February 2006 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 28, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former UPI White House bureau chief, Helen Thomas, to speak Monday, March 6 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In celebration of Women's History Month, Helen Thomas, former United Press International White House bureau chief, will speak in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall University's Huntington campus at 7 p.m. Monday, March 6.

Thomas, a Hearst Newspaper columnist, has covered the American presidency for the past nine administrations, and is a living legend in political reporting. Her work has broken barriers for women reporters and she has earned the title "The First Lady of the Press."

Thomas served for 57 years as a correspondent for United Press International and as White House bureau chief. She was the first woman officer of the National Press Club after it opened its doors to women members.

In 1998, Thomas received the International Women's Media Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award and was honored by President and Mrs. Clinton as the first recipient of the Helen Thomas Lifetime Achievement Award.

The Marshall University Women's Center is sponsoring Thomas' visit to campus.

"Every year for Women's History Month we invite an outstanding woman to be our guest speaker," said Leah Tolliver, Marshall University Women's Center coordinator, "and we are honored that Ms. Thomas will be coming to Marshall University."

For more information, persons may contact the Marshall University Women's Center at (304) 696-3112 or wcenter@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 28, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans can 'audition' for movie at basketball game Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - McG, director of the upcoming movie about the 1970 Marshall University plane crash and the recovery of the football program that followed, has seen and heard the "We Are Marshall" cheer many times - but never in person.

Wednesday night, McG and other Warner Bros. Pictures executives will attend the Thundering Herd's final home men's basketball game of the season with Central Florida at Cam Henderson Center. Tipoff is at 7 p.m.

McG, who will be accompanied at the game by executive producer Brent O'Connor, producer Basil Iwanyk and associate producer Mary Viola, among others, said he will be listening closely as Herd fans "audition" for the movie when they proclaim, "We Are Marshall."

"After meeting many people in Huntington and the tri-state, I am convinced that the 'We Are Marshall" cheer used in the movie must come from these fans," McG said.

Discussions on whether to film potentially thousands of extras who will be used as Marshall fans in Huntington or Atlanta are ongoing, McG said. 

Iwanyk said McG always strives for authenticity when making a movie, which is why shooting some of the film on Marshall's campus and in downtown Huntington is so important.

"He really wants to shoot as much of the movie here as possible, "Iwanyk said. "Having the fans prove that they are the best will go a long way in determining the location of the crowd scenes."

More than 1,900 people have used a special Warner Bros. movie contact line (696-3461) or email (movie@marshall.edu) to submit their information in hopes of being an extra in the movie.

Anyone attending Wednesday's game who has not signed up to be considered as an extra may do so before and during the game. Members of Marshall's communications staff will be on hand to take the information.

"This is a great opportunity for our fans to show their stuff," said Keith Spears, vice president for marketing and communications at Marshall. "We hope fans will come to the game dressed in green with their game faces on. We want the movie executives to see in person why we believe the 'We Are Marshall' cheer is the best in the nation, and why it should be done in the movie by true Herd fans."

For more information, persons may contact Spears at (304) 696-2965.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday February 25, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University surpasses campaign goal with $110 million

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - When Marshall University kicked off the public phase of its Campaign for National Prominence in September 2002, it set an unprecedented goal of raising $100 million in private donations by Dec. 31, 2005.

On Friday, Feb. 24, Glen Kerkian, President and CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., announced that Marshall not only reached its goal, but exceeded it by 10 percent. The total amount raised or pledged in the campaign was nearly $110 million, Kerkian said.

"This campaign has lifted people's sights as to what we can collectively accomplish at Marshall," Kerkian said. "And once sights are raised they never return to the old norm!"

The campaign's successful conclusion was celebrated Friday evening during a private event at the Edgewood Country Club in Charleston. Tim Haymaker, national chairman of the campaign, was among those attending.

"Raising $100 million was a daunting task," Haymaker said. "To get to $110 million is incredible. This is the first of many capital campaigns at Marshall. In addition to the cash and pledges (already received), you also are plowing fields and sowing seeds for continuous harvest."

Kerkian highlighted several projects that were at least partially funded with campaign funds: They include:

        182 new student scholarships created during campaign

        New uniforms for the Marching Thunder

        The university's move to Conference USA

        Construction of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center

        Renovations of Morrow Library

Haymaker, a Marshall graduate now living in Lexington, Ky., described serving as national chairman of the campaign as "an awesome responsibility."

"I am grateful for the opportunity to give back to Marshall University through leadership and participation as well as financially," Haymaker said. "Not forgetting where your roots are and having this opportunity to give back is an awesome responsibility and one I enjoyed enormously."

He praised the campaign workers and those who have contributed and will continue to do so in the future. "One of the things I've said so frequently is, don't forget those who gave the money," Haymaker said. "I just happened to be in the leadership position."

As in most capital campaigns, most of the funds that were donated to the university came as specified gifts for individual projects or scholarships.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 24, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Printmaking students' work to be displayed in downtown Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's department of art and design printmaking students will have an exhibition and print sale at the Morris Building, located on the corner of 4th Avenue and the 9th Street Plaza in downtown Huntington, March 1-4.

The exhibition will be open to the public from 2 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 1 through Friday, March 3, and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 4. It will display a wide range of traditional and contemporary approaches in printmaking, produced by beginning and advanced students from Marshall University's art department.

For more information, persons may contact Peter Massing, a printmaking professor in the department of art and design, at (304) 696-6635.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 24, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fifth production of 'The Vagina Monologues' is March 3-4 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Women's Center is sponsoring its fifth production of the benefit play "The Vagina Monologues" at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 3-4, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on MU's Huntington campus.

The benefit production of "The Vagina Monologues" is part of a college campaign to raise money to end violence against women and girls. All proceeds from this event are donated to local nonprofit organizations in the community.

The proceeds from the local production will be donated to TEAM for WV Children, CONTACT Rape Crisis Center, and BRANCHES Domestic Violence Shelter.

"This is our fifth year doing this powerful event," said Leah Tolliver, Marshall University Women's Center Coordinator, "and we are looking forward to another outstanding response from Marshall and our surrounding community."

Tickets may be purchased at the box office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center through March 4, and also may be purchased at the door. The cost to attend is $14 general admission, $12 senior citizens, and $7 for students.

For more information, persons may contact the Marshall University Women's Center at (304) 696-3338 or wcenter@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 22, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Awards announced from United High School Media convention at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from high schools in West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky took part in workshops and competed for awards in newspaper and yearbook journalism at the 79th United High School Media convention on Friday, Feb. 17 at Marshall University.

The event was sponsored by Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications. A list of the awards which were presented at the convention's banquet may be found at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2006/pr021306.htm.


 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 21, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Poet Jeff Mann to read from his work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Jeff Mann will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 2 in room 2w16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Mann grew up in Covington, Va., and Hinton, W.Va., receiving degrees in English and forestry from West Virginia University.  He teaches creative writing at Virginia Tech University in Blacksburg, Va.

Mann is the author of four books.  His collection of poetry and memoir, Loving Mountains, Loving Men, was published by Ohio University Press in 2005.  Other poetry collections include Bones Washed with Wine.  He also has published a memoir, Edge, and a novella, Devoured, which was included in Masters of Midnight, appearing in 2003.  Forthcoming are a collection of poetry, On the Tongue, and a book of short fiction, A History of Barbed Wire.

His fiction, poetry and essays have appeared in many publications, including The Spoon River Poetry Review, Wild Sweet Notes: Fifty Years of West Virginia Poetry 1950-1999, Prairie Schooner, Shenandoah, Laurel Review, The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide, Crab Orchard Review, West Branch, Rebel Yell, and Appalachian Heritage.

Mann's appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public. For more information, persons may contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English department at (304) 696-2403.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 21, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Award-winning reporter to speak at Marshall's Diversity Breakfast

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University graduate Richard Gregory Lewis, an award-winning reporter with The South Florida Sun-Sentinel, is the guest speaker for MU's 6th annual Diversity Breakfast Friday, Feb. 24, on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The breakfast is from 7:30 to 8:50 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Presented by Marshall's Black United Students in collaboration with several departments and other inter-faith, women's and international student groups, the breakfast was created five years ago with the intent of promoting campus harmony and unity.

"Throughout the course of the year, Marshall University presents a multidimensional set of events designed to embrace the importance of diversity," Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, said. "Learning to recognize, appreciate, and value differences among those with whom we live, study and work, is an ingredient for a successful society. The annual Diversity Breakfast is one among many events that highlight our commitment to a balanced and multicultural society.

"We must remain stimulated and constantly in search of the promise that is associated with acceptance and regard for one another, irrespective of our differences.  We look forward to another enjoyable morning and keynote address from a Marshall grad, Richard G. Lewis."

Lewis is a member of the Race and Demographics Team at the Sun-Sentinel, where he primarily focuses on coverage of black American issues. He was hired at the Sun-Sentinel in 2001 after 14 years at the San Francisco Examiner and San Francisco Chronicle, where he served as a section editor, city hall reporter and assistant city editor.

Lewis began his career with the Huntington Herald-Advertiser in 1976 after graduating from Marshall with a bachelor's degree in English. He also worked at the Greensboro Daily News, where he was among a team of reporters who were Pulitzer Prize finalists in 1980 for their coverage of the Communists-Ku Klux Klan shootout in the streets of Greensboro, N.C.

He has won numerous individual writing and reporting awards. In addition, the Society of Professional Journalists, San Francisco Bay Area chapter, honored Lewis with its career achievement award in 2001 for reporting and his commitment to newsroom diversity.

Lewis also has taught journalism as an adjunct faculty member at North Carolina A&T State University and San Francisco State University. He currently teaches at Florida Atlantic University and has lectured at various prominent universities throughout the country.

Cost to attend the Diversity Breakfast is $11 per person, or $105 for a table of eight. Payment in advance is preferred, but not required. To pay in advance, persons may visit Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs in Room 1w25 of the Memorial Student Center.

The Diversity Breakfast planning committee is facilitated by Multicultural Affairs and the Center for African American Students' Programs, and is chaired by Cooley.

For more information on the breakfast or to make reservations, persons may call Fran Jackson, Program Assistant II with the Center for African American Students' Programs, at (304) 696-6705.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 16, 2006
Contact: Emily Ritchey, Director, Birke Art Gallery, (304) 696-7153

Entries still accepted for Birke Art Gallery's Student Juried Exhibition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Entries from Marshall University art students are being accepted by the Birke Art Gallery through Friday, Feb. 17, for the gallery's 19th annual Student Juried Exhibition.  

Entered pieces should be from students who have had an art class in a previous academic year at Marshall University.  The work will be featured from Monday, Feb. 20 through Friday, Feb. 24. 

An awards ceremony and opening reception for the exhibition are from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb.19 on Marshall's Huntington campus. The ceremony will take place in Smith Hall room 154, and the reception will be held in the gallery and Smith Hall Atrium. The exhibition and ceremony are free to the public.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 15, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Black Heritage Stamp unveiling is Feb. 27 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Multicultural Affairs and the United States Postal Service in Huntington are sponsoring a ceremony to unveil the 2006 edition of the postal service's Black Heritage Series of Stamps.

The ceremony is part of the annual Black History Month celebration. This year's Black History Month theme is "Celebrating Community: A Tribute to Black Fraternal, Social and Civic Institutions."

The stamp unveiling takes place at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 27 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus.  The public is invited to attend.

Hattie McDaniel, who in 1940 became the first African American to win an Academy Award for her role as best supporting actress in the1939 film, "Gone with the Wind," is featured on the stamp. The Hattie McDaniel 2006 Black Heritage Commemorative U.S. Postage Stamp is the 29th in the postal service's series.

"The stamp unveiling at Marshall is always a thoughtful, enthusiastic and very well-attended event," Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall, said. "It is very important, not only because we honor an outstanding black American on the stamp, but because of the collaboration between Marshall University and the postal service. We encourage everyone to attend this event."

McDaniel, who was born in Wichita, Kan., in 1895, and raised in Denver, Colo., was an actress, singer, and radio and television performer. As an actress, she often was criticized for playing maids and other stereotypical roles. She is remembered for saying, "I'd rather play a maid than be one," and often is credited with subverting any idea of subservience through her interpretative performances.

Encountering racism in Hollywood, she and several other black actors worked to change the film industry from within during the 1940s.

McDaniel showed talent at an early age. She dropped out of school as a teenager to tour with vaudeville companies, traveling musical ensembles and minstrel shows, including one run by her father. She sang on Denver radio as early as 1925, and wrote and recorded several of her own songs.

McDaniel arrived in Hollywood in 1931 and soon began to appear in films. She is credited with appearing in more than 90 films, but by some estimates she is believed to have appeared in as many as 300, including uncredited roles and extras, maids and chorus singers.

Some of her notable films include "Judge Priest" in 1934, "Saratoga" in 1937, "Show Boat" in 1936, "This Our Life" in 1942 and "Since You Went Away" in 1944.

From 1947 until 1952, McDaniel played the title role in "The Beulah Show," which was broadcast on national radio. As the first radio show to feature a black star, "The Beulah Show" was praised by the NAACP and the National Urban League. McDaniel died in 1952 at age 57 from breast cancer.

Featured speaker at the stamp unveiling will be Dr. Dolores Johnson, associate professor and director of writing in Marshall's English department. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will offer greetings as will Tammy Autenrieth, Appalachian District Manager with the United States Postal Service in Charleston, and William Smith, superintendent of Cabell County Schools. Cleckley will give closing remarks.

Special music will be performed by the Kellogg Elementary School Choir, under the direction of Stacy Morrison, Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs at Marshall, and William Smith.

Handouts and door prizes, including a football signed by Marshall football coach Mark Snyder, will be provided, and a reception will follow the program.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 8, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Chadwick encourages fans attending Marshall's women's game Sunday with Memphis to wear green

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University women's basketball coach Royce Chadwick is encouraging Thundering Herd fans to wear green Sunday, Feb. 12, when MU plays host to the University of Memphis in a Conference USA game at Cam Henderson Center. Game time is 4:30 p.m.

Chadwick's request of Herd fans is simple: "Don't be seen without your green," he said. The first 600 people entering the arena and wearing green will receive a free drink Coozie, thanks to WMUL, Marshall's student radio station.

Both Marshall and Memphis play a game Friday before squaring off Sunday in Huntington. Marshall, 11-10 overall and 6-4 in the conference, plays at home at 7 p.m. against the University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB). Memphis, 3-18 and 1-9, is at East Carolina.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 8, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Faculty featured in Marshall's Celebration of Books

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Celebration of Books, which features MU faculty who recently published books, takes place three times this month in the Reading Room on the second floor of the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus.

The Celebration of Books will be from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15, Wednesday, Feb. 22 and Monday, Feb. 27. Admission is free and refreshments will be provided. Guests may ask questions of the authors, learn what inspires them and hear how they wrote their books and got them published.

"We want to give the community the opportunity to talk to these published writers to find out what motivates them, and what process they go through to get successfully published," Barbara Winters, Marshall's dean of libraries, said. "We encourage everyone to join us for this unique opportunity." 

Here is a look at the authors scheduled to appear:

Wednesday, Feb. 15

Dr. Ashok Vaseashta, professor of physics and electronics; featured work: Nanostructured and Advanced Materials for Applications in Sensor, Optoelectronic and Photovoltaic Technology (2005).

Dr. Thomas Ellis, professor of psychology; featured work:  Cognition and Suicide:  Theory, Research, and Therapy (2006).

Jack Dickinson, bibliographer, Special Collections; featured work: Civil War Paper Items from the Rosanna Blake Confederate Collection (2005).

Dr. Janet Badia, associate professor of English; featured work: Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present  (2005).
 

Wednesday, Feb. 22

Dr. Kellie Bean, associate professor of English; featured work:  Post-Backlash Feminism:  Women, Politics and the Media (2006).

Dr. Bob Barnett, chair & professor of health, physical education and recreation; featured work:  Biography of Adolph Keifer (publication pending).

Dr. Bobbi Nicholson, associate professor of leadership studies at MU Graduate College; featured work:  E-Portfolios for Educational Leaders (2004).

Dr. Suneel Maheshwari, assistant professor of accounting and legal environment.
 

Monday, Feb. 27

Dr. Frank Gilliam, professor of biology; featured work:  The Herbaceous Layer in Forests of Eastern North America (2003).

Dr. Josh Hagen, assistant professor of geography; featured work:  The Jewel of the German Past: Preservation, Tourism, Nationalism (2006).

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the humanities program, MU Graduate College; featured work:  The Chicago Guide to Collaborative Ethnography (2005).

Dr. Victor Fet, associate professor of biology; featured work: Biogeography and Ecology of Bulgaria (2006).

Here is contact information for four of the authors:

Dr. Janet Badia - (304) 696-2357, badia@marshall.edu
Dr. Eric Lassiter - (304) 696-1923, lassiter@marshall.edu
Jack Dickinson - (304) 696-3097, dickinson@marshall.edu
Dr. Ashok Vaseashta - (304) 696-2755, Vaseashta@marshall.edu

For more information, persons may contact Wendy Moorhead at (304) 696-2336.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 7, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Red Cross to conduct blood drive Feb. 14-15 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The American Red Cross estimates that every two seconds, someone in the United States needs a blood transfusion, requiring more than 38,000 donors daily.

To help meet the need, the Red Cross will conduct a blood drive Tuesday, Feb. 14 and Wednesday, Feb. 15 at Marshall University. The drive will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, and take place in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The Red Cross is hoping for at least 120 donors over the two-day drive.

Taunia Oechslin, senior director of donor recruitment with the Red Cross, said giving blood is a simple gift that truly is from the heart.

"We are not encouraging people to do without the usual flowers and candy during February," Oechslin said. "But we do want local residents to make a commitment to give blood. With each donation, you affect not only a patient in need, but his or her entire family as well. Because of just one donation, a family may get additional days, weeks or years with their loved one."

All blood types are needed every day, but the Red Cross is currently experiencing a high demand for O negative, B negative and A negative. Anyone at least 17 years old, weighing 110 pounds or more and in good health may be eligible to donate blood.

People wanting to donate may call the Red Cross at (800) 448-3543 or go to www.redcrosslife.org to make an appointment.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 7, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

History Dept. Appears in Chronicle of Higher Education

Marshall's history department was featured Jan. 27 in the Chronicle of Higher Education in an article about the current teaching job opportunities for Ph.D.'s in history. As a result of forthcoming retirements, Marshall will have 5 openings on its history faculty. Faculty members traveled to the American Historical Association meeting in Philadelphia this month to interview candidates for the jobs.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 7, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Series on Diversity in Appalachia features three more events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The second of four events that make up the 2006 Spring Series on Diversity in Appalachia takes place Thursday, Feb. 16 at Marshall University.

The series is sponsored by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia (CSEGA) and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. All events are free to the public.

Marshall Professor Cicero Fain III will speak on "The Construction of Colored Huntington, 1905-1930," at 7 p.m. Feb. 16 in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Dining Room. This event is co-sponsored by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs.

The final two events of the spring series are:

        Wednesday, March 15 - 7 p.m., "Ivy Rowe," Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Booth Experimental Theatre; a one-woman show about a "spunky mountain woman," performed by Barbara Bates Smith and co-sponsored by Marshall's Women's Center.

        Thursday, April 20 - 7 p.m., "Revelations: A Celebration of Appalachian Resiliency in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered People," Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room; Reader's theatre production written and directed by Carrie Kline of Elkins, W.Va.

For more information, persons may contact the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia at (304) 696-2875 or email MU professor Linda Spatig at Spatig@marshall.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 3, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Registration nears for Black Alumni Western Caribbean cruise

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Black Alumni, Inc., is sponsoring a Western Caribbean cruise on the Royal Caribbean Enchantment of the Seas March 8-12, 2007.

Black Alumni members Janis Winkfield, Linda Jackson and Mickey Jackson are coordinating the event. An initial deposit of $100 per person is due on or before Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2006. This deposit and all other assessments for the cruise must be paid by credit card.

The cruise begins March 8 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., then heads to Key West, Fla., on March 9, to Cozumel, Mexico March 10 and back to Fort Lauderdale on March 12. Guests may choose from a variety of cabin styles at various rates, such as an inside cabin (no window), ocean view cabin, balcony cabin or large ocean view cabin. Prices range from $548 per person, based on double occupancy, to $918 per person.

Registration forms and more information are available by contacting Winkfield at (304) 416-0938 or via email at winkfiel@marshall.edu, or Black Alumni President David Harris at (304) 696-2597 or via email at harrisdn@marshall.edu.

The cruise reservation form and trip cancellation waiver must be faxed to Katrina May with Global Travel International at (866) 244-7175. She may be reached at (800) 715-4440, ext. 48826.

Each person who signs up for the cruise will be asked to contribute $50 to the new Erickson Alumni Center's Nate Ruffin Initiative.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 3, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

BRAIN STORM! game show features African American trivia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - BRAIN STORM!, a team trivia game show based this month entirely on African American trivia, is coming to Marshall University's Huntington campus on Thursday, Feb. 9.

The production, presented to Marshall by Simplified Entertainment of New York, begins at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It is sponsored by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs and helps promote February as African American History Month.

During the trivia game show, the entire audience plays at the same time.  A 10-foot video screen displays the questions for all to see. A flashy stage display with an energetic host keeps the action going while the audience uses remote control handsets.

Students "brainstorm" it out for the best answer. Categories include politics, medicine, drama, television, music, sports, and others.  Students and community groups are encouraged to form their own teams of five to 10 participants.

Church groups, clubs, fraternities, sororities, class groups, student organizations and resident halls are examples of possible participants. It is free to play, and the winning team receives a $200 grand prize.

For more information, persons visit the Center for African American Students' Programs in room IW25 of the Memorial Student Center or call Director Maurice Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 2, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Gay men's support group starts Feb. 7 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Psychology Clinic will start a gay men's support group beginning Tuesday, Feb. 7 in Harris Hall, room 449, on MU's Huntington campus.

The clinic will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. each Tuesday for six to eight weeks. The group will discuss a variety of topics such as coming out, religion, meeting friends, dating, family issues, living in Huntington, social support and homophobia. The group also will discuss other topics that provide support to those in the group.

Dr. Keith Beard, director of the Marshall University Psychology Clinic, said that living in a rural area can create additional pressure and stress for a gay person. He said he hopes the clinic will provide support to those involved.

"There are fewer opportunities for gay people to meet and have a chance to talk openly about their fears, experiences, problems, relationship concerns, and difficulties accepting themselves," Beard said. "We see clients for individual psychotherapy in our clinic struggling with these issues and others and I believe that a group therapy setting may be beneficial."

The cost of the clinic is a one-time fee of $30 which will be paid at the first session. The clinic is open to the public. Those interested should contact the psychology clinic before the first meeting.

For more information, persons may contact the psychology clinic at (304) 696-2772 or Beard by e-mail at beard@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 2, 2006
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Board of Governors approves Engineering degree program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors, in a special meeting today at the Memorial Student Center, unanimously approved the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE) degree program at Marshall.

The new four-year undergraduate program, which will be implemented this fall and will be the only such program in the state, will be housed in the College of Information Technology and Engineering's existing Division of Engineering and Computer Science. This is the first time in more than 30 years that such a degree program will be available to Marshall students.

The primary objectives of the BSE degree are to build a strong foundation in mathematics, science and in core engineering courses; to allow students the opportunity to pursue an engineering area of emphasis; and to provide students a high degree of flexibility through elective courses.

"This is a very important step for Marshall University toward establishing a program that will open new areas of collaboration and economic development," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "The flexibility of this program will allow us to look at combining interdisciplinary majors that will help prepare students to be adaptive and creative in their work. It opens up tremendous opportunities for our students, and it will attract a broader pool of students to the engineering profession."

The new engineering program largely is the result of state legislation passed in 2004. Senate Bill 448 included language inserted by Sen. Robert Plymale, Chairman of the Senate Education Committee, which allowed Marshall to begin the process of expanding its engineering offerings. This legislation also was strongly supported by the entire Cabell-Wayne legislative delegation.

Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, said implementing the new four-year engineering program "is extremely important to Marshall University."

"This degree complements our already strong science, technology and graduate engineering programs," Denman said. "The engineering degree has been the missing link. It will assist many disciplines, geography and visual arts to name just a couple, at this institution in their ability to grow."

Marshall has had an undergraduate degree program before, but it was discontinued in 1970 because of external factors and institutional priorities that existed at that time. Marshall did, however, retain the program's freshman and sophomore years.

Through this program, students completed the first two years of undergraduate engineering at Marshall and thereafter had to transfer to another institution to obtain the actual engineering degree. Many students took advantage of this program, transferring to West Virginia University, WVU Institute of Technology, or to other institutions in the state.

Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the new program fits in well with other established programs at the college.

"This is an important step in the continuing growth of our engineering and computer science undergraduate programs," Dulin said. "Our faculty members have been working very hard toward this goal for quite some time, and are to be commended for their dedication to these programs and to the students in the state and the region. Marshall's engineering alumni and regional professional communities also played key roles in planning and support of the new program."

Denman said anticipation of the new engineering program is high not only at Marshall, but in the community and the state as well.

"It's good to come full circle," she said. "Engineering was always a part of this institution and now it's back again."


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