November 2005 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Mid-Ohio Valley Center breaks ground for expansion

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As the reputation of Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va., grows, so does enrollment - and the need for more facilities.

To meet the expanding needs of accelerated high school students, traditional college age students and adults who have chosen to return to school in the Mid-Ohio Valley, Marshall's Board of Governors earlier this year approved a $2.5 million, 8,100 square-foot expansion of this six-year-old center. 

An original bond issue, with an outstanding balance of about $2.6 million, will be refinanced by the Mason County Building Commission, which will sell additional bonds of $2.5 million for the expansion.

Today, Marshall President Stephen Kopp and U.S. Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito joined MOVC officials and others in a groundbreaking ceremony for the project. Construction is expected to begin next spring.

"This expansion will enhance our offerings to our students by allowing us to offer state-of-the-art chemistry and biology lab space and a nursing lab that will be second to none," Homer Preece, director of the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, said.

The Mid-Ohio Valley Center, which is affiliated with Marshall's School of Extended Education, was established in April 1994 and opened with limited operation and an enrollment of 11 students. From then until spring 2005, enrollment grew to more than 1,500 registrations.

"The future success of West Virginia's economy is dependent on an educated workforce that can compete worldwide," Capito said. "Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center is helping keep today's workforce competitive by training workers for high demand positions while giving tomorrow's workers the opportunity to gain the skills they need to compete in a global economy."

MOVC classes were conducted for the first five years at Point Pleasant High School, Wahama High School and the Mason County Career Center. Preece's office and other administrative offices were located at Bank One.

"We expanded and expanded and got to the point where we were running out of room at the secondary level," Preece said, referring to the need for a single, large facility.

The current $3 million facility was built on the campus of Pleasant Valley Hospital, and opened in 2000. Now, more expansion is on the horizon.

"When we moved in, the new building was the right size," Preece said. "Within a year, we were back using county facilities again."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp described the Mid-Ohio Valley Center as "an unequivocal success story and a testament to the power of university-community partnerships."

"The civic and business leaders of Mason County, including Pleasant Valley Hospital, have been outstanding partners," Kopp said. "Together, we are making a difference in the lives and career opportunities available to residents of the county and surrounding areas. I am proud of our faculty and staff at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center. Their achievements and success have created the conditions that have made this new expansion possible."

The architect for the expansion, which will increase the size of the MOVC by about 60 percent, is Bastian and Harris of Charleston, W.Va.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 30, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Knight Foundation awards grant to Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation has awarded the Marshall University W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications a $167,000 grant to help journalists improve coverage of nonprofit organizations.

The grant means that The Fourth Estate and The Third Sector, the only national training program of its kind for journalists who cover nonprofits, is moving to Marshall University after four years at the University of Mississippi. It also expands the program's outreach to Washington and the northeast.

Burnis R. Morris, Marshall's Carter G. Woodson Professor, created the program in 2001 as a member of the journalism faculty at Mississippi. Knight Foundation transferred the grant to Marshall after Morris joined the school's permanent faculty this semester.

"Nonprofits are important engines of community life in every U.S. city and town," said Alberto Ibarguen, president and CEO of Knight Foundation. "This program has done much to expose U.S. journalists to important issues, stories, trends and sources."

Marshall President Stephen Kopp said, "Marshall University is very pleased to have this important program and grant from the Knight Foundation moved to Marshall's School of Journalism and Mass Communications. This signals a new level of service and recognition that the School of Journalism has assumed. Students, faculty and professionals in the field of journalism will experience the impact of this initiative."

Dean Corley Dennison described the grant as "a major initiative for the School of Journalism and Mass Communications."

"I believe this is the first significant Knight Foundation Grant to be awarded in West Virginia, and it is quite appropriate since John S. Knight, one of the giants of 20th century journalism, was born in Bluefield, W. Va., in 1894," Dennison said.

The Fourth Estate and the Third Sector is an outgrowth of Morris's work involving nonprofits and journalism. From 1993 to 1997, he helped Independent Sector, a Washington-based national leadership forum, hold conferences at five journalism schools on improving news coverage of the tax-exempt community. He also wrote two books offering journalists advice on coverage.

After he joined the University of Mississippi faculty in 1998, Morris proposed a national training program that would be based at Mississippi and funded by Knight. The first of the Knight training programs was held in 2002.

Morris, a former reporter and editor, said he "wants journalists to think of nonprofits as a serious beat - the way they think about politics, business and government. I want them to cover the nonprofit community as aggressively as they cover other important beats.

"I don't want anyone to attend a fundraiser for a charity and take pictures of rich people drinking wine and eating brie, and think they've covered a charity. I want journalists to realize they have a lot more work to do."

At Marshall, Morris will direct a program for 20 journalism fellows who will study nonprofits and journalism at Marshall next May 17-21. The fellows, selected from nominations by practicing journalists, will study such topics as philanthropy, accountability, tax rules, politics, fundraising and reading and understanding financial data.

Morris also will conduct a one-day conference for journalists on Thursday, Dec. 8 in Washington. That conference will help journalists identify the major issues confronting nonprofits in 2006. A similar program will be held in March at The Record in Hackensack, N.J., for Northeastern journalists.

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation promotes excellence in journalism worldwide and invests in the vitality of 26 U.S. communities. Over the past 50 years, the foundation has invested nearly $250 million in journalism initiatives.

For more information, persons may contact Morris via email at morrisb@marshall.edu or by calling (304) 638-3322.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday November 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community invited to lighting ceremony, holiday party

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Huntington campus will light up for the holidays during a special evening of festivities on Monday, Nov. 28.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp says everyone in the Marshall community is invited to attend the annual lighting ceremony at 6:30 p.m. on the plaza area near the Drinko Library. Holiday lights hung on campus by MU students, along with a Christmas tree inside the Drinko Library, will be illuminated during the ceremony.
 
After the lighting ceremony at 7 p.m., everyone is invited to head over to the Memorial Student Center for a holiday party filled with food, fun and entertainment. The party will take place in the Don Morris Room, located on the second floor of the student center. Santa Claus will be on hand to pose for pictures with children of all ages.
 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday November 22, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU graduate assistant's works on display Dec. 4-11 at Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The works of Marshall University graduate assistant Jackie Parsons will be on display for a week in early December in the Birke Art Gallery, which is located on the first floor of Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

Parsons' work features large-scale prints that express the female figure as a container and explore the connection that women have with vessels.

The exhibition runs Sunday, Dec. 4 through Sunday, Dec. 11.  An opening reception is planned for 2 p.m. Dec. 4 at the gallery, which may be accessed on the Third Avenue side of Smith Hall. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 6 to 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.

For more information, persons may contact Emily Ritchey, Birke Art Gallery director, at (304) 696-2296 or the department of art and design at (304) 696-6760.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 21, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Author of new essays on nature to read from his work Dec. 1

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer and essayist Jim Minick will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1 in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Minick is the author of a new collection of essays on nature, Finding a Clear Path, published by West Virginia University Press.

His poems and essays have appeared in many books and periodicals including Orion, Shenandoah, Encyclopedia of Appalachia, Appalachian Journal, Appalachian Heritage, and Wind. Since 1996, Minick has written a regular column for The Roanoke Times New River Current as well as other articles that have appeared in major newspapers throughout the south.

Finding a Clear Path intertwines literature, agriculture, and ecology as Minick takes readers on journeys through the marvelous natural world, encountering monarch butterflies and morel mushrooms, beavers, black snakes, bloodroot and other subjects. A blueberry farmer, gardener and naturalist, Minick explores Appalachia with wit, sensitivity and wisdom.

Minick lives, writes and farms in southwest Virginia. He teaches writing and literature at Radford University.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts. For more information, persons may contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday November 19, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Six hundred pounds of nickels delivered to Marshall University; part of Fort Gay High School Alumni Association's latest gift

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Fort Gay High School Alumni Association has given Marshall University thousands of dollars in contributions, but the group's latest donation was delivered to the school today in an unusual fashion.

The group wanted to mark the unveiling of the new buffalo nickel, which occurred earlier this year, and honor Marshall University by making part of its $34,000 donation in nickels. Today, 600 pounds of the coins were delivered via backhoe to the campus, accompanied by officers from the Marshall University Police Department and the Huntington Police Department.

"A major gift comprised of buffalo nickels is a very unique way of highlighting both scholarship and the Thundering Herd.  When we discuss having every penny count in higher education, we discover that our Fort Gay alumni group has gone five times better,"   said Dr. H. Keith Spears, Marshall's Vice President of Communications and Marketing and a graduate of Fort Gay High School in Wayne County.

"We appreciate David Graley of Bank One helping us with the logistics in obtaining the nickels and Rick Weston of Walker Cat for the heavy equipment transportation," Spears added.

Richard Plymale, president of the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association, explained the reason for the organization's continuing support of Marshall.

"We who graduated from Fort Gay High School came away with a set of values and a work ethic which we didn't see duplicated everywhere," Plymale said. "We wanted to give something back to our community and a scholarship at Marshall seemed like a good way to accomplish that."

Glen Kerkian, President/CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., praised the FGHS alumni for their efforts.

"This fine tradition of grassroots fundraising by the Fort Gay Alumni Association has created a conduit for attracting students to Marshall and then providing them with the critical resources when they arrive," Kerkian said.

In 1988, Fort Gay High School consolidated with Crum High School to form Tolsia High School. One student is chosen each year to receive the Fort Gay High School scholarship.

More information is available by calling Spears at (304) 696-2965.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM wins Broadcast Best of Show award again

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, recently received the Broadcast Best of Show award for the sixth time in as many contests at the 84th annual National College Media Convention/2005 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) Annual College Competition ceremony.

The broadcast category was for radio only and was offered for only the sixth time in 2005 to recognize excellence among broadcasting attendees. Marshall has won Best of Show each of the six years the category has been offered.

The event took place Sunday, Oct. 30, in the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City, Mo. The Broadcast Best of Show award winning entry by WMUL-FM was a 30-minute newscast: "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" for Monday, March 14, 2005. The students who participated in the newscast were:

Jen Smith, junior, Huntington, W.Va., producer; Vince Payne, graduate student, Hansford, W.Va., news anchor; Melanie Chapman, senior, McConnell, W.Va., news anchor; Brandon Millman, junior, Huntington, W.Va., weather anchor; Alex Reed, senior, Virginia Beach, Va., sports anchor; Dave Mistich, junior, Washington, W.Va., reporter; Joey Spurgeon, senior, Culloden, W.Va., reporter; Phil Turner, graduate student, Huntington, W.Va., reporter.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the campus radio station competed with other broadcasting stations from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the convention.       

The Best of Show competition is open only to publications and media outlets that send student delegates to the national convention. The competition is divided into eight newspaper categories, two yearbook categories, two magazine categories, and the one broadcast category. The entries were evaluated for general excellence, but emphasis was placed on reporting and leadership as expressed through content.

"This is an honor for WMUL-FM and all the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications students featured on the Best of Show entry," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

The second-place award for the 2005 Broadcast Best of Show was won by the Savannah College of Art and Design.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Leah Edwards, Office of University Communications, (304) 696-6397

Marshall University marks contribution in unusual way

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will receive via special "delivery" a generous gift from the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association on Saturday, Nov. 19. 
 
The FGHS Alumni Association has given Marshall thousands of dollars over the years, but its latest donation will come, in part, in the form of buffalo nickels. Marshall will receive the donation at 1 p.m. Saturday on the Huntington campus.
 
 
WHAT: Marshall University receives an unusual donation from the Fort Gay High School Alumni Association.
 
WHEN: 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 19
 
WHERE: Marshall mascot "Marco" and his police escort will accompany an end loader as it leaves the Bank One parking lot at about 12:45 p.m. and carries the nickels east on 4th Avenue to the entrance of Marshall's Old Main on Hal Greer Boulevard where the nickels will be "deposited." Light refreshments will be served.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 18, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Public forum at Marshall allows West Virginia middle school students to speak out about the achievement gap

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A public forum titled "West Virginia Middle School Students Speak Out About The Achievement Gap" will be conducted on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, Nov. 28.

The event, which takes place in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, begins at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. It is presented by The Education Alliance, and is sponsored by The Huntington Black Ministerial Alliance, the Huntington-Cabell Branch of the NAACP, Cabell County Schools and the Marshall University Division of Multicultural Affairs.

Dr. Betty Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall, said the forum is the result of a study launched by Dr. Hazel K. Palmer, President/CEO of The Education Alliance. The goal of the study was to determine what actions administrators of West Virginia's middle schools can take to raise student achievement and close the achievement gap between middle-class white students and African-American or economically disadvantaged white students.

The Education Alliance is a nonprofit organization serving schools in West Virginia by promoting business and community involvement in public schools 

Results of the study will be the subject of a roundtable discussion at Marshall's public forum. Roundtable participants include Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; Rosalyn Templeton, dean of Marshall's College of Education and Human Services; Bill Smith, superintendent of Cabell County Schools and a member of Marshall's Board of Governors; Samuel R. Moore, president of the Huntington-Cabell Branch of the NAACP and a teacher; Joe Williams, a former member of MU's Board of Governors, parent Feon Smith and two local middle school students.

The audience will be invited to participate in the roundtable discussion.

"The achievement gap is a big issue, which we need all citizens involved in solving," Cleckley said. "That is what the public forum is all about.  We expect to hear a variety of opinions about the role of schools, higher education and the public to provide all children a quality education."

For more information, persons may contact Marshall's Multicultural Affairs at (304) 696-4677.

 

View Education Alliance Report at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/RELEASE/2005/AchievementGap.pdf

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

CD by MU professors features music from era of John Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music professors of flute and voice and a guitarist have collaborated to produce a recording of music from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall, for whom the university is named.

The CD, titled "Rallying 'Round Our Liberty," features Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of flute; Linda Dobbs, professor of voice, and Dr. Leo Welch, former professor of guitar at Marshall who now is at Florida State University.

The project was sponsored in part by Marshall's John Deaver Drinko Academy and College of Fine Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the West Virginia Division of Culture and History.

Wendell Dobbs said that he first became interested in music of the early 19th century about 25 years ago while working on his doctorate. Since then, he has studied traditional music from Ireland, Scotland, and England as well as that of the United States.

When he first began looking at this literature, he found that the historically accurate instruments were not available for performing this music. However, he has since been able to acquire a historical copy of a flute produced by the London company Rudall and Rose. The instrument was made by John Gallagher of Elkins, W.Va.

"It's been so serendipitous to find an instrument maker of John Gallagher's skill," Dobbs said. "He's opened a whole area of discovery for me which simply would not have been possible on modern instruments."

The flute is made from African blackwood with eight silver keys.

Most of the selections on the recording were arranged for guitar by Welch. Welch and Dobbs collaborated on some of the other arrangements.

The CD is available at the Marshall University Bookstore on the Huntington campus.  For further information, persons may contact Wendell Dobbs at (304) 696-2359 or by e-mail at dobbs@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 17, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University begins process of creating strategic vision

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Led by Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp's goal of actualizing MU's "tremendous potential," the university has begun the process of creating a strategic vision that will be implemented through a collaborative effort between Marshall and its public constituents. Kopp describes the process outlined as inclusive, dynamic and ongoing.

At a news conference this afternoon in the Communications Building on Marshall's Huntington campus, Kopp announced that the process of enlisting ideas to be considered for the plan, not only from students, faculty and staff at Marshall, but also from MU's  broad constituent base - alumni, friends, elected officials, members of the public, etc. - has begun.

"An inclusive process that inspires active participation across all constituent groups creates a sense of ownership of the plan and a pervasive dedication to accomplishing its goals," Kopp, MU's president for the past 4 months, said. "This is an opportunity that invites everyone to the table who wants to participate and share their ideas for shaping the future of Marshall."

The input stage began today and continues through Dec. 19. During that time, all constituents will use a specific Web site to submit their ideas concerning the university's future priorities. The site to be used is www.marshall.edu/strategic.

 

Complete press release available at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2005/pr112005.htm


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 16, 2005
Contact: Keith Spears, Vice President for Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-2965

President Kopp to make major announcement about the direction of Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, will make a major announcement regarding the direction of the university at 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 in the Communications Building next to Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

The announcement will impact every student, staff and faculty member within Marshall for the next 10 years and beyond.

WHAT: President Stephen J. Kopp will make a major announcement about the future of Marshall University. Link to Live Event

WHEN:  1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17.

WHERE:  Studio A, Communications Building (next to Smith Hall), Marshall University's Huntington campus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 16, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Egnor wins Cyrus R. Vance Award for International Education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Clark M. Egnor, Executive Director of the Center for International Programs at Marshall University, has been named the winner of the 2005 Cyrus R. Vance Award for International Education in West Virginia in the category of  postsecondary educators and institutions.

Egnor, who was nominated by Marshall associate professor of classics Dr. Jerise Fogel, received the award Monday, Nov. 14 at a dinner and reception sponsored by the Office of the Cabinet Secretary of Education and the Arts, the Higher Education Policy Commission, and the West Virginia Department of Education as part of International Education Week. Retired General Wes Clark, Supreme Allied Commander of NATO from 1997 to 2000, was the keynote speaker.

"I was very proud to receive this award, but there are many faculty and staff at Marshall who have helped to internationalize our campus over the years and they should also share in this recognition," Egnor said.

The Vance award carries with it a $5,000 grant.  Egnor said that he will apply it to the recently established Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Scholarship Fund to help Marshall students study abroad.

"I hope others who have benefited from the Study Abroad program will join me in supporting the fund and remembering the work of Clair Matz," he said.

Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, served as a member of the Marshall faculty from 1970 until his death in 2003 and established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

"Dr. Egnor's work has been quietly leading to a revolution in the university's approach to internationalism on campus," Fogel said in her letter of nomination. "Clark's use of his office to advocate for the inclusion of international education as part of the university's mission - both in word and in deed - has had a remarkable impact His achievements over his career at Marshall are amazing by any account."

The Cyrus R. Vance Awards were created by the Office of the Secretary of Education and the Arts in 2001 to honor West Virginia educators who best exemplify Vance's dedication to the understanding of international issues and affairs and promote greater international understanding among West Virginia students.

A native of Clarksburg, Vance served as Secretary of State under President Jimmy Carter, Deputy Secretary of Defense under President Lyndon B. Johnson, and Secretary of the Army under President John F. Kennedy.  He also served as a special presidential envoy to many of the flashpoints of the 20th century: the Panama Canal Zone, Cyprus, Vietnam, South Africa, and Croatia. Vance died in January 2002.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday November 11, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Marshall medical students hold fitness fairs for Lavalette, Altizer students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall medical students will help fifth‑graders dance, jump and race their way toward healthier lifestyles this month at Lavalette and Altizer elementary schools.

The "Let's Get Moving" fitness fairs will be held Nov. 15 at Lavalette Elementary and Nov. 22 at Altizer Elementary. An expansion of a program begun by medical students this spring, the fairs are the first of at least 10 planned for the current school year.

"The medical students organized three 'Let's Get Moving' fitness fairs last year and the success was incredible. The smiles on the students' faces said it all," said Dr. Aaron McGuffin, senior associate dean for medical student education. "The children of West Virginia need to know that we care about their health and that fitness can be fun."

Third-year medical student Samantha Cook of Huntington, one of the program's organizers, said medical students will supervise several activity stations in each school's gym. The fifth‑graders will rotate among the stations, competing for dozens of prizes for activities ranging from jumping rope and running an obstacle course to the video game Dance Dance Revolution. Two winners of a "Physical Fitness" essay contest at each school will receive bicycles and helmets. Students also will rotate through a nutrition station where they will learn about making healthy food choices and the most recent changes to the food pyramid.

At one station, medical students will privately check each child's blood pressure, height, weight and calculate their body mass index. Each child's health information will be sent home to his or her parents in a sealed packet, along with information about how excess weight contributes to diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, Cook said.

In addition, for children with abnormal blood pressure or BMI measurements, parents will receive a recommendation to follow up with their child's physician. For children who do not have a physician, contact information will be provided for physicians who have agreed to see any child referred by the program: University Pediatrics in Huntington and Dr. Adam Franks and Dr. Kevin McCann of University Family Practice of Wayne County.

The West Virginia State Medical Association has provided $2,000 to support the Let's Get Moving fairs, and local businesses are providing significant additional support by donating prizes for the events.

"We at the State Medical Association are proud to support this project," said Sen. Evan Jenkins, its executive director. "It's terrific for the med students to take this initiative, and hopefully their work will help our state's youth make good, healthy lifestyle choices."

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

2005 International Festival kicks off International Education Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University kicks off International Education Week Sunday, Nov. 13 with the 39th annual International Festival in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on MU's Huntington campus.

The theme of the festival, which takes place from 3 to 6 p.m., is "Together in a Global Community," emphasizing the pressing need to understand each other in light of current events worldwide.

The festival features exotic foods, traditional music and dance along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures. All of this will be provided by Marshall University international students and international community individuals and groups such as the Huntington Women's International Club.

Currently, Marshall has 400 international students enrolled from more than 60 countries.  Exhibits, food sampling and entertainment will be provided, and admission is free.

In addition to the International Festival, Marshall is host to the 3rd annual Festival of Flags, which features a spectacular display of flags from all of the countries where the university draws international students or sends students to study abroad.  This semester's festival features flags from more than 60 countries and regions of the world.  The Festival of Flags is sponsored by Student Affairs, the June Harless Center and the Center for International Programs.

Dr. Clark M. Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs, said the festival is the perfect opportunity for individuals to celebrate the rich diversity found in the Tri-State area.

"The International Festival allows the community to celebrate its multi-cultural heritage and showcases the many nationalities of those studying and teaching at Marshall University," Egnor said.

All Tri-state area residents are invited to attend the festival.  For further details about the International Festival and International Education Week activities, persons may contact Scott C. Hoppe, director of the International Students and Scholars Program, at (304) 696-2379, hopes@marshall.edu, or visit the Marshall University Center for International Programs office in Old Main 320.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 10, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU's Huntington campus to be decorated Sunday for holidays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Winter Festival Committee is giving Marshall students the opportunity to help spruce up campus for the holidays on Decorating Day Sunday, Nov. 13.

Students interested in stringing lights and hanging other decorations are asked to meet at 2 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza on MU's Huntington campus. Faculty, staff and members of the community are invited to participate as well. Pizza and soft drinks will be served afterwards.

The traditional lighting ceremony will take place at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28 on the plaza outside the Drinko Library. Refreshments will be served in the Memorial Student Center lobby after the ceremony. Participants will have the opportunity to have their pictures taken with Santa Claus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Graduation, retention rates on the rise at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Graduation and retention rates are on the rise at Marshall University, Provost Sarah Denman said today in a report to the institution's board of governors in the board's regular meeting at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

Denman said Marshall has exceeded its goal of raising its graduation rate by at least one percent per year since the 1999-2000 school year, when the rate was 33 percent. According to preliminary calculations, this year's graduation rate is 43 percent, greatly exceeding the minimum goal set five years ago. It's also already higher than the legislated goals of 40 percent for 2008, and approaching the 2010 goal of 45 percent.

"We are very confident we can meet the goal of 45 percent in 2010," Denman said.

Denman also announced that the retention rate for first-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen in 2004 to this fall was 75 percent. The rate the previous year was 72 percent.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said news of the improved graduation and retention rates is very positive for the university.

"Marshall University is the people's university in West Virginia, and we are committed to their access and success," Kopp said.

Also today, Kopp announced that the accounting firm of Deloitte and Touche, LLP, recently completed the annual financial audit of Marshall, and the result was very favorable. In fact, Dennis Juran, a managing partner with Deloitte and Touche, described the audit as being "as good as you can get."

"We are very pleased with our annual financial audit," Kopp said. "The financial results are good and we received an unqualified audit opinion from our auditor and no management letter. This means that the auditor noted no instances of noncompliance or other matters that would require reporting under government auditing standards."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday November 9, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Community College, Mountain State School of Massage sign articulation agreement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Community and Technical College and the Mountain State School of Massage signed an articulation agreement today in a ceremony on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The agreement will allow students and alumni of Mountain State School of Massage to take courses in general education from Marshall Community and Technical College that will lead to an Associate in Applied Science degree.

An articulation agreement occurs when the college evaluates and recognizes postsecondary training that is done by an agency other than a traditional higher education entity (college) and that training has been determined to have the academic rigor of sufficient quality to be equivalent to college-level coursework.

"Today's signing ceremony is possible because of the hard work of Janet Smith, MC & TC Allied Health Division, and Vanessa Hendley, assistant director from Mountain State School of Massage," said  Steve Brown, MC&TC's associate dean and director of Off-Campus Programs.  "For months they worked together to review the Massage Therapy learning outcomes and to have the program of study approved."

The first established massage therapy school in West Virginia, Mountain State School of Massage, which is located in Charleston, was founded in 1995 and is accredited by the Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA). 

The school is permitted by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission to operate as a postsecondary school providing education for individuals pursuing massage therapy as a career.  MSSM also is approved by the National Certification Board of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) as a continuing education provider.

"Mountain State School of Massage has a training program and they are eager to have their students earn a degree," Brown said. "A degree is not required to work in the field of massage therapy but this agreement provides students an opportunity to fulfill their educational goals as lifelong learners."

The MSSM program is a rigorous one, with multiple educational options to take classes, according to Brown.  "They have a full daytime program as well as weekend and night programs," he said. "Once someone completes their massage therapy training, we will accept their certificate and award equivalent college credits, and then the student will need to complete our college's general education components to earn their degree."

Those students who have previously completed the Mountain State School of Massage training programs are eligible to take college courses to complete the degree as well as currently enrolled students, Brown said.  "It's a very flexible educational program, which provides educational opportunities to students in our service area," he added.               


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Tuesday November 8, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend is Nov. 11-12 at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2005 Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend will take place at Marshall University Friday, Nov. 11 and Saturday, Nov. 12.

The 19th annual event is sponsored by the Marshall University Center for African American Students' Programs. The event is expected to bring in high school students from West Virginia and nearby schools in Kentucky and Ohio. Parents also are invited to visit the campus.

The special weekend is designed to promote college attendance and to familiarize the students with the Huntington campus and the quality academic options available at Marshall. Students are selected based on their academic success and leadership abilities.

"We have a great deal of pride at Marshall in our ability to recruit and retain academically promising African American students from around the state and region," Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs, said. "The weekend will be a great experience for the students and will serve as a primary event to attract the most gifted black high school students and to showcase our rich academic environment and enjoyable campus life."

The following is a schedule of events for the weekend:

Friday, Nov. 11

12:30 p.m. - arrival and registration, Memorial Student Center lobby

1:30 p.m. - student/parent orientation, Memorial Student Center

2 p.m. - student educational seminar and campus tours

4:30 p.m.  - students meet and greet with student hosts and hostesses, Memorial Student Center

6 p.m. - 19th annual Outstanding Black High School Students' Banquet for students and families, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center. Featured speaker is Dr. Kim Bradshaw Austin, a Huntington native, and a former Outstanding Black High School Student and Yeager Scholar. She is a graduate of Marshall University's School of Medicine and currently is practicing medicine in Columbus, Ohio.

8:30 p.m. - free social time

9:30 p.m. - student dance, Marco's, Memorial Student Center

Saturday, Nov. 12

8 a.m. - students' and parents' breakfast with faculty and deans, Harless Dining Hall

9 a.m. - college displays, Memorial Student Center lobby

9:30 a.m. - students and parents meet college deans

10:30 a.m. - parents' informational panel with university administrators, deans, faculty and financial aid staff, and students' informational panel with student organizations, Memorial Student Center.

More information on the 2005 Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend is available by calling Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


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Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Stadium lot must be cleared by 4 p.m. Tuesday, MU director says

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In preparation for Marshall University's 7:30 p.m. football game Tuesday evening (Nov. 8) with Southern Mississippi, all automobiles must be removed from the Joan C. Edwards Stadium west lot and the west annex by 4 p.m. that day, James Terry, director of public safety at MU, said today.

All student, evening and garage parking permits will be honored in lots other than the stadium west lot and west annex, Terry said. No tailgating on Marshall's lots will be allowed until the university closes at 4:30 p.m.

###


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Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's School of Journalism announces grand opening

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications (JMC) will celebrate the grand opening of its new location at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8 in the Communications Building on Marshall University's Huntington campus.
 
All of the various majors offered by the school, one of the most popular programs at Marshall University, will be housed within the Communications Building. It now will serve the more than 400 students who study journalism, advertising and public relations at Marshall. Since 1966, the JMC program was located on the third floor of Smith Hall.

WHAT: Grand opening of the new home for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications in the Communications Building at Marshall University. 
 
WHEN: 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005.
 
WHERE: Next to Smith Hall at Marshall University's Huntington campus, near the corner of Hal Greer Boulevard and Third Avenue.
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Monday November 7, 2005
Contact: Megan Barbour, SGA Communications Director, (304) 696-6412

Service to honor victims on 35th anniversary of crash; Herd to pay tribute with special decal on helmets during game with ECU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association will honor the memories of the 75 people who died in the MU plane crash 35 years ago with a memorial service at noon Monday, Nov. 14.

The annual service, which is open to the public, will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza near the Memorial Fountain. Among those expected to attend and speak are West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin and Frank Loria Jr., son of former assistant coach Frank Loria, who died in the crash.

In addition to the traditional placing of a memorial wreath at the fountain and the silencing of the fountain until next spring, the SGA will unveil a new decal to be placed on the helmets of Thundering Herd football players during their Nov. 19 game with East Carolina University at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

East Carolina is the school Marshall played on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970, in Greenville, N.C. At approximately 7:47 p.m. that day, the plane carrying the Herd home from its game at ECU crashed near Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 aboard. The victims included 37 MU football players, five coaches, seven staff members, 21 community supporters and five crew of the DC-9 jetliner.

This will be the second time since the tragedy that Marshall's football team has played East Carolina in the regular season. The Thundering Herd lost to the Pirates 45-0 in Greenville, N.C., in 1978, but beat ECU in the 2001 GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Ala., 64-61, in double overtime.

The new, quarter-sized decal will be placed on the helmets of Marshall football players as a way to show their respect and remembrance for those who lost their lives in the crash. The decal was designed by Student Government Association Athletics Liaison Colleen Talley.

Student Body President Michael Misiti said he is honored to be a part of this year's plane crash service.

"It is always an honor for our organization to host the plane crash service," Misiti said. "The entire student body is well aware of what happened 35 years ago and we are reminded daily of the significance of the tragedy when we walk past the fountain. To have the opportunity to let the entire football team pay their respects to the victims by wearing this decal on their helmets will be another wonderful expression of our compassion for the victims and the families of those killed in the tragedy."

A moment of silence will be observed during the game with East Carolina. Also, a pennant-shaped flag honoring the victims will fly at the stadium.

For more information, persons may contact Talley at (304) 696-2289, or Misiti at (304) 696- 6436.


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Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Lewis College of Business and Corps of Engineers team together to create leaders

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve individuals chosen from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Huntington district were introduced to leadership concepts in October as part of their participation in the Leadership Intern Program (LIP) offered by Marshall University's Lewis College of Business, Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of the college, said today.

The group met with local leaders and local businesses in addition to traveling to Indianapolis, Ind., to visit Simon Property Group, the largest retail real estate company in the world. 

While at Simon, the team met with various representatives from top management.  The focus of the three-day leadership workshop, according to John Rulli, chief operating officer of Simon and a Marshall alumnus, was to key in on the three ingredients of a high-performing organization - people, process and structure. 

Rulli worked closely with Dr. Lorraine P. Anderson, associate dean of the Lewis College of Business and Marshall's director of LIP, to create a program that would provide the group with examples of best practices in business. 

"Through visits to organizations such as Simon, the participants of LIP expand their knowledge of leadership principles as well as develop themselves professionally," Anderson said. 

Jim Shiner, Corps liaison for the program, said the field trips are an integral part of the program.

"They afford the interns the opportunity to see how high-performing organizations apply the various concepts of leadership they are taught in the classroom," Shiner said. 

In addition to Rulli, the interns heard from Bryan Wiggins of MarketSphere Consulting as to how they use people, process and structure to solve complex problems for clients.  Dave Schacht, Senior VP and CIO of Simon, said communication issues often are more "cultural than technological."  Two other speakers from Simon discussed different aspects of achieving results with people and processes in a matrix structure. 

The LIP interns also were treated to a private meeting with Rick Carlisle, head coach of the Indiana Pacers, who told the group, "If the people ingredient of a team is broken, nothing works." Carlisle also said he had never "coached" players, but "worked" with them. 

Prior to the trip to Simon, the Corps leadership interns met with leaders from Toyota Motor Manufacturing in Buffalo, W.Va., including Mike Lutz, assistant general manager of administration.  Toyota's management team conveyed the essence of the Toyota Production Process, which focuses on planning, standardization, respect for people and continuous improvement.  Moreover, the LIP participants learned that the Toyota culture encourages all employees to reduce waste and work on root causes to solve problems. 

Representatives from Amazon.com's Huntington location brought a different leadership perspective to the LIP interns.   Krista Booth, Human Resources generalist, said decisions made by the company and the individuals are based on six core values - customer obsession, innovation, bias for action, ownership, high hiring bar and frugality.

Additionally, Michael J. Farrell, a member of Marshall's board of governors and a Huntington attorney, addressed the group.  Farrell presented leadership as a combination of style and substance.  He said that to be an effective leader one must have the proper attitude, conduct, effective listening skills and behavior.  Farrell also noted that a leader must have the right people, structures, facilities and resources. 

Ted Hamb, one of the current LIP participants, described the series of field trips as a "once-in-a-lifetime" experience.  "Every organization has problems, but how you deal with the problems defines your organization," he said. 

Marshall University, through the Lewis College of Business, has partnered with the Corps of Engineers to provide the Leadership Intern Program since 1998.  The Corps chooses the 12 individuals on a competitive basis for participation in the prestigious program.  The Leadership Intern Program consists of 80 hours of classroom instruction, retreats, extensive leadership assessments, field trips and a group project.

For more information, persons may contact Anderson at (304) 696-2611.


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Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to conduct public sale of surplus computing equipment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, of surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14, 2005 at its new Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 200 computers will be sold in lots of five or more with minimum bids on some lots. About 10 of the better computers will be sold as individual units. Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the purchasing department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. from Tuesday, Nov. 15 through Thursday, Nov. 17.  Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers and monitors have recently been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold will soon be available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.  Interested buyers may also visit the Web page and subscribe to e-mail notifications for detailed descriptions of equipment and future sales.  Future sale dates are planned for Jan. 30, 2006; March 20, 2006; May 22, 2006; July 17, 2006; and Sept. 18, 2006. These dates are subject to change.


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Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Papa John's continues to 'Drum Up A Deal' during Marshall-Southern Miss game Nov. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to continue fundraising for Marshall scholarships, the Marshall University Alumni Association will partner again with local Papa John's locations to raise scholarship funds through a second "Drum Up A Deal" event on Tuesday, Nov. 8. This date coincides with the Marshall-Southern Mississippi football game, which kicks off at 7:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

For every pizza sold, five Tri-State area Papa John's stores will donate 20 percent of their sales above average sales towards scholarships for Marshall students.

"While we were able to raise more than $500, we want to do more for Marshall," said David Riggs, general manager with Papa John's. "Weekday games are perfect for pizza, so we're hopeful that Thundering Herd fans will take advantage of this opportunity."

Participating Papa John's locations include:

Portsmouth, OH (740) 353-5901 Ashland, KY (606) 325-7676 Huntington, WV (304) 525-7222 Barboursville, WV (304) 736-7272 Teays Valley, WV (304) 757-9220
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Friday November 4, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Red Cross blood drive is Nov. 9-10 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An American Red Cross blood drive will take place at Marshall University from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 9-10. The event is being co-sponsored by the Baptist Christian Ministry and Interhall Government Council.

The drive will be in the Campus Christian Center, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street. Students, faculty, staff and the community are welcome to donate. Students who live in the residence halls can compete to see who works the most hours. The winner will receive a gift certificate. The building with the most volunteers will also be eligible for a reward. 

For more information about the blood drive, persons may contact Prudy Barker at (304) 696-2495 or Miya Hunter, with Residence Services, at (304) 696-3193.


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Thursday November 3, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students win seven awards in national competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's public radio station, WMUL-FM, received three first-place awards and four finalist awards in the 84th annual National College Media Convention/2005 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony. The event took place Friday, Oct. 28 in  Kansas City, Mo.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the William Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Bailey said the contest is in its fourth year and is sponsored by the CBI, which administers it in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

"It is an honor to win three out of the 12 first-place awards granted by these prestigious organizations," Bailey said. "Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations.  This performance is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students."

Bailey said he is proud of the broadcasting students,  whom he said continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be excellent representatives for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities.  

The first-place award-winning entries were:

Best Public Service Announcement

"Didn't You See?" an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Jen Smith, a senior from Huntington.

Best Radio Sports Reporting

"Pruett Retires," written and produced by Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va., broadcast during the sports segment of the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, March 9, 2005.

Best Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus The Ohio State University football game played at the Horseshoe in Columbus, Ohio, Saturday, Sept. 11, 2004.  The students calling the game over 88.1 were football play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Alex Reed, a graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va., and engineer Brandon Millman, a junior from Huntington.

The finalist award-winning entries were:

Best Public Service Announcement

"Listen to Your Car," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Wednesday, April 13, 2005 through the present time, written and produced by Brandon Millman, a junior from Huntington.

Best News Reporting

"Appalachian Music," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a senior from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Friday, Nov. 26, 2004.

Best Radio Sports Reporting

"MU Swimming and Diving Beats In-State Rival," written and produced by Alex Reed, a graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va., broadcast during the sports segment of the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2004.

Best Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of Marshall University versus Bowling Green State University played at the Cam Henderson Center in Huntington Thursday, Jan. 6, 2005.  The students calling the basketball game broadcast over 88.1 were basketball play-by-play announcer Vince Payne, a graduate student from Hansford, W.Va.; color commentator Robert Harper, a graduate student from Hurricane, W.Va.; statistician Clark Davis, a graduate student from Huntington, and engineer Jen Smith, a senior from Huntington.


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Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Theatre Department and Sodexho Campus Services partner for Dinner Theatre

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre and Sodexho Campus Services are partnering to provide the community with a unique blend of entertainment beginning Wednesday, Nov. 9.

Dinner Theatre begins that day with the opening of Marian De Forest's adaptation of the classic "Little Women." Dinner begins at 6 p.m. with a served meal in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, located inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Coffee with the director follows from 7 to 7:45 p.m., with the show beginning at 8 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. The director of "Little Women" is Sandra Forman, a professor of theatre at Northern Kentucky University.

Tickets are on sale at the Marshall University Theatre Box Office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, located on 5th Avenue across from the Memorial Student Center.  Season ticket holders may purchase tickets for $30 per person which includes dinner, coffee with the director and the show.  Non-season ticket holders may purchase tickets for $35 per person. Tickets may be ordered by calling (304) 696-ARTS (2787).

The remaining Dinner Theatre schedule includes the opening of Robert Harling's "Steel Magnolias" on Feb. 22, 2006, followed by William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" on April 19, 2006.  The ticket prices and evening schedule will be the same for all Dinner Theatre events. 

More information is available by calling (304) 696-ARTS (2787) or by visiting www.marshall.edu/theatre.


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Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Wind Symphony to perform Nov. 14 at Clay Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Wind Symphony will perform for the first time at the Clay Center in Charleston at 7:30 p.m. Monday Nov. 14. The concert is free and open to the public.

Under the direction of Marshall Associate Professor of Music Dr. Stephen Lawson, the 44-member ensemble will perform works by contemporary composers, including Dance Movements by Philip Sparke, Cartoon Music by Peter Graham and Fandango by Joseph Turrin.  The performance of Fandango will feature Marshall music faculty members Dr. Michael Stroeher, trombone, and Martin Saunders, trumpet.

The performance coincides with the 35th anniversary of the plane crash that took the lives of 75 Marshall University football players, coaches, and community members in 1970. In tribute to their memory, the Wind Symphony will perform Esprit de Corps by Robert Jager and October by Eric Whitacre. 

Student and faculty members from Marshall's music department will be present in the Clay Center lobby before the concert, beginning at 6:30 pm, to greet the audience and provide information about the university and its music programs.

Following the concert, the Wind Symphony will continue its fall tour with performances at John Marshall High School in Bethel Park, Pa., and Wheeling Park High School in Wheeling, W. Va.  In addition to their concert performances, MU students and faculty will serve as clinicians and will combine forces in performances with select high school students.

For more information about this program or other Department of Music events, please contact the Marshall music office at (304) 696-3117.


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Wednesday November 2, 2005
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Prominent expert on medical education to speak at Marshall Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Medical education authority David Irby, Ph.D., will provide workshops Friday (Nov. 4) to Marshall faculty and students at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Irby, vice dean for education and professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, will present a morning workshop for medical school faculty on "How to Prepare Your Educator's Portfolio." Set for 9:30 a.m. to noon, the workshop will be in the Cabell Huntington Hospital board room. He then will meet with medical school leadership at a mini-retreat, which will be followed at 3:30 p.m. by a general session open to medical students and all university faculty members. The general session will be in the Harless Auditorium on the ground floor of the Marshall University Medical Center.

Irby directs the undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education programs of the UCSF School of Medicine, where he leads the Office of Medical Education. As a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, he also co-directs a national study known as the Second Flexner Report on the professional preparation of physicians.

Over the past three decades, Dr. Irby has conducted research on clinical teaching in medicine and has received several prestigious awards, including the Distinguished Scholar Award by the American Educational Research Association, the John P. Hubbard Award from the National Board of Medical Examiners, and the Daniel C. Tosteson Award for Leadership in Medical Education from the Carl J. Shapiro Institute for Education and Research at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

More information about Friday's events is available from Dr. Darshana Shah, the medical school's assistant dean for professional development in medical education, at 696‑7352.


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