May 2005 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Applications being accepted for Jazz-MU-Tazz workshops, clinics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The seventh annual Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival returns to Marshall University Monday, June 20 through Saturday, June 25.

Applications are now being accepted for the workshops and clinics, which are open to high school and college students. The classes take place from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Center on the Huntington campus.

Participants take classes in jazz improvisation, history and music technology. Students rehearse and receive hands-on training during the classes.

Dr. Ed Bingham, professor in Marshall's music department and MU's director of jazz studies, said the program provides high school students with a high level of jazz training and allows college students to be active with the program.

"The Jazz-MU-Tazz program provides a more intensive experience to enhance what high school students are doing in their jazz bands at school and also allows students who don't have jazz bands at their schools to learn about the program," Bingham said. "It also allows college students to learn about the program while providing our jazz students with the opportunity to stay involved throughout the summer."

The students also will work closely with noted trumpet virtuoso Byron Stripling, who has performed with The Carnegie Hall Jazz Band, The Lincoln Center Classical Jazz Orchestra and many others. Stripling also has had many television and musical performances, including the lead role of the Broadway-bound musical, "Satchmo." Millions have heard his trumpet and voice on TV commercials and theme songs, including "20/20" and CNN.

"It is also great for recruiting for both the university and the jazz program," Bingham said. "We have had several students come to Marshall because they had previously attended the Jazz-MU-Tazz program."

Applications must be received by Friday, June 10. The cost of the program is $200 a person. For more information or to register for the program, persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-2452.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Third MU presidential candidate to visit campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Wednesday and Thursday, June 1-2.

Kupchella will be the third finalist to visit the university. John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University, visited last week, and Thomas R. Hanley, vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University, is visiting today and Wednesday. Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, visits later this week.

Kupchella will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said involvement of Marshall personnel, in both Huntington and South Charleston, and the community is important in the search process.

"We hope everyone takes advantage of this opportunity to meet with Dr. Kupchella and hear his views on higher education and Marshall University," Perry said. "These meetings are an important part of the search process."

On Thursday, Kupchella first will meet at 7:45 a.m. for breakfast with the Marshall president's council in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. His schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

Kupchella has been president of the University of North Dakota, where enrollment last fall was 13,187, since 1999. During Kupchella's time at the Grand Forks, N.D., institution, a president-initiated and completed comprehensive strategic planning process resulted in strategic plans for each unit and a strategic plan for the entire university. Another highlight during Kupchella's tenure has been increased faculty and staff salaries, and a significantly increased endowment. Since 1999, the university had completed nearly $450 million in building projects, some on campus and some as joint ventures with public and private partners.

Before going to North Dakota, Kupchella was provost and professor of biology at Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 1999. He was dean of Ogden College of Science, Technology and Health at Western Kentucky University from 1985 to 1993, and professor and chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences at Murray State University for six years before that. He also served at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine College in Louisville earlier in his career.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 31, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

National Youth Sports Program camp registration extended

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has extended the registration deadline for regional youth ages 10-16 who wish to participate in the National Youth Sports Program weekdays July 5-Aug. 6 on the MU campus. Deadline to register is Friday, June 10.

NYSP is a free camp for area youth who are disadvantaged and meet the federal guidelines for low income.  Free medical checkups will be provided to all applicants from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11 at Marshall's Cam Henderson Center.

Camp runs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. Each day begins with a light breakfast and ends with a nutritious lunch.  Students will participate daily in sports camps such as football, basketball, volleyball, soccer, baseball and softball.  Each day, students will enjoy a relaxing swim in the pool. Students will participate in weekly math and science classes as well as character and substance abuse workshops.

Former Marshall football Coach Bobby Pruett, along with the other coaches, players and volunteers from Marshall University, will be on hand to provide professional instruction and supervision. 

Applications may be picked up at any of the following locations: all Cabell County schools, A.D. Lewis and Fairfield East Community Centers, Marcum Terrace Sports Center, and the Information and Referral Service on the third floor of the Cabell County Public Library in downtown Huntington.

For more information, persons may call Beatrice Crane Banford at (304) 696-5225 or Tim White at (304) 522-0576 or (304) 751-6251.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Second MU presidential candidate to visit campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Tuesday and Wednesday, May 31-June 1.

Hanley will be the second finalist to visit the university. John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University, visited last week. The other two finalists  - Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, will visit later this week.

Hanley will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

About 75 community members attended a reception last week for Bardo and his wife, Deborah, at the president's house. Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said they are hoping for a similar turnout at Tuesday's reception for Hanley, and at on-campus meetings planned for Wednesday.

"Everyone is encouraged to take part in this important search process," Perry said. "The reception for Dr. Hanley and the meetings give the constituents the opportunity to meet and talk with him, and to hear his views on higher education and Marshall University."

Wednesday's schedule begins with breakfast at 7:45 a.m. with the president's council at Marshall in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. The schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

Hanley is a vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. He served as provost from 2003 to 2005. During that time he had administrative responsibility for 12 colleges, the library and information technology with shared responsibility for research, outreach and student affairs.

Before going to Auburn, Hanley was dean of engineering and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Louisville from 1991 to 2003. He had administrative responsibility for six departments and four centers with an overall budget of more than $24 million, more than double what it was when he arrived. Previously he was professor and chairman of chemical engineering for a joint program with Florida State University and Florida A&M University from 1985 to 1991.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 26, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former Marshall Professor Dies

Dr. William Westbrook, retired professor of sociology at Marshall University, died Wednesday, May 25 at the UCSF (University of California-San Francisco) Medical Center. Westbrook was 73.
 
Westbrook, a native of Marietta, Ohio, taught economics and sociology at Marshall from 1972 to 2003, his son, Randy, said. He also was an official scorekeeper for Thundering Herd home football and basketball games from 1974 to 2002.
 
In addition to Randy Westbrook, Dr. Westbrook is survived by another son, Jeff. Randy Westbrook said a memorial service for his dad will take place in mid-June. More information on the service is available at www.bluenail.org.
 
 "He had a passion and dedication to the students at Marshall and the well-being of their education and life in general," Randy said. "He also had a passion for Marshall as a university and for the athletics programs. His passion was working with the students and giving his all to the university and the community with his kindness and intellect."
 
 


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 24, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Autism Training Center featured on WSAZ-TV

A story by television station WSAZ earlier this month describes the activities of Lara Wilson, a program assistant in Marshall's Autism Training Center. It can be viewed at  http://windowsmedia.marshall.edu/autism/wsazatc.wmv.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 24, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Offers Summer Math Workshop

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students who fail to achieve adequate scores on the ACT and SAT exams have an opportunity to improve their abilities and eliminate the need for developmental math classes by completing a math workshop this summer at Marshall University.

The workshop is designed to improve the abilities of students who made below a 19 on the ACT or less than 460 on the SAT. A passing grade in the workshop eliminates all developmental course requirements in math and will allow immediate registration for college level math courses. 

Cost of the workshop is $185 and covers all materials, including books and tutoring. Two sections of the workshop will be offered during summer term C from June 6 to July 8 at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Two additional sections of the workshop will be offered from July 11 to Aug. 12 during summer term D at the same times. The classes meet in Harris Hall from Monday to Friday and are approximately two hours long.

For additional information, persons may contact the University College at (304) 696-3252 or email Randolph Cullum at Cullum@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 23, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First MU presidential candidate to visit campus this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John W. Bardo, chancellor at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, N.C., since 1995, and one of four finalists for the Marshall University presidency, will visit MU's South Charleston and Huntington campuses Wednesday and Thursday, May 25-26.

Bardo will be the first of the finalists to visit the university. The other three - Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University; Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University, and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota, likely will visit next week. 

Presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said it is important to have a good representation of the community at a reception for Bardo Wednesday evening, and for as many people as possible to attend meetings with Bardo on Thursday.

"We encourage everyone to take part in this important process," Perry said. "It's a wonderful opportunity for the constituents to meet Dr. Bardo and hear his views on higher education and Marshall University."

Bardo will meet with the Marshall Graduate College faculty and staff at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, and then attend a reception with community leaders at the Marshall University President's House at 1040 13th Ave. in Huntington from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday's schedule begins with breakfast at 7:45 a.m. with the president's council at Marshall in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room. The schedule for the rest of the day is:

  • 9 to 10 a.m. - group meeting with MU staff in the Memorial Student Center's alumni lounge
  • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. - group meeting with Marshall students in the alumni lounge
  • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - group meeting with MU faculty in the alumni lounge
  • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. - lunch with Marshall's academic deans in the John Spotts Room
  • 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. - campus and city tours
  • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. - visit to Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • 4 to 5:30 p.m. - meeting with the presidential search committee in John Spotts Room

During Bardo's 10 years at Western Carolina, enrollment has increased from about 6,700 students to about 8,400. Much of his work has focused on three issues: increasing enrollment, enhancing academic quality and engaging in regional development. Since 1995, undergraduate applications have increased more than 50 percent and the freshman class has grown from about 1,200 to nearly 1,600.

Before going to Western Carolina, Bardo was provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years at Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, Mass. He also has been an administrator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Fla., the University of Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, and Wichita State University in Wichita, Kan.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 23, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Learning disabilities summer program offered at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College of Education and Human Services is offering a learning disabilities summer program Wednesday, June 8 through Friday, July 8 for kindergarten- to eighth-grade students.

The program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, for students who have been diagnosed with a learning disability or ADHD.

Students will be divided into classes of no more than five to ensure that each receives individual attention. Participants will work on improving reading and decoding skills, reading comprehension, reading speed, arithmetic examples and story problems, self-esteem, organizational skills, test-taking strategies and study skills.

"The summer program is an excellent opportunity for students to receive individual attention to help improve these basic skills," Dr. Barbara Guyer, professor of special education and director of the H.E.L.P. program at Marshall, said. "During the school year students are overwhelmed with school work and improving these skills often gets overlooked."

The cost of the program is $175 for West Virginia residents, $190 for metro residents and $275 for non-residents. Scholarships are available for qualifying students. A copy of the learning disabilities or ADHD test results must be included with the registration form.

For more information or to register for the program, persons may contact Guyer at (304) 696-6317.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Newest Yeager class includes 11 students from five states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven students from five states, including four from both West Virginia and Ohio, make up the Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholars Class of 2009. They will begin their studies at Marshall this fall.

The program is named for U.S. Air Force Brigadier General (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Lincoln County, W.Va.  In October 1947, Yeager captured the world's attention by becoming the first supersonic pilot by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 experimental aircraft in California.

The Yeager program is the only scholarship at Marshall for which students must compete against one another. Students must meet criteria set for the scholars and then, if they are picked, must participate in the interviewing process. The students are interviewed by teams made up of Marshall faculty and administrators, as well as community leaders.

After receiving the scholarship, the students must maintain a rigorous course load, as well as a 3.5 GPA, and participate voluntarily in campus activities. The society also looks for students who have leadership potential.

"I'm looking forward to working with these outstanding students," Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, interim executive director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, said. "Every year brings a new group of Yeager scholars with a new array of talents and interests."

Pendarvis, who served on the program's first steering committee nearly 20 years ago, said among the interests of this year's entering scholars are biology, engineering, political science, psychology, medicine, history, journalism and law.

"Like other Yeager scholars, these students were selected not only for their academic ability, but also for their demonstrated leadership ability as well as their commitment to learning, openness to new ideas, and excitement about taking on new challenges," Pendarvis said. "They need all of those qualities to succeed in the scholarship program."

Also required of the scholars, Pendarvis said, are four interdisciplinary seminars during their first two years in college and development of foreign language skills by taking at least four semesters of a foreign language. She described the program as "exciting as well as demanding."

These students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2009:

Kristen Luchanne Berry of Proctorville, Ohio plans to double major in biology and theology or English.  She will use her degree in biology to prepare herself for a career as an orthodontist.  Berry will soon graduate from Fairland High School in Proctorville.

Morgan Victor Blubaugh of Washington, Va., plans to major in electrical engineering and computer science.  He will use his engineering skills to prepare to be an aeronautic engineer, an IT administrator or Web page designer.  Blubaugh will soon graduate from Rappahannock County High School in Washington, Va.

Brittany Julia Duncan of Lakeville, Minn., plans to major in political science with an emphasis on international relations and linguistics.  She will use her education at Marshall to pursue a career as a linguist, political analyst or editor.   Duncan will graduate from Lakeville High School in Lakeville, Minn.

Mary Catheline Hatfield of Charleston, W.Va., plans to pursue a degree in education, athletic training, or political science.  She wants to be an elementary teacher, an athletic trainer and a congresswoman.   Hatfield will soon graduate from George Washington High School in Charleston, W.Va.

Lauren Margaret Hutchins of Wheeling, W.Va., has not yet decided on a major course of study.  She plans to be an intermediate mathematics teacher, accountant or psychologist.  Hutchins will graduate from Wheeling Park High School in Wheeling, W.Va.

Anna Marie Keffer of South Point, Ohio will major in nursing at Marshall.  She plans to be a registered nurse with a career as a nurse anesthetist.   Keffer will graduate from South Point High School.

Jacob Tyler Kilgore of Kenova, W.Va., plans to major in chemistry so that he can pursue a career in medicine as a pediatrician or cardiologist or pursue a career as a chemist. Kilgore will soon graduate from Spring Valley High School in Huntington.

Rebecca Ryan Minardi of Dayton, Ohio plans to major in environmental sciences.  She is interested in pursuing a career in environmental education, or as a historian or Spanish translator.  Minardi will graduate from Carroll High School in Dayton, Ohio.

Laura Ellen Mitchell of Rock Hill, S.C., will major in psychology and dietetics.  She plans to be a child psychologist, a pediatric physical therapist or a dietician.  Mitchell will graduate from Northwestern High School in Rock Hill, S.C.

Miriam Katherine Reasons of Huntington plans to major in journalism.  She wants to pursue a career as a magazine editor, a newspaper editor or an electronic journalist.  Reasons will graduate from Huntington High School.

Claire Elizabeth Snyder of Portsmouth, Ohio will major in English and history with a minor in Spanish.  She wants to become a lawyer.   Snyder will graduate from Notre Dame High School in Portsmouth.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 20, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

List of presidential candidates at Marshall trimmed to four

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The list of candidates for the Marshall University presidency has been trimmed to four, presidential search committee co-chairs A. Michael Perry and Menis Ketchum said today.

The search committee met Monday and Tuesday in Cincinnati and interviewed eight semifinalists, which were selected from an original pool of more than 50 potential candidates. The committee then selected four finalists, all of whom are expected to visit Marshall's Huntington campus in the near future for a series of meetings with campus and community constituencies.

The finalists, listed in alphabetical order, are: John W. Bardo, chancellor of Western Carolina University; Thomas R. Hanley, current vice president and former provost of Auburn University; Stephen J. Kopp, special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents, and former provost of Ohio University; and Charles E. Kupchella, president of the University of North Dakota.

Marshall is being assisted in the search by Dr. John DiBiaggio of Academic Search Consultation Service of Washington, D.C., which was selected by MU to aid the university in its search. DiBiaggio, former president at Tufts University, Michigan State University, and the University of Connecticut, originally gave the committee the pool of more than 50 potential candidates.

"We are very pleased and grateful to John DiBiaggio for presenting us with an outstanding group of candidates," Ketchum said.

Perry, too, said the list of candidates was impressive.

"We were delighted and impressed with the variety of applicants who are presidents and provosts of major institutions with outstanding academic achievements," he said. "Each of the four finalists have strong backgrounds in higher education and have achieved significant accomplishments in a wide variety of very important areas vital to the future of Marshall University."

Here is a brief look at each of the finalists and the institutions at which they currently are employed:

John W. Bardo, Western Carolina University

Bardo has been chancellor of the Cullowhee, N.C., university since 1995. Since that time, enrollment has increased from about 6,700 students to about 8,400. Much of Bardo's work in that 10-year period has focused on three issues: increasing enrollment, enhancing academic quality and engaging in regional development. Since 1995, undergraduate applications have increased more than 50 percent and the freshman class has grown from about 1,200 to nearly 1,600. Western Carolina, a member of the Southern Conference, has a Carnegie Classification of Master's I, the same as Marshall.

Before going to Western Carolina, Bardo was provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years at Bridgewater State College in Bridgewater, Mass. He also has been an administrator at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Fla., the University of Southewest Texas State University in San Marcox, Texas, and Wichita State University in Wichita, Kan.

Bardo received his B.A. in Economics in 1970 from the University of Cincinnati, his M.A. in Sociology in 1971 from Ohio University, and his Ph.D. in Sociology in 1973 from The Ohio State University.

Thomas R. Hanley, Auburn University

Hanley is a vice president and professor of chemical engineering at Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. He served as provost from 2003 to 2005. During that time he had administrative responsibility for 12 colleges, the library and information technology with shared responsibility for research, outreach and student affairs. Auburn maintains a Carnegie Classification of Doctoral/Research-extensive, and its enrollment is more than 23,000.

Before going to Auburn, Hanley was dean of engineering and professor of chemical engineering at the University of Louisville from 1991 to 2003. He had administrative responsibility for six departments and four centers with an overall budget of more than $24 million, more than double what it was when he arrived. Previously he was professor and chairman of chemical engineering for a joint program with Florida State University and Florida A&M University from 1985 to 1991). The progam's major goals were the development of a quality program at the undergraduate and graduate levels with an emphasis on minorities and women.

Hanley received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1967 from Virginia Tech, his M.S. in Chemical Engineering in 1971 from Virginia Tech, his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 1972 from Virginia Tech, and his M.B.A. in Management in 1975 from Wright State University.

Stephen J. Kopp, Ohio Board of Regents

Kopp has been a special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents since 2004. It is a special assignment at the request of the chancellor, Roderick G. W. Chu, and involves two areas of responsibility: leading a statewide initiative to advance innovative practices that will improve student access, learning productivity and accountability in Ohio public institutions of higher education, and assisting the nation of Hungary on behalf of the board and the state of Ohio with implementing European Union higher education reforms.

Previously, Kopp was provost for two years at Ohio University (2002-2004) in Athens, Ohio, where he shared with the president the central administrative role in the university and served as the chief academic and operating officer. He led the senior administration effort to assist Ohio's medical school in privatizing its patient services clinic. Ohio has an enrollment of about 20,000 and a Carnegie Classification of Doctoral/Research-Extensive. He also was founding dean of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University, and founding dean of the College of Allied Health Professions at Midwestern University. He also served in a variety of positions for nearly 20 years at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine. 

Kopp received his B.S. in Biology in 1973 from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics in 1976 from the University of Illinois.

Charles E. Kupchella, University of North Dakota

Kupchella has been president of the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, N.D., since 1999. During that time, a president-initiated and completed comprehensive strategic planning process resulted in strategic plans for each unit and a strategic plan for the entire university. Another highlight during Kupchella's tenure has been increased faculty and staff salaries, and a significantly increased endowment. Since 1999, the university had completed nearly $450 million in building projects, some on campus and some as joint ventures with public and private partners. The University of North Dakota has an enrollment of more than 12,000 and its Carnegie Classification is Doctoral/Research-intensive.

Before going to North Dakota, Kupchella was provost and professor of biology at Southeast Missouri State University from 1993 to 1999. He was dean of Ogden College of Science, Technology and Health at Western Kentucky University from 1985 to 1993, and professor and chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences at Murray State University for six years before that. He also served at the University of Louisville and Bellarmine College in Louisville earlier in his career.

Kupchella received his B.S. in Education in 1964 from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in 1968 from St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, N.Y.

More information on the finalists is available at www.marshall.edu/presidentialsearch.  Also, photos of each of the finalists are available for use by the media at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Artists Series headed back to Keith Albee Theatre

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Artists Series events for the 2005-06 season will be moving back to the historic Keith Albee Theatre in downtown Huntington.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin, Sen. Bob Plymale and other area legislators presented Penny Watkins, executive director of the Artists Series, with a check for $35,000 to help ensure that Artists Series events will take place at the Keith Albee and aide in the organization's success.

The check was presented May 9 at the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's annual dinner. The money will be used to make needed repairs at the Keith-Albee. Both Manchin and Plymale said they recognize the importance of the series to Marshall and the community, as well as the economic impact it has on the tri-state area.

The Keith Albee Theatre has been home to the artist series for 68 years. The 2004-05 events had to be moved because of the uncertainty of the theatre with the opening last fall of Pullman Square and the Marquee Cinema. The Keith Albee did not book any shows after December 2004.

Angela Jones, director of marketing and external affairs for the Artists Series, said Marshall is excited to be moving back to the Keith Albee.

"The Keith Albee Theatre had been our home for so many years and we have a wonderful relationship with them," Jones said. "We are thrilled to be going back home."

For more information, persons may contact Jones at (304) 696-3334.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Summer technology camp teaches retirees computer basics

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Technology Outreach Center will be host in July to a summer technology camp called Computer Basics.

Computer Basics is a hands-on course for retired citizens, who have little or no experience with computers, but who want to learn about the rapidly changing world of technology.

Computer Basics is a comprehensive introduction to the world of computers.  The course covers fundamentals such as hardware, software, e-mail, the Internet, and basic document processing skills in Windows XP and Word. 

"This course will help individuals gain the skills needed to become computer proficient while learning in a comfortable and friendly environment," said Kelli R. Mayes, director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center. 

Computer Basics will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon daily July 25-29 at Marshall University in Corbly Hall, room 330.  The cost of the camp is $239 per person, which includes all materials. Class size will be kept small to allow for personal attention.  A certificate of completion will be awarded at the end of the camp. 

Persons interested in obtaining more information or registering for Technology Camp: Computer Basics may contact Mayes at (304) 696-3325 or via e-mail at mayes@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Applications for graduate tuition waivers accepted through July 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications for graduate tuition waivers for Marshall University's fall term will be accepted through Friday, July 29 in the graduate dean's office, 113 Old Main, on the Huntington campus and by the students' academic area offices on the South Charleston campus. 

Priority consideration will be given to faculty and staff of the state's public and private colleges and universities. 

Academic merit, which will be determined using grade point average and scores on required graduate admissions examinations, will be the major consideration in awarding the waivers that cover tuition.  Students who receive waivers are responsible for paying student center and activity fees and some department specific fees.

Up to three hours of waiver for graduate course work will be awarded to qualified applicants.  These waivers do not cover E-courses.

Students interested in being considered for a tuition waiver based on financial need criteria should contact the graduate dean's office in Huntington at (304) 696-6606, or the graduate admissions office in South Charleston at (800) 642-9842.

Students who previously held waivers must reapply to be considered for fall term waivers.

Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by mail or email.  Huntington campus students may pick up approved waivers in 113 Old Main beginning Friday, Aug. 12 and take them to the bursar.  Waivers not claimed by Friday, Aug.19 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

South Charleston campus students must be registered for fall classes to receive the waivers and to have the payments posted to their accounts.  Unless special arrangements are made, waivers for students who are not registered by Aug. 19 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 17, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Archived Videocast of MU/WVU Series News Conference

An archived videocast of the news conference May 17, which announced a new series of football games with West Virginia University, is available at http://www.marshall.edu/itvs/stream/muwvu.asx.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall, WVU agree to seven-year football deal; series begins in 2006

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials from Marshall University and West Virginia University today signed a seven-year deal during a news conference at the State Capitol to resume their football series, beginning in 2006.

The long-awaited series pits West Virginia's two Division I-A institutions against one another for the first time since 1997. WVU will be host to the inaugural game of the new deal on Sept. 2, 2006, followed by a game at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium on Sept. 8, 2007. The series swings back to Morgantown on Sept. 13, 2008.

The site for the game on Oct. 3, 2009 will be determined no later than 2008. The team that wins at least two of the first three games will be host to the 2009 game at its stadium.

The final three years of the contract have the series in Huntington on Sept. 11, 2010, and in Morgantown on Sept. 3, 2011, and Sept. 1, 2012.

"This is a great day to be a West Virginian," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin said during the news conference. "This is an unprecedented day in West Virginia history. It will be a game for all America, not just West Virginia. I can hardly wait for Sept. 2, 2006."

Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell said the state of West Virginia is the real winner with the resumption of the series. He recalled the Aug. 30, 1997 game when thousands of Thundering Herd fans traveled to Morgantown for the game won by the Mountaineers, 42-31. Overall attendance at Mountaineer Field was more than 65,000.

"The excitement we felt in Morgantown is something we've missed," Farrell said.

In the new series, the visiting team will be allotted 5,000 tickets for sale to its fans and the home team will own negotiating rights for live television coverage.

Both Manchin and WVU President David Hardesty Jr. said each team should root for the other until the teams meet on the playing field.

"We need to be cheering for each other and keep negative talk to a minimum," Hardesty said.

The series contract was signed by Manchin, Hardesty, Farrell, WVU Athletic Director Ed Pastilong, and Marshall Athletic Director Bob Marcum. West Virginia Coach Rich Rodriguez and Marshall Coach Mark Snyder also spoke briefly at the news conference.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students claim nine awards in state contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received four first-place awards and five honorable mentions during the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2004 broadcast journalism awards ceremony April 23, 2005 at the Canaan Valley State Park in Davis, W.Va.

Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of electronic media management in Marshall's William Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the university competed with commercial and noncommercial radio stations from throughout the state.

"Winning four first-place awards is quite an accomplishment in itself, but one of the first-place awards being for Outstanding News Operation is a signature statement for a college radio station considering that the students are competing with broadcasting professionals across West Virginia," Bailey said.

Bailey said the effort caps a successful year by the volunteer student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall from state, regional, and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations.

The student broadcasters have won 50 awards for the 2004-2005 academic year, including 28 first-place awards. That total is the second highest number of first-place awards since 1985-1986, the academic year Bailey became the faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

The highest number of first-place awards is 30, won in 2003-2004 when WMUL-FM student broadcasters won 60 awards in all.  In the past two years, the student broadcasters have won 110 awards with 58 of the awards being (53 percent) for first place.

The four first-place individual award-winning entries in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2004 broadcast journalism awards were:

Outstanding News Operation

The Newscenter 88 Team; News directors were Kristin Houghton, a senior from Inwood, W.Va., for spring semester 2004 and Melanie P. Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., for fall semester 2004.

Judges' comments:  Really, really good news organization.  Great production of news block; knowledge and implementation of the use of sound bites is perfect; content and writing is exceptional; anchor is, of course, young but is headed in the right direction.  Reporting is the way it should be.  This station's news department is impressive.  Someone has taught this staff well.

Best Breaking News Coverage

"Dan Angel Retires," written and produced by Melanie P. Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2004.

Judges' comments: Great use of sound; bites are the perfect length and content; writing is excellent; reporter needs to smooth out delivery a bit but that will come with maturity.  Great Job!

Best Documentary

"The Fight for Right:  Same-Gender Marriage in America," written and produced by Christina Riffle, a recent graduate from Dunbar, W.Va., broadcast during "Aircheck" Tuesday, May 4, 2004.

Judges' comments:  Good organization of the story with great use of sound; reporter needs work on smoothing out delivery otherwise, nice job!

Best Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the "2004 MAC Men's Basketball Tournament First-Round Game: Marshall University versus Eastern Michigan University" played at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington, W.Va., Monday, March 8, 2004.  The students calling the game were: basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student form Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Robert Harper, a graduate student from Hurricane, W.Va., and engineer Mike Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va.

Judges' comments: Without a doubt, one of the best play-by-plays the judges have ever heard; GREAT pacing, EXCITING deliveries, FANTASTIC recall of stats it put us in the game.  PERFECT SCORE!

The five honorable mention award-winning entries were:

Best News Reporter

"A Complication of Work," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior for McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" during 2004.

 

Best Feature

"Appalachian Music," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, Nov. 26, 2004. 

Best Interview

"The Tripton/Murphy Report," with hosts of the program Richard Tripton, a senior from Ona, W.Va., and Seth Murphy, a junior from Flemington, W.Va., and producer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va., that was broadcast Thursday, Oct. 7, 2004.

Best Sportscaster

"A Complication of Work," written and produced by Vince Payne, graduate student, from Hansford, W.Va., for the FM 88 Sports Team and broadcast during 2004.

Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the 2004 Capital Classic: Marshall University versus West Virginia University men's contest in the game played at Charleston Civic Center Coliseum  in Charleston, W. Va., Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2004.  The students calling the game were:

Basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Travis Smith, a recent graduate from Charles Town, W.Va.; statistician Heather Berry, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.; statistician Angela Bradley, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va., and engineer Michael Stanley, a junior from West Hamlin, W.Va.

The judges of the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association radio contest for 2004 were members of the Arkansas Associated Press Broadcasters Association.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 11, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

West Virginia Public Broadcasting to Open News Bureau at Marshall University

Huntington, WV. - Marshall University and West Virginia Public Broadcasting have announced the opening of a news bureau at Marshall's Huntington campus beginning July 1. Housed in the newly renovated Communication Building, the news bureau will produce content and programming for the statewide public radio and public television networks.   

"This is exciting," said Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell.  "West Virginia Public Broadcasting will give us a point of synergy that will accentuate the university's own mass communications programs. Combined with our nationally acclaimed Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the bureau will help develop a new level of service for our region and state." 

The agreement will permit Marshall University students, faculty and staff to work with WV Public Broadcasting professionals to produce local programming with the potential for statewide distribution. "The bureau is a tremendous opportunity for students and faculty, who seek an outlet for their journalistic talents in audio and video," said Dr. Corley Dennison, Dean of the Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.  "Not only will there be a greater distribution of information from this region of the state, but future professionals in the broadcasting arena will have broadcast professionals on campus by whom they can measure their own work."

Marshall and West Virginia Public Broadcasting have worked cooperatively in various arrangements since 1969. This recent move by WV Public Broadcasting establishes a two-person production team based on campus, allowing the broadcast service to expand its mission.

"We have wanted to renew our physical presence in the Huntington area for a long time," said Rita Ray, executive director for the Educational Broadcast Authority, licensee of the statewide public radio and television networks. "We appreciate the efforts of State Senator Bob Plymale and other legislative leaders, who have seen the need for improved coverage of news and public affairs in the Huntington-Charleston metro area."

Marshall University owns the license to WMUL-FM, an award-winning, student-operated radio station and through its Instructional Television Services provides computer and video programming for Adelphia Channel 25. 

The Educational Broadcasting Authority owns and operates West Virginia Public Broadcasting, which includes West Virginia PBS, a television network with transmitters serving Huntington/Charleston,  Beckley and Morgantown and West Virginia Public Radio, a network with  transmitters serving  Huntington, Charleston, Beckley, Buckhannon, Martinsburg, Petersburg, Wheeling, Parkersburg, and Morgantown.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 11, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Hill Appointed to Marshall Research Post

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Paul Hill, Executive Director of West Virginia EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research), has been appointed Interim Associate Vice President for Research Development at Marshall University, according to Dr. Howard Aulick, Vice President for Research at Marshall. This is a part-time appointment to allow Dr. Hill to work with Marshall and continue his primary role at West Virginia EPSCoR .

"Specifically, Dr. Hill will direct Marshall's current EPSCoR activities, lead the preparation of the university's next Research Infrastructure Improvement proposal (a multimillion dollar proposal to the National Science Foundation due in September), and assist the university in its search for a new EPSCoR campus coordinator," Aulick said. "Dr. Hill graciously accepted these additional responsibilities when Marshall's EPSCoR campus coordinator, Dr. Laura Jenski, accepted the position of Vice President for Research at the University of South Dakota."

A native West Virginian, Hill holds undergraduate and master's degrees from Marshall University (biology/chemistry) and a Ph.D. degree in biology from the University of Louisville.  He has 22 years of combined experience in environmental research, public administration, and policy development and has held productive CEO positions in both the public and private sector.  Prior to becoming the Executive Director of the WV EPSCoR Program in 2001, he was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the United States Chemical Safety Board (CSB). 

"There is no one in West Virginia who has a better understanding of the role and potential of academic research in advancing the state's high tech economy," Aulick said.  "The university is extremely fortunate to have Dr. Hill as its Interim Associate Vice President for Research Development."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall offering research programs for undergraduates this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is offering several research programs for undergraduates this summer at its Huntington campus.

The programs allow students to get hands-on experience with professional mentors in a variety of research fields. The students will spend six to 10 weeks on campus working with Marshall faculty to conduct and present their research.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program is offered at Marshall University to undergraduate students who have had previous research experience. The 10-week program begins May 23. The program is sponsored by the National Science Foundation through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research.

It is designed to promote scientific progress nationwide by designating funds to those states that typically have received less research funding than other areas of the country. The nine students selected to participate in the program will work with Marshall faculty to conduct their research.

The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience Program is offered to Marshall students in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The program is targeted to students with research experience and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to support their research and enhance their presentation skills. A panel of reviewers has accepted 15 students to participate in the program.

The Research Experience for Undergraduates Program sponsored by the National Science Foundation allows students to conduct research in the area of Bio-inspired chemistry. Applicants from colleges and universities across the country were reviewed and eight students have been selected to participate in the program. The students selected faculty mentors by the areas of research in which the faculty members have worked. The 10-week program begins May 23.

Bill Price, The Research Experience for Undergraduates Program leader, said the program benefits both the students and Marshall University.

"Science is really not learned in the classroom; students learn and gain experience through doing research," Price said. "The research these students conduct is also studied across the country so the program provides Marshall with great exposure."

The Idea Network for Biomedical Research Excellence Summer Program sponsored by the National Institute of Health allows students from colleges and universities in West Virginia to work with faculty at Marshall University and West Virginia University on a variety of research projects.

The program takes place June 6 through August 5. A panel of reviewers selected 30 students to participate in the program, including 14 students working with faculty at Marshall University.

The following is a list of programs offered this summer and the leaders of the programs at Marshall:

         Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Simon Collier (304) 696-6111;

         Summer Undergraduate Research Experience Program, Mike Norton (304) 696-6627;

         Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Bill Price (304) 696-3156;

         Idea Network for Biomedical Research Excellence Summer Program, sponsored by the National Institute of Health, Gary Rankin (304) 696-7313.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 10, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2584

Marshall Alum Named Chief Technology Officer

Gov. Joe Manchin announced his appointment of Marshall alumnus and West Virginia native Kyle Schafer to serve as the state's Chief Technology Officer on May 9.

"Kyle's appointment is a great testimonial for both our bachelor's and master's degree programs, said Betsy Ennis Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall.

Schafer earned a B.S. degree in computer science and M.S. degree in technology management from Marshall. He has held various leadership roles with leading energy companies NiSource and Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., most recently serving as director of technology, infrastructure and design for Nisource Corporate Services.

"Kyle Schafer is a talented and driven leader who brings a wealth of experience with him to the management of the state's technology infrastructure," Gov. Manchin said in a prepared statement. "Under Kyle's leadership and guidance, we will continue to evaluate our technology issues and needs, but, more importantly, where West Virginia needs to be in terms of utilizing technology to deliver responsible government to the people of our state."

According to the governor's office, Schafer's responsibilities will include overseeing the Office of Technology, which was reorganized as a result of House Bill 2891 during the 2005 Regular Legislative Session. Formerly structured as part of the Governor's Office, the Office of Technology now operates under the Department of Administration.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 9, 2005
Contact: H. Keith Spears, Vice President for Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

Marcum Extends AD Contract, Accepts Academic Appointment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The contract of Bob "Kayo" Marcum, Marshall University's Director of Athletics, has been extended through June 30, 2007, Marshall Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today. In addition, Marcum was appointed an adjunct professor in sports management in the Division of Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation.

Marcum was hired as Marshall's athletic director on an interim basis in May 2002 and was asked to evaluate the athletic program and help plan its future.  In November of that year he received an extended contract to serve as athletic director until June 30, 2005.  Today, he signed a contract extension reflecting the same annual salary from the university as his current contract, $83,050.00.  In addition, he will receive a salary supplement and automobile allowance from The Thunder Club.

"Bob Marcum is a nationally renowned athletic director," Farrell said.  "He has guided our athletic program extraordinarily well during a time of major transition and we value his experience and expertise as Marshall enters Conference USA." Farrell expressed great appreciation for Marcum's willingness to serve in an academic capacity as an adjunct professor.

Marcum, a Huntington native, graduated from Huntington High in 1955 and received a bachelor's degree in social studies and physical education from Marshall in 1959.  He earned a master's degree in education administration from the University of Akron in 1970.

He served as Associate Athletic Director at Iowa State University from 1971 through August 1978, Director of Athletics at the University of Kansas from August 1978 through January 1982 and Director of Athletics at the University of South Carolina from January 1982 through March 1988.

Marcum came to Marshall after retiring from the University of Massachusetts.  He went to UMass from Atlanta, where he was vice president and general manager of the Atlanta Motor Speedway from October 1990 through February 1992.  He was vice president of the Charlotte Motor Speedway from July 1988 through October 1990.

While Marcum was at UMass, the school produced more Atlantic 10 all-academic selections than any other league university. Marcum was the 1999 Northeast Region I-AA Athletic Director of the Year.

During his tenure thus far as Marshall's athletic director, Marshall has moved from the Mid-American Conference to Conference USA and head basketball coach Ron Jirsa and head football coach Mark Snyder have been hired.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday May 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Templeton named dean of College of Education and Human Services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Rosalyn Anstine Templeton, associate dean of the College of Education and Human Services the past two years at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., is the new dean of Marshall University's College of Education and Human Services, Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today.

Templeton assumes her new position July 1. She replaces Dr. Tony Williams, who has served as interim dean since December 2001.

"I wanted to pick a university where I felt I could fit into all programs and departments it had to offer, a university that needed a dean that could provide leadership and that was excited about progressive education," Templeton said. "And Marshall was the one."

Farrell said he is confident Templeton will do an excellent job at Marshall.

"She is an outstanding educator who will significantly enhance our mission to provide teachers for the state of West Virginia," Farrell said.

Also, Farrell said, "Marshall University is very appreciative of the efforts of interim dean Tony Williams."

Williams said the college is in "excellent condition" as Templeton prepares to take over. He cited the recent awarding of continuing accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

But, Williams said, he also understands the need for a permanent dean. "It's very important to have a permanent dean at the table that can represent faculty, staff and students and the programs of the college," he said.

Prior to serving at Ferris State, Templeton taught at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill., for 12 years, and before that she was at Willamette University in Salem, Ore., for a year.

She received her Bachelor of Science in 1984 from Southern Oregon University, her Master of Education in 1985 from The American University in Washington, D.C., and her Doctor of Philosophy in 1990 from the University of Oregon.

Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, headed the search committee that selected Templeton.

"From the standpoint of the search committee, she was very approachable and also very good at answering questions with specific answers," Van Horn said. "The search committee saw her as someone who would be very effective at interacting with agencies and personnel outside the university, and that's particularly important in the College of Education and Human Services."

Van Horn said Templeton, a native of Oregon, also demonstrated strong interest in the status of junior faculty in the college.

"She is very interested in helping faculty in the College of Education and Human Services develop a mentoring system that would engage senior faculty to work with junior faculty to make sure they were making reasonable progress toward promotion and/or tenure," he said.

Templeton described herself as a person with "very good communication skills and the ability to bring people together, and to deal with tough issues, yet let everybody feel good about what took place," she said.

Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall, said she looks forward to working with Templeton.

"She has a passion for education that was so obvious in the interview process," Denman said. "Marshall is fortunate to have someone with her leadership ability."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to sell surplus computers on May 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, on surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, May 9 at its new Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 100 computers will be sold in lots of five or more with minimum bids on some lots. About 10 of the better computers will be sold as individual units. Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, May 10, in the Purchasing Department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. from Tuesday, May 10 through Thursday, May 12. Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers and monitors have recently been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold is available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

National Youth Sports Program comes to Marshall this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hundreds of underserved youth ages 10-16 from throughout the region will be on Marshall University's campus for five weeks this summer to participate in the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP).

NYSP, in operation since 1968, is a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and selected colleges and universities throughout the U.S. To date, more than 23 million youth have participated in an NYSP camp. The program's mission is to give children "The Right Start." About 75,000 youth are expected to participate this summer in NYSP camps throughout the country.

Beatrice Crane Banford, associate director of athletics at Marshall and the project administrator, applied for and received a federal grant for $50,000 through the National Youth Sports Corp. She said the camp is free to participants, who will be required only to have a medical release from a physician, and whose parents or guardian meet Department of Health and Human Services income guidelines. 

"This is a wonderful, awesome program," said former Marshall football Coach Bobby Pruett, who is serving as honorary chair of the program's board of directors. "If you can't get excited about this, then you can't get excited about anything. It's for the kids and that's what we're here for."

Free medical exams will be provided to all applicants from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 11 at Marshall's Cam Henderson Center. The camp begins Tuesday, July 5 and runs through Saturday, Aug. 6. During most weeks, the camp is conducted from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. It starts each morning with a light breakfast and ends with lunch. All NYSP activities take place on Marshall's campus, and transportation will be provided to all participants.

Students will take part in various sports programs such as basketball, swimming, tennis, soccer and volleyball. Students also will take part in various academic classes and substance abuse classes. Marshall coaches, athletes, staff and volunteers will provide supervision, leadership and medical care during the entire five weeks.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for Marshall University and the children in our community," Banford said. "I am really excited to see so many community leaders getting involved and behind the project. The mission of NYSP is to give children 'the right start' through good nutrition and physical fitness, and that's what we're going to do."

Brian Courts of Huntington said he participated in an NYSP camp at Marshall about 25 years ago when he was 12. The experience, he said, left a lasting impression. He plans to recruit youngsters for this year's program.

"It gave me the opportunity to go on campus and actually interact with some of the athletes," Courts said. "It let me see and know that there's more to life than running the streets. There aren't many chances in the city of Huntington to get instruction on multiple levels. It's not just all sports, it's free and they feed you. It's an excellent program."

Applications for the camp will be available at the Huntington Housing Authority, A.D. Lewis Center, Fairfield East Community Center, schools and libraries throughout the region beginning early next week. Space is limited to 250 and applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-accepted basis. 

Completed applications must be returned to Marshall by Friday, May 27. They should be mailed to NYSP, c/o Marshall Athletics, P.O. Box 1360, Huntington, WV 25715

More information is available by calling Banford at (304) 696-5225 or community liaison Tim White, program coordinator with the Cabell County Youth Empowerment Program, at (304) 522-0576 or (304) 751-6251.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 6, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New MURC board of directors appointed by Marshall president

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Interim President Michael J. Farrell has appointed a new 16-member board of directors for the Marshall University Research Corp. (MURC), he said today.

Farrell said participants in a recent external review of MURC suggested the need for objective, experienced outside directors and an increased role for faculty in the research corporation. Following up on that suggestion, Farrell appointed Lloyd Jackson, Paul Hill, Dwight Sherman, David Graley and John Hess to the board.

Jackson is a former state senator from Hamlin, W.Va., Hill is director of West Virginia EPSCoR, Sherman is a retired Union Carbide Corp. researcher, Graley is Bank One Area President and President of the Huntington Area Development Council, and Hess is a member/partner with Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC.

The board, which conducted its first meeting on Friday, April 29, is chaired by Farrell, and Sarah Denman, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, is the vice chair. MU faculty members on the board are Richard Niles, Richard Begley, Michael Castellani and Chuck Somerville.

"Members of this board will be incredibly important to Marshall University today and in the future in structuring and managing the research mission," Farrell said.

Here is a brief look at each of the MURC board of directors:

Officers

Michael J. Farrell, Chair. Farrell has been interim president of Marshall University since Jan. 1, 2005. A distinguished Huntington attorney, he is taking a sabbatical from the law firm of Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, L.C., to serve as Interim President. He is a 1969 Marshall graduate, earning a Bachelor of Science degree, and former student body president and student senator. He graduated from West Virginia University's College of Law in 1974 with a Doctorate in Jurisprudence. Farrell twice has been appointed to serve on Marshall's Board of Governors.

Sarah Denman, Vice Chair. Denman has been Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall University since 1999. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall. She joined Marshall's Community and Technical College staff in 1975 as coordinator of the communication program and associate professor. From 1988 to 1991, Denman was associate dean of the Community College. She has served on numerous university and statewide committees/task forces.

F. Layton Cottrill, Jr., Secretary. Cottrill is Chief of Staff, General Counsel and Vice President for Executive Affairs at Marshall University. An attorney, he came to Marshall in 1989 from the state system of higher education where he served as chief legal advisor to the governing board. He received his bachelor's and doctor of jurisprudence degrees from West Virginia University.

Outside Directors

Lloyd Jackson, a Hamlin resident, served 12 years in the State Senate, eight of those as chair of the Education Committee.  In that position, he helped write many pieces of higher education legislation, including the most recent amendments to the research corporation law.  Jackson is a graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law and is the CEO of his family's natural gas production business. He also serves as a trustee of the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

Paul Hill is State Director for the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (WV EPSCoR). He has more than 20 years combined experience in environmental research, policy and public administration, management and communication activities applied to complex scientific issues and constituencies in both the public and private sector. A native West Virginian, he holds degrees from Marshall University (B.S. and M.S.) and the University of Louisville (Ph.D.) in biology and chemistry.

Dwight Sherman, a South Charleston, W.Va., resident, is retired from Union Carbide Corporation, where he served several research and management assignments during his 33-year career (1968-2001). His key interests while at Union Carbide included active leadership in educational programs sponsored by Dow/Union Carbide and in advancing economic development in West Virginia.

David A. Graley has been with Bank One for 30 years and currently serves as its Area President. He has been very involved in civic and economic development activities in the Huntington area and was awarded the 2004 Volunteer of the Year by the West Virginia Economic Development Council. Graley currently serves on several boards, including HADCO as its chair, Biotech Alliance, Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Marshall University Lewis College of Business.

John G. Hess, a Barboursville resident, is a member/partner with Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC, with offices in Huntington, Beckley and Oak Hill. He formed the business in 1985 with two partners and six employees. Hess is a 1973 graduate of Marshall University with a BBA in accounting. He is a member of the Marshall University Board of Governors, and past president of the Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

Faculty

Richard M. Niles, professor and chair of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, is associate dean for Research and Graduate Education in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  He also is director of the recently funded $9.3 million Center for Biomedical Research Excellence grant from the NIH.  Niles came to Marshall in 1992 after 18 years on the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine.

Richard Begley has been a professor in engineering at Marshall since 1990. He also has served as chair of the engineering department, assistant dean for Outreach and Special Programs of the Graduate School of Information Technology and Engineering and Interim Director of the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute. He has helped to develop externally funded research partnerships with several institutions in America, Europe, Canada and Mexico in addition to private sector corporations.

Michael Castellani, a professor of chemistry, has been a faculty member at Marshall University since 1988.  He is a member of the legislative body of the Council on Undergraduate Research, was a 2001 Camille and Henry Dreyfus Scholar, and co-chairs the West Virginia Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol event.  He is an active researcher who has been awarded more than $350,000 in external support for his work and published nine research papers while at Marshall, seven with student coauthors.

Chuck Somerville is an associate professor of Biological Sciences and has been a faculty member at Marshall University since 1997.  He earned his B.S. in Microbiology from Penn State in 1978 and his Ph.D. in Marine Microbiology from the University of Maryland in 1989.  He has conducted environmental research at the USEPA laboratory in Gulf Breeze, Fla., and at the US Air Force laboratory in Panama City, Fla.   

 

Administrators

Howard Aulick is the Vice President for Research and Interim Director of IDEA (Institute for the Development of Entrepreneurial Advances). He received his Ph.D. in physiology at Indiana University in 1974 and came to Marshall in 1984 to join the School of Medicine faculty. 

Betsy Ennis Dulin, a Charleston resident, is dean of Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering.  She is a graduate of WVU Institute of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Washington and Lee University, with degrees in Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, and Law.  She is a registered professional engineer in West Virginia, and licensed to practice law in Ohio and West Virginia. 

Herb Karlet, who lives in South Point, Ohio, graduated from Marshall University in 1972 with a BBA in Accounting, and in 1975 became a CPA. He earned his MBA from Lynchburg (Va.) College in 1980. At Marshall, Karlet has served higher education the past 24 years as a professor of accounting, Director of Audits, Vice President for Finance, and in his currently position of Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration.

Charlotte N. Weber is Vice President for Federal Programs at Marshall University and director and CEO of the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. She has been with Marshall University since 1993.   Prior to joining Marshall, Weber worked for United States Senator Robert C. Byrd in Washington, D.C. She earned her degree in 1986 from George Washington University. Weber serves and holds key leadership positions on numerous boards across West Virginia.

###


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 5, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Clair Matz Study Abroad Scholarship winners named at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for International Programs, College of Liberal Arts (COLA) and the Study Abroad Student Association (SASA) have named the winners of the Clair Matz Study Abroad Scholarship for 2005-06.  They are:

  • Mia McDonald, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, to Aalborg University, Denmark through the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP)
  • Sijia "Scarlett" Ma, COLA, International Affairs, to Kansai Gaidai University, Japan
  • Brandy Artrip, COLA, Modern Language and Criminal Justice, to Universidad Antonio de Nebrija, Spain

The winners were selected by competition and will each be awarded $500 to defray the costs of international airfare. The Study Abroad Student Association's elected officers determine recipients of the awards.

The selection was based on participation in SASA activities and anonymous essays, including one that asks the student to outline new and creative things they will bring to the association upon their return from study abroad. Matz Scholars also are encouraged to serve as SASA officers upon their return. 

The Matz Study Abroad Scholarship is named in memory of Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, who served as a member of the Marshall faculty from 1970 until his death in 2003. Matz established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

Individuals who supported this year's Matz Scholarship will be recognized at the first International Education Award Ceremony, which takes place at 3:30 p.m. Friday, May 6 on Buskirk Field during the second annual International Student Graduation Picnic. The picnic and ceremony are open to all Marshall faculty, staff and students. 

Contributions to the Dr. Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Grant Fund can be made by check payable to: The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755.

For  more information, persons may contact Clark Egnor, Executive Director, Center for International Programs (320 Old Main), at egnor3@marshall.edu. Or, they may visit www.marshall.edu/cip/studyabroad/matz.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall names Uselding Lewis College of Business dean

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Paul J. Uselding, dean the past six years of the College of Business and Management at Saginaw Valley State University in University Center, Mich., is the new dean of Marshall University's Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business, MU Interim President Michael J. Farrell announced today.

Uselding assumes his duties at Marshall on July 1, 2005. He replaces Dr. Chong Kim, who has been serving as interim dean since September 2003. Kim replaced Dr. Cal Kent, who served as dean of the college for 10 years before resigning.

"Dr. Uselding possesses a wealth of experience that will benefit the students and faculty," Farrell said.

Uselding assisted the College of Business and Management at Saginaw Valley State University in attaining initial accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), which was accomplished in April 2003.

"Dr. Uselding brings wonderful experience and expertise to the leadership role of the Lewis College of Business," Dr. Sarah N. Denman, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said. "I look forward to working with him."

Prior to serving at SVSU, Uselding held deanships at the University of Illinois-Chicago (1992-1997), University of Toledo (1990-1992) and the University of Northern Iowa (1987-1990).

"Dr. Uselding has 18 years of experience as a business college dean and a national reputation in his field, including having served as the editor of The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance," Dr. Christina Murphy, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts and chair of the search committee, said. "He has extensive experience in building new programs, including those in entrepreneurship and in family business, and he is committed to community outreach and partnerships with the local business community."

Uselding described his new position at Marshall as "a great opportunity."

"First and foremost they are wonderful people in the business school at Marshall," Uselding said. "I had very positive experiences in dealing with the search committee and its chair (Dr. Murphy). It's a beautiful community and Marshall is a well-known institution, visible in the higher education community. The people there are focused and professional."

Uselding received his Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University in 1961, his Master of Business Administration from Cornell University in 1963, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University in 1970.

At Saginaw, Uselding's primary responsibilities involved creating process, practices and procedures to comply with each and every standard of AACSB accreditation and to instill accreditation awareness in a faculty of 27. He also created a multi-stakeholder derived mission for the College that, among other things, seeks to connect the College to the business community, emphasize small/medium size enterprise, and focus on the growing importance of international operations and globalization for firms in the region.

Two of Uselding's additional accomplishments include establishing a family business program and securing endowment funds for its operations, creating an educational partnership with area businesses, and instituting a quarterly "Dean's Dinner" forum to bring faculty and area business executives together in an informal setting.

"We are very excited about the ideas and energy he will bring to the Lewis College of Business in building upon the college's strengths to advance its potential," Murphy said.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 3, 2005
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

International Music Fraternity Reactivates Chapter at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Twelve new members were initiated into Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity at Marshall University Sunday, May 1, thereby reactivating the university's chapter.

"We are always pleased when one of our long-standing chapters gets a new lease on life," said Dr. Jonny Ramsey of Denton, Tex., the international president of the fraternity. "I know these new members are looking forward to being collegiate members of Delta Omicron."

New Delta Omicron members, all undergraduates at Marshall University, are Minna Aminzadeh from Carrollton, Tex., Melanie Baldwin from Westerville, Ohio; Jessica Bethel from Circleville, Ohio; Angela Crum, from Union, W. Va.; Deanna Holderby, from Proctorville, Ohio; Amy Holliday, from New Martinsville, W. Va.; Callie Huff,  from Chesapeake, Ohio; Holly Linn, from Huntington, W.Va.; Meredith McCoy, from Scottown, Ohio; Christina Riley, from Union, W. Va.; Ashli Spinks, from Lewisburg, W.Va.; and Nikki Winter, from Logan, W.Va.

The group is advised by Dr. Vicki Stroeher, a music faculty member at Marshall and an alumna member of Delta Omicron.  Assisting Stroeher with the formal, members-only initiation ceremony were Susan Tams, treasurer of the Delta Omicron Foundation Inc., and a staff member at Marshall; Beverly Miller, Patricia Green, and Harriet Tucker, all of Huntington, W. Va.; and Lee Ann Lykens of Beckley, W.Va.

After the ceremony, several of the new members performed short musical numbers, including a flute duet and solo, saxophone trio, and a trumpet duet.

Delta Omicron is a professional fraternity in the field of music with collegiate chapters established throughout the United States and abroad. The fraternity was founded in 1909 at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music by three undergraduate students.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fors murals to be restored at Marshall University; community invited to watch conservator Michael Ruzga work

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thanks to the conservation work of nationally recognized Cincinnati conservator Michael Ruzga, the art of Marion Vest Fors will be displayed once again at Marshall University.

And, on May 10 and 11, people will have the chance to eat a box-lunch with Ruzga and watch him work on the Fors murals, which ultimately will be housed on the renovated second floor of the James E. Morrow Library on MU's Huntington campus.

Former MU faculty member Marion Vest Fors painted three murals for Marshall's bi-centennial in 1937.  They represent Marshall University, West Virginia Literature, and American Literature. The three panels were hung in the Morrow Library reading room during the university's centennial celebration.

During a renovation in the early 1960s, the murals were taken down from the wall and packed away in cold storage. Although in reasonably good condition now, there are extensive pinpoint losses in the paintings and a moderate layer of grime and debris has accumulated. Library Associates at Marshall have been eager to restore the paintings to their former glory and to display these representations of the history of learning and literature in early-20th century America.

Helen Chambers Hensley, picked by then-Marshall College President James Allen to exemplify the alma mater of Marshall in two of the murals, will be celebrating her 90th birthday in May. Mrs. Hensley is in excellent health and is actively assisting in efforts to raise funds for mural restoration.  Mrs. Hensley will be in attendance at the "Lunch with the Conservator" on May 10.

More than one-third of the funds needed have been raised so that Ruzga can complete restoration of the first panel, entitled "Marshall University," in May.

"The craftsmanship of the murals, as well as Mrs. Fors' techniques, is of high quality," Ruzga has noted. He has worked on a number of similar projects, including the 2001 restoration of murals in the University of Cincinnati's Engineering Library in Baldwin Hall and the 2002 restoration of a group of 19th century paintings at Cincinnati's St. Michael's Catholic Church.

Ruzga is the former Chief Conservator of the Taft Museum of Art.  Paintings he has treated include Rembrandt, Renior, Sargent, Bouguereau, Gerome, Ingres, Claude Lorrain and many others.  He has been Director and Chief Conservator of Fine Arts Conservation for more than 15 years.

Interested community members may purchase a brown-bag lunch on-site and meet Ruzga from noon to 1:30 p.m. on either Tuesday, May 10, or Wednesday, May 11.  Ruzga will discuss his work and describe the restoration process. Persons are asked to RSVP to Pamela Ford at (304) 696-2312.  Space is necessarily limited to 20 attendees for each date.

For more information, persons may contact Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall University Libraries, at (304) 696-2318


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU hooding ceremonies planned this week in Charleston, Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hooding ceremonies to honor Marshall University's master's and doctoral degree recipients take place in Charleston and Huntington this week on separate days prior to Marshall's 168th commencement on Saturday, May 7.

The Charleston ceremony begins at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 4 at the Charleston Municipal Auditorium.  In Huntington, the ceremony is set for 7 p.m. Friday, May 6 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.  More than 350 graduates are expected to attend the two ceremonies. 

Each graduate will be recognized individually when a faculty member presents a hood in a color indicative of the recipient's field of study.

In addition, two faculty members will be honored with the Ashland Inc. Outstanding Graduate Advising Awards:  Dr. Cheryl Brown, Huntington campus, and Dr. Eldon Larsen, South Charleston campus.

Brown, an associate professor of political science, is known for her commitment to guiding students through graduate programs, her helpfulness to them and for encouraging them to strive for excellence and to provide leadership in their chosen fields.

Larson, a professor of engineering, has been lauded for his availability to students, his encouragement to them and for challenging his students to not only learn the material being taught in Marshall courses but to apply it on both personal and professional levels outside the university.

In addition, a Distinguished Graduate Student Alumnus Award will be given on each campus.  Dr. Bernard Queen, who received both bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University, will be honored at the Huntington ceremony.  Paul A. Mattox, Jr., who received an undergraduate degree from West Virginia Tech (now WVU Institute of Technology) and completed an M.S. in Engineering at the MU Graduate College, will receive the award for the South Charleston Campus.

Queen, who served in Naval Intelligence during World War II, was a classroom teacher and later superintendent of Wayne County schools.   He came to Marshall University as a faculty member in 1963 and became chair of the Department of Curriculum and Foundations in 1968.  He served as dean of the College of Education between 1974 and 1977 and subsequently became director of Development and executive director of the Marshall University Foundation.

Under his leadership, assets rose from less than one $1 million to $5.6 million and three distinguished chairs were established.  In memory of his wife, Lamina, who died last year, Queen has established an endowed scholarship for graduate students, the Lamina Faye Maynard Queen Memorial Graduate Research Scholarship.

A professional engineer registered in five states, Mattox recently was appointed Commissioner of Highways by Gov. Joe Manchin.  Mattox worked with the Department of Highways' Construction and Maintenance Division until 1987 and later joined Woolpert, LLP, a nationwide engineering consultant firm. He served as director of the Charleston office until 1998.  That year he became general manager of E.L. Robinson, a West Virginia consultant firm.

Under his leadership, E.L. Robinson became the largest civil engineering firm in the state with 80 employees in five West Virginia and two Ohio offices. Mattox has had extensive experience in projects for highways, bridges and water systems as well as economic development ventures.


Direct Link to This Release