All 2005 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students do well in Communicator Awards Audio Competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received eight awards in The Communicator Awards 2005 Audio Competition.

The winners were named Friday, Dec. 16 in Arlington, Texas. WMUL students won three Crystal Awards of Excellence, three Awards of Distinction and two honorable mention awards. This is the eighth year for this competition to include an audio component for judging.

The Communicator Awards come from a national awards organization that recognizes outstanding work in the communications field.  Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry. There were 1,369 entries in The Communicator Awards 2005 Audio Competition.

The Communicator's prestigious Crystal Award of Excellence is presented to those entrants whose ability to communicate makes them the best in their field.  About 13 percent of the entries won this award.  The Crystal Award of Excellence winners are listed on The Communicator's Web site www.communicator-awards.com.

In addition to the Award of Excellence, The Communicator Awards 2005 Audio Competition also gives The Award of Distinction and Honorable Mention Awards.  The Award of Distinction is awarded for projects that exceed industry standards in production or communication skills.  Approximately 10 percent of the entries won this award.  An Honorable Mention certificate was granted to those entries that meet the high standards of the industry.

Winners of The Communicator Awards come from radio stations, production facilities, advertising and public relations agencies, corporate communications departments, government entities, technicians, narrators, writers, and other professionals associated with the production of audio broadcasts and materials.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced some of the best newscasts, sports programming, PSAs, promo productions and documentaries in the country," Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said.

"I am proud of the honor these Awards of Excellence, Awards of Distinction and the honorable mentions awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University. This success demonstrates to our student staff that dedication and hard work does pay off in the end." 

The Crystal Awards of Excellence winning entry by WMUL-FM were in the following categories: 

Newscast

"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" for Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2004.  The students who participated in the newscast were: Jen Smith, senior, Huntington (producer); Alex Reed, senior, Virginia Beach, Va. (news anchor); Melanie Chapman, senior, Stollings, W.Va. (news anchor); Jay Plyburn, junior, Huntington (weather anchor); Matt Bradberry, senior, Huntington (sports anchor); Vince Payne, graduate student, Hansford, W.Va. (reporter); Deven Swartz, freshman, Philippi, W.Va. (reporter); Jeremy Edwards, freshman, Scott Depot, W.Va. (reporter); Kristin Houghton, senior, Inwood, W.Va.  (reporter); Troy Dunn, senior, St. Albans, W.Va. (reporter); Dave Wilson, junior, St. Mary's, W.Va. (reporter). 

Writing/Documentary Script

The script for the documentary program "To Change or Not to Change Gameday: The Pros and Cons of Weeknight College Football Games" was written by Clark Davis, a graduate student from Huntington. The script was completed Monday, May 9, 2005.

Documentary

"To Change or Not to Change Gameday:  The Pros and Cons of Weeknight College Football Games," a documentary program written and produced by Clark Davis, a graduate student from Huntington.  The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005.

The Awards of Distinction winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories. 

Writing/Documentary Script

The script for the documentary program "Take Charge" was written by Kelsey Austin, a recent graduate from Culloden, W.Va. The script was completed Monday, May 9, 2005.

Documentary

"Take Charge," a documentary program written and produced by Kelsey Austin, a recent graduate from Culloden, W.Va.  The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, Sept. 29, 2005.

Public Service Announcement

"Listen to Your Car," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Brandon Millman, a junior from Huntington.

The honorable mention award winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories. 

Radio Station Promotion

"Live Deejays," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotional Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Jen Smith, a senior from Huntington.

Sports Event

WMUL-FM's live broadcast of the 2005 Capital Classic:  Marshall University versus West Virginia University men's basketball game played at Charleston Civic Center Coliseum in Charleston, W.Va., Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2005.  The students calling the game, which was broadcast over 88.1 in Huntington, were: basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Alex Reed, a senior from Virginia Beach, Va.; and engineer Scott Hall, a senior from Stephens City, Va.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Galardi named Director of Major Gifts for MU Society of Yeager Scholars

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Robert N. Galardi, Director of Development since 2002 with the West Virginia University Extension Service, has been named Director of Major Gifts for the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University.

"This is a career opportunity," Galardi, a Pittsburgh native and graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, said. "It allows me to continue doing what I love to do - raise money in an academic environment to help West Virginia kids go to school."

The Society of Yeager Scholars is a program that provides a scholarship for students that includes tuition and fees, room and board, a stipend for books and supplies, a study abroad experience and the use of a personal computer. The four-year scholarship is awarded as long as the student maintains a 3.5 GPA and an honors course load. The program is named for U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Hamlin, W.Va.

Galardi has set his goals high at Marshall. "We have two years until the 20th anniversary of the Yeager Society," he said. "This milestone presents the opportunity to raise sufficient private funds to restore the number of Yeager Scholars to its original number of 20 annual recipients. That's something I'll be presenting to our board."

Galardi has many accomplishments throughout his 26 year fundraising career. In recent years he:

  • Developed, trained volunteers, and implemented a $7 million capital campaign for the Johnstown (Pa.) Area Heritage Association;
  • Successfully cultivated, solicited and closed two $1 million gifts: one for the Johnstown Area Heritage Association's capital campaign, the second for West Virginia University;
  • Closed the largest private gift received by WVU-Jackson's Mill.  It was a $200,000 donation for the WVU-Jackson's Mill "Save Our Pool" capital campaign;
  • Raised more than $3 million in major gifts at WVU Extension Service.  This amount put WVU Extension Service over its "Building Greatness Capital Campaign" goal of $2.5 million.  The goal was achieved nine months before the campaign deadline.  The final amount raised for the Extension Service's "Building Greatness Capital Campaign" topped $3.1 million;
  • Working with the board of directors and staff, developed and implemented an innovative major gifts campaign strategy at the Johnstown Area Heritage Association, resulting in the three largest major private gifts in the history of the Association;
  • Began and completed a $465,000 "Save Our Pool Campaign," and a $210,000 "Northern Panhandle Cottage Renovation Campaign" at Jackson's Mill.

 "Supporters of the Yeager program who choose to take a close look are always impressed with the caliber of students we attract," Glen Kerkian, Marshall Foundation Inc. President and CEO, said. "With the innovative Board that is currently in place and a seasoned fundraiser like Bob Galardi, our expectations for increased private dollars for Yeager are heightened."

Recent honors for Galardi include the "2005 Outstanding Individual Employee Excellence Award" for successfully completing  three privately funded capital campaigns for WVU Extension Service, and the "2004 West Virginia 4-H All Star Award of Appreciation" for successfully completing the "Save Our Pool Campaign" at WVU Jackson's Mill.

Galardi earned a B.A. degree in Economics from the University of Pittsburgh. He is the father of two children - Jack, 21, who plans to attend the Marshall University Graduate College, and Diane, 19, who is a freshman at Boston University.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 12, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU, community collect toys for local organizations during open house

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the Huntington community teamed up Sunday to help make Christmas special for local boys and girls during an open house at the home of MU President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp.

Guests at the three-hour event brought unwrapped gifts that will be delivered today to the Boys and Girls Club in Guyandotte and Big Brothers-Big Sisters of the Tri-State. Four large containers overflowed with toys by the end of the open house.

A similar toy collection has been conducted in past years by the Marshall University Alumni Association.

"This year, because our open house and the event proposed by the Alumni Association were planned just a few days apart, we decided to combine them," President Kopp said. "The response by the community was overwhelming. Marshall University is honored to have joined with this caring community in helping these two outstanding organizations."

Jane Kopp and Lance West, vice president for alumni development and co-director of the Campaign for National Prominence, will deliver the toys this afternoon. They are expected to visit Big Brothers-Big Sisters at 501 5th Ave. in Huntington at about 3:10 p.m., and the Boys and Girls Club in Guyandotte at about 3:30 p.m.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Pickled Pepper Players entertain hundreds of children during 10-day, 2,400-mile 'Gulf Coast Relief Tour'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Pickled Pepper Players, a touring children's theatre company sponsored by the MU Department of Theatre, traveled to the Gulf Coast recently to do its part in lifting the spirits of children displaced by this year's hurricanes.

On its "Gulf Coast Relief Tour" Nov. 25-Dec. 4, the group gave 24 performances of children's theatre plays for young audiences at 13 locations for 15 different community groups in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The trip took 10 days and covered 2,400 miles.

The cast included Marshall student actors Krista Carter of Elkins, W.Va.; Jennifer Edens of Petersburg, W.Va.; Samantha Elkins of Barboursville, W.Va.; Shay Hannon of Ironton, Ohio; Elissa Horrell of Scott Depot, W.Va.; Karah Markins of Lavalette, W.Va., and Adam Stephens of Charleston, W.Va. Accompanying the students were MU theater professor Mike Murphy and his wife, Karla.

"The cast really gave up their 'dead' week (the week before final exams) to go down and do this," Murphy said. "I can guarantee you that each one came back with much more than they ever thought they would. They learned a lot about themselves, the human spirit, and the resiliency of the people on the Gulf Coast. They saw a whole lot of devastation and communities coming together to rebuild."

The idea for the trip came to Murphy when he was attending a board meeting of the Southeastern Theatre Conference in Charlotte, N.C., a week after Hurricane Katrina hit the coast. Shannon Robert, an associate professor of theatre at William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Miss., suggested benefit performances as fund raisers.

"Through our children's program here (the Pickled Pepper Players), we thought we could take our shows as benefit performances to the Gulf Coast," Murphy said. "The goal from the very beginning was to not be an additional burden on the communities. We wanted to go to whatever community we thought we could benefit."

Murphy said the group was "completely self contained," living in a recreational vehicle the entire time. They brought their own food, water and generator. Karla Murphy drove in a separate vehicle.

The performances staged by the Pickled Pepper Players during the trip were Molly and Her Marvelous Mind and Professor Pocus, both described as character building shows. They had done the same performances at Marshall in late October to raise money for the trip. Molly and Her Marvelous Mind was produced with permission from the Department of Theatre at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, and both plays were directed by Bess Park-Reynolds.

Karla Murphy gave special performances of The Little Old Lady Who Swallowed The Fly to children too young to read. In Slidell, La., she had an audience of about 50 children at the Rainbow Child Care Center.

"The cast was wonderful from day one," Murphy said. "They all said, 'Yeah, let's do it.' They were behind it every inch of the way. You couldn't have asked for better representatives from Marshall University."

The Pickled Pepper Players performed in places such as the Gull Point Recreation Center in Pensacola, Fla.; Mt. Hebron Baptist Church in Mobile, Ala.; Lillie Burnie School and Hope Drive Center in Hattiesburg, Miss.; Townly Center in Laurel, Miss., and Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Bogalusa, La.

Audience sizes and reaction varied at the different venues. Carter stayed in touch each day via email with Lang Reynolds, chair of Marshall's Theatre Department. One note from Carter read, in part:

"Our second and final show for the day was at Oseola McCarty Youth Center (in Hattiesburg, Miss.) and it was scheduled for 5:15. When we arrived, the nearly 40 kids welcomed us with open arms. They had so much energy and were so excited to see us. We set up quickly and went right into Professor Pocus. The children were an absolutely fabulous audience. They laughed during the whole show, clapped when we sang, and participated with smiles on their faces the entire time. Once again, it really helped us to get into it, and remember why we are out here in the first place. They gathered around us after the show, asked a million questions, and tried desperately to help us pack up our stuff. They were all very sweet."

While the children's smiles, hugs and words of thanks thrilled the student actors and the Murphys, seeing the devastation that remains some three months after the hurricanes was heartbreaking, Carter said.

"The damage was still severe. We saw things that broke our hearts," she said. "But it was really amazing to see those kids smile and to hear them talk about what happened, to hear them ask us, 'Do you know what happened?' They were so happy to see us, it made us feel really good. The church pastors thanked us so much and it helped us remember why we went down there."

More information is available by calling Murphy at (304) 696-2517, Reynolds at (304) 696-2546 or Carter at (304) 617-5561.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall jazz groups to be featured at Christmas dance Dec. 10

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 12 O'Clock Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Junta will be featured at a Christmas dance at 8 p.m. this Saturday, Dec. 10 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

The event, which is sponsored by the university's chapter of the International Association for Jazz Education and the Jazz Studies program, is open to the public. General admission tickets are $10 for individuals and $18 per couple. With a valid ID, an MU student may purchase tickets for $8 each or $12 per couple.  Refreshments and food will be provided.  

Proceeds will help fund an upcoming student trip to the annual IAJE Convention in New York City.

For ticket information, persons may contact Holly Linn, Chapter Historian, by phone at (304) 633-8734 or by e-mail at linn3@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 5, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, Communications Director, Student Government Association, (304) 696-6412

Marshall's second annual Luminary Service is Tuesday, Dec. 6

Marshall's second annual Luminary Service is Tuesday, Dec. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's second annual Luminary Service takes place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6 on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

The service, sponsored by the American Cancer Society and conducted with the help of various Marshall students, is a way to honor and remember loved ones who have been diagnosed with cancer.

Candle-lit bags bearing the names of loved ones who have battled cancer will be displayed at the event. Those who attend may purchase the bags at the service for $5, with proceeds going to the American Cancer Society. Additional donations are welcomed.

For more information, persons may contact Becky Fisher at (304) 523-7989.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Parents establish memorial scholarship fund for Misty Dawn Endicott

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A memorial scholarship fund has been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. to celebrate the life of Wayne County native Misty Dawn Endicott, who fulfilled her lifelong dream of becoming a nurse before her untimely death last April at age 32.

A graduate of Ceredo-Kenova High School who attended Marshall, Endicott worked tirelessly to realize her cherished goal of becoming a nurse.  Her family says that even after receiving a scholarship to attend nursing school she continued to take advantage of every opportunity to achieve her dreams and after graduation continued learning and polishing her skills.

Each new scholarship recipient will be a sophomore in the College of Health Professions who has been accepted into the Bachelor of Science Nursing program, has demonstrated financial need and has a 2.5 or better grade point average. Priority will be given to graduates of Spring Valley High School in Wayne County, then to graduates of any Wayne County high school, and then to any West Virginia high school graduates.

The award is for tuition/fees and books and may be renewed for up to three years - six semesters - as long as conditions of the scholarship continue to be met.

Misty Endicott's parents, Jan and Virginia Endicott, established the scholarship. They say they want recipients to know that Endicott walked in their shoes and to never give up on their dreams. The Endicotts are encouraging recipients "to live by Misty's motto, when the world tells you that it is impossible to achieve your dreams, do it and prove them wrong."

The fund will become endowed once a minimum of $10,000 is received.  To contribute to the fund or for additional information about the scholarship, persons may contact Jean Augustine in the Marshall University Development Office at (304) 696-6214 or by e-mail at augustin@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor part of U.S. delegation that attended inaugural ISO meeting on nanotechnology in London

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ashok Vaseashta, a Marshall University College of Science professor, attended the inaugural meeting of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 229, which focuses on nanotechnology, Nov. 9-11 in London.

Nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of reduced dimensional materials, structures, devices and systems with novel properties and functions that are achieved through the control of matter, atom-by-atom, molecule-by-molecule, at or below the micromolecular level.

Vaseashta said nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary research endeavor demonstrating great potential across many traditional fields of application.

"Development of international standards will have an important function in facilitating the beneficial use of nanotechnology and in helping achieve its full potential, the transition to commercialization, and public acceptance of nanotechnology-based products," he said.

Vaseashta participated in the London meeting as a member of an impressive U.S. delegation that included representatives of industry, government, academia and the legal profession. According to the committee's scope, ISO/TC 229 will produce standards for classification, terminology and nomenclature, basic metrology, calibration and certification, and environmental issues related to nanotechnology.

It also will develop standardized test methods that will focus on physical, chemical, structural and biological properties of materials or devices whose performance is critically dependent on one or more dimensions of less than 100 nanometers.

The British Standards Institute (BSI)  served as host of the inaugural meeting, which was attended by 22 national delegations from throughout the world, including Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Sweden, Switzerland and the U.S. The BSI will serve as the chair and secretariat of the new committee of standards.

The U.S. delegation secured a unique position on a key formative task force on health, safety and the environment. "This opportunity will provide the U.S. with a key role in the development of standards," Vaseashta said.

The American delegation represents the American National Standards Institute or ANSI. "The combination of excellent leadership, active participation by a broad base of nanotechnology experts, and ANSI's collective expertise ensured that the U.S. was able to successfully assume the international leadership role set as a goal at the onset of this activity just earlier this year," ANSI president and CEO Mark W. Hurwitz said.

Vaseashta is a leading advocate of nanotechnology and often is invited for lectures and seminars across the globe. Earlier this semester he was invited by the students of the universities in Lithuania to give an invited talk on "Nanostructured Materials Based Devices and Sensors" at their annual International Summer School conference in Palanga, Lithuania.

He also was invited to present a talk at the First International Workshop on Semiconductor Nanocrystals held in Budapest, Hungary. Both meetings were organized under the European Union's Framework Program (FP6) for Research and Technological Development.

Vaseashta serves as a liaison for Eastern European students for Marshall's Center for International Programs.

"Since coming to Marshall, Dr. Vaseashta has launched numerous international collaborations and secured grants and funding for various research projects," Dr. Clark Egnor, director of the Center for International Programs, said. "Since he often involves his undergraduate and graduate students in his international research collaborations, Dr. Vaseashta is making significant contributions to our international efforts by ensuring that Marshall graduates are prepared to live and work in a global environment."

For more information, persons may contact Vaseashta at Vaseashta@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Mid-Ohio Valley Center breaks ground for expansion

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As the reputation of Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va., grows, so does enrollment - and the need for more facilities.

To meet the expanding needs of accelerated high school students, traditional college age students and adults who have chosen to return to school in the Mid-Ohio Valley, Marshall's Board of Governors earlier this year approved a $2.5 million, 8,100 square-foot expansion of this six-year-old center. 

An original bond issue, with an outstanding balance of about $2.6 million, will be refinanced by the Mason County Building Commission, which will sell additional bonds of $2.5 million for the expansion.

Today, Marshall President Stephen Kopp and U.S. Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito joined MOVC officials and others in a groundbreaking ceremony for the project. Construction is expected to begin next spring.

"This expansion will enhance our offerings to our students by allowing us to offer state-of-the-art chemistry and biology lab space and a nursing lab that will be second to none," Homer Preece, director of the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, said.

The Mid-Ohio Valley Center, which is affiliated with Marshall's School of Extended Education, was established in April 1994 and opened with limited operation and an enrollment of 11 students. From then until spring 2005, enrollment grew to more than 1,500 registrations.

"The future success of West Virginia's economy is dependent on an educated workforce that can compete worldwide," Capito said. "Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center is helping keep today's workforce competitive by training workers for high demand positions while giving tomorrow's workers the opportunity to gain the skills they need to compete in a global economy."

MOVC classes were conducted for the first five years at Point Pleasant High School, Wahama High School and the Mason County Career Center. Preece's office and other administrative offices were located at Bank One.

"We expanded and expanded and got to the point where we were running out of room at the secondary level," Preece said, referring to the need for a single, large facility.

The current $3 million facility was built on the campus of Pleasant Valley Hospital, and opened in 2000. Now, more expansion is on the horizon.

"When we moved in, the new building was the right size," Preece said. "Within a year, we were back using county facilities again."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp described the Mid-Ohio Valley Center as "an unequivocal success story and a testament to the power of university-community partnerships."

"The civic and business leaders of Mason County, including Pleasant Valley Hospital, have been outstanding partners," Kopp said. "Together, we are making a difference in the lives and career opportunities available to residents of the county and surrounding areas. I am proud of our faculty and staff at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center. Their achievements and success have created the conditions that have made this new expansion possible."

The architect for the expansion, which will increase the size of the MOVC by about 60 percent, is Bastian and Harris of Charleston, W.Va.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Knight Foundation awards grant to Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has awarded the Marshall University W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications a $167,000 grant to help journalists improve coverage of nonprofit organizations.

The grant means that The Fourth Estate and The Third Sector, the only national training program of its kind for journalists who cover nonprofits, is moving to Marshall University after four years at the University of Mississippi. It also expands the program's outreach to Washington and the northeast.

Burnis R. Morris, Marshall's Carter G. Woodson Professor, created the program in 2001 as a member of the journalism faculty at Mississippi. Knight Foundation transferred the grant to Marshall after Morris joined the school's permanent faculty this semester.

"Nonprofits are important engines of community life in every U.S. city and town," said Alberto Ibarguen, president and CEO of Knight Foundation. "This program has done much to expose U.S. journalists to important issues, stories, trends and sources."

Marshall President Stephen Kopp said, "Marshall University is very pleased to have this important program and grant from the Knight Foundation moved to Marshall's School of Journalism and Mass Communications. This signals a new level of service and recognition that the School of Journalism has assumed. Students, faculty and professionals in the field of journalism will experience the impact of this initiative."

Dean Corley Dennison described the grant as "a major initiative for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications."

"I believe this is the first significant Knight Foundation Grant to be awarded in West Virginia, and it is quite appropriate since John S. Knight, one of the giants of 20th century journalism, was born in Bluefield, W. Va., in 1894," Dennison said.

The Fourth Estate and the Third Sector is an outgrowth of Morris's work involving nonprofits and journalism. From 1993 to 1997, he helped Independent Sector, a Washington-based national leadership forum, hold conferences at five journalism schools on improving news coverage of the tax-exempt community. He also wrote two books offering journalists advice on coverage.

After he joined the University of Mississippi faculty in 1998, Morris proposed a national training program that would be based at Mississippi and funded by Knight. The first of the Knight training programs was held in 2002.

Morris, a former reporter and editor, said he "wants journalists to think of nonprofits as a serious beat - the way they think about politics, business and government. I want them to cover the nonprofit community as aggressively as they cover other important beats.

"I don't want anyone to attend a fundraiser for a charity and take pictures of rich people drinking wine and eating brie, and think they've covered a charity. I want journalists to realize they have a lot more work to do."

At Marshall, Morris will direct a program for 20 journalism fellows who will study nonprofits and journalism at Marshall next May 17-21. The fellows, selected from nominations by practicing journalists, will study such topics as philanthropy, accountability, tax rules, politics, fundraising and reading and understanding financial data.

Morris also will conduct a one-day conference for journalists on Thursday, Dec. 8 in Washington. That conference will help journalists identify the major issues confronting nonprofits in 2006. A similar program will be held in March at The Record in Hackensack, N.J., for Northeastern journalists.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation promotes excellence in journalism worldwide and invests in the vitality of 26 U.S. communities. Over the past 50 years, the foundation has invested nearly $250 million in journalism initiatives.

For more information, persons may contact Morris via email at morrisb@marshall.edu or by calling (304) 638-3322.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday November 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community invited to lighting ceremony, holiday party

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Huntington campus will light up for the holidays during a special evening of festivities on Monday, Nov. 28.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp says everyone in the Marshall community is invited to attend the annual lighting ceremony at 6:30 p.m. on the plaza area near the Drinko Library. Holiday lights hung on campus by MU students, along with a Christmas tree inside the Drinko Library, will be illuminated during the ceremony.
 
After the lighting ceremony at 7 p.m., everyone is invited to head over to the Memorial Student Center for a holiday party filled with food, fun and entertainment. The party will take place in the Don Morris Room, located on the second floor of the student center. Santa Claus will be on hand to pose for pictures with children of all ages.
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday November 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU graduate assistant's works on display Dec. 4-11 at Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The works of Marshall University graduate assistant Jackie Parsons will be on display for a week in early December in the Birke Art Gallery, which is located on the first floor of Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

Parsons' work features large-scale prints that express the female figure as a container and explore the connection that women have with vessels.

The exhibition runs Sunday, Dec. 4 through Sunday, Dec. 11.  An opening reception is planned for 2 p.m. Dec. 4 at the gallery, which may be accessed on the Third Avenue side of Smith Hall. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 6 to 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.

For more information, persons may contact Emily Ritchey, Birke Art Gallery director, at (304) 696-2296 or the department of art and design at (304) 696-6760.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Author of new essays on nature to read from his work Dec. 1

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer and essayist Jim Minick will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1 in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Minick is the author of a new collection of essays on nature, Finding a Clear Path, published by West Virginia University Press.

His poems and essays have appeared in many books and periodicals including Orion, Shenandoah, Encyclopedia of Appalachia, Appalachian Journal, Appalachian Heritage, and Wind. Since 1996, Minick has written a regular column for The Roanoke Times New River Current as well as other articles that have appeared in major newspapers throughout the south.

Finding a Clear Path intertwines literature, agriculture, and ecology as Minick takes readers on journeys through the marvelous natural world, encountering monarch butterflies and morel mushrooms, beavers, black snakes, bloodroot and other subjects. A blueberry farmer, gardener and naturalist, Minick explores Appalachia with wit, sensitivity and wisdom.

Minick lives, writes and farms in southwest Virginia. He teaches writing and literature at Radford University.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts. For more information, persons may contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday November 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Six hundred pounds of nickels delivered to Marshall University; part of Fort Gay High School Alumni Association's latest gift

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Fort Gay High School Alumni Association has given Marshall University thousands of dollars in contributions, but the group's latest donation was delivered to the school today in an unusual fashion.

The group wanted to mark the unveiling of the new buffalo nickel, which occurred earlier this year, and honor Marshall University by making part of its $34,000 donation in nickels. Today, 600 pounds of the coins were delivered via backhoe to the campus, accompanied by officers from the Marshall University Police Department and the Huntington Police Department.

"A major gift comprised of buffalo nickels is a very unique way of highlighting both scholarship and the Thundering Herd.  When we discuss having every penny count in higher education, we discover that our Fort Gay alumni group has gone five times better,"   said Dr. H. Keith Spears, Marshall's Vice President of Communications and Marketing and a graduate of Fort Gay High School in Wayne County.

"We appreciate David Graley of Bank One helping us with the logistics in obtaining the nickels and Rick Weston of Walker Cat for the heavy equipment transportation," Spears added.

Richard Plymale, president of the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association, explained the reason for the organization's continuing support of Marshall.

"We who graduated from Fort Gay High School came away with a set of values and a work ethic which we didn't see duplicated everywhere," Plymale said. "We wanted to give something back to our community and a scholarship at Marshall seemed like a good way to accomplish that."

Glen Kerkian, President/CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., praised the FGHS alumni for their efforts.

"This fine tradition of grassroots fundraising by the Fort Gay Alumni Association has created a conduit for attracting students to Marshall and then providing them with the critical resources when they arrive," Kerkian said.

In 1988, Fort Gay High School consolidated with Crum High School to form Tolsia High School. One student is chosen each year to receive the Fort Gay High School scholarship.

More information is available by calling Spears at (304) 696-2965.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM wins Broadcast Best of Show award again

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, recently received the Broadcast Best of Show award for the sixth time in as many contests at the 84th annual National College Media Convention/2005 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) Annual College Competition ceremony.

The broadcast category was for radio only and was offered for only the sixth time in 2005 to recognize excellence among broadcasting attendees. Marshall has won Best of Show each of the six years the category has been offered.

The event took place Sunday, Oct. 30, in the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City, Mo. The Broadcast Best of Show award winning entry by WMUL-FM was a 30-minute newscast: "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" for Monday, March 14, 2005. The students who participated in the newscast were:

Jen Smith, junior, Huntington, W.Va., producer; Vince Payne, graduate student, Hansford, W.Va., news anchor; Melanie Chapman, senior, McConnell, W.Va., news anchor; Brandon Millman, junior, Huntington, W.Va., weather anchor; Alex Reed, senior, Virginia Beach, Va., sports anchor; Dave Mistich, junior, Washington, W.Va., reporter; Joey Spurgeon, senior, Culloden, W.Va., reporter; Phil Turner, graduate student, Huntington, W.Va., reporter.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the campus radio station competed with other broadcasting stations from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the convention.       

The Best of Show competition is open only to publications and media outlets that send student delegates to the national convention. The competition is divided into eight newspaper categories, two yearbook categories, two magazine categories, and the one broadcast category. The entries were evaluated for general excellence, but emphasis was placed on reporting and leadership as expressed through content.

"This is an honor for WMUL-FM and all the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications students featured on the Best of Show entry," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

The second-place award for the 2005 Broadcast Best of Show was won by the Savannah College of Art and Design.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Leah Edwards, Office of University Communications, (304) 696-6397

Marshall University marks contribution in unusual way

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will receive via special "delivery" a generous gift from the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association on Saturday, Nov. 19. 
 
The FGHS Alumni Association has given Marshall thousands of dollars over the years, but its latest donation will come, in part, in the form of buffalo nickels. Marshall will receive the donation at 1 p.m. Saturday on the Huntington campus.
 
 
WHAT: Marshall University receives an unusual donation from the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association.
 
WHEN: 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19
 
WHERE: Marshall mascot "Marco" and his police escort will accompany an end loader as it leaves the Bank One parking lot at about 12:45 p.m. and carries the nickels east on 4th Avenue to the entrance of Marshall's Old Main on Hal Greer Boulevard where the nickels will be "deposited." Light refreshments will be served.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Public forum at Marshall allows West Virginia middle school students to speak out about the achievement gap

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A public forum titled "West Virginia Middle School Students Speak Out About The Achievement Gap" will be conducted on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, Nov. 28.

The event, which takes place in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, begins at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. It is presented by The Education Alliance, and is sponsored by The Huntington Black Ministerial Alliance, the Huntington-Cabell Branch of the NAACP, Cabell County Schools and the Marshall University Division of Multicultural Affairs.

Dr. Betty Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall, said the forum is the result of a study launched by Dr. Hazel K. Palmer, President/CEO of The Education Alliance. The goal of the study was to determine what actions administrators of West Virginia's middle schools can take to raise student achievement and close the achievement gap between middle-class white students and African-American or economically disadvantaged white students.

The Education Alliance is a nonprofit organization serving schools in West Virginia by promoting business and community involvement in public schools 

Results of the study will be the subject of a roundtable discussion at Marshall's public forum. Roundtable participants include Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; Rosalyn Templeton, dean of Marshall's College of Education and Human Services; Bill Smith, superintendent of Cabell County Schools and a member of Marshall's Board of Governors; Samuel R. Moore, president of the Huntington-Cabell Branch of the NAACP and a teacher; Joe Williams, a former member of MU's Board of Governors, parent Feon Smith and two local middle school students.

The audience will be invited to participate in the roundtable discussion.

"The achievement gap is a big issue, which we need all citizens involved in solving," Cleckley said. "That is what the public forum is all about.  We expect to hear a variety of opinions about the role of schools, higher education and the public to provide all children a quality education."

For more information, persons may contact Marshall's Multicultural Affairs at (304) 696-4677.

 

View Education Alliance Report at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/RELEASE/2005/AchievementGap.pdf

 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

CD by MU professors features music from era of John Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music professors of flute and voice and a guitarist have collaborated to produce a recording of music from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall, for whom the university is named.

The CD, titled "Rallying 'Round Our Liberty," features Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of flute; Linda Dobbs, professor of voice, and Dr. Leo Welch, former professor of guitar at Marshall who now is at Florida State University.

The project was sponsored in part by Marshall's John Deaver Drinko Academy and College of Fine Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the West Virginia Division of Culture and History.

Wendell Dobbs said that he first became interested in music of the early 19th century about 25 years ago while working on his doctorate. Since then, he has studied traditional music from Ireland, Scotland, and England as well as that of the United States.

When he first began looking at this literature, he found that the historically accurate instruments were not available for performing this music. However, he has since been able to acquire a historical copy of a flute produced by the London company Rudall and Rose. The instrument was made by John Gallagher of Elkins, W.Va.

"It's been so serendipitous to find an instrument maker of John Gallagher's skill," Dobbs said. "He's opened a whole area of discovery for me which simply would not have been possible on modern instruments."

The flute is made from African blackwood with eight silver keys.

Most of the selections on the recording were arranged for guitar by Welch. Welch and Dobbs collaborated on some of the other arrangements.

The CD is available at the Marshall University Bookstore on the Huntington campus.  For further information, persons may contact Wendell Dobbs at (304) 696-2359 or by e-mail at dobbs@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University begins process of creating strategic vision

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Led by Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp's goal of actualizing MU's "tremendous potential," the university has begun the process of creating a strategic vision that will be implemented through a collaborative effort between Marshall and its public constituents. Kopp describes the process outlined as inclusive, dynamic and ongoing.

At a news conference this afternoon in the Communications Building on Marshall's Huntington campus, Kopp announced that the process of enlisting ideas to be considered for the plan, not only from students, faculty and staff at Marshall, but also from MU's  broad constituent base - alumni, friends, elected officials, members of the public, etc. - has begun.

"An inclusive process that inspires active participation across all constituent groups creates a sense of ownership of the plan and a pervasive dedication to accomplishing its goals," Kopp, MU's president for the past 4 months, said. "This is an opportunity that invites everyone to the table who wants to participate and share their ideas for shaping the future of Marshall."

The input stage began today and continues through Dec. 19. During that time, all constituents will use a specific Web site to submit their ideas concerning the university's future priorities. The site to be used is www.marshall.edu/strategic.

 

Complete press release available at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2005/pr112005.htm


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 16, 2005
Contact: Keith Spears, Vice President for Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

President Kopp to make major announcement about the direction of Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, will make a major announcement regarding the direction of the university at 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 in the Communications Building next to Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

The announcement will impact every student, staff and faculty member within Marshall for the next 10 years and beyond.

WHAT: President Stephen J. Kopp will make a major announcement about the future of Marshall University. Link to Live Event

WHEN:  1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17.

WHERE:  Studio A, Communications Building (next to Smith Hall), Marshall University's Huntington campus.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Egnor wins Cyrus R. Vance Award for International Education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Clark M. Egnor, Executive Director of the Center for International Programs at Marshall University, has been named the winner of the 2005 Cyrus R. Vance Award for International Education in West Virginia in the category of  postsecondary educators and institutions.

Egnor, who was nominated by Marshall associate professor of classics Dr. Jerise Fogel, received the award Monday, Nov. 14 at a dinner and reception sponsored by the Office of the Cabinet Secretary of Education and the Arts, the Higher Education Policy Commission, and the West Virginia Department of Education as part of International Education Week. Retired General Wes Clark, Supreme Allied Commander of NATO from 1997 to 2000, was the keynote speaker.

"I was very proud to receive this award, but there are many faculty and staff at Marshall who have helped to internationalize our campus over the years and they should also share in this recognition," Egnor said.

The Vance award carries with it a $5,000 grant.  Egnor said that he will apply it to the recently established Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Scholarship Fund to help Marshall students study abroad.

"I hope others who have benefited from the Study Abroad program will join me in supporting the fund and remembering the work of Clair Matz," he said.

Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, served as a member of the Marshall faculty from 1970 until his death in 2003 and established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

"Dr. Egnor's work has been quietly leading to a revolution in the university's approach to internationalism on campus," Fogel said in her letter of nomination. "Clark's use of his office to advocate for the inclusion of international education as part of the university's mission - both in word and in deed - has had a remarkable impact His achievements over his career at Marshall are amazing by any account."

The Cyrus R. Vance Awards were created by the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts in 2001 to honor West Virginia educators who best exemplify Vance's dedication to the understanding of international issues and affairs and promote greater international understanding among West Virginia students.

A native of Clarksburg, Vance served as Secretary of State under President Jimmy Carter, Deputy Secretary of Defense under President Lyndon B. Johnson, and Secretary of the Army under President John F. Kennedy.  He also served as a special presidential envoy to many of the flashpoints of the 20th century: the Panama Canal Zone, Cyprus, Vietnam, South Africa, and Croatia. Vance died in January 2002.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 11, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Marshall medical students hold fitness fairs for Lavalette, Altizer students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall medical students will help fifth‑graders dance, jump and race their way toward healthier lifestyles this month at Lavalette and Altizer elementary schools.

The "Let's Get Moving" fitness fairs will be held Nov. 15 at Lavalette Elementary and Nov. 22 at Altizer Elementary. An expansion of a program begun by medical students this spring, the fairs are the first of at least 10 planned for the current school year.

"The medical students organized three 'Let's Get Moving' fitness fairs last year and the success was incredible. The smiles on the students' faces said it all," said Dr. Aaron McGuffin, senior associate dean for medical student education. "The children of West Virginia need to know that we care about their health and that fitness can be fun."

Third-year medical student Samantha Cook of Huntington, one of the program's organizers, said medical students will supervise several activity stations in each school's gym. The fifth‑graders will rotate among the stations, competing for dozens of prizes for activities ranging from jumping rope and running an obstacle course to the video game Dance Dance Revolution. Two winners of a "Physical Fitness" essay contest at each school will receive bicycles and helmets. Students also will rotate through a nutrition station where they will learn about making healthy food choices and the most recent changes to the food pyramid.

At one station, medical students will privately check each child's blood pressure, height, weight and calculate their body mass index. Each child's health information will be sent home to his or her parents in a sealed packet, along with information about how excess weight contributes to diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, Cook said.

In addition, for children with abnormal blood pressure or BMI measurements, parents will receive a recommendation to follow up with their child's physician. For children who do not have a physician, contact information will be provided for physicians who have agreed to see any child referred by the program: University Pediatrics in Huntington and Dr. Adam Franks and Dr. Kevin McCann of University Family Practice of Wayne County.

The West Virginia State Medical Association has provided $2,000 to support the Let's Get Moving fairs, and local businesses are providing significant additional support by donating prizes for the events.

"We at the State Medical Association are proud to support this project," said Sen. Evan Jenkins, its executive director. "It's terrific for the med students to take this initiative, and hopefully their work will help our state's youth make good, healthy lifestyle choices."

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

2005 International Festival kicks off International Education Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University kicks off International Education Week Sunday, Nov. 13 with the 39th annual International Festival in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on MU's Huntington campus.

The theme of the festival, which takes place from 3 to 6 p.m., is "Together in a Global Community," emphasizing the pressing need to understand each other in light of current events worldwide.

The festival features exotic foods, traditional music and dance along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures. All of this will be provided by Marshall University international students and international community individuals and groups such as the Huntington Women's International Club.

Currently, Marshall has 400 international students enrolled from more than 60 countries.  Exhibits, food sampling and entertainment will be provided, and admission is free.

In addition to the International Festival, Marshall is host to the 3rd annual Festival of Flags, which features a spectacular display of flags from all of the countries where the university draws international students or sends students to study abroad.  This semester's festival features flags from more than 60 countries and regions of the world.  The Festival of Flags is sponsored by Student Affairs, the June Harless Center and the Center for International Programs.

Dr. Clark M. Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs, said the festival is the perfect opportunity for individuals to celebrate the rich diversity found in the Tri-State area.

"The International Festival allows the community to celebrate its multi-cultural heritage and showcases the many nationalities of those studying and teaching at Marshall University," Egnor said.

All Tri-state area residents are invited to attend the festival.  For further details about the International Festival and International Education Week activities, persons may contact Scott C. Hoppe, director of the International Students and Scholars Program, at (304) 696-2379, hopes@marshall.edu, or visit the Marshall University Center for International Programs office in Old Main 320.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU's Huntington campus to be decorated Sunday for holidays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Winter Festival Committee is giving Marshall students the opportunity to help spruce up campus for the holidays on Decorating Day Sunday, Nov. 13.

Students interested in stringing lights and hanging other decorations are asked to meet at 2 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza on MU's Huntington campus. Faculty, staff and members of the community are invited to participate as well. Pizza and soft drinks will be served afterwards.

The traditional lighting ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28 on the plaza outside the Drinko Library. Refreshments will be served in the Memorial Student Center lobby after the ceremony. Participants will have the opportunity to have their pictures taken with Santa Claus.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduation, retention rates on the rise at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Graduation and retention rates are on the rise at Marshall University, Provost Sarah Denman said today in a report to the institution's board of governors in the board's regular meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

Denman said Marshall has exceeded its goal of raising its graduation rate by at least one percent per year since the 1999-2000 school year, when the rate was 33 percent. According to preliminary calculations, this year's graduation rate is 43 percent, greatly exceeding the minimum goal set five years ago. It's also already higher than the legislated goals of 40 percent for 2008, and approaching the 2010 goal of 45 percent.

"We are very confident we can meet the goal of 45 percent in 2010," Denman said.

Denman also announced that the retention rate for first-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen in 2004 to this fall was 75 percent. The rate the previous year was 72 percent.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said news of the improved graduation and retention rates is very positive for the university.

"Marshall University is the people's university in West Virginia, and we are committed to their access and success," Kopp said.

Also today, Kopp announced that the accounting firm of Deloitte and Touche, LLP, recently completed the annual financial audit of Marshall, and the result was very favorable. In fact, Dennis Juran, a managing partner with Deloitte and Touche, described the audit as being "as good as you can get."

"We are very pleased with our annual financial audit," Kopp said. "The financial results are good and we received an unqualified audit opinion from our auditor and no management letter. This means that the auditor noted no instances of noncompliance or other matters that would require reporting under government auditing standards."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community College, Mountain State School of Massage sign articulation agreement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Community and Technical College and the Mountain State School of Massage signed an articulation agreement today in a ceremony on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The agreement will allow students and alumni of Mountain State School of Massage to take courses in general education from Marshall Community and Technical College that will lead to an Associate in Applied Science degree.

An articulation agreement occurs when the college evaluates and recognizes postsecondary training that is done by an agency other than a traditional higher education entity (college) and that training has been determined to have the academic rigor of sufficient quality to be equivalent to college-level coursework.

"Today's signing ceremony is possible because of the hard work of Janet Smith, MC & TC Allied Health Division, and Vanessa Hendley, assistant director from Mountain State School of Massage," said  Steve Brown, MC&TC's associate dean and director of Off-Campus Programs.  "For months they worked together to review the Massage Therapy learning outcomes and to have the program of study approved."

The first established massage therapy school in West Virginia, Mountain State School of Massage, which is located in Charleston, was founded in 1995 and is accredited by the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA). 

The school is permitted by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission to operate as a postsecondary school providing education for individuals pursuing massage therapy as a career.  MSSM also is approved by the National Certification Board of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) as a continuing education provider.

"Mountain State School of Massage has a training program and they are eager to have their students earn a degree," Brown said. "A degree is not required to work in the field of massage therapy but this agreement provides students an opportunity to fulfill their educational goals as lifelong learners."

The MSSM program is a rigorous one, with multiple educational options to take classes, according to Brown.  "They have a full daytime program as well as weekend and night programs," he said. "Once someone completes their massage therapy training, we will accept their certificate and award equivalent college credits, and then the student will need to complete our college's general education components to earn their degree."

Those students who have previously completed the Mountain State School of Massage training programs are eligible to take college courses to complete the degree as well as currently enrolled students, Brown said.  "It's a very flexible educational program, which provides educational opportunities to students in our service area," he added.               


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday November 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend is Nov. 11-12 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2005 Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend will take place at Marshall University Friday, Nov. 11 and Saturday, Nov. 12.

The 19th annual event is sponsored by the Marshall University Center for African American Students' Programs. The event is expected to bring in high school students from West Virginia and nearby schools in Kentucky and Ohio. Parents also are invited to visit the campus.

The special weekend is designed to promote college attendance and to familiarize the students with the Huntington campus and the quality academic options available at Marshall. Students are selected based on their academic success and leadership abilities.

"We have a great deal of pride at Marshall in our ability to recruit and retain academically promising African American students from around the state and region," Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said. "The weekend will be a great experience for the students and will serve as a primary event to attract the most gifted black high school students and to showcase our rich academic environment and enjoyable campus life."

The following is a schedule of events for the weekend:

Friday, Nov. 11

12:30 p.m. - arrival and registration, Memorial Student Center lobby

1:30 p.m. - student/parent orientation, Memorial Student Center

2 p.m. - student educational seminar and campus tours

4:30 p.m.  - students meet and greet with student hosts and hostesses, Memorial Student Center

6 p.m. - 19th annual Outstanding Black High School Students' Banquet for students and families, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center. Featured speaker is Dr. Kim Bradshaw Austin, a Huntington native, and a former Outstanding Black High School Student and Yeager Scholar. She is a graduate of Marshall University's School of Medicine and currently is practicing medicine in Columbus, Ohio.

8:30 p.m. - free social time

9:30 p.m. - student dance, Marco's, Memorial Student Center

Saturday, Nov. 12

8 a.m. - students' and parents' breakfast with faculty and deans, Harless Dining Hall

9 a.m. - college displays, Memorial Student Center lobby

9:30 a.m. - students and parents meet college deans

10:30 a.m. - parents' informational panel with university administrators, deans, faculty and financial aid staff, and students' informational panel with student organizations, Memorial Student Center.

More information on the 2005 Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend is available by calling Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Stadium lot must be cleared by 4 p.m. Tuesday, MU director says

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In preparation for Marshall University's 7:30 p.m. football game Tuesday evening (Nov. 8) with Southern Mississippi, all automobiles must be removed from the Joan C. Edwards Stadium west lot and the west annex by 4 p.m. that day, James Terry, director of public safety at MU, said today.

All student, evening and garage parking permits will be honored in lots other than the stadium west lot and west annex, Terry said. No tailgating on Marshall's lots will be allowed until the university closes at 4:30 p.m.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's School of Journalism announces grand opening

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications (JMC) will celebrate the grand opening of its new location at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8 in the Communications Building on Marshall University's Huntington campus.
 
All of the various majors offered by the school, one of the most popular programs at Marshall University, will be housed within the Communications Building. It now will serve the more than 400 students who study journalism, advertising and public relations at Marshall. Since 1966, the JMC program was located on the third floor of Smith Hall.

WHAT: Grand opening of the new home for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications in the Communications Building at Marshall University. 
 
WHEN: 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005.
 
WHERE: Next to Smith Hall at Marshall University's Huntington campus, near the corner of Hal Greer Boulevard and Third Avenue.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, SGA Communications Director, (304) 696-6412

Service to honor victims on 35th anniversary of crash; Herd to pay tribute with special decal on helmets during game with ECU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association will honor the memories of the 75 people who died in the MU plane crash 35 years ago with a memorial service at noon Monday, Nov. 14.

The annual service, which is open to the public, will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza near the Memorial Fountain. Among those expected to attend and speak are West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin and Frank Loria Jr., son of former assistant coach Frank Loria, who died in the crash.

In addition to the traditional placing of a memorial wreath at the fountain and the silencing of the fountain until next spring, the SGA will unveil a new decal to be placed on the helmets of Thundering Herd football players during their Nov. 19 game with East Carolina University at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

East Carolina is the school Marshall played on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970, in Greenville, N.C. At approximately 7:47 p.m. that day, the plane carrying the Herd home from its game at ECU crashed near Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 aboard. The victims included 37 MU football players, five coaches, seven staff members, 21 community supporters and five crew of the DC-9 jetliner.

This will be the second time since the tragedy that Marshall's football team has played East Carolina in the regular season. The Thundering Herd lost to the Pirates 45-0 in Greenville, N.C., in 1978, but beat ECU in the 2001 GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Ala., 64-61, in double overtime.

The new, quarter-sized decal will be placed on the helmets of Marshall football players as a way to show their respect and remembrance for those who lost their lives in the crash. The decal was designed by Student Government Association Athletics Liaison Colleen Talley.

Student Body President Michael Misiti said he is honored to be a part of this year's plane crash service.

"It is always an honor for our organization to host the plane crash service," Misiti said. "The entire student body is well aware of what happened 35 years ago and we are reminded daily of the significance of the tragedy when we walk past the fountain. To have the opportunity to let the entire football team pay their respects to the victims by wearing this decal on their helmets will be another wonderful expression of our compassion for the victims and the families of those killed in the tragedy."

A moment of silence will be observed during the game with East Carolina. Also, a pennant-shaped flag honoring the victims will fly at the stadium.

For more information, persons may contact Talley at (304) 696-2289, or Misiti at (304) 696- 6436.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Lewis College of Business and Corps of Engineers team together to create leaders

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve individuals chosen from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Huntington district were introduced to leadership concepts in October as part of their participation in the Leadership Intern Program (LIP) offered by Marshall University's Lewis College of Business, Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of the college, said today.

The group met with local leaders and local businesses in addition to traveling to Indianapolis, Ind., to visit Simon Property Group, the largest retail real estate company in the world. 

While at Simon, the team met with various representatives from top management.  The focus of the three-day leadership workshop, according to John Rulli, chief operating officer of Simon and a Marshall alumnus, was to key in on the three ingredients of a high-performing organization - people, process and structure. 

Rulli worked closely with Dr. Lorraine P. Anderson, associate dean of the Lewis College of Business and Marshall's director of LIP, to create a program that would provide the group with examples of best practices in business. 

"Through visits to organizations such as Simon, the participants of LIP expand their knowledge of leadership principles as well as develop themselves professionally," Anderson said. 

Jim Shiner, Corps liaison for the program, said the field trips are an integral part of the program.

"They afford the interns the opportunity to see how high-performing organizations apply the various concepts of leadership they are taught in the classroom," Shiner said. 

In addition to Rulli, the interns heard from Bryan Wiggins of MarketSphere Consulting as to how they use people, process and structure to solve complex problems for clients.  Dave Schacht, Senior VP and CIO of Simon, said communication issues often are more "cultural than technological."  Two other speakers from Simon discussed different aspects of achieving results with people and processes in a matrix structure. 

The LIP interns also were treated to a private meeting with Rick Carlisle, head coach of the Indiana Pacers, who told the group, "If the people ingredient of a team is broken, nothing works." Carlisle also said he had never "coached" players, but "worked" with them. 

Prior to the trip to Simon, the Corps leadership interns met with leaders from Toyota Motor Manufacturing in Buffalo, W.Va., including Mike Lutz, assistant general manager of administration.  Toyota's management team conveyed the essence of the Toyota Production Process, which focuses on planning, standardization, respect for people and continuous improvement.  Moreover, the LIP participants learned that the Toyota culture encourages all employees to reduce waste and work on root causes to solve problems. 

Representatives from Amazon.com's Huntington location brought a different leadership perspective to the LIP interns.   Krista Booth, Human Resources generalist, said decisions made by the company and the individuals are based on six core values - customer obsession, innovation, bias for action, ownership, high hiring bar and frugality.

Additionally, Michael J. Farrell, a member of Marshall's board of governors and a Huntington attorney, addressed the group.  Farrell presented leadership as a combination of style and substance.  He said that to be an effective leader one must have the proper attitude, conduct, effective listening skills and behavior.  Farrell also noted that a leader must have the right people, structures, facilities and resources. 

Ted Hamb, one of the current LIP participants, described the series of field trips as a "once-in-a-lifetime" experience.  "Every organization has problems, but how you deal with the problems defines your organization," he said. 

Marshall University, through the Lewis College of Business, has partnered with the Corps of Engineers to provide the Leadership Intern Program since 1998.  The Corps chooses the 12 individuals on a competitive basis for participation in the prestigious program.  The Leadership Intern Program consists of 80 hours of classroom instruction, retreats, extensive leadership assessments, field trips and a group project.

For more information, persons may contact Anderson at (304) 696-2611.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to conduct public sale of surplus computing equipment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, of surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 at its new Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 200 computers will be sold in lots of five or more with minimum bids on some lots. About 10 of the better computers will be sold as individual units. Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the purchasing department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. from Tuesday, Nov. 15 through Thursday, Nov. 17.  Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers and monitors have recently been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold will soon be available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.  Interested buyers may also visit the Web page and subscribe to e-mail notifications for detailed descriptions of equipment and future sales.  Future sale dates are planned for Jan. 30, 2006; March 20, 2006; May 22, 2006; July 17, 2006; and Sept. 18, 2006. These dates are subject to change.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Papa John's continues to 'Drum Up A Deal' during Marshall-Southern Miss game Nov. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to continue fundraising for Marshall scholarships, the Marshall University Alumni Association will partner again with local Papa John's locations to raise scholarship funds through a second "Drum Up A Deal" event on Tuesday, Nov. 8. This date coincides with the Marshall-Southern Mississippi football game, which kicks off at 7:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

For every pizza sold, five Tri-State area Papa John's stores will donate 20 percent of their sales above average sales towards scholarships for Marshall students.

"While we were able to raise more than $500, we want to do more for Marshall," said David Riggs, general manager with Papa John's. "Weekday games are perfect for pizza, so we're hopeful that Thundering Herd fans will take advantage of this opportunity."

Participating Papa John's locations include:

Portsmouth, OH (740) 353-5901 Ashland, KY (606) 325-7676 Huntington, WV (304) 525-7222 Barboursville, WV (304) 736-7272 Teays Valley, WV (304) 757-9220
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Red Cross blood drive is Nov. 9-10 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An American Red Cross blood drive will take place at Marshall University from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 9-10. The event is being co-sponsored by the Baptist Christian Ministry and Interhall Government Council.

The drive will be in the Campus Christian Center, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street. Students, faculty, staff and the community are welcome to donate. Students who live in the residence halls can compete to see who works the most hours. The winner will receive a gift certificate. The building with the most volunteers will also be eligible for a reward. 

For more information about the blood drive, persons may contact Prudy Barker at (304) 696-2495 or Miya Hunter, with Residence Services, at (304) 696-3193.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 3, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students win seven awards in national competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received three first-place awards and four finalist awards in the 84th annual National College Media Convention/2005 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony. The event took place Friday, Oct. 28 in  Kansas City, Mo.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the William Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Bailey said the contest is in its fourth year and is sponsored by the CBI, which administers it in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

"It is an honor to win three out of the 12 first-place awards granted by these prestigious organizations," Bailey said. "Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations.  This performance is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students."

Bailey said he is proud of the broadcasting students,  whom he said continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be excellent representatives for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities.  

The first-place award-winning entries were:

Best Public Service Announcement

"Didn't You See?" an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Jen Smith, a senior from Huntington.

Best Radio Sports Reporting

"Pruett Retires," written and produced by Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va., broadcast during the sports segment of the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, March 9, 2005.

Best Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus The Ohio State University football game played at the Horseshoe in Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2004.  The students calling the game over 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Alex Reed, a graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va., and engineer Brandon Millman, a junior from Huntington.

The finalist award-winning entries were:

Best Public Service Announcement

"Listen to Your Car," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Brandon Millman, a junior from Huntington.

Best News Reporting

"Appalachian Music," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, Nov. 26, 2004.

Best Radio Sports Reporting

"MU Swimming and Diving Beats In-State Rival," written and produced by Alex Reed, a graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va., broadcast during the sports segment of the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2004.

Best Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of Marshall University versus Bowling Green State University played at the Cam Henderson Center in Huntington Thursday, Jan. 6, 2005.  The students calling the basketball game broadcast over 88.1 were basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Robert Harper, a graduate student from Hurricane, W.Va.; statistician Clark Davis, a graduate student from Huntington, and engineer Jen Smith, a senior from Huntington.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Theatre Department and Sodexho Campus Services partner for Dinner Theatre

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre and Sodexho Campus Services are partnering to provide the community with a unique blend of entertainment beginning Wednesday, Nov. 9.

Dinner Theatre begins that day with the opening of Marian De Forest's adaptation of the classic "Little Women." Dinner begins at 6 p.m. with a served meal in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, located inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Coffee with the director follows from 7 to 7:45 p.m., with the show beginning at 8 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. The director of "Little Women" is Sandra Forman, a professor of theatre at Northern Kentucky University.

Tickets are on sale at the Marshall University Theatre Box Office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, located on 5th Avenue across from the Memorial Student Center.  Season ticket holders may purchase tickets for $30 per person which includes dinner, coffee with the director and the show.  Non-season ticket holders may purchase tickets for $35 per person. Tickets may be ordered by calling (304) 696-ARTS (2787).

The remaining Dinner Theatre schedule includes the opening of Robert Harling's "Steel Magnolias" on Feb. 22, 2006, followed by William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" on April 19, 2006.  The ticket prices and evening schedule will be the same for all Dinner Theatre events. 

More information is available by calling (304) 696-ARTS (2787) or by visiting www.marshall.edu/theatre.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Wind Symphony to perform Nov. 14 at Clay Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Wind Symphony will perform for the first time at the Clay Center in Charleston at 7:30 p.m. Monday Nov. 14. The concert is free and open to the public.

Under the direction of Marshall Associate Professor of Music Dr. Stephen Lawson, the 44-member ensemble will perform works by contemporary composers, including Dance Movements by Philip Sparke, Cartoon Music by Peter Graham and Fandango by Joseph Turrin.  The performance of Fandango will feature Marshall music faculty members Dr. Michael Stroeher, trombone, and Martin Saunders, trumpet.

The performance coincides with the 35th anniversary of the plane crash that took the lives of 75 Marshall University football players, coaches, and community members in 1970. In tribute to their memory, the Wind Symphony will perform Esprit de Corps by Robert Jager and October by Eric Whitacre. 

Student and faculty members from Marshall's music department will be present in the Clay Center lobby before the concert, beginning at 6:30 pm, to greet the audience and provide information about the university and its music programs.

Following the concert, the Wind Symphony will continue its fall tour with performances at John Marshall High School in Bethel Park, Pa., and Wheeling Park High School in Wheeling, W. Va.  In addition to their concert performances, MU students and faculty will serve as clinicians and will combine forces in performances with select high school students.

For more information about this program or other Department of Music events, please contact the Marshall music office at (304) 696-3117.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Prominent expert on medical education to speak at Marshall Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Medical education authority David Irby, Ph.D., will provide workshops Friday (Nov. 4) to Marshall faculty and students at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Irby, vice dean for education and professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, will present a morning workshop for medical school faculty on "How to Prepare Your Educator's Portfolio." Set for 9:30 a.m. to noon, the workshop will be in the Cabell Huntington Hospital board room. He then will meet with medical school leadership at a mini-retreat, which will be followed at 3:30 p.m. by a general session open to medical students and all university faculty members. The general session will be in the Harless Auditorium on the ground floor of the Marshall University Medical Center.

Irby directs the undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs of the UCSF School of Medicine, where he leads the Office of Medical Education. As a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, he also co-directs a national study known as the Second Flexner Report on the professional preparation of physicians.

Over the past three decades, Dr. Irby has conducted research on clinical teaching in medicine and has received several prestigious awards, including the Distinguished Scholar Award by the American Educational Research Association, the John P. Hubbard Award from the National Board of Medical Examiners, and the Daniel C. Tosteson Award for Leadership in Medical Education from the Carl J. Shapiro Institute for Education and Research at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

More information about Friday's events is available from Dr. Darshana Shah, the medical school's assistant dean for professional development in medical education, at 696‑7352.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Representatives from California elementary school to visit MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Representatives of Thurgood Marshall Elementary School in Lynwood, Calif., will visit Marshall University on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 31-Nov. 1, as part of the Partnership Schools Project in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services.

Carlos Hernandez, principal of the elementary school, and Dr. Roberto Casas, assistant superintendent of the school district, will visit the Huntington campus.

During their stay, Hernandez and Casas will meet with Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Senior Vice President and Provost Sarah Denman, and members of the College of Education and Human Services faculty to discuss future plans for the development of the partnership.  They also will visit two of the partnership schools - the June Harless Demonstration Site at Kellogg Elementary School and Geneva Kent Elementary School.

The Partnership Schools Project creates professional development schools to assist in creating new models of teacher education and development.  The partnership brings together higher education and public education in a learning-centered community that encourages P-12 student learning, improves the preparation of teachers, and provides professional development and activities that will enhance the growth of all members of the collaborative.     

Thurgood Marshall Elementary School, located in the suburbs of Los Angeles, will interact with Marshall students and with P-12 students in the partnership schools in various activities throughout the academic year.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU professor receives prestigious Margaret Mead Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program at the Marshall University Graduate College and professor of humanities and anthropology, has received the 2006 Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology.

The Margaret Mead Award, initiated by the Society for Applied Anthropology in 1979, and awarded jointly with the American Anthropological Society since 1983, celebrates the tradition of bringing anthropology to bear on wider social and cultural issues.

The Margaret Mead Award is presented to a younger scholar for a particular accomplishment such as a book, film, monograph, or service that interprets anthropological data and principles in a way that makes it meaningful and accessible to a broadly concerned public.

Dr. Lassiter received the Margaret Mead Award in part for his book, The Other Side of Middletown: Exploring Muncie's African American Community, which was published in 2004, as well as for his continuing explorations of race relations and collaborative, community-based research and writing.

"I am extremely honored to be named the recipient of the 2006 Margaret Mead Award," Lassiter said. "As Margaret Mead was recognized widely for her commitment to both anthropology and, more importantly, to our larger society, I am especially honored that the awards committee singled out The Other Side of Middletown as representative of the kind of work that Mead championed."

Lassiter, 37, came to Marshall this year from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., where he had been an associate professor of anthropology.

Lassiter received his B.S. in anthropology and social science from Radford (Va.) University in 1990, and his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995.

The Mead award is designed to recognize a person clearly associated with research and/or practice in anthropology. The awardee's activity exemplifies skills in broadening the impact of anthropology - skills for which Margaret Mead was admired widely.

 "This is a wonderful honor for Dr. Lassiter, the College of Liberal Arts, and Marshall University, and certainly has broad implications for us in continuing to build the profile and the interdisciplinary contributions of the Graduate Humanities Program to our state and region," Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of MU's College of Liberal Arts, said. "It's really exciting, too, to see our COLA faculty receive the type of national recognition that continues to put Marshall University on the map as an exciting and innovative place to be."

Lassiter said The Other Side of Middletown: Exploring Muncie's African American Community (AltaMira Press, 2004) was a joint writing project among groups of faculty, students, and members of the African American community of Muncie, Ind. - site of the famous "Middletown" studies, first initiated by Robert and Helen Lynd in their 1929 book, Middletown: A Study in Modern American Culture.

"As a collaboration of community and campus, this book recounts the largely unrecorded history of Muncie's black community (which the Lynds and subsequent researchers downplayed), and details the efforts of community and campus to rectify the representation of "small town America" as exclusively white," Lassiter said. "Exploring issues of race, power, and inequity, faculty, students, and community members together designed and implemented a collaborative ethnographic field project that involved intensive interviews, research, and writing between community organizations, local experts, ethnographers, and teams of college students.

"That the Margaret Mead awards committee decided to bestow recognition on The Other Side of Middletown is tremendously gratifying, especially because it is a significant endorsement of the hard work put forth by the students, Muncie community members, and faculty who together worked on this project," Lassiter said. "I am indeed pleased that the award pays tribute to this kind of community-centered and collaboratively conceived work."

More information about the book can be found at http://www.altamirapress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=%5EDB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0759104840.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Three workshops remain in MURC's fall development series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three workshops remain in the Marshall University Research Corporation's fall 2005 Professional Development Workshop Series including a presentation on writing winning grants by Dr. David Morrison of Grant Writers Seminars and Workshops on Nov. 18-19.

Other workshops scheduled include "Locating Grant Funding," offered Nov. 1, 4, and 11, and "Budgeting and Cost Sharing" on Dec. 2, 6 and 9.  Morrison's workshop will run a day and a half and will take place at the Ramada Limited in Huntington.  Separate sessions of the other two workshops will be conducted on the Huntington and South Charleston campuses and at the Medical Education Building, located on the campus of the Huntington VA Medical Center.

Morrison has held peer-reviewed funding continuously throughout his research career and also has spent many years reviewing proposals for a variety of national granting agencies.  The workshop is especially targeted for researchers and staff interested in NIH and NSF funding.  Each registrant will receive a copy of The Grant Application Writer's Workbook, as well as an extensive handout that contains examples and slides from the seminar.

The Morrison workshop is limited to 100 participants. Marshall faculty can attend free and there is a $125 fee for non-Marshall participants that will include materials and lunch.  Registration for this workshop and all the others may be done on-line at http://www.marshall.edu/murc/Profdev/index.htm, or by calling Lisa Daniels at (304) 696-3368.  Registration for the Morrison workshop must be completed by Nov. 4.

"Locating Grant Funding" is offered from 2 to 3 p.m. Nov. 1 at the South Charleston campus, from noon to 1 p.m. on Nov. 4 at the Medical Education Building, and from noon to 1 p.m. on Nov. 11 in room 138 in the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus. Sessions are free and are open to Marshall researchers and administrative staff as well as community organizations.   Presenters are Martha Mozingo, coordinator of sponsored programs at Marshall University Graduate College, and members of the MURC staff.

"Budgeting and Cost Sharing" is a two-part workshop dealing with the development of a financial plan for a grant proposal.  The first workshop is scheduled at noon Dec. 2 at the Medical Education Building. It will be offered again at 1:30 p.m. on Dec. 6 on the South Charleston campus, and at noon Dec. 9 in room 138 of the Drinko Library.  The workshops will be taught by Ron Schelling, executive director of MURC, and the MURC staff.  Sessions are free and open to Marshall personnel and community organizations. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Poet to read from her work Nov. 3 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Diane Gilliam Fisher will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3, in room 2W16 of the Marshall University Memorial Student Center.

Fisher is the author of three collections of poems, most recently Kettle Bottom, which features poems that grow out of West Virginia history.  Eleanor Wilner writes that Fisher "makes the stone of the West Virginia mountains yield up its human past, and gives a second, enduring life through her art to the people of her home place."

Her previous book is One of Everything, from the Cleveland State University Poetry Center.  Her work has appeared in such journals as Appalachian Heritage, Appalachian Journal, Spoon River Review, Crab Orchard Review, Sou'wester, and others.

Among her awards are an Ohio Arts Council Fellowship and the Intro Award from Perugia Press.  Her work also has been anthologized in Learning by Heart: Contemporary American Poetry about School and elsewhere. 

She earned a Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literature from the Ohio State University and has taught Spanish at various universities.  She lives in Ravenna, Ohio with her husband and two daughters.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts. More information is available by calling MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Health fair Nov. 1 features free health screenings for Marshall University students, faculty and the community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - University students and faculty, as well as the Huntington community, can participate in a health fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1 in the Don Morris room on Marshall's Huntington campus. Shirley Lambert, representing Marshall's School of Nursing, which is sponsoring the event, said there will be free food, door prizes, and free health screenings.

Screenings available include those for blood glucose, glaucoma, osteoporosis, cholesterol, carpal tunnel and hearing problems, among others. For the blood glucose and cholesterol screenings, fasting is recommended but not absolutely necessary, according to Lambert. Information will also be available on tobacco cessation, weight loss, Taekwondo, mental health and wellness, and other health-related issues.

The School of Nursing will be joined in the event by representatives of St. Mary's Medical Center, the Cabell County Health Department, the American Cancer Society, the American Lung Association, the Red Cross, Contact Rape Crisis, and EnStyle Hair Salon.

Appointments are not necessary.  For further information, persons may call Lambert at (304) 544-9085 or Michelle Moles, Health Fair Coordinator, at (304) 389-8012.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Works of four MU seniors to be on display at Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning Sunday, Oct. 30, the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University will feature works of MU seniors Corissa Hundley of Hurricane, W.Va., Tabitha McCalop of Northfork, W.Va., Ariel Price of Madison, W.Va., and Katie Webb of Ripley, W.Va.

Their works will be on display through Thursday, Nov. 3 as part of the first Senior Show for the fall semester. The Birke Art Gallery will be displaying student art for the rest of the semester. Exhibits will change weekly. The semester will conclude with a graduate student show by printmaker Jackie Parsons of Nitro, W.Va.

More information is available by calling Birke Art Gallery director Emily Ritchey at (304) 696-2296.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Big weekend ahead for Marching Thunder: Band host to festival Saturday, performs at Bengals' game Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Marching Thunder will participate in two major events this weekend, Steve Barnett, director of athletic bands, said today.

The Marching Thunder will be host to the Tri-State Marching Festival on Saturday, Oct. 29, and will perform at halftime of the Cincinnati Bengals' National Football League home game with the Green Bay Packers Sunday, Oct. 30.

The weekend starts off at 10:30 a.m. Saturday with the marching festival at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Thirty-four high school bands from Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will compete in four classes. The festival is the culmination of the season for high school bands.

The Marching Thunder will perform at 8:30 p.m. after the competition ends. Kappa Kappa Psi, the national honorary band service fraternity, helps sponsor the event and serves as the primary organizer.

"The festival is a really positive experience for the bands," Barnett said. "We have worked hard organizing the event to make it one of the largest festivals in the region. Our stadium is a great venue and they know it's going to be a big show."

The Bengals' game with Green Bay the next day begins at 1 p.m. at Paul Brown Stadium. The band won't play during the game, but will perform its full seven-and-a-half minute halftime show. "This is an excellent opportunity for our students," Barnett said. "It will be fun for the kids to just be spectators at the game."

Barnett, aided by a phone call from Marshall football coach Mark Snyder, initiated the arrangements for the band to perform at the game. Barnett, realizing that opportunities for the band to travel this football season would be limited because of the distant locations of most Conference USA schools, and the expense of traveling to those schools, decided to check into the possibility of playing at a Bengals' game.

Barnett said 12 Marching Thunder members are from the Cincinnati area. Performing at the game, he said, will give Marshall more exposure and show high school students in the area what Marshall has to offer.

"Although we have 12 (band) students from that area, many of the people there don't know a lot about Marshall," Barnett said. "Our out-of-state tuition is less than in-state tuition there, plus Marshall is close."

The 270-member band, largest in school history, will leave Huntington at 6 a.m. Sunday on seven buses. The Bengals are paying for all of the band's expenses. The game will be televised on FOX.

For more information, persons may contact Barnett at (304) 696-2317.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall business students to learn from national expert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Matt Mathis, Director of Government Affairs of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters from Washington, D.C., will lecture students in Marshall University's Lewis College of Business on Tuesday, Oct. 25, Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of the college, said today.

Dr. Lorraine P. Anderson, associate dean of the College of Business, said students in her senior-level Labor Relations class, along with graduate students in Dr. Katherine Karl's Industrial Employee Relations course, will learn why the Teamsters withdrew from the AFL-CIO this past summer.

The lecture will take place at 4 p.m. in room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

"I personally believe that to be an excellent leader, a business student must see labor issues from both management's side as well as that of the union," Anderson said. "Therefore, I am grateful indeed to Tom McCoy, the General Chairman of the Affiliated System Federation, for arranging Mr. Mathis' visit to Marshall University. McCoy said he hopes the lecture will be a learning experience from a labor perspective."

More information is available by calling Anderson at (304) 696-2611.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM students win national finalist award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, won a national finalist award in the 2005 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the category Radio Daily Newscast for the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" broadcast March 31, 2004.

The finalist award was presented to the WMUL-FM news staff and news director Melanie Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., at the SPJ National Convention during the Mark of Excellence Awards Luncheon that took place Oct. 17 in the Grand Ballroom of the Aladdin Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nev.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students on the radio station's news staff competed with other student newscasters from colleges and universities who previously had won  first-place awards in the 12 SPJ regional competitions.

Two finalists and a national winner were selected from the 12 regional winners.  WMUL-FM had won the first-place award for best newscast in Region 4, making it eligible for the national award.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able successfully to compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations," Bailey said. "This time WMUL-FM student newscasters finished as one of the top three presenters of broadcast news in the country in direct competition against 12 other first-place regional award-winning news staffs.  This solid performance in the respected SPJ Mark of Excellence Contest is evidence of the quality work performed by our talented broadcasting students at Marshall University.

The other finalist award winner was the FM 90.7 news staff of WFUV-FM at Fordham University.  The national winner was the Evening Update news staff at California State University - Northridge.

"The winners of the SPJ Mark of Excellence awards represent the best in college journalism and certainly are the result of exceptional work on the part of those chosen for the awards," said Jim Highland, SPJ vice president for campus chapter affairs.  "These young people set the agenda of their college campuses, and they clearly demonstrate that college media are in excellent hands."

For more information on the Mark of Excellence Awards or the Society of Professional Journalists, persons may contact Heather Porter at (317) 972-8000 ext. 204 or hporter@spj.org.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Performances to raise money to send MU theatre students south to entertain displaced children still in shelters

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University department of theatre is presenting two children's theatre performances to raise money to send the Pickled Pepper Players, a group of MU theatre students, to hurricane shelters in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The group will perform plays for free to displaced children still housed in the shelters.

MU theatre chair Lang Reynolds said the goal is to raise $7,000. The Pickled Pepper Players will be presenting two children's theatre plays in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre Saturday, Oct. 22 and again on Saturday, Oct. 29. Performances are at 10 a.m. and noon and last about one hour and 20 minutes.

Reynolds said Molly and Her Marvelous Mind and Professor Pocus are terrific pieces of theatre for children in K-5.  Molly and Her Marvelous Mind encourages children to use their imaginations and Professor Pocus, through the adventures of a bumbling magician, helps children to understand the importance of acting responsibly. All tickets are $5. Reynolds said the department will gratefully accept donations as well.

"Our continued assistance to the children impacted by this disaster is critical," Reynolds said. "Community efforts and generosity toward this project strengthens tri-state area values, provides an educational/entertainment opportunity for these unfortunate children, and provides an opportunity for Marshall University students to assist by donating their time and energy to this project."

Donations may be mailed to: Marshall University Theatre, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755. Checks may be made payable to "Marshall University Foundation" and are tax-deductible.

More information is available by calling Samuel Kincaid, project coordinator with the theatre department, at (304) 696-6395.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Teacher-Lecturer to make three presentations in November at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marsha Dawson, lead literacy coach for the Cabell/Wayne Early Learning Opportunities Grant, has been named the Marshall University Teacher-Lecturer for fall 2005. The series is sponsored by Marshall's College of Education and Human Services.

Dawson will draw upon her expertise as an early childhood educator to lecture on the long-term benefits of promoting diverse early care and education environments.  She will make three presentations during November, all free and open to the public.

The Teacher-Lecturer program's aim is to foster diversity for pre-service teachers by allowing them to interact with diverse exemplary teachers.

"The Teacher-Lecturer series continues to be an extraordinary journey in understanding both the similarities and differences in human beings," Dr. Jane McKee, associate dean for academic programs in the College of Education and Human Services, said. 

Dawson said her presentations will explore the subject of ethnicity as it relates to children's social, emotional and academic development.  A major focus will be on creating classroom environments that are inclusive and enticing for all children.

She emphasized that this approach is especially designed to serve as a significant learning tool for students interested in working with children and families in the field of education, as well as for those interested in enhancing a multi-cultural perspective of human development.

"I'm trying to impart to students that diversity must be lived, rather than taught," Dawson said.

She brings a wealth of experience to the Teacher-Lecturer series. Dawson is an instructor for the Apprenticeship for Child Development Specialist program, an adjunct professor at Marshall, and a former executive director of Children's Place, Inc.  She also is a member of several professional education associations.

All presentations will be held on the Huntington campus.  The dates and topics are: Thursday. Nov. 3, 6:30 p.m., MAT Instructional Strategies, Jenkins Hall, room 235; Friday, Nov. 4, 9 a.m., Elementary Methods, Shawkey Room, Memorial Student Center; and Monday, Nov. 14, 4 p.m., Secondary Methods, Harris Hall, room 135.

For additional information on the Teacher-Lecturer program, persons may contact McKee at (304) 696-2859 or via e-mail at mckeej@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

OSU professor to discuss his works on display at Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Professor Sergio Soave, chair of the Ohio State University art department, will give a talk about his works on display in Marshall University's Birke Art Gallery at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25. The talk is free to the public, and a reception will follow in the Smith Hall Atrium.

Soave's displayed works are part of his series "Carnival of Fun." The display features digital prints, oil on canvas print/paintings, silkscreens, and silkscreens on steel with rust.

For more information, persons may contact Birke Art Gallery director Emily Ritchey at (304) 617-9557.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thirty-three states represented in 2nd annual Marshall Marathon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 300 runners and walkers representing 33 states have signed up to participate in the 2nd annual Marshall University Marathon presented by HealthyHuntington.org, race director Tom Dannals said today.

The marathon begins at 8 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 13 on 3rd Avenue between the main entrance of Cam Henderson Center and the Marshall parking garage. It ends 26 miles, 385 yards later on the playing field at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The course goes through downtown Huntington near Pullman Square and along the Ohio River, extends west to Westmoreland and goes through Ritter Park. A course map is available at www.healthyhuntington.org.

"The course is flat and fast and USATF (USA Track & Field) certified," Dannals said. "A number of people qualified for the Boston Marathon with their times in our marathon."

People are still signing up, Dannals said. Registering in advance online at www.active.com is preferred and ongoing through Nov. 11, he said. The entry fee to run in the marathon is $40, to run in the marathon relay is $20, and to take part in the non-competitive half-marathon walk is $15. It also is less expensive than registering in writing. Written registration costs $20 extra for the marathon, $10 extra for the relay and $5 extra for the walk.

Late registration is from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at Huntington Physical Therapy, which is located at 2240 5th Ave. Participants from New York to Hawaii already have registered, Dannals said.

"This is an event to promote a healthier lifestyle in West Virginia," Dannals, a family practice physician, said. "What are we not proud of? We're in the top three in the country in strokes, heart disease, obesity, dental cavities, etc. Too many people are not exercising. We need to change that."

Tom Dannals' wife, Beth, also is involved in coordinating the marathon as director of volunteers. She is trying to recruit at least 400 volunteers to work the event. Anyone wanting to volunteer may do so by contacting the Huntington YMCA, signing up online at www.healthyhuntington.org, or calling Beth Dannals at (304) 736-1502.

All runners and walkers in the event will receive a long-sleeved t-shirt, with their requested size guaranteed if they register by Oct. 31. Also, participants who finish will receive a specially designed medal.

Relays will consist of two or three people running legs of 9.2, 12.5 and 4.5 miles. An award will be given to the team with the best name as determined by the race committee. Overall prizes will be awarded to the top three men and women finishers and the top three wheelchair entrants. Age group awards also will be given.

HealthyHuntington.org is a subsidiary of the Huntington YMCA dedicated to bringing the HealthierUS Initiative to the tri-state area.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Community invited to Allied Artists of West Virginia reception

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The public is invited to attend a reception Sunday, Nov. 6 at Marshall University to honor the artists who currently are exhibiting in the John Deaver Drinko Library's fall show, Monica Brooks, associate dean of libraries, announced today. The reception is from 3 to 6 p.m. in the library's third-floor atrium.

The artists are members of the Allied Artists Association, which boasts membership from both professional and amateur artists from throughout West Virginia. More than 90 pieces in several media are being showcased throughout the building for the enjoyment of the students, faculty, and community at large.

In the largest display that the library has ever housed, the artistic talent shown presents water colors, oils, pastels, photographs, ceramics, cloth items, and interesting pieces representing mixed media, Brooks said. The show continues through the first week of December.

Light refreshments will be provided at the reception with entertainment from Mrs. Margaret Vance, minister of music at First United Methodist Church of Ashland, Ky.  Mrs. Vance is a professional music teacher and accomplished harpist.

Barbara Winters, dean of university libraries at Marshall, will welcome the group and make a few comments.  Members of the Drinko Library Art Committee, which is hosting the event, will be present to provide tours of the exhibit and welcome visitors.

More information is available by contacting Brooks at (304) 696-6613.  Amateur or professional artists hoping to learn more about the Allied Artists of West Virginia, Inc., may contact Janis P. Cook at (304) 344-8674.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Circle K's 'Kardboard City' will benefit Huntington City Mission

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Circle K organization will be host this weekend to "Kardboard City," a campus-wide service project, to raise awareness of homelessness and to raise money for the Huntington City Mission.

The project will take place from 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 until 9 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22 on the Marshall Memorial Student Center plaza. Participants will spend the night on campus in cardboard boxes to make the homeless experience as realistic as possible.

"This will be our second year sponsoring this event," Beverly Maynard, coordinator of "Kardboard City," said. "I'm really looking forward to doing it again. I encourage anyone and everyone interested to come and join us Friday. There will be plenty of cardboard and duct tape to go around."

The students will have limited food and only their boxes as they spend the night outdoors. Maynard said local furniture stores have been very generous in helping contribute their excess cardboard boxes. Items such as gift certificates and t-shirts, donated by local businesses, will be raffled. Tickets will be sold Friday evening for $1.

All proceeds raised by Circle K members and other organizations will go toward food and toy shopping for the upcoming holidays. The organization has set a goal of raising $1,000.

Circle K International is a collegiate service organization with a worldwide membership that promotes fellowship, leadership, and service. The Marshall Circle K is sponsored by the Kiwanis Clubs of Huntington.

The City Mission was created to promote recovery, stability and personal growth in the community by providing hope and homes to men, women and children in need.

Anyone interested in helping may contact the Marshall University Circle K at MarshallCircleK@yahoo.com or Maynard at (304) 412-3512.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Connections 2005 is Oct. 18-19 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Career Connections 2005, an opportunity for companies to meet qualified Marshall University students and for students to learn more about strategies and tools for success as they look forward to entering the business world, is Tuesday-Wednesday, Oct. 18-19 at MU's Memorial Student Center.

The event is hosted by Marshall University Career Services and the Lewis College of Business, and is sponsored by BB&T. Finance and economics, marketing, legal, management, management information systems, accounting and other majors will be represented.

Valerie Bernard, director of the Career Services Center, said more than 80 recruiters will attend Career Connections 2005.

"We're excited to be working with Dean Paul Uselding and the College of Business in Career Connections 2005," Bernard said. "This is going to provide students the opportunity to network with companies who are not only offering full-time positions, but also internships. Even if you are a freshman, it's not too early to start networking with companies, to start building relationships. And those relationships can start with this fair."

Here is the complete two-day schedule of activities:

Tuesday, Oct. 18

6 p.m.: BB&T will be host to an informational session on the BB&T Management Development Program for qualified students in the Memorial Student Center Shawkey Room. The session features David Helmer, a Marshall University graduate and city executive for BB&T. For more details, contact Taella Hill at Career Services (304) 696-6679. 

Wednesday, Oct. 19

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.: Career Connections 2005 Career & Internship Expo, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center; panel discussions sponsored by Lewis College of Business, Alumni Lounge, Memorial Student Center.

3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.: VIP reception for recruiters, administration and faculty, hosted by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., John Marshall Room, Memorial Student Center. For students, Target's Sheila Clark will present a Career Development Seminar in the Alumni Lounge, Memorial Student Center.  Topics will include networking secrets and the top 10 qualities employers seek.                                  

4:30 p.m. - 5 p.m.: Pre-dinner socializer for students and recruiters, Alumni Lounge, Memorial Student Center.

5 p.m. - 6 p.m.: Panel session - The Importance of Internships and Advance Planning in Career Development, featuring Kathy G. Eddy, CPA and managing partner of McDonough, Eddy, Parsons, & Bayous, AC.; and Kyle Shafer, Chief Technology Officer, West Virginia Office of Technology.

6 p.m. - 7 p.m.: Dinner for panelists, recruiters, faculty, and students, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center. Tickets cost $25 and may be purchased by contacting Career Services at (304) 696-2248. 

More information on Career Connections 2005 is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/Careers/BCC_OnlineReg/bccattendees.asp.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fall Major Expo is Oct. 19 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The University College unit of Marshall University is sponsoring the first Fall Major Expo, which is designed to give students who have not declared a major one central location where they can obtain information on the various majors offered at MU.

Students undecided on a major field of study or students conditionally admitted to Marshall are advised in University College, which consolidates and coordinates retention efforts at Marshall.

The Fall Major Expo takes place from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, on the Memorial Student Center plaza.  

Student and faculty representatives from Marshall's colleges and departments will be available to discuss the various majors available in their units.  In addition to the factual information on each major, upper-class students will be available to share their firsthand knowledge of certain majors with students.

If the weather does not cooperate, the fall expo will take place in the student center lobby. The annual Academic Expo, which also assists students undecided on a major, is planned for next spring.

For more information on the fall expo, persons may call Randolph B. Cullum with University College at (304) 696-3252.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Psychology Awareness Week is Oct. 17-21 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Psychology Awareness Week 2005 will take place at Marshall University Monday, Oct. 17 through Friday, Oct 21.

The annual event in the Memorial Student Center features lectures throughout the week. Students will be able to learn about graduate school and the opportunities available to those with degrees in psychology. The event is sponsored by PSI-CHI, the national honor society in psychology.

"Psychology Awareness Week is devoted to giving students the opportunity to learn more about psychology and what options are available for psychology students," Danielle Davidov, president of PSI-CHI, said. "It is a great opportunity for students to ask questions and learn more about graduate school opportunities and careers in psychology."

The following is a schedule of events for the week:

Monday, Oct. 17: Chrissy Cole, a representative from CONTACT Rape Crisis Center, will speak about the organization at noon in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center.

Aaron Farley and Rachel Frye, Marshall master's program students, will discuss the master's program at Marshall University at 1 p.m. in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center.

Tuesday, Oct. 18: Connie Zirkle, administrative secretary for the psychology department, will give a presentation about gemstone beading and relaxation at 1 p.m. in room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center.

Wednesday, Oct. 19: Ph.D. candidate Keelon Hinton, a psychology professor, will discuss psychology from a cultural perspective at 11 a.m. in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center.

Dr. Marc Lindberg, a psychology professor, will discuss careers and options available for individuals with a bachelor's degree in psychology at 1 p.m. in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center.

Thursday, Oct. 20: Dr. Thomas Ellis, a psychology professor, will speak about obtaining a Psy.D. in clinical psychology at 11 a.m. in room 2E37 ( the John Spotts Room) of the Memorial Student Center.

Friday, Oct. 21: Dr. Wendy Williams, a psychology professor, will discuss the process of getting into graduate school, answering students' questions and letting people know what it's really like for students in graduate school at 10 a.m. in room 2W37 of the Memorial Student Center.

For more information, persons may contact Davidov at (304) 677-5990 or by e-mail at davidov1@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 12, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Verizon announces $100,000 gift to MU's new alumni center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Verizon West Virginia announced today a $100,000 gift to Marshall University to help fund a new Erickson Alumni Center.

"This is another great partnership with Marshall for Verizon," said John Ruddick, executive director of public affairs at Verizon. "It complements our education partnership and will enable more persons and businesses in the state to support the university."

Verizon is providing $40,000 of the pledged amount now, and the rest will be presented at various times in the near future.

Early this year, Verizon provided $250,000 to help fund Marshall's June Harless Center for Rural Education and Research Development in support of distanced learning in six counties. Verizon has been represented on the Society of Yeager Scholars board of directors since the society's inception.

Lance West, Marshall's vice president for alumni development, said MU will honor Verizon for its latest gift by naming the telemarketing calling area in the new building the Verizon Calling Center.

"We are ecstatic to have Verizon as one of the primary investors in this new Erickson Alumni Center," West said. "Verizon has had a history of supporting many areas of Marshall University and this tie-in to alumni demonstrates yet another expression of supporting the overall mission of the institution."

The Erickson Alumni Center fund-raising campaign is ongoing. More than $3 million of the $4 million needed to build the center has been pledged or donated.

For more information on Verizon's latest gift to Marshall, persons may call Ruddick at (304) 344-7234 or West at (304) 696-5407.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU student organizing local event for Make a Difference Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University freshman Francesca Karle of Chesapeake, Ohio is organizing a local event for the nationwide Make a Difference Day Sunday, Oct. 23 at Holderby's Landing on the riverfront in Huntington.

The event will showcase local entertainment beginning at 5 p.m. with a variety of musical groups. The Marshall University Jazz Ensemble also will perform. A special outdoor showing of Karle's film, "On the River's Edge - A Documentary on the Homeless," begins at 7 p.m. The event will benefit local nonprofit organizations and the relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina. Free refreshments will be provided.

Karle's film has received national recognition from the CBS Early Show, which featured her story as the American Hero in April 2005. She has been contacted by Oprah Winfrey, Montel Williams and Tyra Banks for possible appearances as well. Karle also has a taping for the Naomi Judd Show that will premiere at the end of November.

Admission to the Make a Difference Day event will be a monetary, food or clothing donation, which participants can make to any of the various organizations that will be represented.

A proclamation from Mayor David Felinton will be read at the event announcing Oct. 23, 2005 as Make a Difference Day in Huntington. Former Marshall University football Coach Bob Pruett will speak at the event.

Karle was able to donate more than $20,000 to local organizations from the premiere of her film in March 2005 and hopes to achieve that again with this event.

Organizations that will be represented at the event include: The American Red Cross, The Salvation Army, Coalition for the Homeless, Harmony House, City Mission, Christ Temple - Rivers of Hope Ministry, Cabell County Library - Literacy for Homelessness Branches and the Domestic Violence Shelter.

This is the 15th annual Make a Difference Day, which is sponsored by the Points of Light Foundation founded by actor/philanthropist Paul Newman. Millions of people across the country are expected to spend the weekend of Oct. 22-23 doing volunteer projects to improve their communities and to help neighbors in need.

It has been the largest community service effort in the nation, rallying corporations, government leaders, charitable organizations and everyday Americans into action. A record 2.2 million volunteers participated in 2004 and an estimated 22 million people benefited from the event. In 2004, the organization also distributed $2.6 million to charities.

For more information, persons may contact Karle at (304) 634-4284.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday October 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL Carbash returns Friday with additional features

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's student radio station, will get into the homecoming spirit Friday, Oct. 14 by adding something new to its 3rd annual Carbash, which takes place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. on Buskirk Field.

In addition to giving students and faculty the opportunity to smash a car in the colors of MU homecoming opponent University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB) with a sledgehammer, the event also will feature a duck pond, a play-by-play booth and a football toss. Refreshments will be provided by Stewart's Original Hot Dogs, and local bands Aristotle and the Excellent Lovers will play.

Prizes, such as university memorabilia, and free food will be given to people who play the duck pond and participate in the football toss. The cost to play is $1 for five tickets and $2 for 12 tickets.  Participation in each event requires one to three tickets.

For more information, persons may call (304) 696-6640, or AJ Elmore at (304) 617-7350, P.R.Ninja@gmail.com.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 10, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, (304) 746-2038

'Drum Up A Deal' during MU homecoming Oct. 15 : Papa John's to fund scholarships through pizza sales

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association has partnered with 10 local Papa John's locations to raise scholarship funds through their "Drum Up A Deal" event on MU's homecoming day Saturday, Oct. 15.

For every pizza sold, Tri-State area Papa John's stores will donate 20 percent of their above average sales towards scholarships for Marshall students. This promotion coincides with Papa John's support of the Marching Thunder by donating pizza at the Herd Village for band and alumni band members that are performing during the homecoming ceremonies. 

"Anyone who's been to a Marshall game knows how great the Marching Thunder is," said David Riggs, general manager with Papa John's. "When the crowd at Joan C. Edwards Stadium gets loud, one of the reasons for this enthusiasm is the hard work of our marching band, our cheerleaders and our mascot, Marco.

"As people who live here in Herd country, the employees of Papa John's want to do something to help, and we believe that by 'Drumming Up A Deal' we'll be able to provide scholarship assistance to those students who create the excitement during Marshall's Football Season."

Steve Barnett, Marshall's director of athletic bands, said expenses have mounted as the number of band members has grown to more than 275.

"When we were contacted by the folks at Papa John's, they asked how they can help," Barnett said. "It's our hope that Marshall students, faculty, staff and fans can help 'Drum up a Deal' this homecoming weekend that will positively impact the lives of Marshall students, especially through scholarships. I really appreciate their generosity and hope this is a relationship we can continue in the future."

Participating Papa John's locations include:

Portsmouth, OH

(740) 353-5901 Ashland, KY (606) 325-7676 Huntington, WV (304) 525-7222 Barboursville, WV (304) 736-7272 Teays Valley, WV (304) 757-9220 Cross Lanes, WV (304) 776-8500 St. Albans, WV (304) 722-1700 Beckley, WV (304) 253-6100 Kanawha City, WV (304) 925-8500 Charleston, WV (304) 342-3000
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

River Cities alumni chapter ready for homecoming

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The River Cities Club of the Marshall University Alumni Association is preparing for its 10th annual homecoming party. The event is set for Saturday, Oct. 15, immediately following the homecoming football game between Marshall and the University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB), which begins at 5 p.m.

This year's party at Eagle Distributing, 140 W. 3rd Ave., features beverages, food catered by Buddy's Barbecue, and music by Hydrogyn. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door.  Proceeds from the event benefit a Marshall scholarship program for dependents of alumni living in the area.

"Every year we have a great time and it's nice to know the money goes toward education," Brandy Roisman, president of the local alumni chapter, said. 

For more information, persons may contact Roisman at (304) 529-1000, or the alumni office at (304) 696-2901.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Distinguished laser scientist to visit Marshall next week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Professor Carlos Stroud, a laser scientist from the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester, will present a public lecture titled "Quantum Weirdness: Technology of the Future, or 'Beam me up, Scottie!' " Thursday, Oct. 13 at Marshall University.

Stroud's lecture, which begins at 7 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, is free to the public.

Stroud will be on Marshall's Huntington campus Oct. 13-14, giving one other lecture and participating in a roundtable discussion. His visit is sponsored by an award from the Distinguished Traveling Lecturer Program of the American Physical Society's Division of Laser Science.

It also is in conjunction with an open house for middle and high school students, their teachers and the general public on Friday, Oct. 14 in Marshall's department of physics. The open house will celebrate the United Nations-endorsed "Year of Physics," which honors Albert Einstein's contributions to modern science.

"We hope to highlight the vitality of physics and its importance in the coming millennium," Dr. Nicola Orsini, chair of Marshall's department of physics, said. "It is our aim to bring the excitement of physics to the students and to the public in the hope of inspiring a new generation of scientists."

Last May, Orsini proposed the idea for the open house while MU physics professor Dr. Thomas Wilson prepared an application to the American Physical Society's Division of Laser Science for Marshall University to host a Distinguished Traveling Lecturer. Wilson received notification in September that his application had been selected for funding.

"His visit may have a remarkable impact in stimulating young West Virginians to consider the enjoyment and beauty of a career in science and mathematics," Wilson said of Stroud.

Wilson said the open house on Oct. 14 will include tours of MU professor Dr. Ralph Oberly's laser holography laboratory, Wilson's terahertz laser and phonon laboratory, "Fun Physics" demonstrations by MU professor Dr. Elywn Bellis, hands-on learning activities coordinated by Justin Woods and the Society of Physics Students club, physical science demonstrations by MU professor Dr. Rick Bady, and lectures by Orsini and MU professor Dr. Huong Nguyen. Nguyen will present a talk titled "From Electrons-Holes to Phonoritons in Semiconductors," at 11 a.m. that day, and Orsini will present a talk titled "Curved Space Time, Black Holes and Gravity's Final Victory" at 1 p.m., both in Science Building room 277.

Stroud has an A.B. degree in physics and mathematics from Centre College in Danville, Ky., and a Ph.D. in physics from Washington University. He currently is professor of optics and professor of physics, and director of the Center for Quantum Information at the University of Rochester. Stroud has lectured at more than 75 universities.

Stroud has said he believes optics is an enabling technology that is going to be at the heart of advances in many fields from communications to medicine. He said the faculty, staff and students of the Institute of Optics have started more than two dozen companies - many of them in Rochester - over the years.

"His experimental and theoretical research has been published in all the major physics journals, including the Scientific American and Science magazines, and has included such topics as creating exotic, high-angular momentum, electronic orbitals ("Rydberg states") in atoms by tuneable terahertz laser pulsing, to optical approaches to quantum computing," Wilson said.

While at Marshall, Stroud will be involved in many activities, including a tour of the College of Science laboratories, and meetings with Orsini, MU Provost Dr. Sarah Denman, and interim dean of the College of Science, Dr. Wayne Elmore.

Here is Stroud's lecture and presentation schedule during his visit to Marshall:

Thursday, Oct. 13

Noon-1 p.m., lecture: "Rydberg atomic electron wave packets," Science Building room 277. Participants include College of Science faculty and students.

2-3 p.m., roundtable discussion: "Graduate School and Beyond: Why Laser Physics is So Useful," Science Building room 277. Participants include physics and other College of Science students.

7-8 p.m., 2005 Year of Physics public lecture: "Quantum Weirdness: Technology of the Future or 'Beam me up, Scottie!' " Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Lecture is free to the public.

More information on Stroud's visit is available by calling Wilson at (304) 696-2752. Additional information on the Oct. 14 open house is available by calling Orsini at (304) 696-2756.  


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday October 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall, UFI to promote entrepreneurialism in Huntington, area

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business today joined with Unlimited Future, Inc. (UFI) in announcing a cooperative venture that will promote entrepreneurialism in Huntington and the surrounding areas.

College of Business dean Dr. Paul Uselding and D.R. Lester, Esq., executive director of UFI, announced their first class in entrepreneurship. The comprehensive nine-week class will take place at UFI, located at 1650 8th Ave. in Huntington, and will begin at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18. An orientation and overview of the class will be presented at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11 at UFI.

"The class entails a comprehensive fast-start program designed to assist both potential and current business owners in all business aspects including opening, managing, and operating their own business entities," Lester said.

The class will be taught by Marshall instructor Jamey Halleck, along with guest lecturers addressing specific aspects of business. Class size is limited to 15.    

Uselding said the business-training course does more than offer training in start-up fundamentals for new businesses.

"Jamey will also offer consulting services for new ventures including, but not limited to, strategic planning, business plan development, etc., which will facilitate translating classroom material in practical application for developing businesses," Uselding said.

For more information or to sign up for the class, persons may call UFI at (304) 697-3007.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming 2005 activities begin Monday, Oct. 10 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrates homecoming 2005 next week with a variety of activities highlighted by the annual homecoming parade and the Thundering Herd's Conference USA football game against the University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB), both on Saturday, Oct. 15.

Activities begin Monday, Oct. 10 and continue through Saturday evening. The theme of homecoming this year is "R-O-C-K Conference USA," which was the winning submission from MU student Beverly Maynard in a contest to name the theme.

The homecoming parade starts at noon on Saturday and features Maj. Gen. (ret.) David W. Stallings as grand marshal. Stallings is a 1955 graduate of Marshall. The football game with UAB begins at 5 p.m. the same day at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Stallings, who lives in Clearwater, Fla., is a native of Ashland, Ky. He entered the military service through the ROTC program at Marshall. A Marshall University Distinguished Alumnus, Stallings was presented with many awards while in the U.S. Army, including the Distinguished Service Medal, the Bronze Star, and the Army Air Medal.

The schedule of events for Marshall's homecoming 2005 on campus and throughout the university community is as follows:

Monday, Oct. 10

Office Decorations: Each MU office is asked to decorate to promote the homecoming theme, "R-O-C-K Conference USA." Prizes will be awarded.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 12

Thunder into Mason County: The Tri-County Alumni Club of the Marshall University Alumni Association is host to the fourth annual "Thunder into Mason County" at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center at 4 p.m. in Point Pleasant. 

Drunk Driving Prevention program: Sponsored by the Student Government Association (SGA) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Buskirk Field.

Thursday, Oct. 13

Naming of the Homecoming Court: Takes place at noon in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center.

Office decorating judging: Starts at 1 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 14

Green and White Day

Coaches' breakfast: This is the first official event of homecoming weekend, and takes place at the Erickson Alumni Center. This live radio broadcast lets those present as well as radio listeners get to know better some of Marshall's coaches. The DAWG, 93.7 FM, will start broadcasting at 6 a.m., with coaches joining in from 8 to 10 a.m.

Second annual J-Walk: This is a fundraiser for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. It begins at noon on the Memorial Student Center plaza. During the walk, WMUL-FM will provide music and feature its third annual car bash. A car will be painted in the colors of UAB and people will donate a dollar to bash the car. Last year the J-Walk raised more than $5,000 with proceeds going to purchase computers in the digital imaging lab.

School of Nursing open house: The school is celebrating 45 years as a major on the Marshall campus. An open house will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. in Prichard Hall 324. All nursing alumni and friends, faculty and staff, past and present, are invited. Refreshments will be provided.

Alumni Association open house: Takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Erickson Alumni Center. Refreshments will be provided.

Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2005 Induction Banquet: Starts at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Honorees include Chad Pennington (football 1995-99); Christy Waring-Hayes (softball 1995-98); Harold McCloud (basketball 38-51); Pat Carter (golf 1987-90), and Shawn McWhorter (track and field 1980-84). Tickets may be purchased from the Alumni Association or at the MU ticket office, (304) 696-4373 or (800) 843-4373.

Black Alumni activities: Beginning at 7 p.m., members of Black Alumni Inc. will gather at the Radisson Hotel Huntington for registration and activities. The hospitality room will be open from 7 to 9 p.m., followed by the Black Alumni - Black Legends Mixer, also at the Radisson.

Pullman Square concert: Hosted by the Marshall University Alumni Association, it takes place from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. The Marshall University Bookstore will be selling MU merchandise during the concert.

Saturday Oct. 15

Note: Papa John's Pizza will donate 20 percent of its proceeds on homecoming game day to the Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship.

Black Alumni activities: The Black Legends meet from 8 to 9 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center's John Spotts Room. Also scheduled is the Black Alumni Annual Meeting in the MSC Alumni Lounge at 9:30 a.m., and the Black Legends Induction Ceremony at 11 a.m. in the student center's Shawkey Room. Tailgaiting begins at Herd Village at 2 p.m. and lasts until game time at 5 p.m. The Black Legends Dinner begins at 8:30 p.m., and the Black Alumni/Black Legends Award Reception and Dance will be held at the Radisson from 9:30 p.m. until 1 a.m. For more information, persons may call Sandra Clements, president, at (304) 696-2271.

10th annual 5K Alumni Run: This event is sponsored by the Marshall University Recreational Sports Office, and begins at 9 a.m. on 3rd Avenue in front of Cam Henderson Center. Registration is $10 through Oct. 14 (non-refundable) and $15 on race day. Call Sharon Stanton at (304) 696-2943 with questions.

One-Room School House Museum 10th anniversary celebration: The department of history invites people to visit the school house museum from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call Paul Lutz in the department of history at (304) 696-2956 for more information. 

Homecoming parade: Begins at noon in front of the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington. Grand marshal is Maj. Gen. (ret.) David W. Stallings, Class of 1955.

Lunch Under the Tent: Tailgate party sponsored by the Alumni Association starts at 2:30 p.m. at Herd Village. Cost is $15. Those attending are invited to mingle with other Herd fans and cheer along with the MU Marching Thunder and join the Thunder Rally as the band prepares to march into Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Safety Technology Program's first alumni meeting: Alumni, students and friends are invited to the meeting from 2:30 to 5 p.m. in Herd Village. Free food will be available.

College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) tent: Alumni, students and friends are invited to visit the tent at Herd Village from 2:30 to 5 p.m. A barbecue lunch will be provided.

The College of Health Professions: Annual homecoming tailgate at Herd Village is from 2 to 4 p.m. All alumni, friends, faculty and staff are invited. Refreshments will be provided.

Baptist Campus Ministry: "Thundering Tailgate: Students, Alumni and Friends," starts at 3 p.m. in front of the Campus Christian Center. Persons may call Jerry Losh at (304) 696-3053 with questions.

Spirit-building Memorial Walk: Begins in front of Cam Henderson Center at 3 p.m. by members of the Thundering Herd football squad. The team walks to the stadium lot, then through the lot and into the stadium.

Football game: Kickoff between Marshall and UAB (the University of Alabama-Birmingham) is at 5 p.m. at the stadium.

Post-game party and dinner dance: Takes place at Eagle Distributing Co., 140 3rd Ave., and starts about 30 minutes after the game ends. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the door, and the price includes food, beverages and live music by Hydrogen.

Other activities include:

The Step Show: Sponsored by the National Panhellenic Council, it will be held on Saturday. Call Andy Hermansdorfer at (304) 696-2283 with questions.

Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity:  Its annual Homecoming Formal will take place on Saturday night in Huntington. Persons may contact Devin Perry, president, at (703) 967-5778 with questions.

Phi Mu Sorority: Its tailgate party will be in the west lot of Joan C. Edwards Stadium.  Look for the pink and white balloons on lot 367.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon: An open house/cookout is planned at the house before the game. All SAE alumni and their families are invited to attend. Call Sebastian Parsley at (304) 523-9669 with questions.

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority: Its annual Parents/Alumnae Reception is at the sorority house immediately following the homecoming parade. All Tri Sigma alumnae, parents and families are welcome. Call Jenn Witt, president, at (804) 852-4424 or Mandy Cuckler, secretary, at (740) 701-0820 with questions.

Kappa Alpha Order: A BBQ for alumni, their family members and friends before the game will take place at the house. Persons may call Joshua Cremeans, active alumni relations, (304) 638-5228; Bretton L. Schuller, 952-9178 or Mike Miller, (304) 619-5955, co-chairs for alumni; Jim "Nikita" Nash, (304) 634-5766, social chair, or Larry Ledsome, providence commander, (304) 757-4142

Major sponsors for homecoming 2005 are Sodexho and MBNA.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday October 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Second-annual J-Walk to benefit Marshall's School of Journalism

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students, faculty and community members will be "J-Walking" Friday, Oct. 14 at Marshall University in support of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

The second annual J-Walk fund-raiser will take place on the Huntington campus from noon to 5 p.m. The walk will begin at the Memorial Student Center plaza. Participants will walk six miles around campus to raise money to purchase new digital cameras, computers and scholarships and to finish construction of the newly remodeled communications building.

Participants will raise money through sponsors who are pledging donations for each mile that the participant walks. In 2004, the walk raised more than $5,000 that helped buy new digital cameras for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

"The J-Walk was a great success last year," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said. "We hope to have as much participation and fund-raising success as we did last year."

WMUL, Marshall's student radio station, also will have a car bash and carnival Friday on Buskirk field. Raffle tickets will be sold on the Memorial Student Center plaza on Wednesday, Oct. 12 and Thursday, Oct. 13 to benefit the J-Walk.

Raffle items include a baseball autographed by Chicago White Sox player Jonathan Adkins, who is from Wayne, W.Va.; a football autographed by Marshall football coach Mark Snyder; a basketball autographed by Marshall basketball coach Ron Jirsa, and gift certificates from various restaurants in the Huntington area.

For more information, persons may contact Dennison at (304) 696-2360.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Writer to read from her fiction Oct. 13 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Ethel Morgan Smith will read from her fiction at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13 in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center.  Prof. Smith has published essays, reviews, and short stories in Callaloo, The African American Review, and in anthologies in the USA and Germany. 

Her book, From Whence Cometh My Help: The African-American Community at Hollins College, examines the dynamics of an institution built on the foundations of slavery, and steeped in traditions that managed to perpetuate servitude for generations. The book also explores the subtle and complex relationship between the affluent white world of Hollins College (Virginia) and the proud African-American community that has served it since 1842.

Smith is associate professor of English at West Virginia University and teaches African-American literature and creative writing (fiction/nonfiction). She has received grants from The National Endowment for the Humanities, The Virginia Foundation for Public Policy, and West Virginia University Senate Research. Prof. Smith also has been a DuPont scholar at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, a Fulbright scholar at the University of Tbingen in Germany, and resident fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation's Study and Conference Center in Bellagio, Italy.

Her appearance, which is free to the public, is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  More information is available by calling Art Stringer in the English department at (304) 696-2403.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday October 5, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Medical conference to explore alternative therapies

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will present its first integrative medicine conference Oct. 22 at the Marshall University Medical Center.

The conference will focus on systems, practices and products that currently do not fall under the umbrella of conventional medicine. Organizers note that while some scientific evidence exists regarding such therapies, key questions remain -- including, in some cases, whether the therapies are safe and effective.

Lectures will address cancer prevention, homeopathic medicine, integrative treatments for pain, food as medicine, slowing the aging process, and mind-body techniques used in integrative medicine.

Dr. Tara Sharma, professor of integrative medicine, is the conference chair. Guest lecturers include Dr. Marty Sullivan of Duke University; Dr. Nancy Lonsdorf of the Raj Ayurveda Health Spa in Iowa; Linda Geronilla, Ph.D., of Marshall; Dr. Jennifer Jacobs of the University of Washington; and Dr. Timothy McPherson of Marshall.

The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and adjourns at 4:30 p.m. The cost is $150 for physicians and $75 for others. More information is available from Dr. Sharma at 523-8800.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday October 3, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Brown Bag Seminar on Asperger's Syndrome is Thursday for Faculty

The College Program for Students with Asperger's Syndrome at Marshall University will host a Brown Bag Seminar for Marshall University faculty from noon to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 in room 2W22 at the Memorial Student Center. The presentation is entitled "Asperger's Syndrome 101."

Co-sponsored by the West Virginia Autism Training Center and the Office of Disabled Student Services, the Brown Bag Seminar features a talk by Dr. Kimberly Ramsey, Coordinator of the College Program for Students with Asperger's Syndrome at Marshall. A question and answer period will follow the presentation.

The Brown Bag Seminar is free and open to Marshall University faculty. Guests are encouraged to bring their own lunches. Complimentary cookies will be provided.

Pre-registration would be appreciated by calling the Autism Training Center at 696-2840. For more information, contact Ramsey at 696-2332.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday October 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Yeager honored along with benefactors of Yeager Society

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Retired U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, the first pilot to break the sound barrier, and the man for whom the Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholars is named, was honored today during a ceremony on MU's campus.

Nearly 200 people attended the ceremony in the Special Collections Department on the second floor of the Morrow Library. The event marked the dedication of a plaque in honor of the Society of Yeager Scholars benefactors and the generosity of Yeager.

Yeager, a native of Hamlin, W.Va., helped unveil the plaque, which hangs on a wall in the hallway just outside the Chuck Yeager Room. He has been called the most accomplished man in the history of West Virginia, the greatest pilot in history, and a living legend. Yeager is a member of the Aviation Hall of Fame.

"The new plaque is in a perfect place - a section of the library that pays homage to one of the greatest feats in aviation and to one of the world's greatest aviators," Edwina Pendarvis, interim director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, said.

In 1947 at the age of 24, Yeager captured the world's attention by becoming the first supersonic pilot by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 experimental aircraft. The Bell X-1 static tube, which was located at the very front of his aircraft, is among the display items in the Chuck Yeager Room.

"That room is really well laid out," Yeager said while addressing the crowd. "It was sort of emotional to go through the display. You see a lot of things that bring back a lot of memories."

Before today the Yeager Room, which features many of Yeager's personal papers and artifacts, along with donations such as the static tube, the Harmon International Trophy and many personal items, such as a small pocket knife that he carried on flights during World War II, was accessible only by appointment. It now is open to the public during regular Special Collections hours.

"General Yeager is such a rich treasure for this state," Lisle Brown, curator of Special Collections, said. "Having his collection here is a gem for the university. We now have a room where we can display the material, a place where people can come and enjoy it and get a feel for his career and his role in the history of aviation not only in this country, but throughout the world. General Yeager is probably one of the last genuine American heroes."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp called Yeager "a living legend," and said his accomplishments are both inspiring and uplifting. "General Yeager is an example of what a single human being can do to change the world," Kopp said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall department of art and design professor's sculpture 'Pipe Dreams' receives purchase award

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University assistant professor of art Claire Sherwood has been awarded the state's purchase award for her sculpture "Pipe Dreams."   Sherwood's work is now a permanent piece in the state's collection at the West Virginia Cultural Center in Charleston.

"This is the first time I've ever sold a piece that will stay in a collection at the state level," Sherwood said.  "The purchase prize is exactly that.  The state buys the piece in order to place it in its collection."  

Sherwood has one other piece of sculpture that is being featured in the 2005 West Virginia Juried Exhibition, which includes artwork by 93 West Virginia artists.  

The exhibition begins this weekend with a ceremony at the Cultural Center at the state capitol complex at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1. The exhibition continues through Jan. 29, 2006. For more information, persons may contact Claire Sherwood at sherwood@marshall.edu or at (304) 696-4312.

Cultural Center hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall graduate awarded James Madison Fellowship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Arysta N. McGill, a graduate of Marshall University, has been awarded a 2005 James Madison Fellowship by the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation.

Named in honor of the fourth president of the United States and acknowledged "Father of the Constitution and Bill of Rights," the fellowship will help fund McGill's course of study toward a master's degree.

The fellowship is directed toward current and prospective teachers of American history and social studies and supports graduate study of the history and principles of the U.S. Constitution.  The award is intended to recognize promising and distinguished teachers, and to strengthen their knowledge of the origins and development of American constitutional government thereby exposing the nation's secondary school students to accurate knowledge of the nation's constitutional heritage.

McGill, who lives in Point Pleasant, W.Va., was selected for the fellowship in competition with applicants from each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the nation's island and trust territories.  A total of 47 fellowships were awarded in 2005.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Digital Camera Workshop is Oct. 27 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Digital Camera Workshop, a half-day seminar geared towards those who want to learn how to use their digital cameras or for individuals who are considering buying digital cameras, takes place Thursday, Oct. 27 at Marshall University.

The introduction to digital photography, hosted by the Marshall Technology Outreach Center, is from 8 a.m. to noon in Drinko Library room 349. Registration fee is $99 per person, which includes all workshop materials. Attendees may bring their digital cameras with them if they already have them.

Participants will gain the skills they need to become proficient with digital cameras in a comfortable and friendly learning environment. The workshop will cover various facets of digital cameras including purchasing a digital camera, using a digital camera, displaying and sharing digital photos, understanding pixels and image sizes, and basic digital image editing using Adobe Photoshop Elements.

Persons interested in obtaining more information or registering for the workshop may contact Kelli R. Mayes, director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center, at (304) 696-3325 or via e-mail at mayes@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU student representative Seth Murphy resigns from board; student body president Michael Misiti appointed as interim member

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Student representative Seth Murphy has resigned his position as a member of Marshall University's board of governors, BOG chair Menis Ketchum announced today.

Murphy, whose resignation was effective Sept. 23, cited family reasons for his decision to leave the board, Ketchum said.

Board policy allows Marshall's dean of student affairs to appoint an interim member to replace Murphy. Dean Steve Hensley appointed student body president Michael Misiti to take Murphy's place on the board as an interim representative. A permanent replacement will be chosen during the regular student election in November.

"Seth Murphy was an excellent board member who was not afraid to challenge the establishment," Ketchum said. "We do understand, however, that family matters take precedence over institutional concerns."

Marshall president Stephen J. Kopp said Misiti's experience as SGA president will help him as a board member.

"Michael has demonstrated very strong leadership qualities," Kopp said. "He represents the students and their issues very effectively. He will be an outstanding spokesperson for the student perspective as an interim board member."

Misiti said he is honored to have the opportunity to serve on the board. "I look forward to representing the students adequately at the board of governors' level," he said.

Misiti may be reached at (304) 696-6436.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Golf scramble to help fund scholarships for MU's H.E.L.P. program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Higher Education for Learning Problems (H.E.L.P.) program is sponsoring its annual golf scramble to help fund need-based scholarships for students in the program.

The scramble begins with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7 at Riviera Country Club in Lesage. Cost to play is $100 per person, and signup continues through the day of the event.

H.E.L.P. director Lynne Weston said the golf scramble is important to and appreciated by the students.

"We want to thank the people who have participated in the past, and we hope they realize how much these students appreciate their help," Weston said. "Some of the students will tell you that they would not make it through school without the H.E.L.P. program and the scholarships we provide."

Weston said Papa John's and Subway are providing lunch for participants, and Rocco's Ristorante is catering dinner. Special attractions include a putting contest, long drive contest and door prizes.

For more information, persons may call (304) 696-6252 or send a fax to (304) 696-3231.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Board approves significant pay raises for Marshall faculty and staff; School of Medicine raises also approved by board

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's board of governors today unanimously approved a proposal presented by President Stephen J. Kopp to increase annual pay for the 2005-2006 academic year for MU faculty and staff during a special meeting at the Memorial Student Center.

The board also approved Kopp's proposal to increase pay for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's faculty and staff.

Board of governors chairman Menis Ketchum said the board's approval of this salary plan is intended to create conditions conducive to the hiring and retention of quality faculty and staff and to make progress toward addressing the issue of salary compression.

By Jan. 1, 2006, annual faculty pay at Marshall will have been increased by an average of 6.5 percent, classified staff by 5 percent and non-classified staff by 4 percent through the pay increase. School of Medicine increases are: 6.5 percent for basic science faculty, 4 percent for classified staff, 3 percent for non-classified staff and 1 percent for clinical faculty. 

"Governor Manchin jump-started this process when he signed Senate Bill 603 and was successful recently in passing pay increases for public educators through the Legislature," Ketchum said. "With the autonomy that (Senate Bill) 603 gives us, the university leadership has worked with our budget to meet the requests of many of our faculty and staff to improve their lives and retain their talents."

Kopp said issues such as low pay and salary compression for faculty were the top priority of the board of governors and senior administrative leadership when he assumed his presidential duties on July 1.

"Our goal here is simple - we want to have the ability to recruit and keep the best possible educators, scholars and employees here in West Virginia," Kopp said. "Early in my presidency, it has become very clear to me that we need to act now if we're going to maintain a quality faculty, plus create an environment in which our students can reach their full potential."

Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall, said the board's vote shows MU's faculty that the university is committed to the faculty's development and retention.

"On behalf of our faculty, I want to thank Governor Manchin, President Kopp and our board of governors for this increase and believe that we've created a more stable environment that will make Marshall a more attractive place to learn, teach and grow," Denman said.

Kopp, too, applauded Manchin and the Legislature for taking action that led to today's vote by the board of governors.

"We now have the means to address this critical priority in a significant way by increasing faculty pay by an average of 6.5 percent," Kopp said. "We are also addressing competitiveness considerations for classified and non-classified staff through a pay increase during the same academic year."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Pay raises approved for Marshall Community College faculty and staff

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A proposal presented by Marshall Community & Technical College President Dr. Vicki L. Riley to increase pay for the 2005-2006 academic year for MCTC faculty and staff was unanimously approved today by the Marshall University Board of Governors.

The average increase for Marshall Community & Technical College faculty is 5 percent, for classified staff is 5 percent, and for non-classified staff is 4 percent. The increases were approved during a special meeting of the board at the Memorial Student Center.

"It is critical for Marshall Community & Technical College to offer competitive faculty and staff salaries.  We need to retain personnel that are technically skilled and highly dedicated to student success," Riley said. "The governor's salary allocation this year helped us meet that commitment."

The increases will be implemented fully by Jan. 1, 2006.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall art department launches new club

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first meeting of the "Film Snobs," a new club at Marshall University, is scheduled for 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Smith Hall room 621 on MU's Huntington campus.

Although the club is under the auspices of the department of art & design in the College of Fine Arts, students and faculty from across campus are invited to attend the meeting.

Organizers hope every two to three weeks to have meetings in which club members will view full-length feature films as well as short films. This first gathering will feature a potluck dinner provided by organizers, although attendees may bring food if they wish.

For more information, persons may contact David Seth Cyfers at cyfers10@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 26, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Marshall Unveils "Sights and Sounds" Page on Web Site

Huntington, W. Va. - Marshall University's Web site team has created a "Sights and Sounds" page designed to provide easy access to photos, videos, and other materials about Marshall University.

"We've developed this page so that the general public, as well as the university community, can get to this material with just a couple of clicks," said Dr. Jan I. Fox, vice president for information technology at Marshall. "Sights and Sounds gives our community a one-stop shop for the many of the multiple resources that are distributed throughout the many university Web pages."

The "Sights and Sounds" page includes links to Marshall news videos, a photo gallery of recent events, selected archives of WMUL-FM broadcasts, and an academic showcase section that will feature videos of Marshall departments and degree programs, among others.

"By viewing the academic showcase videos, prospective students will see the variety of experiences available at Marshall," said Dr. Sarah Denman, Marshall's senior vice president for academic affairs and provost. "The videos are a great way to enhance the printed materials and the face-to-face contact prospective students have with faculty and admissions counselors."

Other links from "Sights and Sounds" include maps and an interactive tour of the Huntington campus and sections on the local Huntington community and Marshall University history.

To view the page, persons may visit the Marshall Web site at www.marshall.edu/ and follow the link named "About Marshall."

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

19th annual Yeager Symposium at Marshall University focuses on Appalachian traditions, folklore and music

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 19th annual Yeager Symposium takes place Monday, Sept. 26 through Thursday, Sept. 29 at Marshall University.

The lecture series, "Echoes of Appalachia," focuses on Appalachian traditions, folklore and music. A variety of speakers and musical presentations will take place throughout the week, also with an emphasis on Appalachia.

"We chose the topic to explore our region's vast and interesting history," Johnny Walker, event co-chairman, said. "We hope to portray the history and traditions of Appalachia through the series."

The following is a schedule of events for the Yeager Symposium:

Monday, Sept. 26 - "Potluck," a presentation on the oral traditions of Appalachia, takes place in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The presentation also showcases the Appalachian traditions of women, wisdom and home-cooking. The presentation will be given by Karen Vuranch, Julie Adams, and Colleen Anderson, who have traveled across the U.S. with their stories of cookery and community.

Tuesday, Sept. 27 - John Walker, father of symposium co-chairman Johnny Walker, is a fourth-generation rifle maker from the Carper family who produced the locally famous Carper Rifles. John Walker will give a presentation on carrying on the tradition of his maternal ancestors and using the antiquated methods of his relatives to recreate the Appalachian Hog Rifle in both form and spirit. The presentation takes place at 7 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Walker also will present examples of the machinery used to produce the rifles as well as finished work.

Wednesday, Sept. 28 - A showing of "The Mothman Prophecies" takes place at 5 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. After the movie at 7 p.m., Jeff Wamsley, author of "Mothman: The Facts Behind the Legend,"will compare the true story of the Mothman to the 2002 movie starring Richard Gere. Wamsley is a native of Point Pleasant, W.Va., and co-founder of the annual Point Pleasant Mothman Festival.

Thursday, Sept. 29 - Bluegrass sensation Wildfire performs at 7 p.m. in Marco's in the basement of the Memorial Student Center. Wildfire performed as the house bluegrass band at Dollywood in 2000 and 2001 and recorded background music for the Home & Garden cable station before recording its first CD, "Uncontained." Band members Phil Leadbetter, Robert Hale, Darrell Webb, Curt Chapman and Barry Crabtree will present their refreshing bluegrass sound and inform Marshall University's audience about the history of bluegrass music and instruments.

All events are free to the public. For more information, persons may contact Walker at (304) 222-5582.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor's photographs in national magazine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University assistant professor of art Mark Slankard's photographs are featured in the current issue of the Boston Review, a political and literary journal with a circulation of 10,000.  

Eight of Slankard's photos are published in conjunction with the featured New Democracy Forum section titled, "What's Hurting the Middle Class." Slankard said he was contacted by the magazine after someone with the magazine spotted his work at an art show in Cleveland.

"I'm very excited to be sharing the pages of this magazine with many influential people," Slankard said. 

Slankard said most of the photographs included in the feature were taken in southern Ohio and Indiana.  The images of suburban landscapes complement nearly two dozen pages about the middle class and its characteristics.

For more information, persons may contact Slankard at (304) 696-2903.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 21, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, Communications Director, Student Government, (304) 696-6412

'Spike the Cam' theme adopted by Marshall's SGA for Conference USA volleyball opener Friday with UTEP

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association has adopted the theme "Spike the Cam" for the Thundering Herd volleyball team's first Conference USA game at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23 at Cam Henderson Center.

The promotion is similar to the annual "Jam the Cam," in which the MU women's basketball team attempts to attract a big crowd for one of its regular-season games at Cam Henderson Center.

The goal at Friday's "Spike the Cam" is to draw a large crowd when Marshall takes on the UTEP (University of Texas-El Paso) Miners.  Pizza, T-shirts, and prizes will be given away at the game, and the first 200 people to arrive will receive free beverage Koozies.

Also, Giovanni's Pizza will sponsor a "serving competition" and Esquire Golf Club will host a chipping contest between games.

Two tickets to Marshall's football game Oct. 8 at Virginia Tech will be given to the best sign made in support of the volleyball team. The judges will be Colleen Talley, Student Government Association athletic liaison, and other athletic department marketing graduate assistants.

For more information, persons may contact Talley at colleen.talley@marshall.edu, or at (304) 696-289.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Law school recruitment fair is Wednesday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's chapter of pre-law fraternity Phi Alpha Delta is sponsoring a law school recruitment fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

Harrison O'Dell, an MU senior and director of programming with Phi Alpha Delta, said representatives from 11 law schools will participate. They will recruit Marshall undergraduate and graduate students to attend their law schools after graduating from Marshall, O'Dell said.

Participants include Capital University School of Law, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, University of Akron, University of Dayton, University of Louisville, Appalachian School of Law, University of Kentucky, Northern Kentucky's Salmon P. Chase College of Law, the University of Cincinnati and West Virginia University College of Law.

More information is available by calling O'Dell at (304) 412-9521.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fall general faculty meeting is Sept. 29 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A state of the faculty address by faculty senate chair Larry Stickler, remarks by President Stephen J. Kopp and the introduction of 64 new faculty by college deans highlight the agenda for Marshall University's fall general faculty meeting Thursday, Sept. 29.

The meeting begins at 4 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center playhouse. After the meeting, a reception to honor the new faculty will take place in the Performing Arts Center lobby.

New faculty to be introduced are:

College of Education & Human Services - Van Anderson, Marshall Angle, Laura Boswell, and Linda Geronilla

College of Fine Arts - Sean Beavers, Bryon Clercx, Yulia Kozlova, Susan Onofrio, Vicki Stroeher, and Jenette Williams

College of Health Professions - Cary Dixon, Jennifer Perry, Sandra Prunty, and Donna Robinson

College of Information Technology & Engineering - Annie Protopapas

College of Liberal Arts - Melissa Atkins, George Davis, Elena Ermolaeva, Ana Hermoso Gonzalez, Kelli Grady, Rebecca Hoff, Christine Huhn, Sangmoon Kim, Roxanne Kirkwood, Eric Lassiter, Charles Meadows, Donna Sullivan, Wendy Williams, and David Winter

College of Science - Kairui Chen, Menashi Cohenford, Norah Catherine Esty, Diana Fisher, Bratoljub Milosavljevic, Huong Nguyen, and Boris Sorkin

Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - Paul Hamilton and Rex McClure

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Kelly Dick, Wade Douglas, Paul Edwards, Jeffrey George, Michael Goldman, Susan Hager, Erika Harris, Nathalie Henchey, Bonghyun Lee, Mary Marcuzzi, Bobby Miller, Louis Molina, John Parker, Jr., Carol Patterson, Mesfin Seifu, Edward Setzer, Maria-Andrea Vidal, Kenneth Wright, Nadia Yaqub, and Mumtaz Zaman

MUGC Graduate School of Education & Professional Development - Dixie Billheimer, William Capehart, Patricia Myers, Samuel Securro, Jr., and Sandra Stroebel

W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications - Maryl Neff.

More information is available by contacting Bernice Bullock with the faculty senate at (304) 696-4376.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 19, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Marshall Pediatrics Department sending Katrina medical relief team

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Marshall University Department of Pediatrics is sending a four-person team to Louisiana Tuesday to provide medical services to people in the Katrina-damaged town of Angie, about 60 miles northeast of New Orleans.

The team, which will provide services for the next week, includes Dr. Isabel Pino, nurses Rena Chapman and Sherrie Fulton, and social worker Kelli Phelps. The four will leave early Tuesday from Charleston's Yeager Airport.

Marshall is participating in Operation Assist, which is a Katrina response program organized by the Children's Health Fund and the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University. The MU Department of Pediatrics and the Children's Health Fund already collaborate in a mobile pediatric clinic that serves children in rural communities in southwestern West Virginia.

Pino said the Marshall team will be based in a mobile clinic similar to the one used in West Virginia. The van in Louisiana is on loan from an Arkansas project; the Marshall team is replacing a Children's Health Fund team from Phoenix.

"We'll be treating people with normal illnesses like colds and diarrhea, plus people who have problems like asthma and diabetes who have run out of medicine," she said. Phelps will help address the mental health needs of those faced with the immense stresses of the hurricane's devastation.

The team will be taking down as much medication as it can, and will stop in Baton Rouge to buy food and water to avoid straining local resources. With local housing options severely limited in the town of less than 250, Pino and her team are taking sleeping bags so they can camp out at a local fire station or hospital.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MCTC, School of Medicine collect 1 tons of supplies for evacuees

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Community and Technical College and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University recently organized a relief effort to collect and send supplies to Hurricane Katrina evacuees now living at Camp Dawson in Preston County, W.Va.

Marshall students, faculty and staff, along with members of the community, collected one and a half tons of supplies, including toys for children, school supplies, books for children and adults, baby supplies, cleaning supplies and personal care products.

On Monday, Sept. 12, volunteers Rik Abbess, Matt Donathan and Aaron Ross from the senior class at Grace Christian School in Huntington moved the supplies from the third floor of Corbly Hall on MU's main campus, where donations were delivered, to the truck parked nearby, then loaded them on the truck as well.

Transportation of the goods to Camp Dawson was provided free of charge by Tri-State Express.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 16, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Marshall University, (304) 746-2038

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals to be a part of Constitution Week at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of the events recognizing Constitution Week and the 250th Birthday Celebration of Chief Justice John Marshall, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals will participate in two functions next week at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

WHAT: Panel discussion with Chief Justice Albright and Justices Davis, Maynard and Benjamin. The discussion is open to students, faculty, staff, alumni and the public.WHEN: Monday, Sept. 19, 2005 at 4 p.m. WHERE: Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Huntington campus, Marshall University WHAT: The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals will be in session for the first time on the Huntington campus of Marshall University. To review the docket, visit http://www.state.wv.us/wvsca/calendar/sept20_05ad.htm WHEN: Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2005 at 10 a.m. WHERE: Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Huntington campus, Marshall University 
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Volunteer Fair is Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University office of volunteer services is encouraging students to get connected with the Huntington community during the annual Marshall University Volunteer Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20.

The fair, which takes place in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center, provides students with the opportunity to meet representatives from service organizations throughout the area and find out how they can volunteer with an organization.

"The fair allows students to see what organizations are in the area and gives them the opportunity to become a volunteer and help out in the community," Prudy Barker, director of volunteer services at Marshall University, said. "We try to reach out to the community at Marshall and this is the perfect opportunity for our students to be involved in the Huntington area."

The service organizations that will be participating in the fair are: 

CONTACT of Huntington; Big Brothers/Big Sisters; Tri-State Literacy Council; Cabell County Community Services Organization; Cabell County Youth Empowerment; Ebenezer Community Outreach Center; Hospice of Huntington; Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity; Girl Scouts, and American Cancer Society

For more information, persons may contact Barker at (304) 696-2495.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 15, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, Communications Director, Student Government, (304) 696-6412

Blood drive at Marshall brings in record 182 units of blood

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students, faculty and staff donated 182 units of blood to the American Red Cross last week in a two-day blood drive sponsored by the student government association and the student ambassadors.

Student body president Michael Misiti said the 182 units are the most ever collected during a Marshall blood drive. Officially, the drive was conducted from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 7-8 in the Memorial Student Center. However, many students were still donating well into the 6 o'clock hour on the second day, Misiti said.

Misiti said he is overwhelmed by the student, faculty and staff turnout and donations, and attributes the blood drive's success to one of SGA's executives.

"This outcome could not have been possible without the great planning and hard work of Jeanette Kripas, student government director of campus projects," Misiti said. "Many people have mentioned that this large outcome is a result of students' compassion for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. This is very true, but a large portion of this success is due to the hard work of Jeanette Kripas."

Kripas said she is more than pleased with the way the drive went.

"We had numerous businesses donate food and that was a huge help," Kripas said. "I'm really just thankful for all of those who donated blood and appreciative of everyone who helped work the drive."

The next blood drive will be in November at the Campus Christian Center. For more information, persons may contact Misiti at (304) 696-6436 or Kripas at (304) 696-6412.

###

 
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Vandalia, MU to commercialize DNA production system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first biotechnology research company based upon Marshall University research has begun operations in Huntington. The formation of Vandalia Research Inc. makes it the first company to come out of a program begun two years ago to focus on area economic growth based upon scientific research at Marshall.

Vandalia Research and Marshall University have entered into an exclusive license agreement to commercialize the patent-pending Triathlon DNA production system that has been under development since early 2003, Derek Gregg, Director of Business Development with Vandalia, announced today.

The announcement took place at a news conference at the Frederick Building in Huntington, where Vandalia's offices are located.

"DNA in the 21st century will serve as a catalyst for more efficient drug discovery, diagnostics, therapeutics, identification methods, and computing advances," Gregg, a Marshall junior, said. "All of these applications require large amounts of short, specific DNA sequences."

Gregg said Vandalia Research and Marshall University recognized this market need and developed the Triathlon system using the industry-standard PCR method to provide customers with a solution that fits with their research and development efforts.

"The Triathlon system provides advantages over current applications, and its scale and cost allow for many new and exciting applications, increasing scientific knowledge and consumer uses for DNA technology," Gregg said.

Gregg said formation of the company was completed when Vandalia was successful in convincing local investors to provide the start-up capital in excess of $500,000 through acquisition of Vandalia common stock.

"We're indebted to the local group of investors who have worked very closely with Vandalia and actually made this venture possible," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said.

The company's management team includes Gregg, Marshall junior Justin Swick, and MU professors Dr. Elizabeth Murray and Dr. Michael Norton.

"I'm extremely proud of our faculty and students in this entrepreneurial endeavor," Dr. Howard Aulick, vice president for research at Marshall, said. "They have provided both the leadership and the passion to begin a biotech industry here in Huntington. It is not an easy process but I believe it will be one of the first of many biotech companies that will grace this area."

Norton said he hopes other students are inspired by Vandalia's success.

"We do hope that this event awakens the entrepreneurial spirit among the many excellent students of all ages who are part of the intellectual community which calls Marshall its home," he said. 

At Marshall, the project was supported by grants from the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance (NCIIA), and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

For more information about Vandalia Research, Inc., formed in 2005, persons may visit http://www.vandaliaresearch.com or call Gregg at (304) 529-0803.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Day of Service Saturday on campus, in community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Day of Service, formerly known as SweatEquity Day, is expanding off campus this year, Prudy Barker, MU's director of volunteer services and student affairs, said today.

MU Day of Service is planned from 10 a.m. to about noon on Saturday, Sept. 17. In previous years, Marshall students and faculty spent the special day sprucing up the main campus in Huntington with chores such as sweeping, painting, picking up cigarette butts, pulling weeds and washing windows.

Saturday, they'll not only work on campus, but also at Veterans Memorial Field House, the Ritter Park tennis courts, the Huntington Museum of Art and Barnett Child Care Center.

"The planning committee decided it wanted our students to engage in service in the community, to develop a tradition of service in the community," Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, said.

In the five years of SweatEquity Day, the goal was for participants, particularly freshmen, to establish ownership in the campus.

"Now we want them to establish ownership in the campus and the community," Barker said. "We try to involve freshman classes so they can be educated as to their civic responsibilities."

Barker said more than 300 people, including MU President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, and Dr. Sarah Denman, Marshall's provost, are expected to participate in the Day of Service.

Those in the Marshall community who want to help are asked to meet at 10 a.m. near the John Marshall statue, which stands outside the Drinko Library facing John Marshall Drive. Or, they may call Barker at (304) 696-2495.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 14, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, South Charleston, (304) 746-2038

South Charleston campus marks 10 years of serving Kanawha Valley

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - As a familiar part of the landscape within the Kanawha Valley, Marshall University's South Charleston campus continues a 10-year tradition of serving students who seek to better themselves and make a difference here in the Mountain State.

On Thursday, Sept. 15, the South Charleston campus will celebrate its 10th anniversary with an outdoor luncheon for Marshall's students, faculty, staff and alumni.

"I'm very proud of what Marshall has accomplished at the South Charleston campus," Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, said. "It's impressive when you can serve the residents of our capital city and the surrounding area by offering a quality education that is both accessible and affordable. We rely heavily on both private industry and state government for our students and our adjunct faculty, and appreciate this mutually beneficial relationship."

"While the South Charleston campus is our most visible campus from a major highway, it's important to remember that Marshall actually serves the entire state of West Virginia," Kemp Winfree, vice president of regional operations, said. "However, this campus, with more than 2,800 graduate students a semester, offers a valuable resource to the people of the Kanawha Valley."

Betsy Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology & Engineering (CITE), said she believes that the uniqueness of the South Charleston campus can be found in the students who take advantage of the campus.

"Our students at the South Charleston campus are primarily working professionals," Dulin said. "They come to campus after a long day's work and we want to accommodate them with a user-friendly environment combined with high-quality courses that are timely, useful and immediately applicable in their professional lives."

Prior to being a location for learning, Marshall's South Charleston campus was a Little League Baseball field. It was donated to the former West Virginia Graduate College, which was made part of Marshall University on July 1, 1997. The campus now consists of two buildings - the Administration Building and the Robert C. Byrd Academic & Technology Center.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU board of governors meets Wednesday at MOVC in Point Pleasant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's board of governors will conduct its next regularly scheduled meeting at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14 at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va.

The board, which normally meets at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in downtown Huntington, occasionally has its meetings at one of Marshall's regional campuses. This will be the board's first meeting at the MOVC.

Homer Preece, director of the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, will give the board an update on the past, present and future of the MOVC. Also, the board will meet with the center's board of advisors.

"We're very excited about having the opportunity to host the board of governors," Preece said.

The MOVC opened in May 1994, and its current location at One John Marshall Way opened in January 2000.

Three former members of the board of governors, reappointed recently by Gov. Joe Manchin, will be sworn in Wednesday. They are A. Michael Perry, Virginia King and Michael J. Farrell. Also to be sworn in are faculty representative James M. Sottile, staff representative Sherri Noble and student representative Seth Murphy.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tailgate party planned before Marshall-UCF football game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A tailgate party is planned for Marshall University football fans preceding the Thundering Herd's 6 p.m. game Saturday, Sept. 24 at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

The party is from 3 to 5 p.m. at Tinker Field, a baseball facility located next to the Citrus Bowl. Cost is $25 per person, which includes meals and beverages, and those wishing to attend are asked to RSVP no later than Sept. 20 by calling (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869.

The event will be catered by Sonny's Bar-B-Que, with a menu of pulled pork, chicken, baked beans, coleslaw, potato salad, lemonade, tea, water, soda and beer.

Marshall's tent will be located in left field. To get there, fans are asked to enter the main entrance of Tinker Field on the west side of the Citrus Bowl (Tampa Street) and follow the third-base line.

The event is sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association, The Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Central Florida Alumni Club.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday September 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Katrina fund-raising effort brings in more than $520,000

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fans attending today's Kansas State-Marshall football game were asked to "Bring a buck" to Joan C. Edwards Stadium to aid victims of Hurricane Katrina.

They did bring a buck - and more. Lots more.

The total collected from the stadium-record crowd of 36,914 fans, including about 2,000 cheering for Kansas State, was at least $521,000, West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin, MU President Stephen J. Kopp and student body president Michael Misiti announced late in the game.

Clearly, the urgency of the need to help the hurricane victims as quickly and as effectively as possible was obvious to the fans at the stadium. "They need us bad and they need us quick," Misiti said of the victims, explaining the fans' overwhelming response.

The fund-raising effort organized by various campus organizations, including the MU student government association, asked fans to "Bring a buck" - at least one dollar - to the game to help fund the American Red Cross' relief effort.

"This shows great leadership, compassion and caring on the part of our students," Kopp said. "Hopefully this will inspire other students at higher education institutions across the nation to conduct similar fund-raising efforts in this time of terrible tragedy. I'm very proud of our students and everyone who gave."

What the students' effort did, Kopp said, was inspire MU alumni, members of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., board of directors and others to give far more than one dollar each.

"They decided this was the right thing to do," Kopp said. "And they wanted to do it as a representative of Marshall University."

Misiti issued a challenge to all other higher education institutions in the United States to match Marshall's total.

"Here we are, a small university in West Virginia, one of the poorest states in the country, and we raise over a half-million dollars in one day," Misiti said. "Just think how much help we could provide if each of the other colleges and universities in the United States just match our total."

Gov. Manchin, who attended the game and participated with the students in collecting money, said he was going to challenge the country's other 49 governors to persuade student government associations at universities in their states to sponsor a "Bring a buck" event similar to Marshall's during next week's games.

"Marshall's student government was the first in the nation to start a 'Bring a buck' campaign, and raised over $500,000 that will help ease the human suffering caused by this tragedy," Manchin said. "If every person attending every college football game across the nation next week would give just one dollar each, the total would be incredible."

Marshall organizations participating in the "Bring a buck" event were: SGA; Biology Club; Delta Sigma Theta; Student Ambassadors; Pre-AMSA (American Medical Student Association); Honors 101; Circle K; Campus Crusade for Christ; Phi Mu; Gamma Beta Phi; ATO (Alpha Tau Omega); Athletics, Staff and Recreational Sports.

The game's final totals were:

  • Score: Kansas State 21, Marshall 19
  • Attendance: 36,914
  • "Bring a buck" funds raised: at least $521,000.

For more information, persons may contact Misiti at (304) 638-0288.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

From tragedy to triumph: Dardingers join MU's Pathway of Prominence

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In a ceremony this morning on Marshall University's main campus, Robert L. "Bob" Dardinger and his wife, Dianna L. Dardinger, of Columbus, Ohio, joined MU's Pathway of Prominence, bringing to 16 the number of Pathway members.

A plaque honoring the couple was unveiled at the Pathway, which is located at the center of the Huntington campus between Old Main and the Memorial Student Center. Donors who present gifts of $1 million or more to Marshall are honored with a plaque on the Pathway.

Robert Dardinger has three endowed scholarships in Marshall's Big Green Scholarship Foundation. They are a football scholarship, named for his twin brother, Richard "Dick" Dardinger, who died in the Marshall plane crash in 1970; an endowed scholarship for women's athletics in the name of Esther Simmons Dardinger, his first wife, who died of cancer, and another football scholarship in the name of his late mother and father, Louise and Carl Dardinger.

In 2004, Dardinger made the Big Green Scholarship Foundation the irrevocable beneficiary on his Charitable Remaining Trust.

 

"The Big Green would just like to thank Mr. Dardinger for his past, present and future patronage and support of the Big Green," David Cantor, Executive Director of the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, said. "It's people like Mr. Dardinger that will help Marshall University athletics grow into the future and provide quality education for quality students."

Other Pathway of Prominence honorees are: Clayton W. Dunlap and Bernice Virginia Dunlap; James F. Edwards and Joan C. Edwards; Daniel E. Wagoner and Virginia U. Wagoner; Wilbur E. Myers; Elizabeth McDowell Lewis; John Deaver Drinko and Elizabeth Gibson Drinko; James H. "Buck" Harless; John Oliver Butler and Ruth Elizabeth Butler; Lyle A. Smith; Charles B. Hedrick and Mary Jo Hedrick; James E. Gibson and Verna K. Gibson; Timothy L. Haymaker and Sandra K. Haymaker; F. Selby Wellman and Donna Wellman; William E. Willis and Joyce L. Willis; and Bliss L. Charles.

In Robert Dardinger's case, tragedy clearly doesn't know its limits. Even so, catastrophe can be a catalyst for incredible generosity, transforming loss into victory.  The route to Dardinger's generous gift was, however, circuitous and laden with intense struggles. The loss of both a wife and a brother, both at comparatively young ages, is more than many can bear.

Dardinger first became painfully acquainted with tragedy's arsenal after the catastrophic loss of his twin brother in the plane crash. Fighting to carry on after such devastation, Dardinger forged ahead with his life.  Years passed, and just when he thought his life was settling into a normal, middle-aged, middle-class existence, the unthinkable struck:  his 49-year-old wife succumbed to brain cancer. The saga would seem to have an unhappy ending, but the story does not end here.

Dardinger, a 1966 Marshall University freshman linebacker, spent the first two decades of his life playing football side by side with his twin brother, Richard Lee.  The dual announcements of the brothers' collegiate intentions were no surprise to Centerburg, Ohio, when both boys signed to play together.  The twins chose Marshall over the University of Kentucky through the urging of their high school coach, himself a former graduate student at Marshall.

The brothers eventually took separate paths. While Robert left the football team after the 1968 season, got married and started a family, Richard remained on the team.  After that fateful November night in 1970, when Robert Dardinger uncannily sensed something was terribly wrong, he committed to make a difference.  Somehow, some way, he would leave a legacy in memory of his twin. 

After completing a master's degree in education, Dardinger went back to his native Ohio to teach and coach at Johnstown High School, spending 28 years there.  On a teacher's salary, however, he never had the resources to make a real difference for his alma mater, although the desire was never far from his mind.  He had no idea what lurked around the corner, as his beloved Esther was diagnosed with cancer.

Through a series of misfortunes and disastrous errors, Esther lost her battle.  Dardinger took up the crusade to right the wrongs she suffered.  As a result, he ended up as the recipient of a significant jury award.  He immediately knew he would be able to keep the commitment he made to himself long before. He endowed the three scholarships and, ultimately, established a charitable trust as a major donation to the university. 

Dardinger has three adult children and his first biological grandchild, Caylan James LeMaster, was born on Aug. 31. The Dardinger legacy continues, despite the tragedies. And thanks to Robert Dardinger's resolute determination to make a difference, tragedy has been eased by triumph.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU's Black Alumni, Inc., sponsoring bus trip to game at Virginia Tech

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Black Alumni, Inc., is sponsoring a bus trip to the Thundering Herd's football game at Virginia Tech Saturday, Oct. 8, Janis Winkfield, a member and past president of the organization, said today.

The cost is $80 per person, which covers game ticket, light snacks on the bus and a tailgate party. Game time is 1 p.m., and the deadline for reserving a seat on the bus is Friday, Sept. 16.

Winkfield said the bus will leave the parking lot at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium at about 6 a.m. and return to Huntington immediately after the game.

To reserve a seat on the bus or for more information, please call Winkfield at 416-0938; David Harris at 697-1550 or 696-2597; Sonny Vines at 525-1816, or Raymond Ridgeway at 529-4692.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall offering free online courses to students registered at schools forced to shut down by Hurricane Katrina

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is participating with more than 100 universities from around the country in a program that allows college students attending schools affected by Hurricane Katrina to enroll in online courses at no cost to themselves.

Marshall is offering 10 online courses, the maximum allowed, to be taught by Marshall faculty to the displaced students. Courses will begin on Oct. 10 and end no later than Jan. 6. The courses are being offered in collaboration with the Southern Regional Education Board and with a $1.1 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

The Sloan Foundation is a philanthropic nonprofit institution that was established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan, Jr., then president and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation.  

The special accelerated program provides a wide range of courses to serve the learning needs of students at the community college, university and graduate level, regardless of academic discipline.  

The courses being offered at Marshall are: Introduction to Visual Art; General Chemistry I; General Chemistry II; Introduction to Cultural Geography; U.S. History Since 1877; Fundamentals of Computer Technology; Principles of Management; Principles of Marketing, College Algebra and Introduction to Modern Philosophy.

"We have a wonderful opportunity here to help displaced students continue their education," Donna Spindel, chair of the MU department of history and MU's faculty coordinator for online instruction, said. "Online courses, because of their inherent flexibility, are well-suited to meeting the needs of the students in this kind of emergency situation."

Spindel said she is pleased that members of Marshall's faculty are willing to adjust their schedules and participate in the program.

"This is an indication of how many of our faculty are willing to come forward and help where they can," she said. 

Only students registered at schools that had to shut down because of the hurricane are eligible to enroll in the program, Spindel said. 

More information is available at www.SloanSemester.org, or by calling Spindel at (304) 696-2717.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Five to join LCOB Hall of Fame in October

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five individuals who have had distinguished careers in their respective fields of business will be will be honored by Marshall University when they are inducted into the Lewis College of Business' Hall of Fame Tuesday, Oct. 4 at the Clay Center in Charleston, W.Va.

The Hall of Fame honors those people in the business community who have an outstanding record of long-standing achievement in their career fields.  It is the most distinguished honor granted by the Lewis College of Business (LCOB). 

"This is one of the really bright spots in our academic year for the Lewis College of Business," Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of LCOB, said.  "It is a privilege for us to be associated with the successful business people, past and present, who are honored by the peers in the business community with induction into LCOB's Hall of Fame.  We are also grateful for the tremendous vote of confidence shown by the friends of the college who have provided such generous support over the years."

Ross Dionne, president of the LCOB advisory board which oversees the induction process, noted the selection process is a rigorous one.  "The Marshall University Lewis College of Business advisory board of directors each year has the difficult challenge of narrowing the field of Marshall's many successful graduates and supporters to be inductees into the Business Hall of Fame," he said.

This year's inductees are:

Paul E. Arbogast, senior advisor to Ernst & Young LLP in Charleston, W.Va., is an active member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPS). Arbogast graduated from the Lewis College of Business in 1969 with a B.B.A. in Accounting.  He is a past LCOB advisory board member and contributor to the LCOB.

Timothy L. Haymaker, owner of Haymaker/Bean Commercial Real Estate in Lexington, Ky., graduated from Marshall in 1969.  He serves as chairman of the Marshall University Campaign for National Prominence. Haymaker is a member of the university's Pathway of Prominence, the John Marshall Society and the Erickson Alumni Center Society.

Kathy G. Eddy is a shareholder of McDonough, Eddy, Parsons & Baylous, A.C. in Parkersburg, W.Va.  Eddy graduated from the Lewis College of Business in 1972 with a B.B.A. in accounting.  She is an active member and ex-chair of the board of directors of the AICPA and is a member of the LCOB advisory board.  Eddy is a member the West Virginia Society of CPA's and the West Virginia Board of Accountancy holding all offices, including president, of both organizations.    

Franklin P. Justice, Jr., is a retired vice president with Ashland, Inc., and a retired vice president for development at Marshall.  He graduated from the Lewis College of Business in 1977 with an M.B.A. in finance.  He is a member of the LCOB advisory board, the Erickson Alumni Center Society and the West Virginia Roundtable.  Justice has raised money for the John Deaver Drinko Library and endowments for LCOB.

David Hofstetter is founder and president of Parkline, Inc., in Winfield, W.Va.  He is a member of the LCOB advisory board and the Marshall University Graduate College Foundation.  Hofstetter was named West Virginia's Small Businessman of the Year in 1992.  He is a past president of the Putnam County Chamber of Commerce and the Putnam County Development Authority.  He also served on the West Virginia Economic Development Grant Committee.

The criteria for receiving this award include an untarnished reputation, at least 25 years of distinguished service in a professional field, and professional standing evidenced by recognition on a state, regional or national basis.

The event begins with a formal reception at 6 p.m. and will be followed by the induction ceremony at 7 p.m. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Statewide business leaders visit Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 50 business leaders affiliated with the Young Presidents Organization will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Thursday Sept. 8.  

The Mountain State Chapter will gather on campus for an educational conference and  tour of the Forensic Science Center and Drinko Library.  Marshall University alumni Selby Wellman and Verna Gibson, leaders in their respective industries, will deliver a joint presentation to the group at 3 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre. The tour of the Forensic Science Center, located at the old Fairfield Stadium site, is at 4 p.m.

The Young Presidents Organization is an international leadership group that is open to business leaders under the age of 44 who either serve as president or CEO of their companies. They must also meet other stringent requirements to participate. More information on YPO is available by calling Eric Nelson with the organization at (304) 347-7252.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU student government co-hosting 'Bring a Buck' at football game to raise money for hurricane victims

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - MU's Student Government Association, in conjunction with Volunteer Services and other campus organizations, is co-hosting "Bring a Buck" Saturday, Sept. 10, before the Thundering Herd's football game with Kansas State at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"Bring a Buck" is a campaign to collect money for those who have been victimized by Hurricane Katrina. Marshall students and members of the American Red Cross will be stationed throughout Joan C. Edwards Stadium to collect donations from students and fans attending the game.

Student body president Michael Misiti is asking that each person donate at least $1 to the relief efforts.

"While the thoughts and prayers of the entire Marshall community go out to those affected by this tragedy, it is important to show them support and how much we care by making a monetary donation," Misiti said.

All proceeds will go to the American Red Cross Hurricane Relief Fund. Misiti said he hopes the campaign will raise more than $30,000. Kickoff is at 10:30 a.m.

A meeting will take place in the SGA office, Room 2W29 of the Memorial Student Center, at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 7 to discuss details of the event. Anyone interested in the event or how to become involved in the campaign efforts is welcome to attend.

For more information on this event, persons may contact Misiti at (304) 696-6436, Prudy Barker, Director of Volunteer Services at (304) 696-2496, or Jeanette Kripas, Student Government Association campus projects, at (304) 696-6412.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Community and Technical College seeks donations for Katrina evacuees

The Marshall Community and Technical College is organizing a drive to collect toys and other children's items, including school supplies, to be delivered to Camp Dawson in Preston County (W.Va.), where hundreds of evacuees will be or have been taken.

Donna Donathan, Legal Assisting Coordinator with the community college, said people can drop off donations in her office (Corbly Hall 315) until 4 p.m. Friday. The donations will be delivered Saturday morning.

Some of the children will be enrolled in West Virginia schools, Donathan said. They need school supplies, such as pencils, pens, crayons, notebook paper, notebooks, colored pencils, highlighters, pencil boxes, lunch boxes and backpacks. Toys, board games, coloring books, children's books and stuffed animals are needed, too.

Other urgent needs are diapers (all sizes), baby wipes, disposable bibs, children's underwear and socks (boys and girls, all sizes) and toddler "sippy cups." Plastic grocery bags, to be used for diaper disposal, also are needed.

More information is available by calling Donathan at (304) 696-3022.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall waives application, late fees for displaced students; plans underway to raise money for hurricane victims

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has waived all application and late fees for students displaced by Hurricane Katrina who wish to take classes during the fall semester at MU, Craig Grooms, director of admissions, said today.

Grooms said Marshall has admitted three students from Tulane University in New Orleans and accommodated their academic needs. All three students are from the tri-state area.

No deadline has been set for displaced students to enroll at Marshall. Each future request will be assessed on a case-by-case basis by university deans.

On Thursday, MU President Stephen J. Kopp wrote a letter to Shelby F. Thames, president of the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Miss., and Scott Cowen, president of Tulane University, offering assistance to each.

In part, Kopp wrote: "At Marshall University we feel a special bond with your institution following the widespread destruction of Hurricane Katrina. We watched with shock and dismay as the events of the last few days unfolded. Our students, faculty and staff are asking how we may be of assistance to you and your institution."

In a meeting this afternoon at the Memorial Student Center, Marshall students, faculty and staff began making plans for a relief effort for victims of Katrina.

Thunder Relief 2005 will be a joint effort of Marshall student organizations, faculty and staff to raise money in response to the devastation from the disaster in Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. All donations raised from the effort will be given to the American Red Cross.

Thunder Relief 2005 shirts will be sold beginning Tuesday, Sept. 6 for a minimum donation of $5. The shirts will be sold at the Marshall University ticket office and Memorial Student Center.

Students also will be accepting donations at the Kansas State-Marshall football game, which begins at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The hope is that the game will attract a sellout crowd of more than 38,000, and each fan attending will "Bring a Buck" - or more - for the relief fund.

Volunteers will be located at the gates and throughout the parking lots to accept the donations. For more information, persons may contact Prudy Barker, director of volunteer services and student affairs, at (304) 696-2495.

At the medical school, Dr. Robert B. Walker is serving as the liaison officer for any medical personnel in the hurricane-stricken areas who need to get Marshall's assistance in transferring patients or providing medical or other required public health resources.

MU is joining forces with other medical schools across the United States in this "virtual" consultation/triage facility, which is being coordinated by the Association of American Medical Colleges at the request of the National Institutes of Health.

Medical students and others also are looking for ways to help. Fourth-year medical student Robin Bush is working with relief organizations and school officials to find an effective way for med students and school employees to raise funds for hurricane relief.

"Not everybody here who wants to go down there to help can go, but we can help here through appropriate channels like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army," she said. "Right now we're working with the med school administration to identify possibilities."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 2, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, Communications Director, Student Government Association, (304) 696-6412

Marshall University Student Government Association and Student Ambassadors co-sponsoring blood drive

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association and Student Ambassadors are co-sponsoring a blood drive on campus from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, Sept. 7-8 in the Don Morris Room located inside the Memorial Student Center.

Numerous local restaurants have donated food for the blood drive canteen. Some of these include Hillbilly Hotdogs, Jolly Pirate Donuts, Domino's Pizza, Stewart's Hot Dogs and Papa John's Pizza.

Jeanette Kripas, Student Government Association Campus Projects executive chair, has been in charge of organizing the event. "I'm really pleased with how much positive feedback and support I've already received and I'm anticipating a good turnout," Kripas said.

Molly Haught, American Red Cross Donor Marketing Specialist, said summer blood donations have been down, but she is optimistic that as school begins, donations will go up. "The more people you tell about the blood drive and the more people you get involved the better we'll be," Haught said.

T-shirts will be given to those who participate in the blood drive and there also will be a raffle for gift certificates to Chili Willi's.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Manchin joins in celebration of Artists Series' return to Keith Albee

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Today, for the second time in a little more than three months, West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin joined with supporters of the Marshall Artists Series in celebrating the return of the series to the Keith Albee Theatre for the 2005-06 season.

At a news conference on the theatre's stage in downtown Huntington, Manchin announced that $60,000 from the state budget will be used for operation of the Artists Series this season.

"First Lady Gayle Manchin and I remain strong supporters of the fine arts in the Mountain State, and the Marshall Artists Series is a great example of how communities rally together to provide both private and public support that make these kinds of venues a reality," Manchin said.

"I want to recognize the hard work of Senate Education Chair Bob Plymale and the Cabell-Wayne legislative delegation, as well as the tremendous community support this program enjoys. We also want to recognize the involvement of Marshall University, as they continue to serve as a critical component to the betterment of all West Virginians." 

Last May, Manchin, along with Plymale and other area legislators, presented Penny Watkins, executive director of the Artists Series, with a check for $35,000 to help ensure that series events will take place at the Keith Albee and aide in the organization's success.

Plymale, along with Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and David Tyson, chairman of the Artists Series board of advisors, joined Manchin in today's news conference.

"This is the first money ever given to the Artists Series in a budget item," Plymale said. "That's $95,000 in three months, which shows the governor and the Legislature recognize the contribution of the Artists Series to the Huntington community."

Though new to Marshall, Kopp said he is well aware of the importance of the Artists Series continuing at the Keith Albee.

"The Keith Albee Theatre is an excellent venue for the Artists Series," Kopp said. "Not only does it accommodate the large audiences, but its downtown location symbolizes the superb town and gown relationship that Marshall has with Huntington and the Tri-State Area."

Tyson, too, praised Manchin for playing a major role in the future of the Artists Series.

"The fact that the governor has included the Marshall Artists Series in the state budget speaks volumes of his commitment to the performing arts, and to the future of the Marshall Artists Series," Tyson said.

Watkins stressed the importance of legislative support as the Artists Series prepares for its 69th season.

"It is an exciting time for the Marshall Artists Series," Watkins said. "Leadership and vision at both the state and local levels that recognize the importance of arts programming is vital to the quality of life in any community. We are most grateful for the invaluable support of Governor Manchin, Senator Plymale, Delegate Kevin Craig, and David Tyson for their continued efforts and support on behalf of Marshall University and the Marshall Artists Series."

The new season begins Sept. 23-29 with the Fall International Film Festival. Season tickets may be ordered by calling (304) 696-6656. Tickets to individual shows will be available Sept. 12.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Perry, King, Farrell reappointed to MU Board of Governors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three former members of Marshall University's Board of Governors have been reappointed to the board by West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin.

The appointees include A. Michael Perry of Huntington, a past MU interim president and recent board chair; Virginia King of Poca, W.Va.; and Michael J. Farrell of Huntington, who served as Marshall's interim president for the first six months of this year.

Perry and King served on the board until their terms expired on June 30 of this year. Farrell resigned from the board in December to accept the position of interim president at Marshall.

"The governor has appointed three outstanding individuals to our board of governors," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "In Mike Perry, Virginia King and Mike Farrell, we've added years of board experience and knowledge about Marshall University that undoubtedly will benefit not only students, faculty and staff at the university, but the community and state as well. I look forward to working with them, and the entire board, in the coming years."

All three will be sworn in at the next board meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va. Each will serve four-year terms that end June 30, 2009.

In addition to Perry, King and Farrell, the board includes: Menis Ketchum, chair; Robert L. Shell, Jr., vice chair; Verna K. Gibson, secretary; Gary Adkins; Letitia Neese Chafin; John G. Hess; Brent A. Marsteller; H.F. Mooney, Jr.; William Smith; Gary White; James M. Sottile, faculty representative; Sherri Noble, staff representative, and Seth Murphy, student representative.

Sottile, Noble and Murphy, all re-elected to their positions on the board, also will be sworn in at the Sept. 14 meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perry, King, Farrell reappointed to MU Board of Governors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three former members of Marshall University's Board of Governors have been reappointed to the board by West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin.

The appointees include A. Michael Perry of Huntington, a past MU interim president and recent board chair; Virginia King of Poca, W.Va.; and Michael J. Farrell of Huntington, who served as Marshall's interim president for the first six months of this year.

Perry and King served on the board until their terms expired on June 30 of this year. Farrell resigned from the board in December to accept the position of interim president at Marshall.

"The governor has appointed three outstanding individuals to our board of governors," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "In Mike Perry, Virginia King and Mike Farrell, we've added years of board experience and knowledge about Marshall University that undoubtedly will benefit not only students, faculty and staff at the university, but the community and state as well. I look forward to working with them, and the entire board, in the coming years."

All three will be sworn in at the next board meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va. Each will serve four-year terms that end June 30, 2009.

In addition to Perry, King and Farrell, the board includes: Menis Ketchum, chair; Robert L. Shell, Jr., vice chair; Verna K. Gibson, secretary; Gary Adkins; Letitia Neese Chafin; John G. Hess; Brent A. Marsteller; H.F. Mooney, Jr.; William Smith; Gary White; James M. Sottile, faculty representative; Sherri Noble, staff representative, and Seth Murphy, student representative.

Sottile, Noble and Murphy, all re-elected to their positions on the board, also will be sworn in at the Sept. 14 meeting.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU to conduct public sale of surplus computing equipment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, on surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 at its new Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 260 computers will be sold in lots of five or more with minimum bids on some lots. About seven of the better Pentium III computers will be sold as individual units. Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the Purchasing Department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. from Tuesday, Sept. 13 through Thursday, Sept. 15.  Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers and monitors have recently been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold will be available soon at www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.  Interested buyers may also visit the web page and subscribe to free e-mail notifications for detailed descriptions of equipment and future sales.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 29, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour,, Communications Director, Student Government, (304) 696-6412

Marshall University Student Government Association works with Drinko staff to extend library hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hours of operation at Marshall University's Drinko Library are being extended to benefit students.

Beginning Tuesday, Sept. 6, the building will be open to students until one hour past midnight Sunday through Thursday. Check-out services will continue to close at 11 p.m., but students will still be able to use the books and computers within the library after that time.

Marshall University students may check the Drinko Library hours page at http://www.marshall.edu/library/hours/drinko.aspx for a specific date, since hours vary depending on holidays and the university's academic calendar.

Another change within the library concerns the group rooms in Drinko. These rooms will now be used to occupy two or more individuals. If a group of individuals needs to use a room occupied by a single student, that student will be asked to leave.

Those who worked to plan and implement these changes included Barbara Winters, dean of libraries; Dr. Sarah Denman, provost; Dr. Arnold Miller, assistant vice president of information technology; Dr. Jan Fox, vice president of information technology; Michael Misiti, student body president; and Nikki Brown, student body vice president.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Local documentary will have debut showing at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be host to a premiere showing of a local documentary Monday, Aug. 29.  The documentary, which starts at 8 p.m., will be in the Shawkey Room on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center.

The one-hour film is titled "Stonewall City: Voices of Gay West Virginians."  Discussion will follow the screening.

The documentary, created for Marshall University's Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA), is comprised of a series of filmed interviews with 16 openly gay residents of Huntington.  It explores issues such as hostility and violence toward gays, family reactions, religion, Appalachian culture, and acceptance.  It also features music by local and national musicians.

This event is free to the public. For more information, persons may contact Layne Amerikaner at lamerika@fandm.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday August 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WV Secretary of State to Visit Marshall Friday

West Virginia Secretary of State Betty Ireland is celebrating the 85th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote, with a series of events throughout this week, including a presentation Friday at Marshall University.

Marshall's Women's Studies and the Women's Center are sponsoring Ireland's visit, which is scheduled for noon Friday in the third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library. She will be welcomed to campus by MU President Stephen J. Kopp.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fall art exhibit at Drinko Library features more than 90 pieces

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The fall 2005 Allied Artists Association art exhibit, featuring more than 90 pieces in several media, is being showcased throughout Marshall University's John Deaver Drinko Library through the first week of December, Library Art Committee chair Monica Brooks announced today.

Brooks said MU students, faculty and staff, along with the community at large, are invited to view the largest display ever housed in the library. The artistic talent, which hails exclusively from West Virginia, is represented by watercolors, oils, pastels, photographs, ceramics, cloth items, and interesting pieces representing mixed media.

The Allied Artists of West Virginia began in 1930 with the mission of encouraging, nurturing, and presenting the work of West Virginia artists to the community. The membership of the organization consists of professional and amateur artists who create original works of acceptable design and technique appropriate to the materials and method of work employed.  Members must currently reside within the state.

During the organization's long history, the members have shown their works all over the state, including several venues in Charleston, such as the old livery building on Lee Street, the Municipal Auditorium, Sunrise Museum, and now the Clay Center.

"The Allied Artists have captured the imaginations of fellow West Virginians of all ages," Brooks says.

The show is being housed on all four floors of the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus.  Visitors can obtain a full listing of artists' works and locations from the library reference desk. During October, University Libraries will have a reception honoring the Allied Artists' contribution to the show.

For more information about the exhibit and reception dates/times (TBA), persons may contact Brooks, who also is Marshall's associate dean of libraries, at (304) 696-6613.  Amateur or professional artists hoping to learn more about the Allied Artists of West Virginia, Inc., may contact Janis P. Cook at (304) 344-8674.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lynne Weston is new director of MU's H.E.L.P. program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Lynne Weston, a member of Marshall University's Higher Education Learning Problems (H.E.L.P.) program for the past 17 years, is the program's new director.

Weston, selected through a search process, assumed her duties on Aug. 1. She replaced Barbara Guyer, who retired as director, but remains with the program as director emeritus.

"This is such a wonderful place to be," said Weston, who served as associate director of H.E.L.P. for the past 16 years.  "You can do something every day to make a difference in somebody's life. We have a wonderful, hard-working staff that works well together to do what's best for all of the students."

The mission of Marshall's H.E.L.P. program, started by Guyer in 1981, is to provide assistance through individual tutoring, mentoring and support, as well as fair and legal access to educational opportunities for students diagnosed with Learning Disabilities (LD) and related disorders such as ADD/ADHD.

The program has a staff of more than 80 people and helps more than 200 students a year. It began 24 years ago with just three dyslexic students.

"I plan to continue to strengthen the existing programs," Weston said. "And, it's possible we can expand some of our programs. We have other areas where we can grow, like the Medical H.E.L.P. program. It's doing well, but it can grow. I also want to raise money to provide scholarships for students that can't afford our services."

Weston received her undergraduate degree in Special Education and Elementary Education from Marshall, and her master's in Education from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She later became certified in Learning Disabilities at Marshall.

Weston currently is working on a Ed.S. degree in Leadership Studies/Higher Education Administration. She has taught many grades in the public schools system, but said she loves working most with college students. She has taught Introduction to Learning Disabilities in the summer to undergraduates and graduate students. Within H.E.L.P., she taught study skills and worked with a student-mentoring group.

"Dr. Guyer allowed me to be very involved in the administration, very hands on," Weston said. "I feel like that has given me a lot of experience which has helped me make this an easy transition."

Dr. Frances Hensley, Marshall's associate vice president for academic affairs, has worked closely with Weston during Weston's years as associate director of H.E.L.P.

"Lynne has been a strong advocate for students in the H.E.L.P. program for years," Hensley said. "She creates a nurturing atmosphere for her students."

Steve Hensley, MU's dean of student affairs and former chair of the H.E.L.P. advisory committee, said the program's students and their parents often speak highly of Weston.

"Her name always comes up as somebody who is informative and helpful," Steve Hensley said. "She's well respected by the staff and was well prepared to become director. She knows the budget, and she knows the needs of the students and the things that need to happen."

Weston is married to Rick Weston, and they have two sons. She may be reached at (304) 696-6316.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

TTA service free in September for Marshall personnel

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students, faculty and staff may ride The Transit Authority (TTA) buses and vans free the entire month of September, TTA manager Vickie Shaffer announced today.
 
 Shaffer said MU bus riders may ride free by showing the bus operator their Marshall ID card. Dial-A-Ride customers are asked to let the dispatcher know they are MU riders when they schedule their trip and show the van driver their Marshall ID when the Dial-A-Ride van picks them up.
 
 "The free introductory offer is to familiarize the students and faculty with the ease and benefits of commuting to the MU campus on the TTA transit system," Shaffer said.
 
 More information is available by calling the TTA dispatch office at (304) 529-RIDE.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday August 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Local Gallery to Feature Marshall University Students' Work

Huntington, West Va. A local art gallery is set to feature the works of two Marshall University  students beginning Saturday, Aug. 20. Gallery Two/The Framemakers is showcasing the works of Chris Worth, a graduate assistant at Marshall, and MU junior David Seth Cyfers.

The month-long show begins Saturday evening at 6:00 p.m. with a wine and cheese reception complete with live blues music by MU art professors Stan Sporny and Sam St. Clair.   

The show also features work by Huntington resident Chris Baker, who will study at Yale University this fall.   Additional information is available from Byron Clercx, chair of Art and Design at Marshall at (304) 696-6760.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students return to class Monday for start of fall semester

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Provost Dr. Sarah Denman often refers to the start of another school year as "a new beginning." As Marshall prepares to greet students back to campus Friday, Aug. 19, for Welcome Weekend, and Monday, Aug. 22 for the first full day of classes, the word "new" might be more appropriate than ever.

"New, exciting things are happening at Marshall University," Denman said.

All of that newness, combined with thousands of students flooding the campus after a relatively quiet summer at the university, makes this a special time of year, Denman said.

"It's a new beginning for so many people, and to get to be a part of that - influencing lives and expanding people's horizons - is very exciting," she said. "Very few people get to do that."

To mention just a few "new" highlights, MU has:

        A new president in Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, who was hired in June and assumed his duties on July 1;

        A new football coach in former MU player Mark Snyder;

        Four new deans - Dr. Paul Uselding, Lewis College of Business; Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, College of Education and Human Services; Dr. Corley Dennison, W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications; and Dr. Shortie McKinney, College of Health Professions;

        A new language course offering, Mandarin Chinese, which is the most widely spoken language on the planet;

        New artificial turf on the Joan C. Edwards Stadium playing field, which will be tested officially for the first time in the season opener against William & Mary at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1;

        A new athletic league in Conference USA;

        Extended hours in the Drinko Library, which now will remain open until 1 a.m. Sunday through Thursday;

        70-80 new faculty;

        A new relationship with Pullman Square in downtown Huntington, thanks to a shuttle service offered by The Transit Authority, beginning Aug. 22;

        A new record number of Marching Thunder members, with approximately 300 currently in band camp, preparing for the upcoming football season.

The start of school also means the return of heavy traffic, both vehicular and pedestrian, around Marshall's Huntington campus. James E. Terry, director of public safety at MU, said drivers should be aware of the 35 mph speed limit near campus, and that Marshall police officers will be enforcing that speed limit at all times.

Terry also said both surface and garage parking permits remain for Marshall students. They may be purchased in the bursar's office, which is located on the first floor of Old Main, he said.

Beginning the first day of school, volunteers from faculty and staff will be out on campus greeting students and helping them find their way around.

Although the annual Welcome Weekend event, which runs Friday, Aug. 19 through Sunday, Aug. 21, is not new, it has been revamped to include events in academic, health and wellness, social and special interest categories for the estimated 2,500 new students and members of their families who will be on campus during the weekend.

"Welcome Weekend provides new students with the opportunity to come and really make a connection with campus as they begin a new period of their life," Marshall admissions counselor Erin Bradley said. "The weekend allows students to have a lot of fun while meeting faculty and staff from their college, attending sessions on student services, and finishing any last-minute business on campus."

One of the weekend's highlights will be the family picnic from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19. Kopp will meet students and their families and the Marshall University Marching Thunder will perform.

A schedule of events for Welcome Weekend 2005 is available at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2005/pr081205.htm .


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall captures first place at State Fair of West Virginia

FAIRLEA, W.Va. - In its second year as an exhibitor at the State Fair of West Virginia, Marshall University was awarded the "First Place Blue Ribbon" for its outdoor exhibit. More than 50 exhibits competed for this recognition, including civic organizations, government entities and other learning institutions.

The Marshall exhibit featured a "Thundering Trivia" game show hosted by students, a "Marshall duck pond" with green ducks and prizes for younger fairgoers, and technology from the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) and Robert C. Byrd Institute.

"This award means a great deal to students, faculty and staff at Marshall who worked together to make this exhibit a success," said Dr. Keith Spears, vice president for communications & marketing. "The State Fair offers us the perfect venue to reach nearly a quarter million visitors in 10 days. With our goal of communicating to prospective students throughout the Southeastern United States, this recognition shows that our efforts are on the right track."

"In their decision, the judges noted the friendliness of people working the booth at the Marshall exhibit and remarked how the MU booth appealed to visitors of all ages," said Pam Edwards, Special Projects Coordinator for the State Fair of West Virginia. "We look at these awards as a way to recognize the accomplishment of exhibitors who exceed expectations with their booth and create one more reason to visit the State Fair."

The State Fair continues through Sunday, Aug. 21. In the remaining days, Marshall students with WMUL-FM 88.1 will broadcast live from the Fair and members of the MU women's basketball team will visit on Wednesday. A complete schedule of Fair activities can be found at www.wvstatefair.com.

For more information about the Marshall exhibit, contact Dr. Keith Spears at (304) 696-2965. For more information about the State Fair of West Virginia, contact Mike Alkire at (304) 645-1090. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Journal published at MU reveals changing face of Appalachia; findings result from examination of 2000 census data

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Aging, migration and ethnicity are changing the face of Appalachia, according to a special issue of The Journal of Appalachian Studies, which examined data collected in the 2000 census.  The recently released publication was made possible with the support of the Ford Foundation and Marshall University.

The Journal is published by the Appalachian Studies Association (ASA), a national professional organization devoted to scholarship and community activism focused on the Appalachian region.  The organization is headquartered at Marshall University on the Huntington campus.  Dr. Linda Spatig, professor in the College of Education and Human Services at Marshall, is associate editor of the Journal.

The special issue, Appalachia Counts:  The Region in the 2000 Census, lists among its findings that the aging Appalachian population will perpetuate poverty in Appalachia if a younger workforce is not sustained; Appalachian African Americans are concentrated in urban areas; younger Appalachians are on par with their non-Appalachian counterparts in attaining high school diplomas but lag significantly in acquiring college educations; and severe poverty still exists in Appalachia's rural areas, particularly among those households headed by a female with young children.

Other findings raise concerns about the quality and affordability of housing among Appalachian renters.  Increasing costs are more common in urban and metro counties while rural counties are faced with housing quality problems.  Southern Appalachia is attracting large numbers of educated and skilled migrants, while the Northern and Central sub-regions are attracting migrants with less education and fewer skills.

Employment continues to be a concern in Appalachia.  While the region lags the nation in labor force participation by three percent, distressed counties lag the nation by more than 12 percent. 

The ASA has been located at Marshall since July 2001.  The university competed with several other institutions to have both the organization and its journal located on campus. 

"I believe we were successful in bringing the Association to Marshall largely due to two things, the strong reputation of Marshall's Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA), which was established with Rockefeller Foundation funds, and the strong institutional support for it, especially the president's office, the office of Academic Affairs and the COEHS," Spatig said.

Currently, the ASA and Marshall are collaborating on a major National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant - Faces of Appalachia. 

"If we can successfully raise the needed funds for that, it will institutionalize important scholarship on ethnicity and gender in Appalachia that was begun with CSEGA," Spatig said.

Marshall professor Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, a faculty member in the College of Education and Human Services, is a former associate editor of the Journal and currently is the project director for Faces of Appalachia.  Mary Thomas, employed by the Marshall University Research Corporation, is the managing editor of the Journal

Copies of the special census issue are available for $10 plus shipping and handling.  Contact Thomas at the ASA office at (304) 696-2904 for more information.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 12, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU names Dr. Shortie McKinney College of Health Professions dean

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia native Dr. Shortie McKinney, director of the Nutrition Center at Drexel University in Philadelphia for the past 15 years, has been named dean of Marshall University's College of Health Professions, MU dean of libraries Dr. Barbara Winters announced today.

McKinney, a Logan High School honor graduate who received her B.S. in nutrition from Marshall in 1971, replaces Dr. Lynne Welch, who retired earlier this year. McKinney assumes her duties at MU Sept. 1.

"The search committee was impressed by the quality of all the candidates for the position," Winters, who served as search committee chair, said. "We were especially pleased with Dr. McKinney's poise and ability to articulate and with her success in receiving funding for interdisciplinary grants.  She has invigorating ideas and seemingly innate leadership skills.  I am very eager to work with her over the coming years."

McKinney graduated magna cum laude from Marshall. She earned her master's degree in human nutrition from The Ohio State University in 1976, and her Ph.D. in food management from The Ohio State University in 1977.

McKinney said she is excited about "coming home" to West Virginia after 28 years at Drexel, a private research university with traditional strength in undergraduate education. Through a merger four years ago, an emphasis on health was added to Drexel's traditional colleges with the addition of schools of public health, health professions and medicine. As department head of bioscience during the merger, McKinney actively promoted increased health-related education and research opportunities.

"There's a tremendous amount of potential to expand at Marshall," McKinney said. "I'm interested in working with the faculty and administration to determine in what areas expansion is logical. There certainly are many opportunities for people in health careers both locally and nationwide."

McKinney said she also is interested in supporting faculty in developing interdisciplinary projects within the College of Health Professions and with colleagues on campus outside of the College.

"As a West Virginia  native and Marshall alum, I'm interested in promoting health care in the entire southern West Virginia region," she said. McKinney said she has worked the past several years with school districts in Philadelphia to develop nutrition programs with a focus on promoting improved eating habits to foster healthy growth and development. She also has a strong interest in obesity and weight management.

McKinney started at Drexel in 1976 with its Department of Nutrition and Food Services, which merged with Bioscience in 1993. She was named director of the Nutrition Center in 1990. McKinney served as associate dean for research and graduate studies in the College of Arts and Sciences from 2001 to 2003.

"I'm proud of everything I've accomplished at Drexel, but I'm looking forward to and excited about returning to Marshall as dean," she said. "The opportunity was very attractive to me. Marshall has a new president and several new deans it's a dynamic time. The position sang a song to me that resonated strongly. A major draw was coming home to West Virginia, which I'm very much looking forward to."

Dr. Charles H. McKown, dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall, said the College of Health Professions is growing in stature and supporting both the university and community with its integration of training programs for several health-related fields.

"Dr. McKinney comes with the skills and experience to continue that expansion, and she brings both the qualifications and the qualities needed to provide the college's leadership at this important time," McKown said.

While at Drexel, McKinney participated in many conferences that have enabled her to develop professionally. The most prestigious of those was the four-week Bryn Mawr Summer Institute for Women in Higher Education Administration in 2002. Topics during the program ranged from personnel to diversity to curriculum to institutional planning. She has also actively participated in numerous national and international conferences presenting research studies.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 12, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College of Education and Human Services receives software donation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) has received a donation of software totaling $3,879 from Inspiration Software, Inc., according to Dr. William Carter, associate professor of Education who submitted the competitive grant request. 

The grant is part of Inspiration Software, Inc's School of Education Licensing Program.  Marshall will receive a 51-computer volume license of both Kidspiration and Inspiration, with accompanying reference materials and two licenses each of Inspiration for Palm OS and Inspiration for Pocket PC.

Kidspiration and Inspiration are used widely in schools across the country to accomplish curriculum goals using visual learning as implemented by the use of graphic organizers such as concept maps, idea maps, and webs. 

The company says scientifically based research has demonstrated that a research base exists to support the use of graphic organizers for improving student learning and performance across grade levels in a broad range of content areas. 

"We are pleased to be able to instruct our pre-service teachers in the use of Inspiration Software because it is a great tool to encourage critical thinking and to reach educational standards through visual opportunities for writing and thinking," said Dr. Jane McKee, associate dean of the COEHS.  "By enabling our pre-service teachers to use this software program we also serve the PreK-12 students in the classroom who get the benefits of this program."

The use of graphic organizers, according to a literature review of research conducted by the Institute for the Advancement of Research in Education (IARE), has proved useful in reading comprehension, student achievement, thinking and learning skills, retention and cognitive learning theory.

Carter said as he was searching for something new to help pre-service teachers become better prepared for today's classrooms, he heard glowing reviews of Inspiration's software programs from teachers who had used them.

"I am excited about the potential for this software as we strive to continue to prepare bright teachers with bright futures," Carter said.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday August 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marching Thunder totals about 300 members as band camp begins

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A record number of Marshall University Marching Thunder members will start preparing for the 2005 football season in band camp, which begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 13 at Lefty Rollins Field.

The band is directed by  Steve Barnett for the third consecutive year. Since Barnett began at the university in 2003, marching band membership has grown from under 200 to approximately 300 this year.

"I am really excited about this season," Barnett said. "This year we will have more color on the field and bigger formations. I think that both young and old will enjoy our shows."

The Marching Thunder's first public performance is at 4 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19 at Lefty Rollins Field. After playing for about 20 minutes, the band will march across campus to Buskirk Field for a performance during the Welcome Weekend picnic for new students and their parents.

During camp, the Marching Thunder will practice  8 hours a day. The band will learn performances for both the MU football pre-game and halftime shows.

The pre-game show will consist of continuing traditions that began over the past two years, as well as a West Virginia medley and a patriotic medley. The halftime show will consist of a Motown tribute to Ray Charles featuring "Georgia on my Mind" and the theme from "Shaft."

For more information, persons may contact Barnett at (304) 696-2317.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Faculty and Staff Invited to Football Practice

Head football coach Mark Snyder and his staff are inviting Marshall employees to attend the Thundering Herd's practice that begins at 3:55 p.m. Wednesday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The practice will be closed to the public, but Marshall employees may attend by showing their university I.D.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Faculty and Staff Invited to Football Practice

Head football coach Mark Snyder and his staff are inviting Marshall employees to attend the Thundering Herd's practice that begins at 3:55 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The practice will be closed to the public, but Marshall employees may attend by showing their university I.D.'s.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Parthenon students excel in WVPA Better Newspaper contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper, won four first-place awards and one third-place award in the 2005 West Virginia Press Association Better Newspaper contest.

Also, students in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications won three of the five scholarships awarded through the WVPA Foundation.

The awards and scholarships were announced and presented during the annual WVPA convention, which took place Aug. 4-6 at Lakeview Golf Resort and Spa in Morgantown.

"I'm very proud of the students' work," Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said. "The awards and scholarships speak very well of the quality of student journalists we have at the School. The scholarships are especially noteworthy because it shows that other people think our students do quality work."

The Parthenon competes in Division III against small daily newspapers in West Virginia. The awards recognize work from 2004.

The Parthenon staff won first-place awards for best newspaper design, best sports section and best editorial page. Senior Rasmilya Sporny of Huntington won for best columnist, and a third-place award for best informational graphic went to Ashley Perks, a junior from Dunbar, W.Va.

Scholarship winners were Cara Bailey, a senior from Barboursville, Matthew Haught, a sophomore from Barrackville, W.Va., and Kyle Dyer, a sophomore from Huntington.

Bailey won the Roy Owens Memorial Scholarship of $1,000. Owens was former owner and publisher of the St. Mary's Oracle.

Haught won the Cecil B. Highland Jr. Memorial Scholarship of $1,000, named for the former president of the Clarksburg Exponent.

Dyer won the Adam R. Kelly Premier Journalist Memorial Scholarship, named for the former publisher of the Tyler Star News in Sistersville, and past president of the West Virginia Press Association. Dyer's scholarship is for $5,000.

More information is available by calling Dennison at (304) 696-2809.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday August 5, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, South Charleston Campus, (304) 696-7153

Advance tickets still available for Marshall's 'Paint the Capital City Green' Wednesday, Aug. 17

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans have until Friday, Aug. 12 to purchase tickets, which are available only in advance, for "Paint The Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal."  

This annual event, which is recognized as the nation's largest pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends, starts at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 17, at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel.

Now in its eighth year, "Paint the Capital City Green, presented by Friends of Coal" is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, Marshall University Alumni Association, Greater Kanawha Valley Marshall Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and Marshall University Alumni Association.

"With Marshall University continuing to grow our academic offerings in the Kanawha Valley with our South Charleston campus and on-line degree programs, we also want to expand our athletic commitment to West Virginia's capital city," Marshall spokesperson Bill Bissett said.

"Thanks to the generosity of the Friends of Coal, Herd fans from across the Mountain State will once again fill this venue with green and white support.  It's a great evening to celebrate the kickoff of the upcoming football season and recognize all of Marshall's athletic programs," Bissett said.

As the Thundering Herd prepares to "step up" and begin play in Conference USA, Marshall fans will get to meet new President Stephen J. Kopp, new football coach Mark Snyder and his staff, as well as other members of Marshall's coaching staff.  The event begins with a pep rally and tailgate party, featuring food and entertainment by "Marco," the Marshall cheerleading squad and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder.

A formal program begins at 7:15 p.m., featuring remarks from special guests and a special tribute to former Marshall football coach Bobby Pruett. Please note that tickets will only be available in advance for $25 each. For tickets or additional information, call (304) 696-3134, (304) 696-4661 or toll-free (866) I HERD 10 (443-7310).

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday August 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU's 24 presentations the most by far at technology conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will have 24 presentations, more than all other higher education institutions in the state combined, at the West Virginia Statewide Technology Conference Tuesday-Thursday, Aug. 9-11 at the Radisson Hotel at Waterfront Place in Morgantown.

Dr. Jan Fox, vice president for information technology/CIO at Marshall, said the 2005 conference, called "Beyond Imagining," provides an opportunity for Marshall to share its expertise and knowledge with other higher education institutions, K-12, and state agencies.

"The state takes the lead from Marshall in looking to the future for technology implementations in the academic and administrative realm," Fox said. "This is the one time of the year we can show everybody what we're doing, when we get a real synergy from our administrators, faculty and staff. We're real proud of our people."

The conference features presentations, discussions, hands-on tutorials and vendor exhibits, and provides numerous opportunities for vendors and attendees to mix and mingle.

Several of Marshall's representatives, Fox said, will have multiple presentations. They include Terri Tomblin-Byrd, Steve Robinson, Chuck Elliott, Al Goble and Dr. Lisa Heaton.

Marshall alumnus F. Selby Wellman, former senior vice president of Cisco Systems, will be the featured speaker at the conference's awards luncheon, scheduled for noon Wednesday, Aug. 10. Wellman will be discussing "Globalization and the Future of Education in the 21st Century."

Here is the complete list of presentations involving Marshall participants:


TUESDAY

  • 2:50 - 3:40 p.m.
    Not Just Any Portal in a Storm-Using SharePoint for an Accreditation Visit

    Jan I. Fox, Vice President for Information Technology/CIO, Marshall University
    Leonard Deutsch, Dean, Graduate School Marshall University
     

  • 3:50 - 4:40 p.m.
    Enterprise Project Management - Implementing Project Server 2003

    Charles Elliott, Associate Director, Customer Services, Marshall University
    Yanzhi Wu, Senior Office Administrator, Information Technology Administration, Marshall University
     

  • 4:50 - 5:40 p.m.
    The Marshall University Solution to WebCT/Vista Support

    Stephen J. Robinson, Manager, Information Services, Marshall University
    Marianne Kline, Learning Management System Administrator, Center for Instructional Technology
    Al Goble, Learning Management System Administrator Center for Instructional Technology



WEDNESDAY
 

  • 8 - 8:50 a.m.
    Our Account Maintenance System-Banner Style

    Terri L. Tomblin-Byrd, Associate Director, UCS: Databases & Shared Systems
    Omayma Tayar, Application Systems Analyst/Programmer Senior
    Tim Calvert, Lead Systems Programmer, Marshall University
     

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.
    Taking Banner 6.x from OpenVMS to Linux: A Shotgun Approach

    Terri Tomblin-Byrd, Associate Director, Marshall University
    Myke Watts, Senior DBA, UCS: Databases and Shared Systems, Marshall University
     

  • 9 - 9:50 a.m.
    Spyware Sucks

    Ian Levstein, Information Technology Specialist, Marshall University School of Medicine
     

  • 1:30 - 3:20 p.m.
    LDI for e-Learning: A Success Story

    Terri Tomblin-Byrd, Associate Director, Marshall University
    Gary Weis, Application System Analyst/Programmer, Marshall University
    Al Goble, Lead, Learning Management System Administrator, UCS: Databases and Shared Systems, Marshall University
     

  • 2:30 - 3:20 p.m.
    Using VISTA to Manage Student Portfolios in a Degree Program

    Mike Cunningham, Associate Professor, Marshall University
    Teresa Eagle, Associate Professor, Marshall University
     

  • 3:40 - 4:30 p.m.
    Computer and Media Disposal: Information Security At The End Of The Life Cycle

    Charles Elliot, Associate Director, Customer Services, Marshall University Computing Services

     

  • 3:40 - 4:30 p.m.
    WV Teachers and the Internet: Who's Using It and Why
    George Watson, Assistant Professor, Marshall University
     

  • 3:40 - 4:30 p.m.
    Technology in the Science Classroom

    Lisa A. Heaton, Associate Professor, Marshall University
    Lethea Smith, Assistant Professor, Concord University
    Sandra Orr, Assistant Professor, West Virginia State University
     

  • 3:40 - 4:30 p.m.
    Training & Certifying the University Help Desk (Keeping Ahead of the Game)

    Stephen Robinson, Manager, Information Services, Marshall University

     

THURSDAY
 

  • 3:40 - 4:30 p.m.
    Multimedia in Education: Integration on Multiple Levels

    Dixie Billheimer, Coordinator Technical Assistance/InSTEP, RESA II
    Kim Sigman, Computer Curriculum Specialist, Putnam County Board of Education
    Michael Murphy, Associate Director Regional Campuses for Computing Services, Marshall University
    Lisa Heaton, Associate Professor Elementary/Secondary Education, Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, Marshall University



More information on the conference is available by contacting Fox at (304) 696-6706, or by visiting http://www.wvnet.edu/wvconf2005/.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 3, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Heritage Society Recognized at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Many organized individuals plan ahead and conduct their business by the book. Therefore, the John Deaver Drinko Library proved to be the ideal setting for honoring members of Marshall University's Heritage Society at a brunch on Tuesday, Aug. 2.

The Heritage Society is made up of friends and alumni who have committed their personal resources to assure the future of Marshall. Members are providing for the future of the university through planned gifts such as a bequest in a will, a living trust, a charitable trust, a charitable gift annuity, or life insurance.

The theme of Tuesday's brunch for the nearly 50 guests focused on the living history and the legacy that each is leaving for Marshall University. Just as library books connect today's generation of students with the past, the Heritage Society provides opportunities for tomorrow's students.

"By dedicating part of their personal treasury, they are perpetuating the cherished Marshall experience for future students," Mandilyn Hart, Director of Gift Planning, said. "These special friends of the university are authoring a chapter in Marshall's history, helping write Marshall's never-ending story."

Glen Kerkian, President/CEO of The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., was host of the brunch, and Hart formally recognized the Society.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp expressed appreciation for the donors, and assisted in a ceremony to present membership pins and certificates to new members.  Provost Sarah Denman and Confederate Collection bibliographer Jack Dickinson also spoke.

For more information regarding membership in the Heritage Society, persons may contact Hart at (304) 696-6708 or hartm@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Forum on Geohazards in Transportation set for next week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - At the invitation of Marshall University, transportation experts from the Appalachian region will gather in Charleston Aug. 3-4 at the Embassy Suites Hotel.    

The 5th annual Technical Forum on Geohazards in Transportation in the Appalachian Region will focus on the geological hazards that impede all types of travel in the region.    The Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transport Institute (RTI) and the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) are co-sponsoring the event.    

Dr. Tony Szwilski, director of CEGAS, said industry leaders and researchers from across Appalachia are expected to attend.

"This annual forum has proven to be a successful way for everyone in the region to address the geologic issues and challenges faced by the Appalachian states relating to transportation," Szwilski said. "Marshall is once again taking a leadership role in advancing science and solving practical problems facing industry."

Researchers from West Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee and Ohio are expected at attend.   For more information on the Geohazards forum, persons may contact Barbara Roberts (RTI) at (304) 696-7103.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU journalism dean named to first class of JMC Leadership Institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, has been selected to the inaugural class of the JMC Leadership Institute, the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communications (ASJMC) announced.

Dennison is one of only 13 deans and directors nationwide accepted for the 2005-07 program. The institute is the first one designed specifically for journalism/mass communication administrators.

"It's a tremendous opportunity to be able to work with other professionals in the field, to discuss issues of importance to journalism education," Dennison said. "I hope to find out what's going on in the rest of the country. A lot of people are dealing with the same issues as we are here - finances, changing technologies and changing curriculum. We'll see how we compare."

The institute, funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, will feature ongoing administrative programming, networking and discussion with current JMC administrators as well as a professional executive coach to work one-on-one with the participants throughout their fellowships. "It will be like taking classes," Dennison said.

The first of four "face to face" training sessions is planned during the AEJMC Convention in San Antonio from 1 to 6 p.m. Aug. 13 in San Antonio.

The 13 participants were named dean or director at their school after May 1, 2003. Other schools represented include Michigan State University, the University of Kansas, Arizona State University, Quinnipiac University, Florida A&M University, Western Kentucky University, Ithaca College, Middle Tennessee State University, Kansas State University, the University of Central Florida, the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Dennison was named MU's dean in March 2005 after serving as interim dean for a year. He may be reached by calling (304) 696-2809.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MUEEC Outreach Leadership Institute continues through Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Marshall University Early Education Center Outreach Leadership Institute began today and continues through Thursday, July 28, at the Radisson Hotel Huntington.

The event is for early childhood leaders from the region and across a wide spectrum, including directors of childcare centers and preschools, universal pre-k supervisors, head start and the West Virginia Department of Education.

More than 70 leaders from the region have joined with the MUEEC Outreach staff to discuss current challenges in early education, such as professional development, quality, media and parent education, and to begin the dialogue of a continued effort to bring all sides of the early education field together.

The event also launches the start of the MUEEC Outreach program, a statewide and regional early education resource for professionals and parents. More information is available at www.marshall.edu/coehs/mueec, or by calling W. Clayton Burch, director of the MU Early Education Center, at (304) 696-6301.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 20, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, (304) 746-2038

Verizon presents $250,000 grant to June Harless Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Verizon West Virginia President H. Stan Cavendish and First Lady Gayle Manchin today presented major gifts totaling $500,000 to Marshall University's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development at a ceremony at the university's Drinko Library.

The funds will enhance the provision of high school courses and professional development for rural schools in Regional Educational Service Agency (RESA) I, II, III and IV, according to Dr. Stan Maynard, director of the center.

Verizon provided half of the total, or $250,000, through a grant from the State Technology Users Council (S.T.U.C.) for content development and delivery in southern West Virginia.  Maynard said the money also will provide funds for technology needs in the new June Harless Demonstration Site at Kellogg Elementary in Wayne County, expected to open in fall 2006.

"Verizon is West Virginia's leading broadband company and our support of this program will ensure that the benefits of broadband technology continue to spread throughout West Virginia," Cavendish said. "Distance learning is an excellent example of how broadband can bring education and professional development opportunities to anyone, no matter where they are."

Marshall University and State Senator Robert Plymale provided $250,000 in matching funds, which will enable the Harless Center to employ staff crucial to the development and delivery of curricular requests from West Virginia schools.  The targeted professional development needs will be standards-based mathematics, reading education, assessment, science education and assessment strategies.

First Lady Gayle Manchin acknowledged the outstanding partnership between Marshall University and Verizon in establishing the June Harless Center for Rural Education Research and Development as a regional and national model for distance learning.

<"Through projects such as this, we are building a comprehensive educational platform that will provide every West Virginia student access to a vast array of curriculum offerings and academic opportunities," Manchin said. "As our state moves forward with a new level of commitment of using our technology infrastructure to its fullest potential, Marshall University is leading the way in opening new opportunities to students in every West Virginia community. This just shows what we, working together, can accomplish - this is only the beginning."

Verizon West Virginia is part of Verizon Communications Inc., one of the world's leading providers of communications services.  Verizon has a diverse work force of 212,000 in four business units. Domestic Telecom provides customers based in 28 states with wireline and other telecommunications services, including broadband.  Verizon Wireless owns and operates the nation's most reliable wireless network, serving 45.5 million voice and data customers across the United States.  Information Services operates directory publishing businesses and provides electronic commerce services.  International includes wireline and wireless operations and investments, primarily in the Americas and Europe.  For more information, visit www.verizon.com.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Library Associates' Celebration of Books is July 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A noted antiquarian bookman and a local Civil War historian are joining forces to celebrate books at the Marshall University Library Associates' summer event Friday, July 29.

The Celebration of Books is from 4 to 7 p.m. in the third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library on MU's main campus in Huntington. A reception and presentations start the program.

Antiquarian bookman Jack Walsdorf  will speak of the joys of book collecting and some of his adventures in more than 30 years as a bookseller. Walsdorf travels the country with his version of Public Television's Antiques Road Show.

This will be the third time Walsdorf, author or editor of 15 books relating to the history of printing and bibliography, has visited Marshall to share his expertise. Two years ago, 123 people stood in line at the Drinko Library to discover if the book handed down from a grandparent or picked up at a yard sale was a gem.

"Everyone in the audience was riveted by Jack's knowledge of books," Barbara Winters, dean of MU Libraries, said. "Even people who came without a book to be appraised enjoyed simply watching and listening."

Appraisals will follow Walsdorf's talk, beginning at 5 p.m.

Civil War historian Jack Dickinson, confederate bibliographer of the Rosanna A. Blake Library of Confederate History, will talk about his latest publication, Civil War Paper Items.

The museum-quality book reproduces notable examples of printed material in the Blake Library, including sheet music, religious tracts, bonds and currency, patriotic items, newspapers and other periodicals (some printed on the back of wall paper), card photographs, and letters, including one written from Gen. Robert E. Lee to Gen. G. T. Beauregard in 1863.

Author of nine books about the Civil War, Dickinson is a West Virginia native and a member of the Company of Military Historians. A book signing session begins at 5 p.m.

Doors open for the Celebration of Books at 3:45 p.m. and the reception/presentations start at 4 p.m. Admission is free to members of the Library Associates and $5 for all others. Reservations, which are required, can be made by contacting Pam Ford via email at ford@marshall.edu, or by calling (304) 696-2318.

A ticket order form can be printed from the MU Library Associates' Web site at www.marshall.edu/library/libassoc/.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University researchers present best paper at International Railway Engineering Conference in London

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University researchers have received an award for the best research paper presented at the 8th International Railway Engineering Conference conducted last month in London.

The paper, "Employing HADGPS to Survey Track and Monitor Movement at Curves," was written by Marshall engineering professors Dr. Tony Szwilski and Dr. Richard Begley, and Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute graduate associates Peter Dailey and Zhibin Sheng.

Szwilski made the presentation and accepted the award on behalf of the RTI research team. The conference was attended by representatives from 31 countries.    

"Receiving an award for the best research paper at an international conference confirms the quality of engineering research being conducted at Marshall University and the high level of teamwork of project personnel and support from the Nick J. Rahall Transportation Institute," Szwilski said.  "We have a few of the building blocks in place needed for a comprehensive research program - we can only get better!"

The paper reported the results of innovative research applying high accuracy differential global positioning systems (HADGPS) to help railway companies address current problems.  The technology application developed by the Marshall researchers is unique and is creating interest from railway companies across the U.S.

More information is available by contacting Szwilski at (304) 696-5457 or Begley at (304) 696-6660.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Booth Scholars Summer Program begins Sunday at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Booth Scholars Summer Program, hosted by Marshall University and designed to prepare students for higher education, takes place Sunday, July 17 through Saturday, July 30.

The students will be on Marshall's Huntington campus for the first week of the program, and in Washington, D.C., the second week.

Booth Scholars are Wayne County students who will be in the ninth through 12th grades during the 2005-06 school year. The program currently has 100 scholars.

Freshmen in the program will stay on campus for a week and take classes in public speaking, photography, theatre performance and electronic portfolio. Students in the program also receive a laptop and will participate in a laptop orientation class.

The students also will participate in recreational activities throughout the week as well as a dinner where they will learn proper dinner etiquette.

Sophomores and juniors in the program also will be on campus throughout the week for the summer program. Sophomores will participate in orientation for graphing calculators, which they will receive. Juniors will participate in ACT preparation classes.

While in Washington, D.C., the scholars will visit the White House and tour the nation's capitol with U.S. Congressman Nick J. Rahall, II.

The students also will visit many other museums and historical landmarks throughout Washington, D.C. They also will visit Georgetown University and George Washington University.

The Booth Scholars Program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia in their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College. Students from Wayne County, one from Kentucky and one from Virginia, participated.

To qualify for the program, students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and have scored above average on the WESTEST.

For more information, persons may contact Brenda Napier at (304) 696-5205 or by e-mail at napier19@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bragin resigns as dean of Marshall's College of Science

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joseph Bragin, dean of Marshall University's College of Science, has resigned that position effective with the fall 2005 semester, he announced today. Bragin, who has been dean since August 2001, will return to the faculty and work on special assignments.

 "I and the entire Marshall community thank Dr. Bragin for his service as dean," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said.

 A search for a new dean will begin soon, according to Dr. Sarah N. Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs.

 "Dr. Bragin can look back with pride to his time as dean of the College of Science," Denman said. "He made a number of strategic appointments, increased support for scholarships and faculty development, and increased major gifts to the college and alumni support.

"Dr. Bragin expanded and strengthened the College's academic programs in many key areas, including biotechnology, and reached out to the community through establishment of programs such as the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute. Dr. Bragin has championed improvement in student services, particularly advisement and retention programs, and has been a leader in increasing student and faculty diversity and multicultural activities.

"What's more, he assisted in the planning for Marshall's new Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center and the Biotechnology Development Center, so his work will serve the university far into the future."

During the next year, Bragin said, he will assist the college in the further development of student recruitment and retention programs that were begun during his term as dean. He also expects to work to improve student services in the college and to expand the college's outreach to underrepresented student groups.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

College Summit to conduct workshops at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - College Summit, a national comprehensive nonprofit program to improve the college-going rate, will conduct workshops Thursday, July 14 through Sunday, July 17 on Marshall University's Huntington campus for 40 students from six high schools in Kanawha and Wayne counties.

High schools represented include Riverside, South Charleston and St. Albans from Kanawha County, and Wayne, Tolsia and Spring Valley from Wayne County.

"We are proud to be partnering with West Virginia colleges and universities to help students bridge the gap between high school and post-secondary education," said Randy Shillingburg, director of development for College Summit West Virginia. "At our workshops, students complete an on-line college application, receive quality one-on-one college counseling and write a personal statement they can use for scholarships or as an entrance essay for college."

Shillingburg said rising high school seniors who participate in College Summit workshops undergo a transformation from not knowing what it takes to get to college in terms of the college selection, application and financial aid processes, to students who are prepared for college and actually are ahead of other students in their classes.  

College Summit, which is based in Washington, D.C., has grown rapidly in West Virginia, from a program serving two teachers and 10 students in 2001 to a program serving about 1,800 students from 21 schools in 10 counties this year.  In addition to the workshop at Marshall, sessions are also scheduled this summer at West Virginia University, West Virginia State University, Concord University, Bluefield State College, Fairmont State University, and the University of Charleston.

Shillingburg said the entire college transition process can be overwhelming for students, especially if they're first-generation college students.  "College Summit has achieved remarkable results nationwide, dramatically improving the college-going rate for students who attend our workshops," he explained.

"College Summit has been able to take college transition from the horse and buggy era to the 21st century by providing teachers and counselors with tools that allow them to help students transition to college more efficiently and effectively," said Shillingburg. "Teachers and counselors who attend the workshops utilize the College Summit Navigator, a step-by-step curriculum guide to help other seniors navigate the transition process.

"In addition, College Summit has developed on-line tools that enable students to save their senior portfolios while providing teachers and counselors with the ability to track students through the entire process."

More information about this initiative can be found on its Web site, www.collegesummit.org, or by calling College Summit West Virginia at (304) 346-1981.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dean's list, graduates available on Marshall Web site

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Spring 2005 semester, and MU graduates from July 2004 to May 2005, are available on the MU Web site for use by the media.

To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. Marshall has 2,215 dean's list students included on the Web site. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list on the Web.

Many students and their parents have requested that Marshall make the dean's list and the list of graduates available to publications that cover their hometowns.

Each student's name, hometown, county and state are included in the dean's list, which is accessible at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/DeansList/deanslist.html. The list of graduates, accessible at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/Graduates/graduates.html, includes name, hometown, county, state and degree.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall host to Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) training

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University is serving as host to a workshop providing training for sexual assault nurse examiners from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day Monday, July 11 through Friday, July 15 at the MU Forensic Science Center.

Linda Ledray, PhD, RN, FAAN, SANE-A, a nationally recognized expert in sexual assault nurse examiner training, is conducting the workshop. Dr. Ledray developed a nursing-focused service-delivery model that provides responsive treatment for sexual assault survivors.  She has taught nationally and internationally on sexual assault issues and has authored the book, "Recovering from Rape."

The course offers a unique opportunity to registered nurses to become sexual assault nurse examiners (SANE) by receiving specialized training in the complete assessment, evaluation and treatment of the adult sexual assault survivor.    Participants are trained how to recognize, collect and preserve evidence, interview victims and link them to vital community resources for follow-up.

Other topics include the Sexual Assault Response Team (SART), victim perspective/advocacy role, psychological impact, profiling the rapist, role of law enforcement, DNA, drug facilitated sexual assault, assessing physical trauma, and court testimony.

Upon completion of the course, a post-training clinical requirement must be completed according to the nurse's scope of practice and guidelines of the training course. 

The event is being sponsored by the Marshall University Forensic Science Center (through NIJ Cooperative Agreement #2001-RC-CX-K002) and the WV Foundation for Rape Information and Services, Inc. (through Violence Against Women Office, Office of OJP Grant No. 2002-VF-GX-0005 and 2003-SW-BX-0058, and the Division of Criminal Justice Services Drug and Violent Crime Control Grant #03-DC-32). 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Foundation announces title changes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. board of directors has unanimously voted to elevate the titles of Glen Kerkian and Monica Hatfield.

Kerkian's title has changed from executive director to president and chief executive officer of the Foundation. Hatfield, formerly the president, is now chairman of the board.

"The change of title more appropriately aligns and more accurately reflects the scope of Glen Kerkian's responsibilities to the Foundation," Hatfield said. Kerkian also is senior vice president for development at Marshall University. 

The vote to change the titles of Kerkian and Hatfield took place last weekend during the board's quarterly meeting.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine reaccredited until 2011

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Accreditation for Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has been continued until 2011, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Marshall was notified this week of the positive decision by the accrediting agency, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME). The decision followed a limited survey visit to the school in March.

"Full accreditation affirms that the School of Medicine meets or exceeds the high standards set forth by the medical profession for medical education," Kopp said. "This milestone speaks volumes about the high caliber of our faculty and staff, who are among the best in the country, and the quality of the educational experiences they provide to our students. With new facilities and expansion on the horizon, the prospects for the future are very promising."

Dr. Charles H. McKown Jr., dean of the medical school, said teamwork on the part of the school's faculty and staff was responsible for the positive outcome.

"Our faculty, especially through the Curriculum Committee, and the leadership in academic and student affairs worked diligently to prepare for the site visit, and their efforts clearly led to the LCME's favorable action," McKown said.

"Those efforts have made our medical education curriculum the best it's ever been," he added. "Our new challenge - and it's a pleasant one - will be to adapt our curriculum and adjust instruction schedules as we begin in the next two years to occupy two new buildings that will greatly enhance the education of our medical students."

The new buildings are the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, which is currently under construction on Third Avenue, and the Clinical Education and Outreach Center at the old Fairfield Stadium site.

The Byrd Center is expected to be finished by August 2006. Construction on the Clinical Education and Outreach Center began on June 1, and the anticipated completion date is January 2007.

Accreditation by LCME assures that Marshall meets the same high standards as the other 123 accredited medical schools throughout the nation, McKown said. Marshall will not have to be surveyed again for accreditation until 2011.

"The commitment that Marshall University's School of Medicine has to excellence - excellence in medical education and excellence in patient care - is evident in all that it does and is at the heart of the growing national reputation it has earned," Kopp said. 

The School of Medicine was established in 1977. Last year, the school graduated its 1,000th doctor.

A video news release on the accreditation is available on the Web at http://windowsmedia.marshall.edu/ucomm/SOMAccreditationStory.wmv.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Documentary on historic 'Gulf Stream Drift Mission' features Marshall alum from Williamson, W.Va.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-six years ago, in the shadow of the Apollo 11 moon-walk, Marshall University alumnus Chester B. "Chet" May and five other men headed in the opposite direction to make a different kind of engineering history.

In July 1969, while the Apollo 11 astronauts soared upward 250,000 miles, May and the other PX-15 submarine aquanauts descended 2,000 feet off the coast of Florida. May, at that time a NASA scientist, and the others were conducting a dangerous NASA experiment that had them sealed for 30 days inside a tiny deep-sea capsule far below the Gulf Stream surface.

The PX-15 submarine, christened the Ben Franklin, was ingeniously designed by Swiss adventurer and explorer Jacques Piccard to drift in the current, without engine power, to 2,000 feet below the surface. Military submarines of that era were crushed at 1,000 feet and, without engine power, submarines sank. Yet, the PX-15, minus engine thrust, drifted for 1,500 miles, from Florida to Halifax, Nova Scotia.

The Gulf Stream Drift Mission, as it was known, served as a space station analog for long duration missions. The aquanauts' task was simple: survive those 30 days exploring the deep, uncharted depths of the Gulf Stream.

The event is the subject of an Omni Film Productions Ltd. documentary titled "The Disappearance of the PX-15" that airs July 14 on The Science Channel - a digital Discovery network. Viewers should check local listings to see at what time and where the documentary will be shown in their area.

The hour-long documentary debuted April 11 on History Television in Canada, but has not yet been shown in the United States.

May, now 72 and living in Huntsville, Ala., is a 1951 graduate of Williamson (W.Va.) High School, and earned his Bachelor of Engineering Science degree from Marshall in 1961 after a year working in the coal mines and four years in the U.S. Air Force. He also earned a Master of Public Administration from the University of Oklahoma in 1975. May's role on the PX-15 was to collect biological cultures inside the submarine and observe the psychological impact of the mission on the men for NASA.

On the mission, May was known as "NASA's man in the ocean." His crewmates were: Piccard, the mission director; Don Kazimir, a former U.S. Navy captain and captain of the mission; Erwin Aebersold, a Swiss engineer and designer and pilot of the mission; Frank Busby, a U.S. Navy oceanographer who mapped the ocean floor and collected scientific data on the mission; and Ken Haigh, a British Royal Navy acoustics expert who conducted scientific experiments using acoustics on the mission.

What NASA discovered from the mission still guides space travel today, but the story was a virtual secret until 1999 when James Delgado, executive director of the Vancouver, British Columbia, Maritime Museum, stumbled upon the wreck of the PX-15 in a North Vancouver shipyard. He was amazed to find the basic structure still there.

Delgado, astounded that the PX-15 was rusting as junk, vowed to restore it and investigate what happened to the crew. The documentary follows Delgado as he recovers the sub and reunites three of the four surviving crew - May, Kazimir and Aebersold.

"I thought it was great," May said of the documentary. "I just thought the Ben Franklin was doomed for the dumps. He (Delgado) really did a fantastic job. There never really was anything done on the history of that mission."

May was selected by Dr. Wernher von Braun, one of the world's first and foremost rocket engineers and a leading authority on space travel, to represent NASA on the mission. "He built the rocket that put us on the moon," May said of von Braun.

The drift mission began on July 14, 1969, two days before Apollo 11 lifted off. The PX-15 had been built in Switzerland, disassembled, then shipped in crates to Florida, where it was reassembled. On July 14, it was towed 20 miles out to sea from the Florida coast, the hatch was sealed and the descent began.

On July 16, as the Apollo soared, the PX-15 descended. Four days later, on July 20, Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.

The drift mission was not without incident. Water became contaminated and carbon monoxide levels rose, and on one occasion the submarine drifted 35 miles off course. On day 13, it was forced to surface, while remaining sealed, then was towed back into the gulf stream - a bouncy, seven-hour venture May described as "hot, tough and rough."

The PX-15 surfaced again on Aug. 14, 1969, and the mission was declared a success. It did, however, last a few hours longer than expected to ensure that the submarine would surface in daylight.

"It was 30 days, 12 hours," May said. "Slow, slow, slow. By the 15th day we were marking off the days."

May said he always wanted to be an engineer, and to this day credits Marshall for giving him the opportunity to realize his dreams. "Marshall saved me," he said. "It was part of my journey and always has been."

May said he worked his entire NASA career, from 1966 to 1984, toward being on a space flight as a payload specialist, but it just never worked out. He decided in 1982, at age 50, that it was "time to go." He retired from NASA in 1984, then was named chief of McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s Space Station Systems Engineering and Integration Office in Huntsville. He retired for good, this time from Grumman Space Station Program Support Division, in 1995.

While May enjoys life these days with his wife of nearly 49 years, Anita Louise, their three daughters and seven grandchildren, the restored PX-15 stands outside the Vancouver Maritime Museum for all to explore. And the drift mission, forgotten by most for more than 30 years, suddenly lives again.

"I just feel proud to have been a part of it," May said.

 

NOTE: Photos from the documentary are available for use by the media on the Web at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Parking Permit Renewals

Marshall University faculty, staff and students are encouraged to purchase or renew parking permits for the 2005-2006 school year soon. Permits for 2004-2005 expire on Thursday, June 30.

Parking permits may be obtained at the bursar's office, located on the first floor of Old Main on MU's Huntington campus. The bursar's office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Anyone purchasing a permit for the first time will need to know the vehicle license number, make, model, style, and color when applying for the permit.

Four different types of permits at varied costs may be purchased. The cost also depends on whether a half-year or full-year permit is purchased.

Surface permits are $65 for a half year and $130 for the whole year. Third Avenue garage permits are $115 for a half year and $230 for the whole year. Evening permits are $35 for a half year and $70 for the full year. Smith Hall garage permits, which are assigned according to seniority, are $115 for a half year and $230 for the whole year

Fines will be issued to anyone who occupies permit parking without a permit from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday. Parking meters also will be enforced during those same hours. Fire lane and handicapped parking is enforced 24 hours a day.

Tickets for parking violations are issued in the following amounts. Meter violations are $2 each, handicapped violations are $100 each and all other violations are $10.

Employees who normally pay for their permit through payroll deduction who have not received their new parking stickers by July 1 are asked to call Marshall's Office of Public Safety at 696-6406.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall 'Campaign' surpasses $98 million

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than $98 million of the $100 million goal has been secured for Marshall University's "Campaign for National Prominence," Marshall University Foundation Inc. President and CEO Glen Kerkian announced last weekend.

The celebratory announcement highlighted the Foundation's quarterly board meeting at  Stonewall Resort in Roanoke, W.Va. Nearly 50 people attended the weekend event, including Marshall Foundation board members and guests, and MU faculty and staff members. 

"The attainment of the $100 million 'Campaign for National Prominence' goal, combined with the fact that we will soon be managing more than $100 million in assets, puts Marshall University and the Foundation in elite company," Kerkian said. "Our students and academic colleges will be the beneficiaries of this consistent outpouring of generosity."

The board assembled Friday, June 24 to hear an informative presentation by Dr. Paul Uselding, the new dean of the Lewis College of Business.

Following his remarks on integrating the academic realm with the corporate world, the board adjourned to various committee meetings to consider old business and strategize future opportunities. The evening finished with a dinner cruise around the resort lake and entertainment by current Marshall student Victoria Landgrave and her accompanist Mark Smith.

At the Saturday morning session, the university's incoming president, Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, spoke to the group. Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, then gave a state-of-the-university presentation. The board meeting concluded with the campaign update from Kerkian.

"Marshall's future is exciting," Foundation Chairman Monica Hatfield said. "This weekend we had the pleasure of meeting Marshall's new president.  Sarah Denman shared student accomplishments on the state and national levels.  Glen Kerkian shared wonderful news about the conclusion of the Campaign for National Prominence, which will occur at the end of this year.  The Foundation's endowments and assets are at an all-time high.  Needless to say, I left the meeting feeling that Marshall is truly on the road to national prominence."

The Marshall University Foundation Inc. was established Jan. 3, 1947 as a nonprofit educational corporation to solicit, receive, manage and administer gifts on behalf of Marshall University. It is a public charity under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Marshall's Office of Development secures private financial support for the university and encourages greater participation by alumni.  The Foundation board of directors is comprised of 36 alumni, community and business leaders.

More information on the Foundation is available at www.marshall.edu\foundation, or by calling Kerkian at (304) 696-2826.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

130 high school students to attend HSTA Summer Institute at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute takes place from Sunday, July 10 through Friday, July 15 at Marshall University.

The summer institute is called Fun with Science. The program brings 130 ninth- and 10th-grade students from throughout West Virginia to the Huntington campus for one week to learn more about science and the opportunities that are available to students majoring in science.

Students in the program will learn about digestion and the human digestive system. They also will learn about the diversities of cultures in the United States through programs about multicultural contributions to society.

"The program makes learning about science fun for the students," Dr. Joseph Bragin, dean of the College of Science, said. "The program also helps to recruit students to enroll in the science program in college and better prepares them for their future science classes."

HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for West Virginia high school students in grades nine through 12. Students participate in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in the high schools. The program is offered in 26 West Virginia counties.

The summer institute also has a training program for HSTA teachers from around the state from Tuesday, July 5 through Friday, July 8. The teachers will learn about the curriculum for the summer institute and how it should be taught.

The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a post-secondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary care givers. The program was established with 45 students from two counties in 1994.

For more information, persons may contact Bragin at (304) 696-3167 or visit the HSTA Web site at www.wv-hsta.org.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Eighty high school juniors to attend Governor's School for the Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eighty rising high school juniors from throughout West Virginia will spend three weeks on Marshall University's Huntington campus next month, participating in the 2005 West Virginia Governor's School for the Arts.

The residential program, which runs July 3-23, provides individual and in-depth group instruction in the arts for rising juniors living in and attending high school in West Virginia. It has taken place the past two years at West Virginia University, and last was at Marshall in 1999 and 2000. It will continue at MU through 2007.

Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music in Marshall's College of Fine Arts, is dean of the School for the Arts. He also served as dean in 1999 and 2000.

"The School for the Arts is an exciting time for the students," Stickler said. "It's a chance for them to be around other students from the state who share a love for the arts. They'll get to know each other, do some networking among themselves, and later they'll see each other at all-state groups or maybe at the Governor's Honors Academy."

The students auditioned for the school in six artistic areas in January at South Charleston High School and in February at East Fairmont High School. The areas are instrumental music, vocal music, theater, dance, visual arts and creative writing.

Skilled artists/teachers will work with students who demonstrate potential in those areas. Music professor Steven Lawson and theatre professor Gene Anthony from Marshall were selected to teach in the school.

Stickler said the Governor's School for the Arts attempts to broaden the students' understanding of the arts through interdisciplinary courses focusing on common elements in the arts disciplines. Classes, special programming and an extended field trip are among the activities scheduled.

The destination for the field trip will be announced during the school's opening ceremony, which is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. Sunday, July 3 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Expected to attend the ceremony are Kay Goodwin, Cabinet Secretary for Education and the Arts in West Virginia; Jay Cole, Deputy Secretary with the Department of Education and the Arts; and Sherry Keffer, Coordinator of Gifted Education and the Governor's Schools.

The Governor's School for the Arts was initiated through the efforts of former West Virginia First Lady Maestra Rachael Worby. Fairmont State College was selected as the host site for the first five years (1994-1998). Two-year stints at Marshall, West Liberty College and WVU followed.

"It's great just seeing the kids grow, seeing them have the opportunity to enjoy the arts and grow within that three-week period," Stickler said. "They don't go to classes only in their areas. If their area is dance, they might have that class in the morning, then go to one of the other areas in the afternoon. The receive a little touch of it all."

The 80 students who will attend the West Virginia School for the Arts are listed at http://www.wvgovschools.org/GSAClassof2005.htm.

The tentative daily schedule of events is available by calling Cindy Stickler, assistant to the dean of the Governor's School for the Arts, at (304) 696-3686. Larry Stickler may be reached at (304) 696-4368 or 696-3686.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New Playing Surface on Schedule at Joan C. Edwards Stadium

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Conversion of the playing surface at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium from Astroturf to FieldTurf is on schedule, Associate Athletic Director Scott Morehouse said today.

The seven-year-old Astroturf has been removed by Ballard Sports Construction and the field is being prepared for installation of the FieldTurf. The new synthetic playing surface is expected to be ready for the start of fall football practice in early August. Players report to MU on Tuesday, Aug. 2, and practice begins later in the week.

"We are extremely pleased to be enhancing our facilities with what I believe is the best playing surface on the market," Marshall Coach Mark Snyder said. "Our staff, our players and our fans are all looking forward to the new FieldTurf field at Joan C. Edwards Stadium."

The first game on the new turf will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 when Marshall plays host to William & Mary in the 2005 season opener.

Most of the old turf, which had been in place since 1998, was gathered by Marshall fans, who flocked to the stadium a couple of weeks ago to claim souvenir portions of the turf in all sizes and shapes.

After the Astroturf was removed, crews removed the ground surface known as E layer, Morehouse said. It was the surface underneath the Astroturf and consisted of a grounded up tire mixture and stone.

The field currently consists mainly of dirt and gravel as work crews continue preparation for installation of the new turf.

FieldTurf is primarily made up of a rubber base and a hybrid turf and emulates natural grass. The surface is noted for being softer than Astroturf. It currently is used in more than 30 NCAA Division I-A football stadiums. Cost of the project at Marshall is $855,000.

Joan C. Edwards Stadium opened in 1991 and has a current seating capacity of 38,016. It has been the site of multiple Mid-American Conference title games, and also was host to the NCAA Division 1-AA national championship game from 1991 through 1996.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 20, 2005
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

Ron Hicks Named Employee of the Year

When Ron Hicks came to the staff service awards luncheon June 9 he expected to be honored for his 20 years of service. He didn't know that along with that award he would be named the 2004 Marshall University Employee of the Year.

The occasion marked the first time the award was announced at the luncheon. All 2004 Employees of the Month were also introduced.

Interim President Michael J. Farrell presented Hicks with a check for $300. In addition he received a gift certificate for $100 from the Marshall University Bookstore, certificates for two tickets to a future Marshall Artist Series presentation, and two passes good for two meals each from Sodexho Campus Services.

Hicks is a trades specialist/carpenter in Physical Plant, and was the Employee of the Month for March. He was nominated by Charles V. Payne, station manager of WMUL-FM on behalf of the WMUL-FM Board of Directors.

In the nomination, Payne wrote, "We have observed Mr. Hicks' work over the past several semesters while constructing materials for the renovation of our digital news production facility in the Communications Building, and have been very impressed. He was not only dedicated, but extremely thorough with his work. Mr. Hicks' unselfishness has provided many students with the opportunity to produce in a studio that rivals that of any station in our state. WMUL-FM is known throughout the nation as one of America's best college radio stations and with Mr. Hicks' help during the renovation process WMUL-FM can continue paving Marshall's pathway toward national prominence with a facility it can be proud of."

Payne noted Hicks spent many hours working on the project and was warmly regarded by the WMUL-FM family. He said "They appreciate his work and sacrifice made to benefit countless future Marshall students who will have the opportunity to practice for their careers in something Mr. Hicks helped to construct."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sharon Porter named president of MU Alumni Association

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sharon Porter, a Huntington resident and Marshall University graduate, is the new president of the MU Alumni Association. She assumes her two-year term on July 1, replacing Tom Harris.

Porter has been serving as secretary of the MUAA, and will continue those duties until July 1. Her husband, Jeff Porter, was president of the association for three years prior to Harris' two-year term.

Porter, who was selected by the alumni association's nominating committee and elected by the full MUAA board of directors, said she has several goals for the MUAA as she prepares to take office.

"I want us to finish raising money for the new Erickson Alumni Center, and get that under construction," she said. "Another goal is to increase alumni involvement, especially among young alumni - people in their first 10 years out of college. And, we need to increase our visibility in the Conference USA cities."

About $2.9 million of the needed $4 million has been raised or pledged for the new alumni center, Porter said. "(The architect) estimates the building time at about 18 months, so I'd like to see ground broken and construction begin soon," she said.

In addition to Porter, other MUAA board members include: first vice president, Martha Hill; second vice president, Nancy Campbell; treasurer, Mike Graybeal; secretary, Debbie Prestera; and chairperson of the Erickson Alumni Committee, Robert Yost.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Parenting Group planned this summer at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Parents will learn how to manage their children's behavior and be able to share their parenting frustrations with others in a confidential setting during a six-week Parenting Group this summer at Marshall University.

The Marshall University Psychology Clinic, located on the fourth floor of Harris Hall, is host to the group, which meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursdays beginning June 30. The group is limited to care givers who have children between the ages of five and 11.

Stacy Saunders, one of the group leaders, said she believes this type of group is needed because "children do not come with instruction manuals."

"This is an opportunity for primary care givers to learn various parenting skills and techniques that have been researched and found to be effective with a variety of children," Dr. Keith Beard, director of the Psychology Clinic, said. "This will also provide care givers with the opportunity to have guidance and assistance as they implement new parenting skills."

The fee to participate in the group is $20, which will be refunded if all sessions are attended.  Interested persons must register for the group and should contact Saunders at (304) 696-2772, option 2, or Margie Zdrojewski at (304) 696-2772, option 2, before June 23 for more information on group participation.

More information on the Psychology Clinic and the Parenting Group is available at http://www.marshall.edu/psych/clinic/clinic.htm.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New book showcases unique local collection

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Noted Civil War author Jack Dickinson has produced an exhibition catalog based on the unique holdings of the Rosanna A. Blake Library of Confederate History at Marshall University.

Civil War Paper Items showcases printed items produced in the Confederate states of America between 1860 and 1865. The volume is in soft-cover format, 8 by 11 inches, with 140 full-color pages.

Included in the museum-quality book are examples of sheet music, song books, and dance notices; religious tracts; bonds and currency; cachets, letterheads, and patriotic items; government documents and forms; cartes de visite  (card photographs); prints, sketches, and maps; newspapers and other periodicals, some printed on the back of wallpaper; and veterans' association publications.

A letter written by Gen. Robert E. Lee to Gen. G. T. Beauregard in 1863, and the final payment paperwork and check for the commerce raider CSS Alabama, are two of the notable items reproduced.

The Rosanna Blake Library was given to Marshall University by Dr. Rosanna Blake, a Proctorville, Ohio, native who served as a government attorney for many years. Her interest in the Confederacy was sparked by a book about Robert E. Lee she received for her 10th birthday, and she collected materials extensively throughout her life.

In 1965, Dr. Richard B. Harwell, noted Civil War bibliographer, considered her collection one of the best in the country. Housed in the Libraries' Special Collections Department, it has now grown to more than 4,000 monographs and 3,000 imprints. Dr. Blake also established two graduate scholarships at Marshall University, in Southern history and Confederate literature.

The author of nine books and numerous magazine articles on the Civil War, Dickinson is a West Virginia native and 1966 graduate of Marshall University. After a career at IBM, he returned to Marshall as the Confederate Bibliographer for the Blake collection.

Dickinson was the 1999 recipient of the Jefferson Davis History Writing Award from the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and has received the History Writers award from the West Virginia Department of Archives and History. He is a member of the Company of Military Historians.

The volume may be ordered for $14.95 plus $3.95 shipping and handling from:  Marshall University Foundation, Attn: Dean Barbara Winters, Marshall University Libraries, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington WV 25755-2060.

A presentation and autograph session by the author is planned for 4 p.m. on July 29, 2005, in the Drinko Library Atrium. More information is available by contacting Winters at (304) 696-2318.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 17, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, South Charleston Campus, (304) 746-2038

Catapults, robots and high school students invade Marshall for annual Summer Engineering Academy June 19-24

High school students from across the Tri-State region will learn more about the field of engineering during the fourth annual "Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence," beginning Sunday, June 19 at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The week-long summer program is hosted by the College of Information Technology (CITE) in cooperation with Learning for Life Exploring programs and the Huntington post of the Society of American Military Engineers. The program is open to West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky residents preparing to enter their junior year of high school.

Academy participants will explore engineering as a potential field of study and career by participating in hands-on engineering activities, touring engineering-related facilities and organizations, and interacting with practicing engineers from all major engineering disciplines, including civil, chemical, electrical, mechanical and environmental engineering.

The academy also will focus on skills important for success in the study and practice of engineering, such as problem-solving, team-building, project management, and communications.

Students will apply these skills and experiences through the design and construction of their own catapults and robots, which will be "field tested" at Gullickson Hall on Marshall's campus on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Academy activities will start this Sunday with a presentation for students and their families by West Virginia Commissioner of Highways Paul A. Mattox, P.E. The Academy will conclude on Friday, June 24, with the Awards Luncheon, featuring Paula George Tompkins, the founder and CEO of ChannelNet, (www.channelnet.com). The luncheon will occur at 11:30 a.m. in the John Marshall Room of the Memorial Student Center.

For more information on academy activities, persons may contact the Marshall University engineering department at (304) 746-2042 or (304) 696-5453, or by e-mail at eeae@marshall.edu. Additional information is available online at the academy Web site, www.marshall.edu/eeae. A schedule of activities follows:

Sunday, June 19

  • 2-3 p.m., Marshall Commons residence halls, check-in
  • 3-5 p.m., Memorial Student Center, welcome and presentations by Paul Mattox; Andrew Gillette, MU Engineering student
  • 5-9 p.m., Memorial Student Center, icebreaker exercises, dinner, and team building exercises, building bridges (in Gullickson Hall Room 5)

Monday, June 20

  • 8-11 a.m., introduction to CAD/CAM, using AutoCAD Inventor to make a CO2 racer, (GH 206A)
  • 11 a.m.-noon, lunch, Harless Dining Hall     
  • Noon-4 p.m., introduction to civil and environmental  (GH5); Engineering:  surveying, GPS, and environmental sampling - Buskirk Field
  • 4-5:30 p.m., dinner (with guests), Harless Dining Hall
  • 6-6:30 p.m., GPS scavenger hunt (Student Center fountain)
  • 6:30-8:30 p.m., CO2  racers & bridge building (GH5)

Tuesday, June 21

  • 8-9 a.m., introduction to trebuchet design, (GH5)
  • 9:30-11 a.m., Buskirk Field, trebuchet design and construction
  • 11 a.m.-noon, lunch, Harless Dining Hall       
  • Noon-2 p.m., complete trebuchet construction
  • 2-3 :30 p.m., trebuchet competition
  • 4-5:30 p.m., dinner (with guests), Harless Dining Hall
  • 6-7 p.m., RTI ITS research projects, (GH5)
  • 7-8:30 p.m., CO2  racers & bridge building, (GH5)

Wednesday, June 22

  • 8-9:30 a.m., introduction to intelligent transportation systems (using Lego robotics), Gullickson Hall engineering lab (GH 5)
  • 9:30-11 a.m., work on robot design/construction (GH 5)
  • 11 a.m.-noon, lunch, Harless Dining Hall
  • Noon-2 p.m., finalize robot design (GH5)
  • 2-3 p.m., robotics competition (GH5)
  • 3-4 p.m., speaker, Dr. Heidi Burch, "M&M's and Edible Photonic Crystals" (GH5)
  • 4-5:30 p.m., dinner (with guests), Harless Dining Hall
  • 6-8:30 p.m., complete work on CO2 racers & bridge; (GH 5)

Thursday, June 23

  • 8 a.m.-5 p.m., field trips and discussions with engineers:
  • 9 a.m.-11:15 a.m., Toyota Plant, Buffalo, W.Va.
  • 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., lunch at Golden Corral, Cross Lanes
  • 12:30-1:30 p.m., travel to Memorial Tunnel
  • 1:30-2:30 p.m., tour Memorial Tunnel
  • 2:30-3:30 p.m., travel to New River Gorge Bridge
  • 3:30-4:30 p.m., visit New River Gorge Bridge
  • 4:30-6 p.m., return from NRGB
  • 6-9 p.m., dinner and pool party, Waves of Fun in Hurricane, W.Va.

Friday, June 24

  • 8:45-10:15 a.m., CO2 races (GH5)
  • 10:30-11:15 a.m., EEAE evaluation and wrap-up (GH5)
  • 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., awards luncheon (and bridge testing), students, families, sponsors, staff and guests, John Marshall Room; guest speaker, Ms. Paula George Tompkins, founder and CEO of ChannelNet.

Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Jazz-MU-Tazz returns to Marshall June 20-25

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The seventh annual Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival returns to Marshall University with a week of jazz workshops, clinics, rehearsals and concerts from Monday, June 20 through Saturday, June 25.

The week begins with jazz camp for high school and college students. The classes take place from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Jomie Jazz Center. Participants will take classes in jazz improvisation, history and music technology.

The students also will rehearse with and receive hands-on training from noted trumpet virtuoso Byron Stripling, who has performed with The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, The Lincoln Center Classical Jazz Orchestra and many others.

Stripling also has had many television and musical performances, including the lead role of the Broadway-bound musical, "Satchmo." Millions have heard his trumpet and voice on TV commercials and theme songs, including "20/20" and CNN.

"The festival provides an opportunity for Marshall University to share the creative work of professional, collegiate and student musicians with the Huntington community," Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall, said. "Jazz is one of America's national treasures and here in the tri-state region we are fortunate to have many great performers who are dedicated to keeping jazz alive and well."

Here is a schedule of events for the festival:

  • Monday, June 20 - 9 a.m., registration for jazz camp

  • Tuesday, June 21 - 7:30 p.m., film night (camp participants only)

  • Wednesday, June 22 - 7:30 p.m., Bluetrane, Marshall's faculty jazz ensemble, in the Jomie Jazz Center

  • Thursday, June 23 - 7:30 p.m., Jazz Jam Session in the Jomie Jazz Center

  • Friday, June 24 - 7:30 p.m., Backyard Dixie Jazz Stompers in the Jomie Jazz Center

  • Saturday, June 25 - 6:30 p.m., final concert at Harris Riverfront Park; 8 p.m., Huntington Pops Orchestra with Byron Stripling at Harris Riverfront Park

Admission is free to the public for the concerts on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Tickets for the concerts on Saturday are $12 in advance and $15 at the gate for general admission. Reserved seats may be purchased for $30. Tickets are available from the Huntington Symphony Orchestra at (304) 525-0670. For more information persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-2452.

###

 
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community and Technical College hires two directors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two new staff members have joined Marshall Community and Technical College.  The college became a separate institution in 2003 and offers one- and two-year degree programs to prepare students for technical careers, in addition to workforce training and development.

Gary A. Pommerenck has been appointed Executive Director of Workforce Development and John Whiteley is the new Director of the Inland Waterways Academy. They began their positions this month.

 "The college works closely with business and industry to identify and support current and projected employment training needs," Dr. Vicki L. Riley, the college's president, said.  "We are pleased that the new additions to our staff are recognized in their fields and will continue to build and grow the positive relationships we have with business and industry."

Since 1985, Pommerenck has been president and owner of C. M. Love & Co., a 95-year-old family-owned hardware business in downtown Huntington.  He has a B.B.A. in Management from Marshall University and has done graduate work at Marshall in Industrial and Human Relations. 

Whiteley, who has had 31 years of sea-going experience with the United States Merchant Marines and the U.S. Coast Guard, is a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and the United States Naval War College, and will receive a master's degree in Adult and Technical Education from Marshall this summer.

For more information on workforce development programs offered by Marshall Community and Technical College, persons may call (304) 696-6855.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU School of Journalism relocating to Communications Building

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, located on the third floor of Smith Hall since 1966, is moving into a new home.

The school's faculty and staff began moving May 9 into the Communications Building, which is located next to Smith Hall and houses MU's television and radio studios. The move, which will be ongoing through the summer, is part of a campus improvement project at Marshal

The space in the Communications Building became available to the School of Journalism last year when West Virginia Public Broadcasting consolidated into Charleston and no longer needed its offices in Smith Hall.

Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, said the move creates numerous opportunities for expanding the program

"It enhances convergence opportunities for student media with the new facilities side by side," Dennison said. "And, it presents a naming opportunity for the Communications Building."

The TV studio, also known as Studio A, is being upgraded this summer as well. Interim President Michael J. Farrell approved $130,000 for the upgrade.

Also, West Virginia Public Broadcasting will maintain a presence at Marshall with a bureau in the Communications Building that Dennison said will create opportunities for stories involving faculty and students. The school's student-run radio station, WMUL-FM, will remain on the second floor of the Communications Building.

Dennison said he's hopeful the TV studio renovations will be finished by the first of September, and that an official opening of the new School of Journalism facility can take place sometime that month. 

When the School of Journalism moved off the third floor of Smith Hall, the staff from the second floor temporarily moved in to allow for asbestos abatement on the second floor, which is ongoing. Once that is complete, asbestos abatement will begin on the third floor, and that should be finished by spring 2006

For more information on the journalism school's move to the Communications Building, persons may contact Dennison at (304) 696-2809.

###

   


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 14, 2005
Contact: Bill Bissett, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

State Farm continues its commitment to Marshall's nationally recognized Accomplished Teaching Project

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - State Farm Insurance has awarded a $15,000 grant to Marshall University's Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, continuing a partnership that helps West Virginia school teachers attain national certification.

State Farm agency field executive Herman Dixon, along with State Farm agents Lisa Godwin and Faye Zinn, made the presentation Tuesday morning at Marshall's South Charleston campus.

The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) awards national board certification, the highest professional credential in the field of teaching, to teachers who successfully complete a rigorous, performance-based assessment.

During the past five years, State Farm has provided more than $40,000 to support Marshall's Accomplished Teaching Project, a graduate-level program that assists in the preparation of teachers seeking to obtain national certification. Through this program, fifty seven teachers have received National Board Certification.

"Through its continued support, State Farm has played a critical role in the success of Marshall's Accomplished Teaching Project," said Dr. Ron Childress, Marshall University Vice President for Graduate Studies and Dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development.  "With State Farm's continued support, we are establishing West Virginia as a national leader in the development of quality teachers and quality education."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bissett named director of public relations at Marshall University's South Charleston campus

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of Marshall University's ongoing communications effort, Bill Bissett has been selected to serve as Director of Public Relations at Marshall's South Charleston campus.

"Bill brings a strong combination of public service and private sector experience to this position," Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell said.  "We want to put our South Charleston campus more 'on the map' with the public, and I believe that Bill has the ability and enthusiasm to make this happen."

Bissett assumed his duties on June 1.

"As a lifelong fan of Marshall University, I'm very excited about this new position," Bissett said. "While I plan on working with the mass media across the Mountain State, my primary focus will be the Kanawha Valley. From forensic science to football, I'm looking forward to sharing information about the amazing opportunities that Marshall has to offer."

Bissett graduated with his undergraduate and master's degrees from Marshall University. He can be contacted at (304) 746-2038 or by e-mail at bissett1@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sixty high school students at MU for Upward Bound Program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Upward Bound program is host this summer to 60 high school students from Cabell, Wayne and Mingo counties, preparing them for a college education.

The students not only receive the preparation they need for a successful college career, but also are eligible to earn a stipend and one elective credit at their respective high schools. The program began Sunday, June 12, and runs through Friday, July 22.

The students spend six weeks living in Twin Towers on Marshall's Huntington campus while taking a wide assortment of classes that include math, science, study skills, performing arts, etiquette and foreign languages. They also play sports, work in departments on campus, and attend cultural and social events. Plans to travel to Washington, D.C., are scheduled as well.

Upward Bound is a $333,992 federally funded TRIO Program that has been on Marshall's campus since 1972. More than 80 percent of the program's graduates go on to some form of post-secondary education. The students must either be low-income or a potential first-generation college student (neither parent has a four-year college degree).

Jackie Hersman, director of the program, said funding for all future Upward Bound programs is in jeopardy. They are on President Bush's list of 150 programs slated form elimination that would take effect in 2007, she said.

"Fortunately, through the efforts of the parents, alumni and communities all across the country, the programs may be saved by the United States Congress with voting taking place this summer," Hersman said.

For more information on the Upward Bound program, persons may contact Hersman at (304) 696-6846.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Laurie Reasons named director of special projects for MU Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Laurie Reasons, a former sales manager with Continental Airlines, has been named director of special projects for the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., Executive Director Glen Kerkian announced today.

Reasons started with Marshall on June 6. Her primary responsibilities will include event planning for the Foundation, as well as ad hoc special projects.

"I'm looking forward to jumping in with both feet and giving everything I can to strengthen Marshall University," Reasons said. "Our state is unequivocally one of the best places to live and work, so I'm delighted to focus my energies here."

Reasons began her eight-year career at Continental in 1997 as a part-time reservations agent to "show my young children the world." Ultimately a sales and service specialist opportunity became available, which led to TeleSales manager, then a promotion to a field manager with responsibility for Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia.

Her latest position required overseeing the performance for six major airports in three states, as well as negotiating corporate agreements with Fortune 500 companies and consulting on travel and credit programs. She negotiated one of the first joint corporate agreements with alliance partner Northwest Airlines, and twice received "Fly to Win," an annual award for the top managers in a division. Reasons consistently was ranked as the best salesperson in the department.

"My job at Continental was, in a nutshell, to help corporations fly where they needed to go to close a deal or improve the company's bottom line," Reasons said. "In this new position, I will have the consummate privilege of helping students fly to their ultimate destination in life - at which point they will hopefully decide to give back to their alma mater!  Seriously, I intend and hope to make a difference here."

Reasons earned her B.A. in English in 1981 from Baylor University in Waco, Texas. She is married to Dr. Allen Reasons, Senior Minister of Fifth Avenue Baptist Church in Huntington. They have two children, Katherine and Preston. Katherine is a member of Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars Class of 2009.

Reasons may be reached by calling (304) 696-3420.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Free physicals provided for NYSP participants

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Free physical examinations for youth ages 10-16 who plan to participate in the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP) at Marshall University will be provided from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11, in the ticket office lobby of MU's Cam Henderson Center.

NYSP takes place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily July 5 through Aug. 6 on Marshall's Huntington campus. It is open to youth from the region who meet federal income guidelines and age restriction. Participants must provide medical clearance in order to participate.

Space is still available and interested youth may sign up during the physical examinations on Saturday.  Parental permission is required.  For more information, persons may call Tim White at (304) 751-6251. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First MU orientation for new students is June 14

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - New Marshall University students will have a chance to visit campus and begin their college careers during new student orientation on Tuesday, June 14, and at various other dates throughout the summer.

Each orientation will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning in the Memorial Student Center and continuing with programs throughout campus during the day. About 200 students will attend each orientation.

Freshmen and undergraduate transfer students are required to go through the orientation process to become familiar with the university as well as the programs and services offered.

Orientation offers students and parents a chance to tour the Huntington campus and residential halls. Students also will attend programs about public safety, student life, the I.D. system and computing services.

Parents will attend programs concerning financial aid, residence halls for those students living on campus, commuting and food service. Parents also will get the chance to speak with representatives from the Marshall faculty and learn about the transition from high school to college.

"Orientation allows students to make initial contact with the university and begin to learn about campus and student life," Becky Fisher, orientation assistant, said. "Students also get to talk with other students who are already on campus and meet other freshmen who they will be seeing on campus in the fall."

New students also will be using a new system for registering for classes this year. Students previously registered for classes the day of orientation. They now complete a pre-registration survey online after scheduling a registration date.

The deans of each student's college then will place the student in 12 hours of classes. Students then will be able to adjust their schedule during the academic advising session during orientation.

Here are the orientation dates for the summer:

  • June 14-15 for outstanding scholars
  • June 16 for transfer students
  • June 21-22 for transfer students and freshmen
  • June 23-24 for freshmen
  • July 26-29 for freshmen
  • Aug. 18 for transfer students and freshmen

Students should bring the orientation booklet and a driver's license or some form of identification to orientation. For more information or to register for orientation, persons may contact Fisher at (304) 696-2354 or visit the orientation Web site at www.marshall.edu/orientation.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former Ohio University provost chosen as Marshall's next president

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, has been selected as Marshall University's next president, A. Michael Perry, chair of MU's board of governors, announced today.

Kopp was chosen Monday by Marshall's board of governors during a meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. He accepted the position Monday afternoon in Athens, Ohio, and has signed a three-year contract.

Kopp replaces Michael J. Farrell, who has served as interim president since Jan. 1, 2005. He starts July 1, and will be paid $226,000 a year. Farrell replaced Dr. Dan Angel, who was MU's president the previous five years.

"Dr. Kopp did an outstanding job of describing the important collaborative nature of the process involved in formulating a bright vision for an institution of higher education like Marshall University and the number of the various constituency groups that must be involved in a substantive manner in order to make that process successful," Perry, co-chair along with Menis Ketchum of the presidential search and screening committee, said.

"We're delighted that Dr. Kopp has accepted the position and the board looks forward to working with him. His leadership and ideas will benefit not only Marshall, and its excellent faculty, staff and student body, but West Virginia and the entire region."

Perry praised Farrell, an attorney with the Huntington law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., for his work as interim president. Farrell took a sabbatical from the law firm to serve as interim president.
"We certainly appreciate the outstanding job that Mike Farrell has done and the sacrifice he and his partners and associates made during this time," Perry said.

Marshall was assisted in the presidential search by Dr. John DiBiaggio of Academic Search Consultation Service of Washington, D.C. DiBiaggio, former president at Tufts University, Michigan State University, and the University of Connecticut, originally gave the committee the pool of more than 50 potential candidates.

"This is the culmination of a process that involved a lot of people, not only the administration, staff, faculty and students at Marshall, but the community as well," Perry said. "Their involvement was very important in the process. We're also very pleased with the consultant and the outstanding candidates John DiBiaggio submitted to the search committee."

The 20-member search and screening committee, which included the 16 members of MU's board of governors, unanimously recommended the selection of Kopp as the next president during Monday's meeting at RCBI. The board then acted on that recommendation with another unanimous vote in favor of Kopp. All 20 search committee members attended the meeting.

Kopp was selected from a field of three finalists. The other two were Dr. Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University, and Dr. Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota. A fourth finalist, Western Carolina University chancellor Dr. John W. Bardo, withdrew his name before Monday's meeting.

"Looking at Marshall and the Huntington community, I have been so impressed with the tremendous relationship between the two," Kopp said. "That support base, not just in Huntington but in the state as a whole, is a tremendously strong foundation for building a vibrant future for Marshall University, and helping the community and the surrounding area improve the quality of life for West Virginians. To be a part of that, to work with the community to help that transition take place, is an incredibly exciting opportunity."

Kopp spoke of the "promise of a better future" for West Virginians, and said an important part of fulfilling that promise is a solid commitment to advance student learning.

"We need to produce learning that makes a difference in the lives of our students and the communities that they are a part of," Kopp said. "It's a process that involves the entire campus community. How can we improve the achievement of the students? We need to push ourselves to get better and better."

Kopp, 54, said he and his wife, Jane, plan to be very active in the community. He said he also is "absolutely committed" to working closely with Gov. Joe Manchin and collaborating with West Virginia University on economic development for the state.

The Kopps have two grown children. Their son, Adam, lives in Chicago and works in the law office of the Illinois lieutenant governor. Their daughter, Elizabeth, a physical therapist, and her husband, Matthew Bradley, M.D., an orthopedic resident, live in Portland, Ore., and are the proud parents of the Kopps' first grandchild, Rachel.

Kopp has been a special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents since 2004. The special assignment, made at the request of the chancellor, Roderick G. W. Chu, involves two areas of responsibility: leading a statewide initiative to advance innovative practices that improve student access, learning productivity and accountability in Ohio public institutions of higher education, and assisting the nation of Hungary on behalf of the board and the state of Ohio with implementing European Union higher education reforms.

Previously, Kopp was provost for two years at Ohio University (2002-2004) in Athens, Ohio, where he shared with the president the central administrative role in the university and served as the chief academic and operating officer. He led the senior administration effort to assist the university's medical school in privatizing its patient services clinic. He also participated in Ohio University's $200 million Bicentennial Campaign, raising more than $7 million in major gifts and pledges.

Ohio University houses 10 colleges, including a medical school, and has an enrollment of 19,800 students on the main campus in Athens, and an additional 9,000 students on five regional campuses. As provost, Kopp had the principal responsibility for planning the university budget, which was $540 million in fiscal year 2005, and working with the vice presidents to coordinate internal institutional affairs.

Kopp also was founding dean of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University, and founding dean of the College of Allied Health Professions at Midwestern University. He also served in a variety of positions for nearly 20 years at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Kopp received his B.S. in Biology in 1973 from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics in 1976 from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was a postdoctoral fellow at St. Louis University Medical Center, department of physiology, and a research fellow and NIH fellow in the department of biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

More information on Marshall University's new president is available online at www.marshall.edu/presidentialsearch. A video story is available at http://windowsmedia.marshall.edu/ucomm/presanncstory.wmv


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Presidential Announcement Available by Streaming Video and Local Cable

The press conference announcing the appointment of Dr. Stephen J. Kopp as the next president of Marshall University is available on the World Wide Web at http://windowsmedia.marshall.edu/newpres/newpres.wmv.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday June 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Booth Scholars to be recognized, honored Sunday in ceremony at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Booth Scholars Program, which is designed to prepare Wayne County high school students for higher education, will be recognized during a ceremony at 1 p.m. Sunday, June 5 at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The purpose of the ceremony is to recognize the 30 new members of the program as well as honor its graduating seniors. Booth Scholars are students who will be in the ninth through 12th grades during the 2005-06 school year. The program currently has 119 scholars.

In July, the students will learn about college life when they return to Marshall's Huntington campus for their summer program. Freshmen will take part in the first week of the program beginning Tuesday, July 19. Sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the program for the second week beginning Tuesday, July 26.

Students will take classes in different areas including public speaking and fine arts. Juniors also will take a class in ACT preparation.

"By preparing them now for college, it is not a scary experience for them in a few years after they graduate from high school," Brenda Napier, director of the program, said. "They get the chance to learn about college now and it becomes a part of their lives."

The program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia to further their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education.

The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College. Students from Wayne County, along with one student from Kentucky and one from Virginia, participated.

To qualify for the program, students must have at least a 3.0 overall grade point average and have scored above average on the WESTEST. For more information, persons may contact Napier at (304) 696- 5205 or by e-mail at napier19@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Memorial service set for Westbrook

A memorial service for Dr. William Westbrook, a retired professor of sociology at Marshall University who died Wednesday, May 25 at the UCSF (University of California-San Francisco) Medical Center, will take place Saturday, June 18 in Huntington.
 
The service at Klingel-Carpenter Mortuary, located at 328 6th Ave., begins with a viewing at 1 p.m. The service starts at 2 p.m.
 
Westbrook, a native of Marietta, Ohio, taught economics and sociology at Marshall from 1972 to 2003, his son, Randy, said. He also was an official scorekeeper for Thundering Herd home football and basketball games from 1974 to 2002. Westbrook was 73 and living in San Francisco when he died.
 
In addition to Randy Westbrook, Dr. Westbrook is survived by another son, Jeff. Both Randy and Jeff live in San Francisco.

"He had a passion and dedication to the students at Marshall and the well-being of their education and life in general," Randy said. "He also had a passion for Marshall as a university and for the athletics programs. His passion was working with the students and giving his all to the university and the community with his kindness and intellect."
 
 More information on the memorial service is available at www.bluenail.org.
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fourth Marshall presidential candidate to visit campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents and former provost of Ohio University, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Thursday and Friday, June 2-3.

Kopp will be the fourth finalist to visit the university. John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University, visited last week, and Thomas R. Hanley, vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University, is winding up his two-day visit today. Charles Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, is visiting later today and Thursday.

Kopp will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said they are pleased with the number of community leaders who met with Bardo and Hanley at the President's House. An estimated 125 people attended each of the first two receptions.

"The involvement of the community and Marshall personnel is extremely important in the presidential search process," Perry said. "The response has been great so far. We hope it continues throughout the week and everyone takes advantage of this opportunity to meet with Dr. Kopp and hear his views on higher education and Marshall University."

On Friday, Kopp first will meet at 7:45 a.m. for breakfast with the Marshall president's council in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. His schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

Kopp has been a special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents since 2004. It is a special assignment at the request of the chancellor, Roderick G. W. Chu, and involves two areas of responsibility: leading a statewide initiative to advance innovative practices that will improve student access, learning productivity and accountability in Ohio public institutions of higher education, and assisting the nation of Hungary on behalf of the board and the state of Ohio with implementing European Union higher education reforms.

Previously, Kopp was provost for two years at Ohio University (2002-2004) in Athens, Ohio, where he shared with the president the central administrative role in the university and served as the chief academic and operating officer. He led the senior administration effort to assist Ohio's medical school in privatizing its patient services clinic. He also was founding dean of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University, and founding dean of the College of Allied Health Professions at Midwestern University. He also served in a variety of positions for nearly 20 years at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Applications being accepted for Jazz-MU-Tazz workshops, clinics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The seventh annual Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival returns to Marshall University Monday, June 20 through Saturday, June 25.

Applications are now being accepted for the workshops and clinics, which are open to high school and college students. The classes take place from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Center on the Huntington campus.

Participants take classes in jazz improvisation, history and music technology. Students rehearse and receive hands-on training during the classes.

Dr. Ed Bingham, professor in Marshall's music department and MU's director of jazz studies, said the program provides high school students with a high level of jazz training and allows college students to be active with the program.

"The Jazz-MU-Tazz program provides a more intensive experience to enhance what high school students are doing in their jazz bands at school and also allows students who don't have jazz bands at their schools to learn about the program," Bingham said. "It also allows college students to learn about the program while providing our jazz students with the opportunity to stay involved throughout the summer."

The students also will work closely with noted trumpet virtuoso Byron Stripling, who has performed with The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, The Lincoln Center Classical Jazz Orchestra and many others. Stripling also has had many television and musical performances, including the lead role of the Broadway-bound musical, "Satchmo." Millions have heard his trumpet and voice on TV commercials and theme songs, including "20/20" and CNN.

"It is also great for recruiting for both the university and the jazz program," Bingham said. "We have had several students come to Marshall because they had previously attended the Jazz-MU-Tazz program."

Applications must be received by Friday, June 10. The cost of the program is $200 a person. For more information or to register for the program, persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-2452.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Third MU presidential candidate to visit campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Wednesday and Thursday, June 1-2.

Kupchella will be the third finalist to visit the university. John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University, visited last week, and Thomas R. Hanley, vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University, is visiting today and Wednesday. Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, visits later this week.

Kupchella will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said involvement of Marshall personnel, in both Huntington and South Charleston, and the community is important in the search process.

"We hope everyone takes advantage of this opportunity to meet with Dr. Kupchella and hear his views on higher education and Marshall University," Perry said. "These meetings are an important part of the search process."

On Thursday, Kupchella first will meet at 7:45 a.m. for breakfast with the Marshall president's council in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. His schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

Kupchella has been president of the University of North Dakota, where enrollment last fall was 13,187, since 1999. During Kupchella's time at the Grand Forks, N.D., institution, a president-initiated and completed comprehensive strategic planning process resulted in strategic plans for each unit and a strategic plan for the entire university. Another highlight during Kupchella's tenure has been increased faculty and staff salaries, and a significantly increased endowment. Since 1999, the university had completed nearly $450 million in building projects, some on campus and some as joint ventures with public and private partners.

Before going to North Dakota, Kupchella was provost and professor of biology at Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 1999. He was dean of Ogden College of Science, Technology and Health at Western Kentucky University from 1985 to 1993, and professor and chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences at Murray State University for six years before that. He also served at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine College in Louisville earlier in his career.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

National Youth Sports Program camp registration extended

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has extended the registration deadline for regional youth ages 10-16 who wish to participate in the National Youth Sports Program weekdays July 5-Aug. 6 on the MU campus. Deadline to register is Friday, June 10.

NYSP is a free camp for area youth who are disadvantaged and meet the federal guidelines for low income.  Free medical checkups will be provided to all applicants from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11 at Marshall's Cam Henderson Center.

Camp runs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Each day begins with a light breakfast and ends with a nutritious lunch.  Students will participate daily in sports camps such as football, basketball, volleyball, soccer, baseball and softball.  Each day, students will enjoy a relaxing swim in the pool. Students will participate in weekly math and science classes as well as character and substance abuse workshops.

Former Marshall football Coach Bobby Pruett, along with the other coaches, players and volunteers from Marshall University, will be on hand to provide professional instruction and supervision. 

Applications may be picked up at any of the following locations: all Cabell County schools, A.D. Lewis and Fairfield East Community Centers, Marcum Terrace Sports Center, and the Information and Referral Service on the third floor of the Cabell County Public Library in downtown Huntington.

For more information, persons may call Beatrice Crane Banford at (304) 696-5225 or Tim White at (304) 522-0576 or (304) 751-6251.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Second MU presidential candidate to visit campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Tuesday and Wednesday, May 31-June 1.

Hanley will be the second finalist to visit the university. John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University, visited last week. The other two finalists  - Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, will visit later this week.

Hanley will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

About 75 community members attended a reception last week for Bardo and his wife, Deborah, at the president's house. Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said they are hoping for a similar turnout at Tuesday's reception for Hanley, and at on-campus meetings planned for Wednesday.

"Everyone is encouraged to take part in this important search process," Perry said. "The reception for Dr. Hanley and the meetings give the constituents the opportunity to meet and talk with him, and to hear his views on higher education and Marshall University."

Wednesday's schedule begins with breakfast at 7:45 a.m. with the president's council at Marshall in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. The schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

Hanley is a vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. He served as provost from 2003 to 2005. During that time he had administrative responsibility for 12 colleges, the library and information technology with shared responsibility for research, outreach and student affairs.

Before going to Auburn, Hanley was dean of engineering and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Louisville from 1991 to 2003. He had administrative responsibility for six departments and four centers with an overall budget of more than $24 million, more than double what it was when he arrived. Previously he was professor and chairman of chemical engineering for a joint program with Florida State University and Florida A&M University from 1985 to 1991.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former Marshall Professor Dies

Dr. William Westbrook, retired professor of sociology at Marshall University, died Wednesday, May 25 at the UCSF (University of California-San Francisco) Medical Center. Westbrook was 73.
 
Westbrook, a native of Marietta, Ohio, taught economics and sociology at Marshall from 1972 to 2003, his son, Randy, said. He also was an official scorekeeper for Thundering Herd home football and basketball games from 1974 to 2002.
 
In addition to Randy Westbrook, Dr. Westbrook is survived by another son, Jeff. Randy Westbrook said a memorial service for his dad will take place in mid-June. More information on the service is available at www.bluenail.org.
 
 "He had a passion and dedication to the students at Marshall and the well-being of their education and life in general," Randy said. "He also had a passion for Marshall as a university and for the athletics programs. His passion was working with the students and giving his all to the university and the community with his kindness and intellect."
 
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 24, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Autism Training Center featured on WSAZ-TV

A story by television station WSAZ earlier this month describes the activities of Lara Wilson, a program assistant in Marshall's Autism Training Center. It can be viewed at  http://windowsmedia.marshall.edu/autism/wsazatc.wmv.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Offers Summer Math Workshop

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students who fail to achieve adequate scores on the ACT and SAT exams have an opportunity to improve their abilities and eliminate the need for developmental math classes by completing a math workshop this summer at Marshall University.

The workshop is designed to improve the abilities of students who made below a 19 on the ACT or less than 460 on the SAT. A passing grade in the workshop eliminates all developmental course requirements in math and will allow immediate registration for college level math courses. 

Cost of the workshop is $185 and covers all materials, including books and tutoring. Two sections of the workshop will be offered during summer term C from June 6 to July 8 at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Two additional sections of the workshop will be offered from July 11 to Aug. 12 during summer term D at the same times. The classes meet in Harris Hall from Monday to Friday and are approximately two hours long.

For additional information, persons may contact the University College at (304) 696-3252 or email Randolph Cullum at Cullum@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 23, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First MU presidential candidate to visit campus this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John W. Bardo, chancellor at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, N.C., since 1995, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Wednesday and Thursday, May 25-26.

Bardo will be the first of the finalists to visit the university. The other three - Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University; Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, likely will visit next week. 

Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said it is important to have a good representation of the community at a reception for Bardo Wednesday evening, and for as many people as possible to attend meetings with Bardo on Thursday.

"We encourage everyone to take part in this important process," Perry said. "It's a wonderful opportunity for the constituents to meet Dr. Bardo and hear his views on higher education and Marshall University."

Bardo will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday's schedule begins with breakfast at 7:45 a.m. with the president's council at Marshall in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. The schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

During Bardo's 10 years at Western Carolina, enrollment has increased from about 6,700 students to about 8,400. Much of his work has focused on three issues: increasing enrollment, enhancing academic quality and engaging in regional development. Since 1995, undergraduate applications have increased more than 50 percent and the freshman class has grown from about 1,200 to nearly 1,600.

Before going to Western Carolina, Bardo was provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years at Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, Mass. He also has been an administrator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Fla., the University of Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, and Wichita State University in Wichita, Kan.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 23, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Learning disabilities summer program offered at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College of Education and Human Services is offering a learning disabilities summer program Wednesday, June 8 through Friday, July 8 for kindergarten- to eighth-grade students.

The program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, for students who have been diagnosed with a learning disability or ADHD.

Students will be divided into classes of no more than five to ensure that each receives individual attention. Participants will work on improving reading and decoding skills, reading comprehension, reading speed, arithmetic examples and story problems, self-esteem, organizational skills, test-taking strategies and study skills.

"The summer program is an excellent opportunity for students to receive individual attention to help improve these basic skills," Dr. Barbara Guyer, professor of special education and director of the H.E.L.P. program at Marshall, said. "During the school year students are overwhelmed with school work and improving these skills often gets overlooked."

The cost of the program is $175 for West Virginia residents, $190 for metro residents and $275 for non-residents. Scholarships are available for qualifying students. A copy of the learning disabilities or ADHD test results must be included with the registration form.

For more information or to register for the program, persons may contact Guyer at (304) 696-6317.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Newest Yeager class includes 11 students from five states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven students from five states, including four from both West Virginia and Ohio, make up the Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholars Class of 2009. They will begin their studies at Marshall this fall.

The program is named for U.S. Air Force Brigadier General (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Lincoln County, W.Va.  In October 1947, Yeager captured the world's attention by becoming the first supersonic pilot by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 experimental aircraft in California.

The Yeager program is the only scholarship at Marshall for which students must compete against one another. Students must meet criteria set for the scholars and then, if they are picked, must participate in the interviewing process. The students are interviewed by teams made up of Marshall faculty and administrators, as well as community leaders.

After receiving the scholarship, the students must maintain a rigorous course load, as well as a 3.5 GPA, and participate voluntarily in campus activities. The society also looks for students who have leadership potential.

"I'm looking forward to working with these outstanding students," Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, interim executive director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, said. "Every year brings a new group of Yeager scholars with a new array of talents and interests."

Pendarvis, who served on the program's first steering committee nearly 20 years ago, said among the interests of this year's entering scholars are biology, engineering, political science, psychology, medicine, history, journalism and law.

"Like other Yeager scholars, these students were selected not only for their academic ability, but also for their demonstrated leadership ability as well as their commitment to learning, openness to new ideas, and excitement about taking on new challenges," Pendarvis said. "They need all of those qualities to succeed in the scholarship program."

Also required of the scholars, Pendarvis said, are four interdisciplinary seminars during their first two years in college and development of foreign language skills by taking at least four semesters of a foreign language. She described the program as "exciting as well as demanding."

These students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2009:

Kristen Luchanne Berry of Proctorville, Ohio plans to double major in biology and theology or English.  She will use her degree in biology to prepare herself for a career as an orthodontist.  Berry will soon graduate from Fairland High School in Proctorville.

Morgan Victor Blubaugh of Washington, Va., plans to major in electrical engineering and computer science.  He will use his engineering skills to prepare to be an aeronautic engineer, an IT administrator or Web page designer.  Blubaugh will soon graduate from Rappahannock County High School in Washington, Va.

Brittany Julia Duncan of Lakeville, Minn., plans to major in political science with an emphasis on international relations and linguistics.  She will use her education at Marshall to pursue a career as a linguist, political analyst or editor.   Duncan will graduate from Lakeville High School in Lakeville, Minn.

Mary Catheline Hatfield of Charleston, W.Va., plans to pursue a degree in education, athletic training, or political science.  She wants to be an elementary teacher, an athletic trainer and a congresswoman.   Hatfield will soon graduate from George Washington High School in Charleston, W.Va.

Lauren Margaret Hutchins of Wheeling, W.Va., has not yet decided on a major course of study.  She plans to be an intermediate mathematics teacher, accountant or psychologist.  Hutchins will graduate from Wheeling Park High School in Wheeling, W.Va.

Anna Marie Keffer of South Point, Ohio will major in nursing at Marshall.  She plans to be a registered nurse with a career as a nurse anesthetist.   Keffer will graduate from South Point High School.

Jacob Tyler Kilgore of Kenova, W.Va., plans to major in chemistry so that he can pursue a career in medicine as a pediatrician or cardiologist or pursue a career as a chemist. Kilgore will soon graduate from Spring Valley High School in Huntington.

Rebecca Ryan Minardi of Dayton, Ohio plans to major in environmental sciences.  She is interested in pursuing a career in environmental education, or as a historian or Spanish translator.  Minardi will graduate from Carroll High School in Dayton, Ohio.

Laura Ellen Mitchell of Rock Hill, S.C., will major in psychology and dietetics.  She plans to be a child psychologist, a pediatric physical therapist or a dietician.  Mitchell will graduate from Northwestern High School in Rock Hill, S.C.

Miriam Katherine Reasons of Huntington plans to major in journalism.  She wants to pursue a career as a magazine editor, a newspaper editor or an electronic journalist.  Reasons will graduate from Huntington High School.

Claire Elizabeth Snyder of Portsmouth, Ohio will major in English and history with a minor in Spanish.  She wants to become a lawyer.   Snyder will graduate from Notre Dame High School in Portsmouth.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

List of presidential candidates at Marshall trimmed to four

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The list of candidates for the Marshall University presidency has been trimmed to four, presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said today.

The search committee met Monday and Tuesday in Cincinnati and interviewed eight semifinalists, which were selected from an original pool of more than 50 potential candidates. The committee then selected four finalists, all of whom are expected to visit Marshall's Huntington campus in the near future for a series of meetings with campus and community constituencies.

The finalists, listed in alphabetical order, are: John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University; Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University; Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University; and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota.

Marshall is being assisted in the search by Dr. John DiBiaggio of Academic Search Consultation Service of Washington, D.C., which was selected by MU to aid the university in its search. DiBiaggio, former president at Tufts University, Michigan State University, and the University of Connecticut, originally gave the committee the pool of more than 50 potential candidates.

"We are very pleased and grateful to John DiBiaggio for presenting us with an outstanding group of candidates," Ketchum said.

Perry, too, said the list of candidates was impressive.

"We were delighted and impressed with the variety of applicants who are presidents and provosts of major institutions with outstanding academic achievements," he said. "Each of the four finalists have strong backgrounds in higher education and have achieved significant accomplishments in a wide variety of very important areas vital to the future of Marshall University."

Here is a brief look at each of the finalists and the institutions at which they currently are employed:

John W. Bardo, Western Carolina University

Bardo has been chancellor of the Cullowhee, N.C., university since 1995. Since that time, enrollment has increased from about 6,700 students to about 8,400. Much of Bardo's work in that 10-year period has focused on three issues: increasing enrollment, enhancing academic quality and engaging in regional development. Since 1995, undergraduate applications have increased more than 50 percent and the freshman class has grown from about 1,200 to nearly 1,600. Western Carolina, a member of the Southern Conference, has a Carnegie Classification of Master's I, the same as Marshall.

Before going to Western Carolina, Bardo was provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years at Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, Mass. He also has been an administrator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Fla., the University of Southewest Texas State University in San Marcox, Texas, and Wichita State University in Wichita, Kan.

Bardo received his B.A. in Economics in 1970 from the University of Cincinnati, his M.A. in Sociology in 1971 from Ohio University, and his Ph.D. in Sociology in 1973 from The Ohio State University.

Thomas R. Hanley, Auburn University

Hanley is a vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. He served as provost from 2003 to 2005. During that time he had administrative responsibility for 12 colleges, the library and information technology with shared responsibility for research, outreach and student affairs. Auburn maintains a Carnegie Classification of Doctoral/Research-extensive, and its enrollment is more than 23,000.

Before going to Auburn, Hanley was dean of engineering and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Louisville from 1991 to 2003. He had administrative responsibility for six departments and four centers with an overall budget of more than $24 million, more than double what it was when he arrived. Previously he was professor and chairman of chemical engineering for a joint program with Florida State University and Florida A&M University from 1985 to 1991). The progam's major goals were the development of a quality program at the undergraduate and graduate levels with an emphasis on minorities and women.

Hanley received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1967 from Virginia Tech, his M.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1971 from Virginia Tech, his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 1972 from Virginia Tech, and his M.B.A. in Management in 1975 from Wright State University.

Stephen J. Kopp, Ohio Board of Regents

Kopp has been a special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents since 2004. It is a special assignment at the request of the chancellor, Roderick G. W. Chu, and involves two areas of responsibility: leading a statewide initiative to advance innovative practices that will improve student access, learning productivity and accountability in Ohio public institutions of higher education, and assisting the nation of Hungary on behalf of the board and the state of Ohio with implementing European Union higher education reforms.

Previously, Kopp was provost for two years at Ohio University (2002-2004) in Athens, Ohio, where he shared with the president the central administrative role in the university and served as the chief academic and operating officer. He led the senior administration effort to assist Ohio's medical school in privatizing its patient services clinic. Ohio has an enrollment of about 20,000 and a Carnegie Classification of Doctoral/Research-Extensive. He also was founding dean of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University, and founding dean of the College of Allied Health Professions at Midwestern University. He also served in a variety of positions for nearly 20 years at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine. 

Kopp received his B.S. in Biology in 1973 from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics in 1976 from the University of Illinois.

Charles E. Kupchella, University of North Dakota

Kupchella has been president of the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, N.D., since 1999. During that time, a president-initiated and completed comprehensive strategic planning process resulted in strategic plans for each unit and a strategic plan for the entire university. Another highlight during Kupchella's tenure has been increased faculty and staff salaries, and a significantly increased endowment. Since 1999, the university had completed nearly $450 million in building projects, some on campus and some as joint ventures with public and private partners. The University of North Dakota has an enrollment of more than 12,000 and its Carnegie Classification is Doctoral/Research-intensive.

Before going to North Dakota, Kupchella was provost and professor of biology at Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 1999. He was dean of Ogden College of Science, Technology and Health at Western Kentucky University from 1985 to 1993, and professor and chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences at Murray State University for six years before that. He also served at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine College in Louisville earlier in his career.

Kupchella received his B.S. in Education in 1964 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in 1968 from St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, N.Y.

More information on the finalists is available at www.marshall.edu/presidentialsearch.  Also, photos of each of the finalists are available for use by the media at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Artists Series headed back to Keith Albee Theatre

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Artists Series events for the 2005-06 season will be moving back to the historic Keith Albee Theatre in downtown Huntington.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin, Sen. Bob Plymale and other area legislators presented Penny Watkins, executive director of the Artists Series, with a check for $35,000 to help ensure that Artists Series events will take place at the Keith Albee and aide in the organization's success.

The check was presented May 9 at the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's annual dinner. The money will be used to make needed repairs at the Keith-Albee. Both Manchin and Plymale said they recognize the importance of the series to Marshall and the community, as well as the economic impact it has on the tri-state area.

The Keith Albee Theatre has been home to the artist series for 68 years. The 2004-05 events had to be moved because of the uncertainty of the theatre with the opening last fall of Pullman Square and the Marquee Cinema. The Keith Albee did not book any shows after December 2004.

Angela Jones, director of marketing and external affairs for the Artists Series, said Marshall is excited to be moving back to the Keith Albee.

"The Keith Albee Theatre had been our home for so many years and we have a wonderful relationship with them," Jones said. "We are thrilled to be going back home."

For more information, persons may contact Jones at (304) 696-3334.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Summer technology camp teaches retirees computer basics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Technology Outreach Center will be host in July to a summer technology camp called Computer Basics.

Computer Basics is a hands-on course for retired citizens, who have little or no experience with computers, but who want to learn about the rapidly changing world of technology.

Computer Basics is a comprehensive introduction to the world of computers.  The course covers fundamentals such as hardware, software, e-mail, the Internet, and basic document processing skills in Windows XP and Word. 

"This course will help individuals gain the skills needed to become computer proficient while learning in a comfortable and friendly environment," said Kelli R. Mayes, director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center. 

Computer Basics will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon daily July 25-29 at Marshall University in Corbly Hall, room 330.  The cost of the camp is $239 per person, which includes all materials. Class size will be kept small to allow for personal attention.  A certificate of completion will be awarded at the end of the camp. 

Persons interested in obtaining more information or registering for Technology Camp: Computer Basics may contact Mayes at (304) 696-3325 or via e-mail at mayes@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Applications for graduate tuition waivers accepted through July 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications for graduate tuition waivers for Marshall University's fall term will be accepted through Friday, July 29 in the graduate dean's office, 113 Old Main, on the Huntington campus and by the students' academic area offices on the South Charleston campus. 

Priority consideration will be given to faculty and staff of the state's public and private colleges and universities. 

Academic merit, which will be determined using grade point average and scores on required graduate admissions examinations, will be the major consideration in awarding the waivers that cover tuition.  Students who receive waivers are responsible for paying student center and activity fees and some department specific fees.

Up to three hours of waiver for graduate course work will be awarded to qualified applicants.  These waivers do not cover E-courses.

Students interested in being considered for a tuition waiver based on financial need criteria should contact the graduate dean's office in Huntington at (304) 696-6606, or the graduate admissions office in South Charleston at (800) 642-9842.

Students who previously held waivers must reapply to be considered for fall term waivers.

Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by mail or email.  Huntington campus students may pick up approved waivers in 113 Old Main beginning Friday, Aug. 12 and take them to the bursar.  Waivers not claimed by Friday, Aug.19 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

South Charleston campus students must be registered for fall classes to receive the waivers and to have the payments posted to their accounts.  Unless special arrangements are made, waivers for students who are not registered by Aug. 19 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 17, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Archived Videocast of MU/WVU Series News Conference

An archived videocast of the news conference May 17, which announced a new series of football games with West Virginia University, is available at http://www.marshall.edu/itvs/stream/muwvu.asx.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall, WVU agree to seven-year football deal; series begins in 2006

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials from Marshall University and West Virginia University today signed a seven-year deal during a news conference at the State Capitol to resume their football series, beginning in 2006.

The long-awaited series pits West Virginia's two Division I-A institutions against one another for the first time since 1997. WVU will be host to the inaugural game of the new deal on Sept. 2, 2006, followed by a game at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium on Sept. 8, 2007. The series swings back to Morgantown on Sept. 13, 2008.

The site for the game on Oct. 3, 2009 will be determined no later than 2008. The team that wins at least two of the first three games will be host to the 2009 game at its stadium.

The final three years of the contract have the series in Huntington on Sept. 11, 2010, and in Morgantown on Sept. 3, 2011, and Sept. 1, 2012.

"This is a great day to be a West Virginian," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin said during the news conference. "This is an unprecedented day in West Virginia history. It will be a game for all America, not just West Virginia. I can hardly wait for Sept. 2, 2006."

Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell said the state of West Virginia is the real winner with the resumption of the series. He recalled the Aug. 30, 1997 game when thousands of Thundering Herd fans traveled to Morgantown for the game won by the Mountaineers, 42-31. Overall attendance at Mountaineer Field was more than 65,000.

"The excitement we felt in Morgantown is something we've missed," Farrell said.

In the new series, the visiting team will be allotted 5,000 tickets for sale to its fans and the home team will own negotiating rights for live television coverage.

Both Manchin and WVU President David Hardesty Jr. said each team should root for the other until the teams meet on the playing field.

"We need to be cheering for each other and keep negative talk to a minimum," Hardesty said.

The series contract was signed by Manchin, Hardesty, Farrell, WVU Athletic Director Ed Pastilong, and Marshall Athletic Director Bob Marcum. West Virginia Coach Rich Rodriguez and Marshall Coach Mark Snyder also spoke briefly at the news conference.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students claim nine awards in state contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received four first-place awards and five honorable mentions during the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2004 broadcast journalism awards ceremony April 23, 2005 at the Canaan Valley State Park in Davis, W.Va.

Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of electronic media management in Marshall's William Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the university competed with commercial and noncommercial radio stations from throughout the state.

"Winning four first-place awards is quite an accomplishment in itself, but one of the first-place awards being for Outstanding News Operation is a signature statement for a college radio station considering that the students are competing with broadcasting professionals across West Virginia," Bailey said.

Bailey said the effort caps a successful year by the volunteer student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall from state, regional, and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations.

The student broadcasters have won 50 awards for the 2004-2005 academic year, including 28 first-place awards. That total is the second highest number of first-place awards since 1985-1986, the academic year Bailey became the faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

The highest number of first-place awards is 30, won in 2003-2004 when WMUL-FM student broadcasters won 60 awards in all.  In the past two years, the student broadcasters have won 110 awards with 58 of the awards being (53 percent) for first place.

The four first-place individual award-winning entries in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2004 broadcast journalism awards were:

Outstanding News Operation

The Newscenter 88 Team; News directors were Kristin Houghton, a senior from Inwood, W.Va., for spring semester 2004 and Melanie P. Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., for fall semester 2004.

Judges' comments:  Really, really good news organization.  Great production of news block; knowledge and implementation of the use of sound bites is perfect; content and writing is exceptional; anchor is, of course, young but is headed in the right direction.  Reporting is the way it should be.  This station's news department is impressive.  Someone has taught this staff well.

Best Breaking News Coverage

"Dan Angel Retires," written and produced by Melanie P. Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2004.

Judges' comments: Great use of sound; bites are the perfect length and content; writing is excellent; reporter needs to smooth out delivery a bit but that will come with maturity.  Great Job!

Best Documentary

"The Fight for Right:  Same-Gender Marriage in America," written and produced by Christina Riffle, a recent graduate from Dunbar, W.Va., broadcast during "Aircheck" Tuesday, May 4, 2004.

Judges' comments:  Good organization of the story with great use of sound; reporter needs work on smoothing out delivery otherwise, nice job!

Best Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the "2004 MAC Men's Basketball Tournament First-Round Game: Marshall University versus Eastern Michigan University" played at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington, W.Va., Monday, March 8, 2004.  The students calling the game were: basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student form Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Robert Harper, a graduate student from Hurricane, W.Va., and engineer Mike Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va.

Judges' comments: Without a doubt, one of the best play-by-plays the judges have ever heard; GREAT pacing, EXCITING deliveries, FANTASTIC recall of stats it put us in the game.  PERFECT SCORE!

The five honorable mention award-winning entries were:

Best News Reporter

"A Complication of Work," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior for McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" during 2004.

 

Best Feature

"Appalachian Music," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, Nov. 26, 2004. 

Best Interview

"The Tripton/Murphy Report," with hosts of the program Richard Tripton, a senior from Ona, W.Va., and Seth Murphy, a junior from Flemington, W.Va., and producer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va., that was broadcast Thursday, Oct. 7, 2004.

Best Sportscaster

"A Complication of Work," written and produced by Vince Payne, graduate student, from Hansford, W.Va., for the FM 88 Sports Team and broadcast during 2004.

Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the 2004 Capital Classic: Marshall University versus West Virginia University men's contest in the game played at Charleston Civic Center Coliseum  in Charleston, W. Va., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2004.  The students calling the game were:

Basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Travis Smith, a recent graduate from Charles Town, W.Va.; statistician Heather Berry, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.; statistician Angela Bradley, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va., and engineer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va.

The judges of the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association radio contest for 2004 were members of the Arkansas Associated Press Broadcasters Association.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 11, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

West Virginia Public Broadcasting to Open News Bureau at Marshall University

Huntington, WV. - Marshall University and West Virginia Public Broadcasting have announced the opening of a news bureau at Marshall's Huntington campus beginning July 1. Housed in the newly renovated Communication Building, the news bureau will produce content and programming for the statewide public radio and public television networks.   

"This is exciting," said Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell.  "West Virginia Public Broadcasting will give us a point of synergy that will accentuate the university's own mass communications programs. Combined with our nationally acclaimed Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the bureau will help develop a new level of service for our region and state." 

The agreement will permit Marshall University students, faculty and staff to work with WV Public Broadcasting professionals to produce local programming with the potential for statewide distribution. "The bureau is a tremendous opportunity for students and faculty, who seek an outlet for their journalistic talents in audio and video," said Dr. Corley Dennison, Dean of the Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.  "Not only will there be a greater distribution of information from this region of the state, but future professionals in the broadcasting arena will have broadcast professionals on campus by whom they can measure their own work."

Marshall and West Virginia Public Broadcasting have worked cooperatively in various arrangements since 1969. This recent move by WV Public Broadcasting establishes a two-person production team based on campus, allowing the broadcast service to expand its mission.

"We have wanted to renew our physical presence in the Huntington area for a long time," said Rita Ray, executive director for the Educational Broadcast Authority, licensee of the statewide public radio and television networks. "We appreciate the efforts of State Senator Bob Plymale and other legislative leaders, who have seen the need for improved coverage of news and public affairs in the Huntington-Charleston metro area."

Marshall University owns the license to WMUL-FM, an award-winning, student-operated radio station and through its Instructional Television Services provides computer and video programming for Adelphia Channel 25. 

The Educational Broadcasting Authority owns and operates West Virginia Public Broadcasting, which includes West Virginia PBS, a television network with transmitters serving Huntington/Charleston,  Beckley and Morgantown and West Virginia Public Radio, a network with  transmitters serving  Huntington, Charleston, Beckley, Buckhannon, Martinsburg, Petersburg, Wheeling, Parkersburg, and Morgantown.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 11, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Hill Appointed to Marshall Research Post

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Paul Hill, Executive Director of West Virginia EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research), has been appointed Interim Associate Vice President for Research Development at Marshall University, according to Dr. Howard Aulick, Vice President for Research at Marshall. This is a part-time appointment to allow Dr. Hill to work with Marshall and continue his primary role at West Virginia EPSCoR .

"Specifically, Dr. Hill will direct Marshall's current EPSCoR activities, lead the preparation of the university's next Research Infrastructure Improvement proposal (a multimillion dollar proposal to the National Science Foundation due in September), and assist the university in its search for a new EPSCoR campus coordinator," Aulick said. "Dr. Hill graciously accepted these additional responsibilities when Marshall's EPSCoR campus coordinator, Dr. Laura Jenski, accepted the position of Vice President for Research at the University of South Dakota."

A native West Virginian, Hill holds undergraduate and master's degrees from Marshall University (biology/chemistry) and a Ph.D. degree in biology from the University of Louisville.  He has 22 years of combined experience in environmental research, public administration, and policy development and has held productive CEO positions in both the public and private sector.  Prior to becoming the Executive Director of the WV EPSCoR Program in 2001, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the United States Chemical Safety Board (CSB). 

"There is no one in West Virginia who has a better understanding of the role and potential of academic research in advancing the state's high tech economy," Aulick said.  "The university is extremely fortunate to have Dr. Hill as its Interim Associate Vice President for Research Development."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall offering research programs for undergraduates this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is offering several research programs for undergraduates this summer at its Huntington campus.

The programs allow students to get hands-on experience with professional mentors in a variety of research fields. The students will spend six to 10 weeks on campus working with Marshall faculty to conduct and present their research.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program is offered at Marshall University to undergraduate students who have had previous research experience. The 10-week program begins May 23. The program is sponsored by the National Science Foundation through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research.

It is designed to promote scientific progress nationwide by designating funds to those states that typically have received less research funding than other areas of the country. The nine students selected to participate in the program will work with Marshall faculty to conduct their research.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience Program is offered to Marshall students in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The program is targeted to students with research experience and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to support their research and enhance their presentation skills. A panel of reviewers has accepted 15 students to participate in the program.

The Research Experience for Undergraduates Program sponsored by the National Science Foundation allows students to conduct research in the area of Bio-inspired chemistry. Applicants from colleges and universities across the country were reviewed and eight students have been selected to participate in the program. The students selected faculty mentors by the areas of research in which the faculty members have worked. The 10-week program begins May 23.

Bill Price, The Research Experience for Undergraduates Program leader, said the program benefits both the students and Marshall University.

"Science is really not learned in the classroom; students learn and gain experience through doing research," Price said. "The research these students conduct is also studied across the country so the program provides Marshall with great exposure."

The Idea Network for Biomedical Research Excellence Summer Program sponsored by the National Institute of Health allows students from colleges and universities in West Virginia to work with faculty at Marshall University and West Virginia University on a variety of research projects.

The program takes place June 6 through August 5. A panel of reviewers selected 30 students to participate in the program, including 14 students working with faculty at Marshall University.

The following is a list of programs offered this summer and the leaders of the programs at Marshall:

         Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Simon Collier (304) 696-6111;

         Summer Undergraduate Research Experience Program, Mike Norton (304) 696-6627;

         Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Bill Price (304) 696-3156;

         Idea Network for Biomedical Research Excellence Summer Program, sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Gary Rankin (304) 696-7313.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 10, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Marshall Alum Named Chief Technology Officer

Gov. Joe Manchin announced his appointment of Marshall alumnus and West Virginia native Kyle Schafer to serve as the state's Chief Technology Officer on May 9.

"Kyle's appointment is a great testimonial for both our bachelor's and master's degree programs, said Betsy Ennis Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall.

Schafer earned a B.S. degree in computer science and M.S. degree in technology management from Marshall. He has held various leadership roles with leading energy companies NiSource and Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., most recently serving as director of technology, infrastructure and design for Nisource Corporate Services.

"Kyle Schafer is a talented and driven leader who brings a wealth of experience with him to the management of the state's technology infrastructure," Gov. Manchin said in a prepared statement. "Under Kyle's leadership and guidance, we will continue to evaluate our technology issues and needs, but, more importantly, where West Virginia needs to be in terms of utilizing technology to deliver responsible government to the people of our state."

According to the governor's office, Schafer's responsibilities will include overseeing the Office of Technology, which was reorganized as a result of House Bill 2891 during the 2005 Regular Legislative Session. Formerly structured as part of the Governor's Office, the Office of Technology now operates under the Department of Administration.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 9, 2005
Contact: H. Keith Spears, Vice President for Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

Marcum Extends AD Contract, Accepts Academic Appointment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The contract of Bob "Kayo" Marcum, Marshall University's Director of Athletics, has been extended through June 30, 2007, Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today. In addition, Marcum was appointed an adjunct professor in sports management in the Division of Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation.

Marcum was hired as Marshall's athletic director on an interim basis in May 2002 and was asked to evaluate the athletic program and help plan its future.  In November of that year he received an extended contract to serve as athletic director until June 30, 2005.  Today, he signed a contract extension reflecting the same annual salary from the university as his current contract, $83,050.00.  In addition, he will receive a salary supplement and automobile allowance from The Thunder Club.

"Bob Marcum is a nationally renowned athletic director," Farrell said.  "He has guided our athletic program extraordinarily well during a time of major transition and we value his experience and expertise as Marshall enters Conference USA." Farrell expressed great appreciation for Marcum's willingness to serve in an academic capacity as an adjunct professor.

Marcum, a Huntington native, graduated from Huntington High in 1955 and received a bachelor's degree in social studies and physical education from Marshall in 1959.  He earned a master's degree in education administration from the University of Akron in 1970.

He served as Associate Athletic Director at Iowa State University from 1971 through August 1978, Director of Athletics at the University of Kansas from August 1978 through January 1982 and Director of Athletics at the University of South Carolina from January 1982 through March 1988.

Marcum came to Marshall after retiring from the University of Massachusetts.  He went to UMass from Atlanta, where he was vice president and general manager of the Atlanta Motor Speedway from October 1990 through February 1992.  He was vice president of the Charlotte Motor Speedway from July 1988 through October 1990.

While Marcum was at UMass, the school produced more Atlantic 10 all-academic selections than any other league university. Marcum was the 1999 Northeast Region I-AA Athletic Director of the Year.

During his tenure thus far as Marshall's athletic director, Marshall has moved from the Mid-American Conference to Conference USA and head basketball coach Ron Jirsa and head football coach Mark Snyder have been hired.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday May 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Templeton named dean of College of Education and Human Services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Rosalyn Anstine Templeton, associate dean of the College of Education and Human Services the past two years at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., is the new dean of Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services, Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today.

Templeton assumes her new position July 1. She replaces Dr. Tony Williams, who has served as interim dean since December 2001.

"I wanted to pick a university where I felt I could fit into all programs and departments it had to offer, a university that needed a dean that could provide leadership and that was excited about progressive education," Templeton said. "And Marshall was the one."

Farrell said he is confident Templeton will do an excellent job at Marshall.

"She is an outstanding educator who will significantly enhance our mission to provide teachers for the state of West Virginia," Farrell said.

Also, Farrell said, "Marshall University is very appreciative of the efforts of interim dean Tony Williams."

Williams said the college is in "excellent condition" as Templeton prepares to take over. He cited the recent awarding of continuing accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

But, Williams said, he also understands the need for a permanent dean. "It's very important to have a permanent dean at the table that can represent faculty, staff and students and the programs of the college," he said.

Prior to serving at Ferris State, Templeton taught at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., for 12 years, and before that she was at Willamette University in Salem, Ore., for a year.

She received her Bachelor of Science in 1984 from Southern Oregon University, her Master of Education in 1985 from The American University in Washington, D.C., and her Doctor of Philosophy in 1990 from the University of Oregon.

Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, headed the search committee that selected Templeton.

"From the standpoint of the search committee, she was very approachable and also very good at answering questions with specific answers," Van Horn said. "The search committee saw her as someone who would be very effective at interacting with agencies and personnel outside the university, and that's particularly important in the College of Education and Human Services."

Van Horn said Templeton, a native of Oregon, also demonstrated strong interest in the status of junior faculty in the college.

"She is very interested in helping faculty in the College of Education and Human Services develop a mentoring system that would engage senior faculty to work with junior faculty to make sure they were making reasonable progress toward promotion and/or tenure," he said.

Templeton described herself as a person with "very good communication skills and the ability to bring people together, and to deal with tough issues, yet let everybody feel good about what took place," she said.

Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall, said she looks forward to working with Templeton.

"She has a passion for education that was so obvious in the interview process," Denman said. "Marshall is fortunate to have someone with her leadership ability."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to sell surplus computers on May 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, on surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, May 9 at its new Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 100 computers will be sold in lots of five or more with minimum bids on some lots. About 10 of the better computers will be sold as individual units. Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, May 10, in the Purchasing Department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. from Tuesday, May 10 through Thursday, May 12. Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers and monitors have recently been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold is available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

National Youth Sports Program comes to Marshall this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hundreds of underserved youth ages 10-16 from throughout the region will be on Marshall University's campus for five weeks this summer to participate in the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP).

NYSP, in operation since 1968, is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and selected colleges and universities throughout the U.S. To date, more than 23 million youth have participated in an NYSP camp. The program's mission is to give children "The Right Start." About 75,000 youth are expected to participate this summer in NYSP camps throughout the country.

Beatrice Crane Banford, associate director of athletics at Marshall and the project administrator, applied for and received a federal grant for $50,000 through the National Youth Sports Corp. She said the camp is free to participants, who will be required only to have a medical release from a physician, and whose parents or guardian meet Department of Health and Human Services income guidelines. 

"This is a wonderful, awesome program," said former Marshall football Coach Bobby Pruett, who is serving as honorary chair of the program's board of directors. "If you can't get excited about this, then you can't get excited about anything. It's for the kids and that's what we're here for."

Free medical exams will be provided to all applicants from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11 at Marshall's Cam Henderson Center. The camp begins Tuesday, July 5 and runs through Saturday, Aug. 6. During most weeks, the camp is conducted from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. It starts each morning with a light breakfast and ends with lunch. All NYSP activities take place on Marshall's campus, and transportation will be provided to all participants.

Students will take part in various sports programs such as basketball, swimming, tennis, soccer and volleyball. Students also will take part in various academic classes and substance abuse classes. Marshall coaches, athletes, staff and volunteers will provide supervision, leadership and medical care during the entire five weeks.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for Marshall University and the children in our community," Banford said. "I am really excited to see so many community leaders getting involved and behind the project. The mission of NYSP is to give children 'the right start' through good nutrition and physical fitness, and that's what we're going to do."

Brian Courts of Huntington said he participated in an NYSP camp at Marshall about 25 years ago when he was 12. The experience, he said, left a lasting impression. He plans to recruit youngsters for this year's program.

"It gave me the opportunity to go on campus and actually interact with some of the athletes," Courts said. "It let me see and know that there's more to life than running the streets. There aren't many chances in the city of Huntington to get instruction on multiple levels. It's not just all sports, it's free and they feed you. It's an excellent program."

Applications for the camp will be available at the Huntington Housing Authority, A.D. Lewis Center, Fairfield East Community Center, schools and libraries throughout the region beginning early next week. Space is limited to 250 and applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-accepted basis. 

Completed applications must be returned to Marshall by Friday, May 27. They should be mailed to NYSP, c/o Marshall Athletics, P.O. Box 1360, Huntington, WV 25715

More information is available by calling Banford at (304) 696-5225 or community liaison Tim White, program coordinator with the Cabell County Youth Empowerment Program, at (304) 522-0576 or (304) 751-6251.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New MURC board of directors appointed by Marshall president

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell has appointed a new 16-member board of directors for the Marshall University Research Corp. (MURC), he said today.

Farrell said participants in a recent external review of MURC suggested the need for objective, experienced outside directors and an increased role for faculty in the research corporation. Following up on that suggestion, Farrell appointed Lloyd Jackson, Paul Hill, Dwight Sherman, David Graley and John Hess to the board.

Jackson is a former state senator from Hamlin, W.Va., Hill is director of West Virginia EPSCoR, Sherman is a retired Union Carbide Corp. researcher, Graley is Bank One Area President and President of the Huntington Area Development Council, and Hess is a member/partner with Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC.

The board, which conducted its first meeting on Friday, April 29, is chaired by Farrell, and Sarah Denman, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, is the vice chair. MU faculty members on the board are Richard Niles, Richard Begley, Michael Castellani and Chuck Somerville.

"Members of this board will be incredibly important to Marshall University today and in the future in structuring and managing the research mission," Farrell said.

Here is a brief look at each of the MURC board of directors:

Officers

Michael J. Farrell, Chair. Farrell has been interim president of Marshall University since Jan. 1, 2005. A distinguished Huntington attorney, he is taking a sabbatical from the law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., to serve as Interim President. He is a 1969 Marshall graduate, earning a Bachelor of Science degree, and former student body president and student senator. He graduated from West Virginia University's College of Law in 1974 with a Doctorate in Jurisprudence. Farrell twice has been appointed to serve on Marshall's Board of Governors.

Sarah Denman, Vice Chair. Denman has been Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall University since 1999. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall. She joined Marshall's Community and Technical College staff in 1975 as coordinator of the communication program and associate professor. From 1988 to 1991, Denman was associate dean of the Community College. She has served on numerous university and statewide committees/task forces.

F. Layton Cottrill, Jr., Secretary. Cottrill is Chief of Staff, General Counsel and Vice President for Executive Affairs at Marshall University. An attorney, he came to Marshall in 1989 from the state system of higher education where he served as chief legal advisor to the governing board. He received his bachelor's and doctor of jurisprudence degrees from West Virginia University.

Outside Directors

Lloyd Jackson, a Hamlin resident, served 12 years in the State Senate, eight of those as chair of the Education Committee.  In that position, he helped write many pieces of higher education legislation, including the most recent amendments to the research corporation law.  Jackson is a graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law and is the CEO of his family's natural gas production business. He also serves as a trustee of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

Paul Hill is State Director for the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (WV EPSCoR). He has more than 20 years combined experience in environmental research, policy and public administration, management and communication activities applied to complex scientific issues and constituencies in both the public and private sector. A native West Virginian, he holds degrees from Marshall University (B.S. and M.S.) and the University of Louisville (Ph.D.) in biology and chemistry.

Dwight Sherman, a South Charleston, W.Va., resident, is retired from Union Carbide Corporation, where he served several research and management assignments during his 33-year career (1968-2001). His key interests while at Union Carbide included active leadership in educational programs sponsored by Dow/Union Carbide and in advancing economic development in West Virginia.

David A. Graley has been with Bank One for 30 years and currently serves as its Area President. He has been very involved in civic and economic development activities in the Huntington area and was awarded the 2004 Volunteer of the Year by the West Virginia Economic Development Council. Graley currently serves on several boards, including HADCO as its chair, Biotech Alliance, Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Marshall University Lewis College of Business.

John G. Hess, a Barboursville resident, is a member/partner with Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC, with offices in Huntington, Beckley and Oak Hill. He formed the business in 1985 with two partners and six employees. Hess is a 1973 graduate of Marshall University with a BBA in accounting. He is a member of the Marshall University Board of Governors, and past president of the Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

Faculty

Richard M. Niles, professor and chair of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, is associate dean for Research and Graduate Education in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  He also is director of the recently funded $9.3 million Center for Biomedical Research Excellence grant from the NIH.  Niles came to Marshall in 1992 after 18 years on the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine.

Richard Begley has been a professor in engineering at Marshall since 1990. He also has served as chair of the engineering department, assistant dean for Outreach and Special Programs of the Graduate School of Information Technology and Engineering and Interim Director of the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute. He has helped to develop externally funded research partnerships with several institutions in America, Europe, Canada and Mexico in addition to private sector corporations.

Michael Castellani, a professor of chemistry, has been a faculty member at Marshall University since 1988.  He is a member of the legislative body of the Council on Undergraduate Research, was a 2001 Camille and Henry Dreyfus Scholar, and co-chairs the West Virginia Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol event.  He is an active researcher who has been awarded more than $350,000 in external support for his work and published nine research papers while at Marshall, seven with student coauthors.

Chuck Somerville is an associate professor of Biological Sciences and has been a faculty member at Marshall University since 1997.  He earned his B.S. in Microbiology from Penn State in 1978 and his Ph.D. in Marine Microbiology from the University of Maryland in 1989.  He has conducted environmental research at the USEPA laboratory in Gulf Breeze, Fla., and at the US Air Force laboratory in Panama City, Fla.   

 

Administrators

Howard Aulick is the Vice President for Research and Interim Director of IDEA (Institute for the Development of Entrepreneurial Advances). He received his Ph.D. in physiology at Indiana University in 1974 and came to Marshall in 1984 to join the School of Medicine faculty. 

Betsy Ennis Dulin, a Charleston resident, is dean of Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering.  She is a graduate of WVU Institute of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Washington and Lee University, with degrees in Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Law.  She is a registered professional engineer in West Virginia, and licensed to practice law in Ohio and West Virginia. 

Herb Karlet, who lives in South Point, Ohio, graduated from Marshall University in 1972 with a BBA in Accounting, and in 1975 became a CPA. He earned his MBA from Lynchburg (Va.) College in 1980. At Marshall, Karlet has served higher education the past 24 years as a professor of accounting, Director of Audits, Vice President for Finance, and in his currently position of Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration.

Charlotte N. Weber is Vice President for Federal Programs at Marshall University and director and CEO of the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. She has been with Marshall University since 1993.   Prior to joining Marshall, Weber worked for United States Senator Robert C. Byrd in Washington, D.C. She earned her degree in 1986 from George Washington University. Weber serves and holds key leadership positions on numerous boards across West Virginia.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Clair Matz Study Abroad Scholarship winners named at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for International Programs, College of Liberal Arts (COLA) and the Study Abroad Student Association (SASA) have named the winners of the Clair Matz Study Abroad Scholarship for 2005-06.  They are:

  • Mia McDonald, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, to Aalborg University, Denmark through the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP)
  • Sijia "Scarlett" Ma, COLA, International Affairs, to Kansai Gaidai University, Japan
  • Brandy Artrip, COLA, Modern Language and Criminal Justice, to Universidad Antonio de Nebrija, Spain

The winners were selected by competition and will each be awarded $500 to defray the costs of international airfare. The Study Abroad Student Association's elected officers determine recipients of the awards.

The selection was based on participation in SASA activities and anonymous essays, including one that asks the student to outline new and creative things they will bring to the association upon their return from study abroad. Matz Scholars also are encouraged to serve as SASA officers upon their return. 

The Matz Study Abroad Scholarship is named in memory of Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, who served as a member of the Marshall faculty from 1970 until his death in 2003. Matz established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

Individuals who supported this year's Matz Scholarship will be recognized at the first International Education Award Ceremony, which takes place at 3:30 p.m. Friday, May 6 on Buskirk Field during the second annual International Student Graduation Picnic. The picnic and ceremony are open to all Marshall faculty, staff and students. 

Contributions to the Dr. Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Grant Fund can be made by check payable to: The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755.

For  more information, persons may contact Clark Egnor, Executive Director, Center for International Programs (320 Old Main), at egnor3@marshall.edu. Or, they may visit www.marshall.edu/cip/studyabroad/matz.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall names Uselding Lewis College of Business dean

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Paul J. Uselding, dean the past six years of the College of Business and Management at Saginaw Valley State University in University Center, Mich., is the new dean of Marshall University's Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business, MU Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today.

Uselding assumes his duties at Marshall on July 1, 2005. He replaces Dr. Chong Kim, who has been serving as interim dean since September 2003. Kim replaced Dr. Cal Kent, who served as dean of the college for 10 years before resigning.

"Dr. Uselding possesses a wealth of experience that will benefit the students and faculty," Farrell said.

Uselding assisted the College of Business and Management at Saginaw Valley State University in attaining initial accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), which was accomplished in April 2003.

"Dr. Uselding brings wonderful experience and expertise to the leadership role of the Lewis College of Business," Dr. Sarah N. Denman, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said. "I look forward to working with him."

Prior to serving at SVSU, Uselding held deanships at the University of Illinois-Chicago (1992-1997), University of Toledo (1990-1992) and the University of Northern Iowa (1987-1990).

"Dr. Uselding has 18 years of experience as a business college dean and a national reputation in his field, including having served as the editor of The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance," Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts and chair of the search committee, said. "He has extensive experience in building new programs, including those in entrepreneurship and in family business, and he is committed to community outreach and partnerships with the local business community."

Uselding described his new position at Marshall as "a great opportunity."

"First and foremost they are wonderful people in the business school at Marshall," Uselding said. "I had very positive experiences in dealing with the search committee and its chair (Dr. Murphy). It's a beautiful community and Marshall is a well-known institution, visible in the higher education community. The people there are focused and professional."

Uselding received his Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University in 1961, his Master of Business Administration from Cornell University in 1963, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University in 1970.

At Saginaw, Uselding's primary responsibilities involved creating process, practices and procedures to comply with each and every standard of AACSB accreditation and to instill accreditation awareness in a faculty of 27. He also created a multi-stakeholder derived mission for the College that, among other things, seeks to connect the College to the business community, emphasize small/medium size enterprise, and focus on the growing importance of international operations and globalization for firms in the region.

Two of Uselding's additional accomplishments include establishing a family business program and securing endowment funds for its operations, creating an educational partnership with area businesses, and instituting a quarterly "Dean's Dinner" forum to bring faculty and area business executives together in an informal setting.

"We are very excited about the ideas and energy he will bring to the Lewis College of Business in building upon the college's strengths to advance its potential," Murphy said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 3, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

International Music Fraternity Reactivates Chapter at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Twelve new members were initiated into Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity at Marshall University Sunday, May 1, thereby reactivating the university's chapter.

"We are always pleased when one of our long-standing chapters gets a new lease on life," said Dr. Jonny Ramsey of Denton, Tex., the international president of the fraternity. "I know these new members are looking forward to being collegiate members of Delta Omicron."

New Delta Omicron members, all undergraduates at Marshall University, are Minna Aminzadeh from Carrollton, Tex., Melanie Baldwin from Westerville, Ohio; Jessica Bethel from Circleville, Ohio; Angela Crum, from Union, W. Va.; Deanna Holderby, from Proctorville, Ohio; Amy Holliday, from New Martinsville, W. Va.; Callie Huff,  from Chesapeake, Ohio; Holly Linn, from Huntington, W.Va.; Meredith McCoy, from Scottown, Ohio; Christina Riley, from Union, W. Va.; Ashli Spinks, from Lewisburg, W.Va.; and Nikki Winter, from Logan, W.Va.

The group is advised by Dr. Vicki Stroeher, a music faculty member at Marshall and an alumna member of Delta Omicron.  Assisting Stroeher with the formal, members-only initiation ceremony were Susan Tams, treasurer of the Delta Omicron Foundation Inc., and a staff member at Marshall; Beverly Miller, Patricia Green, and Harriet Tucker, all of Huntington, W. Va.; and Lee Ann Lykens of Beckley, W.Va.

After the ceremony, several of the new members performed short musical numbers, including a flute duet and solo, saxophone trio, and a trumpet duet.

Delta Omicron is a professional fraternity in the field of music with collegiate chapters established throughout the United States and abroad. The fraternity was founded in 1909 at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music by three undergraduate students.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fors murals to be restored at Marshall University; community invited to watch conservator Michael Ruzga work

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thanks to the conservation work of nationally recognized Cincinnati conservator Michael Ruzga, the art of Marion Vest Fors will be displayed once again at Marshall University.

And, on May 10 and 11, people will have the chance to eat a box-lunch with Ruzga and watch him work on the Fors murals, which ultimately will be housed on the renovated second floor of the James E. Morrow Library on MU's Huntington campus.

Former MU faculty member Marion Vest Fors painted three murals for Marshall's bi-centennial in 1937.  They represent Marshall University, West Virginia Literature, and American Literature. The three panels were hung in the Morrow Library reading room during the university's centennial celebration.

During a renovation in the early 1960s, the murals were taken down from the wall and packed away in cold storage. Although in reasonably good condition now, there are extensive pinpoint losses in the paintings and a moderate layer of grime and debris has accumulated. Library Associates at Marshall have been eager to restore the paintings to their former glory and to display these representations of the history of learning and literature in early-20th century America.

Helen Chambers Hensley, picked by then-Marshall College President James Allen to exemplify the alma mater of Marshall in two of the murals, will be celebrating her 90th birthday in May. Mrs. Hensley is in excellent health and is actively assisting in efforts to raise funds for mural restoration.  Mrs. Hensley will be in attendance at the "Lunch with the Conservator" on May 10.

More than one-third of the funds needed have been raised so that Ruzga can complete restoration of the first panel, entitled "Marshall University," in May.

"The craftsmanship of the murals, as well as Mrs. Fors' techniques, is of high quality," Ruzga has noted. He has worked on a number of similar projects, including the 2001 restoration of murals in the University of Cincinnati's Engineering Library in Baldwin Hall and the 2002 restoration of a group of 19th century paintings at Cincinnati's St. Michael's Catholic Church.

Ruzga is the former Chief Conservator of the Taft Museum of Art.  Paintings he has treated include Rembrandt, Renior, Sargent, Bouguereau, Gerome, Ingres, Claude Lorrain and many others.  He has been Director and Chief Conservator of Fine Arts Conservation for more than 15 years.

Interested community members may purchase a brown-bag lunch on-site and meet Ruzga from noon to 1:30 p.m. on either Tuesday, May 10, or Wednesday, May 11.  Ruzga will discuss his work and describe the restoration process. Persons are asked to RSVP to Pamela Ford at (304) 696-2312.  Space is necessarily limited to 20 attendees for each date.

For more information, persons may contact Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall University Libraries, at (304) 696-2318


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU hooding ceremonies planned this week in Charleston, Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hooding ceremonies to honor Marshall University's master's and doctoral degree recipients take place in Charleston and Huntington this week on separate days prior to Marshall's 168th commencement on Saturday, May 7.

The Charleston ceremony begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 4 at the Charleston Municipal Auditorium.  In Huntington, the ceremony is set for 7 p.m. Friday, May 6 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.  More than 350 graduates are expected to attend the two ceremonies. 

Each graduate will be recognized individually when a faculty member presents a hood in a color indicative of the recipient's field of study.

In addition, two faculty members will be honored with the Ashland Inc. Outstanding Graduate Advising Awards:  Dr. Cheryl Brown, Huntington campus, and Dr. Eldon Larsen, South Charleston campus.

Brown, an associate professor of political science, is known for her commitment to guiding students through graduate programs, her helpfulness to them and for encouraging them to strive for excellence and to provide leadership in their chosen fields.

Larson, a professor of engineering, has been lauded for his availability to students, his encouragement to them and for challenging his students to not only learn the material being taught in Marshall courses but to apply it on both personal and professional levels outside the university.

In addition, a Distinguished Graduate Student Alumnus Award will be given on each campus.  Dr. Bernard Queen, who received both bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University, will be honored at the Huntington ceremony.  Paul A. Mattox, Jr., who received an undergraduate degree from West Virginia Tech (now WVU Institute of Technology) and completed an M.S. in Engineering at the MU Graduate College, will receive the award for the South Charleston Campus.

Queen, who served in Naval Intelligence during World War II, was a classroom teacher and later superintendent of Wayne County schools.   He came to Marshall University as a faculty member in 1963 and became chair of the Department of Curriculum and Foundations in 1968.  He served as dean of the College of Education between 1974 and 1977 and subsequently became director of Development and executive director of the Marshall University Foundation.

Under his leadership, assets rose from less than one $1 million to $5.6 million and three distinguished chairs were established.  In memory of his wife, Lamina, who died last year, Queen has established an endowed scholarship for graduate students, the Lamina Faye Maynard Queen Memorial Graduate Research Scholarship.

A professional engineer registered in five states, Mattox recently was appointed Commissioner of Highways by Gov. Joe Manchin.  Mattox worked with the Department of Highways' Construction and Maintenance Division until 1987 and later joined Woolpert, LLP, a nationwide engineering consultant firm. He served as director of the Charleston office until 1998.  That year he became general manager of E.L. Robinson, a West Virginia consultant firm.

Under his leadership, E.L. Robinson became the largest civil engineering firm in the state with 80 employees in five West Virginia and two Ohio offices. Mattox has had extensive experience in projects for highways, bridges and water systems as well as economic development ventures.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Gov. Manchin to speak at Marshall's commencement on May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III will be the keynote speaker at Marshall University's 2005 Commencement at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 7, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Marshall will be granting 2,863 degrees, the largest number in school history.

Manchin, along with two others, also will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degree during the ceremony. The other honorary degree recipients are Joanne Jaeger Tomblin, president of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, and Atlanta banker Richard D. Jackson.

The addition of Manchin, Tomblin and Jackson brings to 155 the number of Marshall's honorary degree recipients. 

"Governor Manchin has been selected as the commencement speaker and recipient of an honorary degree because of his unparalleled leadership during the first 100 days of his administration," Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell said. "Marshall University is proud to honor one of West Virginia's most outstanding governors during his first year in office."

Farrell also praised Tomblin and Jackson for their accomplishments since graduating from Marshall.

"President Joanne Tomblin has exceeded all expectations in her leadership at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College," Farrell said. "Marshall University is proud to present an honorary degree to her because of these accomplishments and her distinguished status as one of our alumni.

"Richard Jackson is a distinguished alumnus whose banking, military and writing careers have reflected great honor upon Marshall University. His service as a member of the Yeager Scholars Board of Directors and of the Marshall University Alumni Association continue his long-standing contribution to the university."

Here is a brief look at each honorary degree recipient:

Joe Manchin III

Born and raised in the small coal town of Farmington in Marion County, Manchin's dream was to play football in the National Football League. His athletic skills won him a scholarship to West Virginia University but after a career-ending knee injury he realized he needed to get an education if he wanted to improve his life and provide for his family. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration from West Virginia University in 1970.

After graduation, Manchin returned to Marion County where he became head of a family-owned carpet business.  Later he was the owner of a privately held natural resources company.

He began his career as a public servant with his election to the House of Delegates in 1982.  In 1986, he won a seat in the West Virginia State Senate, winning re-election in 1988 and l992.  He was elected Secretary of State in 2000 and through his Saving History And Reaching Every Student (SHARES) program, his office promoted democracy to schoolchildren and registered 42,000 high school students to vote. 

As a member of the Legislature from 1982 to 1996, he earned a reputation for standing up for West Virginians to improve schools, protect veterans and senior citizens and create jobs.

Joanne Jaeger Tomblin

Tomblin, a transplanted New Yorker, brims with enthusiasm, not only for Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, but for the state she's called home since coming to West Virginia as an undergraduate. She is one of the state's biggest boosters, a proud one-woman Chamber of Commerce touting West Virginia's natural assets, especially its people.

After receiving two degrees from Marshall University, Tomblin had a successful career in television news reporting before moving to Southern West Virginia, where she contributed her multi-faceted talents to agencies working for the betterment of people in that area.  She joined the Southern West Virginia CTC staff in 1981, and soon became an integral part of that institution, holding a variety of positions. The college she championed so enthusiastically and loyally and served so faithfully named her its president in November 1999.   

Richard D. Jackson

Jackson is a 1959 graduate of Marshall, where he played basketball and football, and ran on the track team. He is chairman of the board of Atlanta-based ebank Financial Services, Inc., and a director of Schweitzer-Maudit International, Inc., also headquartered in Atlanta. Previously, he held the positions of president and chief executive officer of two banks in Atlanta.

Jackson served in the United States Marine Corps for eight years and was awarded the Silver and Bronze Stars and Vietnam Cross of Gallantry for action in Vietnam. He has written three books, including his most recent publication titled, "Too Stupid to Quit - Banking and Business Lessons Learned the Hard Way," which is used for textbook reference in Marshall's Lewis College of Business. He also wrote "Yesterdays are Forever, a Rite of Passage through the Marine Corps and Vietnam War," and "The Last Fast White Boy," a story on athletics at Marshall in the 1950s.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Alcon VP to speak at Marshall CTC commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alan Modliszewski, Vice President and General Manager of Alcon Laboratories, Inc., in Huntington, will be the keynote speaker at the Marshall Community and Technical College's graduation next week.

The commencement begins at 7 p.m. Friday, May 6 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. The CTC will award 295 degrees.

Alcon Laboratories, Inc. is the world leader in ophthalmic pharmaceuticals and medical devices, and Alcon Huntington leads the world in developing and manufacturing Intraocular and Refractive Lenses.

With more than 30 years experience in pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing, Modliszewski has increased sales volume exponentially in his 15 years with the Huntington-based company.

 He is an originating member of the Marshall Community and Technical College Board of Advisors, established in 2002 to support the separation and growth of the new institution.   Marshall Community and Technical College currently enrolls an average of 2,400 students in certificate and associate degree programs and an additional 3,000 participants in workforce training and development activities.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Record number of students to graduate from Marshall on May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will award a record high 2,863 degrees during its 168th Commencement Saturday, May 7 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The previous record number of graduates was 2,773 in 2004.

In addition to the record number of graduates, a record high 632 Marshall students are graduating with honors, and 16 students - another record - are graduating with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Commencement begins at 10 a.m.

"This is a reflection of the quality of the faculty, educational programs and students at Marshall University," Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said. "Everyone is dedicated to one goal - to see students graduate and be successful in their lives."

The graduating 4.0 students are:

Sarah Beth Barber of Cincinnati; Aaron Matthew Blackshire of St. Albans, W.Va.; Andrew Robert Burk of Wheelersburg, Ohio; Ann E. Capper of Proctorville, Ohio; Sarah Beth Childers of Huntington; Samer Samir Hodroge of Charleston, W.Va.; Carrie D. Holland of Huntington; Arysta Nichelle McGill of Point Pleasant, W.Va.;

Ashley Dawn Meek of Franklin Furnace, Ohio; Nora Leigh Shalaway of Cameron, W.Va.; Nicholas Ryan Slate of Charleston, W.Va.; Wendi Marie Sparks of Chesapeake, Ohio; Ashley K. Stover of Given, W.Va.; Jessica Lynn Taylor of Whitesville, W.Va.; Stacy Lee Wickline of Fayetteville, W.Va., and David Andrew Woods of Kenova, W.Va.

Seventy-six students are graduating summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA) and 168 are graduating magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA). Also, 264 are graduating cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Thirty-four students are graduating with high honors (3.7 to 4.0 GPA) from the Marshall Community and Technical College, and 90 are graduating with honors (3.3 to 3.69 GPA) from MCTC.

Because parking is limited near the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, Marshall is providing shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena for commencement. People are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, the Welcome Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and in F Lot across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall.

Shuttle service begins at 8:45 a.m. and occurs in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus. At the conclusion of ceremonies for the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Health Professions, which start after commencement at the arena, the shuttle service will return attendees to campus.

The following is a list of commencement-related events centering around Marshall's commencement:

May 4 - 7 p.m. Charleston Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Charleston Municipal Auditorium

May 5 - 7 p.m., School of Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 6 - 4 p.m., Communication Disorders graduate reception, Smith Hall Atrium

May 6 - 3 p.m., Center for International Students Programs graduation picnic, reception, and awards ceremony, Buskirk Field

May 6 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community & Technical College graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

May 6 - 7 p.m., Huntington Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 6 - 7 p.m., School of Medicine Doctoral Investiture Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse; U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is the featured speaker.

May 6 - 7 p.m., St. Mary's Nursing graduation, Highlawn Church

May 7 - 10 a.m., Marshall University's 168th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - Noon, College of Health Professions graduation, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Fine Arts Graduation Brunch, Palms Room of the Touma Building

May 7 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism graduation ceremony, Smith Hall Atrium

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

May 7 - 2 p.m., School of Extended Education graduation ceremony, Harless Dining Hall

May 7 - 3 p.m., College of Education and Human Services graduation ceremony, Huntington City Hall Auditorium

May 15 - 2 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center Nursing reception, MOVC in Point Pleasant


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Early Education Center Art Show and Auction is May 2-6 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fifty paintings by children enrolled in the Marshall University Early Education Center preschool program will be on display May 2-6 on the second floor of MU's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The display is part of the Early Education Center Art Show and Auction, which gives the children a creative outlet for expression and allows them the opportunity to visually represent learning experiences. It also better acquaints the community, which is encouraged to view the paintings, with the goals and philosophy of the Early Education Center through demonstration of child-centered curriculum showcased in the children's artwork.

The artwork reflects various projects the children have completed over the past year related to Appalachia and transportation. Other themes will reflect their projects in woodworking, geology and terrariums, and with pet hamsters.

"An event such as this really opens the door for not only the campus community, but the Huntington community to view the outcomes of quality early childhood experiences," EEC Director Clayton Burch said. "It's a great feeling to be part of an early childhood organization that places such emphasis on children's self-expression, creativity and competencies."

Lori Vovk, lead teacher for the center, said she is looking forward to a successful art show. She commends the pride and hard work the children put into the paintings.

"For many children, painting on canvases is simply a sensory experience," Vovk said. "However, for others, it is something they put a lot of thought into. They take time considering what they want to create and how they want to create it. What a great opportunity for children to develop a strong sense of pride in themselves and their accomplishments!"

A silent auction fundraiser runs throughout the duration of the art show. Last year the art show raised more than $1,000 for the center. The money helps the school take field trips and complete projects such as the study of bridges, the trucking industry and mapping. The children even helped construct a small house that stands on the center's playground.

The art show begins from noon to 2 p.m. Monday, May 2. At that time attendees may view the artwork and begin placing bids on sheets next to the individual pieces. An informal open house runs from 11 to 2 p.m. May 3-4, and a grand viewing runs from 5 to 7 p.m. May 4.  The grand viewing features jazz pianist Jared Pauley, and light refreshments and hors d'oeuvres will be offered.

Marshall's Early Education Center is a preschool laboratory for the College of Education and Human Services. The program promotes the development of social competency, communication abilities, feelings of self worth and independence.

For more information on the art show and auction, persons may contact Zak Richards with the center at (304) 696-6301.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall interim president to be honored Thursday during West Virginia Bar Foundation Fellows Dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell is one of 18 lawyers and judges who will be honored Thursday, April 28, during the West Virginia Bar Foundation's seventh annual Foundation Fellows Dinner at the Marriott Hotel in Charleston.

The dinner, which begins with a reception at 6:30 p.m., honors those lawyers and members of the judiciary whose professional, public and private careers have demonstrated outstanding dedication to the welfare of their communities and honorable service to the legal profession, with the individuals selected reflecting the diverse nature of the legal profession in West Virginia.

The Foundation Fellows Program was initiated in 1999, and about 100 judges and attorneys have been selected as Foundation Fellows.

Farrell assumed the position of interim president at Marshall on Jan. 1, 2005, after agreeing to take a sabbatical from the Huntington law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., of which he has been an attorney since 1995.

"I am humbled to have been selected as a Foundation Fellow, along with my accomplished colleagues," Farrell said. "I look forward to the dinner and joining with these outstanding men and women in celebrating this wonderful honor."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall graduate student Vince Payne named sportscaster of the year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate student Vince Payne of Hansford, W.Va., was named the college radio sportscaster of the year during the Third Annual Broadcast Educators Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition Ceremony April 21 in Las Vegas.

Christina Riffle, a recent Marshall graduate from Dunbar, W.Va., took third place in the Audio Educational Program category. The work entered by both Payne and Riffle was aired in 2004 on Marshall's public radio station, WMUL-FM.  

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

"Vince Payne has received the ultimate compliment for his on-air work at WMUL-FM by being named the college radio sportscaster of the year and it is a significant accomplishment for Christina Riffle to place third with her documentary about same-gender marriage," Bailey said.

"Winning never comes easy, but for Marshall University, the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities and these accomplishments are validations of the quality broadcasting program available through the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.  This high honor for Vince is well-deserved.  I am excited about the prospects for his professional future."

Broadcast Educators Association (BEA) has more than 1,400 academic and professional members and 250 academic institutional members.  It was founded in 1955, and its mission is to prepare college students to enter the radio and television business. Its members share a diversity of interests involving all aspects of telecommunication and electronic media.

Payne's first-place award winning entry in production was: College Radio Sportscaster -

"Student Sportscaster Compilation." Riffle's third-place award winning entry in production was: Audio Educational Program - "The Fight for Right: Same-Gender Marriage in America."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Defense Department research grant goes to Marshall chemistry professor for work in next generation computer circuit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael L. Norton, professor of chemistry at Marshall University, has been awarded a major three-year grant totaling more than $500,000 from the highly competitive Defense Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DEPSCoR) for his work on nanotechnology with DNA.

Norton's proposal, "Directed Sequential Assembly Via DNA Based Nanostructures," was one of five proposals submitted to DEPSCoR from West Virginia and was the only one from the state selected for funding.

The Defense EPSCoR program is designed to stimulate defense related research in states that traditionally have not been large recipients of Department of Defense research awards. Only 27 projects were competitively selected this year from 108 in 22 states.

"I celebrate this great news for Dr. Norton and Marshall University," said United States Senator Robert C. Byrd. "Once again, West Virginia's academic research community proves to be at the national forefront. This grant recognizes not only Dr. Norton's intellectual excellence but also his ability to inspire students to greater achievement."

"As evident by his success with this DEPSCoR award, Mike Norton is one of our brightest research stars," Dr. Howard Aulick, Vice President for Research at Marshall University, said.  "He is one with a real passion for undergraduate research and most of his projects have real potential for economic development.  Students who study with Dr. Norton are exposed to very sophisticated technologies, pioneering concepts and the excitement of discovery."

To explain the complex nature of his work, Dr. Norton likens it to the planning of a garden.  "Most people know how they want to arrange their gardens, lots of roses here, groups of petunias there," he said.  "In certain ways, images of modern electronic circuits bear a striking resemblance to elaborate gardens in the way they are laid out.

"There are many questions involved in producing the next generation of computers and one of these questions is how to place the component parts where your plan calls for them to be located," he said.

Dr. Norton's research essentially involves producing a tapestry representing an elaborate distribution of electronic blooms. The project involves weaving molecule-sized electron components into a tapestry using threads that are actually strands of DNA.

"You could think of DNA threads as 'smart' threads in that DNA is coded and can be designed to fit together in a lock and key manner," Norton said. "Essentially the threads 'know where to go' and the challenge of the work is to design DNA code and assembly conditions so that the molecules all go to the right places."

"Dr. Norton's meritorious award is a building block for additional research and economic capacity in West Virginia," State Research Executive Director Dr. Paul Hill said in Charleston.  An important effect of the DEPSCoR grant is that it will make possible additional staff to work on the project.

"Although preliminary results have been very promising, making progress in this area requires the efforts of many bright students and technicians.  Currently there are six people working on this project and this grant will add two more scientists to the research group," Norton said.

He relates that noted scientist Eric Drexler indicated in his first book on nanotechnology that it promises to bring changes as profound as the industrial revolution, antibiotics, and nuclear weapons all rolled up in one.

"I believe that he was a pessimist," Norton said.  "Marshall has great students who are already contributing to the evolution of nanotechnology.  With this significant grant, we will definitely bring the contribution of our group to the next level."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Commencement Events

The following is a list of commencement-related events at Marshall University, centering around Marshall's 168th commencement at 10 a.m. May 7  in the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

April 28 - 4 p.m., Donning of Kente, Buskirk Field

May 4 - 7 p.m. Charleston Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Charleston Municipal Auditorium

May 5 - 7 p.m., School of Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 6 - 4 p.m., Communication Disorders graduate reception, Smith Hall Atrium

May 6 - 3 p.m., Center for International Students Programs graduation picnic, reception, and awards ceremony, Buskirk Field

May 6 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community & Technical College graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

May 6 - 7 p.m., Huntington Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 6 - 7 p.m., School of Medicine Doctoral Investiture Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse; Sen. Jay Rockefeller is the featured speaker.

May 6 - 7 p.m., St. Mary's Nursing graduation, Highlawn Church

May 7 - 10 a.m., Marshall University's 168th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - Noon, College of Health Professions graduation, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Fine Arts Graduation Brunch, Palms Room of the Touma Building

May 7 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism graduation ceremony, Smith Hall Atrium

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

May 7 - 2 p.m., School of Extended Education graduation ceremony, Harless Dining Hall

May 7 - 3 p.m., College of Education and Human Services graduation ceremony, Huntington City Hall Auditorium

May 15 - 2 p.m., MOVC Nursing reception, MOVC in Point Pleasant


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bill Scarlett Quintet featured in final Jomie jazz concert series program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Department of Jazz Studies will present the final program of the 2005 JAZZ@JOMIE Concert Series at 8 p.m. Friday, April 29 at the Jomie Jazz Forum. 

This concert, sponsored by the Marshall department of music, the International Association for Jazz Education and the American Federation of Musicians local 362-691, features the Bill Scarlett Quintet from Knoxville, Tenn.

The Jomie Jazz Forum is located on 5th Avenue directly across from Marshall's Memorial Student Center. Admission is $10. Marshall University students will be admitted free.

Featured performers with the Bill Scarlett Quintet are:

Bill Scarlett, saxophonist. He received the Master of Music degree in music theory and clarinet at Louisiana State University, and began his collegiate teaching career at the University of Tennessee in 1957. He was the principal clarinet in the Knoxville Symphony and has many solo and chamber music performances to his credit. During his long career at Tennessee, he taught clarinet, saxophone and music theory, and directed jazz band and jazz history.

Scarlett's jazz credits include performances with Art Pepper, Woody Herman, Carl Fontana, Alan Dawson, Slide Hampton and many others. In 1997, he was named alumnus of the year by the LSU School of Music. He currently is performing with the Donald Brown Quintet and the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra.

Bill Swann, pianist. He is an assistant professor of music at Maryville College where he teaches music theory, aural skills, improvisation and general education courses, and directs the jazz band. He performs regularly with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and various other jazz artists.  He has performed with Bill Mobley, James Moody, Marvin Stamm, Lew Tabakin, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, Don Braden, Percy Sledge, Vincent Herring, Ed Soph, Keith Brown, Rusty Holloway, Vance Thompson, Billy Scarlett, Jim Self, the Knoxville Symphony Pops, Paul McKee, Mark Boling, and Jerry Coker.

Swann released a jazz trio CD Three in 2005 and recorded as a sideman with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, Billy Scarlett, Joe Thompson, and Jim Self from 2000 through 2004.

Taylor Coker, bassist. He recently received the Bachelor of Music in Studio Music and Jazz from the University of Tennessee. While at the university, he studied under the accomplished bassist Rusty Holloway and world-renowned pianist and composer Donald Brown. His education was enhanced by his playing experiences with members of the school's jazz faculty such as Bill Scarlett, Vance Thompson, Mark Boling and Keith Brown, as well as fellow students and other local musicians. Coker teaches private lessons and performs in various venues around Knoxville.

Daryl Johnson, drummer. Born in Memphis, he moved to Knoxville to attend UT. He has performed with an eclectic variety of musicians that include jazz performers Bill Scarlett, Donald Brown and Jason Day; the rock/blues band Jobe, and country artists Robinella and the CC String Band. Other musical endeavors include performances with David "Fathead" Newman, Rocky Wynder, the Grateful Dead, the Jazz Liberation Quartet, Johnny Yancy and Steve Lee. His time is divided between his practice sessions, gigs and teaching.

Vance Thompson, trumpet. He grew up in a musical family in East Tennessee. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Tennessee and a Master of Music degree from DePaul University in Chicago. Thompson is the founder and director of the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and a member of the faculty at the University of Tennessee School of Music.

More information on the concert is available by calling Dr. Ed Bingham, Marshall's director of jazz studies, at (304) 696-2452.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU students to 'Take Back the Night' on April 27

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will address issues of sexual violence during the annual "Take Back the Night March and Rally" Wednesday, April 27, on the Memorial Student Center Plaza.

The event, planned from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., will include an information table fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and live music from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. followed by an empowering and unifying rally, a march, and an inter-faith candlelight vigil.

MU History professor Kat Williams speaks at about 6 p.m., and a march around campus follows at about 6:15 p.m. After the march, Political Science professor Jamie Warner will speak.

All events are free to the public. More information is available by calling Carrie Robey or Rebecca Smith with the Marshall University Women's Studies Student Association at (304) 696-3338.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fain to speak Saturday at Woodson Foundation dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Cicero M. Fain III, currently a Marshall University faculty member through the Carter G. Woodson Faculty Initiative, is the guest speaker Saturday, April 23, at the 13th annual Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation dinner at the Radisson Hotel Huntington.

Tickets for the fundraising event are $25 apiece, and available by calling Newatha Myers at 894-5772. Tickets also will be available at the door. The dinner begins with cocktails and hors d'oeuvres at 6 p.m.

Fain, an assistant professor of history at MU, said he is speaking on the topic, "You Have Gifts that Change Other's Lives: How do you Use Them?" He was a guest of Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell on the television program "Headliners" earlier this year.

The Woodson dinner raises scholarship money for high school and college students.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Concert, tribute dedicated to memory of Dr. Paul Balshaw

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union, Chorus, Chamber Choir and Orchestra will present a special concert dedicated to the memory of Dr. Paul Balshaw, Distinguished Professor of Music at Marshall, at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 23, and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in Smith Recital Hall.

Sunday's concert also will include a tribute to Balshaw, who died Jan. 14, 2005. He had been a Marshall professor since September 1965. Balshaw was the founding dean of the College of Fine Arts and maintained that position from 1984 to 1995. He then returned to the music faculty, working with vocal students and teaching courses in theory, analysis and the graduate music history sequence.  He remained active as a vocal coach and accompanist.

Balshaw was coordinator of graduate studies and director of the Marshall University Orchestra. He also was a violist for the Huntington Symphony Orchestra.

"The events of the past four months have confirmed the enormous impact and influence that Dr. Balshaw had on the arts community," Dr. Marshall Onofrio, chair of the department of music, said. "Not a day goes by that my attention is not drawn to something that involved Dr. Balshaw."

Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell and other university administrators will speak during the tribute. Students, colleagues and friends also will offer reflections.

The department of music also will publicly announce the establishment of the Paul A. Balshaw Orchestral Advancement Fund during the tribute on Sunday. The fund provides support for scholarships and orchestral activities. The original donors for the endowment are Janet Bromley, Sally Carey, Rebecca Lepanto and Dorothy Polan.

College of Fine Arts dean Donald Van Horn said the endowment was started by Balshaw's colleagues when he was alive as a way to honor his work for the department of music.

"Dr. Balshaw was such a respected professor," Van Horn said. "He was truly honored when he found out about the endowment."

A reception will follow the memorial tribute and concert on Sunday. All events are free to the public. For more information, please contact Dr. Onofrio at (304) 696-2710.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Public invited to make comments to NCAA Self-Study Committee

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of an ongoing year-long, campus-wide effort to study its athletic programs, Marshall University is required by the NCAA to invite the public to make comments to the university's NCAA Self-Study Committee.

The self-study focuses solely on certification of athletics programs, and is expected to be finished sometime this summer. Areas covered include academic integrity, governance, rules compliance, as well as a commitment to equity, student-athlete welfare and sportsmanship.

The public may make comments to the NCAA Self-Study Committee by visiting www.marshall.edu/ncaa. Marshall's written plan of study also is available at that Web site.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Popular Indian film songs to be performed Sunday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Internationally renowned musicians Ashok Pandey and Sushil Baweja of India will perform popular Indian film songs from 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, April 24 in Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. Admission is Free.

The event is presented by the Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation, an organization that addresses the need of primary education in the tribal villages of India. The mission of the Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation is to set up one-teacher schools in these tribal villages to raise the literacy rate in rural India. About 16,000 such schools are in operation today and the goal is to have 100,000 by 2011.

The event is sponsored by the India Center (Bharat Kendra) of Charleston, Tri-State India Association, MU Indian Student Association, the MU Center for International Programs and the MU College of Fine Arts. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Donning of Kente celebration, processional is April 28 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs has invited African American graduates from last semester and those who will be graduating in May to the Donning of Kente celebration and processional. The event takes place at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 28 on Buskirk Field at the center of the Huntington campus.

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate.

"We ask our graduates and soon-to-be graduates to wear their Kente cloths with pride and for inspiration," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "We expect that they will embrace the values of family, work, and responsibility that the cloths represent."

Keynote speaker at the event is Wilbert Bryant, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Higher Education Programs, U.S. Dept. of Education, and Counselor to the Secretary for Historical Black Colleges and Universities.

A native of Goulds, Fla., Bryant earned a Bachelor of Science in mathematics from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Army. He went on to earn a Master of Education from Howard University and attended the National War College. A Vietnam veteran and highly decorated officer, Bryant served in the Regular Army nearly 28 years, retiring in 1990 after a distinguished career with the rank of colonel.

African music will be provided by the Marshall Musical Lecture Series Ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center Plaza. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Award winners, retirees to be honored at faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight individuals will be honored by Marshall University with awards of distinction for the 2004-05 academic year during the spring general faculty meeting Thursday, April 21 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Five people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. The meeting starts at 2 p.m., and includes remarks from Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell and Faculty Senate President Larry Stickler.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the administration and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

Each of the Distinguished Service Awards winners receives $1,000. They include:

  • Linda Dobbs, associate professor, 23 years, College of Fine Arts, Music
  • Roger Adkins, professor, 25 years, Lewis College of Business, Finance & Economics
  • Raymond Busbee, professor, 26 years, College of Education and Human Services, Exercise Science Sport & Recreation
  • E. Noel Bowling, professor, 30 years, School of Education and Professional Development, Reading Education
  • David Woodward, professor, 35 years, College of Liberal Arts, History

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, a faculty member either must be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

The 2004-05 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Professor Ashok Vaseashta, senior recipient in the field of Science and Technology, College of Science, Physics.
  • Professor Edwina Pendarvis, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business.
  • Assistant Professor Jennifer Mak, junior recipient among all faculty, College of Education and Human Services, Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation.

Also Thursday, Marshall is recognizing 12 retiring faculty who have a combined 299 years of service. They are:

  • Dr. Allen Arbogast, Geography, 17 years of service;
  • Dr. Joyce E. East, Humanities at Marshall University Graduate College, 15 years of service;
  • Dr. Steven Hatfield, Mathematics, 42 years of service;
  • Gary Jarrett, Sociology and Anthropology, 23 years of service;
  • Dr. Helen Linkey, Psychology, 16 years of service;
  • Dr. Victor Lombardo, Special Education at Marshall University Graduate College, 29 years of service;
  • Dr. Sandra Parker, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 15 years of service
  • Dr. K. Venkata Raman, Surgery, 11 years of service;
  • Dr. Frank S. Riddel, History, 35 years of service;
  • Dr. Michael Seidel, Biological Science, 26 years of service;
  • Dr. Troy Stewart, Jr., Political Science, 32 years of service;
  • Dr. David Stooke, English, 38 years of service.

Dr. Linkey will be recognized posthumously. She died Saturday, April 9.

Other faculty to be honored Thursday are Dr. Mary B. Moore, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Dr. Janet L. Badia, Brian M. Morgan and Dr. Kathie D. Williams, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby follows Thursday's meeting.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Video stream of Snyder news conference available on MU Web site

HUNTINGTON - The news conference Thursday announcing the hiring of Mark Snyder as Marshall University's head football coach is available for viewing on MU's Web site.

To access the news conference, go to www.marshall.edu and click on the "Marshall Names Mark Snyder Head Football Coach" link under the announcements. Then, follow the instructions on how to connect to the video stream.

The news conference took place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday in the Joan C. Edwards Stadium Big Green Room.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall English professor Mary B. Moore named Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2004-05

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mary B. Moore, an associate professor of English in Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, has been named MU's 2004-05 Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner, Frances Hensley, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, announced today.

The Hedrick Award winner receives $5,000, thanks to a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, who planned Marshall's graduate program.

Moore has been teaching at Marshall since August 1995, when she was appointed as an assistant professor. Previously she taught at the University of California, Davis, where she received her Ph.D. in English in 1994.

"Having had the pleasure of observing her teaching, I can say without a doubt that she is a master of thoughtful lesson design, impeccable classroom pacing, the creation of relevant and challenging assignments, and the ability to involve all students in a serious and constructive discourse on the material at hand," MU English professor Art Stringer said. "Her work in and out of the classroom is rigorous, inspiring and student-centered."

In addition to the Hedrick Award, Hensley also announced two other awards honoring four people. Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, an associate professor of mathematics in the College of Science, has been named as the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award winner.

Three professors won the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award. They are Dr. Janet L. Badia, assistant professor of English in the College of Liberal Arts; Brian M. Morgan, assistant professor of Integrated Science & Technology in the College of Science; and Dr. Kathie D. Williams, assistant professor of History in the College of Liberal Arts.

The five award winners will be formally recognized Thursday, April 21, during the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Here is a brief look at the three awards and the five winners.
 

Hedrick Award

The Hedrick Award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Mary B. Moore has been director of the Marshall University English Department Writing Center for the past five years, and trains graduate and undergraduate tutors. Since arriving at Marshall nearly 10 years ago, she has won or been nominated for more than 20 awards.

In her statement of teaching philosophy and practices, Moore said that all of her classes are writing intensive.

"That suits me fine; it ensures that I always structure courses that involve many parts of the brain, the body and the mind, that I made my classroom lived spaces," Moore said. "I too live in those spaces. Teaching expands consciousness, that which is most human, most moral, and most spiritual in us: consciousness."

Moore has developed new courses in English, including English 342 "Women Writers," and English 404, a course on the theories and practice of peer tutoring.

"What is clear in Dr. Moore's teaching and in her scholarship/creative activity is the broad range of areas in which she has extensive accomplishments," said Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

Moore is a published scholar in Renaissance literature with her book on Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism, that was published by Southern Illinois University Press and received much critical acclaim.

MU English professor Dr. Lee Erickson said Moore deserves to be honored and recognized for her service as a teacher, a colleague and an administrator.

"She has proven herself as a critic of Renaissance and women's poetry, and has contributed significantly to Marshall's scholarly reputation," Erickson said. "We are lucky to have her in the English department."
 

Reynolds Award

The Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence has been at Marshall since 2000, first as an assistant professor of mathematics, currently as an associate math professor. Ralph W. Oberste-Vorth, chair of the math department, said Lawrence is one of the university's best math teachers.

"Dr. Lawrence's teaching evaluations are among the very best in the department," Oberste-Vorth said. "She is also active in advising and curriculum review and development. She heads the Mathematics Literacy Committee. She oversees the master's program and is our graduate advisor. In addition, I have heard numerous students sing her praises, including students who failed her course!"

Lawrence has received many awards and grants at Marshall, including the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, junior recipient for excellence in all fields, in spring 2002.

Before coming to Marshall, she taught at the University of South Carolina Beaufort (1996-2000), North Carolina Wesleyan College (1994-1996), the University of Texas at Arlington (1990-1993) and Auburn University (1988-1990).

Fellow math professor David A. Cusick described Lawrence as having "high energy, high quality and great rapport with students."

"She is one of Marshall's very best teachers - highly informed and infectiously enthusiastic," Cusick said. "She is able to intrigue and captivate students at all course levels. Under her guidance, students have traveled to multiple conferences and presented their work to professional audiences, both within the U.S. and abroad."

Lawrence said mathematics has an important calling as a tool for modeling and solving problems.

"There is an intrinsic beauty in the interrelated nature of mathematical concepts," she said. "When an exclamation of 'Wow' or 'Cool' is heard after a rigorous journey through interrelated ideas, the professor guiding the journey knows that he or she has found another kindred spirit."
 

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the instructor/assistant professor rank and who have completed six or fewer years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Hedrick Award winner Mary Moore, after watching assistant professor of English Dr, Janet L. Badia teach, had this observation: "I can assert without hesitation that Janet Badia's professionalism, energy and engagement with all aspects of her profession make her a fine teacher."

Badia has 4.5 years of full-time service at Marshall. History professor Donna J. Spindel based her assessment of Badia on an online English course, "American Literature, 1860 to the Present."

"The course itself is a very good example of what a successful online course should be," Spindel said. "I say this because she allows for a high level of communication/interaction among the students. She actually requires online group discussions. We have found that the most successful online courses draw students out and engage them in the course. This clearly happens in (this course)."

Assistant English professor Sherri C. Smith said Badia has the students' needs in mind when teaching a course.

"I have seen firsthand not only the influence she has had on her students over time, but also the influence she has had on me," Smith said. "Dr. Badia is everything a university could want in a teacher-scholar."

Brian M. Morgan has more than seven years of full-time service at Marshall, including more than four years teaching.

"Even as a youth, I knew that I wanted to become a teacher," Morgan said. In the classroom, making every minute of face-to-face instruction valuable is important, he said.

Marques D. Jones, a Website Administrator with Bloss & Dillard Inc. Insurance Managers, took Morgan's classes during his undergraduate days at Marshall.

"During my undergraduate studies I learned more from Brian Morgan's classes than any other professor at Marshall University," Jones said. "There is no way I can put on paper how much he has helped me and numerous other students within the IST program as a professor and a friend."

Morgan also helps his students outside the classroom. "To be worthwhile," Morgan said, "I make myself available to students outside of class. I have an open-door policy, holding extra office hours, and am available via e-mail. I feel that teaching is more than simply feeding students facts - it is about being there to help them find the answers that will solve problems."

MU student Nicholas Slate, an IST major, said Morgan is by far the most accessible and most approachable teacher he has met at Marshall.

"His classes are examples of how to teach a college class, but more importantly, he challenges students to succeed in the classroom and beyond," Slate said.

Dr. Kathie D. Williams believes that history is much more complicated than outcomes, dates, laws, and names.

"People in the past, just as people today, argued, struggled with their consciences, felt ambivalent, were distracted by their everyday lives, and often believed they were right even when the majority of opinion was stacked against them," Williams said. "My job as a history teacher is to show the past not as a seamless narrative, but as a riotous time where conflict was much more prevalent than consensus."

Last fall, student Jessica Caldwell enrolled in History 581 - her fourth class with Dr. Williams. "There are many reasons why I continue to enroll in her highly-recommended classes, not the least of which is her unique style or methods of teaching," Caldwell said. "I have heard many undergraduates complain that 'history is boring.' However, there is nothing boring about Dr. Williams' classes."

Student Jessica Watkins, too, has taken several of Williams' classes for four years, spanning undergraduate and graduate work.

"Her continual commitment to current knowledge, innovative teaching techniques, and dedication to enhancing the scope of each student's educational experience distinguish Dr. Williams as an exemplary faculty member not just within the History Department, but more importantly, as a shaper of the university as an institution of higher learning," Watkins said.

Williams has been at Marshall for four years.

"Kat is one of the most popular teachers at Marshall University," history professor David Woodward said. "She brings passion and commitment to her classes and has a loyal following."

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's COLA Undergraduate Research & Creativity Conference

Student presentations representing a wide range of intellectual disciplines from within Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, many of which have grown out of senior capstone research, will be featured in next week's fifth annual COLA Undergraduate Research & Creativity Conference at MU.

The conference takes place throughout the day Monday and Tuesday, April 18-19, in the Memorial Student Center and the Drinko Library. It is free to the public, and members of the community are encouraged to attend. A complete schedule of presentations and activities is available at http://www.marshall.edu/libartsconf/sch05.htm.

The purpose of the conference is to showcase the academic and creative talents of the COLA students. Students deliver papers, exhibit posters and present their creative works.

In addition, two keynote addresses are planned. Dr. Jeredith Merrin, of The Ohio State University English department, will deliver a poetry reading entitled "Families" from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday in the student center's Shawkey Room.

Dr. Arthur Zucker, chair of the philosophy department at Ohio University, will deliver the scholarly keynote address entitled "Genetics: New Medicine/New People," from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Shawkey Room.

More information on the conference is available by calling John Young at (304) 696-2349. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall names Mark Snyder head football coach

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Interim President Michael J. Farrell and Director of Athletics Bob Marcum announced the hiring Thursday of Marshall alumnus and Tri-State Area native Mark Snyder as the school's new head football coach during a news conference in the Big Green Room at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"When we played for the national championship in 1987 we could only dream of the heights to which Jim Donnan and Bob Pruett would take the program," Snyder said.  "I have always been proud to have been a part of Marshall's resurgence in football and now I am honored to have the opportunity to return to my alma mater and lead Marshall into a new era.  This is an exciting time for the Thundering Herd family as we move into Conference USA and our football team will not only represent, but serve the University and the Tri-State area well on and off the field.  Our goal is to be the class of college football.

Snyder, who has spent the past four years as an assistant coach under Jim Tressel at Ohio State University, is coming off of his first season as the Buckeyes' defensive coordinator.  In Snyder's four years at Ohio State, the Buckeyes posted a 40-11 overall record and tallied a 3-1 record in bowl games, including victories in the 2003 and 2004 Tostitos Fiesta Bowls.

"Marshall University welcomes home a distinguished alumnus," Farrell said. "Mark Snyder follows the tradition established by Bob Pruett by having demonstrated excellence at Ohio State University, Minnesota and Youngstown State. We are very pleased that he has accepted our offer to be head coach of the Marshall University football team."

Farrell said Snyder's five-year contract will pay him a base salary of $144,200 a year. Additional promotional compensation of about $135,000 and an incentive package of about $197,000 could bring the total package to about $478,000 based in large part upon his coaching success.

Farrell also said Snyder will receive a $50,000 "welcome bonus" from the Thunder Club.

"I am pleased that Mark has decided to return to his alma mater and lead our football program into a new era," Marcum said.  "He brings a great deal of experience, enthusiasm, and a proven record of success at the highest levels of college football with him." 

Snyder helped develop a number of outstanding players at Ohio State, including All-Americans Matt Wilhelm, Cie Grant, and A.J. Hawk.   Both Wilhelm and Grant played key roles in Ohio State's 2002 national championship before going on to become NFL draft picks.  Last season, Hawk led OSU with 141 tackles en route to earning All-America status.

Snyder went to Ohio State from the University of Minnesota, where he spent four years coaching the Golden Gophers' defensive ends.  Prior to Minnesota, he also coached at Marshall, Central Florida and Youngstown State.

The Ironton, Ohio, native was an all-state selection at Ironton High School and played collegiate football at Marshall.  Snyder led the Southern Conference with 10 interceptions and was second on the team with 124 tackles his senior year at Marshall.  He captured honorable mention All-American and first-team All-Southern Conference honors that season as the Thundering Herd posted a 10-5 overall record and finished as national runners-up in the 1987 Division 1-AA National Championship game. 

Snyder graduated from Marshall in the spring of 1988 and started his coaching career the following fall as a student assistant for the Herd.  He went to Central Florida the following year and spent two seasons at UCF, the first as a graduate assistant and the second as a part-time coach working with the linebackers.

In 1991, Snyder joined Tressel's Youngstown State staff as the outside linebackers coach.  Snyder was given the added responsibility of special teams coordinator and inside linebackers coach in 1994 and was promoted to defensive coordinator and secondary coach in 1996.

During his tenure at Youngstown State, the Penguins won three NCAA Division 1-AA national championships and played in four consecutive national championship games, facing Marshall in three of those contests (1991, 1992, and 1993).

Following the 1996 season, Snyder went on to spend four years as the defensive ends coach at Minnesota.  While he was with the Golden Gophers, Minnesota's defense twice set school records for single-season sacks and averaged 40.7 sacks during a three-year span.  While at Minnesota, Snyder helped develop Lamanzer Williams, who led the nation in sacks in 1997 and Karon Riley, the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year in 2000. 

Mark and his wife Beth, who also is a native of Ironton and a graduate of the University of Kentucky, have three daughters: Chelsea, 12, Lindsay, 11, and Shaylee, 4.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's COEHS awarded continuing accreditation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services has been awarded continuing accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), interim dean Dr. Tony Williams announced today.

Williams said the accreditation, which ensures the public that schools of education are graduating well-qualified teachers ready for today's classrooms, continues through 2009. A four-person accreditation team was on Marshall's campus Oct. 23-27, 2004 to conduct interviews, review data and observe the COEHS in action. 

The college met each of the six performance-based standards, established in 2001 by NCATE to help insure highly qualified teachers will staff the nation's schools.

"Our excellent report evidences the quality of our programs in the production of teachers and other school-related personnel at Marshall University," Williams said. "We knew we were doing a good job, but this external evaluation says, 'Yes, you are doing an excellent job.' "

The College of Education and Human Services at Marshall has nearly 4,000 graduate and undergraduate students and provides about 40 programs for all types of education majors.

NCATE President Arthur E. Wise notified Marshall that the Unit Accreditation Board's decision to continue the accreditation is at both the undergraduate and graduate level. "This accreditation decision indicates that the unit and its programs meet rigorous standards set forth by the professional education community," Wise said.

In its overall assessment of Marshall, the board said collaboration between Marshall and its school partners "is commendable in the design, implementation and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice. Upon completion of the selected program, it is well documented both by data and anecdotal responses that the Marshall graduate demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help candidates learn."

The six performance-based standards the College of Education and Human Services met are:

  • Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions
  • Standard 2: Assessment and Evaluation
  • Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
  • Standard 4: Diversity
  • Standard 5: Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
  • Standard 6: Resources and Governance

The assessment also said it is evident that collaboration between Marshall University and its public school partners is exemplary. COEHS Associate Dean Jane McKee praised everyone who participated in the accreditation process.

"I feel it's really important to understand the entire university was part of this process, along with the community and the public schools," McKee said. "We have cohorts all over the state. In the College of Education and Human Services, every single person worked so hard. It was definitely a team effort."

School of Education chair Carl Johnson said the report from NCATE is the best Marshall has received "by far" in his 30 years at MU.

"In general, it has been become more difficult to meet the NCATE Standards and for us to receive an excellent report from NCATE speaks volumes about our excellent programs, faculty, and staff in the College of Education and Human Services," Johnson said. "Since Marshall merged with the (West Virginia) Graduate College we have worked through several issues which have made both campuses stronger and better."

The U.S. Department of Education recognizes NCATE as a specialized accrediting body for schools, colleges and departments of education.  NCATE currently accredits 602 institutions which produce two-thirds of the nation's new teacher graduates every year. McKee said all West Virginia institutions must be NCATE accredited.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

News conference set for Thursday in stadium Big Green Room

HUNTINGTON, W.Va - A news conference to introduce Marshall University's next head football coach will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 14, in the Big Green Room at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

All media are welcome and encouraged to attend this important event.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Creating a Tolerant Workplace' topic of panel discussion at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Julie Gedro, an activist and scholar, will lead a panel discussion on "Creating a Tolerant Workplace" on Wednesday, April 13, at Marshall University.

Gedro's visit is in conjunction with the annual Spring Job Fest at MU, and is sponsored by the Marshall University Commission on Multiculturalism and the subcommittee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) issues.

The panel discussion, which is free to the public, is from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge on the Memorial Student Center's second floor.

Other panelists include Bruce Goff, Vice President/Administration with Steel of West Virginia; David Harris, director of equity programs and associate director of human resources at Marshall University; and Huntington Mayor David Felinton.

Panelists will discuss legal issues concerning LGBT individuals in professional and workplace situations.

Gedro, an assistant professor at Empire State College in New York, is the author of many publications, including her doctoral dissertation in 2000 at the University of Georgia titled, Urban Cowgirls: How Lesbians Have Learned to Negotiate the Heterosexism of Corporate America.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Arts and Crafts Fair benefits Marshall University Library

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Buy a handmade craft or artwork and help the Marshall University Library - that's the opportunity being offered at the First Marshall University Arts and Crafts Fair that takes place Saturday, April 16, during Alumni Weekend.

More than 30 people are offering their work in the Memorial Student Center lobby between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. that day with 10 percent of the proceeds going to purchase materials for the University Library.

The offerings range from quilts to aprons, candles to wooden baskets, herbs to Italian charms, fudge to custom designed scrapbooks, watercolors to stained glass, along with an assortment of dolls, gemstone jewelry, picture frames, soaps and lotions, and a wide array of other handcrafted items.

Crafters from the Tri-State and Marshall communities, including employees, alumni and friends, will be represented at the fair.

"We've had a wonderful response," said Dr. Lynne Welch, professor of nursing and dean of the College of Health Professions, who came up with the idea of the fundraising fair.  "There are so many talented people at Marshall and in the community.  We're very happy to have them be a part of the fair."

Rising costs for library materials, coupled with a flat budget, have made it difficult for the University Library to meet the research needs of Marshall faculty and students, Welch said.   The Library Associates, a group which supports the mission of the Libraries, is sponsoring the arts and crafts fair as a way to help increase the funds available for materials.

All sales will be for cash only.  An ATM is available at the Memorial Student Center.  For more information, contact Welch at (304) 696-2626, or at welch@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Closing of 3rd Avenue near biotechnology center planned this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A portion of Huntington's 3rd Avenue will be closed beginning 10 p.m. Saturday, April 9, through midnight Sunday, April 10, to allow for construction of an overhead pedestrian walkway from Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center to the Science Building.

Mike Meadows, Marshall's director of facilities planning and management, said the four-block area from Hal Greer Boulevard to 20th Street will be closed.

Plans to close 3rd Avenue to install the walkway have been canceled twice in the past few weeks because delivery of the steel was delayed. The steel has arrived, Meadows said, and this time the installation will take place as planned, beginning Saturday evening.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Spring Job Fest planned April 13 at Marshall University

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Career Services Center and the Information Technology Career Advancement Program (ITCAP) will be host to the annual Spring Job Fest Wednesday, April 13, on MU's Huntington campus.

The event takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It is designed specifically to encompass all Marshall students in all majors.

MU students and alumni seeking full-time, part-time and internship positions are encouraged to participate. The fair gives students the opportunity to meet and network with numerous companies in one location.

Alyson Doyle, Public Relations/Marketing Assistant with the Career Services Center, said even students not currently searching for a job are encouraged to attend the fair to take advantage of the networking opportunities.

More information is available by calling (304) 696-2249 or (304) 696-2250.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 8, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

Marshall medical students hold fitness fairs at Huntington schools

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Carloads of Marshall medical students will be heading out to two local elementary schools next week to spur a passion for fitness with "Let's Get Moving" fairs for fifth-graders.

With funding from a grant they requested from the American Medical Student Association, 20 to 30 medical students will wage an upbeat war against childhood obesity at Huntington's Altizer and Peyton elementary schools.

One of the program's organizers, second-year medical student Samantha Cook of Huntington, said six activity stations will be assembled in each school's gym.

"At one station each child's blood pressure, height, weight and body mass index will be privately measured and recorded," she said. "The other stations will be exercise and nutrition-based, and will teach the children about healthy living. Each child's health information will be sent home to his or her parents in a sealed packet that will contain information about how the body mass index relates to things like obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease."

The packets also will contain information about national guidelines for exercise and nutrition for children, nutritional information from fast food restaurants, and tips about having a healthy lifestyle, she said.

In addition to the screening and nutrition stations, the fifth-graders will compete for prizes at activity stations ranging from jump rope and an obstacle course to the video game Dance Dance Revolution. Two winners of an essay contest at each school will receive bikes and helmets, which are among the many prizes the medical students got as donations from local businesses.

Cook said she and the other primary organizers, Elizabeth Saunders of Huntington and Jane Wiseman of Ashland, have invested about 100 hours so far in the project, and all the medical students participating have gone to local businesses to get the donated prizes.

The fairs are designed to be fun for children, but the underlying issue is a serious one, Cook said.

"Some people are calling childhood obesity a national epidemic, and West Virginia ranks high," she said. At the same time, children may be finding it less automatic to be active. "Some of the smaller schools don't even have their own gym teacher any more," Cook said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 6, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

HEALTHeWV program deployed to rural clinic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. ‑‑ Dr. Tim McPherson has a new assistant when he sees patients in a rural clinic in Lavalette: a sophisticated software system that, in his words, "lets me spend more time talking to patients about things that matter and less time on paper."

The system is HEALTHeWV, an adapted version of the U.S. Army's award-winning HEALTHeFORCES program of chronic disease management tools and electronic records. This week marks the first time in the nation the program has been used in a rural clinic -- in this case, a Marshall-affiliated clinic in an area identified by the federal government as a medically underserved area and a health professional shortage area.

McPherson, an assistant professor of family medicine at Marshall University's medical school, said the program will improve communication between doctor and patient -- a step that results in improved patient care, especially in treating chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

As in the HEALTHeFORCES program, developed by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the HEALTHeWV program allows patients to use handheld computerized devices to respond to a variety of health surveys. Those responses are immediately available to the doctor, making it easier to incorporate preventive health care and chronic disease management into all visits. The military's program, which has won national awards, has had positive effects on both patient safety and disease outcomes, according to Col. Jill S. Phillips of Walter Reed.

Under a partnership initiated by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the program is being adapted to meet the needs of rural providers and patients. Along with Walter Reed, the partnership includes the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health at Marshall and the Robert C. Byrd National Technology Transfer Center at Wheeling Jesuit University.

"I know that the doctors will welcome the HEALTHeWV technology, and the people who need medical care could benefit greatly by it. I grew up in those West Virginia mountains. I know how important it is that people have access to health care," Byrd explained. "Physicians need to know more about the whole health matrix involving an individual ‑‑ not just this symptom, or that symptom ‑‑ so that the doctor can better treat patients. I'm glad that we have technology that's keeping up with this and getting ahead. This technology can substantially help the physicians and the people who need medical attention."

Byrd, who has helped to expand health care in rural West Virginia as part of his Senate work, is excited at the opportunity that the HEALTHeWV program offers.

"I certainly believe this technology is going to be a leap forward that will benefit the future generations in West Virginia and improve the health care of the total population," he said.

The Army is making the program available without charge and is providing extensive support. The Department of Family Practice at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine implemented the first phase of the program at the school's medical center last summer and now is running the pilot program at the rural site. Ultimately, the National Technology Transfer Center will take the lead in making the program available to other clinics across West Virginia.

"The vision is to take this technology into all medically underserved regions in West Virginia," said Dr. Mazharullah Shaik, director of the NTTC's Health Technology Application Program and program director of HEALTHeWV there.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU student receives prestigious ADDY Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student Jessica Crouch, a senior graphic design major from Scott Depot, W.Va., recently received an ADDY Award for creative excellence in the art of advertising.

The awards, which are presented by the American Advertising Federation, are given on both the student and professional levels. Crouch submitted two entries in the student campaigns category that allows students to include examples of their work for a mixed media campaign.

Crouch received the Gold ADDY for her Sunrise Farms, Inc., campaign entry. The campaign was a project for one of Crouch's graphic design classes, and she then decided to submit her work in the ADDY Award competition.

"I am extremely honored to receive the award," Crouch said. "It is just good to see all of my hard work, the help I have received from my professors and everything that I have learned in my classes has paid off."

Crouch hopes the award will help her not only in her college career, but in her professional career as well.

"I really think the award will look good on my resume," Crouch said. "Hopefully, this will allow me to show not only my classroom experience but that I also worked on a project and won a high-level award in the advertising industry."

Crouch received her award during the ADDY awards ceremony for the Charleston district Feb.10 at the University of Charleston. Her project next will be judged at the national competition. The American Advertising Federation's national conference takes place June 4-7 in Nashville, Tenn.

"This award is really a tremendous honor for Jessica," Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts, said. "She is a very talented individual and this is definitely a reflection on her creativity and perseverance as a student."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Two-time Marshall graduate wins Pulitzer Prize for feature writing

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two-time Marshall University graduate Julia Keller, a cultural critic and reporter for the Chicago Tribune, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing Monday, April 4.

Keller, 47, won for a three-part series on a 10-second tornado that ripped through Utica, Ill. The Pulitzer Board described Keller's account of the tornado, which was published in December 2004, as "gripping" and "meticulously constructed."

The award in feature writing is for a distinguished example of feature writing giving prime consideration to high literary quality and originality. The prize also pays Keller, who joined the Chicago Tribune in late 1998, $10,000.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, graduating from Huntington East High School in 1974. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from Marshall in 1976, and a master's degree in English from Marshall in 1981. Keller earned a doctoral degree in English at Ohio State University in 1996. 

She began her journalism career as a reporting intern for syndicated columnist Jack Anderson in Washington, D.C. Later she worked for the Ashland Daily Independent in Ashland, Ky., and the Columbus Dispatch in Columbus, Ohio.

Her father, the late James Keller, taught mathematics at Marshall for more than 30 years.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former Human Rights Campaign director speaks Wednesday at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Elizabeth Birch, former executive director of the Human Rights Campaign, speaks on "The State of Gay Rights Today" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 6, in the Marshall University Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge.

Birch's visit to campus is sponsored by Marshall's LGBT (Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender) Outreach Office and the Office of Multicultural Affairs and is free to the public.

The Human Rights Campaign is the largest LGBT advocacy group in the United States. Under Birch's leadership, the group grew from 100,000 members in 1995 to 500,000 in 2003. During her tenure, the group became recognized as one of the top political organizations dealing with the equal treatment of LGBT people.

The organization is one of the largest bipartisan political action committees in the United States. The programs Birch helped engineer include HRC Network, a comprehensive resource center for LGBT workplace advocacy; HRC family Familynet, a virtual online community for LGBT families; the National Coming Out Project, dedicated to helping thousands of LGBT people come out every year, and Equality Rocks, the largest LGBT concert ever.

Birch was honored in 2002 by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights for her work in the civil rights community. Additionally, she has served as worldwide director for Apple Computer, Inc., and as general counsel to Claris Corporation to help implement non-discrimination and domestic partner benefits policies.

Birch graduated from the University of Santa Clara School of Law in California with honors and from the University of Hawaii in Political Science and Oceanography in 1980.

For more information on Birch's visit to Marshall, persons may call (304) 696-6623, or visit www.marshall.edu/lgbo.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Retired Marshall professor, program win Appalachian awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A retired Marshall University professor and MU's Center for Studies in Ethnicity and Gender (CSEGA) won two major awards at this year's 28th annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference March 18-20 at Radford University in Radford, Va.

Dr. Lynda Ann Ewen, a retired professor of sociology, won the Cratis D. Williams/James S. Brown Service Award and Marshall was honored with the Appalachian Association's award for the best Web site.

 "Only a few years ago, Marshall University had little connection to scholarship on Appalachian culture," Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, an MU professor and co-director of Marshall's Faces of Appalachian initiative, said. "Winning two prestigious awards from this well-known association after such a short time in this arena is a major accomplishment."

Ewen won the service award for her contributions to research on diversity in the Appalachian region; for her work in editing the Ohio University Press series on ethnicity and gender in Appalachia; for her work in establishing the CSEGA, which she continues to co-direct, and for her activism in fighting for social justice in the region.

Ewen also helped develop the Faces of Appalachia Project, which is jointly sponsored by Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, College of Education and Human Services, and the Appalachian Studies Association.

The e-Appalachia Award went to CSEGA, which is linked to Marshall University's Web site and includes photos related to the region as well as a description of the many research studies conducted by CSEGA scholars. This award was given in recognition of the Web site's providing insight on Appalachia and its people.

"These awards show that Marshall is recognized by the best scholars in the field as a new leader, an institution which represents the best in Appalachian studies," Pendarvis said.

The Appalachian Studies Association is a professional association of nearly 1,000 members. Composed of scholars, writers, artists, teachers, and other professionals whose work or interests relate to the Appalachian region, its members come from all across the United States, as well as from mountainous regions in other countries, such as Scotland and Wales. It conducts conferences, publishes a newsletter and journal, and offers a Web site to promote understanding and growth in the region.

For more information, persons may contact Pendarvis at (304) 696-2855.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Poet Maggie Anderson to visit Marshall, read from her work

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Maggie Anderson will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 14 in room 2W16 of Marshall University's Memorial Student Center.

Anderson is the author of four collections of poems, most recently Windfall: New and Selected Poems from the University Pittsburgh Press (2000).  She also is the author of Cold Comfort and A Space Filled with Moving.  Her work has appeared in such journals as The Alaska Quarterly Review, The Georgia Review, and The American Poetry Review

Anderson also is the editor of the new and selected poems of West Virginia poet Louise McNeill, as well as co-editor of A Gathering of Poets, an anthology of poems commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Kent State University student shootings during an anti-war protest in 1970.

Anderson has received fellowships for her poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, the MacDowell Colony, and the West Virginia Arts and Humanities Commission.  She currently is professor of English at Kent State University, where she directs the Wick Poetry Center and edits the Wick Poetry Series of the Kent State University Press.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public. More information is available by calling MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall representatives to visit with lawmakers Wednesday at capitol

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The second floor of the state capitol in Charleston will be packed with representatives from Marshall University Wednesday, April 6, during Marshall University Day at the Legislature.

Staff, faculty, students and alumni will visit with legislators from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. About 30 booth displays, representing different colleges, departments, schools and programs at MU, will be set up throughout the day.

"Marshall Day at the Legislature is a wonderful opportunity to promote the great programs the university has to offer not only the Huntington community, but the entire state and region," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs with the Marshall University Alumni Association, which is organizing the event.

MU interim president Michael J. Farrell said Marshall Day at the Legislature is an important event for the university.

"This is an opportunity for students, staff, faculty and legislators to interact on a one-on-one basis," Farrell said. "Marshall is very important to the economy of West Virginia and it is critical that our state leaders understand our impact and listen to our message."

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones will proclaim April 6 as Marshall Day in the Capital City. Several Marshall students will be recognized in the House of Delegates and the Senate.

The special day culminates with "The Third House," a political satire scheduled for 8 p.m. at the West Virginia Cultural Center near the state capitol. The event, sponsored by Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, includes skits and songs that poke fun at state political officials.

Tickets for "The Third House," which cost $25 each, may be purchased at the House of Representatives Clerk's office, the Senate Clerk's office or the Governor's Press Secretary office at the state capitol.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Alpha Phi Omega wins 'Can Hunger' food drive

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alpha Phi Omega, a community service fraternity at Marshall University, won the "Can Hunger" competitive food drive sponsored in March by MU's Student Government Association and the Huntington Area Food Bank.

APO donated 866 pounds of food to the food bank. SGA will award the fraternity $500 for its efforts.

The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society donated 363 pounds, which was the second-highest contribution. The Biology Club, Lambda Society, and the Anthropology and Archaeology Club also participated in the event.

All donations benefit the HAFB, which is a nonprofit organization that serves the needs of 17 counties in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio.

For more information, persons may contact Missy Oldaker at (304) 412-2523, or Amanda Taylor at (304) 634-3318.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Closing of 3rd Avenue near biotechnology center planned this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A portion of Huntington's 3rd Avenue will be closed beginning the evening of Saturday, April 2, through midnight Sunday, April 3, to allow for construction of an overhead pedestrian walkway from Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center to the Science Building.

Mike Meadows, Marshall's director of facilities planning and management, said the four-block area from Hal Greer Boulevard to 20th Street will be closed.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU math professor named Teacher of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Karen Mitchell, a Marshall University mathematics professor, has been named the West Virginia Council of Teachers of Mathematics (WVCTM) 2005 College/University Mathematics Teacher of the Year.

Mitchell was recognized by her peers at the annual meeting of the WVCTM recently in Flatwoods, W.Va., according to Jeanne Finstein, the organization's community relations chairman.

"Karen Mitchell is a truly outstanding teacher and very deserving of this highest award," Finstein said.

Mitchell has been teaching math at Marshall for about 20 years. She is a Huntington native, and a graduate of Huntington East High School and Marshall.

"It is an honor to be recognized by the West Virginia Council of Teachers of Mathematics," Mitchell said. "The members of this organization are passionate about their involvement with efforts to improve and to support K-16 mathematics education in West Virginia."

Department chair Ralph Oberste-Vorth said he is thrilled that Mitchell won the award. "It's certainly well deserved," he said.

Mitchell has won other teaching awards while at Marshall. Two of the more significant ones were in 1994-1995, when she won the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award, and in 1995, when was named West Virginia Professor of the Year  by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and Council for Advancement and Support of Education for extraordinary dedication to undergraduate teaching. She was the first Marshall professor to win this award.

More information is available by calling Mitchell at (304) 696-3042.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Committed to Christ Campus Ministries sponsors 'Praisefest 2005'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The sixth annual College Praisefest, a conference for college students and young adults, takes place Friday, April 8 through Sunday, April 10, at Marshall University, Twentieth Street Baptist Church and First Presbyterian Church.

"Praisefest 2005," titled "Living My Life Like It's Golden," is sponsored by Committed to Christ Campus Ministries at Marshall. It showcases college choirs and performing arts groups from Marshall, Morehead State University, Howard University, St. Louis Citywide University Mass and more.

The conference also includes seminars geared toward college students and young adults.

"Praisefest's main goal is to lift the human spirit through the medium of music and to educate and empower young people through seminars relevant to this next generation of leaders," Nicole Yancey, president and founder of Committed to Christ Ministries, said.

"These conferences are very beneficial to college students," said Delali Dzirasa of Washington, D.C., one of the event's speakers. "It's encouraging for them to see other young people from across the country getting on the same page spiritually, knowing that they are not by themselves as they try to learn more about God."

Yancey said Praisefest is unique because it is a conference created and run completely by young people. "It is our hope that all people regardless of their age, race or religious background will come out and join the celebration," she said.

"Praisefest 2005" begins at 7 p.m. Friday, April 8 with a praise and worship service at Twentieth Street Baptist Church. Seminars are scheduled from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 9, at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center.

A concert featuring the college choirs and performing arts groups takes place at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at First Presbyterian Church in Huntington. The conference concludes at 9:30 a.m. Sunday with a worship service at the Radisson Hotel Huntington ballroom.

Admission is free. More information is available by contacting Committed to Christ Ministries at (304) 522-9005 or (304) 544-1567, or via email at committed2christministries@yahoo.com.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Information on majors available to students during Academic Expo

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students have the opportunity to obtain information on various majors offered at the institution during the annual Academic Expo Tuesday, April 5.

The event, sponsored by Marshall's University College, is scheduled from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza. If it rains, the expo will be moved to the Don Morris Room inside the student center.

Students who are undecided about a major or are considering a change of major may talk to representatives of the various academic units within the university in one central location. 

Representatives from the Career Service Center, Financial Aid and Student Activities also will be available to assist students in dealing with the various administrative issues involved in choosing a major. 

In addition to the valuable information students can receive at this event, refreshments will be served and prizes awarded.  Prizes include a cell phone, gift certificates for the Marshall University Bookstore, hats, shirts, and many other items. 

For more information, students may contact Randolph Cullum, Academic Advisor for the University College, at (304) 696-3252 or via email at Cullum@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduate College's Special Education Program receives APEX Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Graduate College's Special Education Program has received an Active Partners in Educational eXcellence (APEX) Award from Eastern West Virginia Community & Technical College.

The APEX Award honors organizations and individuals for extraordinary involvement with Eastern West Virginia Community & Technical College.  It is given to recognize mutually beneficial relations between the College and its partners.

Dr. Ron Wolf, a faculty member in Special Education, accepted the award for Marshall at the recent Founders Day Celebration in Moorefield, W.Va.

"We are extremely pleased to receive the award and are very appreciative of the support that has been provided by President Dunn and her staff," said Dr. Ronald B. Childress, Vice President for Graduate Studies and Dean of the Graduate School of Education & Professional Development.  "This has truly been a win-win situation which has allowed Marshall to provide local access to Special Education licensure programs for individuals in the Eastern Community and Technical College service area.  Through such a cooperative initiative, we have been able to address the shortage of certified Special Education teachers in the region."

Dr. Michael Sullivan, MUGC's Program Director for Special Education, said there had been excellent cooperation between the two institutions.  "They've been wonderful to work with," he said. 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU student's photos to appear on Jones Soda labels

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jones Soda Co. has selected two photographs taken by Marshall University student Nicole Young of St. Albans, W.Va., to appear on two of the company's soda labels.

Young, a senior print journalism major and executive editor of The Parthenon, the university's student newspaper, submitted five photos in October 2004 and recently received a letter from the company that her photos had been selected. She also received six copies of each label that showcases her photos, which will appear on the labels of the root beer and orange and cream flavors.

Young's photos were selected from about 200,000 entries that were submitted both online and through the mail. The soda, which is sold locally at Target and Starbuck's, uses photographs submitted by its customers on the labels of its products. Jones Soda chooses several photos a year for its labels and only one percent of all photos submitted are chosen to be used on the labels.

"I don't consider myself a photographer but I love taking pictures," Young said. "Having my photos on the labels of a nationwide drink is just such a great opportunity."

Young said she also thinks the labels will be a good addition to her portfolio. However, if she wants a bottle of the soda with one of her labels she will have to search local stores for her photos. "I have people on the lookout for my labels," Young said.

The photo that was chosen for the root beer label is a color photo that Young took of the Roanoke Star, which is a neon star on the top of Mill Mountain in Roanoke, Va. Only the root beer and the vanilla cola have color photographs on the labels. The photo on the orange and cream bottle is a black and white one of Young's boyfriend's record player.

For more information, persons may contact Young by e-mail at young124@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nine new exhibits added to Presidential Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Presidential Gallery in Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell's Old Main office continues to grow.

Nine new exhibits from eight students recently were added to the gallery, which features student artwork from the Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts.

Farrell, interim president since Jan. 1, chose to use student artwork in the president's office to emphasize the importance of Marshall's students and to capture the essence and diversity of the campus.

Michael Cornfeld, associate professor of art, said the artwork was chosen based on the quality of work and professional look. Pieces chosen also represent the different areas of concentration within the department, including painting, graphic design, sculpture and print making.

The students whose work was chosen for the Presidential Gallery are Nathan Parrish, a senior from Fairview, W.Va.; Ryan Worley, a senior from Ona, W.Va.; Jessica Gregg, a junior from Moatsville, W.Va.; Krista Korstanje, a sophomore from Huntington; Mark A. Sariwatta, a junior from Huntington; Elizabeth Ash, a senior from Beaver Creek, Ohio; Kristi Lux, a junior from Washington, W.Va., and Justin McCormick, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.

The first pieces in the gallery were from graduate students Kimberly Nickell of Victor, W.Va., Hikari Kimura of Gunma, Japan, Christopher Worth of Huntington, and Jackie Parsons of Nitro, W.Va., and undergraduate senior Staci Leech of Clintonville, W.Va.

Each student will receive a certificate and will have a picture taken with Farrell in front of his or her artwork.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Advisory: Morrow Library Reopens

Effective Monday, March 28, 2005, Morrow Library will reopen. All offices may be occupied, and classes will resume their regular schedules.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 25, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

Two Marshall medical faculty honored in "Local Legends" project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Two physicians at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have become the first West Virginians honored as part of the national "Local Legends" project.
Dr. Mildred Mitchell-Bateman of Charleston and Dr. Paulette S. Wehner of Huntington will be included in the "Local Legends" gallery web site, which is a companion to the National Library of Medicine exhibition "Changing the Face of Medicine: Celebrating America's Women Physicians." The site will be included when the "Changing the Face of Medicine" exhibition goes on national tour this spring.

Although semi-retired, Bateman continues to teach and see patients part-time at Marshall. The first chair of the school's Department of Psychiatry, she has had a distinguished career that included serving as one of four members of the President's Commission on Mental Health, vice president of the American Psychiatric Association, and West Virginia Director of Mental Health. She has received numerous local, state and national honors for her contributions to mental health care.

Wehner, a cardiologist, joined the school's faculty in 1995 and is director of its Adult Cardiovascular Training Program. She also is director of the Cabell Huntington Hospital Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, medical director of the hospital's Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, and medical director of the St. Mary's Hospital Early Defibrillation Program. A member of Marshall's Academy of Medical Educators, she has received more than a dozen awards for her teaching and medical service.

Physicians in the "Local Legends" gallery are recognized by members of their state's congressional delegation. Bateman was selected by Rep. Shelley Moore Capito and Wehner by Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV and Rep. Nick J. Rahall.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Ten alumni, students to be honored at Alumni Awards Banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ten alumni and students, along with the alumni Club of the Year, will be honored Saturday, April 16, at Marshall University's 68th annual Alumni Awards Banquet.

The banquet, which highlights Alumni Weekend April 15-16, takes place at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Cost is $40 per person or $70 per couple. The theme of Alumni Weekend is "Marshall University Yesterday, Today & Forever."

For more information on Alumni Weekend events or to reserve a seat at the banquet, persons should call Kimberly Hudson in the alumni office at (304) 696-2901.

The Distinguished Alumni Award will be presented to businessman Robert "Bob" Cosmai. This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.

Cosmai, president and chief executive officer of Hyundai America, is a native of Hillsdale, N.J. He began a career in the auto industry immediately after graduation from Marshall's School of Business.

After completing the executive training program at Ford, he stayed there for 11 years. In 1982, he moved on to Nissan, then to Accura, where he was vice president of sales. He left that position in 1998 to become vice president for national sales of Hyundai, the Korean automaker. By 2003, he had become president and chief executive officer of Hyundai.

The Distinguished Alumnus in Manufacturing Award will be presented by the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing, in conjunction with Marshall University and the MU Alumni Association, to international entrepreneur Robert L. Shell, Jr. The award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding achievements in and contributions to the manufacturing sector.

Shell, a member of the Marshall Board of Governors, is chairman and CEO of Guyan International, a private holding company whose Permco Division is internationally recognized. Permco has facilities in the United States, Europe and the People's Republic of China.

Shell has been a member of the following Civic Boards: United Way of the River Cities, Huntington Boys & Girls Club, The Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation, United Huntington Industries and the Marshall Artists Series. He is a member of the Marshall University Business Hall of Fame.

The Community Achievement Award will be presented to Sylvia Ridgeway and Sally M. Love. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

Ridgeway is former president of the Huntington/Cabell branch of the National Association of the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). She has served as a secretary in the College of Education and Human Services; instructor in the Community and Technical College, and teacher for the Cabell County Board of Education.

Her community service includes the board of directors of the Ebenezer Learning Center; second vice president of the West Virginia State Conference of Branches, NAACP; member of the evaluation team for the City of Huntington's "Children in the Arts" program at the A.D. Lewis Community Center, and many more honors past and present.

Love, of Charleston, W.Va., is founder and president of the Snowshoe Institute, a nonprofit organization promoting educational and cultural entertainment in conjunction with Marshall, West Virginia University, the West Virginia Humanities Council and Intrawest.

She is on the Foundation board of directors and board of visitors of the Marshall University Graduate College. Her community involvement has included the Ronald McDonald House, the Craik-Patton Historical Home, the West Virginia Mansion Preservation Foundation, the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, YWCA High Hopes and Pro-Kids, an after-school mentoring program.

The Distinguished Service to the Community Award will be presented to Houston, Texas, businessman Bob Brammer and West Virginia Sen. Robert Plymale.

Brammer, a native of Huntington and 1965 Marshall graduate, is founder and owner of the Houston-based Brammer Standard Company Inc., an international distributor of chemical and spectrochemical analytical reference materials.

He also is vice chair of Marshall's Campaign for National Prominence and a strong supporter of the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, The Thunder Club and the Erickson Alumni Center Building Fund.

Brammer and his wife, Sylvia Max Brammer, are major supporters of the Society of Yeager Scholars. He also has endowed several scholarships, including one in memory of his first wife, Connie Sue Pelphrey Brammer. Bob Brammer is working hard to start an alumni club in the Houston area before the Thundering Herd begins its Conference USA play.

Plymale is serving his third four-year term in the West Virginia Senate. He was first elected in 1992. In previous years, he also has served as chairman of the Senate Committee on Pensions; vice-chairman of the Senate Committee on Education; vice-chairman of the Senate Committee on Health and Human Resources; and co-chairman of the Forest Management Review Commission. Plymale is chairman of the Senate Education Committee and a ranking member of Senate Finance.

In 2003, he was appointed to the Southern Regional Education Board of Control by Gov. Bob Wise. Plymale is employed by the Nick J. Rahall Appalachian Transportation Institute. He also serves in various public and community organizations, including the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Cabell County Senior Service Organization, and the Wayne County Economic Development Authority, and is on the board of directors of the Huntington Museum of Art.

The Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award will be presented to Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate professor and program director for elementary and secondary education in South Charleston. Pauley has been the leader for the development and establishment of Marshall's latest doctoral programs for the South Charleston campus.

He is coordinator of that campus' Web CT users group and is strongly supportive of the distance education efforts to deliver graduate instruction to students in many rural areas of the state and the region. Pauley serves on the Kanawha County School superintendent's advisory board and School to Work committee.

The Hunter Award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees were evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

Two Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarships will be awarded. These scholarships, one to a cheerleader and one to a marching band member, were established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds for the scholarship come from proceeds from Herd Village tailgating events.

Brittney Hughart, a culinary arts major from Ona, will be presented with the Cheerleader Scholarship. Hughart has been a community Little League coach for three years, a West Virginia junior high school cheerleading tryout judge, and a cheerleading competition instructor. She is employed at The Different Twist and as a gymnastics instructor at Studio 60.

Nicholas Slate, an integrated science and technology major from Charleston, will receive the Marching Band Scholarship. Slate is director of the Aldersgate Handbell Choir, and has been involved in Marshall's SweatEquity Day, the Kanawha Valley Day of Percussion, and the Golden Key International Honour Society, and he provides technology assistance and training in the community.  

The Cam Henderson Scholarship Award will go to Ian Gray O'Connor, a sophomore science major from Knoxville, Tenn. O'Connor is on the dean's list, and is a member of the Thundering Herd football team. A place-kicker, he was named Mid-American Conference Special Teams Player of the Week three times last season. He is a member of Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society and the Student Athlete Advisory Council, and enjoys painting and drawing.

The Cam Henderson Scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary Marshall football and basketball Coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

The Boone County Club was chosen as the Alumni Association Club of the Year for the third year in a row. President David Price and other members led the club in attracting potential students to Marshall by holding dinners and question and answer sessions at area high schools, and conducting student trips to campus.

Club membership increased by 20 percent, with activities such as the 2004 Golf Classic, which raised $10,000 for scholarship and club activities; an ATV Poker Run at the Hatfield McCoy Trail, raising money for the Big Green Scholarship; tailgate parties averaging 60 fans, and a number of other activities.

For more about the Boone County Club and other alumni clubs, persons may go to http://www.marshall.edu/alumni/clubs.asp.

Here is the complete list of Alumni Weekend activities:

Friday, April 15

  • The first official event of Alumni Weekend is a Champagne Reception from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Drinko Library third-floor atrium. The reception is for individuals who have contributed to the Erickson Alumni Center campaign.
     
  • To make a contribution to the EAC Campaign, persons may call Hudson at (304) 696-2901 or (800) MUALUMX. They also may donate online, designating their gift to the EAC.
     

Saturday, April 16

  • Get Together, Meet, Greet, Reminisce and Tell All Breakfast for the Class of 1955, from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Radisson Hotel.
     
  • The Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1955) and the 60th reunion class (1945). They will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1955. The event is from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. at the John Marshall Room in the Memorial Student Center. The cost is $20 per person. Lunch is complimentary for members of the classes of 1945 and 1955.
     
  • Library Associates' Arts and Crafts Fair is open to all Marshall employees, alumni and friends to sell their arts and crafts. It is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center lobby and the Alumni Lounge.
     
  • The Annual Green & White Spring Football Game, which marks the end to Marshall's spring practice, begins at 4 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Cost is $5 per person. For tickets, persons may call (304) 696-HERD or (800) THE-HERD.
     
  • A financial planning program, Maintaining Your Life Records, will be conducted  from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the John Spotts Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center. The speaker will be The Marshall University Foundation Inc.'s Director of Planned Giving, Mandilyn J. Hart, CTFA (Certified Trust and Financial Advisor). The program is designed to help people maintain a complete overview of their financial picture. Attendees will be provided with a tool to organize their personal financial records and estate planning documents.
     
  • The President's Social will be at the Memorial Student Center Plaza from 6 to 6:45 p.m. and precede the awards banquet.

Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bluetrane featured in sixth JAZZ@JOMIE Concert Series program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Jazz Studies Program at Marshall University in cooperation with the American Federation of Musicians Local 363-691 presents the sixth program of the 2005 JAZZ@JOMIE Concert Series at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 30.

The concert features the MU Jazz Faculty combo Bluetrane. Featured performers are Ed Bingham, saxophone; Jay Flippin, piano; Ben Miller, drumset; Marshall Onofrio, trumpet; Martin Saunders, trumpet, and Mark Zanter, bass.

The Jomie Jazz Forum is located on 5th Avenue directly across from the Memorial Student Center. The performance will be broadcast by MU's public access television channel 25 on Adelphia Cable.

Admission is free for Marshall University students, and $10 for the general public. For further information, persons may contact Bingham, director of jazz studies, at (304) 696-2452, or call the music department office at (304) 696-3117.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 24, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

Medical School Research Day to showcase faculty, student projects

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Nearly 50 students and residents will present results of their research projects Tuesday (March 29) during the annual Research Day of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Topics range from ATV accident costs to the forensic analysis of cocaine, from childhood obesity to DNA analysis and a cause of programmed cell death.

"Research Day provides an opportunity to showcase the research efforts of our faculty, medical students, residents and graduate students," said Dr. Richard M. Niles, the school's associate dean for research and graduate education. "It allows people in our community to learn about our research, through which we discover new medical knowledge that hopefully will lead to better treatments."

Registration is at 8 a.m. at the Marshall University Medical Center, located next to Cabell Huntington Hospital, and activities will continue through an awards presentation at 4:30 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required if participants want to receive lunch.

At 12:30, Dr. William F. Balistreri of Cincinnati Children's Hospital will present the Richard J. Stevens Memorial Lecture on "Viral Hepatitis 2005." He also will lecture at 6 p.m. Monday at the medical center on "Inborn Errors of Bile Acid Biosynthesis." Balistreri is one of the world's foremost authorities on pediatric gastroenterology and liver disease. He is medical director of Cincinnati Children's Pediatric Liver Care Center and Pediatric Liver Transplantation Program.

More information is available from the Office of Continuing Medical Education, 691-1770.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 23, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU scholarship fund honors Lyle and Edith Plymale

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A scholarship fund honoring former Marshall University professor Lyle F. "Doc" Plymale and his wife, Edith, has been established through the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

The goal is to raise sufficient funds to endow the Lyle F. and Edith Plymale Memorial Scholarship through the foundation. A minimum of $10,000 is needed to meet endowment requirements.

The scholarship fund honors the Plymales, both Wayne County natives, Marshall College graduates and teachers of science and math, by providing financial assistance to a Spring Valley High School student who plans to attend Marshall University and major in a math- or science-related field. The student will be a full-time freshman with a high school GPA of at least 2.5.

 Lyle Plymale, who was born in Shoals, W.Va., and graduated from Buffalo High School, taught chemistry for many years at Vinson High School before becoming a chemistry professor in Marshall's College of Science. He retired in the early 1980s after teaching for 38 years.

Edith Plymale was born in East Lynn, W.Va., and graduated from Wayne High School. She taught for many years at Ceredo-Kenova High School before retiring in the early 1980s after teaching for 35 years.

Spring Valley High School is a consolidation of Vinson, Buffalo and Ceredo-Kenova high schools.

Mike Fullerton, one of eight members of the Scholarship Organization Committee, said deciding to honor the Plymales was easy. A 1963 Vinson graduate, he remembers well being a student in one of Lyle Plymale's classes.

"It's very easy to honor somebody who made such an impact on so many people," Fullerton said of Lyle Plymale. "Not only academically, but from a moral standpoint. He was a total package, he helped every kid. I never knew anybody that went to him that didn't receive help. He was just one of those people you remember. He was a dandy, and his wife was a very good teacher, too."

Other members of the Scholarship Organization Committee are Carter Chambers, Ron Elmore, Doug Sullivan and Joe Moreland, all from the class of 1963; Karen Plymale Knowles and Larry Queen, from the class of 1965; and Rick Plymale, from the class of 1970.

Persons wanting to donate to the scholarship fund may do so by mailing a check made payable to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. to: Marshall University Office of Development, Lyle F. and Edith Plymale Memorial Scholarship Fund, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755-6002.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 21, 2005
Contact: Susan Jackson, Coordinator of Women's Studies, (304) 696-7153

'Mom's Turn to Learn' arrives Thursday, March 31

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Women who want to start or return to college are invited to a program offered by Marshall University Thursday, March 31, according to Dr. Susan Jackson, professor of art and coordinator of the women's studies program at the university.

"We've put together the essentials for women who want to get started on a degree from Marshall," Jackson said. "They can get information on admissions, financial aid, and the Regents Bachelor of Arts program, get a tour of the Huntington campus and the Drinko Library, and perhaps even sit in on a class or two."

Participants can select from a morning session, beginning at 9 a.m. and including lunch at 12:30 p.m., or an evening session, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Optional campus tours and class visits will take place in the afternoon for those who attend either session.

In addition, participants will be able to attend two other events on the Huntington Campus. The annual John Deaver Drinko Symposium takes place at 2 p.m. that day in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. Professor Mary E. Reynolds will speak on the topic,   "Language Difference versus Language Impairment: Role of Working Memory in Diagnosis and Outcome."

Following the Mom's Turn to Learn evening session, a panel discussion will take place among women who have served in public office in West Virginia. They will speak about their experiences and how their gender influenced opportunities available to them.

Rebecca Coffman, now a student at Marshall, participated in Mom's Turn to Learn two years ago. "Going to Mom's Turn to Learn made going back to school a lot easier," she said. "People like Taella Hill made me realize that I could do it, and she has been willing to help me with anything I have a problem with or don't understand."

Jennifer Reynolds echoed those sentiments. "I had the desire to return to school; however, I was apprehensive because I didn't know where to get started. I had been out of college for nine years and knew that things had changed. The Mom's Turn to Learn seminar gave me all the information and support I needed to make coming back to school happen ... Everyone involved understood the help that I needed."

The full schedule for the day is as follows:

Morning Session:

- 9-10 a.m. - Memorial Student Center - pick up parking permit, register, coffee and snacks

- 10-11 a.m. - Formal information program on admissions, financial aid, and the Regents B.A. Program

- 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Informal question-and-answer session with past and present nontraditional students

- 12:30 p.m. - Lunch provided in Harless Dining Room.

Optional Afternoon Activities:

- 2-5 p.m. - Campus and library tours, class visits, or attend the Drinko Symposium at 2 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse (reception to follow).

Evening Session:

- 5-5:30 p.m. - Pick up parking permit, register, refreshments.

- 5:30-6 p.m. - Mini tour of campus

- 6-7 p.m. - Formal information program on admissions and financial aid

- 7-7:45 p.m. Informal question-and-answer session with past and present nontraditional students

- 8 p.m. - Panel discussion including women who have served in public office in West Virginia.

Persons who want more information on the sessions may contact the Marshall Women's Studies office by phone at (304) 696-3643, or by e-mail at womensstudies@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Kerry Kennedy to speak at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Kerry Kennedy, author of Speak Truth to Power: Human Rights Defenders Who Are Changing Our World, speaks at Marshall University at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 29 in the Don Morris Room at the Memorial Student Center.

Ms. Kennedy founded the RFK Center for Human Rights and serves as a board member for several foundations including Amnesty International Leadership Council and the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial, a nonprofit organization that addresses the problems of social justice in the spirit of her late father.

Ms. Kennedy has worked on diverse human rights issues such as child labor, disappearances, indigenous land rights, judicial independence, freedom of expression, ethnic violence, impunity, the environment and women's rights.  She will be introduced by First Lady Gayle C. Manchin.

The speakers are a special portion of the activities sponsored by the Women's Center during Women's History Month.  For further information, persons may contact Leah Tolliver, director of the Women's Center, at (304) 696-3112 or via e-mail at tolliver@marshall.edu.

 
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Miraculous Marathon Man' at Marshall March 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Dick Traum, the athlete known as "The Miraculous Marathon Man" for his indomitable spirit and his hand-cranked wheelchair racing, is making appearances at Marshall University's Memorial Student Center and MU's South Charleston campus on Tuesday, March 29, as part of DisAbilities Day.

Traum will follow up the campus appearances with a speech and reception in Huntington at 7 p.m. at the Huntington Physical Therapy facility at 2240 5th Ave.  All events are free to the public. 

Traum speaks at 11 a.m. in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center and at 3 p.m. at the Graduate College in South Charleston.

After losing his right leg following a car accident at the age of 24, Traum became the first amputee to complete a marathon race.  After the accident, he began running to keep in shape and in 1976 he became the first amputee to complete the New York City Marathon - 26.2 miles - in seven hours and 24 minutes.  Since then he has run more than 100 long-distance races.

In 1983, Traum founded the Achilles Track Club to help other disabled individuals realize their athletic aspirations.  There are now 110 chapters on six continents and more than 10,000 members with disabilities such as visual impairments, cerebral palsy, arthritis, amputation and cancer.

Through his organization, Traum has helped organize therapeutic sports and group events for various groups, include disabled Iraqi war veterans at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

"A disability does not have to be a handicap," Traum said.  "If we can bring people with disabilities into the open and have them feel like normal, our mission will be successful.  They get reinforcements and a sense of self-esteem from their physical accomplishments."

Dr. Leonard Deutsch, Dean of the Marshall Graduate School, said Traum is interested in starting a chapter or two of his Achilles Track Club in West Virginia.

"Dick Traum is an inspiring individual who has accomplished amazing things in the course of his life," Deutsch said.  "If anyone is interested in discussing this opportunity (to start a chapter of the Achilles Track Club) with Dr. Traum, they are encouraged to e-mail me and I will be happy to serve as facilitator."

To volunteer or to arrange a meeting with Traum, persons may contact Deutsch at deutschl@marshall.edu.  More information is available on the organization on the club's Web site:  www.achillestrackclub.org.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Noah Adams, longtime co-host of NPR's 'All Things Considered,' featured speaker at Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Noah Adams, an Ashland, Ky., native and former longtime co-host of National Public Radio's award-winning evening newsmagazine All Things Considered, is the featured speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation Friday, April 1, at Marshall University.

The Honors Convocation begins at 7 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. It is one of the highlights of the 11th annual John Deaver Drinko and Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Celebration of Academics, which takes place Thursday, March 31, and Friday, April 1. All events are free to the public.

The Honors Convocation is an awards and recognition ceremony for Marshall's outstanding honors students, and precedes Adams' talk.

The Celebration of Academics begins at 2 p.m. March 31 with the Drinko Symposium.at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. A Marshall faculty member is featured each year in the Symposium.

This year's guest speaker from the faculty is Drinko Fellow Mary E. Reynolds, an MU Communications Disorders professor. Her topic is "Language Difference versus Language Impairment: Role of Working Memory in Diagnosis and Outcome." A public reception follows in the Performing Arts Center lobby.

Adams' topic Friday is "Far Appalachia," which is the title of a book he authored in 2001. The full title of the book is "Far Appalachia: Following the New River North." The book chronicles Adams' 350-mile journey from the New River's North Carolina mountain beginnings to its end at Gauley Bridge, W.Va.

"We are excited to have Noah Adams here as the featured speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the Drinko Academy. "His international reputation as a journalist and his ability to tell a good story will make for a remarkable evening. Students, faculty and the community are in for a real treat."

Adams currently is a senior correspondent for NPR News, working with NPR's National Desk to cover stories on the working poor across America. He lives in Takoma Park, Md.

Adams, whose rich, evenly-paced voice is familiar to NPR listeners nationwide, began his career in 1962 at WIRO in Ironton, Ohio. He also worked for WSAZ in Huntington and WCYB in Bristol, Va., from 1963 through 1965. Adams began his public radio career in 1971 at WBKY-FM at the University of Kentucky.

He began at WBKY as a part-time rock and roll announcer, but soon became involved in other projects including documentaries and a weekly bluegrass show. In 1974, Adams joined the staff full time as host of a morning news and music program.

Adams went to work with NPR in 1975, editing and writing for the next three years. He became co-host of All Things Considered in 1978.

Here is the schedule of public events for the Celebration of Academics:

Thursday, March 31: 2 p.m., The Drinko Symposium in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Professor Mary E. Reynolds speaks on "Language Difference versus Language Impairment: Role of Working Memory in Diagnosis and Outcome." A public reception follows in the performing arts center lobby.

Friday, April 1: 7 p.m., The Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. NPR senior correspondent Noah Adams speaks on "Far Appalachia." A public reception follows in the performing arts center lobby.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students dominate awards competition in California

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received 12 grand prize awards and three honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 14th Annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 42nd Annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony.

The event took place on Saturday, March 12 at the Hilton Universal City Hotel in Universal City, Calif. Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell, in California at the time visiting with prominent MU alumni and friends of the university, attended the ceremony.

"In a national competition among colleges and universities, your measure of success is if you win one award," Farrell said. "In the case of the NBS/AERho awards, Marshall won first place in 12 of the 20 awards. The superiority of our program has now been validated by this national competition. Marshall University is extremely proud of its students and faculty."

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

"It is quite an accomplishment to win 60 percent (12 of 20) of the grand prize total recognized in audio scriptwriting, audio production and overall Web site categories in the National Broadcasting Society's competition in a single year," Bailey said. "This is a dominating performance by our radio students.  Winning speaks well for Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 86 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media.  Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000.  Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) Chapters.

Complete list of WMUL winners at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2005/pr032605.htm.

 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Closing of 3rd Avenue near biotechnology science center delayed

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The closing of 3rd Avenue between Hal Greer Boulevard and 20th Street to allow for construction of an overhead pedestrian walkway from Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center to the Science Building has been delayed two weeks.

The closing was to take place from this Saturday evening through 6 a.m. Monday. Instead, the four-block area will be closed beginning the evening of Saturday, April 2 through midnight Sunday, April 3.

Mike Meadows, director of facilities planning and management, said problems in delivery of steel for the walkway is the reason for the delay.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Veteran Marshall police officer promoted to sergeant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington native Stanley Harper, a 16-year veteran of the Marshall University Police Department, has been promoted from patrol officer to sergeant, Office of Public Safety Director James E. Terry announced today.

Harper, 46, replaces Sgt. John Murphy, who retired.

"Stanley has been involved in most of the current innovations within the department," Terry said. "He's one of the founding members of our Bike Patrol, and of our R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense) program. He's top shelf and I feel very comfortable with the choice the selection committee made."

Harper, a 1977 Huntington High School graduate, is often seen riding his bike on campus. He is continuing that role, but with the promotion comes shift supervising and oversight duties.

"I've seen the confidence they have in me," Harper said, speaking of department heads. "I figured down the line, sooner or later, I'd get (the promotion). I'll still be riding the bike, but I have to oversee a lot, make sure people are doing the right thing."

The Marshall University Police Department has 22 officers who have the same responsibilities and authority as any other law enforcement officers in the state. The department provides 24-hour-a-day patrol protection to the campus, adjacent university-owned facilities and parking lots.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University unveils new Virtual Campus at state capitol

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University unveiled its revamped and revitalized online learning experience during an electronic ribbon cutting ceremony today at the West Virginia state capitol.

First Lady Gayle Manchin symbolically cut a ribbon to unveil Marshall's Virtual Campus during the event in the Governor's Reception Room. Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell presided over the ceremony, which highlighted MU's participation in Higher Education Day at the Capitol.

"By expanding access and resources to our most rural populations, Marshall University is meeting educational needs in a cost effective, scalable and quality centric model," Farrell said. "The online program features real interaction with outstanding faculty members in a collaborative, high-touch environment."

Others who took part in today's ceremony included Chancellor J. Michael Mullen; Senator Robert Plymale, Chair of the Senate Education Committee; Dr. Steve Paine, Deputy State Secretary of Education, and Nancy Sturm, Gov. Joe Manchin's education technology coordinator.

In addition to online multimedia course materials, Farrell said, everything from registration to accessing the world's literature is just a click away. "Marshall University ONLINE expands lifelong learning educational opportunities for all students, from high school to senior citizens," the president said.

Marshall University ONLINE offers hundreds of totally online courses or technology enhanced courses to thousands of students worldwide.

"Online courses at Marshall University are designed for students who prefer to learn outside the physical classroom, according to their own schedules," said Matthew Christian, director of the Center for Instructional Technology.  "Our goal is to offer Marshall University courses with a method of online delivery that will expand student access to our programs, courses, and services and that will provide them with a high quality educational experience."

The courses are developed by Marshall instructors and reflect the same scope and depth of material offered in the traditional classroom.  Students earn the same college credit as they would earn in traditional on-campus classes. All of the learning tools students need - syllabi, course materials, email, assignments, tests, and communications are contained in each course. 

The re-launched Web site reflects a "new day dawning" in the ongoing implementation of the Marshall online program. In 2003, MU adopted WebCT Vista, the market leading enterprise level learning management system.

Marshall currently is host to Vista for other higher education institutions from around the state - a cost saving measure that is proving the model of efficiency.

Its implementation of WebCT Vista will be showcased in the University Business magazine in April. Marshall has been named as a national "Digital Content Leader" two years in a row, and its Public Online Library Technology (PLT) Certificate Program earned the Southern Growth Policy 2005 "Innovations Award" for the state of West Virginia.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

ADVISORY: MORROW LIBRARY CLOSED BEGINNING 3/17

The James Morrow Library building on Marshall University's Huntington campus is scheduled to be closed beginning Thursday, March 17 through portions of the upcoming Spring Break, due to the moving up of a renovation timetable.  Preliminary engineering inspection is being made to determine the integrity of the buildings structural support. 

In order to accomplish a full inspection and to prepare for the complete renovations of the third floor, library materials will need to be removed to lower levels.  Engineers are recommending that the movement of these materials and succeeding inspections be accomplished without people in the building.   

Classes on Thursday, March 17 and Friday, March 18 will be moved to alternate locations.  Administrators and faculty will be on-site to direct students to the temporary class locations.  Offices in the building will be closed on Thursday and Friday as well as during selected days during Spring Break.  It is anticipated that Morrow Library classes will return to their normal locations after the spring break.

Information and updates will be posted on the Marshall University website.   More information may be obtained from Dr. Karen Kirtley, Assistant Vice President for Administration.  Telephone: 304-696-2487.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Greenup County, Ky., native joins Marshall Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - McRae Pennington, a Greenup County, Ky., native, has "returned home" to accept a recently created position with the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

Pennington is the new Director of Corporate and Foundation Relations at Marshall. She started her new job, in which she works to facilitate relationships between the Foundation and corporate donors, on March 7.

"As a young professional there weren't many opportunities in this area, but I never closed the door to coming back home," Pennington said. "This work feels more important than the traditional corporate job. The university's such a large part of the community."

Before coming to Marshall, Pennington worked in Dayton, Ohio, as a regional sales executive with LexisNexis. A licensed attorney in Kentucky, she worked for the Jefferson County Attorney's Office from March 2000 through August 2001, and later was a financial advisor for companies in Maryland and Kentucky.

"It is the Foundation's intent to be more active in building corporate partnerships for Marshall," Glen Kerkian, executive director of the Foundation, said. "McRae's recent position with LexisNexis and experience with several national companies gives her a good grounding in understanding how foundations operate."

Pennington is a 1993 graduate of Raceland-Worthington High School in Raceland, Ky., a 1997 graduate of Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., with a B.A. in Applied Music, and a 2001 graduate of the University of Louisville's Louis D. Brandeis School of Law.

"I initially thought I would be more in arts administration, but I ended up in the corporate world," Pennington said. "I have done fund raising in the volunteer world."

Pennington said she sang in the annual SCORES competition at Marshall while she was a student at Raceland, and also sang in performances with the Huntington Outdoor Theatre and the Musical Arts Guild in Huntington.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 15, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

State Science and Engineering Fair is April 1-2 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 52nd annual West Virginia State Science and Engineering Fair takes place Friday, April 1 and Saturday, April 2 at Marshall University in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center.

The fair is open to the public from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.  The fair, which has taken place at Marshall since 2000, acknowledges scientific creativity and scholarship in West Virginia high school students. The fair is open to all 9th- through 12th-grade students attending West Virginia high schools. Entries can be either an individual or team project.

"Marshall University is honored to have this opportunity to encourage scientific achievement in West Virginia," Dr. Marcia Harrison, fair director and professor of biological sciences at Marshall, said. "The fair offers important acknowledgement and recognition for creativity and effort in math, science and engineering research."

The fair's awards ceremony takes place at 4:30 p.m. Saturday in Smith Hall, room 154. One four-year tuition waiver to Marshall University will be awarded. The grand-prize winner is awarded $750 and the grand prize runner-up receives $350.

The first-place entry in each category receives $100. Second-place entrants receive $50 and 20 additional special awards totaling approximately $1,000 in cash and prizes will be presented. All students receive a t-shirt, registration gifts and a certificate of participation.

The top two entrants receive an all-expenses-paid trip to be eligible to compete at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Phoenix, Ariz., May 8-14.

Team projects are interdisciplinary, involving two or three members who work together in a coordinated effort. Each team jointly submits one abstract and one research plan that outlines each person's work.

Registration and set-up are from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Pre-registration applications are available at www.wvssef.org. Application material and the entry fee of $15 a person must be postmarked by March 21. Entrants may send their registration materials to Dr. Marcia Harrison, Director, WVSSEF, Department of Biological Services, Marshall University, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755. Late registration is available at the fair for $25 a person.

More information is available by contacting Harrison at (304) 696-4867 or by email at harrison@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU faculty member finalist for Professor of the Year in West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Elaine Baker, professor of psychology and director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at Marshall University, was one of five West Virginia faculty members honored as finalists in the Professor of the Year competition sponsored by the Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia.

The Foundation each year honors an outstanding faculty member at a West Virginia college or university.  Wayne de Rosset, associate professor of English at Glenville Sate College, was named this year's Professor of the Year at a banquet in Charleston that recognized the five finalists. 

"I appreciate the recognition, and I applaud the West Virginia Faculty Merit Foundation for its ongoing commitment to quality teaching in higher education," Baker said. 

The award carries a $10,000 cash prize, which is presented by the foundation with financial support from Columbia Gas Transmission.

In addition to De Rosset and Baker, the other finalists were William D. Martin, professor of Anatomy at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine; Kenneth H. Yount, professor of political science and history at Alderson-Broaddus College; and Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, associate professor of history at West Virginia University.       


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Corley Dennison new dean of Marshall School of Journalism

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Corley Dennison, interim dean of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications for the past year, has been named permanent dean of the School, Interim President Michael J. Farrell said today.

A search committee selected Dennison for the position, which he has held on an interim basis since the death of former dean Hal Shaver a year ago.

"Corley Dennison is an outstanding educator who has dedicated his professional career to Marshall University," Farrell said. "I am very pleased to remove the interim tag and recognize our new dean. I am confident that he will continue the excellence in journalism and mass communications that has been the hallmark of this academic discipline."

Provost Sarah Denman, too, said she is elated with the choice of Dennison as the School's dean.

"We're very happy that out of the search process Dr. Dennison rose to the top as the best choice of the search committee and all groups that participated in the interview process," Denman said. "I am confident that he can lead the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications to the next level of excellence. I look forward to working with him in the future."

Dennison, a native of Sutton, W.Va., has been at Marshall since 1985, teaching a full range of graduate and undergraduate journalism and mass communications courses during that time. He was assistant dean to Shaver from 2003 until Shaver's death on March 1, 2004.

"I really appreciate the support from faculty, students and the entire campus during this process," Dennison said. "I've been working in the interim role for a year, and I'm looking forward to starting some new ideas and projects for the school."

Dennison described his year as interim dean as "really good, productive and busy." During that time, the School of Journalism had its five-year review, introduced a fundraising effort known as J-Walk, and began the process of moving The Parthenon headquarters from Smith Hall to the Communications Building.

Dennison received his B.A. in Mass Communications in 1976 from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., and his master's degree in English with emphasis in Speech Communications in 1984 from Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Mo.

In 1992, Dennison earned his Ed.D from West Virginia University in Educational Administration, with a minor in Journalism. 

After graduating from James Madison, he spent nine years in both commercial and public broadcasting.  He assisted in putting four radio stations on the air, including NPR affiliate WMRA-FM in Harrisonburg, Va., and WKYY-AM in Amherst, Va.

From 1980 to 1985, Dennison served as operations director of the Broadcast Services Center at Northwest Missouri State University which included KXCV-FM, a National Public Radio affiliate, KDLX-FM and KNWT-TV-cable channel 8.

His production credits include the NBC Radio network, National Public Radio and multiple syndicated programs in numerous midwestern markets, including St. Louis, Kansas City and Omaha, Neb.

Dennison has held membership in numerous national professional and educational organizations including the Broadcast Education Association, The National Broadcasting Society and The Popular Culture Association.  Since 1997, he has been a member of the editorial review board of The Journal of Radio Studies.

Dennison served as president of the Marshall University Faculty Senate from 1997 to 1999.  He was named the assistant dean of University College in 1999 and served in that position until 2003.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community & Technical College PTA Program announces new Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Kelly Terry, who has taught in the Marshall Community & Technical College's Physical Therapist Assistant Program as an adjunct faculty member for the past four years, is the program's new Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education.

Terry's teaching assignments have included orthopedic rehabilitation, patient care skills and physical therapy procedures.  She has been an active member of the program's Advisory and Admission's Committees, and has been employed with Tri-State Rehab Services as well as Genesis Rehab Services where she treated a variety of orthopedic and geriatric diagnosis.

She also has provided athletic training services to Lawrence County High School in Kentucky.

Travis H. Carlton, assistant professor and PTA Program coordinator, said Terry brings a wealth of experience and an established rapport within the clinical community to Marshall.

"As a highly respected clinician within the physical therapy profession, Kelly is a wonderful addition to our program," Carlton said. "Kelly's primary role will be to provide instruction and to coordinate and supervise the student's clinical affiliations."

Terry graduated from Marshall University in 1996 with her Bachelor of Arts degree in Athletic Training, and obtained her Master of Science in Health and Physical Education in 1998 from MU.  She completed her Doctorate of Physical Therapy in 2001 from Slippery Rock University in Pittsburgh.

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program is accredited by the Commission of Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (CAPTE).  For additional information, persons may contact the American Physical Therapy Association, Department of Accreditation, at (800) 999-APTA or online at www.apta.org.

The Physical Therapist Assistant Program accepts applications for each class with a deadline for submission of all application materials of March 1, annually.  For more information on the Physical Therapist Assistant Program, see www.marshall.edu/ctc/pta.shtml or contact Carlton at (304) 696-3353 or via e-mail at carltont@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tickets are available for 'The Third House'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tickets are available for "The Third House," the political satire scheduled for 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 6 at the West Virginia Cultural Center in Charleston. 

The event includes skits and songs that poke fun at state political officials.

"This is the 16th year for Third House.  It's a great time for the members of the media and the members of the Legislature to get together and have a laugh," said Corley F. Dennison III, Interim Dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. "The faculty and students really appreciate the efforts of the JMC Alumni Association and the members of the media in putting this event together."

The event, sponsored by Marshall University's Journalism and Mass Communications Alumni Association, is a fundraiser for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Tickets may be purchased at the House of Representatives Clerk's office, the Senate Clerk's office or the Governor's Press Secretary office at the West Virginia Capitol.  For more information or special needs, call the Marshall University W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at (304) 696-2360.

Single tickets are $25.  Tickets may be purchased at the patron level for $300 for 12 tickets including two VIP tickets for seats in the front of the auditorium with political leaders.

A reception follows the event in the Cultural Center Great Hall.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students helping to fight hunger

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association (SGA) has teamed up with the Huntington Area Food Bank (HAFB) to "CAN hunger" in the Tri-State.

Marshall student organizations are competing against one another through Friday, March 18, to see which group can collect the most pounds of food for the HAFB. The organization that collects the most pounds will receive a $500 scholarship.

Organizations interested in participating in the drive responded to a mass e-mail about the event and then received necessary guidelines. About 13 organizations signed up to help fight hunger.

Donated food will be stored in barrels provided by the HAFB and the winner will be announced the week students return from spring break.

For more information about the food bank or how to volunteer, persons may contact Jon Rickey, director of HAFB, at (304) 523-6029.

Further information is available by contacting Missy Oldaker at (304) 412-2523 or via email at Oldaker8@marshall.edu, or Kevin Pack at (304) 638-4194 or via email at Pack36@marshall.edu.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday March 11, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

Conference Friday will address ADHD, other disabilities in children

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. ‑‑ Dr. Patricia Quinn, a nationally recognized authority on attention deficit‑hyperactivity disorder, will be the featured speaker for a Parent‑Professional Collaboration Conference Friday, March 18, at Marshall University.
 
 She will speak twice, addressing the changing face of ADHD and its effects during the teen years on driving, college success and substance abuse. Other conference speakers will address a variety of issues related to children with disabilities, including family‑professional partnerships, discipline, organizational skills, sibling issues, and the impact of pervasive developmental disabilities on parenting.
 
 Quinn has written or edited a dozen ADHD-related books, including the best-selling "Putting on the Brakes: A Young People's Guide to Understanding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder." She has worked for more than 28 years in the areas of ADHD and learning disabilities, and is the parent of children with ADHD. Other conference speakers will include Dr. James Lewis of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Dr. Don Hall of Marshall University, Mary Shackelford and Terry Roberts of University Pediatrics and Saun Floyd of Link Child Care and Referral.
 
 The conference will be from 7:50 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of Marshall's Memorial Student Center. The cost is $25 for parents and $30 for most professionals (there is no charge for medical students and residents, and the cost for employees of Cabell Huntington Hospital is $15). Some stipends are available to cover parents' costs.
 
 Continuing education credits are available for physicians, nurses and others. More information on registration and credit is available from Shellie Mellert, mellert@marshall.edu.
 
 The conference is sponsored by University Pediatrics, Cabell Huntington Hospital, and Parent Partners in Education, a project of the West Virginia Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health and Marshall's medical school.
Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Vandalia chosen to exhibit at ninth annual March Madness for the Mind in San Diego

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University juniors Derek Gregg of Barboursville and Justin Swick of Chesapeake, Ohio, have been invited to exhibit their biochemistry research project, "Instrumentation for Large Scale DNA Manufacturing," at a national event in San Diego, Calif.

The National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance's (NCIIA) ninth annual March Madness for the Mind event takes place Saturday, March 19 at San Diego's Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. The exhibition spotlights new work by 15 of the nation's top teams of student scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs.

"These exceptional teams of young innovators represent the future of technology innovation," said Phil Weilerstein, executive director of the NCIIA. "They're taking exciting ideas from lab to market as part of their education - they are benefiting from a new orientation in higher education that gives students the opportunity to be successful innovators in today's dynamic, collaborative workplace."

Gregg and Swick are two of the four-member Vandalia E-team (Entrepreneurship-team) at Marshall. They displayed their project March 1 at West Virginia Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston, and placed as second runner-up in the competition for Researcher of the Year.

In spring 2003, Dr. Elizabeth Murray, Associate Professor of Biotechnology in the Integrated Science & Technology (IST) department, and Dr. Herbert Tesser, Weisburg Professor in the College of Information Technology & Engineering (CITE), offered an NCIIA-funded course entitled "Technology and Innovation."

Dr. Murray challenged IST students Gregg and Swick with the problem of mass-producing specific DNA sequences. With the assistance of Professor of Chemistry Dr. Michael Norton, the Vandalia E-team succeeded in developing a solution. Drs. Murray and Norton are the other two members of the E-team. Gregg and Swick will be accompanied by Drs. Murray and Tesser in San Diego.

Over the past two years, the students and faculty mentors have developed an innovative system and process (patent pending) for the mass production of specific DNA sequences with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The result is the Triathlon Thermal Cycler, a continuous PCR solution that ultimately will support throughput volumes of up to six liters per day, suitable for large industrial applications.

The project has developed into a commercial endeavor. In March 2004, Gregg, Swick, Murray and Norton formed Vandalia Research, LLC to commercialize the technology. It is a direct result of the E-team's research.

March Madness for the Mind is presented in conjunction with the NCIIA's annual meeting - Dynamic Learning: Changing models for changing times, which brings engineering, science, and business faculty together in San Diego for three days of papers, panels, workshops, plenaries, and networking opportunities.

The NCIIA is an initiative of the Lemelson Foundation, a private philanthropy established by one of the country's most prolific inventors, Jerome Lemelson (1923-1997), and his family, supporting faculty and students who believe that invention and innovation are critical to American higher education.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Registration underway for MU Early Ed Center's summer institute

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Early Education Center has begun registration for its upcoming Summer Workshops and Institute. Workshops take place every weekend in July. The week-long institute is planned for the final week of July.

These professional training opportunities focus on child guidance, curriculum development, implementing hands-on projects, technology, and assessment for early childhood educators - those working with children ages 3 to 8.

A different topic is presented each weekend in July. During the final week of July, MUEEC is conducting a week-long institute presenting an overview of all topics, hands-on experiences, and nightly entertainment.  

These workshops and institute not only provide worthwhile opportunities for professional development, but also offer continuing education hours for educators and child care workers.  Furthermore, workshops may be requested for on-site presentation by master level students and the director. 

For more information about workshops and to register, persons may contact the MUEEC Outreach Office at (304) 696-6301 or visit the registration page online at http://www.marshall.edu/coehs/mueec/summerinstitutes.htm.

Further information is available by contacting MUEEC Director Clayton Burch at (304) 696-6301 or via email at Burch1@marshall.edu, or public relations coordinator Zak Richards at (304) 696-6301 or (304) 437-0730, or via email at Richards25@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 10, 2005
Contact: Kelli Kerbawy , , (304) 696-6623

Drag King Sile Singleton to visit MU, discuss race and gender identity

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sile Singleton, a male impersonator who has been in the Drag King and Queen business for 10 years, speaks at Marshall University on Tuesday, March 15.

Singleton will conduct a discussion on race and gender identity from 2 to 3 p.m. in Prichard Hall room 143. The film "Drag Kings on Tour" will be shown from 7 to 9 p.m. the same day in Corbly Hall room 105.

Singleton's appearance and the film are sponsored by the MU Women's Center and the Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender (LGBT) Outreach Office.

Singleton co-founded and produced IDKE - the annual International Drag King Extravaganza, a three-day event that includes presentations, workshops and performances. She also appeared in the Discovery Channel documentary "Kings on the Road."

For more information, persons may call Kelli Kerbawy at (304) 696-6623.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Pruett announces retirement; Kueck named interim head coach

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University head football Coach Bob Pruett, one of the most successful coaches in college football history, today announced his decision to retire from coaching.

"It is just time. I love Marshall University, the administration, the fans, the state of West Virginia, all of it ... and I always will," Pruett said during a news conference in the Shewey Building. "My friends in coaching have always said you will know when the time comes and all of you will know when your time comes, too. I have been coaching football for 40 years, and it is time that I spend more time with my family and be a fan."

MU Interim President Michael J. Farrell gave Pruett the ultimate praise.

"Bob Pruett is the greatest coach in the history of Marshall University football," Farrell said. "I regret that he has decided to retire and wish him well."

Director of Athletics Bob Marcum said quarterbacks coach and associate offensive coordinator Larry Kueck will serve as interim coach until a permanent replacement is named.

"This is bitter sweet, because Bob is such a good friend and a great football coach," Kueck said. "We are going to move forward and start spring practice on time this Friday. I am very grateful for the opportunity."

Pruett, 61, amassed a 94-23 record in nine years at the helm of his alma-mater's football program. His win total is the second highest through nine seasons in Division 1-A history. Only George Woodruff with 114 has won more and that was more than a century ago. Pruett's winning percentage of .803 is higher than any active coach in the country with at least eight years experience.

Marshall's record on the field under Pruett is remarkable, and so is the Thundering Herd's graduation rate. Six times in the past eight seasons the Herd has been recognized by the American Football Coaches Association for a graduation rate of 70 percent or higher. That figure shows the importance the Marshall program, and its head coach, places on getting an education.

"Whatever Coach Pruett wants to do he has earned, and deserves," Marshall Director of Athletics Bob Marcum said. "He is one of the greatest coaches in the history of college football and we regret that he has decided to retire. We wish him nothing but the very best."

Pruett is just the second coach in history to have posted 15 victories in his first season as a head coach and is just the second to have posted an undefeated and untied record in his first season. The two coaches who accomplished those feats first were Woodruff and the legendary Walter Camp, in 1892 and 1888, respectively.

Pruett's 25-3 record after two seasons at Marshall ranks second all-time in college football history; only Camp's 25-1 mark from1888 through 1889 is better. His record of 37-4 after three seasons ranks him third, again behind only Camp and Woodruff, on the all-time coaching list.

After posting a 13-0 season in 1999, his fourth at the helm of the Thundering Herd, Pruett's career mark of 50-4 stood third all-time. Only Camp and Woodruff, who both coached in the 19th century, had more wins than Pruett after four seasons.

After leading the Herd to a record fourth consecutive Mid-American Conference title in 2000 with an 8-5 mark, Pruett's career record stood at 58-9. Only Camp and Woodruff tallied more victories in their first five years.

The wins continued to pile up during the 2001 and 2002 seasons. The Herd put together 11-2 marks both years, improving Pruett's career mark to 80-13, and moving him into second in NCAA history in terms of victories over the first seven seasons as a head coach. Only Woodruff, who was 94-6 in his first seven years (1892-1898) at Penn, can compare to Pruett.

In 2003, Pruett guided Marshall to an 8-4 mark that was highlighted by an historic 27-20 victory at then sixth-ranked, and eventual Big 12 Conference Champion, Kansas State. The Wildcats became the highest ranked opponent ever to fall to a Mid-American Conference opponent that day.


In 2004, Pruett led the Thundering Herd program to its 21st consecutive non-losing season with a 6-6 mark, the fourth longest active streak in the nation, and a berth in the PlainsCapital Fort Worth Bowl.

While the wins have been plentiful, it has been the Herd's performance under Pruett when a championship is on the line that has been most impressive. In 22 games that have decided either a division, conference, bowl or national championship, Pruett's teams are an amazing 18-4, a winning percentage of more than 82 percent.

Pruett has built a successful program that not only produces champions and graduates, but National Football League Draft picks and players. Following the 2003 season, Marshall's Darius Watts was chosen in the second round of the NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos.

Watts is the 12th player to be drafted under Pruett and is one of 20 former Marshall standouts currently playing in the NFL. In fact, at least one Marshall player has been picked in the past five NFL Drafts and Pruett has seen more than 30 of his student-athletes go on to NFL camps.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Educator Expo allows College of Education students, alumni

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The annual Educator Expo, sponsored by Marshall University's Career Services Center and the College of Education and Human Services, takes place from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 15, and Wednesday, March 16, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

The fair is open to all Marshall College of Education students and alumni, and is an excellent opportunity for them to meet with a large number of organizations about teaching positions. Teacher candidates also will have the opportunity to mingle with prospective employers during a reception at the Radisson Hotel Huntington from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, March 15.

Pre-registration for teacher candidates is required for this nationally recognized two-day event. A one-hour open registration period from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. is scheduled both days in the Don Morris Room prior to the start of pre-scheduled interviews. Teacher candidates may adjust interview schedules at that time.

Pre-scheduled interviews end at 2:30 p.m. both days. Recruiters will be available at their tables between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. to speak to candidates and provide additional information with no appointment necessary.

Recruiters from 90 school systems and 10 states - Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia - are participating.

The expo provides teacher candidates the opportunity to interview with employers that have a high demand for Marshall graduates. An updated listing of the participants is available by visiting the Career Services Web site at www.marshall.edu/career-services.

More information is available by contacting Jamie Samples at (304) 696-2370.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday March 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Headliners' returns at Marshall with new format

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Headliners," a public affairs program produced at Marshall University, returns to the air this week with a new host and a new format.

MU Interim President Michael J. Farrell is host of the 30-minute show, which is shown on cable systems throughout the Advantage Valley region. The show debuted a year ago, and was aired throughout much of 2004.

H. Keith Spears, Vice President for Communications and Marketing at Marshall, and the show's executive producer, said "Headliners" is not limited to a one-on-one interview between the host and a single guest as it was last year.

"This new format allows us to feature more faculty and students as they deal with current issues that are relative to all of us," Spears said. "It will feature newsmakers, but will also have on-location reports and interviews."

"Headliners" premieres in the Huntington area at 8 a.m. Tuesday, March 8, on  Adelphhia Cable's Educational Information Channel (Channel 25). It runs five times a day, every day, including weekends, at 8 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 4 p.m., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. 

The program debuts in the Kanawha Valley at 10 a.m. Friday, March 11 on the West Virginia Library Television Network (Channel 11) on Charter Communications. "Headliners" runs at 10 a.m., 4 p.m. and 10 p.m. each Friday, and at 4 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Saturday.

The first show of the new season focuses on Marshall's Carter G. Woodson faculty initiative.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday March 3, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More than 350 high school students to attend HOSA State Leadership Conference at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 350 high school and post-secondary students from throughout West Virginia will attend the Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) State Leadership Conference Friday, March 11, and Saturday, March 12, at Marshall University's Memorial Student Center.

The event is sponsored by the Marshall Community and Technical College. This is the third consecutive year it is being conducted at Marshall.

Bobby Petrocelli, a motivational speaker from Seminole, Fla., is the keynote speaker during the opening session, which takes place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. March 11 in the student center's Don Morris Room. His speech is titled "10 Seconds Can Change Your Life Forever."

The speech is the story of how a tragic event instantly changed Petrocelli's life. One night, Petrocelli went to bed in suburban America, a happy man with a loving wife. But when he woke up dazed in his kitchen, his wife was dead and his life forever changed. The pickup truck that crashed through his bedroom wall was driven by a man who was legally drunk.

Petrocelli will share with the students how he fought through the darkness to triumph; how he drew upon his faith and friends; and how he came to love again. His coaching background and expertise with youth have made him one of the top communicators in his field.

During the conference, the students will compete in health-related categories, including speech, writing, drawing, and written tests. First-, second-, and third-place winners will have the opportunity to compete this summer at the national conference in Nashville, Tenn.

The following is a list of events for the conference:

Friday, March 11

9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.: Conference Registration, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Room

11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.: State Officer Candidate Screening

Noon - 1 p.m.: Advisors' Orientation Meeting

1 - 2 p.m.: Marshall Community and Technical College Preview

2 - 2:30 p.m.: Courtesy Corps Meeting

2:30 - 3:30 p.m.: Round One Written Tests

3:45 - 4:45 p.m.: National Healthcare Issues Exam

6:30 - 8:30 p.m.: Opening Session, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

8:30 - 11 p.m.: Advisors' Reception

8:30 - 11 p.m.: Dance to the Nashville Beat

 

Saturday, March 12

8 a.m.: Competitive Events

10 a.m. - 2 p.m.: Voting:  2005-2006 WV HOSA State Officers

6 - 8:30 p.m.: Awards Closing Session, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU faculty member featured in Spring Teacher Lecturer Series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Nega Debela, a Marshall University faculty member in Elementary and Secondary Education, is the featured lecturer for Marshall's 2005 Spring Teacher Lecturer Series, according to Dr. Jane McKee, associate dean for Academic Programs.

The series is sponsored by the College of Education and Human Services (CEHS).

Debela, a native of Ethiopia, will lecture on "The Benefits and Challenges of Multi-lingual Classrooms in General and English as a Second Language (ESL) in Particular."  He is the latest speaker in a series started to meet the diversity needs of students in the CEHS.

Sessions are scheduled on the Huntington campus for education students and the public is invited to attend all presentations.

The first session takes place from 1 to 2:15 p.m. Friday, March 4 in room 105 of Corbly Hall.  Debela will make two presentations on Thursday, March 10.  The first is for elementary methods students from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center.  It will be followed by a session for secondary methods students from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. in room 235 of Jenkins Hall.

Debela, who has five higher education degrees, including a master's degree in Information Systems from Marshall University, has long been involved in teaching English as a Second Language programs.  

After being educated in Ethiopia, the United Kingdom and Australia, he immigrated to the United States in 1999, settling in the Washington area where he worked for the Department of Alternative Programs, where he taught Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).  In 2001, Debela  joined the faculty of Marshall's Graduate School of Education and Professional Development in South Charleston. 

For additional information about the Teacher Lecturer Program or this year's presentations, persons may contact McKee at (304) 696-2859.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday March 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Award-winning author keynote speaker at Women of Color program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Patricia Russell McCloud, author of A is for Attitude:  An Alphabet for Living, is this year's keynote speaker at the Women of Color program to be held Tuesday, March 8, on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Women of Color awards will be presented during the celebration, which begins at noon in the Alumni Lounge of the Memorial Student Center.   A reception and book signing follow.

McCloud, a winner of the Elks Oratorical Award, is a professional orator who has been identified by Black Enterprise magazine as one of the five top business motivators in the United States.

The program is free and open to the public.  Displays will be set up in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center throughout the day.

The Women of Color Program activities are coordinated by Fran L. Jackson, Leah Tolliver, Taella Hill, LaRhonda Johnson, and Lisa Allen.

For more information, persons may contact Fran Jackson at (304) 696-6705 or Leah Tolliver at (304) 696-3112.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor authors book on Buckskin Boys

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - With lots of help from family and friends, Marshall University psychology professor W. Joseph Wyatt turned his late father's plans to publish a book into reality.

The 235-page softbound book, published in November 2004, documents the history of the Buckskin Boy Scout Council of West Virginia from 1919 through 2004. It is titled Buckskin Boys: A History of the Buckskin Council, 1919-2004 Boy Scouts of America, and was published by Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Inc., of Charleston, W.Va. Former Explorer Scout Stan Cohen is the publisher of Pictorial Histories.

The book is a compilation of hundreds of photographs, along with other memorabilia, much of which was collected by Wyatt's father, William H. "Bill" Wyatt, before his death on Jan. 14, 2000.

Joe Wyatt, who was raised in St. Albans, W.Va., and now lives in Hurricane, W.Va., was an Eagle Scout in his father's Boy Scout troop. He was aware that his father had been developing a manuscript outline and collecting materials for the book. As he was finalizing his father's estate, he found materials and photographs intended for the book.

"I found the materials he had collected, his outline and even the start-ups of several sections that he had written by hand on several yellow legal pads," Joe Wyatt said. "After I reviewed his material, it seemed only natural that the project be completed."

When Wyatt set down to write the book, he realized a lot of research was still needed.  He sent out press releases to every daily and weekly newspaper in the council district covering 23 counties, seeking photos, clippings, anecdotes, narratives and other pertinent information.

He also sent requests for relevant information to longtime scouters outside the Charleston-metro area, many of whom not only returned the forms to Wyatt, but also passed his request on to others in their areas. Many of them, too, contacted Wyatt, who eventually had enough information to compile the book.

"I hope you enjoy this book," he wrote in the foreword. "And, if my father is looking down at the finished product, I trust he will approve."

Persons interested in ordering a copy of the book may do so by sending a check of $27.95 to Wyatt at P.O. Box 844, Hurricane, WV 25526, or by visiting the Boy Scout office at 2829 Kanawha Blvd. E. in Charleston, W.Va.  

More information is available by e-mailing Wyatt at wyatt@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday March 1, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU students win two awards in Researcher of the Year competition

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students earned two of the three awards presented today by the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (WV EPSCoR) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Undergraduate Researcher of the Year competition at the Capitol.

Marshall freshman Zachary Tackett of Proctorville, Ohio, was chosen first runner-up for his biochemistry poster titled, "Identification of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus." He won $500.

MU juniors Justin Swick of Chesapeake, Ohio and Derek Gregg of Barboursville were chosen second runner-up for their biochemistry poster titled, "Instrumentation for Large Scale DNA Manufacturing." They were presented with a check for $300.

Danielle Large of Alderson-Broaddus College was chosen Undergraduate Researcher of the Year for her biology poster titled, "Barriers to the Eradication of HIV in infected Individuals: Factors Contributing to the Persistence of the Latent Viral Reservoir." She won $1,000.

The awards were presented by Paul Hill, director of WV EPSCoR, during a reception that followed Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol. Ninety-nine students representing eight public institutions and four private institutions took part in the event, displaying posters of their projects on both levels of the Capitol's rotunda area.

Fourteen Researcher of the Year finalists were chosen from the 99 participants, and the three winners were picked from the 14 finalists.

"We had two juniors and a freshman who walk away with checks," Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell said after congratulating the winners.  "What does that say? It says we're doing good things here at Marshall University.

"Zach Tackett began his research during his junior and senior years at Fairland High School. As outstanding as he is, he chose Marshall because it provided the best opportunity for him and his continuing research."

Tackett described himself as "very shocked" when Hill called his name during the ceremony in the lower rotunda. But, he said he's also aware that research at Marshall is moving quickly ahead.

"As Interim President Farrell said, we took home the majority of the checks today," Tackett said. "Research in the area of biotechnology is advancing at a rapid pace."

Both Gregg and Swick said they were "very excited" to place in the top three.

"We've worked really hard the past two years," Gregg said. "We knew we had the caliber of research that was good enough to be included here; we just didn't know where we stood."

Swick praised WV EPSCoR  for allowing the students to show their work to legislators and visitors at the capitol.

"We're thankful to be representing Marshall University here at the Capitol," Swick said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday February 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

SCORES attracts more than 2,000 high school students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 2,000 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will be on Marshall University's main campus Friday and Saturday, March 4-5, to participate in the 27th annual SCORES Academic Festival.

Ryan Helton, senior admissions counselor and SCORES coordinator, said this is the largest SCORES competition ever, in terms of student participation. The event is hosted by the Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES).

"In its 27th year, SCORES is proud to announce record numbers," Helton said. "With more than 2,000 students registered from more than 60 schools, this year is sure to bring the stiffest competition from the finest young minds in the tri-state."

The 9th-to 12th-grade students compete for Marshall tuition waivers and trophies in more than 100 contests. The awards ceremony is set for 1 p.m. Saturday, March 5, in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The student receiving the most points in the Outstanding Student competition and planning to attend Marshall receives the Robert Wheeler Scholarship, which provides a tuition waiver for one year and $1,000 towards books, room, board, etc. If the student maintains a 3.0 GPA during the spring and fall terms, he or she will be eligible to receive $1,000 for a maximum of four consecutive years.

One of the festival's highlights is the 32-team, double-elimination Quiz Bowl, which begins at 9 a.m. Friday, March 4. The opening rounds are as follows:

9 a.m. - Boyd County vs. Huntington High School, Cabell Midland vs. Ironton St. Joe, Chesapeake vs. Huntington St. Joe, Ashland Paul Blazer vs. Spring Valley, Fairland vs. Ironton High School.

9:45 a.m. - Capital vs. Wahama, Rock Hill vs. Wheelersburg, Portsmouth vs.Russell, Symmes Valley vs. Hannan, Sheldon Clark vs. South Gallia.

            1 p.m. - Bridgeport vs. Notre Dame, Cameron vs. St. Mary's, Tug Valley vs. Parkersburg Catholic, Matewan vs. Ripley, Ritchie vs. Parkersburg.

            1:45 p.m. - Point Pleasant vs. James Monroe.

The first- and second-place teams in the Quiz Bowl receive $500 and have the opportunity to receive an additional $500.

More information on the SCORES Academic Festival is available by calling Helton at (304) 696-6754.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Award-winning poets to read from their work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poets Don Platt and Dana Roeser will read from their work at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 10, in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Platt is the author of two collections of poems, most recently Cloud Atlas from Purdue University Press. His work has appeared in many of the country's leading journals, including Poetry, The Paris Review, The Georgia Review, The Nation, and The New Republic.  He received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the Paumanok Poetry Prize and a Discovery/The Nation Award.

Roeser's first book of poems, Beautiful Motion, received the Samuel French Morse Poetry Prize and has been published by Northeastern University Press.  Her work has appeared in such journals as The Iowa Review, The Massachusetts Review, and The Antioch Review. 

Both poets have appeared frequently at universities across the nation.  Platt teaches in the Writing Program at Purdue University, and Roeser teaches at Butler University in Indianapolis.

Their joint appearance is sponsored by the Marshall University Visiting Writers Series, the College of Liberal Arts, and the English Department.  The event is free to the public.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Five MU students finalists for state Researcher of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five Marshall University students, representing four projects, are among 14 finalists for West Virginia Undergraduate Researcher of the Year, which will be announced Tuesday, March 1 during a reception following the second annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston.

The MU finalists are Drew Clark and Zachary Tackett of Proctorville, Ohio, along with Derek Gregg of Barboursville, Justin Swick of Chesapeake, Ohio and Kelli Hall of Huntington. A West Virginia Undergraduate Researcher of the Year and two runners-up will be chosen by a panel of judges.

The first-place winner will receive $1,000, first runner-up $500 and second runner-up $300. The competition is presented by the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (WV EPSCoR) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) in recognition of original scientific merit and contribution to the advancement of technical knowledge among all institutions in West Virginia.

The finalists were selected from the 99 student researchers chosen as participants in Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol. The research projects are based on their content, presentation and plans for publication and support funding. The students' posters will be on display from 9:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. on both levels of the rotunda area of the capitol.

The following is a list of the five Marshall finalists, their disciplines and their research posters:

Drew Clark, Chemistry - "An Atoms in Molecules Study of Hydridobridged Carbocations."
Derek Gregg and Justin Swick, Biochemistry - "Instrumentation for Large Scale DNA Manufacturing."
Kelli Hall, Mathematics - "Changing Time Scales."
Zachary Tackett, Biochemistry - "Identification of Fluoroquinolone Resistance Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus."

Students from West Virginia University, Alderson-Broaddus College, Bluefield State College, West Virginia University Institute of Technology, University of Charleston and Shepherd University also are among the finalists.
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Rockefeller to speak at Student Leadership Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller will speak at the West Virginia Association of Educational Opportunity Program Personnel's 4th Annual TRiO Student Leadership Conference banquet Saturday, Feb. 26 at Marshall University.

The banquet, which begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room, is one of many activities planned for the conference, which takes place Friday, Feb. 25, through Sunday, Feb. 27. The event is for college-bound students in grades six through 12 in the tri-state, including Ohio and Kentucky.

The weekend's activities include a State Capitol Complex tour in Charleston, a visit to Pullman Square in downtown Huntington, college fair and topical workshops on leadership, time management, learning styles, diversity, ACT, and writing/grammar skills. 

A group of 11 Cabell County students from the Empowering Appalachia Talent Search Program will visit Gov. Joe Manchin's office at the capitol at 11 a.m. Friday. At that time, the governor will proclaim Saturday, Feb. 26, West Virginia TRiO Day.

This year's conference theme Bridging Worlds, Building Leaderships embodies the mission of TRiO programs, according to La Rhonda Johnson, a counselor with the Talent Search Program. She said the community- and university-based college preparatory programs identify and support students who have the potential to succeed in postsecondary education.

Funded by the United States Department of Education, TRiO programs have served college-bound students of all ages for 40 years and have a proven record of success in helping students achieve educational goals, Johnson said.

Through hands-on activities, mentoring, and individual attention, support is offered to students in the form of academic, career, financial and personal counseling. In addition, TRiO program participants are provided with tutoring, career exploration workshops, decision-making skills, self awareness clarification, financial aid information, cultural enrichment activities and much more at no cost.

For more information regarding TRiO programs or to register to attend the Student Leadership Conference, persons may call (304) 696-2647 or (304) 696-3258. The one-day registration fee for Saturday's activities is $55. Wednesday, Feb. 23 is the last day to register.
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

President's office features Marshall students' artwork

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell is including student artwork in the dcor of his Old Main office on the Huntington campus.

The "Presidential Gallery" features the artwork of five students from the Department of Art and Design in the College of Fine Arts. Farrell said he chose to use the student artwork rather than typical prints or photographs of the university because he wants to emphasize the importance of MU's students.

"The president's office should be a showcase of the talent that Marshall students possess," Farrell said. "I think that the selections capture the essence and diversity of our students. I'm extraordinarily honored to have the artwork on display."
 Michael Cornfeld, associate professor of art, said the pieces chosen were based on their quality and professional look. Cornfeld also chose pieces that represent the different areas of concentration within the department, including: painting, graphic design, sculpture and print making.

 "President Farrell wants the work of Marshall art students to be seen in a lot of different venues," Cornfeld said. "I believe that he is really showing support for the art department by making his office the first new venue for these art students."

The students whose work is displayed in the president's office are graduate students Hikari Kimura of Gunma, Japan, Christopher Worth of Huntington, Jackie Parsons of Nitro, W.Va., and Kimberly Nickell of Victor, W.Va., and undergraduate senior Staci Leech of Clintonville, W.Va.

"I'm very pleased, it shows he actually has an interest in his art department," Parsons said. "He is willing to support art and be proud enough to hang it in his office for everyone to see. It's a pleasant surprise."

Four of the five students today had their pictures taken with Farrell in front of their artwork. Each student will receive a certificate from Farrell as well.

"The students were very pleased and proud to be asked to put their work in the president's office," Cornfeld said. "Students in the department take pride in knowing the administration is supportive of what they are doing."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday February 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

History scholar Blanche Wiesen Cook to give talk on Eleanor Roosevelt

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Blanche Wiesen Cook, distinguished professor of History and Women's Studies at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, will give a talk at Marshall University on "Eleanor Roosevelt and the Ongoing Struggle for Human Rights."

The event, made possible through a grant from the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 3, at the Smith Recital Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

"It is an honor to have Professor Cook here to help us celebrate Women's History Month," Dr. Katie D. Williams, project director and assistant professor of Women's History at Marshall, said. "Cook is a renowned scholar on the life of Eleanor Roosevelt and an outspoken advocate on behalf of women's issues."

Cook's most recent book, bestseller Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume Two, was published by Viking Penguin in July 1999. Volume One, published in 1992, remained on The New York Times bestseller list for three months and received many awards, including the 1992 Biography Prize from The Los Angeles Times, and the Lambda Literary Award.

Cook is now working on the third and final volume of Eleanor Roosevelt. For the first time, in Cook's biography, "Roosevelt" is seen as the most important woman in American political history - an activist, a desiring and desired woman, a person of great independence of spirit, a teacher, writer and crusader for social justice and human rights worldwide.

Cook shares Eleanor Roosevelt's commitment to the principle of greater dignity and security for all women and men, and, in addition to her teaching, writes frequent reviews and columns for many newspapers and periodi­cals. She has edited and contributed to several anthologies, and her book The Declassified Eisenhower was listed by The New York Times Book Review as one of the notable books of 1981.

For more than 20 years, she also produced and hosted her own program for Radio Pacifica, originally called Activists and Agitators, and later retitled Women and the World in the 1990s. Cook appears frequently on television, on such programs as The Today Show, Good Morning America, C-Span's Booknotes and MacNeil/Lehrer, where she participated in the joint PBS-NBC coverage of the 1992 Democratic National Convention.

Cook is a provocative and engaging speaker on history, politics and women's issues for political, academic and community organiza­tions. She is the former vice president for research of the American Historical Association, and was vice president and chair of the Fund for Open Information and Accountability (FOIA, Inc.).

She also was co-founder and co-chair of the Freedom of Information and Access Committee of the Organization of American Historians, which was actively committed to maintaining the integrity of the Freedom of Information Act. Cook received her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 1970. She lives in East Hampton, N.Y.

More information about the event may be obtained by calling Dr. Katie D. Williams at (304) 696-2959.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Signing of 2 + 2 agreement strengthens relationship

ASHLAND, Ky. - Presidents from Ashland Community and Technical College and Marshall University today signed a 2 + 2 articulation agreement that further strengthens the relationship between the two institutions.

The agreement, signed in a ceremony at ACTC's College Drive Campus, offers an additional 2 + 2 degree option in Business Administration. It allows students to complete an Associate in Arts at ACTC and transfer the courses smoothly into any business major within the Lewis College of Business at Marshall.

"We know that we have friends at Marshall University," Ashland Community and Technical College President Greg Adkins said. "This partnership, among the many others that we in higher education forge, enhances higher education throughout the region. The concept of working together for the common good improves educational, as well as economic, vitality of the tri-state."

Adkins was joined by Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell in signing the agreement.

"Marshall University is very proud of the long relationship with Ashland Community and Technical College," Farrell said. "We have been very satisfied with the students who have transferred here as part of the 2 plus 2 agreement. "With this agreement, students can begin their academic careers in Ashland and complete them at Marshall with confidence that they have received a high quality education close to home."

The agreement specifically states that students may enter Accounting, Economics, International Economics, Finance, Management, Health Care Management, Management Information Systems or Marketing.

The institutions also announced the updating of another 2 + 2 agreement already in place between the two institutions. It allows ACTC students who are pursuing an Associate in Applied Science degree with a management option a smooth transition into Marshall's Business Administration program with a management major. The original agreement was signed in 1996.

"There are many positives in having 2 + 2 programs," said Lorraine Anderson, associate dean in Marshall's Lewis College of Business. "They allow us to articulate the transfer of courses between two programs which makes students feel comfortable knowing how their coursework will be accepted at the next institution."

Anderson said the agreements also could encourage a student to pursue a four-year degree when previously he or she had considered only a two-year degree.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Unveiling of Marian Anderson postage stamp Feb. 28 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marian Anderson 2005 Black Heritage Commemorative U.S. Postage Stamp will be unveiled during a ceremony Monday, Feb. 28 at Marshall University.

The event, sponsored by Marshall's office of multicultural affairs and the U.S. Postal Service in Huntington, begins at 6 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. The public is invited to attend.

The Marian Anderson Stamp is the 28th in the Postal Service's Black Heritage Series of stamps. The latest stamp was first revealed Jan. 27 during a first-day-of-issue ceremony in Washington, D.C. The local unveiling, a tribute to Black History and Anderson's contributions in American history, is one of many events at Marshall celebrating Black History Month.

Members of the Marshall and Huntington communities, along with U.S. Postal Service representatives, will conduct the unveiling. Bruce William Moody, a Marshall University alumnus and retired high school principal in Fairburn, Ga., will be the featured speaker.

"This is one of the most important events we put on because it's a collaboration between the Postal Service and Marshall University," Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at MU, said. "And, it's the unveiling of an outstanding black American. We look forward to this event with great enthusiasm." 

The stamp art of Anderson, a legendary opera star throughout much of the 20th century, shows an oil painting of her by Albet Slark of Ajax, Ontario, Canada. It is based on a black and white photograph believed to have been made by Moise Benkow in Stockholm around 1934.

Anderson is regarded as one of the greatest classically trained singers of the 20th century and an important figure in the struggle of black Americans for racial equality. She performed more than 50 times at Carnegie Hall, making her first appearance there in 1920, and her last one in 1989.

Her most memorable performance occurred in 1939, in response to the Constitution Hall's division of race policy, calling for "white artists only." She presented an eclectic repertoire, including "America," Schubert's "Ave Maria," and several black spirituals, to an audience of more than 75,000 from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

In 1955, Anderson became the first African-American artist to perform at the Metropolitan Opera and was named as a delegate to the General Assembly of the United Nations by President Dwight Eisenhower.

Anderson received the NAACP's Spingarn Award, presented by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1938, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, presented by President Lyndon Johnson in 1963.

Anderson was born into a working class family in south Philadelphia in 1897 and died in Portland, Ore., in 1993 at the age of 96.

Several people will speak during the stamp unveiling, including Cleckley and Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell. Other speakers include Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs; James E. Adkins, Charleston, W.Va., postmaster with the U.S. Postal Service; William Smith, superintendent of Cabell County Schools, and Andre Taylor, a reporter with The Herald-Dispatch.

Special music will be performed by the Kellogg Elementary School Choir and MU student Angela Moore. About 40 members of the Kellogg choir, under the direction of Stacy Morrison, plan to sing six short spirituals. Moore will sing two songs.

Handouts and door prizes will be provided by the U.S. Postal Service, and a reception will follow the program.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Backyard Dixie Jazz Stompers featured in 'Jazz@Jomie' concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Backyard Dixie Jazz Stompers, a group of musicians from the Huntington and Charleston areas, are the featured guest artists Friday, Feb. 18, in the fifth concert of the Marshall University department of jazz studies' inaugural "Jazz@Jomie" series.

 The concert begins at 8 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Forum, and admission is $10. Marshall students are admitted free. The Forum is located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on 5th Avenue across from the Memorial Student Center.

 Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies, said the Backyard Dixie Jazz Stompers were formed in 1984, and came together because of their love for Dixieland Jazz. They have been featured at the Rusty Nail in Kent, Ohio, and the Coon Sanders Original Nighthawks Fans' Reunion in Raleigh, N.C., and they appear regularly at the annual Coon Sanders Bash in Huntington.

The Stompers also have been featured at the Huntington Museum of Art Hilltop Festival, Camden Park, Taste of River Cities, West Virginia Pumpkin Festival, Lawrence County (Ky.) Septemberfest and Huntington's St. Patrick's Day festivities.

They have played aboard the West Virginia Belle, the Jewel City Sternwheeler and the PA Denny Riverboats, and at Huntington's Harris Riverfront Park during visits of the Delta Queen, Mississippi Queen and the American Queen Sternwheelers.

For more information, persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-2452 or via email at bingham@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Twenty-four Marshall students to participate in second annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students are participating in the second annual West Virginia Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston Tuesday, March 1.

The event, which takes place from 9:45 a.m. to 2 p.m., features 99 students from across West Virginia, including 24 Marshall students. Their displays will be set up on both levels of the rotunda area of the capitol.

Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol is designed to give students the opportunity to present their research in poster format and talk with legislators about their findings. The projects are original research and the posters have been designed for a general audience.

The students are presenting posters in the areas of biochemistry, biology, chemistry, computer science and information technology, engineering, environmental science, geography, geology, mathematics, physics and psychology.

"This event highlights for the public an exciting array of research projects students engage in on our college campuses," Michael Castellani, Marshall chemistry professor and organizing committee chair, said. "The posters show the component of higher education that gives students the opportunity to use what they learn in the classroom in the process of discovery.  Their research represents a major transition for them as they move from being students to entering their chosen careers."

Students who were hopeful of participating in Undergraduate Research Day applied online. Their applications were then examined by a committee and those chosen to participate were notified.

The following is a list of the 24 Marshall students, their hometown, their disciplines, their research posters and their advisors:

  • Andrea Belderes, Cross Lanes, W.Va., Adria Crutchfield, Ft. Drum, N.Y., and Brittany Poling, Buckhannon, W.Va. (Psychology) - "Deployment: The Effects of a Forced Separation in Relation to Attachment Schemas." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Marsha Bryant, Man, W.Va., Lena Weisman, Huntington, W.Va., and Meredith Woodall, Huntington, W.Va. (Psychology) - "A Quality of Life Assessment for Care Recipients of Faith in Action of the River Cities." Christopher LeGrow, advisor.
  • Drew Clark, Proctorville, Ohio (Chemistry) - "An Atoms in Molecules Study of Hydridobridged Carbocations." Lawrence Schmitz, advisor.
  • Alexia Denson, Given, W.Va., and James Watters, St. Albans, W.Va. (Psychology) - "Goal Specificity and its Relation to Problem Solving Performance."  David Trumpower, advisor.
  • Anna Fauber, Belle, W.Va., Monica Miller, Harts, W.Va., and Holly West, Ashland, Ky. (Psychology) - "The Role of Protective and Aggravating Variables and Their Relation to Identified Health Outcomes." Sarah Lewis, advisor.
  • Melanie Fugett, Borderland, W.Va. (Psychology) - "Women Warriors: Motivational Factors for Female Political Participation in Revolutionary or Guerrilla Movements." Marybeth Beller, advisor.
  • Derek Gregg, Barboursville, W.Va., and Justin Swick, Chesapeake, Ohio (Biochemistry) - "Instrumental for Large Scale DNA Manufacturing." Michael Norton, advisor.
  • Kelli Hall, Huntington, W.Va. (Mathematics) - "Changing Time Scales." Ralph Oberste-Vorth, advisor.
  • Jessica Hughes, Ashland, Ky. (Psychology) - "The Mediating Factors of the Negative Effects of Divorce." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Tara Lamm, Elkview, W.Va. (Psychology) - "Funny or Offensive: Defining the Boundaries of Appropriate Workplace Humor." Christopher LeGrow, advisor.
  • Nicole Liette, Huntington, W.Va., and Maria Ramey, Harts, W.Va.
    (Biochemistry) - "A New Way to Look at Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms." Elizabeth Murray, advisor.
  • Courtney Scott, Willow Wood, Ohio and Jessica Taylor, Whitesville, W.Va. (Psychology) - "Attachment and Depression." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Zachary Tackett, Proctorville, Ohio (Biochemistry) - "Identification of Fluoroquinolone." Elizabeth Murray, advisor.
  • Steven Taylor, Huntington, W.Va. (Physics) - "Accessibility of Home Blood Pressure Monitors for Blind or Visually Impaired People." Tom Wilson, advisor.

Other college and universities represented during Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol include: Alderson-Broaddus College, Bluefield State College, Davis & Elkins College, Fairmont State University, Shepherd University, University of Charleston, West Virginia State University, West Liberty State College, Wheeling-Jesuit University, West Virginia University and West Virginia University-Institute of Technology.

More information is available by contacting Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU researchers receive patent for new type of light bulb

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A patent on a product invented at Marshall University during a cooperative research and development effort from 1998 through 2001 has been approved by the U.S. Patent and Trade Office.

The patent is for a flat ceramic-on-steel light-emitting bulb or device that could lead to new manufacturing jobs for West Virginia in addition to helping reduce energy costs for many of our nation's businesses, consumers, and governmental agencies, said Richard Begley, one of two Marshall professors involved in the research and development effort.

"The ceramic light is anticipated to be immediately useful in signs for transportation and traditional advertising," Begley said. "Advantages of the new technology include improved durability and visibility during inclement weather and at night with smaller power requirements."

The new flat, steel ceramic bulb also will be immediately useful for homeowners interested in address markers that will be easier to see at night and cost less to illuminate, Begley said. He added that preliminary market research appears to be very promising with significant demands for the new lights nationally and internationally. International patent applications for the new technology also are being developed, Begley said.

West Virginia Congressman Nick J. Rahall, II said he is excited about the new light technology created at Marshall.

"I have always known that we have some of the best researchers and scientists in the world here in West Virginia," Rahall said. "Now, everyone else will also know. This new technology will not only create many new manufacturing jobs in Southern West Virginia, but it will also make our roads safer with signs that are easier for all of us to read."

Begley, an engineering professor who works at the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) at Marshall, joined with Michael Norton, a Marshall Chemistry professor, and researchers from Alfred University College of Ceramics in New York and Meadow River Enterprises, Inc., an Alta, W.Va., small manufacturing firm, in developing the light bulb.

Begley said the effort was made possible with funds obtained from a national competition conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory program established through the efforts of West Virginia Sen. Robert C. Byrd. The successful proposal was prepared through a public private partnership developed by Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. In addition, more than $175,000 in federal funding was obtained through the efforts of Congressman Rahall and the RTI.

"This research partnership developed at Marshall University has resulted in a new product line that will keep our current and many additional employees working for a long time," Don Osborne, president of Meadow River Enterprises, said. "We would not be in this position without Marshall University helping us to satisfy our research needs and I am extremely hopeful that all the new manufacturing can be done here in West Virginia."

Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell noted the importance of collaboration in developing the product.

"I am extremely gratified that the creative work took place on the Marshall University campus," Farrell said. "Equally important, Marshall's engineer and scientist collaborated with a West Virginia business to produce this product. When Marshall succeeds, West Virginia succeeds."

More information is available by calling Begley at (304) 696-6660, or Norton at (304) 696-6627.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 27, 2005
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, (304) 746-1971

Planning and grant writing workshop planned for Feb. 11 at Marshall's South Charleston campus

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A planning and grant writing workshop, "Advancing the Non-Profit Organization," is being offered by Marshall Community & Technical College's Continuing Education Program on Friday, Feb. 11 at Marshall University's South Charleston campus at 100 Angus E. Peyton Drive.

Both morning and afternoon sessions are available. Strategic Planning for Grant Writing is offered from 9 a.m. until noon; Successful Grant Writing runs from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m.

Participants may select either session for $55, or attend both sessions for $95. Two or more participants from the same organization receive a $10 discount off the combined session fee.

The Strategic Planning facilitator is Skip Gebhart, a consultant and trainer specializing in long-range planning, leadership development and workforce diversity. He has conducted seminars for numerous government agencies as well as for national corporations including IBM, Exxon-Mobile, Dow Chemical, and amazon.com.

Lisa Starcher Collins facilitates the afternoon session on Successful Grant Writing. Collins was a non-profit executive for 17 years, most recently serving as president and CEO of Artsbridge in Parkersburg. She has been awarded more than a million dollars in grant funds and now serves as an independent consultant for non-profits through her business, Charity Match.

To register or to receive additional information, persons may contact Martha Pierson, program manager for the MCTC Continuing Education Program in South Charleston, at (304) 746-2062, or by e-mail.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor to receive Mabel Lee Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University professor Jennifer Mak will receive the Mabel Lee Award from the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance on April 14.

The award, which will be presented in Chicago during the alliance's convention and exposition, recognizes its young members who have demonstrated outstanding potential in scholarship, teaching and professional leadership.

The alliance evaluates the candidates on exemplary teaching abilities, publications, citations (awards or other recognition for outstanding teaching), coaching or administration performance and active leadership in district or national associations of the alliance.

Mak is an assistant professor in the division of exercise science, sport and recreation. She has been at Marshall since August 2000 after receiving her doctoral degree from Indiana University. She is president of the state branch of the national association and coordinator of the sports management and marketing program and the recreation and park resources program at Marshall.

Mak has 15 published articles and has 25 refereed or invited presentations at international, national, regional and state conferences. Mak recently was invited by the South China Normal University to speak at the International Forum of Sports for All.

"It is a great encouragement for me to be recognized by my colleagues as a young professional," Mak said. "I will continue to work hard in developing my scholarship, teaching and professional leadership. Marshall has provided a great environment for me. My recognition is only one example of Marshall's national prominence for excellence in the areas of high quality teaching, research and services."

Dr. Robert Barnett, professor in the division of exercise science, sport and recreation at Marshall, wrote the recommendation letter for Mak.

"It is really phenomenal for a young professional to receive this award," Barnett said. "It reflects tremendously well on Marshall and our program. Jennifer has really stepped up in the areas of research and professional service to our division. It is rare that someone this young has accomplished so much."

For more information, persons may contact Mak at (304) 696-2997 or via email.

Photo Available


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Legendary musician Hugh Masekela at Marshall on Feb. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hugh Masekela, a legendary musician who has been hailed as both a prodigiously talented giant of jazz and world music and a pioneer in bringing the voice and spirit of African music to the West, is coming to Marshall University Monday, Feb. 7 for a series of workshops, media presentations and a performance.

Masekela's visit is sponsored by Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the Department of Music, the Center for African American Student Programs, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

Participating in events with Masekela will be D. Michael Cheers, former editor of Ebony magazine and a renowned photojournalist and author whose book about Masekela, "Still Grazing," was published last year.

Both Masekela and Cheers will present workshops for Marshall students during the day. Masekela will conduct music workshops and Cheers will meet with journalism and art students.

A reception, photo exhibit and book signing will take place from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Birke Art Gallery. At 8 p.m. in Smith Music Hall, Masekela and Cheers will present a multi-media presentation of Cheers' work and the two will participate in a discussion of "Still Grazing." Following that program, Masekela will perform with a Marshall University jazz band. All of the evening events are free to the public.

From the beginning, Masekela's life has been rich and magical, although sometimes streaked by dark clouds. He was born and raised in grim South African mining towns defined by music, racial oppression and bloody tragedy. A member of a youth band, Masekela's first trumpet was a gift from his high school chaplain, anti-apartheid activist Bishop Trevor Huddleston. Later, Huddleston, who was expelled from South Africa, met the legendary Louis Armstrong and Armstrong sent one of his horns to the youth band.

Masekela soon mastered South Africa's unique brand of township dance music and American jazz. But by then, many of his friends and close relatives were tortured or murdered and his mother also died in mysterious circumstances. He became even more active in the campaign to bring down the regime but was eventually driven into exile in what would become a 30-year pilgrimage of the world.

Adopted by international stars such as Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Harry Belafonte and Miriam Makeba, he soon became part of the raucous swirl of the 1960s music world. His first song, "Grazing in the Grass," which featured Masekela's unique trumpet riffing, hit number one around the world in 1968. He co-composed and co-authored the hit musical, "Sarafina," and traveled the world as part of Paul Simon's epic Graceland tour, all the while agitating for the release of Nelson Mandela.

Upon Mandela's release from prison, Masekela made a triumphant return in 1990 to South Africa where he subsequently worked for one year in the ministry of culture during Mandela's administration.

During the course of his career, Masekela played with many greats, notably Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Jimi Hendrix, the Supremes, Herb Albert and Bob Marley. In all, he has recorded 40 albums and sold more than five million recordings.

Cheers, a faculty member at the University of Mississippi, has chronicled Masekela's remarkable, one-of-a-kind musical life in his book. "Still Grazing" has been characterized as a recounting of one man's whirlwind musical journey around the world and eventual return to his African homeland where he found peace and redemption.

Photo Available


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU art professor to receive Sasakawa Fellowship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jonathan Cox, a faculty member in the Marshall University art department, is one of 20 faculty members nationwide who have been selected to receive a 2005 Sasakawa Fellowship.

Offered through the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, the fellowships offer faculty members an intensive one-month experience designed to study aspects of Japanese life and culture with the aim of incorporating information about Japan into undergraduate courses.

This year's institute will take place in June at San Diego State University. Participants will have an opportunity to learn from scholars, business leaders, artists and journalists about Japanese civilization, history, language, business and education.

While modern Japan is the focus for the program, participants are provided a foundation in the pre-modern history and culture of Japan as well.

Cox, a sculptor, says he is eager to learn about the country and its culture. "I've been interested in Japanese culture for a number of years, but I don't know a whole lot about it," he says. "This will be a good time for me to settle in and learn more about Japan."

The institute will involve seminars, lectures, readings, films and cultural activities related to Japanese history, culture, literature, government, business, language and education. Cox says he plans to visit Japan in the summer of 2006.

"I'd like to work and study in Kyoto for a good part of the summer," he says. "I have ideas about artwork and I think this fellowship will encourage and inspire me. I'm excited to have the exchange with other colleagues and faculty from around the country."

Another MU faculty member, Karl Winton of the Communication Studies department, was awarded a Sasakawa Fellowship in 2004. Cox may be reached at (304) 696-3202.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Portion of 18th Street near Marshall to be closed Feb. 1-4

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A portion of 18th Street near the Marshall University parking garage will be closed Feb. 1-4 for construction of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

James Terry, Director of Public Safety, said 18th Street will be closed from 3rd Avenue to the parking garage entrance. Motorists will be able to enter the 18th Street side of the garage only from the alley or from Commerce Avenue.

Terry said motorists are encouraged to use the 19th Street entrance to the garage while part of 18th Street is closed.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Indigo' premieres Saturday at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The international premiere of the movie "Indigo" takes place Saturday, Jan. 29 at Marco's Lounge in Marshall University's Memorial Student Center. Show times are 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.

"Indigo" also premieres Saturday at AMC DTDS (digital) movie theatres and in more than 500 churches and organizations in 49 states and 35 countries.

"Indigo" was created in a new genre of films called spiritual cinema. The film is about redemption, grace and the healing powers of a new generation of psychic and gifted Indigo children. The movie tells the story of one family's three fateful choices that result in bankruptcy, jail and their estrangement and total dissolution.

The title "Indigo" comes from an indigo child, a name that was given to children who display a new and unusual set of psychological attributes. They were called indigo because of the indigo blue color that is seen in their auras. Many of these children have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD.

These children can be strong willed, creative with an artistic flair, highly intuitive, prone to accidents, suffer from insomnia and bore easily. Many bond easily with plants and animals, look for deep long-lasting friendships and desire to make a difference in a big way.

Alecia Rice, an independent group facilitator from Milton, W.Va., is sponsoring "Indigo" in the Huntington area. Rice, who says she is interested in the ways children are taught, recently completed an 8-week course with "Indigo" director Stephen Simon, examining ways movies could cast a more positive reflection of humanity than she believes currently is provided by Hollywood.

Rice said she believes showing the film will be a good social experiment to find out the desire for spiritual films in the community.

"I believe there are many people like myself who are interested in movies with positive messages and I wanted to play a part in proving that fact," Rice said. "I think that others will be interested in seeing this film and learning more about these special kids, especially teachers. Marshall serves as a hub of education and entertainment in our community. I could think of no better place to host the international premiere of this film."

For more information, persons may contact Rice at (304) 743-4625 or via e-mail at AleciaRice@aol.com.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Three join advisory board for West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Board of Governors approved the addition of three new members to the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University's advisory board during its meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 19.

James P. Corley of Martinsburg, W.Va., Lenore Zedosky of Charleston, W.Va., and Marshall associate professor Dr. Mary E. Reynolds were added to the advisory board's membership.

Corley is a retired West Virginia State Trooper, Zedosky is a retired registered nurse, and former executive director of the West Virginia Department of Education's Office of Healthy Schools, and Reynolds is an associate professor in Communication Disorders at Marshall.

The latest additions bring the number of advisory board members to 20. That total does not include ex-officio members Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the Autism Training Center, and Dr. Tony Williams, interim dean of the College of Education and Human Services.

The board meets four times a year. It serves to advise the center's executive director in matters relating to the mission of the agency, which is to provide education and training to families, educators and anyone involved in the life of a West Virginian with autism and who is registered with the agency.

"We are delighted to have three new members that are as knowledgeable in the field of autism and service delivery as these new members are," Becker-Cottrill said. "Their contributions will certainly make a difference to all of those that the agency serves."

The board is divided into three categories - 50 percent (10) parents, 40 percent (8) professionals and 10 percent (2) citizens. More information is available by calling Becker-Cottrill at (304) 696-2332.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall dean to take part in relief mission in India

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Lynne Welch, a professor of nursing and dean of Marshall University's College of Health Professions, will be in southern India from Feb. 16 through March 4 taking part in a tsunami relief mission.

Welch is going to the Chennai area with Fellowship Baptist Church of Barboursville, W.Va., to provide healthcare for those affected by last month's disaster. The church is going as part of Medical Missions to India, Inc., a nonprofit medical relief agency based in Barboursville.

In 2002, Welch went with this same group on a medical mission to northern India. She also has traveled to Africa, Brazil, and Peru on other missions. Her role on this trip will be as a nurse practitioner.

"I have the skills as a nurse practitioner to assist those in need," Welch said. "I believe that we are lucky in the U.S. and I feel that I should give back to those less fortunate."

Welch currently is trying to raise money to pay for her trip. The cost is $3,500. For more information or to donate, persons may contact Welch at (304) 696-2616 or via email.

Checks may be sent to Medical Missions to India, c/o Fellowship Baptist Church, 3661 Rt. 60 E., Barboursville, WV 25504. For more information on Medical Missions to India, Inc., persons may visit www.mminet.org.

Photo Available


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall theater professor, director honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A professor and a director from the Marshall University Theatre Department recently received the 2004 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival Certificate of Merit Awards for the department's October 2004 production of "Angel Street."

Joan St. Germain, associate professor of theatre, received a merit award for costume design. Jamez Morris-Smith, adjunct faculty and theatre facilities director, received a merit award for scenic design.

The Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF) is a national theater program involving 18,000 students from colleges and universities nationwide that has served as a catalyst in improving the quality of college theater in the United States. The KCACTF has grown into a network of more than 600 academic institutions throughout the country, where theater departments and student artists showcase their work and receive outside assessment by KCACTF respondents.

St. Germain has been the costume designer and associate professor of theatre at Marshall for the past seven years. She holds a B.A. in speech/theatre arts from Marquette University and an M.F.A. from The Ohio State University.

In 2003, St. Germain was awarded Marshall's Pickens-Queen Award for excellence in teaching, and "Best Costumes, Professional" by the New Hampshire Theatre Awards. Her latest Costume Design credits include "A Christmas Carol," "Twelfth Night," "Romeo & Juliet," and "The Lion in Winter" for Marshall University Theatre, and "The Pirates of Penzance," "Sweeney Todd" and "Chicago" for the Papermill Theatre in Lincoln, N.H.

Morris-Smith graduated from Marshall in 1982 with a B.F.A. in theatre design. He subsequently worked with Theatre West Virginia for two years before returning to Marshall University Theatre in 1984 as a scenic designer.

In 1989, Morris-Smith worked with Lorimar Studios on CBS Television's long-running "Falcon Crest." He then moved to manager of auditoriums for university theatre at Marshall while continuing to work as a scenic/lighting designer and instructor.

Other honors for Morris-Smith include: Clayton Page Theatre Award, 1982; President's Service Award, 1995; Alpha Psi Omega Theatre Honorary - Lifetime Achievement; Marshall University Employee of the Year, 2003.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Jazz Festival is Jan. 27-29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 36th annual Jazz Festival is planned for Thursday-Saturday, Jan. 27-29, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

All evening concerts begin at 8 p.m. General admission tickets, which are available at the door, cost $10. Tickets for Marshall faculty, staff and seniors are $5, and MU students are admitted free by showing their ID card.

This year's featured guest ensemble is the Columbus Jazz Orchestra, which performs on Friday, Jan. 28. The CJO began in 1973 as a vehicle to create performance opportunities for jazz musicians in a big band setting. Today, the CJO is considered one of the world's finest jazz orchestras and a model for success, presenting big band jazz and guest artists in a concert setting to thousands each year.

The Columbus Jazz Orchestra is known for its bold sound and for the recreation of music by masters such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Stan Kenton and Gil Evans. The CJO helps to promote the future of the medium by commissioning new arrangements and masterworks for jazz orchestras.

The CJO is led by internationally-known band leader and trumpet virtuoso Byron Stripling, former lead trumpet for the Count Basie Orchestra. A favorite in jazz festivals and events throughout the world and a popular symphony orchestra soloist, Stripling has been featured with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Cincinnati Pops, the St. Louis Symphony and the Boston Pops Orchestra.

On Thursday, Jan. 27, ensembles from Winfield High School and Spring Valley High will perform for the festival's evening audience. Marshall's faculty jazz ensemble Bluetrane will continue its tradition of bringing a variety of styles to the opening event. Following the concert, a session by Velvet Spasm, a local jazz-fusion group, will be presented in the Jomie Jazz Forum.

The "Thundering Herd All-Stars" return to the concert stage on Saturday evening. Built on the success of the summer Jazz-MU-Tazz ensemble, the "All-Star" performers have been selected from participating high schools to perform during the evening's final concert.

To conclude the festival, the Marshall University Jazz Ensemble will be featured in concert with members of the Columbus Jazz Orchestra and Marshall's faculty. Marshall's Jazz Ensemble has recently participated in the prestigious Notre Dame Jazz Festival and has performed with many of the world's best-known jazz artists.

More information on the festival is available by calling Dr. Ed Bingham, Director of Jazz Studies, at (304) 696-2452.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mooney appointed to replace Farrell on Marshall board

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Retired Brig. Gen. H.F. Mooney, Jr. of Charleston was appointed on Dec. 28 to Marshall University's board of governors.

Mooney, a Democrat, replaced Michael J. Farrell, who resigned on Dec. 17 to accept the position of interim president at Marshall. Mooney's term runs through June 30, 2007. He was sworn in today (Wednesday, Jan. 19) at MU's board meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

Former West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise appointed Mooney to Marshall's board.

"This is a very critical time in Marshall's history," Mooney said today. "We're at the dawning of a new century, and the dawning of hiring a new president at Marshall. It's the explosion of the information age, an exciting time to be in higher education."

Mooney also was approved as a member of Marshall's Presidential Search and Screening Committee, which met formally for the first time after today's board meeting. All members of the board of governors, along with four non-BOG members, are on the search committee.

"There won't be a more important decision that we make than choosing the guy who drives the ship," Mooney said of the presidential search.

Mooney, a 1954 graduate of West Virginia University and a two-time graduate of Ohio University, was a highly decorated career officer in the U.S. Army. He did combat duty in the Korean and Vietnam wars, taking a physical disability retirement in 1977. He has been in business since.

The search committee today voted to give co-chairpersons A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum the authority to narrow the field of consulting services that will be considered to two or three. The committee then will meet with representatives from those services before hiring one to assist in the search.

The co-chairs also plan to develop "a statement of characteristics and qualities of a president." In an effort to seek input for this process, they will conduct a series of constituent group meetings from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28, in the Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge.

A separate meeting will be scheduled for input from the Kanawha Valley/Charleston area's community leaders.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall, WVU to participate in blood drive competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Coming off its doubleheader basketball sweep of West Virginia University last week at the Toyota Capital Classic in Charleston, Marshall University is preparing to take on the next challenge with its state rival.

Both Marshall and WVU will sponsor an American Red Cross Blood Drive on Thursday, January 20. MU's blood drive takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center, room 2W22. WVU's is from 1 to 7 p.m. in the Mountainlair Ballroom in Morgantown.

The school with the most donors will be recognized by the Red Cross during an upcoming Marshall men's basketball game.

A faculty and staff blood drive also takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 19 in Marshall's Memorial Student center, room 2W22. Faculty and staff interested in making an appointment or volunteering to work the blood drive may contact Prudy Barker at (304) 696-2495 or by email.

"January is the National Volunteer Blood Donor Month and with the recent tsunami disaster and other disasters in the United States, there is currently a critical need for all blood types," Cheryl Gergely, spokesperson with the Red Cross, said. "Approximately half of the U.S. population is eligible to donate blood, yet only five percent donate annually, and relatively few donate more than two times a year."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 14, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Longtime MU music professor dies

Dr. Paul Balshaw, distinguished professor of music at Marshall University, died early today, Jan. 14, 2005. He was 66.

Dr. Balshaw had been at Marshall since September 1965, when he was hired as an assistant professor in the department of music. He later was the founding dean of the College of Fine Arts, a position he maintained from 1984 to 1995.

Upon returning to the music department, he taught voice, advanced analysis courses for undergraduates, and courses in the graduate music history sequence.

"Dr. Balshaw cut such a wide swath through our cultural, intellectual and artistic community that we will probably realize this loss and its magnitude only over time," said Dr. Marshall Onofrio, chair of the department of music. "He was the consummate gentleman, colleague, mentor and pedagogue. He will be missed."

Funeral arrangements are incomplete.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 13, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New paint job gives locomotive engine Thundering Herd look

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ohio River Terminals, Co. in Huntington has been a neighbor of Marshall University for more than 75 years. And its manager, Otis (Ott) Adkins, describes himself as a big Marshall fan.

So, it stands to reason that Adkins must have had something to do with the new, distinctive paint job on one of his company's working locomotive engines. This particular engine, which pulls coal-hauling rail cars to the Ohio River Terminals dock, where the coal is loaded onto barges, is painted Marshall green and white, and features the Thundering Herd logo.

"We wanted to do something to show our support," Adkins said. "We're just doing this because we love Marshall we ARE Marshall."

The engine travels east and west between 15th Street and 25th Street east, where the terminal is located. It does not cut through town or across any city streets.

The parent company of Ohio River Terminals, Co., is Ingram Barge Lines of Nashville, Adkins said. The job of painting the engine, done by CSX, took only a few days, he said.

Adkins said the engine is not the only way his company is supporting Marshall. He recently instituted a safety incentive program that will reward the 30 or so employees at Ohio River Terminals, Co., with what he considers an unbeatable experience.

"If they make it until the beginning of the (2005) football season with no lost-time injury, I'm going to take all of them to the first home game of the season," he said.

Adkins can be reached by calling (304) 523-6461. Photos Available


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 11, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall names Career Services Center director

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Valerie L. Bernard has been named director of Marshall University's Career Services Center as of Jan. 3.

Bernard has a master's degree from Marshall in Adult Education (Training & Development) and has been an adjunct faculty in the Adult & Technical Education Department.

Career Services works with students as they seek employment opportunities by offering career coaching, resume writing and other job related activities.

"It's a great opportunity for students to utilize our service and they can use this service while they're still in school," Bernard said. "I'm very excited to be associated with Marshall."

Bernard originated and led Executive Training Centers, Inc., a training and sales company. Formerly she served as director of the Mason County WV Gear-Up Program and as Public Relations Chair for Mason County's Building for Academic Excellence Program.

"We are excited to have Valerie on board," said Patricia G. Gallagher, recruiting coordinator.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Numerous activities highlight annual King Symposium

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 12th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium, which takes place Monday, Jan. 17 in Huntington, will be celebrated through an array of activities including panels, forums, music, award presentations and the traditional march to honor the slain civil rights leader.

Established by Marshall University's Division of Multicultural Affairs and partially funded by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, this year's theme is "Continuing the Legacy and the Struggle for Justice and Equality in the 21st Century."

The Rev. Dr. Teresa E. Snorton, executive director of the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc., of Decatur, Ga., is the keynote speaker Monday evening following the announcement of the awards competition winners.

"Marshall University is proud to join with the mayor of Huntington, The Herald-Dispatch, the Cabell County Board of Education and other organizations to sponsor the 12th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium," Dr. Betty Cleckley, vice president for Multicultural Affairs, said. "It portends to be a thought-provoking, stimulating experience."

The symposium opens with a Focus on Youth program from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Fairfield West Community Gardens. The coordinators are Edward Dawson, executive editor of The Herald-Dispatch, and Sally Lind, executive director of the Huntington Human Rights Commission.

The program will be followed by a luncheon and roundtable panel discussion from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Ebenezer Community Outreach Center. The theme is, "Bringing Unity to the Community." The Rev. Paul Willis, Sr., pastor of First Baptist Church, is the coordinator.

A highlight of each symposium is the traditional march that begins at the Ebenezer Community Outreach Center at 1660 8th Ave. and ends at the 5th Avenue Baptist Church at 1135 5th Ave., where the annual memorial service begins at 6 p.m. The lineup begins at 4:30 and the march gets underway at 4:45 p.m.

The presentation of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards Competition winners will be made by Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of the Marshall University College of Liberal Arts. Following the presentation, music will be provided by the University of Charleston/All Nations Vocal ensemble under the direction of Stan Spottswood.

Snorton's address focuses on legacy building. She is the former executive director of Clinical Services at the Emory Center for Pastoral Services at Crawford Long Hospital and has been an adjunct instructor at Emory University since 1991. She also is the council chair for the Uhuru Community Caregivers, a pastoral care and counseling ministry of the First African Presbyterian Church in Lithonia, Ga., and co-chair of the First African Community Development Corporation.

An ordained minister in the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, Snorton formerly was a pastor in Kentucky. She is the author of several articles, chapters and book reviews on topics related to pastoral care and ministry.

A reception takes place at 8 p.m. in the fellowship hall.

Dr. Rainey Duke and Sylvia Ridgeway are co-chairs of this year's symposium planning committee. Committee members include Philip W. Carter, Maurice Cooley, Edward Dawson, Margot Durbin, Jennifer Gaston, Rebecca Glass, Stephen Hensley, Byron Holmes, David Johnson, Steve Landes, Sally Lind, Charles Lloyd. Samuel Moore, Christina Murphy, Larry Patterson, William Smith, Susan Tams, Paul Willis Sr., and Barbara Winters.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 7, 2005
Contact: Tom Hunter, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

Herd fans gear up for annual Capital Classic with two special game-day events

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumni, fans and friends have an opportunity to gear up for Thundering Herd's annual Capital City Classic men's and women's basketball doubleheader with West Virginia University during two special game-day events Tuesday, Jan. 11.

The Marshall Tip-Off Club of Charleston is host to a noon luncheon honoring the Marshall men's and women's basketball teams at the Athletic Club Restaurant at Charleston's Embassy Suites hotel. Speakers include men's basketball coach Ron Jirsa and women's basketball coach Royce Chadwick. Seating is limited for the luncheon, with tickets available at the door for $11 per person. To RSVP or for additional information, contact Rusty Webb at 343-2900.

The Marshall University Alumni Association is host to a Capital Classic pre-game reception from 6 to 8 p.m. in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center. Sponsored in part by CSX and West Virginia Wireless, this free event is open to the public. Complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar are available.

Marshall interim president Michael J. Farrell, along with university staff and representatives, will greet visitors during the reception. Marco and the Marshall University cheerleaders will entertain the crowd.

Marshall and WVU meet in a women's game at 5:30 p.m., and the Thundering Herd and West Virginia men play at 8 p.m. in the annual Capital Classic.

Tickets for the doubleheader are still available by calling the Marshall ticket office at
1-800-THE HERD or the Charleston Civic Center box office at 345-7469.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Moses family presents significant gift to Erickson Alumni Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As a gift to their father, the children of Jack Fitzgerald Moses and Sue Moses of Huntington last week presented a significant gift in his name to Marshall University's Erickson Alumni Center.

Interim MU President Michael J. Farrell accepted the gift on behalf of the university on Wednesday, Dec. 29, in his Old Main office. About 20 members of the Moses family looked on as Jack, accompanied by his wife of 62 years, was honored.

Because the gift was substantial, the new Erickson Alumni Center board room will be named the J.F. Moses Executive Board Room.

"The generosity of the Moses family has been a 50-year experience," Farrell said. "The donation to name the premier conference room in honor of Jack Moses Sr. is graciously accepted and warmly welcomed by Marshall University."

Jack Moses, a 1940 Marshall College graduate, described the gift as "a wonderful surprise for me."

"I loved Marshall when I was here as a student and I still love it," he said. "It has changed so many lives. It is a great university and I am proud to be part of it."

Jack Fitzgerald Moses II said his father, who started in the automobile business in 1947 in Welch, W.Va., with the original Moses Automotive, has been a longtime Marshall supporter, providing donor automobiles to MU's athletic department since 1955.

"Our father has been a businessman in West Virginia for almost 60 years, and we wanted to honor him," Jack Moses II said. "This will be his 50th year of furnishing cars for Marshall. There are so many exciting things going on at Marshall and we wanted to be a part of it."

Jack Fitzgerald Moses was born in Huntington, but his family moved to McDowell County, where his father was an accountant. Jack graduated from Iaeger High School. He turned down a football scholarship at Marshall to concentrate on earning his business degree.

Bob Moses, a Charleston resident and one of the Moses' three sons, said it was appropriate to honor his father with a gift that helps Marshall and Huntington.

"He's been a pillar of that community. That's his home and always has been," Bob Moses said. "We wanted to have something there for a long time that bears his name. He's such a huge Marshall supporter and Marshall is such a large part of the Huntington community, we felt this was very appropriate. We wanted to let people know what he's done."

Although she did not attend Marshall, Sue Moses has joined her husband in supporting the university for years.

"We have always loved Marshall," she said. "It has meant so much to both of us and now our children are part of the Marshall family, too."

A fundraising campaign by the Marshall University Alumni Association has been ongoing for the past couple of years. The goal is to raise $3 million, which will be used to build a new Erickson Alumni Center.

"With the Moses contribution, this puts us well over the two-thirds mark in meeting our goal," said Lance West, vice president for alumni development. "To this point we've attracted more than 1,000 investors to this very worthwhile project. We look forward to surpassing our goal in the very near future."

Tom Harris, president of the alumni association, said the gift was a great gesture on the part of the Moses family.

"It shows their love for the community and the univ