mo. - 1997 Bassmaster Classic champion; 8-time Bassmaster Classic finalist; lure designer and bass fishing guide.
    • Guido Hibdon, Gravois Mills, Mo. - 1988 Bassmaster Classic champion; 1991 BASS Angler of the Year; 1990 BASS Angler of the Year; 10-time Bassmaster Classic finalist.
    • Rich Tauber, Camarillo, Calif. - Winner of the $50,000 U.S. Open; 3-time Bassmaster Classic finalist; nationally known for his finesse techniques and his enthusiasm and ability to instruct others in his methods.
    • Greg Hawk, Vandalia, Ohio - Bassmaster Classic finalist; Red Man All-American finalist.

    Persons may register for Bassmaster University by calling the Marshall Community College at (304) 696-6855, or online at: http://proxy.espn.go.com/outdoors/bassmaster/members/bmu/westVirginia. More information may be obtained by calling the community college or (866) 732-2277.


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    Enactment of Life of Harriett Tubman and Underground Railroad set for Monday, Feb. 16 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ilene Evans, Artistic Director and Storyteller with Voices from the Earth Inc., will portray Harriett Tubman in an enactment of Tubman's life on Monday, Feb. 16, at Marshall University.

    "Stories from the Life of Harriett Tubman and the Underground Railroad" will be enacted beginning at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. The event is free to the public, and a reception with light refreshments will follow.

    Tubman was born into slavery in Maryland but escaped through the Underground Railroad to Pennsylvania in 1849. She then became the most famous leader of that network, aiding more than 300 slaves in their escape to free states and Canada.

    Tubman was known as "Moses" to the slaves and the thousands of others that she inspired. She never was caught and never lost a slave on the route to freedom.

    Evans, noted for her choreography, teaching, acting and poetry, has performed as a storyteller in numerous venues throughout the country, showcasing her talents in fables and fairytales, poetry in motion, characterizations of African and Native American cultures and much more.

    Her appearance at Marshall is sponsored by the Center for African American Students' Programs and the West Virginia Humanities Council. More information is available by contacting Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, at (304) 696-5430, or via email.


     


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    Marshall announces administrative restructuring

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The duties of Dr. K. Edward Grose, Marshall University's retiring senior vice president of operations, will be shared by current administrators in a restructuring move aimed at saving the university more than $100,000, President Dan Angel said today.

    Grose is retiring effective March 1. Many of his responsibilities will be assumed at that time by Herbert J. Karlet, whose title will change from senior vice president for finance to senior vice president for finance and administration.

    Marshall will advertise internally for a person to fill the new position of assistant vice president for administration. That person will report to Karlet.

    In other changes announced today, Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, will report to provost Sarah Denman, and Kemp Winfree, vice president for regional operations, will report to Chief of Staff Layton Cottrill. Both Hensley and Winfree currently report to Grose.

    "Our goal is to provide administrative cost savings by not filling Dr. Grose's position," Angel said. "Because we recognize Dr. Grose's extensive value to the university, he will be retained in a consulting capacity for the foreseeable future to provide expertise in the facilities and management area. We anticipate a smooth and seamless transition."

     


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    'The Vagina Monologues' to be performed at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - "The Vagina Monologues," a benefit production sponsored by the Marshall University Women's Center as part of the V-Day 2004 College Campaign, is coming to MU's main campus this week.

    The benefit production will be performed by Marshall students at 8 p.m. daily Thursday, Feb. 12 through Saturday, Feb. 14 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    This is the fourth consecutive year the Marshall Women's Center has sponsored "The Vagina Monologues." Hailed by The New York Times as "funny" and "poignant," the show dives into the mystery, humor, pain, power, wisdom, outrage and excitement in women's experiences.

    The play is performed in honor of V-Day, a global movement to stop violence against women and girls. V-Day promotes creative events to increase awareness, raise money and revitalize the spirit of existing anti-violence organizations.

    Local volunteers and college students produce the annual benefit performances to raise awareness and funds for anti-violence groups within their own communities. The V-Day College Campaign has raised awareness of the problem of violence against women and girls on 1,500 college campuses worldwide.

    V-Day, a nonprofit corporation, distributes funds to grassroots, national and international organizations and programs that work to stop violence against women and girls. In its first six years, the V-Day movement raised more than $20 million.

    The play was first performed off-Broadway by Eve Ensler. The show has been performed throughout the world, from London to Seattle, from Jerusalem to Oklahoma City. "The Vagina Monologues" book was published in February 1998 and a special V-Day edition of the play with two sections about the College Campaign was released in February 2001.

    Tickets for the show are $7 for Marshall students and $12 for the general public and may be purchased in advance at the Women's Center, Prichard Hall room 143, or at the box office the night of the performance. For more information contact the Women's Center at (304) 696-3338.

    More information about V-Day and violence against women can be found at http://www.vday.org.


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    MU graduate student receives grant from Sigma Xi

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate student Nathan Head of Tyler, Texas, has been selected to receive a Grant In Aid of Research from Sigma Xi, the scientific research society.

    Head is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Biomedical Sciences program at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He is studying microbiology and specifically the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is the major infectious organism for cystic fibrosis.

    Applicants had to prepare a research proposal statement along with two letters of recommendation. Head's proposal, "Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms in Cystic Fibrosis," was one of 300 selected from 1,300 applicants from North America and abroad.

    "I am happy that I can continue to provide funding for my project in combating the disease of CF and to also bring notoriety to our area of interest as well as our institution," Head said. "We are sometimes overshadowed by larger and better-funded institutions, but it is awards such as these that show that we can be competitive and successful in an environment."

    To be eligible for the grants, applicants must be an undergraduate or graduate student formally enrolled in a degree program. Membership in Sigma Xi is not required to receive a grant, but 75 percent of the awards are designated for applicants who themselves or their advisors are Sigma Xi members.

    The program supports direct costs of the research such as the purchase of equipment and supplies, travel to and from the research site and reimbursement for human subjects in psychological studies.

    Head said he plans to use his grant for laboratory supplies for his research in molecular genetics tools used to manipulate genes of interest and to sequence DNA.

    "This research is important to me, because I realize that CF is a very important problem," Head said. "Removal of this organism from the CF lung should allow the patient to live a much healthier and longer life."

    Sigma Xi promotes scientific excellence and achievement through hands-on learning and close working relationships between students and faculty. Applications are available online at http://www.sigmaxi.org under the "Programs" section. Deadlines are March 15 and October 15, annually.

    This is the fourth time in three years that students at Marshall have received the grants. Previous ones were awarded to Jennifer Smith and twice to Sarah Price, both in the Microbiology department.


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    Marshall School of Journalism sponsoring career and internship fair

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Journalism and Mass Communications career and internship fair is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 12 at Marshall University in the Marvin Stone Library, 330 Smith Hall.

    The fair, sponsored by the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. Representatives from advertising, public relations, radio, television and print publications will be available to talk to students and provide information about internships and careers.

    Organizations scheduled to participate in the fair include: The Herald-Dispatch, Charleston Daily Mail, Charleston Gazette, Ironton Tribune, State Journal, West Virginia Media Holdings, Clear Channel Communications, WSAZ, WOWK, West Virginia Public Broadcasting, WRVC, WGDD, The Arnold Agency, Charles Ryan Agency, Herd Insider, MotionMasters, Marshall University Sports Information and public relations departments from Cabell-Huntington Hospital, St. Mary's Hospital, Charleston Area Medical Center, Columbia Gas Transmission and Marshall.

    Two sessions earlier in the week, conducted by Sue Wright, director of Marshall's Career Services, will aid students in preparation for the fair. The first session at noon, Monday, Feb. 9, will offer advice on designing and writing resumes and cover letters. The second session at noon, Wednesday, Feb. 11, will provide guidelines and tips for interviewing. Both events will take place in the Marvin Stone Library.

    The fair is open to anyone interested in a journalism or mass communications internship or career. For more information contact Dr. Harold Shaver, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, at (304) 696-2738.
     


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    Cabell County Schools administrator featured speaker for 2004 Spring Teacher Lecturer Series

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - William A. Smith, assistant superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction and Student Services for Cabell County schools, will be the featured lecturer for Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) 2004 Spring Teacher Lecturer Series.

    Lectures will be presented on Marshall's Huntington campus Feb. 11, 12, 13 and 18. Dr. Jane McKee, associate dean for Academic Programs, said Smith is the latest speaker in a series started to meet the diversity needs of students in the COEHS.

    "The Teacher Lecturer Program enables teacher candidates in the School of Education to interact and discuss diversity issues with an exemplary educator," McKee said. "Mr. Smith's presentations are open to the entire Marshall community and the general public."

    Smith will speak on "Creating a Climate of Cultural Competence: Leaders Speak from the Classroom."

    A graduate of Marshall, Smith has a B.A. degree in English and Speech as well as an M.A. in English and certifications in Gifted Education and Educational Administration.

    Smith has had a long association with Cabell County Schools. He has been assistant superintendent for Cabell County schools since 1996. Prior to that he was coordinator of Federal Programs and Technology from 1988 to 1996, served in an interim position as Manager of Professional Personnel in 1993-94, and was coordinator of Continuing Education from 1982 through 1986.

    Smith received Marshall University's Black Alumni Association Achievement Award in 1985. He is chairman of the Board of Advisors for Marshall Community and Technical College, and was a member of the Advisory Board for the Governor's Honors Academy from 1984 through 1988. He has been actively involved in numerous civic and community organizations and has been honored for his many contributions to these groups.

    "Mr. Smith brings a variety of experiences in education and a deep understanding of the process of teaching and learning. His work with diverse children and their educational needs will be of great interest and significance to all who hear him," McKee said.

    Smith's wife, Victoria, a kindergarten teacher at Geneva Kent Elementary School in Cabell County, was the first Teacher Lecturer for the COEHS and helped inaugurate the series in 1999.

    "The Smiths are true treasures to the Huntington area and to the Cabell County schools," McKee said. "Their knowledge, commitment, and love of education and the children with whom they interact are wonderful!"

    Lectures on secondary methods will be presented at 4 p.m. Feb. 11 in the Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge and at 4 p.m. Feb. 12 in Harris Hall, room 134. Smith will speak to student teachers at 1 p.m. Feb. 13 in Corbly Hall, room 105. A session on elementary methods is scheduled for 9 a.m. Feb. 18 in the Memorial Student Center Shawkey Room.

    For additional information, persons may contact McKee at (304) 696-2859 or via e-mail.


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    Job Op Career Fair scheduled March 4 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The third-annual Community and Technical College Job Op Career Fair is scheduled for Thursday, March 4 in the Marshall University Memorial Student Center, according to Patricia Gallagher, recruiting coordinator with Marshall's Career Services Center.

    The fair will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Don Morris Room. It is open to all Marshall students and alumni. The fair provides them an opportunity to meet with representatives from organizations about entry-level and career positions.

    Pre-registration is not required, but participants are advised to bring resumes and dress professionally. Last year the fair brought in 49 recruiters from 25 organizations and a comparable number is expected this year.

    For more information and an updated list of participants, persons may contact Gallagher at (304) 696-2371.


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    Friday January 30, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall president's new TV show to premiere

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Marshall Headliners," a new public affairs program hosted by Marshall University President Dan Angel, will premiere next week on cable systems throughout the Advantage Valley region.

    The first "Marshall Headliners" program will feature West Virginia Delegate John Doyle (D-Shepherdstown), vice-chairman of the House Finance Committee, as Angel's guest.

    Produced in cooperation with Marshall University Instructional Television and Video Services, this half-hour program is intended to provide a platform for the discussion of critical issues affecting Marshall University, West Virginia, and the region.

    "Marshall Headliners" is expected to reach a total audience of more than 425,000 through distribution on the Educational Informational Channel (Channel 25) on Adelphia Cable systems in Cabell, Wayne and Putnam counties and the West Virginia Library Television Network (Channel 11) on Charter Communications throughout the Advantage Valley region, which includes Fayette, Lincoln, Kanawha and Putnam counties.

    "Marshall Headliners" will premiere in the Huntington area at 10 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 1, on the Educational Information Channel (Channel 25) on Adelphia Cable. In the Kanawha Valley, the show will premiere at 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 6, on the West Virginia Library Television Network, (Channel 11) on Charter Communications.

    For more information on "Marshall Headliners," visit http://www.marshall.edu/president/.

    "Marshall Headliners" air dates (Week of Feb. 1-7, 2004)

    Huntington area:
    Educational Information Channel (Channel 25),
    Adelphia Cable

    Sunday, Feb. 1: 10 a.m., 2 p.m., 7 p.m.;
    Monday, Feb. 2 - Friday, Feb. 6: 10 a.m., 7 p.m.;
    Saturday, Feb. 7: 10 a.m., 2 p.m., 7 p.m.

    Kanawha Valley region:
    West Virginia Library Television Network (Channel 11), Charter Communications

    Friday, Feb. 6: 10 a.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m.;
    Saturday, Feb. 7: 4 a.m., 10 p.m.


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    Marshall Community & Technical College's Physical Therapist Assistant Program accredited through 2012

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Community & Technical College's Physical Therapist Assistant Program has been granted accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (CAPTE) through 2012.

    CAPTE grants specialized accreditation status to qualified entry-level education programs for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants. CAPTE is listed as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE).

    Specialized accreditation is a system for recognizing professional education programs for a level of performance, integrity, and quality that entitles them to the confidence of the educational community and the public they serve. Accreditation status signifies that the program meets established and nationally accepted standards of scope, quality, and relevance.

    Once awarded accreditation status, a program must submit reports regularly to the Commission ensuring continuing compliance with the evaluative criteria and is formally reviewed every five to 10 years.

    Marshall Community & Technical College's Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program prepares students to work as skilled health care providers who work under the supervision of a physical therapist. Duties of the PTA include assisting the physical therapist in implementing treatment programs and training patients in exercises and activities of daily living.

    Physical therapist assistants work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, and educational settings. Marshall Community & Technical College's PTA program is full-time and offers a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree, which prepares graduates for entry-level positions.

    For more information, persons may contact program coordinator Travis H. Carlton, PTA, M.S., at (304) 696-3353, or visit the program's Web page at: http://www.marshall.edu/ctc/Allied%20Health/allied_health_pta.htm.

    For additional information relating to the accreditation status of the program, persons may contact the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, 1111 N. Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; (703) 684-2782 or (703) 706-3245; accreditation@apta.org.


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    Autism Training Center at Marshall featured in segment on NPR; story selected as a top 3 editors' pick'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A segment which aired Monday on National Public Radio highlighting the West Virginia Autism Training Center's efforts to identify autistic children in West Virginia has drawn attention and accolades from listeners across the nation.

    The Training Center is housed on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Autism is a neurological disorder that affects communication and social skills. Individuals with autism have a restricted range of activities and interests. It is estimated that 50 percent of those with autism do not speak at all.

    The nearly 10-minute segment was narrated by NPR staff member Jon Hamilton, who visited families of autistic children in Huntington in preparation for the feature. After its airing, the story was selected as a "top 3 editors' pick" on the NPR Web site and was the most frequently e-mailed from that site for the day.

    West Virginia is one of 17 states receiving funding from the Centers for Disease Control in an effort to obtain the first accurate count of children with autism. As the number of individuals diagnosed with autism appears to be increasing, studies are underway to determine whether autism is becoming more common or just more likely to be recognized.

    "We must answer questions about the number of individuals with autism because without understanding of how many people this affects, we can't tackle the problem itself," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Executive Director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center.

    "The diagnosis is made solely based on observation. There is no test for autism. You can't get a blood sample and detect it and you can't give a standard IQ test and detect it," she said.

    The West Virginia project involves researchers sifting through the files of every child born in the state in 1992 who was ever placed in a special education class. Researchers search for key phrases and traits to identify autism. The files number in the thousands and each one can involve hours of work.

    In addition to identifying individuals with autism, the results of the project could affect funding and the direction of autism research.

    The link to the NPR segment is: http://www.npr.org/display_pages/features/feature_1617147.html.


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    Monday January 26, 2004
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    Annual awards banquet highlights Alumni Weekend April 2-3

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven Marshall University alumni and students will be honored at this spring's Alumni Awards banquet, which highlights the annual Alumni Weekend Friday and Saturday, April 2-3, on the Huntington campus.

    The banquet starts at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 3 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It will be preceded by the President's Social from 6 to 6:45 p.m. on the student center plaza. The cost is $40 per person or $70 per couple.

    The theme of Alumni Weekend 2004 is "Swing Time at Marshall." The theme will be in full force with swing time entertainment throughout the two days.

    Here is a look at the six alumni awards and the 11 people who will receive them at the banquet, along with a look at the Alumni Association Club of the Year.

    Distinguished Alumni Award

    The Distinguished Alumni Award will be presented to attorney William "Bill" Willis and CNN news correspondent Sean Callebs. This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.

    Willis, Class of 1948, practices law, concentrating in commercial litigation in courts throughout the United States. He is a retired partner with Sullivan & Cromwell in New York City and still serves as senior counsel.

    After graduating from Marshall summa cum laude, Willis attended Harvard University where he received his juris doctor degree cum laude in 1951. He received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Marshall in 1997.

    He has been involved in numerous high profile cases, including the AT&T break-up decree, National Football League player disputes and the Exxon Valdez case, as well as a number of securities and banking law cases and antitrust litigations.

    Willis is married to the former Joyce Litteral and they have three children.

    Callebs, Class of 1983, is an Atlanta-based national correspondent for CNN Newsource, the world's most extensively syndicated news feed service with more than 750 network affiliates and independent stations nationwide. In 1993, he won an Emmy Award for coverage of midwestern floods, and was honored the same year with a gold medal at the New York Film Festival for a special on Alaska dealing with the after effects of the Exxon Valdez spill.

    Before joining CNN, Callebs was an anchor and editor for WSAZ-TV in Huntington-Charleston, and, before that, an anchor and producer for CNN and NBC affiliate WIS-TV in Columbia, S.C.

    Community Achievement Award

    The Community Achievement Award will be presented to educator William Smith and speech pathologists Jaqueline "Jackie" Scaggs Frazier and Vickie Hinzman Pullins. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

    Frazier and Pullins graduated from Marshall in 1974 with degrees in speech pathology. They both went on to earn their masters degrees in that field.

    In 1990, they decided to form a private practice in speech pathology in Charleston. Since then, LinguaCare Associates Inc. has been providing services to children in public school systems and to adults in nursing homes and hospitals. LinguaCare employs six full-time and nine part-time speech pathologists, serving four hospitals and nine county school systems. They also provide training to Marshall and West Virginia University students and continuing education programs to speech pathologists nationwide.

    Frazier and Pullins are active in their communities supporting various programs to encourage children and youth.

    Frazier is married to Barney Warren Frazier and has two children. Pullins is married to Charles Adrian Pullins and has three children.

    Smith, assistant superintendent of Cabell County Public Schools, graduated from Marshall with a bachelor of arts degree in 1973 and a master of arts in 1976. He received a Gifted Education Certification in 1977 and an educational administration certification in 1989. He is responsible for, among other things, the development and implementation of the instructional program for pre-school through adult basic education; Title 1 programs; special education programs; and student services such as alternative education, at-risk student programs and drop-out prevention.

    Smith received the Marshall University Black Alumni Association Achievement Award in 1985 and the Huntington Black Professional and Business Women's Association Recognition Award for Contributions in the Field of Education in 1986.

    He is a member of the West Virginia State Department's Education First Committee for The National Goals 2000, and a member of Leadership Tri-State. Among his numerous community activities are chairman of the board of advisers for Marshall's Community and Technical College; chairman of the board for Tri-State Occupation and Industrialization Center (OIC); and a member of the Martin Luther King Symposium Committee, the Tri-State area Council of Boys Scouts of America, the HOSPICE of Huntington board of directors and the Huntington/Ironton Enpowerment Zone Inc.

    He is married to Victoria L. Smith, Marshall Class of 1975.

    Distinguished Service to the Community Award

    The Distinguished Service to the Community Award will be presented to businessmen Gary G. White and Joseph L. Williams Jr.

    White, who earned his Marshall degree in 1997, is president and chief executive officer of International Industries Inc., a natural resources and manufacturing company with locations in five states, headquartered in Gilbert, W.Va. He is a member and immediate past chairman of the Marshall University Institutional Board of Governors and second vice president of the Marshall University Foundation Inc.

    In addition, he serves as vice president of the Larry Joe Harless Community Center Foundation Inc.; chairman of the board of trustees of the Appalachian Hardwoods Manufacturers Association; and is a member of the board of directors of West Virginia Media Holding LLC, RAF America's Riverton Coal Company and The West Virginia Coal Association, among others.

    White was appointed by former Gov. Cecil H. Underwood for his transition team in 1996-97 and by former Gov. Gaston Caperton to the West Virginia Board of Education.

    In 2003, he was honored as the recipient of the City of Hope "Spirit of Life" award and was inducted into Marshall's Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame.

    White and his wife, Jo Ann, reside in Logan, W.Va., with their daughter.

    Williams, MU Class of 1978, is chairman, president and chief executive officer of BASIC Supply Company Inc. in Huntington. His also serves as director of First Sentry Bank in Huntington, Adams National Bank in Washington, D.C., and the West Virginia Capital Corporation. He is a member of the Marshall University Institutional Board of Governors, the Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation board of directors and the State of West Virginia Workforce Investment Council.

    Among his many awards and recognitions are the Marshall University Most Outstanding Black Alumni Award in 1984; Who's Who Among Black Americans; a profile in The Herald-Dispatch's "Movers & Shakers" feature (1988), and one of the paper's "50 Most Influential People in the 20th Century" (1999).

    Williams was founder and director of the Ebony Golf Classic, is a former member of the Huntington City Council and former mayor and assistant mayor of Huntington.

    Williams is married to Shirley Ann Johnson Williams and they have four children.

    Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award

    This award will be presented to Dr. Marcia Harrison, professor of biological sciences at Marshall University. Harrison has been a member of the Marshall community since 1986. Her professional service to the community includes director of the West Virginia State Science and Engineering Fair, director of the West Virginia Junior Academy of Science and a member of the Educational Committee of the American Society of Gravitational Space Biology.

    On campus, she is chair of the NASA Space Grant Committee, manages the College of Science Greenhouse and the teaching lab "Cell Central," and serves on the advisory group for the new biotechnology building, among other responsibilities. She also excels as a mentor and advisor to her students.

    The Hunter Award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees were evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

    Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarships

    The Herd Village Scholarships will be awarded to Michaelyn Ann Butcher, Class of 2006, and Nicholas Slate, Class of 2005.

    Butcher will receive the Cheerleader Scholarship. A pre-communications disorders major, Butcher is active in a number of campus and community projects, including reading programs in elementary schools, campus blood drives, care packages to troops, Branches (domestic shelter), the Robby Page Memorial Walk, Sweatequity Day and the Wild Dawg Safe Trick-or-Treat Night.

    Slate will receive the Marching Band Scholarship. He is an integrated science and technology major. His activities and accomplishments include director of the Handbell Choir at Aldersgate and Barboursville First United Methodist churches; teaching assistant for Marshall IST courses; and assistant instructor for the Sissonville High School marching band. He is employed in Charleston, providing contract-based technology services.

    Cam Henderson Scholarship Award

    This athletic scholarship will be presented to John Ryan Stewart, a senior from Barboursville and a member of the Thundering Herd golf team. He is active in the Student Advisory Committee, the Golden Key Honor Society, and has made the Dean's List every semester in college while majoring in accounting and finance.

    The Cam Henderson Scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

    Alumni Association Club of the Year

    The Boone County (W.Va.) Friends of Marshall Club has been chosen as the Alumni Association Club of the Year for the second consecutive year. President Rodney Miller, Class of 1981, and club members have done a tremendous job, according to Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs.

    "The club has raised the visibility of Marshall University in the Boone County area and has promoted Marshall at every opportunity," Pelphrey said. "They have done a great job recruiting students from the area and have funded six scholarships to graduating seniors. This club always goes the extra mile whether they are having a golf outing, fundraiser or just cheering for the Herd. I am not surprised the Alumni Association chose to honor them with this award for the second year."

    The Friends of Boone County also sponsored a tour of Marshall University for Madison Middle School students with 118 students attending a football game, a women's basketball game and band day, and speaking with coaches and faculty. The club also donated $1,000 to the Erickson Alumni Center Building Fund and monies toward the television broadcast of football games.

    Alumni Weekend

    Alumni Weekend coincides with the annual John Deaver Drinko Symposium at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 1, and the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convention, set for 7 p.m. on Friday, April 2. Both of those events will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    The first official event of Alumni Weekend is a champagne reception from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 2, at the home of President Dan Angel. The reception is for individuals who have contributed to the Erickson Alumni Center campaign.

    On Saturday, April 3, the Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1954) and the 60th reunion class (1944). They will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1954. The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Black Box Theater of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, and the cost to attend is $20.

    The annual Green and White football scrimmage, which marks the end of Marshall's spring practice, starts at 4 p.m. Saturday at Marshall Stadium. Cost to attend is $5 per person.

    Glade Springs Resort and Cooper Land Development of Daniels, W.Va., are major sponsors of Alumni Weekend.

    For information on how to order tickets to any Alumni Weekend event, persons may contact the Alumni Association office at (800) MUALUMX or (304) 696-2901, or via email.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday January 23, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall meets national information security standards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been designated by the Information Assurance Courseware Evaluation center as meeting the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) National Standards 4011 and 4012.

    The CNSS represents a broad cross-section of federal departments and agencies, which set the training standards for information assurance professionals in government and industry.

    These standards reflect the federal awareness that consistency in training and education for information assurance is critical to the national infrastructure. The curriculum in Information Systems within the College of Information Technology and Engineering and in Forensic Sciences at Marshall University was approved for certification.

    Dr. Patricia Logan, associate professor in the College of Information Technology and Engineering, and Ron Jewell, CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) administrator in Forensic Sciences, led the effort for Marshall to be recognized as the first institution in West Virginia to have met the two standards in the areas of information assurance, networks, computer security, computer forensics, enterprise management, database, digital imaging, operating systems, software development, and engineering.

    Marshall will receive recognition and a certificate during the CNSS annual conference April 13-15 in Norfolk, Va. Presentations will be made by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence. The conference is attended by more than 200 representatives from federal departments and agencies, private industry, and academia.

    For more information, persons may contact Dr. Logan at (304) 746-1951 or via e-mail.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday January 23, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall enrollment records established during fall 2003 semester

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University set records in the major enrollment categories of full-time students, first-time freshmen, full-time equivalent students, and out-of-state students during the fall 2003 semester, MU officials announced today.

    In the end-of-semester submission of enrollment data to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Marshall reported an overall head count enrollment of 16,360 students, the second-highest in the institution's 167-year history.

    Of those students, 12,356 were undergraduates, 199 were in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and 3,805 were graduate students on the Huntington and South Charleston campuses and across the state of West Virginia in Marshall's network of graduate locations. Marshall Community and Technical College enrolled 2,393 students, about 19 percent of the total undergraduates.

    "We're very gratified that our enrollment for last fall was our second-highest ever, and that we set a number of important enrollment milestones," MU President Dan Angel said. "This just shows that our students like what we're doing and the programs we have to offer. Overall, I'm very pleased."

    Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) enrollment was 12,664, an increase of 199 (1.6 percent) over last year's FTE enrollment of 12,465. The previous record was set last year. FTE enrollment is a commonly used method for calculating enrollment by giving more weight to full-time students.

    First-time freshmen enrollment was 2,409, an increase of 99 (4.3 percent) over last year. The previous record enrollment for first-time freshmen was 2,381 set in fall 1998. There were 1,932 first-time freshmen from West Virginia, an increase of 143 (8 percent) over last year's 1,789. Among those first-time freshmen from West Virginia were 823 PROMISE scholarship recipients, an increase of 14 percent over the 722 PROMISE recipients last year.

    Full-time student enrollment was 11,178, an increase of 153 (1.4 percent) over last year's previous record full-time enrollment of 11,025. A record number of the full-time students are from West Virginia: 8,973 vs. 8,857 for last year, an increase of 116 (1.3 percent).

    Out-of-state enrollment is 2,768, an increase of 25 (0.9 percent) over last year's record count of 2,743. Out-of-state enrollment represents about 17 percent of the total headcount enrollment.

    "The growth in West Virginia first-time freshmen and non-resident students, and an increase in continuing students are the result of the quality teaching of our faculty and the hard work of our enrollment management staff," said Sarah Denman, Marshall's Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

    Overall, undergraduate enrollment was 12,356, an increase of 134 (1.1 percent) over last year's count of 12,222, the previous record. Of that undergraduate total, 10,162 are from West Virginia.

    "The number of undergraduates from West Virginia is more than Marshall has ever seen and more than we've seen at any state institution in many years," said Michael McGuffey, Marshall's Director of Institutional Research and Planning.

    Ironically, with the large number of major enrollment records set this year, the total headcount enrollment decreased last fall by 191 from the record 16,551 in fall 2002. The decline is due to a decrease in part-time students, and most of that decrease occurred at the graduate level.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday January 22, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University Libraries announces new digital museum exhibit

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Libraries' newest exhibit in its Virtual Museum is Camp Washington-Carver, a summer camp established in 1942 for African American youth.

    The exhibit can be found online at:

    http://www.marshall.edu/speccoll/VirtualMuseum/CampWashingtonCarver/index.html.

    Initially called the "West Virginia Negro 4-H Camp," its name was soon changed to "Camp Washington-Carver" in honor of two prominent black Americans: Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver. It was the first 4-H camp for African American youth in the nation.

    The camp is located in Fayette County (W.Va.), near Babcock State Park, and is a state and national treasure. Its Great Chestnut Lodge was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, and it is the largest chestnut log building in the nation.

    The camp originally was administered by West Virginia State College. In 1978, the West Virginia Division of Culture and History received responsibility for the camp, which was rededicated in 1980. Since that time, it has continued to serve as a mountain cultural arts center, as well as a general camp for various groups.

    The online exhibition focuses on the camp's early period through the eyes of those who either worked there or enjoyed its facilities as children. The camp's story is presented through the use of still pictures, audio recordings, transcribed interviews, and moving pictures.

    "Only a few West Virginians know of Camp Washington-Carver and its important role in West Virginia's history," said Lisle Brown, Curator of Special Collections at Marshall, and the exhibit developer. "I hope that those who view the exhibit will enjoy it and will also come away more knowledgeable about the camp and the significant place it played in the lives of the state's African American children."

    Of special interest in the exhibit are three video clips of early motion picture footage of children participating in camp activities. These rare images, shot in color in the 1940's soon after the camp opened, provide the visitor to the exhibit with an immediate and intimate view of the camp and its activities.

    The exhibit includes many rare photographs of the camp buildings, its personnel, and participants engaging in a variety of activities, such as arts and crafts, swimming, gun safety, horseshoes, and many other events. Also included in the exhibit are transcripts, and some actual audio, of interviews with persons associated with the camp. These interviews give a full and fascinating glimpse of the camp by those who either worked there as adults or attended it as children.

    In addition, the exhibit includes an illustrated article by Norman Jordan that appeared in the Winter 1999 issue of Goldenseal, giving his personal account of the history and importance of the camp.

    The online exhibit uses many resources throughout the state, including those of Camp Washington-Carver, Marshall University Special Collections, Marshall University Instructional Television and Video Services, West Virginia State College Archives, the Archives and History Section of West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the Cabell County Public Library.

    For more information, persons may contact Barbara Winters, Dean of Marshall University Libraries, at (304) 696-2318 or via e-mail.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday January 21, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Board of Governors completes evaluation of Marshall president

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Board of Governors recently completed a performance evaluation of its president, Dan Angel, as required by West Virginia law and the Higher Education Policy Commission.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to ensure that the institution is being well managed, pursuing sound institutional goals, and to help the president improve his performance. The board is required to conduct a written performance evaluation of Marshall's president every fourth year of employment as president. President Angel has been at Marshall since Jan. 1, 2000.

    The primary vehicle for the evaluation was a 12-member presidential evaluation committee composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students, administration and external community. The evaluation committee conducted meetings that were promptly noticed starting June 17, 2003 and concluded in early December.

    The committee's findings were reported to the Board of Governors after it concluded its evaluation. The evaluation process was open, inclusive and comprehensive. The evaluation committee was assisted by Dr. Clifford M. Trump, former chancellor of the State College System of West Virginia and a former university president.

    The evaluation concluded that "President Angel is performing very well in areas which are substantive, on-the-ground measures vital to Marshall University. By way of example, student enrollment and graduation numbers are up, much needed facilities have been constructed or are in the planning stage, research volume and research dollars are higher, the Governor's higher education budget cuts were managed extremely well and also the increasing donor contribution is bringing considerable attention."

    These were sighted as "positive" and "strong" indicators of a president focused upon the improvement of Marshall University."

    A handful of areas were singled out for additional attention, renewed focus and long-term institutional betterment. The board will follow up with President Angel to address these areas of emphasis over the next four-year evaluation period.

    President Angel issued the following statement regarding the evaluation:

    "I was impressed with the inclusive and openness of the evaluation. There were many positives and also some areas to be improved. That's what presidential evaluations are all about and it is the most thorough evaluation that I've had during my 25 years of being a president, in California, Texas and West Virginia. It was a constructive process and will have some significant benefits for the institution and West Virginia. After four years serving as president of Marshall University, I have even more passion for the institution and its mission and betterment than I had when I arrived in January of 2000. I love Marshall University and it's an honor to serve as its president."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday January 20, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Team trivia game show coming to Marshall's campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Brain Storm! Team Trivia Game Show" is coming to Marshall University's campus on Wednesday, Feb. 4.

    The show, to be staged at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room, will be based entirely on African American history to help promote February as Black History Month. It is sponsored by Marshall's Center for African American Students and the Student Activities Programming Board.

    All Marshall student organizations, such as clubs, the Student Government Association, fraternities and sororities, may form their own teams of five to 10 participants and take part in Brain Storm! Or, students may enter as singles and be placed in a group. The winning team will collect $200, with $125 going to the runner-up and $75 to the third-place team.

    "It's a Hollywood style game show and it should be a blast," said Maurice Cooley, Director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs. "It's a fun opportunity for the students to enjoy themselves and possibly win some money."

    Participants will use remote control handsets to answer questions displayed on a 10-foot video screen. All teams play at the same time while the host keeps the game moving. Among the categories for the game are politics, medicine, drama, television, music and sports.

    "We want all students to come together, all classes and races, to have fun and be exposed to African American history," Cooley said. "No preparation is required. We'll see how much we know and how much we don't know about African American history. It should be a festive experience."

    The show, presented by Simplified Entertainment of New York, has visited campuses throughout the United States. Brain Storm! is free to those who want to play, including community groups. Community groups should, however, call Cooley at (304) 696-5430 if they're interested in playing.

    "Students should not feel intimidated," Cooley said. "We do not want the student body to think it's primarily for African American students. It's for all students. Everyone should come out and have fun."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday January 16, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MUAA seeks new members for Board of Directors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association is seeking names to place on a ballot as it prepares to elect new members to its board of directors.

    Anyone who wishes to nominate a person for the board may do so by contacting the alumni office at (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869, or by sending an email to hudson2@marshall.edu by Monday, Jan. 26. The MUAA plans to send ballots to active members early in February 2004.

    The Marshall University Alumni Association, founded in 1931, has four primary goals. They include:

    • Raising $3 million for construction of a new Erickson Alumni Center;
    • Marketing the online community;
    • Recruiting students; and,
    • Developing the alumni club network around the country.

    "Now is a great time to be an active participant in the alumni association," said Lance West, vice president for alumni development at Marshall. "Now, more than ever, we need alumni and friends to get involved as we continue to grow and spread the word about this great university."

    To qualify as a board member, a person must:

    • Be an active member of the alumni association, which includes making an annual gift to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.;
    • Be energetic and enthusiastic in support of the university, and concerned that it will realize its full growth and potential;
    • Be available to attend two on-campus board meetings a year, and serve on various MUAA board committees; and,
    • Be willing to assist in his or her home area in promoting Marshall University and the alumni association.

    "We need help in finding candidates who are interested in serving the university in this important capacity," said Tom Harris, president of the alumni association. "We're looking for people who have a passion for Marshall and a desire to see the university grow and prosper."

    Those elected to the board will serve a term of three years, beginning July 1, 2004. Ten new members will be elected, including five from the local community and five at-large.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday January 12, 2004
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall to provide webcast for State of the State address

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the sixth consecutive year, Marshall University will provide the webcast for West Virginia's State of the State address.

    Gov. Bob Wise will deliver his final State of the State address at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 14 from the House chambers at the state capitol in Charleston.

    The address may be accessed at http://www.marshall.edu/www/stateofstate2004/. The webcast is made possible in part through West Virginia Public Broadcasting, which provides the live video via satellite. The webcast from last year's address is available at http://www.marshall.edu/www/stateofstate2003/.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday January 8, 2004
    Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Herd fans to gear up for annual Marshall/WVU Capital Classic with two major game-day events

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumni, fans and friends will have an opportunity to gear up for the Thundering Herd's annual Capital Classic men's and women's basketball doubleheader with West Virginia University during two special game-day events, Wednesday, Jan. 21.

    The Marshall Tip-Off Club of Charleston will be host to a noon luncheon honoring the Marshall men's and women's basketball teams at the Charleston Marriott. Speakers will include men's basketball Coach Ron Jirsa, women's basketball Coach Royce Chadwick and head football Coach Bob Pruett. Tickets are $20 each and reservations are required. For more information, call (304) 343-2900.

    The Marshall University Alumni Association, Big Green Scholarship Foundation, Inc., and Greater Kanawha Valley Marshall Club will be hosts to a Capital Classic pre-game reception from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center. Sponsored in part by the Friends of Coal, this free event is open to the public. Hot and cold hors d'oeuvres will be served and a cash bar will be available.

    Marshall President Dan Angel, university staff and representatives will greet visitors during the reception. Marco and the Marshall University cheerleaders will be on hand to entertain the crowd.

    Marshall and WVU meet in a women's game at 5:30 p.m., and the Thundering Herd and West Virginia men play at 8 p.m. in the annual Capital Classic.

    Tickets for the doubleheader are still available by calling the Marshall ticket office at 1-800-THE HERD or the Charleston Civic Center box office at (304) 345-7469.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday January 7, 2004
    Contact: Office of Multicultural Affairs, , (304) 696-4677

    Marshall to Host Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Symposium

    The Martin Luther King, Jr., Eleventh Annual Symposium, scheduled to run Jan. 19-20 in Huntington, will be celebrated through an array of panels, forums, memorial programs, a march, a Chautauqua impersonation and other activities in honor of the late civil rights leader.

    Established by Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs and partially funded by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, this year's theme will be "Continuing the Legacy and the Struggle for Justice and Equality in the 21st Century."

    As Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs, observes, "Each annual symposium is an opportunity to promote Martin Luther King Jr.'s ideals of peace, equality, justice and unity, and to encourage the Marshall family and the Tri-state community's participation in programs of service and action."

    The Symposium gets underway Monday, Jan. 19, with a Focus on Youth program from 11 a.m. to l p.m., presented by the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) at the A.D. Lewis Community Center at 1450 A.D. Lewis Avenue.

    The program will be followed by a luncheon, and a roundtable panel discussion with the theme, "What would Dr. King do about violence and drugs in our community?" from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. It will be coordinated by Rev. Paul Willis, Sr., pastor of the First Baptist Church at 901 Sixth Avenue.

    A highlight of each year's symposium is the traditional march, which begins this year with a line-up at 4:30 p.m. at the First Baptist Church. Beginning at 5 p.m., marchers will make their way to the Sixteenth Street Missionary Baptist Church located at 1647 Ninth Avenue, where the annual memorial service begins at 6:30 p.m.

    During the service, the winners of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards Competition will be announced by Dr. Christina Murphy, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and chair of the awards competition. In addition, a community mass choir will perform.

    Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City will be the speaker. A recipient of six honorary degrees, Butts has gained renown for his professional and religious activities. He serves as President of the Council of Churches of New York, Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors of United Way of New York City, and he is a member of the leadership boards of the September 11th Fund, the Boy Scouts of America, the American Baptist College and the Community Development Corporation of Long Island.

    Following the memorial service, a reception will be held in the Church Fellowship Hall, beginning at 8 p.m. A Chautauqua impersonation (costumed characterization) of A. Phillip Randolph is scheduled Jan. 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Randolph was a political and civic activist who in 1917 co-founded "The Messenger," an African American magazine dedicated to ending the exploitation of workers. He led the successful campaign to outlaw racial discrimination in the Federal government and defense industries during World War II. He has been called the architect of the August 28, 1963 March on Washington.

    Portraying Randolph will be Joseph Bundy, a native of Bluefield, W.Va., and a Marshall University Graduate College alumnus. Bundy is the founder and director of the Afro Appalachian Performance Company and drama instructor for the West Virginia African American Arts and Heritage Academy, and has served as an adjunct instructor at Glenville State Community and Technical College. He is well known for portraying, among others, such influential historical figures as Booker T. Washington and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

    Bundy has made presentations at the West Virginia Black History and Appalachian Studies Conferences, and coordinated West Virginia's first African American Team Chautauqua. He is a playwright, and his poetry appears in "Wild Sweet Notes," an anthology of West Virginia poets.

    Dr. Rainey Duke and Sylvia Ridgeway are co-chairs of this year's symposium planning committee. Committee members include Phillip W. Carter, Maurice Cooley, Edward Dawson, Margot Durbin, Rebecca Glass, Stephen Hensley, Rev. David Johnson, Dr. Dolores Johnson, Sally Lind, Dr. Charles O. Lloyd, Rev. Samuel Moore, Dr. Christina Murphy, Rev. Larry Patterson, Feon Smith, William Smith, Brandon Stevens, Susan Tams, Rev. Paul Wills, Sr., and Barbara Winters.

    "We thank the Eleventh Annual Martin Luther King, Jr., Symposium Planning Committee, sponsors, speakers, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards Competition evaluation committee, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission for their invaluable assistance in making this symposium a success," said Cleckley.

    NOTE: Photos of Butts and Bundy for use by the media are available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


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