April 2006 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 28, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Byrd, Haymaker to receive honorary degrees from Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd and West Virginia native and businessman Timothy L. Haymaker will receive honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees from Marshall University at the institution's 169th commencement on Saturday, May 6. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m. at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena.  

The degrees are being bestowed in recognition of their contributions to the university and for their lifetime achievements.  The addition of Byrd and Haymaker brings to 157 the number of Marshall's honorary degree recipients. Both Byrd and Haymaker also have earned degrees from Marshall.

Named in 2001 the "West Virginian of the 20th Century" by the Governor and both Houses of the West Virginia Legislature, Byrd's story is a classic American saga of hard work, success and achievement. 

He entered politics when he won terms in the West Virginia House of Delegates and Senate before being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He was elected in 1958 to the U.S. Senate where he has served continuously since, serving longer in the U.S. Senate than anyone in West Virginia history.

Byrd has the distinction of having held more leadership positions in the U.S. Senate than any Senator of any party in Senate history.  He has been a member of the Senate leadership, the Senate democratic whip, Senate majority leader from 1977 through 1980 and 1987-1988, and the Senate minority leader from 1981 through 1986.  Byrd twice has been the Senate pro tem, a position that placed him third in line to the succession of the presidency, from 1989 through 1994, and again in 2001-02.

By taking night classes, Byrd earned his law degree, cum laude, from American University in Washington, D.C., in 1963.  He was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science, summa cum laude, by Marshall University in 1994.

Bryd has given strong support to Marshall University through the years.  One of his proudest achievements was the establishment in 1999 of the Erma Byrd Scholars, which honor his late wife. Among his other endeavors on behalf of the university are the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

His continuing support has helped support the vision of Marshall in the fields of technology, medicine and biotechnology.  His efforts helped fund MU's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, which is under construction, and other university projects.         

Haymaker, a 1969 Marshall graduate with a degree in business administration, served as chair of Marshall's ambitious Campaign for National Prominence, which ended in December 2005 and raised more than $100 million.  In an effort to raise funds, Haymaker and his wife, Sandra, traveled around the country meeting alumni and spreading the word about the campaign.  

A graduate of Pineville High School, Haymaker used the business acumen he had learned in Marshall classes to launch a series of successful enterprises.  In 1989, he started a commercial real estate company in Lexington, Ky., where he now lives.  Through the years his businesses grew and expanded as he added a property management company, a holding company, several partnerships and an affiliated accounting company.   

In spring 2001, Haymaker was asked to head up the capital campaign.  It would mean a major commitment of time and effort for the next few years.  He recounts the deciding factor in his accepting the responsibility came after Sandra Haymaker urged him to "Go for it!"

The Haymakers have been longtime supporters of Marshall. They were inducted into the Marshall University Pathway of Prominence, which honors those who have given $1 million or more to the university. The Lewis College of Business inducted Haymaker into its hall of fame in October 2005.

Long active in community and civic affairs, Haymaker serves on the boards of numerous groups. He also has received many awards, including being named Volunteer of the Year by the Lexington Chamber of Commerce.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 27, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Each graduate to be recognized during MU's 169th commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate its 169th commencement on Saturday, May 6 by recognizing each graduate in attendance at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Tentative numbers indicate that Marshall will award a record high 2,868 degrees, eclipsing the previous high of 2,844 set last year. Each graduate attending will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the MU Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2005 can participate in commencement.

"Earning a university degree, whether on the undergraduate, graduate or doctoral level, is a tremendous accomplishment and one worthy of individual praise," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We want to publicly acknowledge each of our graduates at this very special time in their lives, and wish them continued success in the future."

U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., will be the keynote speaker at commencement.

Marshall students will celebrate a banner year academically. Tentatively, 15 students will graduate with perfect 4.0 GPAs. That could change since final grades for spring 2006 are due after commencement, and 12 of the 15 are May graduates. The three assured of 4.0s are Leah N. Frye of Huntington, Andrew A. Iafrate of Parkersburg, W.Va., and Malory S. Morgan of Huntington.

Those with tentative 4.0s are Megan Leigh Collins of Mineral Wells, W.Va.; Danielle Marie Davidov of Fairmont, W.Va.; Nicholas Jeremy Facci of New Martinsville, W.Va.; Sharon Kay Fowler of Huntington; Jered Wellington Green of Frazier's Bottom, W.Va.; Emily B. Hager of Milton, W.Va.; Jason Paul Hildebrand of Mineral Wells, W.Va.; Sean Patrick Keatley of Newport News, Va.; Justine Christina Near of Nashville, Tenn.; Bonnie E. Shook of St. Albans, W.Va.; Mary Lou Sigler of Milton, W.Va., and John Paul Stonestreet of Hurricane, W.Va.

Seventy-seven students are graduating summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 168 are graduating magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA) and 281 are graduating cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

From the Marshall Community and Technical College, 31 are graduating with high honors (3.7 to 4.0 GPA) and 54 are graduating with honors (3.3 to 3.69 GPA). The community college commencement will be at 7 p.m. Friday, May 5, on Buskirk Field on Marshall's main campus.

As in previous years, because of limited parking near the Civic Center, Tri-State Transit Authority will provide shuttle service to transport graduates and guests to the arena for the university's commencement on May 6. Anyone interested in taking the shuttle should park on the university lots at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, the Welcome Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium and Lot F, located across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall.

Shuttle service will begin at 8:45 a.m. and occur in 15-minute intervals. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus. Also, at the conclusion of ceremonies for the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Health Professions - also conducted at the arena - shuttle service will return attendees to campus.

Here is a list of commencement-related events scheduled May 4-6:

  • May 4 - 5 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Awards Ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge, Huntington campus

  • May 4 - 7 p.m., Charleston Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Charleston Municipal Auditorium

  • May 4 - 7 p.m., School of Nursing Recognition Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 11 a.m., LEAP Program graduation, Alumni Lounge, Memorial Student Center, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 3 p.m., Center for International Programs' American-style picnic, reception and International Education Awards Ceremony, Buskirk Field, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 4 p.m., Communication Disorders graduation reception, Smith Hall Atrium, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 4 p.m., Forensic Science graduation reception, Erickson Alumni Center

  • May 5 - 5 p.m., Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture Ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community and Technical College graduation, Buskirk Field, Huntington campus

  • May 5 - 7 p.m., Huntington Graduate Hooding Ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • May 6 - 10 a.m., Marshall University's 169th Commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • May 6 - Immediately following Marshall commencement, College of Health Professions and Social Work department, Grand Ballroom, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • May 6 - Immediately following Marshall commencement, College of Fine Arts, Palms Room of the Touma Building

  • May 6 - 1:30 p.m., College of Liberal Arts, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

  • May 6 - 1:30 p.m., College of Science, Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, Huntington campus

  • May 6 - 2 p.m., School of Extended Education, Regents Bachelor of Arts, Harless Dining Hall, Huntington campus

  • May 6 - 2 p.m., School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Smith Recital Hall, Huntington campus

  • May 6 - 2:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business, Henderson Center, Huntington campus

  • May 6 - 3 p.m., College of Education and Human Services, Christ Temple Church


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 25, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Forensic Science Center announces the rollout of DNA preservation and testing services to WV funeral homes

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Center is offering DNA preservation and testing services to local funeral homes, Dr. Terry Fenger, director of the center, announced today.

Through the MUFSC, family members served by the participating funeral homes will have the opportunity to preserve a sample from their family members' DNA, which can be used in the future for gene testing, inheritance, and identification purposes. Strict confidentiality of services provided to families will be maintained.

Family members who purchase a preserved DNA sample will receive a labeled, sealed sample placed in an engraved metal case displaying the individual's name and "Preserved DNA Sample." The funeral home delivers the preserved DNA sample to the family or authorized representative who finalizes the process by signing the chain of custody form, assuring that their privacy has been protected.

Fenger said the center is the only resident DNA laboratory in West Virginia that provides DNA identification and family relationship testing services. "The mortuary services we are offering to the funeral homes are unique for an organization in West Virginia, and it's a way to utilize our scientific expertise to provide services to the public," he said.

The rollout of the mortuary services includes 12 funeral homes. The funeral homes participating are: Klingel-Carpenter Mortuary, Huntington, W.Va.; Bartlett -Burdette-Cox Funeral Home, Charleston, W.Va.; Blue Ridge Funeral Home, Beckley, W.Va.; Calfee Funeral Service, Pineville, W.Va.; Casdorph & Curry Funeral Home, St. Albans, W.Va.; Dodd-Payne-Hess Funeral Home, Fayetteville, W.Va.; Evans Funeral Home, Oceana, W.Va.; Stevens & Grass Funeral Home, Charleston, W.Va.; Teague Funeral Service in Charlottesville, Va.; Tyler Mountain Funeral Home, Cross Lanes, W.Va.; Williams-Blue Ridge Funeral Home, Sophia, W.Va.; and Wilson Funeral Home, Charleston, W.Va.

MUFSC and Klingel-Carpenter Mortuary began conducting a beta test of the services in August 2004. Tim Carpenter of Klingel-Carpenter Mortuary said families have been very receptive to this new service.

Marshall University Forensic Science Center also offers paternity, family relationship testing and DNA identification services through MU Parentage Testing Services, one of the university's first economic development ventures in biotechnology.

MUFSC is accredited by Forensic Quality Services - International (FQS-I) for forensic testing, DNA databasing and as an ISO 17025 testing laboratory. It also is accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) as a parentage testing laboratory.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 24, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Pullman Jazzfest slated for Saturday, April 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A "jazzfest" that organizers hope will become an annual event will take place at Pullman Square in Huntington from 2 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 29. Admission is free and the event is open to the public.

Marshall University's faculty jazz ensemble, Bluetrane, is scheduled to perform, as is the Zanter Trio, which includes Marshall faculty members. Other performing groups from the Charleston-Huntington area include the Dixie Stompers, Steve Himes, and Magic Bronson.

For further information, persons may visit the Pullman Square Web site at www.pullman-square.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 24, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Recent works of Regina D. Perry on exhibit at Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Recent works created by Regina D. Perry from Marshall University's College of Art and Design graduate program are on exhibit today through Friday, April 28 at the Birke Art Gallery in Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus. A public reception will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, April 26.

Perry's works include the use of traditional women's materials used in a nontraditional way.  Her emotionally charged, abstracted sculptural works include many mixed media elements, presented from a feminist perspective.

Perry says she approaches femininity abstractly, and that there is a definite link with the gift of life and woman as the gift giver.  She expresses her feelings clearly with a minimalist's use of color, form and texture, making use of materials such as fabric, thread, clay, found objects, paper, glazes and cold finishes, among others.

Perry holds an undergraduate degree with an emphasis in ceramics from West Virginia State University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 21, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sen. Byrd to speak at Marshall's 169th commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., will be the keynote speaker at Marshall University's 169th commencement, which begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 6 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Byrd has represented West Virginia continuously in the United States Senate since 1958, and has served longer in the Senate than anyone in West Virginia history. He also the distinction of having held more leadership positions in the Senate than any senator of any party in Senate history.

"We are very honored that Senator Byrd has agreed to serve as our commencement speaker," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "He is truly the preeminent American statesman and he speaks on such a high plane. And, of course, he's done so many incredible, worthwhile things for the state."

Byrd has been elected by West Virginia voters to eight consecutive six-year terms in the U.S. Senate. He has carried all 55 counties several times and, in 2000, carried all but seven of the state's 1,970 precincts. He also has cast more votes - 17,500 - than any senator in history.

Byrd received what he considers his greatest honor in May 2001 when West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise and both Houses of the West Virginia Legislature named him "West Virginian of the 20th Century." He said he is looking forward to speaking at Marshall.

"What an exciting time to graduate from college and set forth on life's journey," Byrd said. "There are enormous opportunities ahead for our young people, opportunities that come with challenges and responsibilities. I look forward to speaking at this year's Marshall University commencement. I want to encourage the graduates to hold fast to the West Virginia values which can serve as the Pole Star of their journeys in the days and years ahead."

Byrd earned his law degree, cum laude, from American University in Washington, D.C., in 1963. He was awarded his Bachelor of Arts degree in political science, summa cum laude, by Marshall University in 1994.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 21, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Kopp inaugurated as Marshall University's 36th president

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HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp was inaugurated as Marshall University's 36th president today at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Kopp's wife, Jane, and other family members attended the inauguration. They included the Kopps' daughter Elizabeth, son-in-law Matt, and granddaughter Rachel; and the Kopps' son, Adam.

Kopp, president at Marshall since July 1, 2005, was sworn in by West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin. Kopp described the day, which included inauguration-related events before and after the actual ceremony, as a "Marshall University Day of Celebration," and said he is deeply humbled and honored to have the privilege of serving as MU's president.

"Each day is a new learning experience, a new opportunity to excel and contribute," Kopp said. "I have observed a great deal during my brief sojourn here and have found a renewed sense of purpose that has been shaped by the people I have come to know, respect and admire."

Kopp told the audience at the performing arts center that Marshall stands at a crossroads in its history.

"The future, uncertain as it is, lies ahead," Kopp said. "Our vision of that future resides in our hearts, minds and souls. It will be shaped and reshaped by our imagination, creativity, aspirations and strategies for accomplishing them. The time is now for leadership and cohesive commitment. The time for action to manifest our vision is now, so let's get moving!"

Prior to his appointment at Marshall, Kopp had been serving as a special assistant to the chancellor with the Ohio Board of Regents. Previously he was provost for two years at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. Kopp also was founding dean of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow College of Health Professions at Central Michigan University, and founding dean of the College of Allied Health Professions at Midwestern University. He also served in a variety of positions for nearly 20 years at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Kopp received his B.S. in Biology in 1973 from the University of Notre Dame, and his Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics in 1976 from the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was a postdoctoral fellow at St. Louis University Medical Center, department of physiology, and a research fellow and NIH fellow in the department of biochemistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Manchin praised Kopp for his accomplishments at Marshall since he became president less than 10 months ago.

"While today we officially celebrate him as Marshall University's 36th president, Dr. Stephen Kopp has already made a tremendous impact upon this institution," Manchin said. "In less than 10 months on the Marshall campus, Dr. Kopp has exhibited outstanding leadership and vision that is moving Marshall University to a new level of success as a research and educational leader."

Manchin also noted the similarities between Kopp's Strategic Vision, introduced publicly last fall, and his own vision for West Virginia.

"He was instrumental in bringing a very fresh approach to the development of Marshall's new Strategic Vision plan - a seven-year working plan for the future development of the institution that harnesses the input of every stakeholder in the Marshall University community," Manchin said of Kopp. "This plan mirrors similar efforts that we're instituting with success on the statewide level and puts Marshall University firmly on a path for future academic growth, positioning the university to be an engine for economic growth in our state and region."

Kopp has worked closely with many people at Marshall and in the community since coming to Marshall.

"We absolutely have selected the right man for the right time at Marshall University," said A. Michael Perry, member and past chair of the MU Board of Governors. "With his considerable background in medicine, science and technology, Dr. Kopp is almost uniquely qualified to take advantage of the opportunities that have been created at Marshall by his predecessors.

"With the significant emphasis on these areas and the development of a variety of new programs, particularly in research and engineering, we are optimistic that Marshall is well on its way to becoming less of a commuter university, and more of a university of destination in which the students not only from West Virginia, but from throughout the country, will benefit from a total academic experience."

Dr. Charles Somerville, interim head of the department of biological sciences at Marshall, said the university's future appears bright under Kopp's leadership.

"This is an exciting time for Marshall University," Somerville said. "Dr. Kopp has put some very bold initiatives on the table, but his approach to implementing them is deliberate and fiscally responsible. That's a nice balance, and I think it bodes well for our future."

Provost Sarah Denman said she expects Marshall to reach new levels of excellence under Kopp's leadership. "He brings the right balance of experience, vision and scholarship to this institution that will lead us into the next chapter of our history," Denman said.

Menis Ketchum, a member of the Board of Governors since 2002 and its current chair, said, "President Kopp's leadership has invigorated the Board of Governors' vision as to Marshall's role for the future in the development of our community and the state of West Virginia."

And Larry Stickler, president of Marshall's faculty senate, said Kopp and the faculty work well together. "The Marshall University faculty are poised to join President Stephen J. Kopp in his quest to realize the incredible potential of Marshall's intellectual community," Stickler said.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 20, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Circle K's second annual Rock-A-Thon to benefit Children's Miracle Network

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Circle K will have its second annual Rock-A-Thon, a service project to raise donations for the Children's Miracle Network, from 7 p.m. Saturday, April 22, through 7 a.m. Sunday, April 23.

Participants will spend the night in Marshall's Campus Christian Center literally "rocking" all night in rocking chairs donated by local furniture stores.

"This will be our second year raising funds for a charity through this event," said Beverly Maynard, coordinator of Rock-A-Thon. "I am really looking forward to doing it again. Last year we raised right at $500 to give to Tsunami survivors."

The participants this year want to raise money for a charity more geared to Circle K's purpose - helping children. The organization has set its goal to raise $500 again. Pizza donated by Papa John's Pizza and drinks donated by Foodfair will be provided. Circle K is inviting local high school Key Clubs to participate in the event.  

Circle K International is a collegiate service organization. For more information, to donate or to sign up to participate, persons may call Maynard at (304) 412-3512.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 20, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Donning of Kente celebration is April 26 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the Center for African American Students' Programs have invited African American graduates from last semester and those who will be graduating in May to the Donning of Kente celebration and processional at 4 p.m., Wednesday, April 26 on the Buskirk Field at the center of the Huntington campus.

More than 200 people are expected to take part, according to Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs.  Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African-Americans several years ago.

The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries.  Kente was developed in the 17th Century by the Ashanti people of Africa and has roots in weaving that go back to around 3000 B.C. 

In its cultural context, Kente is more than just a cloth, Cooley explained.  It is reserved for very special occasions and may be used as a special gift item during such rites and ceremonies as child naming, puberty, graduation, marriage and soul-washing. It also is used as a symbol of respect and achievement.

"The Donning of Kente is one of the most prestigious and important events of the year offered by Marshall University Multicultural Affairs," Cooley said.  "Our primary focus is to uplift, support, and nurture our students to reach their optimum levels of academic success.  The Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is an opportunity to recognize and show high regard to our African American students that are completing undergraduate and graduate school from Marshall University."

With its ancient roots, the Kente is bestowed to those who have made extraordinary accomplishments and is worn as a symbol of honor, Cooley added.      

The keynote speaker for the ceremony will be William A. Smith, Cabell County Superintendent of Schools, and he will be introduced by Jocelyn Williams, president of the Black United Students.  Cooley will offer the welcome and meditation.  Opening remarks will be given by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Betty J. Cleckley, vice president for MU's Multicultural Affairs.  Philip Carter, professor and chair of Marshall's department of Social Work, will conclude the program with farewell remarks.

Musical selections will be provided by Shanti Chapman, director of the Musical Lecture Series Ensemble.

"There are few things that are more important in today's society than to successfully complete one's education at an institution of higher learning," Cooley said.  "At Marshall University, we hold this these moments as significant to our purpose."

Following the ceremony, a reception will take place on the Memorial Student Center plaza. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 19, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Three MU students among those featured in Concert of Soloists

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University students and the winner of the annual competition of the Women's Club of Huntington will be featured on Marshall University's Concert of Soloists. The concert will take place at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 26 in the Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Charles Morey, violinist and winner of the Women's Club competition, is from Fayetteville, W. Va., and currently accepted to the Junior Division of the Cleveland Institute of Music in Ohio. He will perform the finale from Violin Concerto No. 2 by Henri Wieniawski.

The three other performers were chosen in a competition for Marshall students conducted by the Marshall Symphony Orchestra earlier in the year. Josh Richardson, trumpet, will play Trumpet Concerto No. 1 by Johann Hertel; Nikki Winter, saxophone, will play "Tableaux de Provence for Saxophone" by Paule Maurice; and Yuri McCoy will play the finale from the Piano Concerto No. 3 of Sergei Rachmaninov.

Dr. Solen Dikener, assistant professor of music at Marshall, will conduct the orchestra. He teaches cello and bass at the university as well as conducting the orchestra.

"The Concert of Soloists is a great honor and opportunity for a student," said Dr. Marshall Onofrio, chair of Marshall's department of music. "The chances to play a solo with a symphony orchestra while still in school are few and far between."

The Concert of Soloists is free and open to the public. For further information, persons may contact the Marshall Department of Music at (304) 696-3117.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 19, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU history students investigating issues of local importance; semester projects will be presented April 25

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The students in Dr. Daniel Holbrook's Seminar in Public History class at Marshall University will present their semester projects at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 25 in the lobby of the Frederick Building, located on the corner of 4th Avenue and 10th Street in downtown Huntington.

The class has been investigating several issues of local historical importance.  First is the lack of a local/regional historical society. The class is proposing the establishment of the Greater Huntington Historical Association (GHHA).  The other student projects relate to the future of the Frederick Building, and potential local history exhibits concerning black-owned businesses in the city; manufacturing in Huntington, postcards of the area and a historical walking tour of the downtown area.

John Hankins, owner of the Frederick Building and an avid advocate of local history, has promised the proposed historical association space in the Frederick Building, and wants the public parts of the building to be available for historical exhibits.

The proposed association will be a source of ongoing student involvement with local histories and the local communities. Possibilities for internships and service learning opportunities will be extended to students from across the university.  The GHHA will pursue projects across a wide array of historical topics and eras, and will work with local business and civic organizations to promote local history.

For more information, persons may contact Dan Holbrook in the Marshall department of history at (304) 696-2417 or via e-mail at holbrook@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 18, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

2005-06 award winners, retirees to be honored at spring faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nine Marshall University faculty members will be honored with awards of distinction and 17 retiring faculty will be honored during the spring general faculty meeting at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 20 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Seven people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and two will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. The meeting will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Larry Stickler.

To qualify for the Distinguished Service Award, faculty members must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a distinguished record of service to the university, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

Each Distinguished Service Award winner receives $1,000. They are:

  • Janet Dooley, associate professor, 27 years, School of Journalism and Mass Communications;
  • Dr. Daniel Babb, professor, 33 years, College of Science, Physical Science;
  • Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, professor, 27 years, College of Education and Human Services, School of Education;
  • Dr. Elaine Baker, professor, 34 years, College of Liberal Arts, Psychology;
  • Dr. Alan Gould, professor, 37 years, College of Liberal Arts, History;
  • Dr. Fran Simone, professor, 21 years, Graduate School of Education and Professional Development;
  • Dr. Barbara Guyer, professor, 31 years, College of Education and Human Services, School of Education.

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, a faculty member must either be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

The 2005-06 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Dr. Steven Banks, associate professor in the College of Education and Human Services, senior recipient for excellence in Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business;
  • Dr. Eric Blough, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, junior recipient in all fields.

Also Thursday, 17 retiring faculty with a combined 386 years of service will be recognized. They are:

  • Dr. Murray Batt, Internal Medicine, 5 years of service;
  • Dr. Raymond Busbee, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 25 years of service;
  • Dr. William Crockett, Engineering, 36 years of service;
  • William Downs, Psychiatry & Behavioral Medicine, 19 years of service;
  • Dr. David Duke, History, 34 years of service;
  • Dr. Loraine (Rainey) Duke, English, 33 years of service;
  • Dr. Susan Ferrell, School of Education, 21 years of service;
  • Dr. Bertram Gross, Communication Studies, 28 years of service;
  • Charles Gruber, History, 38 years of service;
  • Dr. Dolores Johnson, English, 17 years of service;
  • Dr. John Kiger, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 5 years of service;
  • Dr. Paul Lutz, History, 18 years of service;
  • Dr. J. Terrence McQueeny, Modern Languages, 28 years of service;
  • Dr. Susan Power, Art, 15 years of service;
  • Dr. Herbert Tesser, Engineering & Computer Science, 13 years of service;
  • Dr. Lynne Welch, Dean, College of Health Professions, 15 years of service;
  • Dr. David Woodward, History, 36 years of service.

Three other awards honoring five faculty members will be presented Thursday. Recipients include Dr. Barbara P. Guyer, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Dr. Stephen Fish, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Dr. Marybeth Beller, Dr. Darlene Daneker and Dr. Kimberly DeTardo-Bora, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby follows Thursday's meeting.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 18, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU art department to be represented in Huntington art exhibition

 

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's art department will be well represented in a group show titled "Representations: Mine. Yours. Ours." that begins Saturday, April 29 at the old Huntington Historic Arcade of the St. James Building.

Opening night, which begins at 8 p.m., will include a musical performance by One Track Minds. The show will run in an abbreviated session for two weeks after the opening.

David Seth Cyfers, print maker and upperclassman at Marshall; Clay McNearney, print maker and religious studies chair at Marshall, Allen Toney, mixed-media artist, and Christopher Worth, painter and graduate student at Marshall, are the four headline names for the show.

For more information, persons may contact Worth at Worth2@marshall.edu or (304) 417-6430.


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Student parking lot at Marshall closed later this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will close a student parking lot later this week for the inauguration of President Stephen Kopp, Director of Public Safety Jim Terry said today.

The student lot beside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center containing permit parking and metered parking will be closed from 10 p.m. Thursday through 8 p.m. Friday. Inauguration activities are planned Friday at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Alternate parking is being directed to the Joan C. Edwards Stadium lot. "We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause," Terry said.


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Guyer named Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara P. Guyer, founder and director emeritus of Marshall University's H.E.L.P. Program, has been named MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2005-06, Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs, announced today.

The Hedrick Award winner receives $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Hensley also announced two other awards honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Stephen E. Fish, professor in the department of anatomy and pathology in Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine;
  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Marybeth Beller, assistant professor of political science; Dr. Darlene Daneker, assistant professor of counseling; and Dr. Kimberly DeTardo-Bora, assistant professor of criminal justice.

All five award winners will be formally recognized Thursday, April 20, during the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

Here is a brief look at the three awards and the five winners:

Hedrick Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Barbara P. Guyer has been at Marshall University since 1975, when she was hired as an associate professor of special education and director of the learning disabilities program. In 1981, she founded the H.E.L.P. (Higher Education for Learning Problems) program, which since has grown from three students with two employees to 200 students with 10 full-time employees and 50 part-time employees.

Guyer retired as director of H.E.L.P. on Aug. 1, 2005, but continues to serve as director emeritus while teaching graduate courses in special education. She has received many awards since coming to Marshall, including Teacher of the Year by the West Virginia Association for Children with Learning Disabilities in 1984 and 1997, induction into the Huntington Wall of Fame in 1994, and Outstanding Educator in Learning Disabilities by the West Virginia Learning Disabilities Association in 2004.

In describing her philosophy of education, Guyer refered to a book that was later made into a movie. The book is titled The Prince of Tides, and the main character is a teacher named Tom.

"Someone asked him why he chose to 'sell himself short' by becoming a teacher when he could have become anything he wanted," Guyer said. "The author, Pat Conroy, wrote, 'There's no word in the language I revere more than teacher. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher, and it always has. I've honored myself and the entire family of man by becoming a teacher."

Dr. Edwina Pendarvis, a professor of education who has worked with Guyer in special education for 22 years, said Guyer's motivation comes primarily from the desire to help children and adults with learning disabilities. Pendarvis referred to a feature in Newsweek magazine several years ago which designated her as "a hero."

"This is not just journalistic hyperbole," Pendarvis said. "Through her writing, through hundreds of presentations here and across the country, and most of all through the multimillion-dollar H.E.L.P. program, funded largely through donations by people who want to show their gratitude for the changes she has brought to their lives, Barbara has successfully combined research, teaching, and community service to the benefit of, literally, thousands of learning disabled individuals and their families."

H.E.L.P. students, past and present, have written Guyer to thank her for her guidance. One called her "an angel," another "a woman of purpose," and another "the savior of the learning disabled."

Laura Ellen Rowden with the H.E.L.P. program has known Guyer for 10 years in a variety of settings. "She has been my supervisor, advisor, professor, mentor, fellow board member, and friend," Rowden said. She described Guyer as "a blessing for West Virginia, the surrounding region, and indeed our country."

"Truly, Rowden said, "the world is a better place because of what Barbara has done."

Reynolds Award

This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Stephen E. Fish joined Marshall in 1986 as an assistant professor in the department of anatomy in MU's School of Medicine. He has been a full professor in the department of anatomy, cell and neurobiology (now the department of anatomy and pathology) since 1995.

"Dr. Fish is an outstanding and uncompromisingly committed teacher who has contributed in a remarkably positive way to the education of students, the progression of the curriculum and the addition of learning resources," said Dr. William B. Rhoten, section head and emeritus chairman in the department of anatomy, cell and neurobiology. "He is an outstanding innovator in the curriculum and has spearheaded major improvements in the curriculum and the education of both medical and graduate students."

Fish has received several awards from students, such as Best Course Coordinator (microanatomy and ultrastructure) in 1998; Best Course (microanatomy and ultrastructure) in 2003 and 2004; and Graduate Faculty Achievement Award in 2003.

Fish said he believes in a "friendly atmosphere" for students both inside and out of the classroom. Since 2002 he has been doing scientific illustrations for himself and his colleagues. He has completed more than 600 teaching illustrations, of which 490 are for his own teaching in cell biology and microanatomy.

"Dr. Fish is an outstanding educator in many, many ways," Rhoten said. "He is recognized by students and faculty as outstanding and has received excellent evaluations by students, peers and myself as section/departmental chairperson." 

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the instructor/assistant professor rank and who have completed six or fewer years at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Marybeth Beller is described by Dr. Simon Perry, longtime professor of political science at Marshall, as "a remarkable teacher. Both our faculty and students have the utmost respect for her," he said.

Beller says knowledge building, analysis and writing are the central components of helping students develop skills that will further their ability to be productive.

"By allowing them to leave institutions of higher learning without good analytic and writing skills, we fail them and the public trust," she said.

Camila Morsch, a political science international graduate student, said she was a student of Beller's three times. "In all of them, Professor Beller kept her unique style of teaching," Morsch said. "She would question students, play with them, establish connection with the class and, then, lecture with great enthusiasm and theoretical domain."

Courtney Pistelli, another student of Beller's, simply described her as "an inspiration to her students, particularly me."

Dr. Darlene Daneker said she believes the goal of teaching is to encourage and support the development of students' cognitive abilities, psychosocial skills, professional abilities, and self-awareness as individuals within a larger context.

Colleague Dr. Linda L. Maier said Daneker is outstanding in her ability to make contact with her students.

"Not just teaching the material, but rather teaching them the material, personalizing it, and translating it into understandable and meaningful information," Maier said. "Her students enjoy themselves in the process, chuckling at her dry wit, while feeling personally embraced in her cooperative teaching style."

Daneker said she endeavors to provide students with a positive learning environment to aid in achieving their potential.

"She is a practical, down-to-earth practitioner of our profession," said Vicki Buell, coordinator in the Office of Institutional Education Programs. "Her style of teaching and demeanor of talking with her students make her a stellar representative for teachers everywhere."

Dr. Kimberly DeTardo-Bora describes her teaching philosophy as a bit clich, but says, "above all, it is to be a facilitator of knowledge in an environment that is conducive to learning."

She said she believes that since many of her students will enter the criminal justice profession, it is her duty to provide them with a holistic understanding of the individuals that make up this system, including victims, offenders, practitioners, politicians, and research professionals.

Dr. Irene Burgess, associate dean for academic affairs at Wilmington College in Wilmington, Ohio, and a longtime friend of DeTardo-Bora, said she is "a gem."

"When Marshall University hired Kim, I thought that the university was extremely lucky to have found such a dedicated, talented, and thoughtful educator," Burgess said.

Criminal justice graduate student Joy Upton said she has been more inspired by DeTardo-Bora than any other professor. "She is not only a wonderful professor, and caring individual, but truly a lifelong friend," Upton said.


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MU Theatre presents The Tragedy of Julius Caesar this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre is presenting William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Julius Caesar at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 19 through Saturday, April 22, in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Tickets to the production are free to full-time Marshall students. Other tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for MU faculty and staff, $10 for persons 60 and older, and $7 for persons 17 and under.

More information is available by calling (304) 696-2787.

 
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Administrative Professionals Day is April 19 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Creating Excellence" is the theme of the 2006 Administrative Professionals Day, which is scheduled for Wednesday, April 19 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.  The event is sponsored by the Marshall Community & Technical College.

The registration fee of $99 includes materials, lunch and refreshments.  To register or to obtain additional information, persons may call (304) 696-6855.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Jerri Liszewski, director of Human Resources/MTS, Alcon Laboratories, Inc., of Fort Worth, Texas.  Her topic will be "Creating Personal Excellence And Then Some."  Liszewski will highlight ways individuals can discover to inspire themselves to perform at optimal levels and to attain personal excellence. 

Before going to work at Alcon Laboratories, Inc., she worked at Hewlett-Packard for 16 years in human resources.  She is a former high school psychology and sociology teacher and a practicing counseling psychologist.  In addition to working with numerous community groups, Liszewski has for more than 10 years served on the faculty of the University of Phoenix, where she has been an instructor in the MBA program and a diversity instructor to all new faculty members at the Denver, Colo., campus.

Participants can select two workshops from among the seven offered.  The workshops will have a maximum of 20 participants per workshop per session.  The workshops include:

  • "Can You Hear Me Now?" by Shelia Brownfield,  CPS/CAP Executive Assistant to the VP/General Manager of Alcon Manufacturing Lt. in Huntington and president emeritus of the International Association of Administrative Professionals.
  • "Put On Your Big Girl Panties and Deal With It," by Michele Conley, an executive with the Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation in Huntington. 
  • "Humor, Happiness, & Health," by Bill Ellis, newspaper columnist, Scott Depot, W.Va.
  • "Do You Think You Know What Your Customers Think?" by Beth Lengel, Director of Services for Lengel Vocational Services, Inc., of West Columbia, S.C.
  • "Getting the Credential - Administrative Assistant Technology Associate Degree," by Wylma Skean, professor of Administrative Assistant Technology at MCTC.
  • "Time of Your Life," by Frank Lengel, Director of Services at Lengel Vocational Services, Inc., West Columbia, S.C.
  • "Begin With the End in Mind, One Step at a Time," by Marcia Smith, First Vice President, Chase Bank, and a Certified Treasury Professional in Huntington.

The group will be welcomed by Dr. Vicki Riley, president of the Marshall Community and Technical College, at 9 a.m.  Following her remarks Dr. Lorraine Anderson, associate dean of the Lewis College of Business at Marshall, will speak on "Give 'em a Pickle."

In addition to the workshops and lunch,  Frank Lengel will present "Ping Pong All the Day Long" at 1:30 p.m.; Tia Theriaque, International Director, Southeast District, International Association of Administrative Professionals, will speak on "Your Life is a Canvas:Paint a Masterpiece" at 2 p.m.  A fashion show presented by Marshalls of Huntington follows at 2:30 p.m.  A drawing for door prizes at 3 p.m. will close out the day's activities.

                                                                        ###     


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University of Calgary professor to give Moffat lecture at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Frank Towers, a University of Calgary history professor, will be the guest speaker at the Charles Hill Moffat Memorial Lecture at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 20, in Smith Hall room 154 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The Moffat Lecture, which is free to the public, is sponsored by Marshall University Multicultural Affairs and the College of Liberal Arts. Another event honoring his memory is the Moffat Banquet, which is at 7 p.m. Friday, April 21, and takes place in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Room. Tickets are $18, and may be purchased in advance in Harris Hall room 116, or by calling Terry Dennis in the history department at (304) 696-6780.

Charles Hill Moffat was one of Marshall University's great personalities.  His enthusiastic lecturing style, his solid scholarship and his amiable nature were fixtures of the history department from 1946 to 1976.  When Moffat retired, his family endowed an annual lecture in his name.

Every April for the past 29 years, a distinguished historian has been invited to address the Marshall community for the "Charles Hill Moffat Memorial Lecture."  The list of previous speakers has included Ruth Schwartz Cowan, Deborah Grey White and Andre Millard.

Towers is the latest to join that list. He has written widely on the political culture of cities in the antebellum South.  His investigations have culminated in a well-received monograph, The Urban South and the Coming of the Civil War (2004, University of Virginia Press).  He also has written a number of scholarly articles on race, labor and the development of the African-American community in Baltimore. Towers currently is preparing a book on the end of slavery in the "border South."

The title of Towers' Moffat Lecture is "Making an Anti-Modern South: Multiculturalism, Cities, and the Argument for Secession."  In it, Towers will challenge long-held assumptions about the predominantly "rural" character of the South and the overwhelmingly "industrialized" nature of the North.  He will demonstrate that the two communities shared a number of social and economic characteristics, including their respective levels of urbanization and the multicultural composition of their populations.


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Health & Wellness Fair for Faculty, Staff Set for April 26

Marshall University's 3rd Annual Health & Wellness Fair, sponsored by Recreational Sports & Student Health Education Programs, will take place Wednesday, April 26, beginning at 6 a.m. and continuing until capacity has been reached, in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington Campus.

Faculty and staff who are insured by the Public Employees Insurance Agency (PEIA) can receive free testing for total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, total cholesterol/HDL ratio, triglycerides, glucose, bone density and PSA (for men over age 45). In addition, optional tests available for a fee include Hemoglobin A1C ($14.00), Thyroid Panel ($25.00), Comprehensive Metabolic Panel ($15.00), Complete Blood Count ($10.00) and PSA for men under 45 ($25.00).

Those not covered by PEIA may receive the following tests:  Lipid Panel/Glucose($28.50), Bone Density for over age 35 ($10.00) and PSA ($25.00).

Persons wishing to register should call Sharon at ext. 62943 or Tassy at ext. 64652 for a testing time. They should also print out the attached enrollment form, fill it out and bring to the fair. 

For best results, fasting for 8-12 hours is recommended. (Water and black coffee are allowed.) Participants that have blood work will be eligible for a drawing and will receive a FREE health literacy bag, according to Amy Saunders, Student Health Education Specialist.

For further information, persons may contact Saunders at (304) 696-4800.


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Marshall University Announces Inauguration Schedule

The inauguration of Dr. Stephen J. Kopp as president of Marshall University will take place on Friday, April 21. The university has released the following schedule of events, all of which are open to the public.

10 a.m.             University Showcase in the lobby of the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse
                         on the Huntington Campus

11:30 a.m.        Pre-Inauguration Luncheon on on the front lawn of the Playhouse

1 p.m.              Featured Alumni Lecture by Drs. Lonnie B. Thompson 
                        and Ellen Mosley-Thompson in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre.

2 p.m.              Inauguration Ceremony in the Playhouse

3:30 p.m.          Reception


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Marshall University plans 3 percent raises for faculty and staff,

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Despite significant increases in Marshall University's annual operating expenses, its Board of Governors today approved an average 3 percent raise for faculty and staff during a special board meeting in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. The Board also approved a 3 percent raise for Marshall Community and Technical College faculty and staff.

The 3 percent annualized raise pool planned for the 2007 fiscal year is subject to final Board review, based on actual fall-term revenue proceeds versus revenue plan projections (e.g., enrollment). The effective date for raise pool implementation is Jan. 1, 2007. Raises will be administered in accordance with Board-approved policies.

The operating budget for Marshall University includes nearly a $2.3 million increase in expenditures to fund faculty and staff raises. This budget includes an additional $978,000 to complete a full year of raises implemented in January 2006, $900,000 for the raises that are planned for January 2007, and $390,000 for faculty AEI (Annual Experience Increment). The faculty AEI is $50 per year, per person, based on longevity and will go into effect July 2006.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said a "greatly appreciated" additional state base appropriation of $3 million for Marshall's 2006-07 operating budget, along with an approved $109 per-semester increase in tuition and fees, will help defray the added operating expenses and planned raises.

"We would prefer to forego a tuition increase this year, but major increases in operating expenses and the importance attached to improving conditions and our competitiveness for recruiting and retaining faculty requires the $109 per-semester increase," President Kopp said.

In addition to the planned raises, university operating expenses will increase by nearly $2.5 million. Some of the major areas affected are listed below:

     Approximately $800,000 increase in facility operating and maintenance expenditures to open and operate the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center;

  • Approximately $750,000 increase for investment in academic programs, support for undergraduate research and grant matches;
     
  • Approximately $500,000 increase in annual utility expenditures;
  • Approximately $436,000 increase in the university's annual Board Risk & Insurance Management (BRIM) premium.

"We are doing everything we can to control and manage costs where we can," President Kopp said. "However, some areas are not readily controllable. For example, the sudden and unprecedented increase in utility costs, combined with the unanticipated increase in our BRIM premium, adds essentially $1 million to our overall operating expenses."


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Award-winning poet to read from her work April 20 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet J. Allyn Rosser will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 20 in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Rosser's first collection, Bright Moves, won the Morse Poetry Prize.  Her second, Misery Prefigured, won the Crab Orchard Award and was published by Southern Illinois University Press in 2001.  Her poems are forthcoming in Best American Poetry 2006, Poetry, and Michigan Quarterly Review, and have been featured recently in The Atlantic Monthly, Slate, Poetry, The Kenyon Review, and The Georgia Review.

She has received numerous awards for her work, among them the Peter I.B. Lavan Award for Younger Poets from the Academy of American Poets, a Pushcart Prize, the Wood Prize and the Frederick Bock Prize (the latter two from Poetry).  Her many fellowships include those from the National Endowment for the Arts, Yaddo, Bread Loaf, the Ohio Arts Council, and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. 

Rosser has taught at the University of Houston, the University of Michigan, and Vermont College, and currently teaches at Ohio University. 

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public. For more information, persons may contact Art Stringer with the English department at (304) 696-2403.


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MU professor awarded Fulbright Scholar Lectureship for spring 2007

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kat D. Williams, associate professor of history at Marshall University, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar Lectureship for spring 2007, according to the U. S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

Williams was selected to lecture at the University of Pecs in Pecs, Hungary.  She will teach courses on United States Women's history and the History of Women in Sports.

Williams is one of about 800 faculty and professionals who will travel abroad to some 150 countries for the 2006-07 academic year through the Fulbright Scholar Program.  Established in 1946 under legislation introduced by the late Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the program's purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

"It is a great honor to be awarded this Fulbright lectureship to Hungary and I look forward to the challenges and experiences this award will present," Williams said.  "I am excited about the chance to teach U.S women's history in Hungary and I'm convinced that Marshall students will also benefit from my experiences."

The Fulbright award is viewed as recognition of Williams' status in the field of women's history and an opportunity to establish a dialogue with foreign colleagues that will benefit Marshall students and provide a means by which to spread the news about Marshall's academic programs to foreign countries.

Dr. Donna Spindel, chair of  MU's Department of  History, said, "Dr. Williams' selection as a Fulbright Scholar is a great honor and she will be the perfect 'ambassador' abroad."


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Spring Series on Diversity concludes on April 20 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA) concludes its 2006 Spring Series on Diversity in Appalachia with a performance by folklorist and oral historian Carrie Kline of Elkins, W.Va., on Thursday, April 20.

"Revelations: A Celebration of Appalachian Resiliency in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered People," is a reader's theatre production written and directed by Kline. It starts at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Room and is free to the public.

"Revelations" is the final event in a series of four that have made up the Spring Series on Diversity in Appalachia. The series has been sponsored by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA) and Marshall University Multicultural Affairs.

For more information, persons may contact Dr. Linda Spatig with CSEGA at (304) 696-2875.


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Judy Shepard, mother of hate crime victim Matthew Shepard, to speak at Marshall on Wednesday, April 12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Judy Shepard will speak about the legacy of her son Matthew Shepard, who died in 1998 after being brutally attacked because he was gay, at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the Don Morris room on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The event is free and open to students, faculty, staff, and members of the community. It is sponsored by the Marshall University Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender Outreach Office and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, with additional support from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission's social justice grant program.

On Oct. 8, 1998, Judy and Dennis Shepard were awakened in the middle of the night in Saudi Arabia, where Dennis works, by a telephone call. What they heard - that their eldest son, Matthew, was in a coma after being attacked - changed their lives forever.

The distraught parents flew to Ft. Collins, Colo., and met up with their youngest son, Logan, to visit Matthew in the hospital. On Oct. 12, Matthew passed away.

While the Shepard family mourned in private, the tragedy quickly spurred a spontaneous, unprecedented public outcry from coast to coast. The incident galvanized millions of people, and focused the nation's attention on the growing epidemic of hate crimes. Vigils were held across America. The Shepard family received tens of thousands of letters and e-mails of support.

Fighting for social justice was central to who Matthew Shepard was, and it formed a significant part of his life. In the aftermath of his death, Judy and Dennis Shepard started the Matthew Shepard Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit, (www.MatthewShepard.org) to help carry on Matthew's legacy by embracing the causes their son had championed. This includes working for gay and lesbian equality and helping to prevent hate crimes.

On May 11, 1999, Judy testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of the Hate Crimes Prevention Act. In front of the committee, she delivered a powerful message to those who oppose hate crimes laws: "I can assure opponents of this legislation firsthand; it was not words or thoughts, but violent actions that killed my son."

She appeared in two Human Rights Campaign public service television spots aimed at curbing anti-gay violence and promoting a greater understanding of gay issues. Produced by the Matthew Shepard Foundation, they were distributed during the autumn of 1999 to every network affiliate and cable operator in the U.S. who uses public service announcements.

One of the ads shows a home video of Matthew on-screen as Judy says: "In a perfect world because your child is gay, you don't worry about their safety. You just worry about them being happy. I loved Matt just the way he was. Just the way he was."

In September 1999, she agreed to appear in another television public service announcement (PSA) campaign decrying hate crimes. Sponsored by the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), the PSA began airing on MTV in October 1999.

She also has become actively involved with Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG), and she wrote an open letter to school administrators that the organization included in a mailing to high school counselors around the U.S. In the letter, she encourages the school officials to make schools safer for gay students by promoting tolerance, and reprimanding students who harass gay students.

Judy Shepard says she is determined to use her grief over her son's death to make a difference - to do what she can to ensure that no other parent will have to endure what she has. She is now speaking to audiences nationwide about what they can do to make their schools and communities safer for everyone, regardless of their race, sex, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity or expression.

For more information on Wednesday's event, persons may contact the LGBT Outreach at (304) 696-6623, online at www.marshall.edu/lgbo , or e-mail evans107@marshall.edu.


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Library Associates celebrate the past, look to the future

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Library Associates will celebrate the past while looking to the future with a wine and cheese reception at 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 22 on the second floor of the Morrow Library on MU's Huntington campus.

The event, which is free and open to the public, is a double celebration of James E. Casto's new book on Marshall University's history and the opening of an exhibit showing the importance of transportation to the Huntington area.

Casto has been associated with Marshall since he was a child as a student, teacher and supporter, as well as a reporter and editor at The Herald-Dispatch for more than 40 years. As the author of several books of regional history, Casto says he saw the need for an updated book focusing only on the history of the university.

Published in 2005 as part of Arcadia Publishing's Campus History Series, the book "Marshall University" has more than 200 historic photographs gleaned from the university archives and other sources. Each of the eight sections covers a different important period in Marshall's history, from the early building stages to the granting of university status in 1961 and from the disastrous 1970 plane crash to the recovery and subsequent glories both on and off the athletic field. Casto will be present at the reception to sign copies of his book.

The area around where Huntington developed has been a transportation hub from the time that it was Holderby Landing. Here roads from the agricultural and industrial inlands met the Ohio River, the great highway of the country's interior. With the development of the C&O Railroad the east coast was linked to Huntington, and later advances in transportation are reflected in the city's history.

Jerry Sutphin, another Marshall alumnus, has put together an exhibit in the Morrow Library highlighting some of this history. A noted historian of the western rivers and steamboats, Sutphin served as the project consultant for the "Ohio River Odyssey," a major Ohio River exhibition at The Huntington Museum of Art, was the principal author of the book "Sternwheelers on the Great Kanawha River," and has produced a video history of the Delta Queen riverboat. 

"I have selected a series of artifacts and photographs that I think demonstrate the importance and impact that our rivers have on our past and our future," Sutphin said. "There are two video presentations; one photographed in the late 1920's and the other of operations on our rivers today. The latter was produced as a part of a permanent exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution's American History and Technology Museum. Floods, river accidents, packet boats and towboats are shown at a time when the river was the main route of commerce and travel in America."

Taylor Vinson of Alexandria, Va., has loaned part of his extensive collection of historical automotive literature to be part of the transportation exhibit. Editor of the Automotive History Review, Vinson is acknowledged as one of the great collectors of automobile catalogs, advertisements, and other printed materials.

For more information about the reception, or the Library Associates, persons may contact Pam Ford at (304) 696-2318.


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Movie Extra Clarification

Due to some inaccuracies in the original Warner Bros. email, there was some confusion as to who could be an 'extra' on Monday, April 10 and Tuesday, April 11.  Here is a clarification:

Monday, April 10-  this is the movie's signature scene, where thousands of students are gathered in Buskirk Field (on the campus side of Science Hall).  While this is primarily a student scene, anyone who would like to participate and support the students may do so.  This means that all faculty and staff are encouraged to participate.  Here is some additional info:

  • Those wanting to participate should arrive at Henderson Center at 7:30 a.m. for staging
  • Food and drinks will be provided
  • Participants should wear  '1970 style' clothing.  No logos.  No bright colors.  No red clothing.
  • Be prepared -This will take several hours
  • Although the previous Warner Bros. email provided a telephone number, there is no need to call.  Merely, show up.
  • Groups who would like to participate together may do so.  Inform the staging personnel and they will locate your group together.

With supervisor's approval, staff members are granted leave time to participate in this movie scene.

Student class attendance is subject to university guidelines and professors' discretion.

 

Tuesday, April 11- this is the movie's final scene. It will occur in modern day.  The serious scene depicts a re-creation of the annual memorial service around the fountain in the MSC plaza.  The directors want this to be a more comprehensive crowd with many adults and community people involved.  But, students are encouraged to participate.  Many want to represent families that will not be able to be in Huntington on that day.  Here is some additional info:

  • Those wanting to participate should arrive at Henderson Center at 7:30 a.m. for staging
  • Food and drinks will be provided
  • Participants should wear current day clothing.  Business casual to business dress code (slacks, dresses, dress shirts). No logos.  No bright colors.  No red clothing.
  • Be prepared- This will take several hours
  • Although the previous Warner Bros. email provided a telephone number, there is no need to call.  Merely, show up.
  • Groups who would like to participate together may do so.  Inform the staging personnel and they will locate your group together.

With supervisor's approval, staff members are granted leave time to participate in this movie scene.

Student class attendance is subject to university guidelines and professors' discretion.

 

Thank you for your patience and the inconvenience in bringing the message of "We AreMarshall" to the world.


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Thursday April 6, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Regional accrediting team visits Marshall University next week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of 11 representatives from the North Central Association/Higher Learning Commission will visit Marshall University's Huntington and South Charleston campuses Monday-Wednesday, April 10-12.  Based on what they find, the team will recommend continued accreditation and/or some follow-up action. 

A steering committee of 15 people and five subcommittees, consisting of approximately 35 additional people, have been working on a self-study document for more than two years, according to Dr. Leonard Deutsch, dean of the Graduate College and Self-Study coordinator.

The visiting team has read the report and will be confirming its veracity by interviewing students, faculty members and staff. They also will examine documentation collected in the resource room which is located in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room, according to Deutsch.

NCA reaccredidation is of utmost importance to the university, and intensive efforts have been made to meet standards and prepare for it, Deutsch said.  "Our regional accrediting body visits us every 10 years," he said.  "If we don't 'pass inspection' we don't get reaccredited.  If we are not accredited, Marshall University would cease operating as an institution of higher education."

Marshall has studied itself in light of five criteria posed by the NCA/HLC:  mission and integrity; preparing for the future; teaching and learning; the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge; and engagement and service.

"We not only cite evidence that we are meeting these criteria, we also have discovered how and where we fall short," Deutsch said.  "In the report we have proposed opportunities for improving how we do things, how we operate, how we meet the needs of our constituents."

For more information, persons may contact Beth Tappan in the accreditation self study office at (304) 696-6713.


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Wednesday April 5, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Conference of West Virginia Shakespeare and Renaissance Association is April 7-8 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 33rd Annual Conference of the West Virginia Shakespeare and Renaissance Association (SRA) will take place at Marshall University on Friday and Saturday, April 7-8 in the Alumni Lounge of the Memorial Student Center.

The SRA is a joint scholarly effort between Marshall and West Virginia University that  rotates locations for the annual conference among Marshall, West Virginia University, Shepherd University, Davis & Elkins College, Bethany College and the College of West Virginia campuses.  It is partially funded by the West Virginia Humanities Council.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. April 7.  Following that, Session One,  "Shakespeare's Afterlife," will be chaired by Edmund M. Taft of Marshall University.  Topics to be presented include "I am Prospero, I am Ariel, I am Caliban:  Graphical Representations of Control in Neil Gaiman's The Sandman," by Leah Haydu, Marshall University; and "To Allow or not to Allow - That is the Question:  Selective Release of Shakespeare in the Former Soviet Union," by Elena Ermolaeva, Marshall University.

Session Two will focus on "History and Art in the Renaissance"  and will be chaired by Byron Nelson of West Virginia University.  Among the presentations will be "The Costs of Religious Reform and the Demise of Local Drama in Tudor England," Jim Forse, Bowling Green State University; "Earning a Living as an Author in Early Modern England:  The Case of Anthony Munday," Gerald D. George, Capital University; "Remembering Queen Bess Through the Bard:  Impressions of Queen Elizabeth in the Epilogue of Henry IV, Part 2,"  Megan Roeling, BrighamYoung University.

Nelson, editor of the journal,  "Shakespeare and Renaissance Association Selected Papers,"  will  discuss instructions for submissions from 11:30 a.m. to noon.

Session Three begins at 1:30 p.m. with the topic,  "Shakespearian Comedy and Romance"  chaired by William Godshalk of the University of Cincinnati.  Presentations include "Sacred Physic:  Healing, Therapy and Magic in Pericles," by Byron Nelson, WVU; "Succor from Suckers:  Bassanio's Usury in The Merchant of Venice," Megan Fitzpatrick, University of Cincinnati; and "Malvolio in Purgatory:  Tragedy and the Deuteronomic Cycle in Twelfth Night," Jeremy R. Fiebig, Mary Baldwin College and The American Shakespeare Center.

Session Four features  "Milton's Life and Legacy"  with Timothy Burbery of Marshall as the chair.  Topics will be "Light Spent:  New Information on Dating Milton's Blindness," by Carol Barton, Library of Congress; and "Blasted Health:  Paradise Lost and H.P. Lovecraft," by Alex Morton of the University of Akron.

John Rooks of Morris College will give the Plenary Address from 5 to 6 p.m. on "The Winter's Tale and the Political Allure of Sheer Inertia."  A banquet begins at 6:30 in the John Marshall Room with a performance of the tent scene from "Julius Caesar" to be performed by Jack Cirillo and the Marshall Student Players.

Session Five opens at 8:30 a.m. April 8 with  "The Exercise of Power in the Renaissance"  chaired by Bob Hong of Marshall. Brandy Bagar of Marshall will present "The Manipulation of the Other:  The Function of the Lower Class in Arden of Faversham and A Woman Killed with Kindness;" Denise de Ribert of East Tennessee State University, will present "Lavinia as Victim Turned Avenger in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus;"  and Ali Altaf Mian of the University of Louisville will conclude the session with "Engendering Language and Authority in Richard III."

The final session of the conference,  "Shakespearian Design,"  begins at 10:30 a.m. and will be chaired by John McKernan of Marshall.  Topics include "Coriolanus and the Gown of Humility," by Kateryna Schray of Marshall; "What Happens in Hamlet (from 3.2 on)?", Edmund M. Taft, Marshall; and "E! True Hollywood Story:  Shakespeare and His Dark Lady, Revealed," Tara Regan, University of Akron. 

The meetings are free and open to the public.


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Tuesday April 4, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Two from Marshall selected to receive 2006 Sasakawa Fellowships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University faculty members  Dr. Dallas Brozik, professor of finance and economics, and  John Van Kirk, professor of English, are among 20 faculty members nationwide who have been selected to receive 2006 Sasakawa Fellowships.

This is the first time two faculty members from Marshall have been chosen to receive the fellowships, which are offered through the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU).

The fellowships offer faculty members an intensive one-month experience designed to study aspects of Japanese life and culture with the aim of incorporating information about Japan into undergraduate courses.

The  i nstitute takes place in June at San Diego State University.  Participants will have an opportunity to learn from scholars, business leaders, artists and journalists about Japanese civilization, history, language, business and education.  The institute involves intensive seminars, lectures, readings, and other activities.

While modern Japan serves as the focus for the program, participants are provided a foundation in the pre-modern history and culture of Japan as well.

"What most people do not realize is that professors are really permanent students," said Brozik.  "There is nothing we like better than having time to dig into something new and find out about other people and places.  The job of teaching, though, is incredibly time intensive, so it is only rarely that we get a chance to devote ourselves to full-time study.   I have no doubt that I am going to enjoy this whole experience, because I will get a chance to be a student again.  And we all know there is nothing in the whole wide world better than being a student."

The faculty advisor and chief instructor of the Marshall University Aikido Club, Van Kirk says he has long been interested in Japanese culture.

"I've been fascinated by Japanese culture since I was a boy and my father would tell me about his experiences in occupied Japan shortly after WWII," Van Kirk said. "I have studied Japanese martial arts for many years.  Also, as a teacher of international literature, I have taught several Japanese novels in translation.  This is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about Japan and bring that knowledge back to my students."

Brozik sees an international future for West Virginia and its citizens. "I try to introduce international topics into all of my classes, and the Sasakawa Institute will help broaden my perspective of this area of the world," he said.  "There are many opportunities for our students on the other side of the Pacific Ocean, and after this institute I will be better able to bring that information into my classroom."   

Two other Marshall faculty member were awarded Sasakawa Fellowships - Karl Winton of communication studies in 2004 and Jonathan Cox of the art department in 2005. 


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Monday April 3, 2006
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Parking lots to be closed during filming of 'We Are Marshall'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will close some parking lots on its Huntington campus at various times over the next two weeks to accommodate Warner Bros. Pictures as it begins filming the movie, "We Are Marshall."

Jim Terry, director of public safety at Marshall, said lots to be closed include employee parking lot B, located near Jenkins and Holderby Hall; the Campus Christian Center parking spaces; all handicapped parking in that area, and the Career Services parking lot.

Here is the schedule:

The employee B lot and Campus Christian Center lots will be closed during two time periods: today, after 5 p.m. (all vehicles must be removed from these lots by 5 p.m.); and Tuesday, April 4, all day. The lots will reopen on Wednesday, April 5.

The second closing will be for an extended period. The employee B lot and the Campus Christian Center lots will be closed Monday, April 10 through Monday, April 17. They will reopen on Tuesday, April 18.

The Campus Career Services parking lot and the spaces on the back lot going toward 6th Avenue will be closed all day on Thursday, April 13. This lot is tentatively set to reopen on Friday, April 14, if filming from the previous evening has been completed.

All permit holders may find parking in the employee lots on 3rd Avenue, 5th Avenue and the Joan C. Edwards Stadium lot on 3rd Avenue and 20th Street. Handicapped parking is located throughout campus and the handicapped lots C and D on 3rd Avenue and 18th Street are in close proximity to Jenkins Hall.

"We are aware of the impact this will have in finding a parking space but we ask for everyone's support during this movie production," Terry said. "We appreciate everyone's understanding and cooperation during this time."


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Monday April 3, 2006
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Author/education consultant visits Huntington area this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Author and education consultant Charlotte Danielson will be in the area Tuesday-Wednesday, April 4-5, for a series of presentations sponsored by  Marshall University's Professional Development School Partnership in collaboration with Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS).

Currently based in Princeton, N.J., Danielson has taught at all levels, from kindergarten through college.  She has worked as a consultant on curriculum planning, performance assessment, and professional development for numerous schools and districts in the United States and overseas.  She has designed materials and training programs for several testing groups.

Danielson is the author of "Enhancing Student Achievement" and "Enhancing Professional Practice," and is  co-author with Tom McGreal of "Teacher Evaluation to Enhance Professional Practice."

Her schedule of presentations includes:

April 4 - 9 a.m., Student Teaching Rubrics, 219 Jenkins Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus campus; 11:30 a.m., Enhancing Professional Practice:  A Framework for Teaching, Cabell Midland High School Advisory Council; 2 p.m., Reflecting on Teaching, 219 Jenkins Hall; 4 p.m., Teacher Leadership, Public School and Higher Education Learning Community for Teacher Preparation, Virginia Room of the Radisson Hotel in Huntington.

April 5 - 9:45 a.m., Enhancing Professional Practice:  A Framework for Teaching, Culloden Elementary School; 11:30 a.m., Framework, Ceredo Elementary School; 2 p.m., Using Rubrics for Assessing Students, Higher Education Faculty, 233 Jenkins Hall.

Marshall University's Professional Development School Partnership in the COEHS assists in forming learning communities whose focus is enhancing student learning, improving teacher preparation, and providing appropriate professional development.

For more information, persons may contact Jane McKee, associate dean in the College of Education and Human Services, at (304) 696-2859 or via email at mckeej@marshall.edu.


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