April 2005 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Gov. Manchin to speak at Marshall's commencement on May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III will be the keynote speaker at Marshall University's 2005 Commencement at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 7, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Marshall will be granting 2,863 degrees, the largest number in school history.

Manchin, along with two others, also will receive a Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degree during the ceremony. The other honorary degree recipients are Joanne Jaeger Tomblin, president of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, and Atlanta banker Richard D. Jackson.

The addition of Manchin, Tomblin and Jackson brings to 155 the number of Marshall's honorary degree recipients. 

"Governor Manchin has been selected as the commencement speaker and recipient of an honorary degree because of his unparalleled leadership during the first 100 days of his administration," Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell said. "Marshall University is proud to honor one of West Virginia's most outstanding governors during his first year in office."

Farrell also praised Tomblin and Jackson for their accomplishments since graduating from Marshall.

"President Joanne Tomblin has exceeded all expectations in her leadership at Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College," Farrell said. "Marshall University is proud to present an honorary degree to her because of these accomplishments and her distinguished status as one of our alumni.

"Richard Jackson is a distinguished alumnus whose banking, military and writing careers have reflected great honor upon Marshall University. His service as a member of the Yeager Scholars Board of Directors and of the Marshall University Alumni Association continue his long-standing contribution to the university."

Here is a brief look at each honorary degree recipient:

Joe Manchin III

Born and raised in the small coal town of Farmington in Marion County, Manchin's dream was to play football in the National Football League. His athletic skills won him a scholarship to West Virginia University but after a career-ending knee injury he realized he needed to get an education if he wanted to improve his life and provide for his family. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration from West Virginia University in 1970.

After graduation, Manchin returned to Marion County where he became head of a family-owned carpet business.  Later he was the owner of a privately held natural resources company.

He began his career as a public servant with his election to the House of Delegates in 1982.  In 1986, he won a seat in the West Virginia State Senate, winning re-election in 1988 and l992.  He was elected Secretary of State in 2000 and through his Saving History And Reaching Every Student (SHARES) program, his office promoted democracy to schoolchildren and registered 42,000 high school students to vote. 

As a member of the Legislature from 1982 to 1996, he earned a reputation for standing up for West Virginians to improve schools, protect veterans and senior citizens and create jobs.

Joanne Jaeger Tomblin

Tomblin, a transplanted New Yorker, brims with enthusiasm, not only for Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, but for the state she's called home since coming to West Virginia as an undergraduate. She is one of the state's biggest boosters, a proud one-woman Chamber of Commerce touting West Virginia's natural assets, especially its people.

After receiving two degrees from Marshall University, Tomblin had a successful career in television news reporting before moving to Southern West Virginia, where she contributed her multi-faceted talents to agencies working for the betterment of people in that area.  She joined the Southern West Virginia CTC staff in 1981, and soon became an integral part of that institution, holding a variety of positions. The college she championed so enthusiastically and loyally and served so faithfully named her its president in November 1999.   

Richard D. Jackson

Jackson is a 1959 graduate of Marshall, where he played basketball and football, and ran on the track team. He is chairman of the board of Atlanta-based ebank Financial Services, Inc., and a director of Schweitzer-Maudit International, Inc., also headquartered in Atlanta. Previously, he held the positions of president and chief executive officer of two banks in Atlanta.

Jackson served in the United States Marine Corps for eight years and was awarded the Silver and Bronze Stars and Vietnam Cross of Gallantry for action in Vietnam. He has written three books, including his most recent publication titled, "Too Stupid to Quit - Banking and Business Lessons Learned the Hard Way," which is used for textbook reference in Marshall's Lewis College of Business. He also wrote "Yesterdays are Forever, a Rite of Passage through the Marine Corps and Vietnam War," and "The Last Fast White Boy," a story on athletics at Marshall in the 1950s.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 29, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Alcon VP to speak at Marshall CTC commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alan Modliszewski, Vice President and General Manager of Alcon Laboratories, Inc., in Huntington, will be the keynote speaker at the Marshall Community and Technical College's graduation next week.

The commencement begins at 7 p.m. Friday, May 6 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. The CTC will award 295 degrees.

Alcon Laboratories, Inc. is the world leader in ophthalmic pharmaceuticals and medical devices, and Alcon Huntington leads the world in developing and manufacturing Intraocular and Refractive Lenses.

With more than 30 years experience in pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturing, Modliszewski has increased sales volume exponentially in his 15 years with the Huntington-based company.

 He is an originating member of the Marshall Community and Technical College Board of Advisors, established in 2002 to support the separation and growth of the new institution.   Marshall Community and Technical College currently enrolls an average of 2,400 students in certificate and associate degree programs and an additional 3,000 participants in workforce training and development activities.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 28, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Record number of students to graduate from Marshall on May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will award a record high 2,863 degrees during its 168th Commencement Saturday, May 7 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The previous record number of graduates was 2,773 in 2004.

In addition to the record number of graduates, a record high 632 Marshall students are graduating with honors, and 16 students - another record - are graduating with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Commencement begins at 10 a.m.

"This is a reflection of the quality of the faculty, educational programs and students at Marshall University," Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said. "Everyone is dedicated to one goal - to see students graduate and be successful in their lives."

The graduating 4.0 students are:

Sarah Beth Barber of Cincinnati; Aaron Matthew Blackshire of St. Albans, W.Va.; Andrew Robert Burk of Wheelersburg, Ohio; Ann E. Capper of Proctorville, Ohio; Sarah Beth Childers of Huntington; Samer Samir Hodroge of Charleston, W.Va.; Carrie D. Holland of Huntington; Arysta Nichelle McGill of Point Pleasant, W.Va.;

Ashley Dawn Meek of Franklin Furnace, Ohio; Nora Leigh Shalaway of Cameron, W.Va.; Nicholas Ryan Slate of Charleston, W.Va.; Wendi Marie Sparks of Chesapeake, Ohio; Ashley K. Stover of Given, W.Va.; Jessica Lynn Taylor of Whitesville, W.Va.; Stacy Lee Wickline of Fayetteville, W.Va., and David Andrew Woods of Kenova, W.Va.

Seventy-six students are graduating summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA) and 168 are graduating magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA). Also, 264 are graduating cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Thirty-four students are graduating with high honors (3.7 to 4.0 GPA) from the Marshall Community and Technical College, and 90 are graduating with honors (3.3 to 3.69 GPA) from MCTC.

Because parking is limited near the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, Marshall is providing shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena for commencement. People are encouraged to park on university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, the Welcome Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and in F Lot across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall.

Shuttle service begins at 8:45 a.m. and occurs in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus. At the conclusion of ceremonies for the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Health Professions, which start after commencement at the arena, the shuttle service will return attendees to campus.

The following is a list of commencement-related events centering around Marshall's commencement:

May 4 - 7 p.m. Charleston Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Charleston Municipal Auditorium

May 5 - 7 p.m., School of Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 6 - 4 p.m., Communication Disorders graduate reception, Smith Hall Atrium

May 6 - 3 p.m., Center for International Students Programs graduation picnic, reception, and awards ceremony, Buskirk Field

May 6 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community & Technical College graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

May 6 - 7 p.m., Huntington Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 6 - 7 p.m., School of Medicine Doctoral Investiture Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse; U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is the featured speaker.

May 6 - 7 p.m., St. Mary's Nursing graduation, Highlawn Church

May 7 - 10 a.m., Marshall University's 168th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - Noon, College of Health Professions graduation, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Fine Arts Graduation Brunch, Palms Room of the Touma Building

May 7 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism graduation ceremony, Smith Hall Atrium

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

May 7 - 2 p.m., School of Extended Education graduation ceremony, Harless Dining Hall

May 7 - 3 p.m., College of Education and Human Services graduation ceremony, Huntington City Hall Auditorium

May 15 - 2 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center Nursing reception, MOVC in Point Pleasant


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Early Education Center Art Show and Auction is May 2-6 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fifty paintings by children enrolled in the Marshall University Early Education Center preschool program will be on display May 2-6 on the second floor of MU's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The display is part of the Early Education Center Art Show and Auction, which gives the children a creative outlet for expression and allows them the opportunity to visually represent learning experiences. It also better acquaints the community, which is encouraged to view the paintings, with the goals and philosophy of the Early Education Center through demonstration of child-centered curriculum showcased in the children's artwork.

The artwork reflects various projects the children have completed over the past year related to Appalachia and transportation. Other themes will reflect their projects in woodworking, geology and terrariums, and with pet hamsters.

"An event such as this really opens the door for not only the campus community, but the Huntington community to view the outcomes of quality early childhood experiences," EEC Director Clayton Burch said. "It's a great feeling to be part of an early childhood organization that places such emphasis on children's self-expression, creativity and competencies."

Lori Vovk, lead teacher for the center, said she is looking forward to a successful art show. She commends the pride and hard work the children put into the paintings.

"For many children, painting on canvases is simply a sensory experience," Vovk said. "However, for others, it is something they put a lot of thought into. They take time considering what they want to create and how they want to create it. What a great opportunity for children to develop a strong sense of pride in themselves and their accomplishments!"

A silent auction fundraiser runs throughout the duration of the art show. Last year the art show raised more than $1,000 for the center. The money helps the school take field trips and complete projects such as the study of bridges, the trucking industry and mapping. The children even helped construct a small house that stands on the center's playground.

The art show begins from noon to 2 p.m. Monday, May 2. At that time attendees may view the artwork and begin placing bids on sheets next to the individual pieces. An informal open house runs from 11 to 2 p.m. May 3-4, and a grand viewing runs from 5 to 7 p.m. May 4.  The grand viewing features jazz pianist Jared Pauley, and light refreshments and hors d'oeuvres will be offered.

Marshall's Early Education Center is a preschool laboratory for the College of Education and Human Services. The program promotes the development of social competency, communication abilities, feelings of self worth and independence.

For more information on the art show and auction, persons may contact Zak Richards with the center at (304) 696-6301.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 27, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall interim president to be honored Thursday during West Virginia Bar Foundation Fellows Dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell is one of 18 lawyers and judges who will be honored Thursday, April 28, during the West Virginia Bar Foundation's seventh annual Foundation Fellows Dinner at the Marriott Hotel in Charleston.

The dinner, which begins with a reception at 6:30 p.m., honors those lawyers and members of the judiciary whose professional, public and private careers have demonstrated outstanding dedication to the welfare of their communities and honorable service to the legal profession, with the individuals selected reflecting the diverse nature of the legal profession in West Virginia.

The Foundation Fellows Program was initiated in 1999, and about 100 judges and attorneys have been selected as Foundation Fellows.

Farrell assumed the position of interim president at Marshall on Jan. 1, 2005, after agreeing to take a sabbatical from the Huntington law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., of which he has been an attorney since 1995.

"I am humbled to have been selected as a Foundation Fellow, along with my accomplished colleagues," Farrell said. "I look forward to the dinner and joining with these outstanding men and women in celebrating this wonderful honor."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall graduate student Vince Payne named sportscaster of the year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate student Vince Payne of Hansford, W.Va., was named the college radio sportscaster of the year during the Third Annual Broadcast Educators Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition Ceremony April 21 in Las Vegas.

Christina Riffle, a recent Marshall graduate from Dunbar, W.Va., took third place in the Audio Educational Program category. The work entered by both Payne and Riffle was aired in 2004 on Marshall's public radio station, WMUL-FM.  

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

"Vince Payne has received the ultimate compliment for his on-air work at WMUL-FM by being named the college radio sportscaster of the year and it is a significant accomplishment for Christina Riffle to place third with her documentary about same-gender marriage," Bailey said.

"Winning never comes easy, but for Marshall University, the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities and these accomplishments are validations of the quality broadcasting program available through the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.  This high honor for Vince is well-deserved.  I am excited about the prospects for his professional future."

Broadcast Educators Association (BEA) has more than 1,400 academic and professional members and 250 academic institutional members.  It was founded in 1955, and its mission is to prepare college students to enter the radio and television business. Its members share a diversity of interests involving all aspects of telecommunication and electronic media.

Payne's first-place award winning entry in production was: College Radio Sportscaster -

"Student Sportscaster Compilation." Riffle's third-place award winning entry in production was: Audio Educational Program - "The Fight for Right: Same-Gender Marriage in America."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Defense Department research grant goes to Marshall chemistry professor for work in next generation computer circuit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael L. Norton, professor of chemistry at Marshall University, has been awarded a major three-year grant totaling more than $500,000 from the highly competitive Defense Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DEPSCoR) for his work on nanotechnology with DNA.

Norton's proposal, "Directed Sequential Assembly Via DNA Based Nanostructures," was one of five proposals submitted to DEPSCoR from West Virginia and was the only one from the state selected for funding.

The Defense EPSCoR program is designed to stimulate defense related research in states that traditionally have not been large recipients of Department of Defense research awards. Only 27 projects were competitively selected this year from 108 in 22 states.

"I celebrate this great news for Dr. Norton and Marshall University," said United States Senator Robert C. Byrd. "Once again, West Virginia's academic research community proves to be at the national forefront. This grant recognizes not only Dr. Norton's intellectual excellence but also his ability to inspire students to greater achievement."

"As evident by his success with this DEPSCoR award, Mike Norton is one of our brightest research stars," Dr. Howard Aulick, Vice President for Research at Marshall University, said.  "He is one with a real passion for undergraduate research and most of his projects have real potential for economic development.  Students who study with Dr. Norton are exposed to very sophisticated technologies, pioneering concepts and the excitement of discovery."

To explain the complex nature of his work, Dr. Norton likens it to the planning of a garden.  "Most people know how they want to arrange their gardens, lots of roses here, groups of petunias there," he said.  "In certain ways, images of modern electronic circuits bear a striking resemblance to elaborate gardens in the way they are laid out.

"There are many questions involved in producing the next generation of computers and one of these questions is how to place the component parts where your plan calls for them to be located," he said.

Dr. Norton's research essentially involves producing a tapestry representing an elaborate distribution of electronic blooms. The project involves weaving molecule-sized electron components into a tapestry using threads that are actually strands of DNA.

"You could think of DNA threads as 'smart' threads in that DNA is coded and can be designed to fit together in a lock and key manner," Norton said. "Essentially the threads 'know where to go' and the challenge of the work is to design DNA code and assembly conditions so that the molecules all go to the right places."

"Dr. Norton's meritorious award is a building block for additional research and economic capacity in West Virginia," State Research Executive Director Dr. Paul Hill said in Charleston.  An important effect of the DEPSCoR grant is that it will make possible additional staff to work on the project.

"Although preliminary results have been very promising, making progress in this area requires the efforts of many bright students and technicians.  Currently there are six people working on this project and this grant will add two more scientists to the research group," Norton said.

He relates that noted scientist Eric Drexler indicated in his first book on nanotechnology that it promises to bring changes as profound as the industrial revolution, antibiotics, and nuclear weapons all rolled up in one.

"I believe that he was a pessimist," Norton said.  "Marshall has great students who are already contributing to the evolution of nanotechnology.  With this significant grant, we will definitely bring the contribution of our group to the next level."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Commencement Events

The following is a list of commencement-related events at Marshall University, centering around Marshall's 168th commencement at 10 a.m. May 7  in the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

April 28 - 4 p.m., Donning of Kente, Buskirk Field

May 4 - 7 p.m. Charleston Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Charleston Municipal Auditorium

May 5 - 7 p.m., School of Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 6 - 4 p.m., Communication Disorders graduate reception, Smith Hall Atrium

May 6 - 3 p.m., Center for International Students Programs graduation picnic, reception, and awards ceremony, Buskirk Field

May 6 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community & Technical College graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

May 6 - 7 p.m., Huntington Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 6 - 7 p.m., School of Medicine Doctoral Investiture Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse; Sen. Jay Rockefeller is the featured speaker.

May 6 - 7 p.m., St. Mary's Nursing graduation, Highlawn Church

May 7 - 10 a.m., Marshall University's 168th commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - Noon, College of Health Professions graduation, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse

May 7 - 12:45 p.m., College of Fine Arts Graduation Brunch, Palms Room of the Touma Building

May 7 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism graduation ceremony, Smith Hall Atrium

May 7 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Cam Henderson Center

May 7 - 2 p.m., School of Extended Education graduation ceremony, Harless Dining Hall

May 7 - 3 p.m., College of Education and Human Services graduation ceremony, Huntington City Hall Auditorium

May 15 - 2 p.m., MOVC Nursing reception, MOVC in Point Pleasant


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 25, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bill Scarlett Quintet featured in final Jomie jazz concert series program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Department of Jazz Studies will present the final program of the 2005 JAZZ@JOMIE Concert Series at 8 p.m. Friday, April 29 at the Jomie Jazz Forum. 

This concert, sponsored by the Marshall department of music, the International Association for Jazz Education and the American Federation of Musicians local 362-691, features the Bill Scarlett Quintet from Knoxville, Tenn.

The Jomie Jazz Forum is located on 5th Avenue directly across from Marshall's Memorial Student Center. Admission is $10. Marshall University students will be admitted free.

Featured performers with the Bill Scarlett Quintet are:

Bill Scarlett, saxophonist. He received the Master of Music degree in music theory and clarinet at Louisiana State University, and began his collegiate teaching career at the University of Tennessee in 1957. He was the principal clarinet in the Knoxville Symphony and has many solo and chamber music performances to his credit. During his long career at Tennessee, he taught clarinet, saxophone and music theory, and directed jazz band and jazz history.

Scarlett's jazz credits include performances with Art Pepper, Woody Herman, Carl Fontana, Alan Dawson, Slide Hampton and many others. In 1997, he was named alumnus of the year by the LSU School of Music. He currently is performing with the Donald Brown Quintet and the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra.

Bill Swann, pianist. He is an assistant professor of music at Maryville College where he teaches music theory, aural skills, improvisation and general education courses, and directs the jazz band. He performs regularly with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and various other jazz artists.  He has performed with Bill Mobley, James Moody, Marvin Stamm, Lew Tabakin, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, Don Braden, Percy Sledge, Vincent Herring, Ed Soph, Keith Brown, Rusty Holloway, Vance Thompson, Billy Scarlett, Jim Self, the Knoxville Symphony Pops, Paul McKee, Mark Boling, and Jerry Coker.

Swann released a jazz trio CD │Three▓ in 2005 and recorded as a sideman with the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, Billy Scarlett, Joe Thompson, and Jim Self from 2000 through 2004.

Taylor Coker, bassist. He recently received the Bachelor of Music in Studio Music and Jazz from the University of Tennessee. While at the university, he studied under the accomplished bassist Rusty Holloway and world-renowned pianist and composer Donald Brown. His education was enhanced by his playing experiences with members of the school's jazz faculty such as Bill Scarlett, Vance Thompson, Mark Boling and Keith Brown, as well as fellow students and other local musicians. Coker teaches private lessons and performs in various venues around Knoxville.

Daryl Johnson, drummer. Born in Memphis, he moved to Knoxville to attend UT. He has performed with an eclectic variety of musicians that include jazz performers Bill Scarlett, Donald Brown and Jason Day; the rock/blues band Jobe, and country artists Robinella and the CC String Band. Other musical endeavors include performances with David "Fathead" Newman, Rocky Wynder, the Grateful Dead, the Jazz Liberation Quartet, Johnny Yancy and Steve Lee. His time is divided between his practice sessions, gigs and teaching.

Vance Thompson, trumpet. He grew up in a musical family in East Tennessee. He holds a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Tennessee and a Master of Music degree from DePaul University in Chicago. Thompson is the founder and director of the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and a member of the faculty at the University of Tennessee School of Music.

More information on the concert is available by calling Dr. Ed Bingham, Marshall's director of jazz studies, at (304) 696-2452.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU students to 'Take Back the Night' on April 27

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will address issues of sexual violence during the annual "Take Back the Night March and Rally" Wednesday, April 27, on the Memorial Student Center Plaza.

The event, planned from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., will include an information table fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and live music from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. followed by an empowering and unifying rally, a march, and an inter-faith candlelight vigil.

MU History professor Kat Williams speaks at about 6 p.m., and a march around campus follows at about 6:15 p.m. After the march, Political Science professor Jamie Warner will speak.

All events are free to the public. More information is available by calling Carrie Robey or Rebecca Smith with the Marshall University Women's Studies Student Association at (304) 696-3338.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fain to speak Saturday at Woodson Foundation dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Cicero M. Fain III, currently a Marshall University faculty member through the Carter G. Woodson Faculty Initiative, is the guest speaker Saturday, April 23, at the 13th annual Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation dinner at the Radisson Hotel Huntington.

Tickets for the fundraising event are $25 apiece, and available by calling Newatha Myers at 894-5772. Tickets also will be available at the door. The dinner begins with cocktails and hors d'oeuvres at 6 p.m.

Fain, an assistant professor of history at MU, said he is speaking on the topic, "You Have Gifts that Change Other's Lives: How do you Use Them?" He was a guest of Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell on the television program "Headliners" earlier this year.

The Woodson dinner raises scholarship money for high school and college students.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Concert, tribute dedicated to memory of Dr. Paul Balshaw

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union, Chorus, Chamber Choir and Orchestra will present a special concert dedicated to the memory of Dr. Paul Balshaw, Distinguished Professor of Music at Marshall, at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 23, and 3 p.m. Sunday, April 24, in Smith Recital Hall.

Sunday's concert also will include a tribute to Balshaw, who died Jan. 14, 2005. He had been a Marshall professor since September 1965. Balshaw was the founding dean of the College of Fine Arts and maintained that position from 1984 to 1995. He then returned to the music faculty, working with vocal students and teaching courses in theory, analysis and the graduate music history sequence.  He remained active as a vocal coach and accompanist.

Balshaw was coordinator of graduate studies and director of the Marshall University Orchestra. He also was a violist for the Huntington Symphony Orchestra.

"The events of the past four months have confirmed the enormous impact and influence that Dr. Balshaw had on the arts community," Dr. Marshall Onofrio, chair of the department of music, said. "Not a day goes by that my attention is not drawn to something that involved Dr. Balshaw."

Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell and other university administrators will speak during the tribute. Students, colleagues and friends also will offer reflections.

The department of music also will publicly announce the establishment of the Paul A. Balshaw Orchestral Advancement Fund during the tribute on Sunday. The fund provides support for scholarships and orchestral activities. The original donors for the endowment are Janet Bromley, Sally Carey, Rebecca Lepanto and Dorothy Polan.

College of Fine Arts dean Donald Van Horn said the endowment was started by Balshaw's colleagues when he was alive as a way to honor his work for the department of music.

"Dr. Balshaw was such a respected professor," Van Horn said. "He was truly honored when he found out about the endowment."

A reception will follow the memorial tribute and concert on Sunday. All events are free to the public. For more information, please contact Dr. Onofrio at (304) 696-2710.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Public invited to make comments to NCAA Self-Study Committee

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of an ongoing year-long, campus-wide effort to study its athletic programs, Marshall University is required by the NCAA to invite the public to make comments to the university's NCAA Self-Study Committee.

The self-study focuses solely on certification of athletics programs, and is expected to be finished sometime this summer. Areas covered include academic integrity, governance, rules compliance, as well as a commitment to equity, student-athlete welfare and sportsmanship.

The public may make comments to the NCAA Self-Study Committee by visiting www.marshall.edu/ncaa. Marshall's written plan of study also is available at that Web site.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Popular Indian film songs to be performed Sunday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Internationally renowned musicians Ashok Pandey and Sushil Baweja of India will perform popular Indian film songs from 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, April 24 in Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. Admission is Free.

The event is presented by the Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation, an organization that addresses the need of primary education in the tribal villages of India. The mission of the Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation is to set up one-teacher schools in these tribal villages to raise the literacy rate in rural India. About 16,000 such schools are in operation today and the goal is to have 100,000 by 2011.

The event is sponsored by the India Center (Bharat Kendra) of Charleston, Tri-State India Association, MU Indian Student Association, the MU Center for International Programs and the MU College of Fine Arts. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Donning of Kente celebration, processional is April 28 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs has invited African American graduates from last semester and those who will be graduating in May to the Donning of Kente celebration and processional. The event takes place at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 28 on Buskirk Field at the center of the Huntington campus.

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate.

"We ask our graduates and soon-to-be graduates to wear their Kente cloths with pride and for inspiration," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "We expect that they will embrace the values of family, work, and responsibility that the cloths represent."

Keynote speaker at the event is Wilbert Bryant, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Higher Education Programs, U.S. Dept. of Education, and Counselor to the Secretary for Historical Black Colleges and Universities.

A native of Goulds, Fla., Bryant earned a Bachelor of Science in mathematics from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Army. He went on to earn a Master of Education from Howard University and attended the National War College. A Vietnam veteran and highly decorated officer, Bryant served in the Regular Army nearly 28 years, retiring in 1990 after a distinguished career with the rank of colonel.

African music will be provided by the Marshall Musical Lecture Series Ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center Plaza. 


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Tuesday April 19, 2005
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Award winners, retirees to be honored at faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight individuals will be honored by Marshall University with awards of distinction for the 2004-05 academic year during the spring general faculty meeting Thursday, April 21 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Five people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. The meeting starts at 2 p.m., and includes remarks from Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell and Faculty Senate President Larry Stickler.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the administration and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

Each of the Distinguished Service Awards winners receives $1,000. They include:

  • Linda Dobbs, associate professor, 23 years, College of Fine Arts, Music
  • Roger Adkins, professor, 25 years, Lewis College of Business, Finance & Economics
  • Raymond Busbee, professor, 26 years, College of Education and Human Services, Exercise Science Sport & Recreation
  • E. Noel Bowling, professor, 30 years, School of Education and Professional Development, Reading Education
  • David Woodward, professor, 35 years, College of Liberal Arts, History

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, a faculty member either must be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

The 2004-05 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Professor Ashok Vaseashta, senior recipient in the field of Science and Technology, College of Science, Physics.
  • Professor Edwina Pendarvis, senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business.
  • Assistant Professor Jennifer Mak, junior recipient among all faculty, College of Education and Human Services, Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation.

Also Thursday, Marshall is recognizing 12 retiring faculty who have a combined 299 years of service. They are:

  • Dr. Allen Arbogast, Geography, 17 years of service;
  • Dr. Joyce E. East, Humanities at Marshall University Graduate College, 15 years of service;
  • Dr. Steven Hatfield, Mathematics, 42 years of service;
  • Gary Jarrett, Sociology and Anthropology, 23 years of service;
  • Dr. Helen Linkey, Psychology, 16 years of service;
  • Dr. Victor Lombardo, Special Education at Marshall University Graduate College, 29 years of service;
  • Dr. Sandra Parker, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 15 years of service
  • Dr. K. Venkata Raman, Surgery, 11 years of service;
  • Dr. Frank S. Riddel, History, 35 years of service;
  • Dr. Michael Seidel, Biological Science, 26 years of service;
  • Dr. Troy Stewart, Jr., Political Science, 32 years of service;
  • Dr. David Stooke, English, 38 years of service.

Dr. Linkey will be recognized posthumously. She died Saturday, April 9.

Other faculty to be honored Thursday are Dr. Mary B. Moore, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Dr. Janet L. Badia, Brian M. Morgan and Dr. Kathie D. Williams, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby follows Thursday's meeting.


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Friday April 15, 2005
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Video stream of Snyder news conference available on MU Web site

HUNTINGTON - The news conference Thursday announcing the hiring of Mark Snyder as Marshall University's head football coach is available for viewing on MU's Web site.

To access the news conference, go to www.marshall.edu and click on the "Marshall Names Mark Snyder Head Football Coach" link under the announcements. Then, follow the instructions on how to connect to the video stream.

The news conference took place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday in the Joan C. Edwards Stadium Big Green Room.


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Friday April 15, 2005
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Marshall English professor Mary B. Moore named Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2004-05

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Mary B. Moore, an associate professor of English in Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, has been named MU's 2004-05 Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner, Frances Hensley, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, announced today.

The Hedrick Award winner receives $5,000, thanks to a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, who planned Marshall's graduate program.

Moore has been teaching at Marshall since August 1995, when she was appointed as an assistant professor. Previously she taught at the University of California, Davis, where she received her Ph.D. in English in 1994.

"Having had the pleasure of observing her teaching, I can say without a doubt that she is a master of thoughtful lesson design, impeccable classroom pacing, the creation of relevant and challenging assignments, and the ability to involve all students in a serious and constructive discourse on the material at hand," MU English professor Art Stringer said. "Her work in and out of the classroom is rigorous, inspiring and student-centered."

In addition to the Hedrick Award, Hensley also announced two other awards honoring four people. Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence, an associate professor of mathematics in the College of Science, has been named as the Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award winner.

Three professors won the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award. They are Dr. Janet L. Badia, assistant professor of English in the College of Liberal Arts; Brian M. Morgan, assistant professor of Integrated Science & Technology in the College of Science; and Dr. Kathie D. Williams, assistant professor of History in the College of Liberal Arts.

The five award winners will be formally recognized Thursday, April 21, during the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Here is a brief look at the three awards and the five winners.
 

Hedrick Award

The Hedrick Award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Mary B. Moore has been director of the Marshall University English Department Writing Center for the past five years, and trains graduate and undergraduate tutors. Since arriving at Marshall nearly 10 years ago, she has won or been nominated for more than 20 awards.

In her statement of teaching philosophy and practices, Moore said that all of her classes are writing intensive.

"That suits me fine; it ensures that I always structure courses that involve many parts of the brain, the body and the mind, that I made my classroom lived spaces," Moore said. "I too live in those spaces. Teaching expands consciousness, that which is most human, most moral, and most spiritual in us: consciousness."

Moore has developed new courses in English, including English 342 "Women Writers," and English 404, a course on the theories and practice of peer tutoring.

"What is clear in Dr. Moore's teaching and in her scholarship/creative activity is the broad range of areas in which she has extensive accomplishments," said Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

Moore is a published scholar in Renaissance literature with her book on Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism, that was published by Southern Illinois University Press and received much critical acclaim.

MU English professor Dr. Lee Erickson said Moore deserves to be honored and recognized for her service as a teacher, a colleague and an administrator.

"She has proven herself as a critic of Renaissance and women's poetry, and has contributed significantly to Marshall's scholarly reputation," Erickson said. "We are lucky to have her in the English department."
 

Reynolds Award

The Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Bonita A. Lawrence has been at Marshall since 2000, first as an assistant professor of mathematics, currently as an associate math professor. Ralph W. Oberste-Vorth, chair of the math department, said Lawrence is one of the university's best math teachers.

"Dr. Lawrence's teaching evaluations are among the very best in the department," Oberste-Vorth said. "She is also active in advising and curriculum review and development. She heads the Mathematics Literacy Committee. She oversees the master's program and is our graduate advisor. In addition, I have heard numerous students sing her praises, including students who failed her course!"

Lawrence has received many awards and grants at Marshall, including the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, junior recipient for excellence in all fields, in spring 2002.

Before coming to Marshall, she taught at the University of South Carolina Beaufort (1996-2000), North Carolina Wesleyan College (1994-1996), the University of Texas at Arlington (1990-1993) and Auburn University (1988-1990).

Fellow math professor David A. Cusick described Lawrence as having "high energy, high quality and great rapport with students."

"She is one of Marshall's very best teachers - highly informed and infectiously enthusiastic," Cusick said. "She is able to intrigue and captivate students at all course levels. Under her guidance, students have traveled to multiple conferences and presented their work to professional audiences, both within the U.S. and abroad."

Lawrence said mathematics has an important calling as a tool for modeling and solving problems.

"There is an intrinsic beauty in the interrelated nature of mathematical concepts," she said. "When an exclamation of 'Wow' or 'Cool' is heard after a rigorous journey through interrelated ideas, the professor guiding the journey knows that he or she has found another kindred spirit."
 

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of the Pickens-Queen Teacher Award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the instructor/assistant professor rank and who have completed six or fewer years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Hedrick Award winner Mary Moore, after watching assistant professor of English Dr, Janet L. Badia teach, had this observation: "I can assert without hesitation that Janet Badia's professionalism, energy and engagement with all aspects of her profession make her a fine teacher."

Badia has 4.5 years of full-time service at Marshall. History professor Donna J. Spindel based her assessment of Badia on an online English course, "American Literature, 1860 to the Present."

"The course itself is a very good example of what a successful online course should be," Spindel said. "I say this because she allows for a high level of communication/interaction among the students. She actually requires online group discussions. We have found that the most successful online courses draw students out and engage them in the course. This clearly happens in (this course)."

Assistant English professor Sherri C. Smith said Badia has the students' needs in mind when teaching a course.

"I have seen firsthand not only the influence she has had on her students over time, but also the influence she has had on me," Smith said. "Dr. Badia is everything a university could want in a teacher-scholar."

Brian M. Morgan has more than seven years of full-time service at Marshall, including more than four years teaching.

"Even as a youth, I knew that I wanted to become a teacher," Morgan said. In the classroom, making every minute of face-to-face instruction valuable is important, he said.

Marques D. Jones, a Website Administrator with Bloss & Dillard Inc. Insurance Managers, took Morgan's classes during his undergraduate days at Marshall.

"During my undergraduate studies I learned more from Brian Morgan's classes than any other professor at Marshall University," Jones said. "There is no way I can put on paper how much he has helped me and numerous other students within the IST program as a professor and a friend."

Morgan also helps his students outside the classroom. "To be worthwhile," Morgan said, "I make myself available to students outside of class. I have an open-door policy, holding extra office hours, and am available via e-mail. I feel that teaching is more than simply feeding students facts - it is about being there to help them find the answers that will solve problems."

MU student Nicholas Slate, an IST major, said Morgan is by far the most accessible and most approachable teacher he has met at Marshall.

"His classes are examples of how to teach a college class, but more importantly, he challenges students to succeed in the classroom and beyond," Slate said.

Dr. Kathie D. Williams believes that history is much more complicated than outcomes, dates, laws, and names.

"People in the past, just as people today, argued, struggled with their consciences, felt ambivalent, were distracted by their everyday lives, and often believed they were right even when the majority of opinion was stacked against them," Williams said. "My job as a history teacher is to show the past not as a seamless narrative, but as a riotous time where conflict was much more prevalent than consensus."

Last fall, student Jessica Caldwell enrolled in History 581 - her fourth class with Dr. Williams. "There are many reasons why I continue to enroll in her highly-recommended classes, not the least of which is her unique style or methods of teaching," Caldwell said. "I have heard many undergraduates complain that 'history is boring.' However, there is nothing boring about Dr. Williams' classes."

Student Jessica Watkins, too, has taken several of Williams' classes for four years, spanning undergraduate and graduate work.

"Her continual commitment to current knowledge, innovative teaching techniques, and dedication to enhancing the scope of each student's educational experience distinguish Dr. Williams as an exemplary faculty member not just within the History Department, but more importantly, as a shaper of the university as an institution of higher learning," Watkins said.

Williams has been at Marshall for four years.

"Kat is one of the most popular teachers at Marshall University," history professor David Woodward said. "She brings passion and commitment to her classes and has a loyal following."

###


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Friday April 15, 2005
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Marshall's COLA Undergraduate Research & Creativity Conference

Student presentations representing a wide range of intellectual disciplines from within Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, many of which have grown out of senior capstone research, will be featured in next week's fifth annual COLA Undergraduate Research & Creativity Conference at MU.

The conference takes place throughout the day Monday and Tuesday, April 18-19, in the Memorial Student Center and the Drinko Library. It is free to the public, and members of the community are encouraged to attend. A complete schedule of presentations and activities is available at http://www.marshall.edu/libartsconf/sch05.htm.

The purpose of the conference is to showcase the academic and creative talents of the COLA students. Students deliver papers, exhibit posters and present their creative works.

In addition, two keynote addresses are planned. Dr. Jeredith Merrin, of The Ohio State University English department, will deliver a poetry reading entitled "Families" from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday in the student center's Shawkey Room.

Dr. Arthur Zucker, chair of the philosophy department at Ohio University, will deliver the scholarly keynote address entitled "Genetics: New Medicine/New People," from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Shawkey Room.

More information on the conference is available by calling John Young at (304) 696-2349. 


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Thursday April 14, 2005
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Marshall names Mark Snyder head football coach

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Interim President Michael J. Farrell and Director of Athletics Bob Marcum announced the hiring Thursday of Marshall alumnus and Tri-State Area native Mark Snyder as the school's new head football coach during a news conference in the Big Green Room at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"When we played for the national championship in 1987 we could only dream of the heights to which Jim Donnan and Bob Pruett would take the program," Snyder said.  "I have always been proud to have been a part of Marshall's resurgence in football and now I am honored to have the opportunity to return to my alma mater and lead Marshall into a new era.  This is an exciting time for the Thundering Herd family as we move into Conference USA and our football team will not only represent, but serve the University and the Tri-State area well on and off the field.  Our goal is to be the class of college football.

Snyder, who has spent the past four years as an assistant coach under Jim Tressel at Ohio State University, is coming off of his first season as the Buckeyes' defensive coordinator.  In Snyder's four years at Ohio State, the Buckeyes posted a 40-11 overall record and tallied a 3-1 record in bowl games, including victories in the 2003 and 2004 Tostitos Fiesta Bowls.

"Marshall University welcomes home a distinguished alumnus," Farrell said. "Mark Snyder follows the tradition established by Bob Pruett by having demonstrated excellence at Ohio State University, Minnesota and Youngstown State. We are very pleased that he has accepted our offer to be head coach of the Marshall University football team."

Farrell said Snyder's five-year contract will pay him a base salary of $144,200 a year. Additional promotional compensation of about $135,000 and an incentive package of about $197,000 could bring the total package to about $478,000 based in large part upon his coaching success.

Farrell also said Snyder will receive a $50,000 "welcome bonus" from the Thunder Club.

"I am pleased that Mark has decided to return to his alma mater and lead our football program into a new era," Marcum said.  "He brings a great deal of experience, enthusiasm, and a proven record of success at the highest levels of college football with him." 

Snyder helped develop a number of outstanding players at Ohio State, including All-Americans Matt Wilhelm, Cie Grant, and A.J. Hawk.   Both Wilhelm and Grant played key roles in Ohio State's 2002 national championship before going on to become NFL draft picks.  Last season, Hawk led OSU with 141 tackles en route to earning All-America status.

Snyder went to Ohio State from the University of Minnesota, where he spent four years coaching the Golden Gophers' defensive ends.  Prior to Minnesota, he also coached at Marshall, Central Florida and Youngstown State.

The Ironton, Ohio, native was an all-state selection at Ironton High School and played collegiate football at Marshall.  Snyder led the Southern Conference with 10 interceptions and was second on the team with 124 tackles his senior year at Marshall.  He captured honorable mention All-American and first-team All-Southern Conference honors that season as the Thundering Herd posted a 10-5 overall record and finished as national runners-up in the 1987 Division 1-AA National Championship game. 

Snyder graduated from Marshall in the spring of 1988 and started his coaching career the following fall as a student assistant for the Herd.  He went to Central Florida the following year and spent two seasons at UCF, the first as a graduate assistant and the second as a part-time coach working with the linebackers.

In 1991, Snyder joined Tressel's Youngstown State staff as the outside linebackers coach.  Snyder was given the added responsibility of special teams coordinator and inside linebackers coach in 1994 and was promoted to defensive coordinator and secondary coach in 1996.

During his tenure at Youngstown State, the Penguins won three NCAA Division 1-AA national championships and played in four consecutive national championship games, facing Marshall in three of those contests (1991, 1992, and 1993).

Following the 1996 season, Snyder went on to spend four years as the defensive ends coach at Minnesota.  While he was with the Golden Gophers, Minnesota's defense twice set school records for single-season sacks and averaged 40.7 sacks during a three-year span.  While at Minnesota, Snyder helped develop Lamanzer Williams, who led the nation in sacks in 1997 and Karon Riley, the Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year in 2000. 

Mark and his wife Beth, who also is a native of Ironton and a graduate of the University of Kentucky, have three daughters: Chelsea, 12, Lindsay, 11, and Shaylee, 4.


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Wednesday April 13, 2005
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Marshall's COEHS awarded continuing accreditation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services has been awarded continuing accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), interim dean Dr. Tony Williams announced today.

Williams said the accreditation, which ensures the public that schools of education are graduating well-qualified teachers ready for today's classrooms, continues through 2009. A four-person accreditation team was on Marshall's campus Oct. 23-27, 2004 to conduct interviews, review data and observe the COEHS in action. 

The college met each of the six performance-based standards, established in 2001 by NCATE to help insure highly qualified teachers will staff the nation's schools.

"Our excellent report evidences the quality of our programs in the production of teachers and other school-related personnel at Marshall University," Williams said. "We knew we were doing a good job, but this external evaluation says, 'Yes, you are doing an excellent job.' "

The College of Education and Human Services at Marshall has nearly 4,000 graduate and undergraduate students and provides about 40 programs for all types of education majors.

NCATE President Arthur E. Wise notified Marshall that the Unit Accreditation Board's decision to continue the accreditation is at both the undergraduate and graduate level. "This accreditation decision indicates that the unit and its programs meet rigorous standards set forth by the professional education community," Wise said.

In its overall assessment of Marshall, the board said collaboration between Marshall and its school partners "is commendable in the design, implementation and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice. Upon completion of the selected program, it is well documented both by data and anecdotal responses that the Marshall graduate demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to help candidates learn."

The six performance-based standards the College of Education and Human Services met are:

  • Standard 1: Candidate Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions
  • Standard 2: Assessment and Evaluation
  • Standard 3: Field Experiences and Clinical Practice
  • Standard 4: Diversity
  • Standard 5: Faculty Qualifications, Performance, and Development
  • Standard 6: Resources and Governance

The assessment also said it is evident that collaboration between Marshall University and its public school partners is exemplary. COEHS Associate Dean Jane McKee praised everyone who participated in the accreditation process.

"I feel it's really important to understand the entire university was part of this process, along with the community and the public schools," McKee said. "We have cohorts all over the state. In the College of Education and Human Services, every single person worked so hard. It was definitely a team effort."

School of Education chair Carl Johnson said the report from NCATE is the best Marshall has received "by far" in his 30 years at MU.

"In general, it has been become more difficult to meet the NCATE Standards and for us to receive an excellent report from NCATE speaks volumes about our excellent programs, faculty, and staff in the College of Education and Human Services," Johnson said. "Since Marshall merged with the (West Virginia) Graduate College we have worked through several issues which have made both campuses stronger and better."

The U.S. Department of Education recognizes NCATE as a specialized accrediting body for schools, colleges and departments of education.  NCATE currently accredits 602 institutions which produce two-thirds of the nation's new teacher graduates every year. McKee said all West Virginia institutions must be NCATE accredited.


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Wednesday April 13, 2005
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News conference set for Thursday in stadium Big Green Room

HUNTINGTON, W.Va - A news conference to introduce Marshall University's next head football coach will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 14, in the Big Green Room at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

All media are welcome and encouraged to attend this important event.


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Monday April 11, 2005
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'Creating a Tolerant Workplace' topic of panel discussion at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Julie Gedro, an activist and scholar, will lead a panel discussion on "Creating a Tolerant Workplace" on Wednesday, April 13, at Marshall University.

Gedro's visit is in conjunction with the annual Spring Job Fest at MU, and is sponsored by the Marshall University Commission on Multiculturalism and the subcommittee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) issues.

The panel discussion, which is free to the public, is from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Alumni Lounge on the Memorial Student Center's second floor.

Other panelists include Bruce Goff, Vice President/Administration with Steel of West Virginia; David Harris, director of equity programs and associate director of human resources at Marshall University; and Huntington Mayor David Felinton.

Panelists will discuss legal issues concerning LGBT individuals in professional and workplace situations.

Gedro, an assistant professor at Empire State College in New York, is the author of many publications, including her doctoral dissertation in 2000 at the University of Georgia titled, Urban Cowgirls: How Lesbians Have Learned to Negotiate the Heterosexism of Corporate America.


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Monday April 11, 2005
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Arts and Crafts Fair benefits Marshall University Library

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Buy a handmade craft or artwork and help the Marshall University Library - that's the opportunity being offered at the First Marshall University Arts and Crafts Fair that takes place Saturday, April 16, during Alumni Weekend.

More than 30 people are offering their work in the Memorial Student Center lobby between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. that day with 10 percent of the proceeds going to purchase materials for the University Library.

The offerings range from quilts to aprons, candles to wooden baskets, herbs to Italian charms, fudge to custom designed scrapbooks, watercolors to stained glass, along with an assortment of dolls, gemstone jewelry, picture frames, soaps and lotions, and a wide array of other handcrafted items.

Crafters from the Tri-State and Marshall communities, including employees, alumni and friends, will be represented at the fair.

"We've had a wonderful response," said Dr. Lynne Welch, professor of nursing and dean of the College of Health Professions, who came up with the idea of the fundraising fair.  "There are so many talented people at Marshall and in the community.  We're very happy to have them be a part of the fair."

Rising costs for library materials, coupled with a flat budget, have made it difficult for the University Library to meet the research needs of Marshall faculty and students, Welch said.   The Library Associates, a group which supports the mission of the Libraries, is sponsoring the arts and crafts fair as a way to help increase the funds available for materials.

All sales will be for cash only.  An ATM is available at the Memorial Student Center.  For more information, contact Welch at (304) 696-2626, or at welch@marshall.edu.


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Friday April 8, 2005
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Closing of 3rd Avenue near biotechnology center planned this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A portion of Huntington's 3rd Avenue will be closed beginning 10 p.m. Saturday, April 9, through midnight Sunday, April 10, to allow for construction of an overhead pedestrian walkway from Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center to the Science Building.

Mike Meadows, Marshall's director of facilities planning and management, said the four-block area from Hal Greer Boulevard to 20th Street will be closed.

Plans to close 3rd Avenue to install the walkway have been canceled twice in the past few weeks because delivery of the steel was delayed. The steel has arrived, Meadows said, and this time the installation will take place as planned, beginning Saturday evening.


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Friday April 8, 2005
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Spring Job Fest planned April 13 at Marshall University

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Career Services Center and the Information Technology Career Advancement Program (ITCAP) will be host to the annual Spring Job Fest Wednesday, April 13, on MU's Huntington campus.

The event takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It is designed specifically to encompass all Marshall students in all majors.

MU students and alumni seeking full-time, part-time and internship positions are encouraged to participate. The fair gives students the opportunity to meet and network with numerous companies in one location.

Alyson Doyle, Public Relations/Marketing Assistant with the Career Services Center, said even students not currently searching for a job are encouraged to attend the fair to take advantage of the networking opportunities.

More information is available by calling (304) 696-2249 or (304) 696-2250.


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Friday April 8, 2005
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Marshall medical students hold fitness fairs at Huntington schools

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Carloads of Marshall medical students will be heading out to two local elementary schools next week to spur a passion for fitness with "Let's Get Moving" fairs for fifth-graders.

With funding from a grant they requested from the American Medical Student Association, 20 to 30 medical students will wage an upbeat war against childhood obesity at Huntington's Altizer and Peyton elementary schools.

One of the program's organizers, second-year medical student Samantha Cook of Huntington, said six activity stations will be assembled in each school's gym.

"At one station each child's blood pressure, height, weight and body mass index will be privately measured and recorded," she said. "The other stations will be exercise and nutrition-based, and will teach the children about healthy living. Each child's health information will be sent home to his or her parents in a sealed packet that will contain information about how the body mass index relates to things like obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease."

The packets also will contain information about national guidelines for exercise and nutrition for children, nutritional information from fast food restaurants, and tips about having a healthy lifestyle, she said.

In addition to the screening and nutrition stations, the fifth-graders will compete for prizes at activity stations ranging from jump rope and an obstacle course to the video game Dance Dance Revolution. Two winners of an essay contest at each school will receive bikes and helmets, which are among the many prizes the medical students got as donations from local businesses.

Cook said she and the other primary organizers, Elizabeth Saunders of Huntington and Jane Wiseman of Ashland, have invested about 100 hours so far in the project, and all the medical students participating have gone to local businesses to get the donated prizes.

The fairs are designed to be fun for children, but the underlying issue is a serious one, Cook said.

"Some people are calling childhood obesity a national epidemic, and West Virginia ranks high," she said. At the same time, children may be finding it less automatic to be active. "Some of the smaller schools don't even have their own gym teacher any more," Cook said.


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Wednesday April 6, 2005
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HEALTHeWV program deployed to rural clinic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. ‑‑ Dr. Tim McPherson has a new assistant when he sees patients in a rural clinic in Lavalette: a sophisticated software system that, in his words, "lets me spend more time talking to patients about things that matter and less time on paper."

The system is HEALTHeWV, an adapted version of the U.S. Army's award-winning HEALTHeFORCES program of chronic disease management tools and electronic records. This week marks the first time in the nation the program has been used in a rural clinic -- in this case, a Marshall-affiliated clinic in an area identified by the federal government as a medically underserved area and a health professional shortage area.

McPherson, an assistant professor of family medicine at Marshall University's medical school, said the program will improve communication between doctor and patient -- a step that results in improved patient care, especially in treating chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.

As in the HEALTHeFORCES program, developed by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the HEALTHeWV program allows patients to use handheld computerized devices to respond to a variety of health surveys. Those responses are immediately available to the doctor, making it easier to incorporate preventive health care and chronic disease management into all visits. The military's program, which has won national awards, has had positive effects on both patient safety and disease outcomes, according to Col. Jill S. Phillips of Walter Reed.

Under a partnership initiated by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the program is being adapted to meet the needs of rural providers and patients. Along with Walter Reed, the partnership includes the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health at Marshall and the Robert C. Byrd National Technology Transfer Center at Wheeling Jesuit University.

"I know that the doctors will welcome the HEALTHeWV technology, and the people who need medical care could benefit greatly by it. I grew up in those West Virginia mountains. I know how important it is that people have access to health care," Byrd explained. "Physicians need to know more about the whole health matrix involving an individual ‑‑ not just this symptom, or that symptom ‑‑ so that the doctor can better treat patients. I'm glad that we have technology that's keeping up with this and getting ahead. This technology can substantially help the physicians and the people who need medical attention."

Byrd, who has helped to expand health care in rural West Virginia as part of his Senate work, is excited at the opportunity that the HEALTHeWV program offers.

"I certainly believe this technology is going to be a leap forward that will benefit the future generations in West Virginia and improve the health care of the total population," he said.

The Army is making the program available without charge and is providing extensive support. The Department of Family Practice at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine implemented the first phase of the program at the school's medical center last summer and now is running the pilot program at the rural site. Ultimately, the National Technology Transfer Center will take the lead in making the program available to other clinics across West Virginia.

"The vision is to take this technology into all medically underserved regions in West Virginia," said Dr. Mazharullah Shaik, director of the NTTC's Health Technology Application Program and program director of HEALTHeWV there.


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MU student receives prestigious ADDY Award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student Jessica Crouch, a senior graphic design major from Scott Depot, W.Va., recently received an ADDY Award for creative excellence in the art of advertising.

The awards, which are presented by the American Advertising Federation, are given on both the student and professional levels. Crouch submitted two entries in the student campaigns category that allows students to include examples of their work for a mixed media campaign.

Crouch received the Gold ADDY for her Sunrise Farms, Inc., campaign entry. The campaign was a project for one of Crouch's graphic design classes, and she then decided to submit her work in the ADDY Award competition.

"I am extremely honored to receive the award," Crouch said. "It is just good to see all of my hard work, the help I have received from my professors and everything that I have learned in my classes has paid off."

Crouch hopes the award will help her not only in her college career, but in her professional career as well.

"I really think the award will look good on my resume," Crouch said. "Hopefully, this will allow me to show not only my classroom experience but that I also worked on a project and won a high-level award in the advertising industry."

Crouch received her award during the ADDY awards ceremony for the Charleston district Feb.10 at the University of Charleston. Her project next will be judged at the national competition. The American Advertising Federation's national conference takes place June 4-7 in Nashville, Tenn.

"This award is really a tremendous honor for Jessica," Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Fine Arts, said. "She is a very talented individual and this is definitely a reflection on her creativity and perseverance as a student."


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Two-time Marshall graduate wins Pulitzer Prize for feature writing

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two-time Marshall University graduate Julia Keller, a cultural critic and reporter for the Chicago Tribune, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing Monday, April 4.

Keller, 47, won for a three-part series on a 10-second tornado that ripped through Utica, Ill. The Pulitzer Board described Keller's account of the tornado, which was published in December 2004, as "gripping" and "meticulously constructed."

The award in feature writing is for a distinguished example of feature writing giving prime consideration to high literary quality and originality. The prize also pays Keller, who joined the Chicago Tribune in late 1998, $10,000.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, graduating from Huntington East High School in 1974. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from Marshall in 1976, and a master's degree in English from Marshall in 1981. Keller earned a doctoral degree in English at Ohio State University in 1996. 

She began her journalism career as a reporting intern for syndicated columnist Jack Anderson in Washington, D.C. Later she worked for the Ashland Daily Independent in Ashland, Ky., and the Columbus Dispatch in Columbus, Ohio.

Her father, the late James Keller, taught mathematics at Marshall for more than 30 years.


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Former Human Rights Campaign director speaks Wednesday at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Elizabeth Birch, former executive director of the Human Rights Campaign, speaks on "The State of Gay Rights Today" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 6, in the Marshall University Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge.

Birch's visit to campus is sponsored by Marshall's LGBT (Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender) Outreach Office and the Office of Multicultural Affairs and is free to the public.

The Human Rights Campaign is the largest LGBT advocacy group in the United States. Under Birch's leadership, the group grew from 100,000 members in 1995 to 500,000 in 2003. During her tenure, the group became recognized as one of the top political organizations dealing with the equal treatment of LGBT people.

The organization is one of the largest bipartisan political action committees in the United States. The programs Birch helped engineer include HRC Network, a comprehensive resource center for LGBT workplace advocacy; HRC family Familynet, a virtual online community for LGBT families; the National Coming Out Project, dedicated to helping thousands of LGBT people come out every year, and Equality Rocks, the largest LGBT concert ever.

Birch was honored in 2002 by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights for her work in the civil rights community. Additionally, she has served as worldwide director for Apple Computer, Inc., and as general counsel to Claris Corporation to help implement non-discrimination and domestic partner benefits policies.

Birch graduated from the University of Santa Clara School of Law in California with honors and from the University of Hawaii in Political Science and Oceanography in 1980.

For more information on Birch's visit to Marshall, persons may call (304) 696-6623, or visit www.marshall.edu/lgbo.


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Retired Marshall professor, program win Appalachian awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A retired Marshall University professor and MU's Center for Studies in Ethnicity and Gender (CSEGA) won two major awards at this year's 28th annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference March 18-20 at Radford University in Radford, Va.

Dr. Lynda Ann Ewen, a retired professor of sociology, won the Cratis D. Williams/James S. Brown Service Award and Marshall was honored with the Appalachian Association's award for the best Web site.

 "Only a few years ago, Marshall University had little connection to scholarship on Appalachian culture," Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, an MU professor and co-director of Marshall's Faces of Appalachian initiative, said. "Winning two prestigious awards from this well-known association after such a short time in this arena is a major accomplishment."

Ewen won the service award for her contributions to research on diversity in the Appalachian region; for her work in editing the Ohio University Press series on ethnicity and gender in Appalachia; for her work in establishing the CSEGA, which she continues to co-direct, and for her activism in fighting for social justice in the region.

Ewen also helped develop the Faces of Appalachia Project, which is jointly sponsored by Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, College of Education and Human Services, and the Appalachian Studies Association.

The e-Appalachia Award went to CSEGA, which is linked to Marshall University's Web site and includes photos related to the region as well as a description of the many research studies conducted by CSEGA scholars. This award was given in recognition of the Web site's providing insight on Appalachia and its people.

"These awards show that Marshall is recognized by the best scholars in the field as a new leader, an institution which represents the best in Appalachian studies," Pendarvis said.

The Appalachian Studies Association is a professional association of nearly 1,000 members. Composed of scholars, writers, artists, teachers, and other professionals whose work or interests relate to the Appalachian region, its members come from all across the United States, as well as from mountainous regions in other countries, such as Scotland and Wales. It conducts conferences, publishes a newsletter and journal, and offers a Web site to promote understanding and growth in the region.

For more information, persons may contact Pendarvis at (304) 696-2855.


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Poet Maggie Anderson to visit Marshall, read from her work

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Maggie Anderson will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 14 in room 2W16 of Marshall University's Memorial Student Center.

Anderson is the author of four collections of poems, most recently Windfall: New and Selected Poems from the University Pittsburgh Press (2000).  She also is the author of Cold Comfort and A Space Filled with Moving.  Her work has appeared in such journals as The Alaska Quarterly Review, The Georgia Review, and The American Poetry Review

Anderson also is the editor of the new and selected poems of West Virginia poet Louise McNeill, as well as co-editor of A Gathering of Poets, an anthology of poems commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Kent State University student shootings during an anti-war protest in 1970.

Anderson has received fellowships for her poetry from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, the MacDowell Colony, and the West Virginia Arts and Humanities Commission.  She currently is professor of English at Kent State University, where she directs the Wick Poetry Center and edits the Wick Poetry Series of the Kent State University Press.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public. More information is available by calling MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.

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Marshall representatives to visit with lawmakers Wednesday at capitol

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The second floor of the state capitol in Charleston will be packed with representatives from Marshall University Wednesday, April 6, during Marshall University Day at the Legislature.

Staff, faculty, students and alumni will visit with legislators from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. About 30 booth displays, representing different colleges, departments, schools and programs at MU, will be set up throughout the day.

"Marshall Day at the Legislature is a wonderful opportunity to promote the great programs the university has to offer not only the Huntington community, but the entire state and region," said Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs with the Marshall University Alumni Association, which is organizing the event.

MU interim president Michael J. Farrell said Marshall Day at the Legislature is an important event for the university.

"This is an opportunity for students, staff, faculty and legislators to interact on a one-on-one basis," Farrell said. "Marshall is very important to the economy of West Virginia and it is critical that our state leaders understand our impact and listen to our message."

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones will proclaim April 6 as Marshall Day in the Capital City. Several Marshall students will be recognized in the House of Delegates and the Senate.

The special day culminates with "The Third House," a political satire scheduled for 8 p.m. at the West Virginia Cultural Center near the state capitol. The event, sponsored by Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, includes skits and songs that poke fun at state political officials.

Tickets for "The Third House," which cost $25 each, may be purchased at the House of Representatives Clerk's office, the Senate Clerk's office or the Governor's Press Secretary office at the state capitol.


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Alpha Phi Omega wins 'Can Hunger' food drive

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Alpha Phi Omega, a community service fraternity at Marshall University, won the "Can Hunger" competitive food drive sponsored in March by MU's Student Government Association and the Huntington Area Food Bank.

APO donated 866 pounds of food to the food bank. SGA will award the fraternity $500 for its efforts.

The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society donated 363 pounds, which was the second-highest contribution. The Biology Club, Lambda Society, and the Anthropology and Archaeology Club also participated in the event.

All donations benefit the HAFB, which is a nonprofit organization that serves the needs of 17 counties in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio.

For more information, persons may contact Missy Oldaker at (304) 412-2523, or Amanda Taylor at (304) 634-3318.


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Closing of 3rd Avenue near biotechnology center planned this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A portion of Huntington's 3rd Avenue will be closed beginning the evening of Saturday, April 2, through midnight Sunday, April 3, to allow for construction of an overhead pedestrian walkway from Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center to the Science Building.

Mike Meadows, Marshall's director of facilities planning and management, said the four-block area from Hal Greer Boulevard to 20th Street will be closed.


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