All 2007 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bridge Campaign surpasses half of goal

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Bridge Campaign, launched during homecoming festivities this past October, has reached more than half of a $16 million goal.

"We are pleased to report that during the early stages of this campaign we have secured nearly $8.4 million in commitments for the three Bridge Campaign projects," said Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. "We are enthusiastic about the momentum behind this campaign, and feel confident that our alumni and friends will continue to support this effort."

The Bridge Campaign is a focused initiative led by The Marshall University Foundation, Inc. to connect academics, alumni and athletic programming through the construction of three new facilities. Construction began earlier this fall on two of the three Bridge projects: a 16,000-square-foot Engineering Laboratory for the newly reinstated engineering program, and a new women's softball complex resulting from demolition of the old field to make way for new residence halls and a student recreation center.

Construction on a new building to house the University's alumni relations staff and programs in addition to the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. and Development offices will begin in early 2008. 

For more information, visit the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. Web site at www.marshalluniversityfoundation.com or call (304) 696-3292.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Statement of Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp on the loss of Leah Hickman

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "This outcome was not the way we had hoped the search for Leah Hickman would culminate. The Marshall community and the citizens of Huntington are saddened by her loss. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family, friends and everyone who was touched by Leah's life. She will be missed."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

South Point freshman wins first Commemorative Plate Design Contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Andy Burgess, a Marshall University freshman from South Point, Ohio, is the winner of the first Commemorative Plate Design Contest sponsored by MU President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp.

The contest is the second in a series of student design competitions begun this year by President and Mrs. Kopp. The other, a Holiday Card Design Contest, was won by Julia Urban of Chesapeake, Ohio.

Burgess, who is majoring in graphic design, won $700 for his plate design. Second-place Jason Philabaun won $400 and third-place Miriah Dolen won $150.

Burgess' plate design is divided into six sections - three on the top and three on the bottom. He said he used basic line drawings to illustrate Marshall's progression through the years.

"I just wanted to incorporate Marshall's start with what it is today," Burgess said. He said he used computer programs to create his final design.

"I was really surprised, I really didn't expect to win," he said. "It was a good feeling. I think it's a great competition. It's really a good opportunity for anyone, but mainly for the people in the art department."

Burgess may be reached by calling (740) 894-5049 or via e-mail at silvusvalentine@hotmail.c


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 19, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Candlelight vigil for missing Marshall student set for Thursday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Friends of Leah Hickman, the Marshall University student reported missing since Friday, Dec. 14, will conduct a candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus.

K.D. Crank, a Marshall student and close friend of Hickman's who is helping to organize the vigil, said it is open to the public. "We want Leah to know that we want her back; that we are searching for her. We are just looking for information that will give us hope," Crank said.

For more information, contact Crank at (304) 840-9225 or e-mail her at crank16@marshall.edu.

Anyone who has information on Hickman's whereabouts is asked to call the Huntington Police Department at (304) 696-4444.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 18, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to offer services during the holiday break

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities at Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open for business at various times during the holiday break, which runs Dec. 21-Jan. 1, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Kopp said it is important to have services available not only for Marshall's returning students, but for those considering attending MU in the future.

"We anticipate that people might need the services of our offices during the holiday break," Kopp said. "Some of our returning students might need to address certain issues or people in town visiting family might be considering Marshall as an education destination and want to visit or ask questions about the University. Our dedicated staff will do everything possible to assist them during this time."

Departments and facilities scheduled to be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 21 and Thursday-Friday, Dec. 27-28, include Admissions, the Bursar's Office, Financial Aid, the Registrar's office, University College and the Recruitment and Welcome Center. University College will be working out of the Recruitment and Welcome Center.

The Marshall Bookstore will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 21 and Wednesday-Friday, Dec. 26-28, and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Dec. 31. Marshall's mailroom will be open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 21, 27, 28 and 31.

Also, Marshall's Development Office in the Erickson Alumni Center will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 21, 24 and 26. The Marshall University Foundation's office in Old Main 323 will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 27, 28 and 31.

Here is a list of some services that will be available during the break:

  • Admissions: phone and walk-in inquiries; credentials and applications
  • Bursar's Office: payment of tuition and fees, parking permits, loan counseling, payment plans, telephone correspondence and general student counseling 
  • Financial Aid: all services
  • Registrar: enrollment verification, degree verification, transcript services, re-admission and certification of VA benefits
  • University College: assisting students in good standing attempting to register
  • Welcome Center: answering questions, meeting with prospective students and scheduling campus tours

The Huntington campus will reopen on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2008. Students will be back in class for the start of the spring semester on Monday, Jan. 14, 2008.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 17, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Oak Hill resident wins TV during Jam the Cam VII

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Joe Elcess of Oak Hill, Ohio, won a 32-inch Toshiba LCD TV during Jam the Cam VII Sunday, Dec. 16 at Cam Henderson Center. The TV giveaway was sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association and Big Sandy Superstores.

Marshall's women's basketball team defeated Navy, 70-58, in Jam the Cam VII before a crowd of 927. Marshall improved its record to 6-4 while Navy fell to 2-9.

Elcess had the winning ticket in a drawing that took place during the first half. Everyone 18 and over was given a ticket as he or she entered Henderson Center.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 14, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MUAA to give away flat panel TV during 'Jam the Cam'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association will give away a 32-inch flat panel TV Sunday to a fan attending the seventh annual "Jam the Cam" women's basketball game at Cam Henderson Center. The game between Marshall and Navy begins at 1 p.m.

Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs with the MUAA, said fans 18-and-older entering Henderson Center for the game will be given a ticket, entering them in the drawing. The winning number will be called during the first half of the game, and the winner will be recognized at halftime. Pelphrey said the person with the winning ticket must be present to claim the TV.

"The alumni association is excited to be a part of 'Jam the Cam,' which traditionally is one of the most popular games of the season," Pelphrey said. "We thank Big Sandy Superstores for sponsoring the TV give-away and we hope all Herd fans will come out Sunday and show their support by jamming the Cam."

The 2007 version of "Jam the Cam" will be a salute to United States military troops. All current and former military personnel will be admitted free by showing their military I.D. Admission will be $1 for all others.

The game will feature a military theme. The United States Marine Corps Color Guard will be present and a video presentation will be shown in honor of the troops. West Virginia legend Woody Williams, the oldest living recipient of the Medal of Honor, also will be present.

In its first six years, "Jam the Cam" attracted more than 24,000 fans, including a Marshall school record of 7,017 in 2004 for the Herd's game with the University of Kentucky.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Groundbreaking for Marshall Habitat House set for Monday, Dec. 17

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will join with officials from Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity and the city of Huntington at 2 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17 in a groundbreaking celebration for a Habitat House that MU faculty, staff and students will help build.

The groundbreaking will take place at 1930 Artisan Ave., the site chosen for construction of a house for Chris and Drema Page and their 4-year-old daughter, Shayna, according to Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity.

Prep work at the site actually began about a week ago. The house is expected to be ready for occupancy in about four months.

WHAT: Groundbreaking celebration for construction of a Habitat House, which Marshall University and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity are teaming to build

WHEN: 2 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17

WHERE: 1930 Artisan Ave. in Huntington

The media are welcome to attend and cover the event.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students, staff and faculty complete Fitness Challenge

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three teams won championships in the Marshall University Fitness Challenge, which wrapped up recently after a three-month run. The challenge was sponsored by the Marshall Health and Fitness Center.

Fourteen student teams, 17 teams representing residence hall floors and eight faculty/staff teams participated.

The first-place winner among student teams was Tower of Power. The residence hall champion was Twin Towers East second floor, and the first-place winner in the faculty/staff division was Shake & Bake (Computing Services).

Tower of Power's participants were Josh McMillion, Michael Cooper, Derek Lewis, Aaron Childers and Matthew Dial. Those who competed for Twin Towers East second floor were Dustin Campbell, Paul Blazer, Evan Fonner and Charles Sergeon. Shake and Bake participants were Mike Meyers, Dave Daniel, Steve Robinson, Iyad Kaddora, Corey Schaffer, Justin Holmes, Rebecca Fox-Gieg, Josh White, Dave Kendall and Taryn Amos.

According to Heather Smith, program coordinator with the fitness center, activities included strength training, walking, biking, racquetball, basketball, swimming, aerobic classes, intramural participation, nutrition seminars and many other types of exercise.  Winners received T-shirts, fitness equipment prize packs, and award certificates.

"In addition, participants made healthy lifestyle changes, developed new friendships and became motivated to dedicate time each week to improving their fitness levels," Smith said. She said the free program, which first began in January 2007, has had very positive results. 

The next Fitness Challenge will begin in January 2008 and run until spring break in March. Smith said all MU students and employees are welcome to take part, and start some "healthy competition" among peers.

For more information, contact the Health and Fitness Center at (304) 696-3653.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Griffis named director of development for College of Fine Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington native and Marshall University alumna Melanie Griffis has recently returned to campus to serve as the new director of development for Marshall's College of Fine Arts.

Griffis will focus primarily on fundraising and work closely with Dean Donald Van Horn to develop priority initiatives. In addition, she will provide counsel on program and project development endeavors.

"We're so fortunate to have such talented students, gifted professors and leadership dedicated to fostering the arts on campus, in our communities and globally," Van Horn said. "And with Melanie's assistance, we hope to grow support and enhance funding for our programs."

One of Griffis' main priorities will be to expand scholarships for theatre and visual art students. She also hopes to sustain current scholarships for undergraduate students in music while developing opportunities for those students who want to continue their education within the college's graduate program.

Lance West, vice president for major gift development, said Griffis' previous experience in fundraising makes her an ideal member of the development team. She has more than 20 years experience consulting and leading fundraising efforts for nonprofit organizations and independent schools throughout Virginia.

"Her experience working closely with educational leaders, community members and donors is very important," West said. "But it's her love of Marshall that will be the cornerstone of her success."

A third-generation Marshall graduate, Griffis earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in History in 1979. Her great grandfather, Floyd Morris, began the tradition when he graduated from what was then known as Marshall College Normal School in 1904. Her father, Robert Griffis, followed in 1956. Melanie Griffis' daughter continues the legacy as a Marshall freshman.

"I have my great grandfather's diploma hanging in my office. It reminds me of the importance of Marshall University education for my family," Griffis said. "It is also testimony to how important this institution is to so many families - past, present and future. I hope my great grandchildren carry on the tradition of learning and working for this institution."

Griffis can be reached by calling (304) 696-3686 or via e-mail at griffism@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 11, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Build-A-Bear Workshop creates 'We Are Marshall' bear-sized T-shirt

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Build-A-Bear Workshop has created an officially licensed "We Are Marshall" bear-sized T-shirt, which can be purchased online or at the Build-A-Bear Workshop at the Charleston Town Center Mall.  Build-A-Bear Workshop is the only global company that offers an interactive, make-your-own stuffed animal retail-entertainment experience.

"It's very significant for Marshall University to have its brand associated with a well-known and well-respected specialty retail company such as Build-A-Bear Workshop," said Kemmeth Rivers, director of marketing and branding at Marshall.

The T-shirts may be purchased individually online or in the store.  Fully dressed bears wearing complete boy or girl Marshall outfits can be ordered online. 

The boy outfit includes a "We Are Marshall" T-shirt, faded denim jeans, black canvas high tops and a red and blue backpack. The girl outfit includes a "We Are Marshall" T-shirt, a rhinestone denim skirt, white mule Skechers shoes and a pink camera cell phone. The bears with fashions and accessories retail for about $40.

"Or, you can customize your own 'We Are Marshall' bear by choosing from dozens of different accessories that they offer," Rivers said.

"Marshall University has long been recognized for its courage and perseverance," said Maxine Clark, founder and chief executive bear of Build-A-Bear Workshop.  "We are proud to have worked closely with the university to create these teddy bear T-shirts with the motto that reflects the school's determination and strength of character."

Founded in St. Louis in 1997, Build-A-Bear Workshop currently operates more than 300 stores in the United States, Puerto Rico, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France.  The addition of franchise stores in Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia makes Build-A-Bear Workshop the leader in interactive retail. 

For more information, call 888 (560) BEAR (2327) or visit the company's Web sites at www.buildabear.com and www.friends2bmade.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 10, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Julia Urban wins first Holiday Card Design Contest

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Julia Urban of Chesapeake, Ohio, a May 2007 graduate in Marshall University's College of Fine Arts and a current MU graduate student majoring in graphic design, is the winner of the first Holiday Card Design Contest sponsored by Marshall President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp.

The contest is the first of a series of student design competitions initiated by President and Mrs. Kopp, according to Byron Clercx, chair of Marshall's Department of Art and Design.

"We are grateful to President and Mrs. Kopp for recognizing and rewarding the creative acumen art and design students bring to a practical visual challenge," Clercx said.

"Jane and I decided to initiate and support this competition as a way of recognizing and showcasing the amazing artistic talent of our students," President Kopp said. "The holiday card that Julia designed will be mailed to everyone on our list and she is featured as the card creator."

Clercx said more than 50 students ranging from freshman to graduate students entered the Holiday Card Design Contest.

"The art and design faculty was instrumental in the high number of quality student responses to the competition, which made choosing a winner challenging for the design selection committee," Clercx said.

Urban won $700 for her holiday card design. It features a buffalo covered in snow walking above the words, "There is snow place like MARSHALL." Mika Kanai of Huntington took second place and was awarded $400, and Tonya Rayburn of Eleanor, W.Va., took third place and received $150.

Mary Grassell, a professor of design in Marshall's Department of Art and Design, worked closely with Urban, helping her with the production side of the contest.

"Julia is a good, solid designer, a very competent designer," Grassell said. "Winning this competition gives her a push into the limelight and shows her that she does do good work. It has put a smile on her face and given her confidence to know that she was the best in this contest."

Urban said she wanted to portray a snowy scene with an image of a buffalo on her card.

"I soon developed the idea of a snow buffalo instead of your ordinary snowman," she said. Urban created snowflakes throughout the card, then added the phrase, "There is snow place like Marshall," which she said connects the idea of snow and Marshall University to the snow buffalo.

Grassell agreed with Clercx that the contest received a positive response from Marshall's students.

"They liked it; they seemed to enjoy the competition," she said. "It's been good for them. It helps them feel more like they are important to the university."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 7, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Washington Post selects 'FDR' as one of top 5 non-fiction books of '07

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Washington Post, in its Dec. 2 issue, selected FDR, a comprehensive biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt by Marshall University professor Jean Edward Smith, as one of the top five non-fiction books of 2007.

Other books in the top five are Edith Wharton by Hermione Lee; Ralph Ellison: A Biography, by Arnold Rampersad; The Unnatural History of the Sea, by Callum Roberts; and The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story, by Diane Ackerman.

In reviewing FDR, Jonathan Yardley, book critic for the Post, said FDR is "a model presidential biography. Now, at last, we have the book that is right for the man."

FDR, an 880-page hardcover book, was released last spring. Smith was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for his biography of Ulysses Grant.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 6, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Grant will help Marshall University do critical research to support NASA's technology needs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University recently was awarded $99,659 through the West Virginia High Technology Consortium (WVHTC) Foundation's Innovative Research initiative for research that supports NASA's latest critical technology needs.

Through this initiative, the WVHTC Foundation seeks to stimulate technological innovation in the private sector and strengthen the role of university and small business collaborations in meeting federal research and development needs. 

The project is being headed by Marshall University Professor of Chemistry Dr. Mike Norton.  Norton is a pioneer in the emerging field of nanotechnology, which involves the designing and building of materials and devices from molecular components.  The National Science Foundation estimates the market for nanotechnology products and services will reach $1 trillion by 2015. 

NASA's Next Generation Space Exploration efforts require the development of new materials to ensure mission safety and success.  Norton is performing an analysis of nanoscale composite materials which will provide new functionalities.  These experiments are being performed at the Molecular and Biological Imaging Center (http://www.marshall.edu/mbic/ ) at Marshall.  

The computational costs of identifying DNA sequences are typically high. Therefore, research efforts have utilized the Global Grid Exchange (G2EX), a collaborative grid computing effort between Parabon Computation, Inc., and the WVHTC Foundation. G2EX provides a low-cost alternative to traditional supercomputing resources by harnessing the idle processing capacity of donors' computers around the globe and creating a network which acts like a giant parallel processing supercomputer.  G2EX provides a platform ideally suited for this type of research.

The Molecular and Biological Imaging Center has focused its research efforts on the development of nanoscale optical, electronic and structural elements.  Nanotechnology holds promise for future NASA missions by reducing payload mass while providing enhanced functionality.  In order to realize these enhancements, structures with the locations of every atom must be designed, built, characterized and tested. 

The project is a collaborative effort between academia and small business entities. Optical elements are being designed to atomic specificity by Marshall University Postdoctoral Fellows Hong Zhong and Chad Huffman under the direction of Norton.  Several of these designs have been constructed and are now being characterized.

Simultaneously, software is being developed by programmers at Parabon Computation, Inc., under the direction of Dr. Steven Armentrout.  These efforts are aimed at validating the human-generated designs and developing an easy-to-use interface for the DNA design software.  This interface will allow for the rapid design of much more complex, integrated nanoscale systems that will be capable of meeting the strict performance and weight specifications of future NASA missions.   

The WVHTC Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization based in Fairmont, W.Va., functioning as an engine of economic change for growing a statewide and regional high-tech business sector.  The foundation has established a multi-faceted approach to maximize economic development, including infrastructure development, research and development, commercialization and workforce development.

For more information, contact Norton at (304) 696-6627.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 4, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Work set to begin on Habitat House sponsored by Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Prep work is set to begin Wednesday on the Habitat House that Marshall University and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity are teaming to build in Huntington for a family of three.

Marshall and Habitat for Humanity announced the partnership, the first on a project of this scale between the two organizations, last summer. The house, which will be the 64th built by Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, is expected to be ready for occupancy in about three months.

Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, said the house will be built at 1930 Artisan Ave., which is near the Marshall campus.

"Marshall University always has and continues to be a leader in so many ways for this community," Kluemper said. "As the director of development for Habitat, a resident of the city of Huntington, and alumnus of Marshall University, I could not be more excited about the contribution they are going to make to this city in the means of providing safe, decent and affordable housing. We are so blessed that the university has agreed to partner with us on such a landmark project."

A ceremonial groundbreaking will take place later this month, and a media event is planned for sometime in January after Marshall's students return for the second semester, which begins on Monday, Jan. 14.

Megan Barbour with MU's Student Affairs Office said interest among students wanting to help build the house has been great.  

"We have had an overwhelming amount of interest among students wanting to volunteer and I am enthusiastically optimistic that we will have an even more overwhelming turnout of volunteers throughout the build," Barbour said. "We are always looking for more volunteers and we have adequate work for anyone looking to help out."

Some volunteers are needed to help over the next two weeks. The majority of work to be done by volunteers, including students, student groups, faculty and staff, will be done after the holidays. To learn more about the project, including hours in which volunteers are needed, persons may call Habitat's office at (304) 523-4822.

Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian ministry, whose mission is to partner with qualified families in need, and provide them the opportunity for safe, decent, affordable housing. To volunteer with the organization, visit www.huntingtonareahabitat.org.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 3, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall student wins $5,000 scholarship in BEA competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Adam Cavalier, a Marshall University junior from Montgomery, W.Va., recently won a $5,000 scholarship in the Broadcast Education Association's 2008-2009 competition.

Cavalier, production director with WMUL-FM, Marshall's public radio station, was among 13 students from 12 different campuses who were awarded scholarships in the competition. The winners were selected by the BEA Scholarship Committee at its fall meeting in Washington, D.C., according to Pete Orlik, committee chair.

Cavalier won the Abe Voron Scholarship, which goes to a person who is planning a career in radio. Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said Cavalier has a perfect 4.0 grade point average at MU.

"This scholarship is tremendous recognition of the hard work Adam has performed for the student media in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications and for maintaining a perfect 4.0 GPA," Dennison said. "I can speak for all of the faculty members in congratulating Adam as the winner of the 2008-2009 Abe Voron Scholarship."

Cavalier said he hopes to pursue a career doing radio play-by-play after he graduates from Marshall. He does a variety of sports broadcasts for WMUL-FM.

"Winning this scholarship is a true honor," Cavalier said. "Getting the award only validates what I am doing to prepare myself for my future and what I am doing as a student of Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications."

To qualify for the scholarship, Cavalier submitted an essay and letters of recommendation from Dennison, Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the School of Journalism and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, and Dan Hollis, professor of broadcast journalism at Marshall.

BEA scholarships are awarded to outstanding students for study on campuses that are institutional members of the organization. The BEA is the professional association for professors, industry professionals, graduate and undergraduate students who are interested in teaching and research related to electronic media and multimedia enterprises. Currently, there are more than 1,600 individual and institutional members.

Official recognition of Cavalier's award will take place during the annual meeting of the BEA, which runs April 17-19, 2008 in Las Vegas.

For more information, contact Cavalier at (304) 552-4519.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 29, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Art work of MU students, faculty on display at University of Rio Grande

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The art work of several students and faculty from Marshall University's Department of Art & Design is being exhibited at the Greer Museum on the campus of the University of Rio Grande (Ohio) through Friday, Dec. 14.

Marshall professors Peter Massing and Mary Grassell from the Department of Art & Design hand-picked the students to join them in exhibiting their work at the University of Rio Grande.

The exhibition displays printmaking from Massing, Clay McNearney and Seth Cyfers; graphic design from Grassell, Elaine Holliday and Amelia Boslough; and photography by Rebecca Holbrook.

Gallery hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

For more information, contact Massing at (304) 696-6635 or Grassell at (304) 696-2894.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 29, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall students ready for state Business Plan Competition finals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A group of three students from Marshall University is among the 10 finalists competing in the 2008 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition.

The team that wins the competition, which takes place in April in Morgantown, will receive $10,000 and a package of business resources aimed at helping turn their business plans into reality.

Marshall is represented by a proposed new company called Good Times, which intends to provide an array of candy or mint substitutes.  

The team is composed of juniors Matthew Smith of Poca, W.Va., a Management Information Systems and Finance double major, Daniel Hager of Milton, W.Va., a Health Care Management major, and sophomore Molly Grove of Bunker Hill, W.Va., an Advertising and Graphic Design double major.

The team will spend January through March developing business and marketing plans, and making product prototypes. Amy Anastasia, assistant director of Marshall's Technology Transfer Office and Marshall's representative on the competition's oversight committee for the Student Business Plan Competition, said the winning team will be the one judged to be the best on specific criteria.

"The winning team must offer a novel product or service, and a business plan that can expose and market that product in a profitable way," Anastasia said.

Anticipation and excitement are evident among the students, she said.

"I have watched the competition since last year, having learned of it just after the deadline passed in 2006," Smith said. "For a year I stewed on what would be a neat and fun business idea to work toward. For some reason that has always appealed to me."

Smith said he was struck with a fresh idea for a creative new candy-like product.

"We are looking at doing really vibrant flavors," he said. "We are hoping to target young- and middle-aged people whose tastes are changing, and new generations of people a little more open to new things.

"It is cute and fun," he said. "I daydreamed about it instead of paying attention in certain classes that will remain unnamed.  Good Times needs some refining, but really the idea is solid, the team is capable, and I have faith that no matter what, we will learn and grow thanks to this experience.  I can't wait to enter again next year. Who knows? Winning two years in a row wouldn't be too bad in my mind."

For more information about the 2008 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition, visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc/ or contact Anastasia at (304) 696-4365.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday November 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Choir and Orchestra Present 'Elijah' this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Choral Union, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present two performances of Felix Mendelssohn's oratorio "Elijah" at Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

The first performance is at 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1 and will be repeated at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2. The choir will be joined by the Marshall University Orchestra, MU Chorus, and MU Chamber Choir, along with student and community soloists.

"Elijah," one of the most significant choral-orchestral works of the nineteenth century, is filled with dramatic moments, beautiful melodies, and thrilling music-making, Castleberry said.

The role of Elijah will be sung by Dale Capehart, bass-baritone. Other soloists include sopranos Kristen Pino, Leeah Webber, and Burcu Korkmaz; altos Earline Allen and Barbara Ladner; and tenors Mitch Spurlock and Michael Sidoti.

Tickets are available at the door at a cost of $10 for adults and $5 for students and senior citizens. Admission is free to Marshall students with ID. For further information, persons may call the Marshall Department of Music at (304) 696-3127.


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Monday November 26, 2007
Contact: Barbara Winters, Dean, University Libraries, (304) 696-2318

Holly Berry Festival returns to Marshall Dec. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The third annual Holly Berry Festival returns to Marshall University's Huntington campus from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8 in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center.

Sponsored by the Marshall University Library Associates, this year's Holly Berry Festival is bigger and better, with more vendors, artists and craftspeople participating and more general and holiday-themed items for sale, according to festival organizers. Shoppers who attend the Holly Berry Festival will be treated to an expanded variety of gift ideas presented by a wide variety of tri-state artisans and crafts persons.

"Whether you're looking for hand-crafted jewelry or for paintings, art, quilts, aprons, kitchen towel sets, scarves, prints, or books, chances are excellent you'll find what you're looking for at the Holly Berry Festival," said Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall Libraries. Winters said 10 percent of all sales at the festival will be donated to the Library Associates endowment fund, which supports the ongoing development of the Marshall University Libraries book collections.

Winters said visitors to the festival will be able to pick up a few pointers about pottery and chair caning from master crafters, who will demonstrate both techniques during the course of the day.  Books about West Virginia and the Civil War and related items will be on display for sale as well.  

Special guest is Jim Casto, former editorial page editor of The Herald-Dispatch in Huntington. Casto will sign copies of his latest book, The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (Arcadia Publishing, 2006), from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the student center. The book traces the history of the C&O from the laying of its first tracks in the 1860s to its role as part of the CSX Transportation giant of today.

Casto also will have copies of two of his previous books, 50 Years Of Caring and Marshall University, for sale and for signature. 

Casto recently retired from The Herald-Dispatch, where he was a reporter and editor for more than 40 years. He now is senior public information specialist at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

Admission is free to the Holly Berry Festival, and there is free parking off 5th Avenue on the Marshall parking lot opposite Corbly Hall for festival goers.  Free snacks will be provided throughout the event.

For more information, contact Winters at (304) 696-2318 (wintersb@marshall.edu) or Dr. Lynne Welch at (304) 696-6611.


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Monday November 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University, MCTC launch United Way campaign today

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College today kicked off the 2007 United Way campaign by announcing numerous activities designed to involve everyone in the university community in an effort to meet the goal of $50,000.

Bernice Bullock, chairperson of Marshall's 16-member Blue Ribbon committee, which represents different departments and campuses, said the campaign runs Monday, Nov. 26 through Friday, Dec. 7. It is being conducted as part of the West Virginia State Employee Combined Campaign, which is entitled "A State of Caring - Investing in Your Community."

"This is the time of year when we think about how we can give to our family and also how we can give back to our community," Bullock said. "Making a pledge to the United Way is one way of giving back that requires little effort from us other than making a donation or completing a pledge card."

The United Way campaign focuses its assistance on youth, families, safe neighborhoods and aging populations. Those who choose to donate may target their contribution to a specific agency. The Huntington community is represented by United Way of the River Cities, Inc., which has 33 partner agencies.

"In looking over the list of partner agencies - the Red Cross, Big Brothers-Big Sisters, Boy Scouts, food bank, day care centers, the Salvation Army, and the YMCA and YWCA, just to name a few, it occurred to me that I am very grateful that the United Way helps me to take care of so many," Bullock said. "All I have to do is make a donation and they spread my money where it will do the most good for my community."

In addition to annual pledges and payroll deductions, Marshall employees may contribute by participating in some of the fund-raising activities planned over the next two weeks. One of those activities is "I'm Wearing Jeans for United Way," or "Jeans Wednesdays." Participants will be "allowed" to wear jeans to work on Nov. 28 and Dec. 5 for a minimal donation.

For $5, employees may wear jeans to work on both designated Wednesdays. For a $3 donation, they may wear jeans on one of the two Wednesdays. To take part, persons may purchase "I'm Wearing Jeans for United Way" stickers from selected contacts in each building on the Huntington campus and the Marshall Medical Center.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 29, a soup and salad lunch will be available for $3.99 in the John Marshall Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center. Members of the Blue Ribbon committee will be accepting donations to the United Way campaign as persons enter or exit the dining room.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3, local barber Chris Slash will be on campus to give haircuts. He will donate a portion of the proceeds to the United Way campaign. A location for the haircuts is still to be determined.

Marshall students also will take part in the United Way campaign. A corn-hole tournament is in the planning stages, and a prize basket will be raffled.

To monitor the progress and increase awareness of Marshall's campaign, large thermometer posters will be placed outside the university's Huntington campus.

Pledge forms and more information are available at the Marshall/United Way Web site at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/unitedway/. For additional information, call Bullock at (304) 696-4376.


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Wednesday November 21, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Services has increased placement and informational activities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Career Services Center at Marshall University is seeing an increase in activities as companies and governmental agencies are gearing up for gaps due to the baby boomers preparing to exit the workforce, Director Denise Hogsett said today.

Hogsett said one recent event brought to Marshall University the commander of the USS West Virginia, who not only provided information to 45 engineering students and engineering faculty, but also presented MU President Stephen J. Kopp with a wood placard from the submarine.

Cmdr. Chris Anklam, U.S. Navy commanding officer on his first tour through the state, talked about his experiences and career path to becoming a commander. He will complete his education soon and plans to become a high school math teacher upon retirement. Hogsett said Anklam has a great relationship with the state of West Virginia as fostered by Gov. Joe Manchin and is hoping to develop a similar relationship with Marshall University.

Representatives from Lockheed Martin, a Fortune 500 company, recently spoke to 25 computer science and management information system students and alumni, and later conducted interviews.  Lockheed Martin is seeking software developers, database administrators, systems engineers, network managers, test engineers and configuration analysts for positions in Fairmont, W.Va.

According to Hogsett, recruiters Kirk Judd and Bill Jordan, both Marshall graduates, said they were impressed with the skill level of the students and want to continue their relationship with Marshall.

Hogsett participated in the first Career and Advancement Workshop sponsored by the Association of Young Scientists and the Cell Differentiation and Development Center.  The two-hour workshop focused on the development of required skills for those wishing to enhance their employment and research opportunities.

Dr. Eric Blough, a member of the Marshall faculty, was the keynote speaker. Students were given the opportunity to ask questions of the panel of experts that ranged from physicians, post-doctoral researchers, faculty, medical residents and career services representatives.


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Tuesday November 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students honored in two national competitions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, recently were presented awards in two different national competitions, according to Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at MU and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

WMUL-FM received a third-place Podcast Best of Show award at the 86th annual National College Media Convention/2007 Associated Collegiate Press (ACP) annual College Competition ceremony at the Hilton Washington Hotel in Washington, D.C., Sunday, Oct. 28.

The station's award was for a 30-minute sports program called "Herd Roundup," which ran Friday, Sept. 28, 2007. The students who participated in the program were co-host and producer Adam Cavalier, a junior from Montgomery, W.Va.; co-host and producer Andrew Ramspacher, a sophomore from Dublin, Ohio; reporter Brian Dalek, a junior from McMechen, W.Va., and reporter Cathleen Moxley, a senior from Chapmanville, W.Va.

Bailey said the station competed with other media outlets with an online Web site from colleges and universities throughout the country whose staffs attended the 86th annual National College Media Convention.

WMUL students also received one Platinum award, two Gold awards and one Honorable Mention award in the MarCom Creative Awards 2007 Competition. The winners were named in a letter dated Tuesday, Nov. 13 from Arlington, Texas. 

The MarCom Creative Awards is an international competition that recognizes achievement by marketing and communication practitioners.  Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry.  More than 5,000 entries were submitted in the MarCom Creative Awards 2007 Competition.

The MarCom's prestigious Platinum Award is presented to those entries judged to be among the most outstanding entries in the competition.  Platinum Winners are recognized for their excellence in terms of quality, creativity and resourcefulness. The Gold Award is presented to those entries judged to exceed the high standards of the industry.  Honorable Mention certificates are granted to those entries that meet the expectations of the judges.

Platinum and Gold Winners come from radio stations, advertising and public relations agencies, corporate communication departments, educational institutions, government entities, designers, writers, video production professionals, broadcast and cable operations and other business and individuals throughout the country and several foreign countries.

The Platinum Award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was in the Writing/Radio Script category. The script for the documentary program "Lasting Perfection: The Tenth Anniversary of the 1996 Marshall Thundering Herd Football National Championship Season" was written by Dave Wilson, a recent graduate from St. Marys, W.Va. The script was completed Friday, Nov. 3, 2006.

Each of the Gold Award-winning entries was in the Public Service Announcement category. "Cabell-Wayne Adopt-A-Pet" is an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 1, 2006 through the present time. It was written and produced by Adam Cavalier.

"Intolerance" is an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, April 16, 2007 through the present time, written and produced by Terry Bartley, a senior from Foster, W.Va.

The Honorable Mention Award-winning entry also was in the Public Service Announcement category. "Sleep Deprivation," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, April 30, 2007, through the present time, was written and produced by Alexis Stewart, a senior from Cyclone, W.Va.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best documentary scripts in the country as well as highly regarded radio production of three public service announcements," Bailey said. "The scriptwriting skill honored by the Platinum Award demonstrates the research and storytelling ability of our motivated students. The Gold and Honorable Mention Awards are a tribute to production quality and public service commitment of our broadcast students in competition with professional practitioners."


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Monday November 19, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University announces new major in Japanese language

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has announced the formation of a new major designed to educate students in the Japanese language.   The Japanese major was launched in the 2007 fall term and currently has 22 students enrolled who are declared majors.

"Thanks to leadership of Governor Joe Manchin and the West Virginia Legislature's adoption of Senate Bill 603 in 2005, we now have the flexibility to add a new major like Japanese that prepares our graduates for the global marketplace and responds to the interest of our students," said Marshall University president Stephen J. Kopp.

Plans for a Japanese major have been in the development stages for several years.

"I came on board with Marshall University in August 2006 in preparation for this program," said Dr. Natsuki Anderson, assistant professor of Japanese. "We redesigned the courses which were being offered so that we could offer Japanese as a major and minor."

Anderson said the program, which is in the Department of Modern Languages and under the umbrella of the College of Liberal Arts, is experiencing tremendous growth because of an interest in the Japanese culture largely due to film and video.   She said she advises students who are interested in the Japanese language major to combine their interest with another field of study in order to be more marketable.

"I encourage students to double-major because language is a tool that is used to do something else," Anderson said.  "Many of our students are combining their Japanese major with information technology, education and business.  This prepares them for careers in many different fields."

A variety of avenues are available for native English speakers with training in Japanese, Anderson said.  She said she is aware of opportunities for her students ranging from government-sponsored teaching positions located in Japan to Japanese companies located in West Virginia. 

For more information, contact Anderson at (304) 696-3543 or by e-mail at andersonn@marshall.edu.


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Thursday November 15, 2007
Contact: Jim Nelson, College & Media Relations Director, Bluefield State College, (304) 327-4103

Higher Education open house set for Saturday, Nov. 17

ATHENS, W.Va. - An open house will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 at the Erma Byrd Higher Education Center, located at 300 University Dr. in Beaver, W.Va., according to the advisory board for the center.

Marshall University will be among the members of the Erma Byrd Center Advisory Board and institutions that will participate in the open house. Others are Bluefield State College, Concord University, New River Community and Technical College, Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College, and the Community and Technical College at WVU Institute of Technology.

Prospective students are encouraged to attend to tour the facility and meet representatives from the participating public institutions.

"We're excited about the synergy that's evident at Erma Byrd Higher Education Center," said Dr. Albert Walker, president of Bluefield State College. "Several public colleges and universities have come together in a 'higher education mall' arrangement, permitting students to access tremendous educational opportunities - opportunities that are much more diverse than could be offered by any single institution in the region.  The 'one-stop shop' approach permits each institution to collaborate and enhance operating efficiencies, maximizing our collective ability to meet the needs of students and industry."

Dr. Bill O'Brien, Concord University Director of the Beckley Center, said the Erma Byrd Center brings to the Beckley area the very best in public higher education - in quality, in cutting-edge technology, and in cost. 

"This open house gives us all a first shot at showing off what we can do here," O'Brien said. "We hope that prospective students and parents will attend.  But we want especially to appeal to adults in the region, those who've wanted to give college a try but never made that first move."

According to Dr. Ted Spring, president of New River Community and Technical College,  students attending a community college program at the Erma Byrd Center can learn skills and earn certificates and/or degrees that lead to employment or can transfer their two-year associate degree coursework from a community college to a four-year institution. 

Enrollment at New River has increased by 33 percent in part, Spring believes, to New River's participation at the Higher Education Center.

###


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Tuesday November 13, 2007
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

Two Marshall University business faculty awarded Kermit McGinnis professorships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two professors in the Marshall University Lewis College of Business were awarded Kermit McGinnis Professorships Monday during a reception at the home of Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

Dr. Deanna Mader, professor of marketing, and Dr. Harlan Smith, professor of economics, were recognized for their contributions to both the university and community. Both have taught at Marshall for 16 years.  Mader is best known for her work with student groups consulting in the area of hands-on marketing.

"Her students have worked with local businesses, car dealerships in particular, to hone their marketing skills," said Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of the Lewis College of Business. "She has brought quite a bit of favorable notice to the college and the university."

Smith is best known for his service work, most notably in the area of assurance of learning, which was critical in the business school's accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

"His hard work was vital in our accreditation process," Uselding said. "We couldn't have done it without his commitment to the university and our college."

The professorships are named in honor of Kermit McGinnis, past CEO of Huntington Federal Savings Bank, the successor to Huntington Federal Savings and Loan Association. McGinnis is a Marshall alumnus known for being one of the youngest presidents of any financial institution in the United States. He currently is chairman of the board of Huntington Federal Savings Bank, and has been with the bank for 59 years.

McGinnis, who has been a member of several civic and social boards, was inducted into Marshall's Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame in 2000.

The professorships were made possible by a gift to the Marshall University Foundation by Huntington Federal Savings Bank in honor of McGinnis. Both Mader and Smith will receive stipends to supplement their salaries during the next several academic years.


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Monday November 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students receive five CBI National Student Production Awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received one first-place award and four finalist awards at the 86th annual National College Media Convention/2007 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony.

The event took place late last month in the Jefferson Room at the Hilton Washington Hotel in Washington, D.C.

"The students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

Bailey said the contest, which is in its sixth year, is sponsored by CBI, which administers the contest in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization.

"I am proud of our broadcasting students who continue to provide quality broadcast performances to Tri-State listeners and to be excellent representatives for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University in competitions against nationally known colleges and universities," Bailey said.

The first-place award-winning entry was in the Best Radio News Reporting category. "Hollywood Comes to Huntington" was written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a recent master's graduate from McConnell, W.Va. It was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006.

The finalist award-winning entries were:

Best Radio Sports Play-By-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus Tulane University football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington, W. Va., Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006. Students calling the game were football play-by-play announcer Alex Reed, a recent master's graduate from Virginia Beach, Va.; color commentator Dave Wilson, a recent graduate from St. Marys, W.Va., and Melanie Chapman, who was the sideline reporter.

Best Radio Public Service Announcement: "Intolerance," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, April 16, 2007 through the present time, written and produced by Terry Bartley, a senior from Foster, W.Va.

Best Radio Promotion: "Eighty-eight Hours on 88.1," an on-air promotional event to highlight WMUL-FM's format changes.  The music-announcing marathon was broadcast three days, 16 hours, from Tuesday, Aug. 29 through Friday, Sept. 1, 2006.  The feat was accomplished by Terry Bartley.

Best Radio Newscast:  "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007. The students who participated in the newscast were producer Ryan Vance, a junior from Culloden, W.Va.; news anchor Melanie Chapman; news anchor Deven Swartz, a senior from Phillipi, W.Va.; and sports anchor Bobby Iddings, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.

In all, 445 entries were submitted for judging in the 2007 CBI National Student Production Awards, Bailey said.


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Monday November 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU seniors to conduct public forum on local economic development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University seniors from Political Science and International Affairs are conducting a public forum on economic development in the Huntington area.

The forum takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Guest speakers include West Virginia Del. Kelli Sobonya (R-Cabell), Cabell County Commissioner Bob Bailey, Huntington Mayor David Felinton, John Mendez from the Coalition for the Homeless and Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp.

The forum will begin at 6 p.m. with a social hour that includes light refreshments and the opportunity for those attending to view presentations by different groups of students on issues pertaining to economic development in the area, including tourism, demographics and The Old Main Corridor Project.

The portion of the program featuring guest speakers will begin at 7 p.m. An open question-and-answer time for all speakers will start at 8:15 p.m.

The seniors are conducting the forum as part of their capstone experience. Dr. Robert Behrman and Dr. George Davis of the Political Science Department are teaching the capstone class.

For more information, contact Dustin Burgess at (304) 617-3552 or Mikaela Perry at (304) 633-7011.


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Friday November 9, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Annual memorial service honors victims of 1970 plane crash

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The annual memorial service honoring the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash, including football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five, will be conducted on Wednesday, Nov. 14 on the Huntington campus.

The service, presented by Marshall's Student Government Association, begins at noon on the Memorial Student Center plaza. In addition to SGA President Dominique Elmore, who will welcome those attending, speakers include Teddy Kluemper, a 2002 Marshall graduate and Marshall University Alumni Association board member, Marshall football Coach Mark Snyder, President Stephen J. Kopp and Parker Ward, whose father died in the crash.

The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970 occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Marshall plays East Carolina at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"The SGA is honored to continue the important tradition of publicly remembering those who lost their lives in the crash," Elmore said. "Even though it has been 37 years, the families of the victims and many, many people in the Marshall community still hurt, and still wonder why this happened. As we have said numerous times, we will never, ever forget those who were taken from us far too early in this tragic event."

The service will conclude with the traditional placing of memorial wreaths at the Memorial Fountain. Snyder, Elmore, the Thundering Herd football captains and the Ceredo Fire Department Honor Guard will participate. Team captains include Bernard Morris, Albert McClelland, Doug Legursky, Cody Slate, Ian Hoskins, Brian Shope and Maurice Kitchens.

The fountain, which was installed on the plaza 35 years ago, will be silenced after the laying of the wreaths. It will remain silent until next spring.


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Friday November 9, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Harmony Institute Auction rescheduled for Nov. 17 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A live auction to benefit the Harmony Institute at Marshall University will take place at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 in the Alumni Lounge on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

The event, now labeled the Marshall University Harmony Institute Holiday Auction, was rescheduled from Friday, Sept. 7 because of a conflict with activities involving the Marshall-West Virginia University football game.

The silent portion of the auction was conducted in September, but at least 95 percent of the original items remain to be auctioned, according to Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs and interim vice president of Multicultural Affairs at MU.

"This is a do-not-miss event," Cooley said. "Some wonderful, wonderful items will be auctioned. We have sports items signed by Randy Moss of the New England Patriots. We have a range of collectibles, including gorgeous art pieces, antiques and glass pieces of high value. The auction will be the perfect opportunity to shop for the holidays and buy gifts you might normally not be able to get. There are a lot of unique things you cannot buy in a store."

The purpose of the Harmony Institute Auction is to raise funds to sustain the Institute's mission, goals and initiatives. A similar auction in 1998 raised $25,000, and the goal for this year's event is to raise $50,000. State Treasurer John D. Perdue will be the auctioneer.

The Harmony Institute has worked for years to promote respect for, and an appreciation of, human and civil rights, social justice and racial harmony across Marshall University  and the tri-state region. Proceeds from the auction will be used for that purpose.

The Institute, which was established in 1997, has sponsored many special events and exhibits throughout its first decade, such as theatre and music performances, lectures, conferences and symposiums.

Among the many other items to be auctioned are sports memorabilia, such as a basketball signed by former University of Kentucky coach Tubby Smith; basketballs signed by members of Huntington High School's 2007 championship basketball team; HHS jerseys signed by former players Patrick Patterson and O.J. Mayo; autographed NFL jerseys from former Marshall greats Chad Pennington and Byron Leftwich; a football signed by former Marshall football coaches Jim Donnan and Red Dawson, and a football signed by Indianapolis Colts Coach Tony Dungy.

Some of the items are WVU-related, since the auction originally was scheduled during the week of the Marshall-WVU game. Those items include an autographed basketball by Jerry West, a Jerry West bobblehead, a West Virginia University Blenko Glass vase, a football signed by Mountaineers Coach Rich Rodriguez and a basketball signed by WVU Coach Bob Huggins.

Admission to the auction is free. However, food and drinks will be provided for a $25 donation.

For more information, contact Feon Smith with Marshall University Multicultural Affairs at (304) 696-4637.


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Friday November 9, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Society of Yeager Scholars to increase next class by one student

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars will increase the size of its next incoming class by one scholar, bringing the total number of incoming 2008 freshman scholars to 12.

John Kinzer, chairman of the program's finance committee, reported during the October board of directors meeting that through fund-raising success in building the program's endowments, and with the interest earned on these funds, the Society of Yeager Scholars is in the position to increase the size of its class of 2012 from 11 to 12.

Grant Rice, chairman of the program's development committee, said the significant increase in donations to the Yeager Scholars program - $1 million over the past 18 months - contributed to the increase in scholars. For the past several years, the program accepted 11 freshmen per year.

The cost to support one Yeager Scholar for the four-year undergraduate honors program is $85,000.

Sharon Davis Shaffer of Columbus, Ohio, a member of the Society of Yeager Scholars board of directors, Yeager Scholar alumna and member of the Yeager Alumni Homecoming Committee, said support of the program was evident when 65 Yeager Scholars and their spouses attended Marshall's recent homecoming activities.

"Their contributions are a new revenue stream for the SYS program and are part of the reason for the financial success that allows the addition of a 12th scholar," Shaffer said.

The mission of the Society of Yeager Scholars is to seek out and attract to Marshall University a diverse and talented group of students with outstanding leadership potential.

The Society provides these students a learning environment which will foster that leadership potential and graduate the next generation of leaders with, as its namesake, Brig. Gen. (ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, would say, "the right stuff" to make a difference in the world.  The Society of Yeager Scholars is in its 21st year.

For additional information regarding the Society of Yeager Scholars, call Bob Galardi, the program's director of major gifts, at (304) 696-3336.


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Thursday November 8, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Seventy-five students to take part in Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 75 high school students from West Virginia and metro area schools in Kentucky and Ohio will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday and Saturday, Nov. 9-10, to participate in the 21st annual Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend.

Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, which is sponsoring the event, said the special weekend attracts gifted black high school students and showcases campus life and the academic environment at Marshall.

"Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend is a wonderful experience for these young men and women visiting our campus," Cooley said. "Each student gets thoroughly introduced to the Marshall experience. They even stay on campus with Marshall students who have volunteered to host them in their residence halls.

"This annual affair ultimately results in the most academically promising African American students in our region choosing Marshall University as their environment to learn and enrich their lives. Most of these students, upon enrollment, also enter the prestigious MU Society of Black Scholars, which has continual avenues for enrichment and growth."

Students and parents participate in educational forums and campus tours, meet college deans and attend informational panels composed of faculty and staff representing the Marshall University community.

High schools participate in the special weekend by nominating African American juniors and seniors with GPA's of 3.0 or above for the Outstanding Black High School Students recognition.

In addition to the 75 students and their parents, another 22 students from the Duke Ellington School of the Arts in Washington, D.C., will arrive on campus tonight and then take part in activities planned with the College of Fine Arts. They also will participate in some of the Outstanding Black High School Students' Weekend activities, and attend a banquet at 6 p.m. Friday in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

For more information, contact Cooley at (304) 696-5430.


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Wednesday November 7, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Graduation Celebration' set for Nov. 12-13 for December, summer '07 graduates

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A "Graduation Celebration," designed to assist December and summer 2007 graduates of Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College in communicating with campus administrative offices in a central location, will take place Nov. 12 and 13 on MU's Huntington campus.

Marshall Registrar Roberta Ferguson said the celebration is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 12, and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13. It will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. All tentative December graduates, as well as summer 2007 graduates, are invited to participate.  

Ferguson said the first-time event will give students the opportunity to purchase announcements, diploma frames, class rings and other items to commemorate their graduation.

Representatives from the Office of the Registrar, the Marshall Community and Technical College, the Marshall Bookstore, Jostens, Alumni Relations, the MU Graduate College, Career Services, the Office of the Bursar and Financial Aid will be available to assist those attending.

"We encourage all tentative December graduates to attend the 'Graduation Celebration,' not only to take advantage of the many services available, but to confirm graduation status, validate name format for their diplomas, and verify diploma mailing addresses," Ferguson said. "Additionally, participants will have an opportunity to learn more about the May (2008) commencement ceremony. From ordering class rings to inquiring about student loan consolidation programs, this event will have something for everyone."

For more information, call the Office of the Registrar at (304) 696-6410.


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Wednesday November 7, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Open house planned Saturday at Recruitment and Welcome Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University and Huntington communities are invited to visit Marshall's new Recruitment and Welcome Center during an open house from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10.

The center, located at 1601 5th Ave., is the former home of Marshall's chapter of Alpha Chi Omega sorority.

"We are extremely excited to be operating from the new Recruitment and Welcome Center," said Jean Gilman, director of Marshall's Office of Recruitment. "This is a wonderful 'front door' for our prospective students and families.  We welcome everyone to stop in and see the new Recruitment and Welcome Center."

Light refreshments will be served during the open house.


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Tuesday November 6, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Writer Tom Bailey to read from his work Nov. 15 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Tom Bailey will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Bailey, who grew up in West Virginia and attended Marshall, has been widely recognized for his work.  His recent novel, The Grace That Keeps This World, has been praised in Publisher's Weekly as an accomplished novel with "the validity of deeply felt truths." His new novel is Cotton Song, called "graceful and fluid" by the Washington Post.  He also is the author of a collection of short stories, Crow Man, as well as non-fiction works including A Short Story Writer's Companion.

Widely published in literary journals and magazines, including Double Take, his fiction has been reprinted in such anthologies as The Pushcart Prizes and New Stories From the South and cited in The Best American Short Stories. He received a Newhouse Award from the John Gardner Foundation and was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Fiction.

Bailey teaches in the creative writing program at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department, the College of Liberal Arts, the Graduate College and the Office of Academic Affairs.  It is free to the public.

For more information, call Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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Tuesday November 6, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Two Marshall seniors win Political Science awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University seniors have been awarded the Claude J. Davis Award, given annually by the West Virginia Political Science Association for the best undergraduate paper written in a political science course.

Joshua Lynn, a Yeager Scholar with a double major in political science and history, and Paul Turner, an honors student majoring in philosophy, received the awards at the group's annual convention last month at West Virginia Wesleyan College.

Lynn and Turner, both undergraduates, won the award for papers written in a graduate-level research class taught by Marshall faculty member Dr. Jamie Warner, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Political Science. Warner said she invited Lynn and Turner to take the graduate course.

Students in the class studied the work of Jrgen Habermas, a German philosopher who gained fame as a sociologist for his work in the public sphere.  Habermas has taught and written extensively about social and political theory.

Warner assigned the students to study Habermas' The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, as well as other literature supporting and critiquing Habermas' claims.  The object of the study, she says, was to encourage students to think critically and gather "real world" data, and then write a conference-level paper on their findings. 

"I didn't want them to do a strictly theoretical paper," Warner says.  "The paper had to be anchored in Habermas and they had to use Habermas to analyze, describe or critique something in the 'real world.' "

Lynn's and Turner's papers were so promising they presented their research at the Midwest Political Science Association's annual meeting last spring.

"That's quite a feat for undergraduate-level students," Warner said.

Lynn plans to attend graduate school to work on his Ph.D. in history. Turner intends to pursue a Ph.D. in philosophy.

For more information on the awards, contact Warner at (304) 696-2761.


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Monday November 5, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Honoring of Mary and Churchill Hodges among special events this week involving Marshall University Libraries

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two events and one honor involving the Marshall University Libraries are making news this week.

Here is a brief look at each event or accomplishment:

Mary and Churchill Hodges to be honored: The Marshall University Foundation, Inc. is hosting a High Tea in honor of Huntington natives Mary and Churchill Hodges from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in the third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The High Tea will celebrate a recent gift of $15,000 from the Hodges to the Marshall University Libraries in the form of an endowed fund known as the Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges Library Endowment.

The Library Endowment will benefit the Library Associates' fund, which is used to supplement the libraries' book and journal budget and to provide book- and author-related social and cultural opportunities for the Tri-State region.  This annual giving fund will now have added stability because earnings from the endowment will boost the fund on a regular basis.

The Hodges are long-standing major contributors to Marshall University. Their generosity has supported many areas including the academic and athletic scholarships, including the J. Churchill Hodges Summer Scholars, the library, the Geography Department GIS Laboratory, the President's home and the Erickson Alumni Center.

The Hodges' contributions to science were recently honored and recognized with the naming of the Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges Biotechnology Capstone Research Laboratory in the new Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

The Hodges are natives of Huntington and are Marshall alumni. Mary attended Marshall in 1950 and 1951, and Churchill earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1948 and Master of Arts in 1953.

For more information about the Mary H. and J. Churchill Hodges Library Endowment, contact Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall University Libraries, at (304) 696-2318.

Marshall Libraries to unveil restored centennial mural panels: Restoration of the final two panels of the mural painted during the celebration of the Marshall University Centennial in 1937 by MU faculty member Marion Vest Fors is complete and the panels are ready to be unveiled, according to the Marshall University Library Associates.

A reception to celebrate the unveiling will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11 in the Hoffman Conference Room, which is located on the second floor of the Morrow Library on the Huntington campus.

The three murals were dedicated and hung in the reading room of the Morrow Library in 1937 during Marshall's centennial celebration.  The three panels, chronicling Marshall and West Virginia history, are entitled Marshall University, West Virginia Literature and American Literature

The paintings were removed and placed into storage during a renovation of the Morrow building in the 1960s. Although the paintings were in safe cold storage, it was discovered by library staff that they had deteriorated somewhat. This prompted the need for a comprehensive restoration of the panels. 

The first of the three panels was restored and unveiled to the public in May 2005, with Mrs. Helen Chambers Hensley (model for the Marshall University Alma Mater) in attendance.

Mrs. Hensley also plans to attend the Nov. 11 unveiling, as do Mrs. Fors' two children, Jack Fors and Peggy Fors Grimes. Fine Arts Conservator Michael Ruzga, who completed the delicate restoration work, also is scheduled to attend. 

Parking will be available on the 3rd Avenue parking lot directly across from the Morrow Library, and a golf cart will be provided to transport guests with mobility problems to the Morrow Library building.

For more information, contact Winters at (304) 696-2318.

Patsy Stephenson receives award: Patsy Stephenson, a library associate with the Marshall University Libraries, was awarded the West Virginia Library Association (WVLA) Certificate of Merit for 2007, according to Winters.

Stephenson, a 25-year Marshall library employee, received the award at the WVLA's Fall Conference in October at the Lakeview Country Club in Morgantown. Winters said Stephenson was given the award in honor of her hard work with WVLA marketing efforts.

"One of the highlights of each WVLA conference is the recognition of constructive accomplishments and meritorious achievement of groups and individuals in West Virginia library service," Winters said. "We at Marshall University Libraries are proud that Patsy Stephenson was chosen by the WVLA Resolutions and Awards Committee to receive her Certificate of Merit, given in recognition of her longstanding efforts to market WVLA services and messages to libraries in communities across West Virginia."

Linda Blake, Electronic Journals Coordinator at West Virginia University, nominated Stephenson for the award. 

Stephenson began working full time at Marshall in April 1982 at the circulation desk, and in 1984 joined the cataloging staff where she serves today. She graduated from Marshall in May 2007 with a Regents Bachelor of Arts degree. Stephenson plans to continue her education, and wants to pursue a degree in Library and Informational Sciences online.

Stephenson began working with the West Virginia Library Association in 1999 and started working with the WVLA Marketing Committee in 2000. 

As a member of the WVLA Marketing Committee, Stephenson travels throughout West Virginia selling items for WVLA to help support conference speakers and workshops. 

"Being a part of the West Virginia Library Association has encouraged me to be stronger in self confidence, and I've met and worked with library professionals from all over West Virginia," Stephenson said.  "Working with the WVLA has given me a strong understanding of the importance of libraries and the people who are dedicated to the enhancement of education. It is awesome to be apart of this working group of people."


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Monday November 5, 2007
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Marshall University professor Dr. Frank S. Gilliam publishes paper in top biological sciences journal

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A paper written by Dr. Frank S. Gilliam, a professor in Marshall University's College of Science, is published in the November issue of the journal BioScience, one of the leading peer-reviewed journals in the biological sciences.

The paper, entitled "The ecological significance of the herbaceous layer in temperate forest ecosystems," is a synthesis of the research done by plant ecologists primarily in the eastern United States on the plant communities that occupy the lowest layer of forest vegetation.

"When you are walking in the woods and look up, you see what we call the overstory," Gilliam said. "When you look down, you see what we call the herbaceous, or herb, layer."

Because species diversity is highest in the herb layer among all forest strata, forest biodiversity is largely a function of the herb layer community, Gilliam concludes in his article.  Indeed, by reviewing numerous studies in the ecological literature he found that 80 to 90 percent of the plant biodiversity of an average forest is found in the herb layer, despite the fact that its biomass is less than one percent of the trees.

Because the herb layer responds sensitively to disturbance, understanding herb layer ecology can provide important information regarding site characteristics of forests, including patterns of past land-use practices.  Gilliam concludes in his article that the herbaceous layer has an importance to forests that belies its diminutive stature.

BioScience has a circulation of more than 6,000, including libraries of research universities around the world.  Based on scientific impact, it is ranked sixth in its category.  Gilliam's is the first article to appear in this journal by a Marshall University professor.

Gilliam is author of two books, the more recent of which was published by Oxford University Press on the topic of herb layer ecology.  He is the author of 40 peer-reviewed papers and 18 book chapters. Gilliam is on the faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences and can be reached via e-mail at gilliam@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 2, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU grad from Iran who founded medical services company to make presentation Monday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Shahin Mafi, a Marshall University graduate and founder of Home Health Connection, Inc. (HHC), a medical services company in the Washington, D.C., area, will give a presentation Monday, Nov. 5 at Marshall as part of the Ruth Butler Executive in Residence Program.

Mafi, a native of Tehran, Iran, will speak at 11 a.m. in the Alumni Lounge, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. She will show two short films as part of her presentation, and a question-and-answer session will follow. The event is free to the public.

"Shahin Mafi's presentation is a wonderful opportunity for all Marshall students and faculty to learn about the success of one of our alums," said Dr. Lorraine P. Anderson, associate dean of Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

"Ms. Mafi's story has a broad appeal to the entire campus," Anderson said. "As a person who came to the United States and learned to speak English living in our dorms, Ms. Mafi went on to become a highly successful female entrepreneur.  Today she embodies the concept of giving back to her community through the time she devotes to many nonprofit organizations."

HHC was incorporated in 1992 with a focus on therapy services in the home. Its first office was located in Chevy Chase, Md., and the company has since expanded to Baltimore, Md., and Alexandria, Va. HHC's focus has shifted to private duty nursing for children with longstanding and complex medical problems, although providing adult care still remains an important part of its services.

Mafi recently created The AZAR Foundation for Children of the World, the goal of which is to fight teenage pregnancy. All proceeds from the foundation benefit mothers and babies.

Mafi earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Advance Institute of Accounting in Tehran. She then came to the United States and earned an MBA in Business Administration from Marshall. She earned another degree, equivalent to a Master's in Management Information Systems, from a university in Paris.

Mafi is a natural born artist, and has a passion for interior design.  She designed her own home interior, and often gives tours of her home.  She enjoys painting portraits in her spare time as well.

Marshall's Executive in Residence Program was created in 1984 by Dr. Robert P. Alexander, then dean of the Lewis College of Business, with the purpose of providing students with the opportunity to hear and interact with successful business executives.

The program provides role models with outstanding business experience related to students through lectures, discussions and informal dialogue.

For more information on Mafi's visit, contact Anderson at (304) 696-2611.


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Friday November 2, 2007
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Mullen joins College of Information Technology and Engineering as director of development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sara Mullen, a West Virginia native, recently returned to the state to serve as the new director of development for Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE).

Mullen will focus primarily on fundraising, strategic planning and counsel, media relations and marketing for both the Marshall University Foundation Inc. and the college. She will work closely with CITE Interim Dean Dr. Tony Szwilski and Lance West, vice president for major gift development, to identify key areas of need.

One of Mullen's main priorities will be securing additional funds and support for the new engineering laboratory, a 16,000-square-foot building currently under construction on the Huntington campus. The new facility will be state of the art and give students valuable hands on experience.

"This is an exciting time for Marshall and CITE as we work together to expand and enhance our educational opportunities," Mullen said. "I will be working closely with leadership, alumni and students to ensure our young people have the best programs and facilities from which to learn and develop as leaders."

West said Mullen's previous experience will be a valuable asset in her new role. A graduate of William Woods University with a bachelor's degree in marketing, she brings more than 15 years of experience to Marshall. Her professional career includes fundraising and more than 10 years in state government - as an assistant to the Missouri state treasurer, legislative aide and lobbyist.

"Her experience working with legislators, public officials and citizens in state government provides her with a unique perspective to the growing need for fundraising," West said. "She's an effective communicator, a creative problem solver and, frankly, she won't hesitate to roll up her own sleeves to get the job done."

Szwilski said the impact of the college on the state and surrounding region will increase significantly with the increased numbers of students enrolling at the college and contributions from outstanding faculty. The combination of the intelligent, experienced teaching staff with smart, eager and talented students will allow Marshall University to continue contributing at a greater level to the state.

"The future of West Virginia - everything from infrastructure to economic development - is dependent upon individuals with specialized skills in engineering and technology," Szwilski said. "We're dedicated to providing our students with a solid foundation from which to grow and contribute in the future."

Mullen can be reached by calling (304) 696-3438 or via e-mail at mullenmccoy@marshall.edu.


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Thursday November 1, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cooley named interim VP for Multicultural Affairs at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Maurice R. Cooley, Director of the Center for African American Students Programs at Marshall University since January 2003, has been named interim Vice President for Multicultural Affairs at MU, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Cooley, a two-time Marshall graduate, replaces Dr. Betty Cleckley, who retired in October. Cooley, who assumed his duties on Wednesday, Oct. 31, remains as Director of the Center for African American Students Programs while serving as interim VP for Multicultural Affairs.

"It is a worthy recognition and honor to be considered for the position of interim Vice President for Multicultural Affairs for such a prestigious and growing university," Cooley said. "I also am grateful to walk in the footsteps of the former vice president, Dr. Betty Cleckley."

Cooley said he plans soon to closely examine the goals and vision of Multicultural Affairs for the year ahead, then evaluate whether certain areas will warrant some modification.

"There is great work that must continue to be done in both areas," he said. "We will work diligently."

The search for a permanent Vice President for Multicultural Affairs already has begun. Steve Hensley, Marshall's Dean of Student Affairs, is chair of a 10-person search committee that he said is sifting through the process of reviewing applications. Cooley is a member of the search committee.

"There are some very well-qualified folks," Hensley said. "We anticipate concluding the screening process by around mid-November, and we hope to start interviewing candidates on campus by the second week of December. When they come to campus, there will be an opportunity for every constituency to meet with them."

Before coming to Marshall, Cooley had been Director of Marketing and Corporate Development at Prestera Center for Mental Health Services, Inc., in Huntington since July 1996.

From April 1986 to July 1996, Cooley was Program Director for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Community Support Services at Prestera. Before that, he was Clinician and Supervisor of Emergency and Diagnostic Services at Prestera from May 1977 to April 1986.

Cooley graduated from Marshall with a bachelor's degree in Sociology in 1970, then served three years active duty in the U.S. Army as a psychology specialist. He returned to Marshall and earned his Master of Arts degree in Counseling in 1975.

Cooley is a native of Lewisburg, W.Va., in Greenbrier County, and is a 1966 graduate of Lewisburg High School. He and his wife, Deborah, have two children, McKenzie, 15, and Luke, 12.


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Thursday November 1, 2007
Contact: Leah Tolliver, Marshall University Women's Center, (304) 696-3338

Cast auditions for 'The Vagina Monologues' set for Nov. 6-7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Cast auditions for the spring 2008 performance of "The Vagina Monologues" will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 6 and 7 in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. The spring performance is scheduled Feb. 15 and 16, 2008.

Auditions will take place in room 2W22 on Nov. 6 and in room 2W16 on Nov. 7. Women of all backgrounds are invited to audition. No acting experience is required and monologues will be provided.

The benefit production of "The Vagina Monologues" is a college campaign that empowers women to find their collective voice and demand an end to the epidemic levels of violence and abuse on their campuses, in their communities and around the world. The proceeds from these events are donated directly to local organizations in the community that are working to stop violence.

The Marshall University Women's Center and the MU Women's Studies Program are sponsoring the production.

"Nationally this is the 10th anniversary of the V-Day college campaign and our sixth year doing this powerful event," said Leah Tolliver, Marshall University Women's Center director. "We are looking forward to another outstanding response from Marshall and our surrounding community."

For more information, contact the Women's Center at (304) 696-3338 or wcenter@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 31, 2007
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Marshall University professor Dr. Ashok Vaseashta to co-chair international symposium on pollution prevention

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ashok Vaseashta, a professor in Marshall University's College of Science, will join Dr. Jurgen Schulte, executive director of the Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum (APNF), as co-chair of an International Symposium on Nanotechnology in Environmental Protection and Pollution Dec. 11-13 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

This is the first time the APNF will host the event in the United States. Several world-renowned scientists, politicians and key stakeholders will attend, and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will be one of the keynote speakers.

Vaseashta said the primary objective of the event is to help advance the emerging field of nanotechnology in the areas of environmental pollution protection and remediation. Vaseashta, one of the key advocates of "green" nanotechnology, said that although correlation between environmental pollution and global warming is debatable, the effects of pollution and its impact on human health are irrefutable and highly observable.

"Long-term exposure to air pollution provokes inflammation, accelerates atherosclerosis, and alters cardiac function," Vaseashta said. "These illnesses are further magnified for people suffering from diabetes, chronic pulmonary diseases and inflammatory diseases. In most large metropolitan cities, about one-third of population suffers from pollution-related illnesses."

Citing a quote from the World Energy Congress (WEC), he said that if the world continues to use fossil fuels at the current rate, the damage from environmental pollution in 2025 will reach a "point of no return."

According to the American Lung Association (ALA), Charleston, W.Va., ranks 20th in U.S. metropolitan areas most polluted by year-round particle pollution. "One of the objectives of this research is to gather enough data to convince the policymakers to implement changes to reduce pollution sooner rather than later," Vaseashta said. "Even a small difference in discharge of pollutants will improve quality of life for thousands of people." Participants in the symposium will discuss [learn] the future effects of the fate and transport of pollutants in the atmosphere, soil and water streams, Vaseashta said.

In the past several years, Vaseashta has delivered several invited and keynote lectures worldwide promoting education highlighting the adverse effects of pollution and how these nanodimensional materials can help mitigate the problem and also reduce our carbon footprint. At a recent American Physical Society meeting, Professor Richard Zallen, a world renowned physicist, commented on Vaseashta's work as a "worthwhile cause that will help our children and our children's children."

Vaseashta is a much sought-after lecturer and speaker at meetings worldwide. He is the lead editor and author of two books on nanotechnology (Springer, 2005, 2008) and has authored several research publications. Vaseashta is on detail to the U.S. Government but may be contacted by e-mail at prof.vaseashta@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday October 30, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

44th annual International Festival, other events planned for International Education Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four events, including the 44th annual International Festival, are planned leading up to and during International Education Week Nov. 11-16 at Marshall University, Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs, announced today.

International Education Week is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of State to promote international awareness and international education. 

Marshall has 433 international students from 64 countries, which is a five percent increase over the fall 2006 enrollment, and almost double the number of international students at MU since 2000.

Here are events planned for International Education Week at Marshall:

  • 44th annual International Festival: 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. The International Festival, with a theme this year of "Living in a Global Society," features exotic foods, traditional music and dance and displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures. Egnor said the festival emphasizes the pressing need for universities in the United States to prepare their students to live and work in a globalized world. The festival is open to the public and admission is free.
     
  • Festival of Flags: More than 60 flags will be on display throughout November in the Memorial Student Center, Drinko Library and other buildings throughout the Huntington campus. The flags represent all of the countries and regions from where Marshall University draws international students or sends students to study abroad.  
     
  • 4th annual Study Abroad Expo: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13 in the Memorial Student Center lobby. Applying for a passport is one of the many things visitors will be able to do at the Study Abroad Expo. More than 20 study abroad providers are expected to take part in the fair.  MU students and faculty will have the opportunity to discuss the programs directly with the providers, apply for a passport and get assistance with immunizations.   One $250 travel certificate, two $500 study abroad scholarships and other prizes will be given away at the fair.
     
  • "Internationalizing the Curriculum: A panel of recipients of the international innovation grants:" Wednesday, Nov. 14. Faculty members will discuss the creative ways they are internationalizing the curriculum at Marshall with grants they received from the Center for International Programs and the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning. Panel members are Dr. Laura Wyant, Dr. Carlos Lopez, Dr. Michael Newsome, Dr. Charles Hossler and Dr. Shortie McKinney. The presentation will take place from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Marco's in the Student Center basement.

For more information on International Education Week events at Marshall, contact Egnor at (304) 696-2465, or via e-mail at egnor3@marshall.edu.


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Saturday October 27, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Psychology Awareness Week Starts Oct. 29

Marshall University's annual Psychology Awareness Week will begin Oct. 29 and continue through Nov. 2 this year. Included are 22 lectures and workshops, a silent auction nd a Halloween party for psychology majors. 

Faculty, graduate students, and community professionals will speak on a variety of topics to provide information about the psychology department at Marshall, to give students information on graduate school and careers in psychology, and to provide resources that help the community maintain good mental health.

The times vary (see full schedule below), but all talks will be given in the Memorial Student Center, in room 2W22 Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and room 2W37 on Thursday. All presentations are free and open to the public.

Bidding on silent auction items begins at 8a.m. Monday  and closes at noon on Friday.  Items available in the auction include an original painting by a local artist, baked goods, handmade jewelry, various "Night-on-the-Town" packages, gift certificates to local businesses and others. 

Interested individuals should register to bid in front of the psychology department office on the third floor of Harris Hall on the Huntington campus, where auction item descriptions and bidding sheets can be found.  Items will be awarded to the highest registered bidder and all proceeds will help establish a yearly scholarship to support psychology students and their research.

As part of the Psychology Awareness Week festivities, there will be a Halloween Costume Party for psychology majors on Wednesday   from 4 to 6 p.m. on the 2nd floor of Harris Hall in room 230.

The annual event is sponsored by Psi Chi, the Psychology honor society, and the Psychology Club. 

Following is a list of the presentations:

Monday, Oct. 29
10 a.m.: "Neurobiological constituents of flexible coping and resiliency" by Dr. Massimo Bardi
11 a.m.: "Graduate Training in Professional Psychology: Clinical, Counseling, School, etc." by Dr. Marty Amerikaner
Noon: "Domestic Violence 101" by Staff at Branches Domestic Violence Shelter
1 p.m.:  "Unraveling the mysteries of grant writing for undergraduates and graduate students" by Okey Napier
2 p.m.: "Clinical Master's Program" by Steve Fink
3 p.m.: "Working with the LGBT Population" by Doug Evans

Tuesday, Oct. 30
11 a.m.: "Psi Chi and What it has to Offer" by Chris Crytzer and Kristina Isaacs
Noon:  "Stereotypical Images of Appalachian women on the web" by Connie Zirkle
1 p.m.: "The Masters Program in Psychology at Marshall University" by Dr. Steven Mewalt

Wednesday, Oct. 31
10 a.m.: "How your mind affects your body" by Dr. Tom Ellis
11 a.m.: "Tips and Tricks for writing your Statement of Purpose for graduate school" by Dr. Paige Muellerleile
Noon: "The Atlantis Study Abroad Program" by Dr. Joseph Wyatt
1 p.m.: "Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child? Current Perspectives on Punishment" by Dr. Melissa Atkins
2 p.m.: "Surviving Sexual Assault" by Todd Jones with CONTACT
3:00 p.m.: "Counseling Services" by Linda Stockwell

Thursday, Nov. 1
10 a.m.: "Training our Subjective Ways of Knowing: Visualization, Mind Talk and Dreams" by Dr. Pamela Mulder
11 a.m.: "PsyD vs. PhD: Which one is right for you?" by Dr. Keith Beard
Noon: "Preparing for a career in rural mental health: The PsyD Program at Marshall University" by Dr. Mariana Linz
1 p.m.:  "Behavioral Psychology" by Katherine Forsyph with Starlight Behavioral Services
2 p.m.:  "What is it like to work in a Clinical Setting - Panel Discussion" by Sarah Jarvis
3 p.m.:  "Eating Disorders: the Basics You Should Know" by Briana McElfish
5 p.m.: "The Marshall Psychology Clinic" by Emily Selby

For more information about the presentations, contact Dr. Wendy Williams at 696-2779 or williamw@marshall.edu.


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Friday October 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Foundation Announces 'Bridge Campaign'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation today joined university officials, students, athletes and alumni to launch its new campaign, "The Bridge," and to announce three upcoming construction projects on campus.

"The Bridge" is a united fund-raising effort to support academics, athletics and alumni through the building of new facilities. The goal for the campaign is to raise funds to construct the College of Information Technology and Engineering Lab facility, a new women's softball facility and the new Alumni Center and Foundation offices.

"It is an exciting time for Marshall University and the Marshall University Foundation," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation. "The Bridge for the Future will help propel Marshall to a new level in academics, women's athletics and alumni relations with the construction of the three new facilities. In addition The Bridge for the Future will provide a facility which will increase the impact of the University and Foundation advancement team at a time when private funding is quickly becoming the lifeblood of our growing university."

The new Alumni Center and Foundation offices will serve as a home away from home for alumni. The center will also house the staffs of the foundation, Alumni Relations and the Development Office.

The College of Information Technology and Engineering Lab Facility (CITE Lab) is a 16,000-square-foot facility. It will play a critical role in both the education of a new generation of engineers and the accreditation necessary to ensure that Marshall's engineering graduates compete at the highest level.

The new softball complex will upgrade the university's women's softball facilities to make them among the finest in the eastern United States. The program has been very competitive in Conference USA, boasting all-conference players and All-Americans.


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Thursday October 25, 2007
Contact: Denise Hogsett, Director of Career Services, (304) 696-2370

Job interviews, informational seminars coming up at Marshall Career Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The new director of Marshall University's Career Services is seeing a greater range of opportunities opening up for new college graduates, but cautions students and alumni against putting off their job searches.

"Students need to be proactive," said Denise Hogsett. "They can start by coming to us for guidance and to use our resources."

Career Services has several opportunities coming up for students to learn about employment opportunities. Unless otherwise noted, all interviews will take place at the center, located at 1681 5th Ave., on the corner of 5th Ave. and 17th Street. The center is open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays.

  • Nov. 6 - Kroger, a Fortune 500 company, will be seeking managers for its West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky stores. Open to all majors. Career Services Center.
  • Nov. 6-7 -- Appalachian Electric Power's Division of Fuel, Emissions and Logistics will be conducting an informational seminar on Nov. 6 with interviews to follow Nov. 7. They are seeking majors in Earth sciences, mining, biology, geology or petroleum engineering. Career Services Center.
  • Nov. 13-14 -- The Naval Captain of the USS West Virginia will talk to students about the Naval Officer Nuclear and Supply program and the Naval Officer Program. Location TBA.

For more information or to schedule interviews, contact the Marshall Career Services office at (304) 696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday October 23, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall president to give keynote address at statewide conference on international studies

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will be the opening keynote speaker for the annual conference of the West Virginia Consortium for Faculty and Course Development in International Studies (FACDIS), at 11:45 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at the Lakeview Resort & Conference Center, Morgantown, West Virginia.

Approximately 130 professors representing all of the West Virginia institutions of higher education and from more than fifteen different disciplines are expected to attend the two-day conference.

Kopp's speech, entitled "Preparing a West Virginia Citizenry for the Global Economy," is expected to cover current issues and concerns that face West Virginia higher education institutions in the 21st century as they educate their students to live and work in the global environment.

This is the first time a Marshall University president has served as the keynote speaker at a FACDIS conference.

"Since Marshall is one of the founding member institutions of FACDIS," said Dr. David Mills, Assistant Professor of History and Marshall's faculty representative for FACDIS, "I'm pleased that President Kopp supports our faculty's interests in developing the international dimensions of their courses."

FACDIS was founded in 1980 as the result of initiatives by faculty at a number of West Virginia institutions of higher education and a grant from the U.S. Department of Education.  FACDIS is comprised of nearly 400 faculty members and represents all colleges and universities in the state, both public and private.

For more information about FACDIS and the conference schedule, visit http://www.wvu.edu/~facdis/.


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Friday October 19, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Denise Hogsett is new director of Career Services at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Denise Hogsett, a three-time Marshall University graduate, is the university's new director of Career Services, Carla Lapelle, associate dean of Student Affairs, announced today.

Hogsett assumed her duties in August. She came to Marshall following an extensive career in health care, with her most recent experience being in human resources, management and marketing at Huntington Physical Therapy, where she worked for the past 15 years.

She received her undergraduate degree in 1976, her master's in communication disorders in 1977 and her executive MBA in 1995. She is a 1972 graduate of Mullens (W.Va.) High School.

"I had always hoped I would be able to come back and work in the communication disorders department at Marshall," Hogsett said. "That didn't happen, but I am achieving my career goals, which has always been to work at Marshall."

Hogsett said her major focus as Career Services director is connecting students with employers.

"We are here for the students," she said. "We want to make sure that the students know the opportunities that are available. We need to increase utilization of career services, not only for the students, but also for faculty and alumni."

Lapelle said Career Services is a free service to Marshall students and alumni.

"All employers are encouraged to utilize Marshall's Career Services to assist them in finding that exceptional employee," Lapelle said. "Denise is available not only to students but those employers needing assistance with developing a presence on campus."

She said students not only can receive career counseling, but also can attend workshops, presentations, job fairs and on-campus information sessions on job search, career development, resume preparation and interviewing.  Career Services can be contacted by calling (304) 696-2370 or by visiting its Web site at www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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Thursday October 18, 2007
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Former WMUL student claims national finalist award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Melanie Chapman, a former student broadcaster with WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, won a national finalist award in the 2006 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the Radio News Reporting category.

The award was presented during the SPJ National Convention Friday, Oct. 5 at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the former student news director/reporter competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities across the nation representing the SPJ's 12 regions.

"Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student-operated college radio stations," Bailey said. "This recognition for WMUL-FM's former news director Melanie Chapman in SPJ's National Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students."

The national finalist award-winning entry in radio was:

Best News Reporting, Category 19: "We Are Marshall Movie Premiere," written and produced by Melanie Chapman, a recent master's degree graduate from McConnell, W.Va., broadcast during "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006.

Overall, there are 45 categories for print, radio, television and online journalism in the SPJ National Mark of Excellence contest.  There were more than 3,300 entries from schools across SPJ's 12 regions in the Mark of Excellence contest.  SPJ has been presenting the Mark of Excellence Awards since 1972.


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Thursday October 18, 2007
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Thunder into Mason County tailgate party is Oct. 24 at MOVC

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Tri-County Alumni Club of the Marshall University Alumni Association is hosting the sixth annual Thunder into Mason County Tailgate Party next week as part of Marshall's homecoming activities.

The event, which is free to the public, is from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24 on the lawn next to the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant, W.Va.

"This event shows our support for the football team and the university as a whole," MOVC Director Homer Preece said. "It provides a stronger tie among the community, the MOVC and the main campus. After all, we are all Marshall."

Several people from Marshall's Huntington campus are expected to attend. Among those are Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs; Royce Chadwick, head coach of the women's basketball team; Jean Gilman, director of recruitment; and Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations.

Entertainment will be provided by the Wahama High School marching band and Thundering Herd mascot Marco. Food and drinks will be served.

For more information, contact Nancy Pelphrey in Marshall's alumni office at (304) 696-3134 or visit the MOVC Web site at www.marshall.edu/movc.


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Thursday October 18, 2007
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Musicians from University of Brasilia to visit Marshall University next week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A trio of guest musicians from the University of Brasilia, Brazil, are spending a week in Huntington to perform and conduct master classes while on the Huntington campus of Marshall University.

The visit is a result of a recently signed document between Marshall and the University of Brasilia regarding an exchange program for students and faculty, with the goal of establishing a dual degree in music in the future.

Soprano Irene Bentley, composer Dr. Sergio Nogueira Mendes, and pianist/composer Renato Vasconcellos are attending various music department classes in theory, history, and jazz as well as working individually with Marshall music students.

On Friday, Oct. 19 at 8 p.m., Vasconcellos will give a recital in the Smith Music Hall. Also performing that evening will be Dr. Sean Parsons, Marshall music faculty member in jazz studies and piano.

Next week, on Tuesday, Oct. 23, Mendes will give a lecture on the history of Brazilian Music at 2 p.m. in Smith Music Hall.

Bentley, a native of Sao Paulo, graduated from the Federal University of Gois, where she earned both a bachelor's degree in vocal music and the teaching license degree in music. At the University of Brasilia, she teaches applied voice lessons, physiology of the voice, techniques of vocal expression and opera studio.  She has participated in several operas and extensively performed solo recitals throughout Brazil.

Mendes received his bachelor's degree in Musical Education, Composition and Conducting from the University of Brasolia, his M.A. in musicology from the University of Rio de Janeiro, and his Ph.D. in music theory from the University of Campinas. At the University of Brasilia, he teaches composition, musical analysis, orchestration and Brazilian music history. As a composer, his works have been performed and recorded by groups of diverse instruments.

Vasconcellos was born in 1959, in Caratinga, Minas Gerais, Brazil. He holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Brasilia and in 2001 graduated from the University of Louisville with a Master of Music degree with a concentration in jazz. 

At Louisville, he served as a graduate teaching assistant, performed in Jazz Ensemble I and directed the Brazilian Ensemble.

Vasconcellos was awarded the Medal of Cultural Merit by the Government of Brasilia, in 1999 in recognition to his composition Suite Brasilia, considered one of the three most representative works since the foundation of the new capital in 1960.

Bentley, Mendes, and Vasconcellos will be in residence on the Huntington campus until Friday, Oct. 26. For further information, persons may contact the Marshall department of music at (304) 696-3117.


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Thursday October 18, 2007
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'Art of Autism' on exhibit at Marshall University Oct. 29 through Nov. 2

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "The Art of Autism," a traveling exhibition featuring 30 works by child and adult artists with autism, will be on display Monday, Oct. 29 through Friday, Nov. 2 at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus. Viewing hours are 1 to 5 p.m. and the exhibition is free to the public.

The exhibit includes a video produced in western Pennsylvania featuring children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), their parents and educators.

Hosted by the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University, the exhibit will open with a reception in the performing arts center lobby from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Oct. 29. Presentations on autism and artists with autism will take place at 4:30 p.m. in the center's Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre. Refreshments will be served in the lobby after the presentations.

The paintings, limited edition prints and pastel drawings of the show help "build a bridge of awareness to the world of autism," said Prism Gallery coordinator Vallene Weeda.

"They illustrate the common thread of creative expression existing in all people.  Creative expression allows everyone to elegantly say without words, 'I exist and I'm a lot like you!'" said Weeda, who travels with the show throughout Pennsylvania and surrounding areas. "Creative expression is a primary building block for healthy emotional and intellectual development, and is the foundation for everything we do with Prism Gallery."

Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center, said art and music can be among the strengths of individuals with autism spectrum disorders.  "Autism is the fastest growing developmental disability occurring in about one in 150 births," Becker-Cottrill said. "We hope the exhibit will also promote greater public awareness."

The Prism Gallery is part of an Autism Initiative undertaken by Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School and the National Network of Digital Schools. The initiative focuses on raising awareness, curriculum development, teacher training and support for students with autism and their families.

Agencies, schools, businesses and other organizations interested in hosting "The Art of Autism" may contact Weeda at (724) 777-8973.

More information about Prism Gallery is available at www.prismgallery.org and www.nndsonline.org.


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Wednesday October 17, 2007
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Beginnings of Marshall University Google Earth 3-D campus created

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Information Technology (IT) team members have created the beginnings of the Marshall University Google Earth 3-D Campus, according to Dr. Jan I. Fox, senior vice president for information technology/CIO at Marshall.

Google Earth is a mapping program that combines satellite imagery and aerial photographs with 3-D capability. Anyone with Internet access can explore his or her hometown, Rome or Marshall University.

Fox said Bethany Cremeans, Anna Banks and Hengdan Ge, armed with digital cameras, Adobe Photoshop and Google Sketchup, a 3-D computer modeling tool, have been working on the project.

"Marshall University is using a multitude of resources to attract the best and brightest from our nation and state," Fox said.

Dr. James Leonard, a geography professor at Marshall, and James Wolfe with the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), also have provided input into the project.  In addition to the 3-D drawings of buildings, each location includes a description as well as possible videos of what happens in that location.

The 3-D buildings serve a variety of functions. They can be viewed by prospective Marshall University students who may be too far away for an actual visit. New buildings can be drawn up and placed on Google Earth to give an idea of what those buildings will ultimately look like.

Marshall's new student recreation center, residence halls and engineering lab, all of which are either under construction or will be soon, will be added to give everyone an idea of what is coming. People needing more information about where a campus building is located can even reference it before visiting the campus in person.

The buildings were created using Google's free Sketchup software and they were uploaded to the Google Earth Warehouse. Now that they are uploaded, they are awaiting review and accuracy checking by Google. After the graphics are reviewed, they become part of the Google Earth application. Tolga Yalniz, another IT member, has recreated the MU Virtual Tour to include Google Earth.

Marshall Google Earth 3-D can be found at: http://www.marshall.edu/it/virtual-tour/google-earth-3d-tour/.


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Tuesday October 16, 2007
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Marshall Music Department adds Broadway to homecoming weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's Department of Music will present two performances of a Broadway Cabaret Saturday, Oct. 27 in the Jomie Jazz Forum on the Huntington campus. Show times are 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. and admission is free.

Singers from Marshall Opera Theatre will perform old and new favorites, led by pianist and director Bruce Rous, an adjunct professor in the Department of Music. An alumnus of Marshall Opera Theatre, Rous enjoyed a career in New York as a pianist and musical director following graduation.

His Broadway credits include Grease and Peter Pan, Off-Broadway shows, and national tours of popular shows including CATS. Most recently he served as musical director of Huntington's ARTS production of Hello Dolly. At Marshall, he is teaching music theory and music appreciation, as well as sharing his experiences from Broadway to grand opera with Marshall's singers.

For further information on the performances, persons may contact Linda Dobbs, professor of music and director of the Marshall Opera Theatre, at (304) 696-2347 or by e-mail at dobbsl@marshall.edu.


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Monday October 15, 2007
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Award-winning West Virginia writer to appear at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Ann Pancake will read from her work at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Pancake, a native of Romney, W.Va., has been widely recognized for her work. Her collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless Award. Her novel, Strange as This Weather Has Been, about mountaintop removal mining in southern West Virginia, has just been published by Shoemaker & Hoard and reviewed in The New York Times Book Review.

She also is the recipient of a Whiting Foundation Award, an NEA Grant, a Pushcart Prize, the Glasgow Prize, and writing fellowships from the states of Washington, West Virginia and Pennsylvania. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies such as Glimmer Train, Virginia Quarterly Review, Massachusetts Review, Shenandoah and New Stories from the South.

She holds a Ph.D. in Literature from the University of Washington and now teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University.

Pancake's appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public.

For more information, call Art Stringer in Marshall's English department at (304) 696-2403.


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Friday October 12, 2007
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Mike Bartrum to serve as grand marshal in MU homecoming parade

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mike Bartrum, a former NFL and Marshall University football standout, will be the grand marshal in the university's annual homecoming parade Saturday, Oct. 27, Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations, said today.

The parade, sponsored by the Student Government Association, begins at noon downtown near the Big Sandy Superstore Arena and ends at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.  Marco, the Marshall cheerleaders, the Marching Thunder and special dignitaries will take part. Marshall plays host to Rice University at 4:30 p.m. in the homecoming football game.

Bartrum, who retired after the 2006 season, was regarded as one of the best long snappers in the NFL. He played 13 years with the Kansas City Chiefs, Green Bay Packers, New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles. At Marshall, he was a two-year starter and three-year letterman (1989, 1991 and 1992), earning all-Southern Conference honors as a senior and helping lead Marshall to the Division I-AA national championship in 1992.

Bartrum, a native of Meigs County (Ohio), was presented with a Distinguished Alumni Award this past April during Alumni Weekend at Marshall.

"Through his work with the Bartrum-Brown Football Camp, which funds youth programs and charities, Mike continues to have a positive impact on the Huntington and Marshall communities," Littlehales said. "He has always been well respected on and off the field. Marshall University is honored that Mike is willing and able to share our homecoming with us by serving as grand marshal in the parade."

Bartrum also is one of eight former Thundering Herd student-athletes who will be inducted into the Marshall Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday, Oct. 26. The Class of 2007 Induction Banquet will take place at the Grand Theatre at the Pullman Plaza Hotel. A reception starts at 5:30, followed by the induction banquet at 6:30 p.m.

The parade is one of many events planned for homecoming week, Oct. 22-27. Marshall student organizations and local high school bands will be competing for thousands of dollars in cash prizes in the parade. The deadline to submit an entry form in the float competition is Wednesday, Oct. 17. Entry forms are available in the Student Government Association office in the Memorial Student Center or by contacting Amy Isble at amy.isble@marshall.edu. Floats will be judged on theme, attractiveness, creativity and personality.

Bands will be judged on music, marching and general effect. For more information on the band competition, contact Rachel Sargent at Rachel.sargent@marshall.edu.

Winners of the float competition in the 2006 parade were: first place - Sigma Sigma Sigma and Sigma Alpha Epsilon; second place - Campus Flood; third place - Phi Mu and Sigma Tau Gamma. Huntington High School won the band competition.

Here is a brief look at events sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association:

        The first official Alumni Association event of homecoming weekend is the Coaches Breakfast Friday morning, Oct. 26, at the Erickson Alumni Center. This live radio broadcast lets those present as well as radio listeners get to know some of Marshall's coaches. The DAWG, 93.7 FM, will start broadcasting at 6 a.m.

  • The Marshall University Foundation will kick off "The Bridge" at 3 p.m. Friday at the John Marshall Statue on John Marshall Drive. "The Bridge" will connect academics, athletics and alumni through construction of the College of Information Technology and Engineering Laboratory facility, the women's softball field and the new Alumni and Foundation Center.
  • The Party at Pullman Square begins at 7 p.m. Friday with a performance from the Subway Beach Band, which plays music from the 1950s,'60s,'70s and '80s. Food and beverages will be available. The party will last into the evening.

        A pre-game tailgate, planned in conjunction with Black Alumni, Inc., takes place from 1:30 to 5 p.m. Saturday in the Thunderzone Corporate Area located on the east side of Joan C. Edwards Stadium just across from Gate E.

 

For more information on the Alumni Association events, call Nancy Pelphrey at (304) 696-3134.

The theme of this year's homecoming is "Marshall's Whoooo's Bringing the Thunder." The "Whoooo's" is in reference to the Rice University Owls, the Thundering Herd's Conference USA opponent in the football game.

"Homecoming is always one of the most exciting times of the year for Marshall alumni, students and faculty," Littlehales said. "This year will be no different, with many special events and activities planned for our alumni, students, staff and friends from near and far. We look forward to meeting and greeting everyone during what will be a fantastic homecoming week."

Day by day, here are other events planned during homecoming week:

 

Monday, Oct. 22


Marshall employees are asked to decorate their offices to promote the homecoming theme. Prizes will be awarded at the Coaches Breakfast Friday morning.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 24

The naming of the homecoming court will take place at noon in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant is the site of the sixth annual homecoming tailgate celebration called "Thunder Into Mason County." The event runs from 5 to 7 p.m. and is open to the public. Those attending will have the opportunity to visit the center, meet Marshall dignitaries as well as Mid-Ohio Valley Center administrators. Music, food and fun will be provided.

 

Thursday, Oct. 25

 

Office decoration judging begins at noon.

 

Also, the Student Government Association will be conducting a canned food drive on campus to help the Huntington City Mission. The SGA also will be taking donations for the Habitat Restore, a store Habitat for Humanity runs where people can take household items to be sold at low prices.


Friday, Oct. 26
Green & White Day

The Fourth Annual J-walk begins at noon on the student center plaza. This fundraiser for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications has raised more than $18,000 for equipment. Participants may walk or sponsor a student to walk for them. A silent auction of items donated from area businesses will take place, local radio stations will be doing live remotes, and Marco and the MU dance team will entertain the crowd. All walkers get a free t-shirt. For more information on how to get involved with the J-walk, contact the J-school at (304) 696-2360.  

Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering will have an alumni reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at Savannah's Restaurant at 1208 6th Ave. Capacity is limited, so persons are asked to R.S.V.P. before Oct. 18 by calling the CITE office at (304) 696-5453.

Parent & Family Weekend kicks off with a reception hosted by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, from 5 to 6 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center lobby. During this informal gathering, those attending will have an opportunity to mingle with Dr. and Mrs. Kopp along with deans from each college. Light hors d'oeuvres and punch will be served.

Members of Black Alumni Inc. will gather at the Pullman Plaza Hotel, with registration beginning at 7 p.m. They will gather for a viewing of the movie, We Are Marshall, at 7:30 p.m. The Dance at the Plaza begins at 9 p.m.

The Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2007 Induction Banquet will take place at the Grand Theatre at the Pullman Plaza Hotel. The inductees include: Mike Bartrum (football, 1993-1996); Ron Darby (football, 1986-1989); Aaron Ferguson (football, 1993-1996); Rodney Holden (basketball, 1984-1988); Frank Huffman (football, 1936-1938); Mike Kaufman (baseball, 1971-1975); Billy Lyon (football, 1993-1996), and John Taft (basketball, 1988-1991). For tickets, call the Marshall athletic ticket office at (304) 696-HERD or 1 (800) THE-HERD. For more information, call Linda Holmes at (304) 691-1711.

A reception for the 1971 Young Thundering Herd football team will take place at 8 p.m. in the Hartley Room in Cam Henderson Center to honor Dan Canada as the distinguished M Club member for 2007. Canada will be presented with an M Club blanket during the MU-Rice football game. For more information, call Allen Meadows at (304) 736-6293 or (304) 412-3990.

Saturday, Oct. 27

The 12th annual Marshall Alumni 5K Run/Walk, sponsored by the MU Recreational Sports Office, will take place at 8 a.m. Registration is $15 through Oct. 26 (non-refundable); $20 on race day. Call Sharon Stanton at (304) 696-2943 or e-mail stanton@marshall.edu for more information.

Other events for Black Alumni Inc. include the annual business meeting, election and awards ceremony at the Alumni Lounge in the Memorial Student Center at 9:30 a.m. At 1 p.m., the group will visit Spring Hill Cemetery for a graveside ceremony in honor of the 1970 football team. A tailgate party will take place from 1:30 to 5 p.m. in the Thunderzone Corporate Area located on the east side of the stadium just across from Gate E.  A dance starts at 9:30 p.m. at the Pullman Plaza Hotel. The cost for the entire package of Black Alumni Inc. events is $75 per person. For questions and to RSVP, call Janis Winkfield at (304) 696-3158 or (304) 416-0938.

Parent & Family Weekend continues with a parent and student breakfast at 10 a.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. Student speakers will provide updates for campus projects. Those attending are then invited to join the crowd along 5th Avenue to watch the homecoming parade.

Marshall's H.E.L.P. Program will have its 2007 Open House/Meet the Tutors at Wilbur E. Myers Hall from 1 to 3 p.m. This will be an informal opportunity for parents to meet and discuss their students' progress, followed by a brief program. All interested persons are invited to attend and refreshments will be served. 

Parent & Family Weekend continues with a pre-game tailgate from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Thunderzone Corporate Area located on the east side of the stadium just across from Gate E.

The College of Information Technology and Engineering will have its 8th annual CITE Tailgate at the Football Practice Field (just east of the football stadium on 3rd Avenue). A barbeque lunch will be provided. The tent will be open from 2 to 4 p.m. No reservation is needed. Call (304) 696-5453 for more information.

Marshall plays host to Rice at 4:30 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in the homecoming football game.

The Step Show, sponsored by the National PanHellenic Council, will take place at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center after the game at 7:45 p.m. The cost is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Tickets can be purchased in Memorial Student Center room 2W27, room 1W25, and at Xpressions 4 U at 825 4th Ave.


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Friday October 12, 2007
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Vendor registration opens for 3rd annual Holly Berry Festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local and tri-state area artisans and crafters wishing to participate as vendors at the 3rd annual Holly Berry Festival at Marshall University have until Friday, Oct. 26 to register, Barbara Winters, MU's dean of libraries, said today.

Winters said vendors interested in exhibiting their wares during the one-day festival should contact her by phone by at (304) 696-2318 or by e-mail at (wintersb@marshall.edu).

The Holly Berry Festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8 in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Sponsored by the Marshall Library Associates, this year's festival again will feature hand-made arts, crafts and books for sale designed and crafted by local and area crafts people.

While a number of festival favorite vendors from last year have indicated that they will return this year, Winters said space is still available for artisans and crafters wanting to join in on the now-traditional Huntington festival for the first time.

"We're thrilled that the number of people attending the festival keeps increasing, and we're honored that the number of artists and crafters who keep coming back each year is increasing, too," said Dr. Lynne Welch, chair of the Festival Planning Committee. "We're looking forward to seeing a lot of familiar friendly faces at this year's festival, as well as a whole lot of new friendly faces of those celebrating here with us for the first time." 

Welch said 10 percent of the sales at the festival will be donated to the Library Associates endowment fund, supporting development of the Marshall University Libraries book collections.

Admission and parking are free for festival goers, and free snacks will be available throughout the day.


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Wednesday October 10, 2007
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Pappas serving as chair of Marshall music department

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, an experienced administrator and choral musician, has been appointed chair of the Marshall University department of music beginning this semester, according to Donald Van Horn, dean of the university's College of Fine Arts.

"We are very pleased to welcome a music educator of Dr. Pappas' caliber to Marshall," Van Horn said. "His leadership will be a valuable addition to the administration and teaching here."

Prior to coming to Marshall, Pappas was Director of Choral Activities and Coordinator of Ensembles and Conducting at Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., where he conducted the chamber choir, taught upper-level undergraduate conducting, master's and doctoral level choral literature and conducting, and administered the choral area.  He has also served as the Director of Choral Activities at Mississippi State University and at Clarke College in Dubuque, Iowa and on the music faculty at Otterbein College in Westerville, Ohio.

He holds a Bachelor of Music degree in vocal performance from Northern Kentucky University, a Master of Music degree in choral conducting from the University of Illinois, and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in choral conducting and pedagogy from the University of Iowa. His conducting teachers have included William Hatcher, Don Moses, Chester Alwes and James Dixon.

His choirs have performed throughout the Midwest and in southern California, Colorado, Atlanta and New Orleans. Most recently, he conducted members of the Ball State Chamber and Concert Choirs in a concert tour of Hungary, Austria and the Czech Republic, which included performances at the Stephansdom, St. Vitas Cathedral and Elte University. The chamber choir was an invited ensemble at the 2006 Indiana Music Educators Conference and at the Regional Music Educators Conference in Lincoln, Neb., in November 2006.

"My family and I have received a warm welcome from the Marshall and Huntington communities," Pappas said. "I am looking forward to working with the outstanding music faculty and becoming a part of the musical life of this region."

Pappas has been invited on three occasions to make presentations at the International Vocal Symposium in St. John's, Newfoundland. He is frequently called on to be a guest conductor, clinician and adjudicator at choral festivals, workshops and competitions.

He has also been active in the American Choral Directors Association, serving as repertoire and standards chair for 4-year colleges and universities in Iowa and Mississippi, membership chair and president-elect in Mississippi, repertoire and standards chair for music and worship in Indiana and the membership chair for the central division.

As a tenor soloist, his concert and/or opera performances have included Mozart's Cosi fan tutte, Massenet's Herodiade, Handel's Messiah, Bach's Mass in B Minor, Mendelssohn's Elijah, Beethoven's 9th Symphony and Stravinsky's Les Noces.

He lives in Huntington, W.Va., with his wife, Joni, daughter, Amara, and son, Case.


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400 members of nonprofit arts organization headed to Charleston for conference sponsored by Marshall, WVU

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and West Virginia University have joined forces to bring 400 members of a nonprofit arts organization to the Capital City Oct. 17-20.

This is the first time the Mountain State will be host to the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC), a nonprofit organization that seeks to promote the visual arts in higher education and represents Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.  Membership in SECAC is required to attend the conference.

"Because our state is on the northern fringe of the 12-state region, we never dreamed we would have such an amazing response from members," said Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts and conference organizer. "The opportunity to host this conference is long overdue. As a result, those of us from Marshall and WVU are determined to put on quite an event for our visitors."

The conference provides a forum for the exchange of ideas and concerns relevant to the practice and study of art. During the daytime, attendees will be focused on presenting papers, research and other work.

Evening hours have planned events including a board meeting in the Governor's Conference Room at the Capitol Complex and a tour of the West Virginia art collection at Marshall University Graduate College in South Charleston. Also on display at the Clay Center will be an exhibit of ceramics from China's Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute, which is in partnership with WVU.

The SECAC Members Juried Exhibition will be on display at the Cultural Center and, at City Hall, the work of West Virginia faculty representing 12 institutions will be shown.

Organizers have planned tours for participants including one of the Capitol building led by Bernie Schultz, WVU Dean of the College of Creative Arts, Cookie Soldo Schultz, adviser in the WVU Honors College, and Chad Proudfoot, vice chair of the Capitol Building Commission. A trip to Blenko Glass in Milton and the Huntington Museum of Art are planned as well as an architectural tour of Charleston.

A highlight of the conference is the announcement of the recipient of the 2007 SECAC Fellowship. Last year's winner, Barry Freedland, will have a solo exhibit featured at the Cultural Center.

Keynote speaker for the event is artist Willie Cole, internationally known for transforming ordinary objects such as bicycle parts, irons and lawn jockeys into compelling works of art. His work reflects his African American heritage. Cole was born in New Jersey, attended the Boston University School of Fine Arts and received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Cole's work is included in numerous public collections such as the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago; the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis; and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.


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Marshall's med school ties for nation's top spot for graduates entering family practice

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Marshall University's medical school is tied for No. 1 in the nation in the percentage of medical school graduates entering family practice, according to a study in the September issue of the journal Family Medicine.

Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine shares the top spot with Florida State University. Both had 22.2 percent of their graduates enter family practice residencies in the study year (2006-07), compared to a national average of 8.5 percent.

"This #1 ranking affirms the commitment of Marshall University's School of Medicine to educating physicians who are the front line of primary health care delivery in our nation," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, Ph.D. "Combined with the stellar medical licensure exam performance achieved by our medical school graduates each year, the MUSOM serves the State of West Virginia and our nation exceptionally well through the education of highly qualified physicians who excel in family practice and other medical specialties."

The finding represents good news for small West Virginia communities, said Dr. Robert B. Walker, who is the medical school's executive vice dean and chair of the Department of Family and Community Health.

"Most West Virginia counties have communities that rely on primary care physicians because they do not have a hospital or city where subspecialists practice," he said. "Family doctors are on the front line of our attempt to create a healthier West Virginia.

"National studies show there is an impending shortage of family doctors and other primary care physicians of monumental proportions, so we are fortunate in West Virginia that we have communities and policy makers who support the education of these physicians," he added. "We're proud of our ranking at the top, and we're grateful to Marshall for giving us the resources to achieve this ranking."

Led by Dr. Perry Pugno of the American Academy of Family Physicians, the researchers gathered data from schools that grant M.D. and D.O. (osteopathic) degrees, as well as from family medicine residency programs. The study had a 100 percent response rate.

Nationally, the percentage of students entering family practice is lower than two years ago. The researchers said that schools were more likely to have higher rates of students entering the field when the schools had departments of family medicine and were public, rather than private, schools.

As the nation's medical schools take more students to help head off a predicted shortage of doctors, a strong emphasis on family medicine remains essential, the study's authors believe. "[S]imply increasing the number of medical school graduates will result in a physician workforce that will continue to be inappropriately distributed to care for the needs of the nation," they said.

"An adequate pipeline of future family physicians is essential to achieving the primary care foundation needed in the US health care system."


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Yeager Symposium features artists Jack Mackie, Tom Kelly; theme is 'For One, For All: Perspectives on Public Art'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jack Mackie, a public artist living in Seattle, will be the keynote speaker at the 21st annual Yeager Symposium Lecture Series, which runs Oct. 22, 23 and 25 at Marshall University.

The theme of the symposium is "For One, For All: Perspectives on Public Art." All events will take place at the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus, will start at 7 p.m. and are free to the public.

"Public art is really at the heart of civic identity and purpose," said Dr. Barry Sharpe, executive director of the John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence at Marshall. "This year's Yeager Symposium will be organized around how public art centers on basic questions of identity, purpose and memory. It will also provide a wonderful opportunity to focus attention on the place and value of art in urban planning and economic development."

Mackie will present the Harry and Betty Wolfe Lecture on Thursday, Oct. 25. The title of his presentation is "Towards a Civic Art."  Mackie is based in Seattle, but has worked on major urban redevelopment and urban planning and design projects in Nashville and other major cities, as well as in Seattle.

"Mr. Mackie is a tremendous speaker and a leading force in public art policy and practice who will appeal to broad constituencies," said Byron D. Clercx, chair of Marshall's department of art and design. "Jack is decidedly articulate and disarmingly empathetic and empowering. He will illustrate how public art is a 'value added' community enhancement that redefines how people understand and interact with civic spaces and one another."

Mackie has participated in major urban redevelopment and new construction projects, including serving as project artist for Santa Clara County (Calif.) light rail and BART projects; as design team artist for the City of Albuquerque and National Parks on the Unser Boulevard crossing of the Petroglyphs National Monument; and as commissioned artist for the Health Sciences Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin and Scottsdale (Ariz.) Justice Center.

As an artist planner, Mackie has co-authored the public art program for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Agency; the aesthetic design standards and design implementation procedures for CENTRO Transport Authority in Birmingham, United Kingdom; the Bute Avenue Corridor plan in Cardiff, Wales; and the new San Jose International Airport. He created the public art plans for the Memphis/Shelby County Central Library in Tennessee; the Performing Arts Center in Mesa, Ariz.; the Charlotte Area Transit System; and Terminal A at Miami International Airport and American Airlines.

He is past chair of the Public Art Committee for the Seattle Arts Commission, vice chair to the Seattle Design Commission and chair to the Seattle Light Rail review panel. He currently serves as chair to the Port of Seattle Art Oversight Committee.

The Yeager Symposium begins Monday, Oct. 22 with a visit from Tom Kelly of the Bogside Artists, which is a group of three mural painters from an area of Derry City, Northern Ireland, known as the Bogside. It was in the Bogside area that 14 people were shot dead on "Bloody Sunday" by the British army on Jan. 30, 1972. To date, the Bogside Artists have painted a dozen murals about the political conflict of "Bloody Sunday."

Kelly, who will speak on "Art and Conflict," is well known for his cross-community work and has pioneered the use of art to assuage religious conflict long before its efficacy in this respect was fully recognized by the cultural elite of Northern Ireland. The Bogside Artists have been working together on mural projects since 1994.

The second event of the Yeager Symposium, scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23, is a panel discussion featuring Clercx and Dr. Dan Holbrook from Marshall's department of history. The title of their presentation is "Regeneration through Public Display: The Interaction of Public Art and Public History."

Holbrook and Clercx will speak about how public art and public history can work together to rejuvenate communities, with specific reference to projects in Huntington. Marshall student Josh Lynn, one of the organizers of the Tuesday event, said the goal is to have an interactive panel discussion. "There will be opportunities for audience participation," Lynn said.

Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said the focus on public art "is an important step for the Symposium and Marshall.  We have talked about public art on campus for many years and I applaud Dr. Sharpe and the Yeager program for raising the awareness of the issue," Van Horn said.   

For more information on the Yeager Symposium Lecture Series, contact Caitlin Haught at (434) 610-6970 or via e-mail at Haught25@marshall.edu


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Smith to speak at dedication of FDR's suite at Harvard University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University professor Jean Edward Smith will be the keynote speaker Monday, Oct. 8 at Harvard University as it dedicates the suite in Westmorely Hall where Franklin D. Roosevelt lived as an undergraduate from 1900 to 1904.

Smith is the author of FDR, a full-length biography of the 32nd president that was released last spring by Random House. The dedication ceremony Monday begins at 11 a.m.

Smith said the suite is furnished as it was in Roosevelt's time, complete with a clawfoot bathtub and wooden water closet. Smith has been invited to spend the night there - the first guest to do so.

"This is a real thrill," he said. "Roosevelt paid $400 a year for the suite, which in today's currency would be about $8,500. Not many undergraduates could afford that."


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Courtroom drama and seminar at Marshall to honor West Virginia's first African American lawyer, J.R. Clifford

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "J.R. Clifford and the Carrie Williams Case," a free, family-friendly live courtroom drama, will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Reservations are not required and a reception will follow the performance.  Music will be provided by the "Voices of Supreme" gospel choir.

The award-winning four-act dramatic program, which has played to standing-room-only audiences and garnered rave reviews in Charleston, Bluefield, Morgantown and Harpers Ferry, honors West Virginia's first African American attorney, John Robert "J.R." Clifford (1848-1933).

The Huntington performance will feature a local "celebrity cast" headed by Huntington native Arley Johnson playing Clifford.  The cast also includes Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Larry Starcher, Huntington actress Carolyn Thomas and Huntington Mayor David Felinton.

From 3 to 4:30 p.m. that same day, a symposium panel featuring five distinguished historians will discuss African American history in the Mountain State in the Performing Arts Center's Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre.  This program, titled the "Roots and Branches Symposium," also is free to the public.

The evening program, performed in 1890s period costume, is based on the 1898 civil rights case, Williams v. Board of Education.  In the Williams case, Clifford represented Carrie Williams, a black schoolteacher at the "colored" school in Tucker County, W.Va.

In 1893, Williams continued teaching after school officials shortened the term at her school from eight months to five months. Williams sued the school board for her salary for the full school term.  A jury in the Tucker County Circuit Court and the West Virginia Supreme Court ruled in Williams' favor, making Williams the first case in U.S. history to hold that racial discrimination in school terms and teacher pay is against the law.

The Williams case re-enactment was first presented in April 2004 in Martinsburg, W.Va., as part of the State Supreme Court's celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education decision.  Ten subsequent productions have brought the program to audiences across the state.

"We are delighted to put on these entertaining and educational productions in Huntington, where so much important African American and West Virginia history has taken place," said Tom Rodd, the State Supreme Court law clerk who adapted the trial transcript for the performance. "Clifford and Williams are two of our state's great civil rights heroes, and it's wonderful to have so many people volunteer to help bring their story to life. We guarantee a good time for all!"

The afternoon symposium on African American history in West Virginia will feature a talk by Dr. Connie Rice of West Virginia University. Her biography of Clifford will be published by West Virginia University Press in 2008.  Also making presentations will be Marshall professors Cicero Fain and Kevin Barksdale, West Virginia State University professor Lois Lucas and Tidewater College professor Tim Konhaus.

Both programs are sponsored by Marshall University, the Mountain State Bar, the West Virginia Supreme Court and the J.R. Clifford Project.  For more information, contact Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students' Programs at Marshall University, at (304) 696-3642, or via email at Cooley@marshall.edu.

In the evening program, Carolyn Thomas will portray the schoolteacher Carrie Williams.  Presiding over the trial will be Cabell County Chief Circuit Judge Dan O'Hanlon. The 1896 West Virginia Supreme Court will be portrayed by Starcher, West Virginia House of Delegates Speaker Rick Thompson, Marshall University vice president for multicultural affairs Betty Cleckley, and Cabell County School Superintendent William Smith.

The jury will include Huntington residents Marie Redd, Cheryl Henderson, Esq., Deborah Cooley, Marshall provost Dr. Sarah Denman, Pat Thompson Frantz, Sharon Fraizer, Esq., Rev. Samuel Moore, Kenneth E. Blue, Michael Thomas, MU Board of Governors member A. Michael Perry, Felinton, and State Senator Robert Plymale.

Children from the Huntington area will portray the children in the Tucker County colored school.  Huntington lawyer Menis Ketchum, vice chair of Marshall's Board of Governors, will play the lawyer for the Tucker County school board and Dr. Kopp will play the school board president. Charleston attorney Kitty Dooley will serve as narrator, and Marshall professor Phillip Carter will officiate as bailiff.


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Marshall senior wins statewide award for research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University senior has won a statewide award for her research.

Megan Neal, a 21-year-old biology major from Shreve, Ohio, was named Best Undergrad Researcher during the recent STAR Symposium in Morgantown for her presentation examining the effects of acetaminophen on microRNA expression in the aging heart.

Neal's data indicates that chronic, low-dose acetaminophen ingestion may be very beneficial in reducing the incidence of age-associated cardiac dysfunction. In particular, her findings suggest that the over-the-counter drug may decrease the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias.

"This award is an outstanding accomplishment for everyone involved," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "It is an achievement that is exceptional and makes our entire university community proud. Clearly any research that produces findings that can prevent or reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and improve quality of life is a major accomplishment and we are very proud of Megan and her fellow researchers for their hard work."

Neal's research is an extension of a study being conducted by the university in the molecular physiology lab at the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center for McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals, the makers of Tylenol. In all, nine researchers are working on the project including Neal's lab partner, Jackie Decker, a doctoral student in the biomedical sciences program.

"This finding may be quite important to West Virginia, Appalachia and to our elderly because cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of individuals in the developed world," Neal said. "Arrhythmias cause half of these deaths and often without warning. In our research, we are seeing positive effects in our lab models. There are indications that it is cardio-protective."

Neal's work was supported by several grants, the department of biological sciences and in particular the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program. She won $1,200 for her award at the symposium.

The STAR (Science, Technology, and Research) Symposium is West Virginia's forum for science and technology enterprise. The symposium was held this year at the Waterfront Place Hotel in Morgantown and was sponsored by the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. WV EPSCoR's mission is to build research competitiveness within institutions, individual researchers, research teams and collaborations among institutions throughout the Mountain State. 

Marshall also had undergraduate finalists in the poster category. They are Camden Clutter, Brad Fitzwater, Thomas Hagerman, Sarah Kelly, William Kelly and Mary Teter. Graduate finalists in the poster category include Nicholas Adkins, Lora Chetel, Timothy Dotson, J. Adam Hall, Sunil Kakarla, Sarath Meduru and Sriram Mupparaju.


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Lewis College of Business announces study abroad opportunities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business (LCOB) is partnering with universities in the United Kingdom, Turkey and France to offer business majors the chance to take classes overseas.

The LCOB currently works with Buckinghamshire University in England, the European University Lefke in Cyprus and the University of Lyon in France to provide students the opportunity to get an international perspective on the business world.  Each program features classes taught in English by highly qualified professors on small campuses near large metropolises.  Classes taken abroad can be transferred back to Marshall, and count toward graduation.

Several study abroad positions are still available for interested students.  Financial aid is available to help defray the cost of study abroad for those individuals who qualify.

An international component is vital to students entering the business world today, according to Dr. Lorraine Anderson, associate dean of the LCOB.

"As new markets open and international relationships become vital to the success or failure of a company, businesses are looking for employees who are able to meet the needs of internationalization," Anderson said.  "College graduates today are facing greater challenges as companies are no longer looking just for college graduates, but for graduates with an edge over the competition.  Study abroad programs like ours provide that." 

The deadline to apply for these programs for the fall 2008 semester is Feb. 1, 2008.

Additional programs of study at other universities are available to students in all departments through study abroad. 

For more information about LCOB study abroad programs, contact Anderson in Corbly Hall 107, or call (304) 696-2611 for more details.  For further information on study abroad, contact Jeanette Kripas, chief study abroad adviser, at (304) 696-2465 or by e-mail at jeanette.kripas@marshall.edu, or visit the Center for International Programs office in Old Main 320.


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Float, band competition featured in Marshall's homecoming parade

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Campus organizations and local high school bands will be competing for thousands of dollars in cash prizes Saturday, Oct. 27 in Marshall University's homecoming parade.

Prizes of $3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second place and $1,000 for third place will be awarded in a float competition, which is open to all recognized Marshall University campus organizations.

Organizations are encouraged to create floats that coordinate with the homecoming theme, which is "Marshall's Whoooo's Bringing the Thunder." Floats will be judged on theme, attractiveness, creativity and personality.

The deadline for submitting the entry form is Wednesday, Oct. 17. Entry forms are available in the SGA office in the Memorial Student Center or by contacting Amy Isble at amy.isble@marshall.edu.

Organizations who want to participate in the parade but do not want to compete must also contact Isble.

Also, local high school bands have the opportunity to compete during the parade for cash prizes, which also are $3,000 for first place, $2,000 for second place and $1,000 for third place. The bands will be judged on music, marching and general effect. 

For more information on the band competition, contact Rachel Sargent at Rachel.sargent@marshall.edu.


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Scholarship established for studying abroad in northern Europe

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An anonymous donor has established a scholarship designated for use by Marshall University undergraduate students who will study abroad in northern Europe. Three $1,000 awards are available to help students defray the cost of international travel next year.

"These scholarships will make it possible for students, who may not otherwise have the financial means, to achieve their dream to study abroad," said Dr. Sarah N. Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall.

Marshall University currently offers 134 reciprocal exchange programs in 38 countries, including northern European universities in Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, the Netherlands and Sweden. On a reciprocal exchange program, a student pays tuition and room and board at Marshall and these fees are waived at the host institution; the only additional costs are travel, health insurance and incidental expenses.  All scholarships and financial aid can be applied to the program. 

According to Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs, Marshall's exchange programs in northern Europe offer a variety of courses, especially in area studies, business, environmental science or the social sciences.

"There are also strong programs in engineering and technology in Denmark, Finland and Sweden," Egnor said. "And, courses in English are available in most subjects."

Sonya M. Shafer, a recent graduate of Marshall who studied abroad at Rovaniemi Polytechni in Finland, said the program there was excellent.

"I loved it," Shafer said. "The program was in English, the university had state-of-the-art technology, and I had the opportunity to travel all over Europe."

A student interested in applying for one of the scholarships should be a full-time, undergraduate student in his/her sophomore year or higher who is applying to, or has been accepted into, a Marshall University study abroad program at one of the northern European universities.

Applicants must submit a statement of purpose essay (1-2 pages) describing the reason behind his/her choice of program and the impact that it will have academically, professionally and personally. Applications should be made in the academic term prior to the start date of the study abroad program: by Oct. 15 for the spring term and April 15 for fall and summer terms.

More information about studying abroad can be obtained from the MU Office of Study Abroad Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/studyabroad/, or by visiting the Center for International Program's Office of Study Abroad in Old Main 320.


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Maynard named associate dean of academic programs in COEHS

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stan Maynard, director of the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development at Marshall University, has accepted a new position as associate dean of academic programs within MU's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS).

Dr. Rosalyn Templeton, executive dean of COEHS, announced Maynard's new position today.

"The COEHS is extremely fortunate to have someone with Dr. Maynard's skills and expertise to lead the college's programs into the 21st Century," Templeton said. "With his creativity and enthusiasm, there is no doubt that our programs will thrive. I am excited about the collaborations he will promote."

Templeton said Maynard's major responsibilities will relate to overseeing COEHS's academic programs within the Divisions of: School of Education (SOE), Exercise Science, Sports and Recreation (ESSR), and Human Development and Allied Technology (HDAT).

"Dr. Maynard will continue his role of overseeing the creation of the 21st Century Model School in cooperation with the Department of Education," Templeton said.

Maynard said he is excited about having the opportunity to combine the work of developing the Model School initiative for the West Virginia Department of Education.

"My plan is to integrate the research data produced at the Model School into the undergraduate and graduate programming in the College of Education and Human Services to better reflect 21st Century content and skills," he said.

For more information, contact Maynard at (304) 696-2890, or via email at Maynard@marshall.edu. His office is located in Room 218 of Jenkins Hall on the Huntington campus.

 


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Online auction of 'We Are Marshall' items continues through Oct. 2

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Movie props from "We Are Marshall," donated to Marshall University by Warner Bros. Pictures, continue to be offered to the public through an online auction until midnight Tuesday, Oct. 2.

Rebecca Samples, director of annual giving at Marshall, said proceeds from the auction will benefit the Marshall University Foundation Inc. and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, primarily by providing academic and athletic scholarships.

"We are pleased with the level of activity on the auction site so far," Samples said of the auction, which began on Tuesday, Sept. 18. "All of the items are still up for bid."

Samples said about 35 items are up for bid, including football jerseys - some with dirt still on them, windbreakers, ball caps, faux newspapers circa November 1970, prop newspapers and letters and menus from Boone's Diner.

To bid on an item, go to http://herdzone.cstvauctions.com. For more information on the auction, call Samples at (304) 696-3292.


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'Airmen of Note' to perform at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The United States Air Force band unit known as the "Airmen of Note" will perform at Marshall University's Smith Recital Hall at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12.

The Airmen of Note is one of eight performing units of the United States Air Force Band in Washington, D.C., and is the premier jazz ensemble of the United States Air Force. Originally created in 1950 to carry on the tradition of Glenn Miller's Army Air Corps dance band, the Airmen of Note is one of today's few touring big bands, and has attracted 18 of the finest musicians in the country.  As a result, it has earned an international reputation as one of the finest and most versatile big bands of its kind in the world.

Twice yearly, the "Note" tours throughout the United States, spreading its big band sound to communities from coast to coast. The Airmen of Note also has an extensive record of international performing, with appearances in five South American countries, eight European countries and Japan. The group also appears regularly at the world's most famous jazz festivals, including featured performances at the Detroit/Montreux Jazz Festival, Notre Dame Jazz Festival, Jacksonville Jazz Festival, Wichita Jazz Festival, Elkhart Jazz Festival and the Pensacola Jazz Festival.

The Airmen of Note's steadfast commitment to musical excellence and its reputation for setting the highest standards has earned the respect of the world's foremost jazz artists.  This has led to many collaborative efforts, recordings and performances with such luminaries as Joe Williams, Sarah Vaughan and Cleo Laine.

The group's Jazz Outreach program, a series of educational clinics and performances at high schools and colleges across the nation, reflects its commitment to music education. Another sign of the Airmen of Note's commitment to music education is the Sammy Nestico Award, initiated in 1994 and named after the former leader of the Note.  The objective of this annual competition is to encourage young jazz composers writing for big bands.  The award winner travels to Washington, D.C., for the performance of his or her composition by the Airmen of Note at a major concert.

Admission to the performance at Marshall is free, but tickets are required. They may be picked up at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center Box Office (304) 696-ARTS. Ticket requests also may be made by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to:

Airmen of Note Tickets
Department of Music
Marshall University
1 John Marshall Dr.
Huntington, WV 25755

Tickets are limited to four per request and ticket holders must be seated 15 minutes prior to the concert. Ten minutes before the concert begins, doors will open for nonticket holders.

For further information, contact Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall University, by calling (304) 696-3147, or by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu.


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General faculty meeting includes State of the University address by President Kopp, introduction of 72 new faculty

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's fall general faculty meeting, which includes President Stephen J. Kopp's State of the University address, takes place at 2 p.m. Friday, Sept.  28 in the Playhouse of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The agenda consists of welcoming remarks by Dr. Larry Stickler, chair of the faculty senate; singing of the Star Spangled Banner by Derek Gwinn, associate athletic director for compliance; introduction of 72 new faculty by Dr. Sarah Denman, provost/senior vice president for academic affairs, and Dr. Gretchen Oley, senior associate dean for clinical affairs; Kopp's address; and a State of the Faculty address by Stickler.

New faculty to be introduced are:

College of Education & Human Services - Lisa Burton, Tina Cartwright, Debra Conner, Barbra Haptonstall and Cheryl Jeffers.

College of Fine Arts - Maribea Woodington Barnes, Jeffrey Pappas and Robert Wray.

College of Health Professions - Melanie Akers, Chanin Boyle, Charles Hossler and Amy Knell.

College of Information Technology & Engineering - Andrew Nichols.

College of Liberal Arts - Ryan Angus, Massimo Bardi, Keith Bell, Linda Cole, Christina Franzen, Brian Hoey, Walter Iriarte, Jason Mornissette, Neal Stidham, Laura Wadley and Jun Zhao.

College of Science - Brian Antonsen, Maria Babiuc-Hamilton, Xiaojuan Fan, Duane Farnsworth, Mohammad Itani, Greg Kuhn, Howard Richards, Jennifer Shell, Wendy Trzyna, Bin Wang and Xiangqian Zhou.

Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - Dick Drass, Raymond Keener, David Spudich and Weishen Wang.

Marshall University Graduate College - Mindy Allenger, Jeanette Lee-Farmer, Yetunde Shobo and Louis Watts.

W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications - Joanne Gula, Rob Rabe and Nerissa Young.

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Gabriela Ballester, Oscar Ballester, Yan Chen, Pier Claudio, Piyali Dasgupta, Jenna Dolan, Brian Dunlap, Richard Egleton, Ahmad El-Bash, Marie Frazier, Muhammad Gill, Andrea Hill, Casey Holliday, Dawn Holliday, Mateen Hotiana, Hisham Keblawi, Toussaint Leclercq, Cheri Yost Lindberg, Wen Long, Ahmad Nusair, Bryan Payne, Frank Richter, Ashar Salman, Charles Shuff, Sara Walker von Wulffer and John Wilkinson IV.

A reception to honor the new faculty will take place in the Performing Arts Center lobby after the meeting.

For more information, call Bernice Bullock with the faculty senate at (304) 696-4376.


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Tuesday September 25, 2007
Contact: Tom Resler, President of Museum of Radio and Technology Board, (304) 389-5585

Huntington Museum of Radio and Technology announces second class of inductees into the W.Va. Broadcasting Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-two radio and television pioneers will become members of The West Virginia Broadcasting Hall of Fame at the second annual induction ceremony on Saturday, Nov. 3.

The ceremony is scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Museum of Radio and Technology located at 1640 Florence Ave. in Huntington.

Tom Resler, president of the museum board, said the hall of fame truly represents the great legacy West Virginia has in the broadcasting industry.

"These inductees have created a rich diversity of programming at radio and TV stations across the state," Resler said. "This year's class of 32 and last year's class of 61 inductees represent West Virginians who have been an important part of the lives of viewers and listeners in the region and even across the country."

The members of the second class of inductees into the West Virginia Broadcasting Hall of Fame are:

Bob Bower, WTIP sportscaster, program director; Harry Bright, WETZ, Martinsville; Glen Chase, founder, WSAZ radio; Charlie Cooper, WKAZ DJ Super Dooper Charlie Cooper; Bud Dailey, WSAZ weathercaster; Randy Damron, WQBE personality;

George Diab, GM at WCHS; Little Jimmy Dickens, Grand Ole Opry star; Bob Harvit, WBTH, WXCC-FM owner-Williamson; Ira Southern, Southern Communications; Dorothy "Dottie" Johnson, Marshall University professor; Pete Johnson, consulting engineer;

Carrol King Kessel, engineer, WSAZ radio; Ken Kurtz, news reporter; George Lewis, Steamboat Bill and Mr. Cartoon on WSAZ; Bob Orr, CBS News correspondent, WTRF-Wheeling; Jack O'Shea, DJ on WKEE, Huntington; Don Ray, current GM of WSAZ-TV;

Dick Reid, Lucky 8 Ranch on WCHS-TV; Bud Rogers, WSAZ-TV's second GM; Jim Schneider, WKEE DJ known as "Flying Dutchman;" David Selby, Quentin Collins on "Dark Shadows;" Bob Smith, news anchor-WSAZ, WOWK-TV; Bert Sonis, GM of WTIP-Charleston;

Buddy Starcher, "Buddy Starcher Show" on WCHS-TV; Bob Thomas, Sr., engineer, owner WOAY in Oak Hill; Bob Turley, WKAZ DJ; Greg Van Camp, WWVU-Morgantown; Mort Victorson, sales manager at WTIP; Phil Vogel, longtime radio voice, WWNR, WGKV; and Gary Vorhees, program manager, WTRF-Wheeling.

A portion of the museum was renovated to house the hall of fame with support from the Tri-State Foundation and the Cabell County Commission.  The museum, founded in 1991, features hundreds of radio and TV exhibits and maintains a library of broadcasting history.

The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and from 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays.

For more information, contact Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and a member of the Hall of Fame selection committee, at (304) 696-2809.


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Monday September 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Extravaganza set for Oct. 3 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students preparing to find job opportunities that fit their career goals or seasoned veterans wanting to make a career move are invited to attend the Marshall University Career Services Center's Career Extravaganza on Wednesday, Oct. 3.

The event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Don Morris Room on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. It is specifically designed to include all Marshall students, and is open to all majors.

Students not in search of a job also are encouraged to attend to take advantage of numerous networking and research opportunities.

This year's Extravaganza will feature the traditional organization table set-up as well as career panels for students exploring different career fields and options. More than 60 companies are expected to be recruiting for local and regional positions.  The complete list of registered organizations is available at www.marshall.edu/career-services.

Job seekers are encouraged to visit the Career Services Center prior to the fair to have their resumes reviewed and to answer questions about career fair etiquette. During the fair, the Career Services Center will be hosting a Resume Doctor kiosk that allows fair attendees to have their resumes reviewed at the fair.

More information is available by calling the Career Services Center at (304) 696-2370 or e-mailing Kim Adkins, projects coordinator, at adkins277@marshall.edu.


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Monday September 24, 2007
Contact: Jenny Thalheimer, Senator Robert C. Byrd's Communications Office, (202) 224-3904

Byrd announces grant funding for Marshall Forensic Science Center

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Marshall University is set to benefit from more than $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Justice for initiatives at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center (MUFSC.  The funding will support the continued development of MUFSC as a working model forensic laboratory and a resource for the national forensic community.

"I am pleased to learn of the grant funding Marshall's Forensic Science Center received, and I am proud to be a supporter of this program that has become a leader in national forensic research, training, and service.  The additional funding will help to further the university's efforts to provide instruction in DNA testing to laboratory specialists and other members of the criminal justice system, and to test DNA samples from convicted felons from West Virginia and throughout the country. This important work is helping to put criminals behind bars," Byrd said.

Marshall University officials were notified by the Department of Justice recently that they would receive funding for two competitive grant applications that university officials submitted earlier this year to the National Institute of Justice (NIJ).  Because of previous federal support Byrd has secured since Fiscal Year 1998, the Center is now in a competitive posture at the national level to obtain additional grant funding.  The grant awards will help fund the Center's education and training agenda and will help expand upon MU's efforts to establish the National Institute of Forensic Science Education and Training.

"The Center has benefited greatly from Senator Byrd's support and direction over many years.  The grant funding that he has identified not only helps train practicing DNA analysts and crime scene investigators, but also will help prepare the next generation of forensic scientists to meet ever evolving challenges for the justice system," said Dr. Terry Fenger, MUFSC Director.

A grant of $1.5 million will be used toward funding MUFSC's DNA training courses that are endorsed by the NIJ.  An additional grant of $510,974 will help MUFSC, in partnership with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), provide courses in the areas of crime scene investigation, crime scene photography, impression evidence analysis, and additional relevant courses.

"The availability of Marshall's Crime Scene House provides the FBI and MU with a unique setting to conduct a variety of mock crime scene exercises which benefit forensic scientists and investigators from state and local law enforcement agencies from across the country," Fenger added.

"I am pleased to have secured funding for Marshall's Forensic Science Center in the past, and am proud that the Center will be able to continue to improve forensic technologies and to provide best practices for state and local crime labs throughout the nation. Also, Marshall is graduating highly trained forensic scientists whose expertise will help to solve crimes in West Virginia and across the country," Byrd said.

The MUFSC is dedicated to providing the highest quality forensic analysis for the promotion of truth and justice throughout West Virginia and the nation.   MUFSC has a unique relationship with the West Virginia State Police as the first university to partner with a state crime laboratory on developing and maintaining a Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) database, the DNA database for convicted offenders. Through MUFSC's Master of Science degree program, students have access to state-of-the-art equipment, as well as a top notch faculty.  The MUFSC employs one of the most skilled DNA workforces in the country, consisting predominantly of the Center's Forensic Science graduates.


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Monday September 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Annual Day of Service planned Saturday at Marshall, in community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual Day of Service, an organized cleanup of the Huntington campus and community, will take place from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 29 on the Huntington campus.

Marshall students, faculty and staff will meet on the Memorial Student Center plaza at 9:15 a.m. for breakfast and registration, then begin the cleanup at 10 a.m.

"The students should consider the campus their home," said Prudy Barker, director of judicial affairs and volunteer services at Marshall. "This is a day set aside for the students, faculty and staff to come together and spruce up their "home," to spend a couple of hours cleaning up the campus and assisting in some much-needed work off campus."

Day of Service, which originated a few years ago as SweatEquity Day, typically draws hundreds of Marshall students. Projects on campus include washing windows, pulling weeds, sweeping, dusting and picking up trash.

This year, as part of Day of Service, workers will be washing automobiles in a parking lot at the corner of 3rd Avenue and 20th Street. The cost is a $10 donation. Proceeds will help fund a Habitat House, which Marshall and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity are teaming to build this fall.

Off-campus projects are planned at the Huntington Museum of Art, the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center and Barnett Child Care Center.

Those who participate in Day of Service will receive a t-shirt.

For more information, contact Barker at (304) 696-2495 or barkerp@marshall.edu.


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Thursday September 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

H.E.L.P. Program recognized by U.S. News and World Report

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Higher Education for Learning Problems (H.E.L.P.) has been included in the Aug. 27 issue of U.S. News and World Report in a story about schools with programs for students with learning disabilities.

"This is a great honor," said Dr. Barbara Guyer, founder and director emeritus of the H.E.L.P. program, who is quoted in the article. "The story does a good job of describing our program in a nutshell."

Lynne Weston, current director of the program, agreed. "We work hard to help students with learning problems, and to be recognized in this way, with just a few other schools, is very exciting," she said.

According to the article, Marshall's H.E.L.P. program addresses skills students need as undergraduates, such as reading speed and comprehension, test-taking strategies and time management, among others.

The Aug. 27 edition was U.S. News and World Report's yearly issue on "America's Best Colleges." Marshall was ranked among the Top 50 Southern master's universities.


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Thursday September 20, 2007
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

Marshall student television show to air on My Z TV

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A late-night television show that got its start as a class project at Marshall University has been picked up by My Z TV.

"Up Late" will begin airing from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22 on My Z TV, according to Don Ray, general manager of WSAZ.

"This is a good opportunity for us to partner with Marshall University to provide unique cutting-edge programming for our My Z TV audiences," Ray said.

Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, describes the show as "Conan O'Brien in College."

"This is truly a unique opportunity for our students," Dennison said. "They get to have a program that they write and produce and it will have great exposure on My Z TV. I very much appreciate the opportunity WSAZ is giving our students. It's a win-win for both the students of Marshall University and the viewers of My Z TV."

"Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors Jamie LoFiego and Eric Himes, both of whom also work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students in and is hosted by LoFiego. The program has a late-night show quality and features interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and, of course, comedy.

"The students asked me to be the host to give the show consistency through the semesters," LoFiego said. "And because they know I'm seeking fame and fortune."

Comedy bits aside, the class does include lecture, course work as well as studio time.


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Thursday September 20, 2007
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

Marshall's human research program receives national accreditation

HUNTINGTON - Marshall University's human research program has received national accreditation, a first for any university in West Virginia, according to the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc.

Only 32 organizations in the country have full accreditation through the association, a nonprofit that evaluates organizations that conduct human research. Accredited entities must be able to demonstrate that extensive safeguards are built into every level of their research operation.

"Marshall University is committed to the most comprehensive protections for research participants as well as the highest quality research," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "We sought accreditation, because our program is committed to continuous improvement. We strive to go beyond what is required by law to protect human participants and ensure integrity in research. It is an honor to have our program recognized in this manner."

Marshall's Office of Research Integrity serves as the institutional review board for the Huntington VA Medical Center, St. Mary's Medical Center, Cabell Huntington Hospital and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. The types of research conducted include medical studies, cancer studies, new medical devices, investigational drugs and social and behavioral studies like the ones conducted through the Marshall University main campus and the Graduate College in South Charleston. Through affiliation with Marshall, all of these programs share in the accreditation, which is valid for three years.

Dr. Cynthia Winger, director of the office, said that the tough process meant every aspect of the entire program was examined. She said the university puts the wellbeing of all research participants first giving the program a strong foundation before the accreditation review process began.

"After going through a very stringent process we know without doubt that everything about our human research program meets or exceeds federal regulations," Winger said. "Through accreditation, we demonstrated our high ethical standards in protecting research participants, which should be a signal to the public that they can trust our process."

Other academic institutions that were granted accreditation at the same time as Marshall include Harvard University, University of Oklahoma and University of Kansas.


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Wednesday September 19, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Poet Marianne Boruch to read from her work Sept. 24 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Marianne Boruch will read from her work at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Boruch's appearance, sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts, is free to the public.

Boruch's latest collection is Poems: New and Selected, from Oberlin College Press. She is the author of four other books of poetry, including A Stick that Breaks and Breaks and Moss Burning. She also is the author of two books of essays on poetry - In the Blue Pharmacy: Essays on Poetry and Other Transformations, and Poetry's Old Air.

Her poems and essays have been published in such periodicals as The New Yorker; The Nation; Iowa Review; The Georgia Review, and The American Poetry Review. She has appeared in such anthologies as The Best American Poetry 1997; Boomer Girls; Poets of the New Century; Poets Reading: The Field Symposia, and others.

She received a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Terrence DePres Award from Parnassus.

Boruch has taught at Purdue University since 1987 and directed the M.F.A. program there from its beginning in 1987 until 2005.

For more information, call Art Stringer in the English department at (304) 696-2403.


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Tuesday September 18, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Latest class of Erma Byrd Scholars announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The latest class of Erma Byrd Scholars at Marshall University is attending MU this fall, Dr. Barry Sharpe, executive director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, announced today. The scholars consist of six freshmen from West Virginia.

Every year two scholars are selected from each of the state's three congressional districts. The program, which was established in 1994, honors the late Erma Byrd, wife of West Virginia's senior United States Senator, Robert C. Byrd.

The new class of Erma Byrd Scholars includes: Cody Collins of Shinnston and Ellen Kist of Parkersburg representing District 1; Brittany Racer of Nitro and Margaret Stonestreet of St. Albans representing District 2; and Michael Bledsoe and Jill Lansden, both of Chapmanville, representing District 3.

The scholars are selected on the basis of an essay, which they wrote during the application process, their high school grade point average and two recommendations. They are required, while at Marshall, to maintain a grade point average of 3.5. The scholars also will have the opportunity, when schedules permit, to visit Washington, D.C., and meet Senator Byrd.

Erma Byrd Scholars are not limited to a particular field of study at Marshall. Current and past scholars have been majors in physics, chemistry, biology, English, history, integrated science and technology, communications studies, political science and teacher education.

For more information, contact Sharpe at (304) 696-2475.


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Friday September 14, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Volunteers needed to help Herd fans recycle at home games

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Volunteers are needed to help Marshall University football fans recycle at home football games.

Marshall launched its Be Green recycling campaign at the game against West Virginia University.  The program encourages fans to recycle plastic bottles and cans. Volunteers will be asked to hand out recycling bags to tailgaters and encourage people to place their recyclables in specially marked recycling bins throughout Joan C. Edwards Stadium and surrounding tailgate areas. Kickoff Saturday is at 4:30 p.m. 

Volunteer shifts will begin a few hours prior to kickoff. Each person is asked to work for at least two hours and some may be needed to stay after the game to canvass the stadium and parking lots for recyclables.

All volunteer service hours will be validated. Groups or individuals are encouraged to volunteer. To find out more, or to volunteer for an upcoming game, contact Brett Mount at (304) 696-3484 or bmount@ispsports.com.

The Be Green program is a cooperative effort among REAP - The Next Generation, the DEP, ISP Sports, Goodwill Industries and Marshall University. REAP is located within the Department of Environmental Protection and houses all of the state's volunteer-driven cleanup programs by providing supplies and support in community cleanup, recycling and beautification projects. To learn more about Be Green or other REAP initiatives, call (800) 322-5530.


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Friday September 14, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'We Are Marshall' actor Arlen Escarpeta to visit Marshall, other area venues Saturday through Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Arlen Escarpeta, who portrayed quarterback Reggie Oliver in "We Are Marshall," returns to Huntington this weekend to participate in several activities, including Chilifest in downtown Huntington and the coin toss before Marshall University's football game with New Hampshire.

Escarpeta also will make special appearances at other venues in Huntington and Charleston during his visit, which begins Saturday, Sept. 15 and continues through Wednesday, Sept. 19. His visit coincides with the DVD release of "We Are Marshall," which is set for Tuesday, Sept. 18.

During the New Hampshire game, which kicks off at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium, Escarpeta will be joined by Oliver, who resides in Columbus, Ohio.

"Any actor who can portray a great Marshall alumnus like Reggie Oliver is always welcomed in Huntington," said Marshall Chief of Staff Bill Bissett. "Arlen Escarpeta combines tremendous talent with the ability to relate to anyone he meets. From our students to visitors to the Joan C. Edwards Stadium this weekend, we look forward to spending more time with this adopted 'Son of Marshall'."

Since filming "We Are Marshall" in 2006, Escarpeta has appeared as a guest star in episodes of "Law & Order: SVU" and "Without a Trace," both of which will air later this fall; in the lead role in independent feature films "Midnight Son" and "Privileged;" and, in the feature film "The Ten," which also stars Paul Rudd and Jessica Alba.

Here is a schedule of some of Escarpeta's planned public appearances. Oliver will join him at each event on Saturday:

Saturday, Sept. 15

  • 10 to 11:30 a.m. - Signs copies of the special "We Are Marshall" edition of Huntington Quarterly at the St. Mary's Medical Center tent at Chilifest in downtown Huntington. The magazine will be available for purchase at the tent. Escarpeta and Oliver also will sign other memorabilia as requested.
  • 1:30 to 2 p.m. - Attends Marshall's student tailgate at the Career Services Center parking lot at 1681 5th Ave.  
  • 2:30 p.m. - Participates in the Marshall football team's traditional walk from Cam Henderson Center to Joan C. Edwards Stadium.
  • 4:15 p.m. - Takes part in the coin toss on the field before the Marshall-New Hampshire game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.  

Sunday, Sept. 16

  • 1 p.m. - Attends sub-varsity football game between Marshall and Hargrave Military Academy at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Monday, Sept. 17

  • 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Participates in a videoconference at West Virginia State University's Cole Complex. The videoconference will be available through streaming video on the Internet from the film office's Web site (www.wvfilm.com). It is for anyone interested in learning about the film industry, according to Pam Haynes, director of the West Virginia Film Office. Joining Escarpeta as participants in the videoconference are Escarpeta's manager, Britton Hein; Steve Schmidt and Jason Hively, local crew hires on "We Are Marshall;" and Haynes and Jamie Cope with the Film Office. It is anticipated that the movie's producer, Basil Iwanyk, and McG, the director, will participate either by videoconference or pre-recorded message. Access to the videoconference also will be available in Drinko Library room 402 on Marshall's Huntington campus.
  • 1:30 p.m. - Speaks to students at Horace Mann Middle School in Charleston.
  • 3 p.m. - Speaks at the Charleston Job Corps.

Tuesday, Sept. 18 

  • Makes various promotional appearances in Charleston with the West Virginia Film Office and the West Virginia Division of Tourism.

Wednesday, Sept. 19

  • 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - Signs copies of the "We Are Marshall" DVD on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus.

Escarpeta's visit is made possible by the West Virginia Division of Tourism, the West Virginia Film Office, Jackson Kelly PLLC, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., Marshall's Student Government Association and the university's Office of Recruitment.


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Friday September 14, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to host Appalachian Studies Association's 31st annual conference in March 2008

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Appalachian Studies Association's 31st annual conference will take place at Marshall University in March 2008.  The ASA encourages citizens from the tri-state region to submit ideas for presentations.

The conference will highlight how people (citizens, professionals, students, scholars, educators, artists, activists, etc.) are responding to the next generation of challenge and change in Appalachia's "road ahead," according to Dr. Chris Green, the conference program chair.

Green said everyone involved in the life and welfare of the Appalachian region is encouraged to submit ideas and to join more than 700 people in the conference. 

Presenters might share work that an organization has been doing, organize a panel, submit a research paper, put together a roundtable discussion, conduct a reading, develop a workshop, create a poster, or produce a display table, Green said.

To submit presentations, visit http://www.appalachianstudies.org/conference/.  

Marshall University has housed ASA's national headquarters since 2001.  ASA's members include all ages of scholars, educators, students, professionals, grassroots activists, individuals, groups, and institutions from around the country.

According to Green, ASA's mission is to promote and engage dialogue, research, scholarship, education, creative expression, and action.  Its mission is driven by its commitment to foster quality of life, democratic participation and appreciation of Appalachian experiences regionally, nationally, and internationally.

For more information, contact Green at (304) 696-6269 or greenc@marshall.edu, or ASA's executive director, Mary Thomas, at (304) 696-2904 or mthomas@marshall.edu.


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Thursday September 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd Around the World raising funds for clean water project in West Africa

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is partnering with Rotary International to raise funds to bring safe drinking water to a small village in West Africa.

A new Marshall student organization, led by a group of international and American students, is working with the Rotary Club of Huntington on fundraising and volunteering for the project.  The club, called Herd Around the World, plans to enlist individual students and other student clubs at Marshall to get involved in raising funds for the clean water project.

"The partnership with Rotary International will add an international dimension to the University's emphasis on service as a part of the Freshman Experience," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said.

Herd Around the World began raising funds by selling bottled water at a Student Organization Fair earlier this month. The fundraising is continuing each week from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Wednesday at the Memorial Student Center. The cost per bottle of water is $1, but people may also donate additional funds toward the cause. 

Karen Dickson, president of the Rotary Club of Huntington, also is excited about the partnership with Marshall.

"We are so pleased that the university has agreed to partner with us on our annual international service project," Dickson said. "The leadership and involvement of both international and American students captures the spirit of Rotary International which strives to promote peace and understanding throughout the world."

According to Tom Greenstreet, governor of the Rotary District 7550 of Southern West Virginia, the partnership that the Rotary Club of Huntington has established with Marshall is unique.

"I'm not aware of any other Rotary club that has developed this level of cooperation on a service project which involves international students and global education at a university," Greenstreet said. "It's a great fit for Rotary and Marshall since we are both active internationally."

Marshall University currently enrolls more than 400 international students from more than 60 countries and sends more than 100 American students abroad each year.

 "Our goal," said Dickson Muchiri, president of Herd Around the World and an international graduate student at Marshall from Kenya, "is to sell water which has been donated to the Rotary Club of Huntington on the Marshall campus. In addition, the club will educate students about the Rotary International's clean water initiatives and promote global awareness."

"Water is a resource that all of us in the United States use on a daily basis and with easy access.  However, in many countries water is not only in short supply but the quality is poor," said Laura Evans, fundraising chair for Rotary Club of Huntington, who has set a goal to raise $6,000 by May 2008. 

The money the Rotary Club of Huntington collects will be matched with funds from Rotary International to build three water wells in a small village near Lagos, Nigeria. Several local companies and individuals are supporting the project, including West Virginia American Water, Sodexho Campus Services at Marshall University, and Mark George, facility manager of Pepsi Bottling Group in Huntington.

"This partnership with Rotary creates a valuable opportunity for our students at Marshall University to develop an international perspective while becoming involved with a service project that will improve people's lives on the other side of the globe," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs at Marshall University.

Rotary is a worldwide organization of business and professional leaders that provides humanitarian service, encourages high ethical standards in all vocations, and helps build goodwill and peace in the world. Approximately 1.2 million Rotarians belong to more than 32,000 clubs in more than 170 countries and geographical areas.

For more information, contact Egnor at (304) 696-2465.


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Tuesday September 11, 2007
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Director of Public Relations, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Traveling Marshall clinic gives boost to screenings, on-the-spot care

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- At sporting events, businesses and health fairs, a new medical clinic on wheels is making it easier to provide on-the-scene screening and care to people of southern West Virginia.

A project of Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health, the mobile medical unit fills an important niche for the region without duplicating services, says Jennifer Plymale, the center's director.

U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., secured federal funding for the project.

"I have long been concerned about the health care of West Virginians, particularly of those in rural communities. Too often, these families must travel long distances to see a physician, and even farther if specialized care is required," said Byrd. "The challenges confronted in the area of rural health are serious, but they can be effectively answered with tools such as the mobile medical unit.

"I hope this new device will help southern West Virginians overcome the roadblocks that have prevented them from receiving the quality medical treatment that they deserve."

Designed as a way to effectively provide health screenings for businesses, students and the general public, the custom-designed van is full-featured. In addition to two exam rooms, it has a reception area, a restroom, and a receiving area where nurses can check vital signs.

"We tried to be as multi-purpose as possible," said Plymale. "In addition to all the basics you would find in a primary care doctor's office, we've got a microscope for checking samples, supplies needed to start IVs, and everything necessary to handle minor office surgeries like putting in stitches. We're wired for computers, and we also have a TV and VCR for patient education videos."

Marshall used input from medical groups in rural communities to help define the van's role.

"We've tried to recognize community needs and offer support," Plymale said. "The van doesn't duplicate existing services; the idea is for it to provide screenings or services the community for whatever reason cannot."

So far the project has offered aid on the sidelines of soccer and football games, done occupational health screenings for businesses and sports physicals for schools, provided demonstrations at the Concord University Summer Academy, and done screenings at the Lincoln County Health Fair.

Physicians and other medical personnel from Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine staff the van, and the Center for Rural Health provides the driver.

Custom-built for Marshall by Farber Specialty Vehicle of Columbus, Ohio, the mobile clinic is part of a more comprehensive grant to the Center for Rural Health from the Office for the Advancement of Telehealth, which is part of the Health Resources and Services Administration.


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Monday September 10, 2007
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Special features available for Marshall students in marathon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As the annual Marshall University Marathon continues to grow, so does the number of challenges for the runners and walkers - particularly those representing Marshall.

New to the fourth annual Marshall Marathon, scheduled for 8 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 4 in Huntington, is a competition among Marshall student organizations in the half-marathon (13.1 miles) relay.

A special award will be given to the top half-marathon relay team consisting of members of a single Marshall student organization. Two or three people may run the half-marathon relay in any order they wish. The legs will be 3.3, 5.7 and 4.1 miles.

Another component of the marathon is the Governor's Cup, which highlights students, faculty and staff of colleges and universities from West Virginia competing against each other. Teams will be made up of at least three women and three men half-marathoners and the total times for those six will constitute the team time. The winning team wins the Governor's Cup.

For more information on how to register for any marathon event, persons may visit http://www.healthyhuntington.org/Registration/tabid/412/Default.aspx. Participants can register online at www.active.com through 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 1. Registration in person is available only at the race expo/packet pickup on Saturday, Nov. 3.

The race is presented by HealthyHuntington.org, which is affiliated with HIMG (Huntington Internal Medicine Group) and dedicated to bringing the HealthierUS Initiative to the area.

Race director Tom Dannals also is hoping Marshall students join the long list of volunteers needed to help make the event a success. Volunteers are needed along the 26.2-mile, USA Track and Field certified course at water stops, at traffic intersections and to simply cheer the runners and walkers on during the race.

"Marshall University is so important to the marathon," Dannals said. "We would love to see many of the university's students, faculty and staff participating either as runners or walkers, or helping out as volunteers. Or, they can just line the course and cheer the runners on, which is extremely important to them."

In addition to the 26.2-mile marathon and the half-marathon relay run, events include the half-marathon run, half-marathon walk and 5-mile walk.

Thundering Hooves competition: Road running clubs are invited to compete as a team in this new event. Teams consist of at least four marathoners, and at least one of the scoring members must be female and one male (i.e., a mixed team is needed). Teams may have as many competitors as they wish, but only four score and the team score is the total of those individual marathon times.

Worship time available: The Campus Christian Center, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street next to the Memorial Student Center, will be open from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 3 for those seeking a time of prayer or reflection. No services will be provided. Also, a prayer service is tentatively scheduled for 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, just inside the Cam Henderson Center (next to the starting line).

Entrants in the marathon must be at least 16 years old. There is no age restriction for the other events.

The entry fees are as follows:

        Marathon: $50 by Sept. 15 and $60 after that

        Half-marathon (run and walk): $25 by Sept. 15 and $30 after that

        Half-marathon relay: $15 per runner by Sept. 15 and $20 after that

        5-mile walker: $15 regardless of signup date

All full-marathon registrants who enter by Sept. 15 will have their option of race shirts. They may elect to receive a fleece pullover or long-sleeved technical material t-shirt in a guaranteed size. All other runners and walkers will receive a long-sleeved t-shirt (size guaranteed if entry is received by Oct. 21). Everyone receives a distinctive finisher's medal, which is specially designed for the event in a 3D format.


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Monday September 10, 2007
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September 11 Observance

In observance of the 6th anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001, Marshall University community members are asked to observe a moment of silence and reflection at 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, the approximate time of the first attack. Thank you.


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Saturday September 8, 2007
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More than $6,400 raised in 'Bring-a-Buck' campaign at stadium

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fans attending today's Friends of Coal Bowl between Marshall University and West Virginia University at Joan C. Edwards Stadium donated $6,440 in a "Bring-a-Buck" fundraising campaign conducted by Marshall and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity.

The money raised will help fund a Habitat House, which Marshall and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity are teaming to build this fall. Groundbreaking for the house, which will be built near Marshall's Huntington campus at 1903 Artisan Ave., will occur later this month. A married couple in their early 20s with a nine-month-old son has been selected for the home.

Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, thanked those who made the campaign possible and fans from both universities for their contributions.

"On behalf of everybody from Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, I would like to thank the Huntington community, Marshall University, Marshall's athletic department, Marshall University Public Safety and everyone who volunteered today to raise a substantial portion of the funds needed to build a house in Huntington," Kluemper said. "I look forward to continuing this great partnership between Marshall University and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity."


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Friday September 7, 2007
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Doctoral program in clinical psychology awarded grant of $89,314

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The doctoral program in clinical psychology (Psy.D.) at Marshall University has been awarded a grant of $89,314. The grant will allow fourth-year Marshall graduate students to work in clinics and schools in underserved regions of central Appalachia including, initially, Wayne and Lincoln counties in West Virginia.

The grant is part of the funding initiative in Graduate Psychology Education (GPE) which is authorized through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA).  As a "two-for-one" federal program, GPE supports training of psychology graduate students while they provide supervised mental and behavioral health services to underserved populations.

Under this grant, Marshall students will provide mental health services in such settings as school-based health centers, primary care clinics, and social service agencies located in rural areas in West Virginia.  In addition to sites in Wayne and Lincoln counties, the possibility of placement in other areas will be explored.

"We are truly thrilled to have been awarded this grant," said Dr. Marianna Footo-Linz, a Marshall University professor who is overseeing the grant.  "The majority of the funds will be used to provide financial support to the students while they deliver services to these sites.  This support will allow them to focus more exclusively on their training and delivering much-needed mental health services to those in need."

Established in 2002 with $2 million, Graduate Psychology Education is the only initiative aimed at funding graduate-level training in psychology and it is authorized through HRSA.  GPE grants support the integrated training of psychology graduate students to work with other health professionals in the treatment of underserved populations such as the elderly, children, chronically ill persons, and victims of abuse and trauma, including members of the military service.

Marshall students will work in cooperation with the Prestera Center, ABLE Families, Lincoln County Schools, West Virginia Children's Health Project (administered through Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine), and Wayne County Schools. 


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Friday September 7, 2007
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Marshall University commercial starring theater major to air during Friends of Coal Bowl

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Football fans attending the Friends of Coal Bowl at Joan C. Edwards Stadium and watching the game on ESPN2 will be the first to see the latest Marshall University recruitment commercial starring a senior theater major from Ironton, Ohio.

The 30-second ad will air on ESPN2 and on the video board at the stadium during a break in the Marshall-West Virginia University game, which starts at 11:02 a.m. Saturday. It follows 22-year-old student Shay Nicole Hannon through student life on the Huntington campus while her father checks up on her via cell phone.

"My years at Marshall have been the most important chapter in my life so far," Hannon said. "It's not every day that someone like me gets the chance to promote something I love and feel so passionate about. When they asked me to do it, I was so honored and excited."

As a freshman, Hannon lived in the dorms and participated in student life despite being only 30 minutes from her home and family.

"I was so happy that the commercial focuses on how much living there is to do on campus," she said. "It's where I made all of my friends and where I became so connected to the university. What you see in the ad - including the frequent phone calls from my dad - is very much what I experienced and I'm glad I get to share that with potential students."

The commercial was produced by Charles Ryan Associates of Charleston in conjunction with Instructional Television Services of Marshall University. Both 30-second and 60-second spots will air predominantly in West Virginia and bordering states beginning in mid-September.

Director of recruitment Jean Gilman said it's important to show potential students that Marshall has a wonderful environment for living and learning.

"We want students to know that we are an exciting, innovative, destination campus," Gilman said. "We are currently visiting high schools around the nation to recruit students and this television exposure is key in these recruitment efforts.

###


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Thursday September 6, 2007
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Marshall to patrol marketplace for unlicensed merchandise

University will protect its marks by dispatching enforcement teams in Huntington Saturday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As Marshall University prepares for the Friends of Coal Bowl Saturday with West Virginia University, MU officials, in conjunction with The Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), are preparing to rid the market of potential counterfeit and unlicensed merchandise.

CLC will work closely with local law enforcement officials, along with representatives from Marshall, to patrol the marketplace in search of counterfeiters selling "knock-off" merchandise. All counterfeit merchandise is subject to seizure.

When purchasing Thundering Herd merchandise, consumers should always look for the following characteristics to ensure the merchandise they purchase is officially licensed:

  • All officially licensed merchandise should display the Officially Licensed Collegiate Product Hologram somewhere on the product or hangtag.
  • The merchandise should depict Marshall University logos and marks in a tasteful manner, as the University does not approve distasteful designs.
  • The tag on the garment should be intact. A torn or missing tag is evidence of a second-hand garment, one that probably would not meet the stringent quality standards in place at the University.
  • All merchandise should bear the name of the manufacturer somewhere on the product, either in the form of a hangtag, a neck label, or screen-printed directly on the garment.
  • All merchandise should have the appropriate trademark designations (i.e. TM, a) next to a specific name or design.

Royalties generated through the sales of Thundering Herd merchandise go back to Marshall for university development opportunities. To report Thundering Herd product in the marketplace believed to be unlicensed or any other infringing use of a Marshall University trademark or logo by any individual, company, or organization, visit the Resources Section of http://www.clc.com and click on "Report Infringers" to anonymously report it to CLC.

About the Collegiate Licensing Company:

Founded in 1981, CLC is the oldest and largest collegiate licensing agency in the U.S. and currently represents nearly 200 colleges, universities, bowl games, athletic conferences, The Heisman Trophy and the NCAA. Headquartered in Atlanta, CLC is a full-servicing licensing representative, which employs a staff of more than 80 licensing professionals who provide full-service capabilities in brand protection, brand management, and brand development. CLC is a division of IMG Worldwide.

For more information on CLC, visit www.clc.com.


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Thursday September 6, 2007
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Three Marshall students from southern West Virginia receive Friends of Coal scholarships for 2007

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University freshmen from southern West Virginia have been awarded the Friends of Coal scholarships for 2007.

The recipients, all high school honor graduates, are Jeremy E. Lloyd,  a 2007 graduate of Princeton Senior High School in Mercer County; Odessa C. Compton, a 2007 graduate of Chapmanville High School in Logan County; and Krista B. Ratliff, a 2007 graduate of Matewan High School in Mingo County.

Lloyd is in Marshall's pre-science program, Compton is in pre-health professions and Ratliff is in pre-nursing.

Each student receives a $2,500 scholarship. The scholarships are a result of the sponsorship provided by the Friends of Coal for the Marshall-West Virginia football series. Students eligible to receive the scholarship must have had high GPAs in high school, live in southern West Virginia and demonstrate financial need.

"It is absolutely fabulous to have three young West Virginians from coal-producing counties whose achievements and performance are so outstanding receive the first Friends of Coal scholarships," said Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association. "It is critical that we do everything possible to keep these talented students in their home counties after graduation.  The majors they are pursuing are so very important to providing a strong and dependable infrastructure for the continued mining of West Virginia coal."

Steve Hensley, Marshall's dean of student affairs, said it is appropriate that the university honor three of its students from the coal mining region Marshall serves as recipients of the Friends of Coal scholarships.

"Clearly, our state's economy is reliant on coal for employment, tax revenue and many other benefits, so we are happy to show our support in this manner," Hensley said.

Provost Sarah Denman said Marshall is dedicated to providing opportunities for education and success for its students.

"Scholarships are one of the most important ways for Marshall to reach out and make sure that an education is possible for those who seek a better future," Denman said. "Any time we add additional scholarships to the citizens of this wonderful state is a good day. This is a day when all West Virginians win."


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Wednesday September 5, 2007
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USPS gets into the spirit of Friends of Coal Bowl

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The second annual Friends of Coal Bowl is making its mark on Huntington.

The Huntington Post Office is paying tribute to Saturday's match-up between Marshall University and West Virginia University with a cachet depicting both teams' football helmets surrounded by the Friends of Coal Bowl logo. In the study of postage stamps, a cachet is a printed decoration on an envelope that highlights a special event.

Because the game is in Huntington this year, all cachets will be stamped with the We Are Marshall logo, according to Huntington Postmaster John Prokity.

"It's a great way to honor two great West Virginia universities, two great traditions and a great game," Prokity said. "We expect this to be a very popular item, so I encourage anyone who wants one not to delay placing an order."

Marshall President Stephen Kopp said fans from both sides should take a look at this piece of artwork.

"We appreciate the United States Postal Service for their creativity and hard work on making such a unique collectible for fans of the Friends of Coal Bowl," he said.

The $2 cachet goes on sale from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on game day, Sept. 8, at the Marshall Station post office located across from the Joan C. Edwards Football Stadium at 2016 3rd Avenue. Each one will be postmarked Sept. 8 and also will be available at all Huntington post office locations the following Monday as well as by mail from Coal Bowl Cachet, c/o Postmaster, 1000 Virginia Ave. W., Huntington, WV 25704.

A photo of the cachet is available online at: www.marshall.edu/ucomm/newsphotos/2007/CoalBowlCachet.jpg.


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Tuesday September 4, 2007
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Rick Robinson joins College of Education and Human Services as director of development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Rick Robinson, who has spent the past 20 years as an exercise/teaching specialist with Marshall University's Division of Exercise Science, Sports and Recreation (ESSR) and Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER), is the new director of development for Marshall's College of Education and Human Services (COEHS).

Robinson, who began his duties on Aug. 6, is working in the areas of fundraising, project and program development, media relations and promotions for both the Marshall University Foundation Inc. and the college. He reports to Lance West, vice president for major gift development, and COEHS Dean Rosalyn Templeton.

"I am very excited to accept the new challenges, experiences and the learning curve that will be associated with my new role at Marshall University," Robinson said. "Although this position is very different than before, ultimately the bottom line is similar. I will be working to make Marshall University a better place for our students to attend by increasing their opportunities and by improving the environments in which they will live and learn."

West said Robinson's experience at Marshall should help him excel in his new role.

"We're excited to have Rick become part of the Marshall University development and foundation team," West said. "With his experience of more than 20 years on the faculty, he has gained tremendous insight on the great values that Marshall offers to its students, alumni and supporters."

Templeton said the COEHS "desperately needed a director of development, and it found a perfect person when Rick accepted the position.

"Many people do not know about the college's exciting projects, and I know Rick will do an excellent job of promoting the college on a local, state, and national level," she said.

Robinson, a native of St. Albans, W.Va., and 1980 graduate of St. Albans High School, has two degrees from Marshall. He earned a B.A. in adult fitness in 1984 and a Master of Science in physical education/exercise physiology in 1986. Rick, his wife, Rebecca, and their 15-month-old identical twin sons, David and Brian, live in Huntington. Rebecca also is a Marshall graduate and teaches art at South Point (Ohio) High School.

Robinson's father, Dave Robinson, is a 1955 Marshall College graduate and member of Marshall's Athletics Hall of Fame. Dave Robinson played basketball for Marshall and Coach Cam Henderson from 1951 to 1955.

Rick Robinson can be reached by calling (304) 696-7081 or via email at robinsor@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday September 4, 2007
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Fans urged to 'Bring-a-Buck" to Marshall-WVU game; proceeds will help fund Habitat for Humanity House

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity will conduct a "Bring-a-Buck" fundraising campaign Saturday, Sept. 8 before the Marshall-West Virginia University football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Fans attending the game will be asked to contribute at least $1 each toward a Habitat House, which Marshall and Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity are teaming to build this fall. Volunteers with buckets will begin collecting at 9 a.m. and continue until about 11:30 or 11:40 a.m. The game kicks off at 11:02 a.m. All collecting will be done outside the stadium.

Groundbreaking for the house, which will be built near Marshall's Huntington campus at 1903 Artisan Ave., will occur later this month. A married couple in their early 20s with a nine-month-old son has been selected for the home.

"All proceeds will go to this important project," said Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity. "With a crowd of about 40,000 expected for the game, we are confident we can raise a minimum of $40,000, which would allow Marshall to partner with us in providing safe, decent and affordable housing."

A similar "Bring-a-Buck" effort in 2005 raised funds for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. The money was collected before Marshall's home football game with Kansas State.

Prudy Barker, Marshall's director of volunteer services, said about 50 volunteers are needed to help collect donations. Anyone wanting to volunteer should contact Barker at (304) 696-2495 by the end of the day Thursday, Sept. 6.


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Tuesday September 4, 2007
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Blood drive planned at Marshall University Sept. 5-6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association and the MU Student Ambassadors are hosting an American Red Cross campus blood drive from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 5-6, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

Everyone who donates blood will receive a free "Join the Race to Save Lives" long-sleeved t-shirt and automatically be entered to win two tickets to the 2008 Daytona 500, along with round-trip airfare and hotel accommodations.

Refreshments will be provided to those participating in the blood drive.

For more information, contact Amy Isble at amy.isble@marshall.edu.


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Monday September 3, 2007
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John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps to debut during pre-game show when Marshall plays WVU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A new music performance ensemble from Marshall University's department of music will debut on Saturday, Sept. 8, at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps will perform that day with the Marshall Marching Thunder during the pre-game show when the Thundering Herd plays West Virginia University. Kickoff is at 11 a.m.

The new group was the idea of Dr. Wendell Dobbs and his wife, Linda, both professors in the department of music. They approached Dr. Alan Gould, director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall, and he coordinated fundraising efforts to absorb the group's startup costs and make the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps a reality.

"Dr. Gould and President Stephen Kopp immediately recognized the potential of such an organization both for our students and the institution," Wendell Dobbs said. "And then, Judy Ketchum and Lena Shell provided the resources to make it happen. Without their belief in our work, this worthy project simply wouldn't happen."

The corps is patterned after the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps in Washington, D.C. Marshall alumni Lutricia Tampa Fields and Jennifer Razok Bailey both serve in that premier ensemble.

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps wear Revolutionary War-era uniforms created locally by Magic Makers Costumes and perform on McDonagh fifes and rope drums similar to those used in Washington. Their music is from the era of Chief Justice John Marshall. Members of the corps are students and teachers in the department of music.

"They have devoted the summer months to learning the fife and writing drill routines," Wendell Dobbs said. They were trained early in August by Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps retiree Susan Brockman, who spent several days with the group, Dobbs said. "The students have been splendid. They've devoted their creativity, time, effort and professionalism in making this a quality group. I think the public will recognize their excellence."

The emblem on the corps' drums and uniforms was designed by John Marshall and appears on a watch fob he procured in Paris during the time of the famous XYZ Affair. The emblem is used with the kind permission of APVA Preservation Virginia, Dobbs said.

As Drinko Fellow for the 2007-08 academic year, Wendell Dobbs has developed a schedule of events to display the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps. In addition to home football games, they will perform in Richmond on Sept. 24 (John Marshall's birthday) at the rededication of Shockoe Hill Cemetery, where the remains of John Marshall, John Cabell and other famous Virginians rest, and later that day at the John Marshall House and the Library of Virginia.

The return trip from Richmond will include events at Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University and Carnegie Hall in Lewisburg, W.Va. The corps will perform at the Mountain State Forest Festival on Oct. 6 in Elkins, W.Va., and at the Tri-State Band Festival at Marshall University on Nov. 3.

Dobbs said the John Deaver Drinko Academy's mission to reinvigorate civic and political culture inspired the creation of the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps. "The corps' music and image will reaffirm Marshall University's link with the era and spirit of Chief Justice John Marshall," Dobbs said.


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Friday August 31, 2007
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Career Services Part-Time Job & Internship Fair is Sept. 12 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and alumni seeking part-time and internship positions may participate in the school's Career Services Part-Time Job & Internship Fair Wednesday, Sept. 12.

More than 50 recruiters have registered to participate in the event, which is called "Solving the Employment Puzzle" and takes place from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Booth space is available for organizations still wanting to participate.

Some of the recruiters include A.K. Steel, Cabell Huntington Hospital, WCHS-TV, West Virginia Power Baseball, Amazon.com and several on-campus departments. The complete list of organizations attending the fair is available at www.marshall.edu/career-services.

Amber Bentley, student jobs coordinator with Career Services, said the fair is designed specifically to include all Marshall students regardless of their majors. She said students that are not in search of jobs also are encouraged to attend to take advantage of numerous networking opportunities. Typically, Bentley said, about 400 students attend the fair.

Soft drinks and popcorn will be available to all fair participants.

For more information, call Bentley at (304) 696-2370.


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Friday August 31, 2007
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Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to visit Marshall Sept. 10

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, Sept. 10, to speak at the regular meeting of the Huntington chapter of AARP. The meeting will take place at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The general public is invited to attend, although seating will be limited. The meeting begins at 6 p.m., and doors open at 5:30 p.m. AARP members are asked to bring their local membership cards to receive priority seating.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the university is honored to welcome Justice Thomas to campus.

"It is a tremendous honor to have a United States Supreme Court Justice visit Marshall University," Kopp said. "Although our institution is named after Chief Justice John Marshall, this visit will be the first time a Justice of the nation's highest court has visited one of our campuses. We look forward to learning more about Justice Thomas and hearing his presentation on September 10."

Dolly Rozzi, president of the Huntington chapter of AARP, worked for Thomas for eight years in the 1980s while he was chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She headed the office of review and appeals where final decisions of discrimination were made.

About six months ago, Rozzi and a group of local citizens visited Thomas in Washington, D.C. Joining Rozzi on the trip were Cabell County Circuit Judge Alfred E. Ferguson, Christ Temple Church Pastor Chuck Lawrence and his son, Chafe, and Maryann Henry.

Rozzi asked Thomas to attend the Huntington AARP meeting to help increase enrollment in the chapter, which has been in existence for only 10 months. She said the chapter has 190 members and is the fastest growing chapter in the United States. Rozzi said Thomas will speak on senior issues and aging in America.

When asking Thomas to visit Marshall, Rozzi informed him that John Marshall never visited the college.

"It is ironic that Justice Marshall was never able to visit Marshall University," Rozzi said. "We are extremely excited that Justice Thomas will be the first to visit Marshall at its Huntington campus."

John Marshall served the Supreme Court from 1801 to 1835, the longest serving Chief Justice in United States history. He died two years before Marshall Academy was formed in 1837.

Thomas took his seat on the Supreme Court on Oct. 23, 1991. He was nominated by then-President George H.W. Bush.

Thomas was born in Pin Point, Ga., in 1948. He attended Conception Seminary from 1967 to 1968 and received an A.B., cum laude, from Holy Cross College in 1971 and a J.D. from Yale Law School in 1974. He was admitted to law practice in Missouri in 1974 and served as an Assistant Attorney General of Missouri from 1974 to 1977.

From 1981 to 1982, he served as Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights with the U.S. Department of Education, and as Chairman of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1982 to 1990. From 1990 to 1991, Thomas served as a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Although she is a Democrat and Thomas is a Republican, Rozzi said they had no problem working together. "It was not a Democrat or Republican thing," she said. "We were about the business of eliminating discrimination in employment. We were both dedicated to the goal of equal employment opportunity. Sometimes we disagreed on how to get there, but the goal was the same."

The corporate sponsor of the Huntington AARP is St. Mary's Medical Center which has been a partner, not only in the success of the Huntington chapter, but also in bringing Justice Thomas to Huntington.

"St. Mary's Medical Center is pleased to support the Huntington chapter of AARP and its members in sponsoring Justice Clarence Thomas' visit to Marshall's campus," said Michael Sellards, president and CEO of St. Mary's. "We are very interested to hear his views on senior and health issues and hope the community will benefit from his words of wisdom."

For more information on the Huntington chapter of AARP or Thomas's visit, contact Rozzi at (304) 733-3656.


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Wednesday August 29, 2007
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Marshall adds two new engineering faculty

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science of the Marshall University College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) has added two new engineering faculty members.

The addition of Dr. Betsy Dulin and Dr. Andrew Nichols is part of the continuing expansion of the educational and research efforts of the college, especially the undergraduate Bachelor of Engineering (BSE) program, which was initiated during the fall of 2006.

 "We have parallel efforts to build our faculty and facilities in order to create a first-class engineering program at Marshall University," CITE Dean Tony Szwilski said. "The talents and experiences of these new additions to our faculty are an important step in this building process."

Dulin has rejoined the faculty as an engineering professor.  She is a civil engineer who has a master's degree in environmental engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and an attorney who received a Doctor of Jurisprudence from Washington and Lee University.  She has extensive academic experience as well as having extensive practice as an environmental engineer and environmental attorney.

In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate engineering courses, Dulin is serving as Research and Development Coordinator with the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI).

"Having an individual with Dr. Dulin's unique set of technical skills and experience will be a tremendous asset to RTI in fulfilling its mission to help improve and expand the transportation infrastructure of the region," RTI Director Robert Plymale said. 

Dulin is a licensed Professional Engineer, licensed to practice law in West Virginia and Ohio, and is a Registered Patent attorney.

Nichols came to Marshall from the University of South Carolina, where he had served on the civil engineering faculty since 2004.  He grew up in Point Pleasant, W.Va., and completed his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering at West Virginia University.

Nichols received his Master of Science and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Purdue University, specializing in transportation engineering, and is a licensed Professional Engineer.  In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate engineering courses, Nichols will be developing research initiatives in the area of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) in conjunction with the RTI.

"Dr. Nichols' special expertise in the area of Intelligent Transportation Systems will be instrumental in helping RTI expand its capabilities in this important area of transportation research," Plymale said.


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Tuesday August 28, 2007
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Theatre season begins Oct. 3 with Little Shop of Horrors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre's 2007-2008 season features four presentations, beginning with Little Shop of Horrors Oct. 3-6. All shows are in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center and begin at 8 p.m.

Here is a brief description of each show:

Little Shop of Horrors, Oct. 3-6: Book and lyrics by Howard Ashman, music by Alan Menken. One of the longest-running Off-Broadway shows of all time, this affectionate spoof of 1950s sci-fi movies has become a household name, thanks to a highly successful film version and a score by the songwriting team of Ashman and Menken, who redefined the animated musical film with Disney's The Little Mermaid, Beauty And The Beast and Aladdin. Charming, tuneful and hilarious, with tongue firmly planted in cheek, Little Shop Of Horrors never fails to entertain.

The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940, Nov. 14-17: By John Bishop.

An ingenious and wildly comic romp which enjoyed a long and critically hailed run both on and Off-Broadway. Poking antic fun at the more ridiculous aspects of "show biz" and the corny thrillers of Hollywood's heyday, the play is a non-stop barrage of laughter as those assembled (or at least those who aren't killed off) untangle the mystery of the "Stage Door Slasher."

The Seagull, Feb. 20-23, 2008. By Anton Chekhov.

The classic story about Irina, a middle-aged and fading actress, Trigorin, a moderately popular author who realizes that he has failed to achieve greatness, and Irina's muddled and melancholy son who is lovesick over a pretty neighbor named Nina.

The Merry Wives of Windsor, April 23-26, 2008. By William Shakespeare.

At the request of the Queen, Shakespeare wrought this farce starring Sir John Falstaff of his Henry IV plays, here transplanted from the 15th to the 16th century, where he attempts to seduce two wealthy married women who are a bit too smart for him.

Season tickets are on sale and can be purchased by calling Sam Kincaid, Marshall University Theatre Box Office Manager, at (304) 696-2787 from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 


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Tuesday August 28, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall fans urged to wear green on College Colors Day, every Friday during the academic year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans, students, faculty and staff have even more reason than usual to wear green throughout the day on Friday, Aug. 31 - the day before the Thundering Herd plays at Miami of Florida in its college football season opener. The third annual National College Colors Day celebration will take place nationwide on that day.

Earlier this month, Gov. Joe Manchin III proclaimed Friday, Aug. 31, as College Colors Day in West Virginia. Manchin's proclamation states in part that College Colors Day seeks to celebrate and promote the traditions and spirit of the college experience by encouraging fans, alumni and students to wear the colors of their favorite college throughout the day of Aug. 31, 2007.

Marshall is participating in College Colors Day for the second consecutive year and is continuing a tradition begun last year of encouraging faculty, staff and students to wear green every Friday during the academic year. College Colors Day is a national event that coincides with students returning to college and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics.

"We hope that everyone, not only at Marshall University but within organizations and companies throughout the community, will wear Marshall green on Fridays during the academic year as a show of support for and celebration of Marshall University," President Stephen J. Kopp said. "'Green Friday' was a great success last year and we ask everyone who supports Marshall to help us continue this tradition beginning this Friday."

West Virginia is one of 10 states whose governors proclaimed Aug. 31 as College Colors Day in their state. As part of the national celebration, the University of Washington will play at Syracuse University at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31 in the second annual College Colors Day Classic. The game will be televised by ESPN.


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Monday August 27, 2007
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall wins technology award for enterprising e-mail system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Information Technology department has won top honors in the Governor's Office Information Technology Awards competition.

The Computing Services Team won first place in the category of Enterprise Information Systems for the successful creation of a high-end student e-mail system. The new system provides a scalable architecture, faster access, increased storage, enhanced spam and virus filtering capabilities, as well as integrated identity management. It also dramatically reduces software and hardware costs related to the system.

Dr. Jan I. Fox, senior vice president for Information Technology/CIO, said her department has won previous awards from the Governor's Office.

"Our IT teams are normally looked at as the leaders in information technology in the state, so it is wonderful and important that we continue the trend," Fox said. 

Members of the award-winning team include Jon B. Cutler, director of systems administration, Tim Calvert, lead systems programmer, Jack Chongjie Xue, institutional research specialist, Brent Maynard, assistant director of systems administration, and Jaymz Mynes, senior systems programmer. They were presented the award during the state's recent Information Technology Conference.  

In a separate competition recognizing Web site design excellence in state government, K-12 schools or higher education, the Marshall University Foundation placed third in the 2007 Swiggy Awards. Rebecca Samples, Director of Annual Giving, was responsible for overseeing the winning site's design, development and deployment.


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Thursday August 23, 2007
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Paintings by June Kilgore at Birke Art Gallery through Sept. 14

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Birke Art Gallery is exhibiting paintings by June Kilgore, a former professor of art at MU, today through Friday, Sept. 14.

Works in the exhibition are acrylics, some on paper and other, larger ones, on canvas, as well as a few monoprints on paper.  Caryl Toth, Kilgore's friend and former student, will give a talk about the paintings in the gallery at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27.

Kilgore (1927-2006) was a professor of art at Marshall for nearly 25 years and chaired its department of art from 1973 until she retired in 1989.  Kilgore was from Huntington and earned bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall.  She taught in the public schools and Marshall's "Lab" School before joining the university faculty.

In 1972, she earned an MFA in painting and printmaking at the Pratt Institute in New York, where she had studied with the noted abstract expressionist, George McNeil. Like many artists of the later 20th century, Kilgore usually worked in series in order to explore an idea in depth, so some works have nature or gardens as their theme and others focus on Greek temples.

With several monoprints from the late 1980s, the majority of works in the exhibition are abstract acrylic paintings from the 1990s that reflect Kilgore's response to the spirit of place.  Kilgore used form, color, texture and space to encapsulate her experience and evoke a parallel response in viewers. Her work is in the collections of art institutions throughout the Southeast as well as in many private collections.

Lenders to the exhibition include the Art Store in Charleston, the Huntington Museum of Art, the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and individuals who live in this region.

The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday. The Birke Art Gallery is on the ground floor of Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.  For more information, call (304) 696-2296.


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Tuesday August 21, 2007
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Officials dedicate high-tech wing at Mid-Ohio Valley Center

POINT PLEASANT, W.Va. - U.S. Congresswoman Shelley Moore Capito joined Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp in dedicating the new science and nursing wing of the university's Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant today.

The $3 million, 8,100 square-foot addition increases by 50 percent the size of the seven-year-old center, which has seen its enrollment grow from 11 students attending classes at regional high schools in 1994 to 1,600 students now.

Capito helped MOVC officials cut the green and white ribbon to the addition. The congresswoman played an integral part in helping the center secure a $250,000 modernization grant that made possible the latest in technical equipment for nursing classrooms, computer labs, interactive equipment and wireless communication.

"I am proud to see this state-of-the-art nursing and science wing come to Marshall's Point Pleasant center," Capito said. "Marshall prides itself on its educational experience and this facility enhances that experience to a whole new level. I look forward to continued success for Marshall and its students in Point Pleasant."

President Kopp describes the Mid-Ohio Valley Center as "an unequivocal success story and a testament to the power of university-community partnerships."

"We could not have asked for better partners than the leaders of Mason County and Pleasant Valley Hospital," Kopp said. "I am proud of our faculty and staff here and know that together we are all making a difference in the lives and career opportunities for our students."

The center meets the expanding needs of accelerated high school students, traditional college age students and adults who have chosen to return to school in the mid-Ohio Valley. In 2005, Marshall's Board of Governors approved the expansion of the center. The architect for the expansion was Bastian and Harris of Charleston, W.Va.

Homer Preece, director of the center, has watched the program grow from its infancy.

"This center has a 100 percent passage rate and our graduates have good careers," Preece said. "I'm so proud that we can offer the very best facilities to our hardworking students."


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Tuesday August 21, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Highlights of the 71st Season of the Marshall Artists Series

HUNTINGTON-The Marshall Artists Series proudly announces its 2007-2008 season of events. For 71 years the Marshall Artists Series has been a gateway to the world of cultural entertainment in the Tri-State and at Marshall University. 

"We are thrilled to announce such an exciting lineup of events for our 71st season," says Penny Watkins, Executive Director for the Marshall Artists Series. "From our Broadway events to our family fare, this season we have something for everyone and events the whole family will enjoy."

The following events will be featured on this season's Baxter Series:

  • Direct from Broadway, Chase Bank and Cabell Huntington Hospital present Peter Pan as it flies into the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center with Tinkerbell and Captain Hook in tow, Tuesday, & Wednesday, November 6 & 7, 2007, beginning at 7:30 p.m.  Take your family on a fantastical journey to Neverland for an event sure to please one and all.
  • The biggest Tony Award winner in Broadway history, The Producers, arrives Saturday, February 2, 2008, at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Everything you've heard is true! "Mel Brooks has put the comedy back into musical comedy. The Producers is the funniest, most fearlessly irreverent thing ever seen on stage!"- USA Today.
  • Shakespeare's forbidden love story, Romeo & Juliet presented by the Tchaikovsky Ballet & Orchestra, Tuesday, March 11, 2008, leaps onto the stage of the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center beginning at 7:30 p.m. At 125 members strong, including a 60-piece live orchestra, this performance will fill the stage with traditional ballet, artistic sets, and hauntingly beautiful music.
  • Join the remarkable March sisters - Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy as St. Mary's Medical Center presents Little Women - The Broadway Musical. Louisa May Alcott's timeless tale about the power of family, friendship and romance, comes to life, Wednesday, April 23, 2008, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. This new musical is capturing the hearts of a new generation and captivating audiences of all ages!

The following events will be featured on this season's Mount Series:

  • The Law Office of Doug Reynolds presents seven-time Grammy Award winning vocalist, Al Jarreau, the only vocalist in history to win a Grammy in 3 separate categories, as he lights up the stage of the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Saturday, October 6, 2007, at 8 p.m. Known for his many hits including "Touch Me Tonight," the theme from "Moonlighting," and We're In This Love Together." "All I Got," Jarreau's recent duet album with George Benson won this year's Grammy for best jazz album.
  • Movin' Out, the Broadway musical collaboration between five-time Grammy Award winner Billy Joel and legendary choreographer Twyla Tharp, hits the stage of the  Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 18, 2008, at 8 p.m. Movin' Out brings 24 Billy Joel classics to electrifying new life as it tells the story of five lifelong friends over two turbulent decades.
  • Spend a hilarious Evening with Martin Short, on Friday, February 15, 2008, at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. Known for his films, Three Amigos and Father of the Bride, his recent Broadway success, Fame Becomes Me, and of course his stint on TV's Saturday Night Live, Short will bring his humor, musical talent and special "guest" Jiminy Glick for an evening of fun entertainment, just in time for Valentine's Day.
  • Direct from Broadway, Hairspray takes you back to 1962 Baltimore as Tracy Turnblad sets out to dance her way onto TV's most popular show on Wednesday, April 30, 2008, at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.  Winner of eight Tony Awards, including Best Musical, this mega hit is piled bouffant-high with laughter and romance - and enough deliriously tuneful new songs to fill a non-stop platter-party.

The following events will be featured on this season's Belanger Series:

  • Animal expert Jungle Jack Hanna will bring many of his favorite animal friends to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, as well as fascinating and humorous stories and footage from his adventures around the world during his live show on Monday, October 29, 2007, beginning at 7 p.m.  Known for his television show Jack Hanna's Animal Adventures, as well as hundreds of television appearances, Hanna's show is sure to please everyone from the youngest child to the oldest adult.
  • The Kennedy Center's fifth visit to the Marshall Artists Series brings Teddy Roosevelt & The Treasure of Ursa Major, 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 4, 2008, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.  This fun story for the entire family was inspired by Teddy Roosevelt and his family during their time in the White House.  In 1904 Roosevelt's three young children stumble upon a real-life treasure map hidden in the White House library's copy of Treasure Island.  Together they untangle a decades-old mystery that leads them from the Red Room to the President's Office to the Lincoln Bedroom. This clever and comical production features songs by Washington satirist Mark Russell.

The Fall and Spring International Film Festival The Fall International Film Festival will take place September 28 - October 4, 2007, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.  Featured films include: Lives of Others (Germany), Family Law (Argentina), Days of Glory (France/Algeria/Morocco/Belgium), Maxed Out (USA), After the Wedding (Denmark), and Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles (Hong Kong/China/Japan).

The Spring International Film Festival will take place February 22-28, 2008, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. Featured films include: The Wind That Shakes the Barley (Ireland/UK), The Valet (France), Ghosts of Cite Soleil (Haiti), Away From Her (Canada), The Italian (Russia), and Ladron Que Roba a Ladron (Mexico).

Season Ticketing Information:

  • Superticket (Baxter, Mount, Belanger & Films) - $495, $445, $406 & $370.
  • Baxter Series: 4 Events -  $245, $195, $175 & $157
  • Mount Series: 4 Events -  $257, $207, $189 & $170
  • Belanger Series: 2 Events - $45 & $25
  • International Film Festival (12 Films) $70

Youth season tickets are available for children age 17 and under. Contact the Marshall Artists Series for more details.

Season ticketing begins Monday, August 6th at 9 a.m.

The deadline to purchase or renew season tickets is Monday, August 20th.

New season subscription orders and season ticket renewal orders will be taken beginning Monday, August 6th at 9a.m.  Subscriptions may be ordered and current subscriptions may be renewed through the deadline date of August 20th.  After that day, all orders will be processed in order of date and time received.

The Marshall Artists Series accepts all major credit cards, checks and cash.  Season tickets may be ordered via telephone by calling our administrative offices at (304) 696-3326.  Orders may also be mailed in to Marshall Artists Series, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755-2210.  Order may also be faxed to (304) 696-6658.  Our offices are located in the Jomie Jazz Center on Fifth Avenue across from Marshall University's Student Center.  Our hours are Monday through Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m..

Tickets to individual events will go on sale in early September. Details will be announced at a later date.

For additional information please call the Marshall Artists Series at (304) 696-3326 or send us an email at artistsseries@marshall.edu. Office hours are 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday.


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Marshall University announces special events to take place week of Friends of Coal Bowl

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Here is a list of some of the special events and activities planned the week of the Marshall University-West Virginia University football game, which will be played Sept. 8 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium:   

Monday, Sept. 3 through Friday, Sept. 7

  • Marshall students will have a chance to win tickets to the Marshall-WVU football game all week in a variety of activities at the Memorial Student Center plaza. Cornhole and NCAA Football 08 are two of the planned competitions. Thirty-five tickets will be available for the winners. Contact James Clark with the Student Activities Planning Board (SAPB) at (304) 696-6770.

Wednesday, Sept. 5

  • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Student Organizational Fair on the Memorial Student Center plaza, sponsored by SAPB. Marshall's 191 student organizations are invited to participate by setting up tables and handing out information about their organizations. Student organizations may sign up to participate in the fair by calling the SAPB at (304) 696-6770 or (304) 696-2283.

Thursday, Sept. 6

  • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., organizational fair continues on the student center plaza.
  • 10 a.m., silent portion of the Harmony Institute Auction at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The range of items includes antiques, art, stained glass, autographed sports memorabilia, framed prints and many others. The silent portion continues throughout the day. For more information, call Marshall University Multicultural Affairs at (304) 696-4637.
  • 6 p.m., pep rally in the parking lot at Gino's Pub on 5th Avenue in Huntington. Thundering Herd Coach Mark Snyder's weekly call-in show starts at 7 p.m. and will be broadcast from the parking lot. The MU pep band and cheerleaders will participate, and those attending will be able to place food and drink orders from outside the pub. Nearby parking will be available. The event is sponsored by Gino's Pub. For more information, call Nancy Pelphrey with the Marshall University Alumni Association at (304) 696-3134.

Friday, Sept. 7

  • 10 a.m., silent portion of the Harmony Institute Auction at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center continues throughout the day. The live auction is from 6 to 9:30 p.m.
  • 6 p.m., free concert on Third Avenue in front of Pullman Square features country music bands Lonestar and Trick Pony. They will be preceded on stage by the Angie Fletcher Band and Walking Out Blind. Contact the Marshall University alumni office at (304) 696-3134 for more information.
  • Beginning at 5:30 p.m., parking for the concert will be available on designated lots in downtown Huntington for $10 per automobile. The special parking is in conjunction with the Huntington Municipal Parking Board. Proceeds will benefit the MU Alumni Association.

Saturday, Sept. 8

  • 8 to 10 a.m., Thunderfest tailgate for Marshall students in the Marshall University Career Services Center parking lot at 1681 5th Ave. Hot dogs, Papa John's Pizza, snow cones and Pepsi products will be provided. Students also may bring their own food and drinks. For more information, contact Dominique Elmore, president of Marshall's Student Government Association, at (304) 696-6436, or James Clark with SAPB at (304) 696-6770.
  • 11:10 a.m., Marshall students who want to see the Marshall-WVU game but don't have  tickets may gather in the remodeled Memorial Student Center lobby to watch the game on two plasma TVs above the fireplace. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call Tootie Carter at (304) 696-2528.
  • Special game parking downtown will be available. For $10, fans may park in reserved spaces at designated downtown lots, then, beginning at 9 a.m. and continuing in 20-minute intervals, board a shuttle bus near Pullman Square. It will take them to the Marshall Book Store. After the game, the bus will pick the fans up at the book store and return them to the drop-off spot near Pullman Square. The special parking and transportation is in conjunction with the Huntington Municipal Parking Board. Proceeds will benefit the MU Alumni Association. For a map and more information, call Nancy Pelphrey with the Marshall University Alumni Association at (304) 696-3134.

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Harmony Institute Auction set for Sept. 6-7 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An auction to benefit the Harmony Institute at Marshall University will take place Thursday, Sept. 6 and Friday, Sept. 7 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

 

The purpose of the Harmony Institute Auction is to raise funds to sustain the Institute's mission, goals and initiatives. A similar auction in 1998 raised $25,000, and the goal for this year's event is to raise $50,000, according to Dr. Betty Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall.

 

The silent portion of the auction will take place throughout the day Sept. 6 and 7, beginning at 10 a.m. each day, with the live auction scheduled from 6 to 9:30 p.m. on Sept. 7.

 

"Since our first auction nine years ago we have been working over the years to promote respect for, and an appreciation of, human and civil rights, social justice and racial harmony across the Marshall campus and the tri-state region," Cleckley said. "Funds from the auction will go a long way in helping us to reach our goal as well as foster the Harmony Institute mission and objectives."

 

Since its inception in 1997, the Harmony Institute has been dedicated to fulfilling Marshall University's multicultural mission through community engagement and scholarly development.

 

In partnership with the College of Liberal Arts, the Harmony Institute fosters scholarship, research, training and instruction that supports racial harmony and advances race relations.

 

The Institute has sponsored many special events and exhibits throughout its first decade, such as theatre and music performances, lectures, conferences and symposiums.

 

Cleckley said the timing of the auction coincides with Marshall's home football game Saturday, Sept. 8, with West Virginia University at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Some of the items for auction are WVU-related, such as an autographed basketball by Jerry West, a Jerry West bobblehead and a West Virginia University Blenko Glass vase, among others.

 

"The day before the Marshall/West Virginia game is a perfect opportunity to raise funds for the Institute. We are hoping that many of our friends from West Virginia University will participate in the auction," Cleckley said. "While the two schools will be competing on the football field, I believe both have similar goals when it comes to increasing social justice, racial harmony and awareness, which is what the Harmony Institute is all about. Through the Harmony Institute, we are celebrating the academic and physical endeavors of this generation while ensuring and enriching the endeavors of future generations."

 

Among the many other items to be auctioned are sports memorabilia, such as a basketball signed by former University of Kentucky coach Tubby Smith; basketballs signed by members of Huntington High School's 2007 championship basketball team; jerseys signed by former HHS players Patrick Patterson and O.J. Mayo; autographed NFL jerseys from former Marshall greats Chad Pennington and Byron Leftwich, and a football signed by former Marshall football coaches Jim Donnan and Red Dawson.

 

For more information on the Harmony Institute Auction, contact Feon Smith with Marshall University Multicultural Affairs at (304) 696-4637.


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Marshall begins One Book program for freshmen

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University freshmen have not yet started fall classes, but many, along with students in the Marshall Community and Technical College, already are doing homework for their University, Honors and CTC 101 courses. The early assignment is part of a required common reading program called One Book, which is starting this year at Marshall.

 

Freshmen who attended orientation sessions this summer at Marshall were given copies of The Glass Castle, a memoir written by former Welch, W.Va., resident Jeannette Walls. They were encouraged to read the book before the Monday, Aug. 20 start of fall classes.

 

Once school begins, the students and community members will take part in discussions and events focused on issues introduced in The Glass Castle as part of their University, Honors and CTC 101 courses.

 

Common reading programs such as One Book have been adopted by many universities and communities. The program offers a shared intellectual experience for first-year students and other members of the university community, and also provides a way to introduce and promote critical thinking skills.

 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp encouraged Marshall to implement the One Book program and supported it financially. The Glass Castle was chosen by Marshall's One Book committee.

 

"I envision the One Book program as one of the major ways to encourage students to become actively involved in their own learning - not only through meeting the author, but also through the One Book Web site and blogs, and through university-wide events in the fall and spring semesters," President Kopp said. "The book is intended to be a discussion starter. I hope it will open up avenues for interdisciplinary discourse on important topics related to poverty, inequality, mental health, homelessness and resilience."

 

In The Glass Castle, Walls tells the story of her unorthodox upbringing and how she used the adversities of her early years to create a memoir illustrating the complexities of family, trust and forgiveness.

 

As a child and teenager, Walls often went without food. Lunch, if she was lucky, sometimes came from classmates' castoffs and scraps found in the school restroom garbage can. In the schools of Welch, she was reviled as an outsider because she wasn't from "around here," because her family was poor and because she was smart.

 

She, her three siblings and their intellectually and artistically brilliant but unorthodox  parents (Rex and Rose Mary) spent many years living in poverty while moving from town to town in the Southwest desert, often camping in the mountains. They finally were forced to move back to Rex's family home in Welch.

 

Walls managed to break the cycle of poverty, graduate from Harvard and become a successful journalist. She has written for Esquire and USA Today, and for eight years wrote a gossip column called The Scoop for MSNBC.com. She wrote her final column on July 26, and now is turning her attention to writing books.

 

President Kopp announced earlier this year that Marshall will be involved this fall in a project related to one of the themes of The Glass Castle - homelessness and poverty. The university is teaming with Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity to build a Habitat House in a neighborhood near Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

"This service project will be an important part of the First Year Experience Program designed for members of the Class of 2011," he said when announcing the project. "This community service project will create a valuable opportunity for our students to become involved and have a direct impact on the problem of homelessness in our community."

 

For more information on the One Book program at Marshall, contact Jennifer Sias, Information Literacy Librarian at Marshall, at (304) 696-6577. 

 

 

 

 


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Orthopedic surgery residency training program approved at Marshall

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has become one of just two United States schools since 1995 to have a first-time orthopedic surgery residency training program approved, West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III announced Wednesday in Charleston.

The new program will play an essential role in meeting the health needs of West Virginians, Manchin said.

"Here in West Virginia, we have the nation's second-oldest population and more than our share of high-risk occupations, but our state lags far behind the rest of the nation in the availability of orthopedic surgeons," he said. "As a result, our people sometimes have to travel too far or wait too long to get the services they need. Marshall's new program will bring us important new resources, and it should become a pipeline that helps supply doctors who can expand top-notch orthopedic services to underserved areas of the state."

Manchin cited a 2004 national study by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons that showed only one state - Michigan - had a lower number of orthopedic surgeons for each 100,000 people. West Virginia's rate was 4.5 orthopedists per 100,000 people, compared to the national rate of 6.2. Marshall's program will double the number of orthopedic surgeons who can be trained in West Virginia, bringing the total to 30.

MU President Stephen J. Kopp said the program is a logical outgrowth of advances in medical education at Marshall.

"Marshall's medical school has been working diligently to complete the rigorous work required to earn program approval from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for our new residency program in orthopedic surgery," Kopp said. "This new graduate medical education program will take advantage of the outstanding group of physicians assembled by the Department of Orthopaedics. Orthopedic residents accepted into this program will experience leading-edge training in a field that has seen remarkable advances in diagnosis and treatment options. As new orthopedic surgeons complete their training at Marshall University and Cabell Huntington Hospital, all of West Virginia will benefit, especially the rural and underserved areas of our state and region."

Kopp said the growing orthopedic surgery program will complement the services of the new Department of Neuroscience, which will offer both neurosurgery and neurology.

Dr. Ali Oliashirazi, chair of Marshall's Department of Orthopaedics, said the residents will be based primarily at Cabell Huntington Hospital.

"Cabell Huntington has been wonderfully helpful in making sure we have the facilities and financial backing we need to offer top-notch training," he said. "Its support was vital in making this program a reality."

He said Marshall will accept its first residents for the training year beginning next summer.


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Lonestar to be featured in free concert as part of Marshall-WVU celebration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A free concert Friday, Sept. 7 featuring Lonestar, one of country music's most successful bands, and country music trio Trick Pony highlights a series of special events planned the week of Marshall University's home football opener with West Virginia University.

 

The Thundering Herd and Mountaineers play at 11:10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 8 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Details of other related events will be announced next week.

 

The concert, presented by 93.7 "The DAWG" on behalf of the Marshall University Alumni Association and Marshall's Student Activities Programming Board, takes place on 3rd Avenue in front of Pullman Square. On-stage entertainment begins at 6 p.m.

 

"This is the biggest event the radio station has ever been involved with," said Mike Kirtner, president and general manager of 93.7 "The DAWG," and a Marshall alumnus. "This shows you the significance of this event when you can get two top-line bands to come to Huntington to celebrate the Marshall-WVU Friends of Coal Bowl series. It signifies the importance of the event to the state."

 

Preceding Lonestar on the stage, which will be situated near 10th Street facing west, will be the Angie Fletcher Band, Walking Out Blind and Trick Pony. "The DAWG" will begin broadcasting from the site at 4 p.m.

 

Lonestar has had 30 chart hits, including nine number one singles. Recent awards for the group include:

  • "Mr. Mom," Radio Music Awards Song of the Year/Country Radio in 2005;
  • "My Front Porch Looking In," Billboard's Most Played Country Song of 2003;
  •  "I'm Already There," the ASCAP & BMI Song of the Year in 2002;
  • The Academy of Country Music Award - Top Vocal Group in 2002.

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Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'We Are Marshall' to be shown Friday night as part of Welcome Weekend activities

The movie "We Are Marshall" will be shown at about 9:30 p.m., or as soon as it is dark, Friday, Aug. 17 at Buskirk Field on Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

The movie is part of Welcome Weekend activities at Marshall. All students and their families taking part in Welcome Weekend are invited to attend. No seating will be provided, so those attending are encouraged to bring a blanket.


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Wednesday August 8, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

The Parthenon wins 11 awards in WVPA's Better Newspaper

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's student newspaper, The Parthenon, received 11 awards in the West Virginia Press Association's annual Better Newspaper Contest. The awards were announced Saturday, Aug. 4 at the association's convention in Shepherdstown, W.Va.

The contest was based on publications from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, 2006. The categories included news, sports and feature writing, photography and design. The Parthenon won third place in General Excellence in Division 3, which is for daily newspapers with a circulation of less than 15,000. Top awards for general excellence are based on awards won in the individual categories.

Ten individual awards were given to members of The Parthenon staff. These included five first-place awards, two second-place awards, one third-place award and two honorable mentions.

"I am particularly proud of this year's awards because of the student editors involved in the production," said Marilyn McClure, the newspaper's adviser who is retiring Aug. 10. "The editors are to be commended for putting out a quality product. I'm really proud of them."

The individual awards are as follows:

First-place awards

Best columnist - Greg Roberts for his Jan. 26 column, "To the Guy who Broke
Into my Car."

Best front page - Matt Haught for the Jan. 26, Sept. 21 and Oct. 4 editions.

Best newspaper design - Joshua DeLung, Kyle Dyer and Matt Haught
for editions dated Sept. 21, Oct. 5 and Nov. 2.

Best news photo - Rasmi Hunt for the Aug. 31 front-page photo of flooding in
Huntington.

Best sports column - Matt Gajtka for his Aug. 30, Sept. 21 and Sept. 27
columns.

Second-place awards

Best sports column - Ryan Hanchett for his Oct. 12, Nov. 1 and Nov. 9 columns.

Best sports news story - Grant Traylor, no date given.

Third-place award

Best news headline - Matt Haught for his Sept. 20, Nov. 1 and Nov. 8 headlines.

Honorable mentions

Best front page - Matt Haught for edition dated Feb. 23.

Best sports feature - Matt Gajtka for the Sept. 22 story, "Putting
the Pieces Together."

For more information, contact McClure at (304) 696-2736.

.

   
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Friday August 3, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

State of West Virginia, Marshall University applaud release of 'We Are Marshall' DVD

With this week's announcement of the Sept. 18, 2007 release date for the DVD of "We Are Marshall" from Warner Home Video, West Virginians will see the state and Marshall University receive attention for the story about one of the most tragic events and spirited recoveries in college sports history.  With featurettes about the state of West Virginia and Marshall University, Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures have provided the state with a unique opportunity to share good news about the university, economic development and travel in the Mountain State.

The single-disc DVD release comes nine months after the film opened in theaters across the country and will renew interest in the story of the way a university and a community grew after the  November 1970 Marshall University football team, coaching staff and supporters died as the plane they were in attempted to land at Huntington's Tri-State Airport.

"The movie is not just about our loss, but about our strength and our ability to survive and grow from such a heart-wrenching experience," said Gov. Joe Manchin.  "As governor, I am pleased that the state, the city of Huntington and Marshall University were able to be an integral part of the production and introduction of the film."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said, "The upcoming release of the 'We Are Marshall' movie on DVD signals the next chapter in what has been an amazing experience for the Marshall community.  Through the making of this inspirational film, people from across the United States have gained a greater awareness and affinity for Marshall University, the Huntington community and the State of West Virginia.

"We are already seeing this impact expressed through increased interest in our university, especially from prospective students and their families," Kopp continued.  "We appreciate the creativity, hard work and commitment of McG, the film's director, and all of the talented people at Warner Bros. who succeed in telling our story, which has a timeless message, in a meaningful and compassionate manner."

The five-minute West Virginia featurette is made all the more special because it is narrated on camera by the three lead actors of "We Are Marshall" and because it is an auto play feature, which means it is the first thing viewers will see when the DVD begins playing.   Matthew McConaughey, Matthew Fox and Oscar-nominee David Strathairn share their enthusiasm for the state with Gov. Manchin.

The DVD also includes "Marshall Today," a comprehensive look at the University since the events that are portrayed in the movie.  The segment features well-known and highly successful Marshall alumni such as Bob Cosmai, former Hyundai America CEO; Verna K. Gibson, former President and CEO of the Limited Stores Division of The Limited Inc.; CNN correspondent Joe Johns; Broadway singer Mark McVey, Olympic silver medalist Lea Ann Parsley and New York Jets quarterback Chad Pennington. They reflect on how Marshall prepared them for life after college, and marvel at how the University has evolved since their time on campus.

The West Virginia Film Office along with Marshall University played important roles in the decision by Warner Bros. to film some of the most moving scenes in the film in Huntington, W. Va.  Discussions between the state and the film company began in 2005 and filming took place in the spring of 2006.  The historic Keith-Albee Theater in Huntington was the site of a gala hometown premier on Dec 12, with the national release on Dec. 22.

"We Are Marshall" will be available Sept. 18 on standard format in both widescreen and full frame formats and in HD DVD and Blu-ray versions.


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Thursday August 2, 2007
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CAZ director named Vice President for Research at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. John M. Maher, executive director of the Chemical Alliance Zone, Inc. (CAZ) since October 2003, has been named Vice President for Research with the Marshall University Research Corp. (MURC), effective Sept. 1, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. Maher replaces Dr. Howard Aulick, who retired.

"I am looking forward to working with everyone in the Marshall community and continuing the good work of the Research Corporation," Dr. Maher said. "We want to make the Research Corporation a leading service organization for the university, make our environment conducive to growing the research enterprise substantially, and build on our excellent record of compliance and economic development. Many significant opportunities are on the horizon for Marshall, and we at the Research Corporation will be working to make those opportunities a reality."

MURC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that serves as the fiscal and administrative agent for sponsored research and other projects conducted by Marshall University. The corporation has the authority to enter into agreements with external funding agencies on behalf of the university, and it provides a complete range of administrative and fiscal services in support of funded projects.

The Chemical Alliance Zone is a nonprofit group of citizens, labor leaders, educators, government officials, chemical executives and business leaders committed to maintaining and expanding the presence of the chemical industry in Cabell, Kanawha, Putnam and Wayne counties. As director, Dr. Maher served as the chief executive of a statewide collaborative organization devoted to economic development in the chemical and allied sectors.

Dr. Maher is also President and Managing Partner of Rampant Technology Partners, LLC, a South Charleston-based chemistry and materials consulting and research firm. Before serving at the Chemical Alliance Zone, he worked for 21 years at Union Carbide, serving in a broad range of technical and managerial assignments, in areas as diverse as catalysis, plant technology support, capital project execution and new business development.

Dr. Maher is a graduate of Cornell and Harvard Universities. He received his A.B. in Chemistry from Cornell University in 1976, a Master of Science from Harvard in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Organic/Organometallic Chemistry from Harvard in 1986.

"Beginning with his academic credentials to his accomplishments in new business creation, Dr. John Maher brings to Marshall University impressive credentials and achievements in both research and research-based economic development," Kopp said. "His entrepreneurial outlook and proven ability to lead research program development bode well for Marshall University as we intensify our commitment to research that will yield new scientific breakthroughs, create new business opportunities and expand job growth in our region. I am confident that Dr. Maher is the right person to lead Marshall University's research enterprise."

Dr. Maher was born in Texas, grew up in New York City and lives in Charleston with his wife Regan. He may be reached at (304) 696-4748, or via e-mail at maherj@marshall.edu.


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Thursday August 2, 2007
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

Marshall University Graduate College invites potential students to meet the faculty

SOUTH CHARLESTON - Marshall University Graduate College is opening its doors for an evening to give potential students the opportunity to learn about the variety of advanced degrees conveniently offered at the South Charleston campus.

Doors will be open from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7, in the Robert C. Byrd Academic Center, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., South Charleston.

Kemp Winfree, Vice President for Regional Operations, said he hopes to see a great turnout for the event.

"Marshall University's South Charleston Campus is right in the heart of the Kanawha Valley providing opportunity to busy professionals who want to continue their education and enrich their careers," Winfree said.  "If you have ever considered advancing your education, come and meet our faculty and learn how we can help you meet your goals."

Many programs are accessible at the South Charleston campus. Depending on career goals and experience, people can apply to one of nearly 50 programs. Faculty and staff representing several programs will be on hand during the open house event. Several programs will be represented including:

       College of Business - MBA and Executive MBA, Health Care Administration, Human Resources Management.

        College of Information Technology and Engineering - Engineering with emphases in Engineering Management and Environmental Engineering; Environmental Science, Information Systems and Safety; Technology Management with emphases in Information Security, Information Technology, Environmental Management, Manufacturing Systems, Transportation and Pharmacy in collaboration with the University of Charleston.

        Graduate School of Education & Professional Development - Special Education, Counseling, Elementary and Secondary Education, Reading Education, Doctoral Programs, Leadership Studies and School Psychology.

        College of Liberal Arts - Humanities and Psychology.

Admission and financial aid experts also will be on hand to answer questions.

To access information about the graduate school online, go to http://www.marshall.edu/mugc/schas/.

For more information, contact Lalena Price, University Communications, at pricel@marshall.edu or (304) 746-1989.


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Tuesday July 31, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans can win tickets to WVU-Marshall game at Paint the Capital City Green pep rally

CHARLESTON - Two lucky Marshall University fans have an opportunity to win tickets to watch their Thundering Herd face off with the West Virginia University Mountaineers at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington. All they have to do is show a little green and a lot of spirit.

All tickets to the 10th anniversary of Paint the Capital City Green, which takes place Wednesday, Aug. 15 in Charleston and is presented by Friends of Coal, will be entered into a drawing. The winner will get two tickets to the Friends of Coal Bowl Sept. 8.

Tickets are on sale now for $35 per person.

Paint The Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel. This annual event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Marshall fans will get to meet President Stephen J. Kopp, head football coach Mark Snyder and other members of the university's coaching staff.  The event begins with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7:15 p.m.

"I always look forward to Paint the Capital City Green," Snyder said. "I hope that all Herd fans in Charleston will come out and support this great event."

For ticket information, call (304) 696-7138.


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Tuesday July 31, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Early Education Center offers development institute for West Virginia Pre-K educators

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Early Education Center Outreach Program will offer its Inquiry Support System summer professional development institute for West Virginia Pre-K educators Aug. 6-10 at Pullman Plaza in Huntington.

The summer institute will include Pre-K educators from Boone, Calhoun, Clay, Logan, McDowell, Mingo, Roane and Wyoming counties, and will focus largely on the integration of 21st Century skills into West Virginia public Pre-K classrooms. 

The West Virginia Pre-K initiative, mandated in 2002, requires that each county have a functioning Pre-K program by 2012.  In an effort to assist counties with the development of their programs, the MUEEC has designed an outreach program which will offer educators a 10-month professional development program.

The five-day summer institute will be followed by learning community meetings, quarterly workshops, electronic support and various other forms of correspondence and assistance to help educators learn how to integrate critical thinking and other 21st Century skills into their curricular framework.

"The summer institute is a wonderful opportunity for West Virginia Pre-K educators to begin their year-long journey with the MUEEC Outreach Program and to integrate 21st Century learning skills into their preschool classrooms," MUEEC Director W. Clayton Burch said. "The educators attending the institute will receive training in digital photography, technology literacy and a holistic approach to cultivating critical thinking and problem-solving skills for young children."

During the summer institute, participants will attend workshops at Pullman Plaza, and also will spend time at the MUEEC, which is a model classroom for the state of West Virginia.  Participants also will learn about integration of technology into the early childhood classroom by attending workshops at Marshall's Drinko Library computer lab, where they will learn to utilize the digital camera they will receive for participation.

"At the institute, participants will be grouped into learning communities, and will also begin work on their classroom strategic plans, which will be utilized by the participants throughout the school year to gauge the successes and/or challenges they experience," said Outreach Coordinator Monica DellaMea.  "A primary focus of the Inquiry Support System is to assist Pre-K educators in the state to think critically about their teaching methods.  Ultimately, the impact will be seen in the young children who are served by Pre-K programs throughout the state."

A strategic plan has been established which will make the professional development system available to all 55 West Virginia counties by 2012.  The strategic plan can be found on the MUEEC's Web site at www.marshall.edu/coehs/mueec

The MUEEC is a service program of the Marshall University College of Education and Human Services.  The outreach program is funded by the support of a Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation grant, as well as contributions from the participating school districts/agencies.   For more information, call (304) 696-6301 or e-mail mueec@marshall.edu.


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Friday July 27, 2007
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Lockridge named Senior VP for Finance and Administration; Fox promoted to Senior VP for Information Technology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Anita Lockridge, who has held numerous senior-level financial positions in the healthcare field over the past 16 years, has been named Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration at Marshall University, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Lockridge replaces Herb Karlet, who is now serving as Dean of Business Services with the Marshall Community and Technical College.

Kopp also announced that Dr. Jan Fox has been promoted from Vice President for Information Technology/Chief Information Officer to Senior Vice President for Information Technology/Chief Information Officer.

"Both of these individuals are highly accomplished and bring proven talent, experience and expertise in their respective fields to their new roles," Kopp said. "Beyond their considerable talents, they also bring an abiding dedication to the continued success of Marshall University. I look forward to the leadership and contributions both will make as members of the senior staff."

Lockridge, a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), began her career as an auditor for the McDonald's Corporation in 1980. She has more recently served in the healthcare field as the Chief Financial Officer of the largest public hospital in the state of Tennessee located in Memphis, as Vice President of Finance at a hospital in Fort Worth, Texas, and as Senior Vice President, CFO at a hospital in Greenwood, S.C.

"I am thrilled to be here and to have the opportunity to work in higher education, to carry out the mission of the university and to help students succeed," Lockridge said. "Both healthcare and higher education serve a specific group of people for the public good. I am confident that my skill set will transition into higher education, and that I will make a positive impact."

Lockridge, who was born and raised in Chicago, received a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from Chicago State University, and a Master of Science degree in accounting from the University of Memphis. Her husband, Dr. T. Maurice Lockridge, is an assistant professor in Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

Fox has been at Marshall since 1984 and CIO since 1996. She is a tenured faculty member in the School of Medicine. Fox received her Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Biology from Marshall and her Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration from West Virginia University.

Her administrative responsibilities include the integration of Information Technology into all aspects of education, administration and research throughout the Marshall community.  Her principal management responsibilities include Computing Services, University Libraries and Distributed Education.  

Fox serves as chair of several technology committees, is the previous chair of the statewide Information Technology Council of State CIO's and is the state representative to the Southern Growth Policy Technology Committee. In addition, she serves on the Governor's West Virginia Broadband Committee, is Secretary of the West Virginia TeleAlliance, and is a board member of the West Virginia Network for Telecomputing and MissionWV. 

"We will continue to utilize the power of Information Technology to implement our bold strategies at Marshall," Fox said. "These strategies will continue to position Marshall University as a national leader in American higher education for the 21st Century. I, and all of my team, appreciate Dr. Kopp's support of our efforts."

Fox is married to William Cremeans, Jr., a biologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. They have two children.


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Tuesday July 24, 2007
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Cotroneo new president of Marshall Community and Technical College

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Keith J. Cotroneo, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs at Quincy College in Quincy, Mass., for the past two years, is the new president of the Marshall Community and Technical College (MCTC).

John Hess, chair of the Marshall University Board of Governors' Community and Technical College Committee, said Cotroneo was offered and accepted the job today. He starts at MCTC Sept. 1.

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted Friday, July 20 to approve the recommendation of the MCTC Board of Advisors that Cotroneo be offered the presidency. Today, the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education approved the recommendation.

"We're excited to have Dr. Cotroneo join us," Hess said. "He brings a lot of experience in education administration to our Community and Technical College, and will be a great asset as we move forward and grow this institution."

Cotroneo replaces Dr. Robert B. Hayes, who has served as the college's interim president since November 2006.

"I'm really excited," Cotroneo said of his new job. "It's an important time for the community college and the university. I'm looking forward to being at the community college and providing greater access to the citizens of West Virginia and to assisting the local community and the state in economic development."

Cotroneo was one of three finalists for the position. The other two were Dr. Kathy J. D'Antoni, Vice Chancellor for the West Virginia Community and Technical College System, and Dr. Susan D. Huard, Dean of Learning and Student Development at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson, Conn.

"I'm really impressed with the community," Cotroneo said of Huntington. "Things are headed in a positive direction."

Before going to Quincy in 2005, Cotroneo served as:

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs at Broome Community College in Binghamton, N.Y., from 1998 to 2005;
  • Dean of Instruction and Chief Academic Officer at Treasure Valley Community College in Ontario, Ore., from 1995 to 1998;
  • Associate Dean and Assistant to the President at Hagerstown Community College in Hagerstown, M.D., from 1992 to 1995;
  • Associate Dean at Hagerstown Community College from 1988 to 1995.

Cotroneo received a Bachelor of Science degree from Auburn University in 1976, a Master of Education from the University of Georgia in 1979, a Specialist in Education from the University of Georgia in 1985, and a Doctor of Education from the University of Georgia in 1987.

The Marshall Community and Technical College offers 11 certificate and 23 associate degrees. Enrollment in fall 2006 was 2,580.


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Tuesday July 24, 2007
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Marshall computer science students conduct robotics research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University computer science students, as well as faculty from the Colleges of Science and Information Technology and Engineering, are participating in a multi-disciplinary project to build a sensor suite for the U.S. Navy to be used on autonomous marine vehicles.

Through the efforts of U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, Spatial Integrated Systems (SIS) of Rockville, Md., and its partners were awarded a four-year, $24.7 million contract in to build a sensor suite for the United States Navy to be used on autonomous marine vehicles.

The project is referred to as Autonomous Maritime Navigation (AMN) and all of the software development will take place in West Virginia.  Marshall University is one of the research partners. The three Marshall professors involved in the project are Joe Fuller, associate professor of computer science, Dr. Venkat Gudivada, professor of computer science, and Dr. Peter Saveliev, associate professor of mathematics.  The three Marshall computer science students working on the project are Camden Clutter of Clarksburg, W.Va., Shawn Cotton of Huntington and Brad Fitzwater of Eleanor, W.Va.

According to Gudivada, the goal of the AMN project is to develop a set of integrated hardware and software that will enable boats and ships to autonomously navigate in waterways. This requires intelligent data fusion from an array of sensors including sonar, radar, GPS and digital cameras (stereo vision), Gudivada said.

Though humans have the innate ability for exceptional vision perception, endowing computers with human vision is still an elusive problem even in a laboratory environment, according to Gudivada. He said choppy waters of the oceans and uncontrolled lighting conditions of the outdoors only make the computer vision even more elusive.

Fuller, who also serves as a consultant for SIS states, said for years he has seen students educated in computer science in West Virginia forced to leave the state to find employment in high-tech positions.

"I am delighted that Senator Byrd was able to secure funding for this project that will allow high tech to grow in West Virginia," Fuller said. "The work the computer science students do will be extremely valuable to the project and the experience they gain may lead to eventual employment in a rewarding job located in West Virginia."

Gudivada and Saveliev are focusing on approaches and algorithms for generating 3D points using stereo vision. This capability is needed to accurately estimate the distance of obstacles such as ocean vehicles and coast line so that a marine vehicle can steer itself clear from the obstacles.

Clutter, Cotton and Fitzwater are spending the summer working on a variety of efforts in support of the project.  These efforts include 3D viewing, 3D point generation using cameras, sonar, GPS, system integration and sensor fusion. The three students are conducting their research and developing software under the direction of Gudivada and Saveliev.

"There is no dispute that computers and software have fundamentally touched all our lives both at work and home to varying degrees," Gudivada said. "The next wave of advances in computers and software will unfold many new applications, one of them being robots. Though robots have been widely used in manufacturing industry for a while, their full potential will be realized when they are capable of performing hazardous tasks such as bomb diffusion, search-and-rescue operations and hostage recovery.

"It is timely and very exciting for Marshall to be involved with robotics research," Gudivada continued. "We are grateful to Senator Byrd for securing funding for this project. The AMN project not only helps to establish a strong robotics research program at Marshall, but, more importantly, helps to mentor and train our bright students in this exciting field that has numerous commercial applications. Furthermore, the research that will result from the AMN project will help us to showcase our college to attract inspired high school students to study computer science at Marshall."

Fitzwater said he believes robotics research area is interesting for a variety of reasons. 

"The problems that we have encountered so far are unlike anything that I have been exposed to," he said. "Hence, there is a new learning experience at each progression.  The concept of dealing with problems that are both extremely difficult and have not been solved yet excites me. As I progress, I find that I am constantly challenged, which makes me inspired and intrigued."

Shawn Cotton said the project has allowed him to experience what it would be like to have a software development job out in the real world.

"This project is challenging and intriguing," Cotton said. "Solutions to the problems that I am working on have the potential for high impact. The project has allowed me to see how many possibilities are there to expand our horizons with research."

Clutter said, "Doing robotics research has been a great experience so far and can only get better. The research that I and the others are doing is consistently challenging, pushing us to think differently. I hope that, through this research, we pave the way to a greater emphasis on robotics engineering and automated systems here at Marshall."

Dr. Tony Szwilski, interim dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the project is "another indication of the quality of our students and academic programs in the College of Information Technology and Engineering."


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Friday July 20, 2007
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Recent School of Journalism grads receive prestigious awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two recent graduates of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications received prestigious awards earlier this summer.

Paul Gessler, a broadcast journalism major, placed second in the National Television Broadcast News division of the Hearst Championships, held in June by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation Journalism Awards Program. Gessler won $4,000 for his second-place finish.

Jen Smith, a former student with WMUL-FM, Marshall's public radio station, received a Gold Award in The Hermes Creative Awards 2007 competition. The winners were named in a letter dated Saturday, June 30 from Arlington, Texas.

"This is the second year in a row we have placed someone in the top five in that category," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's School of Journalism, said of Gessler's award. "The Hearst awards are considered the collegiate Pulitzers. Paul began the year competing against at least 100 other top programs from around the country."

The Hearst Championships were the culmination of the 2006-07 College Journalism Awards Program, with 107 undergraduate colleges and universities competing under the auspices of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Smith's Gold Award winning entry, "Addicted," was an in-house promotional announcement she wrote and produced. It has been used in WMUL's rotation from May 1, 2006 through the present time.

"This is a noteworthy accomplishment for WMUL-FM to be recognized for writing and producing an effective media self-promotional announcement," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM. "I am proud for the honor this award bestows on WMUL-FM, the School of Journalism and Marshall University."

The Hermes Creative Awards were created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media.  All entries are judged on a point system in areas including creativity, design, innovation, presentation and technical merit.  There were more than 3,000 entries in The Hermes Creative Awards 2007 Competition.


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Thursday July 19, 2007
Contact: Sonja G. Cantrell, Director of Recruitment, Marshall Community and Technical College, 304-696-2243

MCTC to Host Credit Fair

The Marshall Community and Technical College (MCTC) will host an Adult Credit Fair on Monday, July 23 in Room 101 of Cabell Hall.

Staff members from several departments will be available to evaluate for college credit any previous work experience, certifications, college courses, military training and continuing education courses.  On hand to answer questions and provide information will be  representatives from Admissions, Financial Aid, associate deans, program coordinators and faculty.

Although the event is primarily aimed at nontraditional students, incoming freshmen are also being encouraged to attend. 

Marshall employees are invited to drop by from 4-5 p.m. and the public is welcome from 5-7 p.m.  Refreshments will be provided and there will be door prizes.

For additional information, call ext. 66282 or contact CTC@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday July 17, 2007
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Marshall sponsors free electronic prescribing to help state doctors improve patient safety

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Through a partnership in a national initiative known as National ePrescribing Patient Safety InitiativeSM (NEPSISM), Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health is offering West Virginia doctors free use of software that will let them write prescriptions electronically.

"Electronic prescribing is one of the best steps to improve patient safety, and now it will be one of the easiest as well," said Dr. Gretchen E. Oley, associate dean for clinical affairs for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "E-prescribing is an effective way to avoid the use of duplicate drugs or adverse drug interactions, and it provides physicians with instant access to warnings about allergies and drug contraindications. It's more efficient for patients as well, because the order goes directly to the pharmacy, and the pharmacy can contact the doctor when refills are needed."

The program also can help curb the abuse of prescription medications, noted Jennifer T. Plymale, director of the Center for Rural Health.

Through the program, Marshall is providing West Virginia doctors free use of the eRX NOWTM software developed by Allscripts (Nasdaq: MDRX), the leading provider of clinical software, information and connectivity solutions that physicians use to improve healthcare.  This software already is used by more than 30,000 physicians to write millions of electronic prescriptions each year.

"Medication errors represent a significant challenge for our nation and we can and must do better by taking action - right now," said Glen Tullman, Co-Chair of NEPSI and Chief Executive Officer of Allscripts. "We welcome Marshall as our newest regional supporter and commend them for their strong commitment to this simple yet remarkable idea - that providing free electronic prescribing for every physician will ultimately reduce errors and improve care."

In addition to providing financial support for the program in West Virginia, Marshall and the Center for Rural Health will help the state's physicians get up and running with the necessary software as needed. Physicians can find out more by going to www.wverx.com and by visiting www.nationalerx.com.

National ePrescribing Patient Safety Initiative Fact Sheet

        According to the Institute of Medicine, each year more than 1.5 million Americans are injured and more than 7,000 die from preventable medication errors. In addition, the problems related to paper prescriptions cost billions of dollars each year. NEPSI brings together a who's who of the leading technology and healthcare stakeholders with one joint purpose: to provide every physician in America with safe, secure, free software they can learn to use in less than 30 minutes.

        NEPSI is led by Allscripts, the leading provider of clinical software, information and connectivity solutions that physicians use to improve healthcare, and by Dell Computers, the world's leading computer company. Other technology companies sponsoring NEPSI include Cisco Systems, Fujitsu Computers of America, Microsoft and Sprint Nextel. Google is the search sponsor for NEPSI while SureScripts is the connectivity sponsor and Wolters Kluwer Health provides the content. Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health is the regional sponsor making the program available free to West Virginia physicians.

        The eRx NOW web-based software is designed to appeal to physicians in solo practice or small groups who may not be ready to move to a comprehensive Electronic Health Record. It is available to every healthcare provider with legal authority to prescribe medications, and requires no download, no new hardware and minimal training.

        eRx NOW  includes the ability to quickly generate secure electronic prescriptions that can be sent computer-to-computer or via electronic fax to 55,000 retail pharmacies - more than 95 percent of all U.S. pharmacies - via SureScripts.

        All prescriptions are instantly checked for potentially harmful interactions with a patient's other medications using a real-time complete medication database provided by Wolters Kluwer Health, as well as real-time notification of insurance formulary status from leading payers, plans and pharmacy benefit managers.

        eRx NOW  also includes the ability for physicians to search and find targeted health-related information for themselves or patients using a custom search engine from Google. The NEPSI Custom Search Engine was created for medical professionals and enables those using the eRx Now product to get search results tailored for the medical community.

        eRx NOW offers physicians and patients the highest levels of security available, with multiple redundant layers of firewall, deep-packet inspection, SSL encryption, database encryption, intrusion detection and virus, spyware and malware protection for the program's remote servers. To ensure patient privacy, all patient information is stored on remote servers in a secure location, so information cannot be compromised even if a physician's computer or phone is stolen.


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Friday July 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to host 110 Booth Scholars from Wayne County

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host 110 Wayne County students in the ninth through 12th grades for two weeks beginning Sunday, July 15 as they participate in the annual Booth Scholars Summer Program on the Huntington campus.

 

The Booth Scholars Program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia in their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College with students from Wayne County, Kentucky and Virginia participating. The Wayne County portion of the program moved to Marshall in 2004.

 

"The lack of exposure outside the traditional classroom is limited in Wayne County," said Brenda Napier, the program's director. "We are trying to fill that gap."

 

The first week is for the 30 freshmen in the program only. The 80 returning sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the freshmen on campus the second week. All Booth Scholars qualified by having at least a 3.0 GPA and scoring above average on the WESTEST.

 

During their first week at Marshall, the freshmen will take classes in public speaking, photography, theatre performance and electronic portfolio. They also will receive laptops and graphing calculators.  All of the students will take part in a variety of academic, social and cultural activities, according to Napier.

 

Napier said she and her staff have received a lot of good feedback from previous participants.

 

"My mentors are now former scholars, and my former mentors are now instructors (in the program)," Napier said. "That says a lot about the integrity of the program, that we are able to sustain such a good reputation."


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Friday July 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to host 110 Wayne County students participating in Booth Scholars Summer Program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host 110 Wayne County students in the ninth through 12th grades for two weeks beginning Sunday, July 15 as they participate in the annual Booth Scholars Summer Program on the Huntington campus.

The Booth Scholars Program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia in their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College with students from Wayne County, Kentucky and Virginia participating. The Wayne County portion of the program moved to Marshall in 2004.

"The lack of exposure outside the traditional classroom is limited in Wayne County," said Brenda Napier, the program's director. "We are trying to fill that gap."

The first week is for the 30 freshmen in the program only. The 80 returning sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the freshmen on campus the second week. All Booth Scholars qualified by having at least a 3.0 GPA and scoring above average on the WESTEST.

During their first week at Marshall, the freshmen will take classes in public speaking, photography, theatre performance and electronic portfolio. They also will receive laptops and graphing calculators.  All of the students will take part in a variety of academic, social and cultural activities, according to Napier.

Napier said she and her staff have received a lot of good feedback from previous participants.

"My mentors are now former scholars, and my former mentors are now instructors (in the program)," Napier said. "That says a lot about the integrity of the program, that we are able to sustain such a good reputation."

For more information, contact Napier at (304) 696-5205 or visit www.marshall.edu/bsp.


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Wednesday July 11, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'We Are Marshall' premiere proceeds presented to Keith-Albee, MU Foundations; Marshall academics, athletics also benefit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Proceeds from the Dec. 12, 2006 premiere of "We Are Marshall" in Huntington were distributed today in presentations at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, Inc., in downtown Huntington.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III, Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, former Marshall University Foundation Inc. interim Chief Executive Officer John Kinzer and Curtis McCall, president and CEO of Marquee Cinemas, presented checks totaling $431,500.

The $400,000 in proceeds from the premiere event at the Keith-Albee were split evenly between the Keith-Albee and Marshall scholarships. The Keith-Albee received $200,000, and Marshall received $100,000 for academic scholarships and $100,000 for athletic scholarships.

The Marshall University Foundation Inc. received $31,500 from McCall for the new Marquee Cinemas Scholarship. Those funds came from the premiere shown Dec. 12 on all 16 screens at Pullman Square's Marquee Cinemas.

"On December 12th, 2006, we witnessed firsthand the power of collaboration as the City of Huntington was transformed into Hollywood," Kopp said. "Beyond wonderful memories, the many individuals and organizations that worked together to make the Huntington premiere a success can take great pride in our announcement of funding for both the Keith-Albee and scholarships at Marshall University. Not only are we preserving our past with this historic venue, but we are also investing in the future education of our students who have demonstrated their ability in academics and athletics."

David Tyson, co-president of the Keith-Albee Foundation, said the performing arts center's future brightened instantly with the donation of $200,000 from the premiere.

"This is a huge day for the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center," Tyson said. "This is the first step towards our renovation project to make this a tri-state arts center."

Kinzer was interim CEO of the Foundation at the time of the premiere. Dr. Ron Area was recently hired as the permanent CEO of the Foundation and senior vice president for development at Marshall, and assumed his duties two days ago.

"We were very pleased that Marquee Cinemas agreed to partner with us on the premiere and it was very generous of them to use their net proceeds to endow a scholarship," Kinzer said.

The Marquee Scholarship goes to full-time, undergraduate theatre majors in Marshall's College of Fine Arts who have an overall minimum GPA of at least 2.50.

Dr. Sarah Denman, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost at Marshall, said academic scholarships funded by the $100,000 from the Keith-Albee premiere "will continue to build on the legacy of those who have already given to provide even more opportunities for students in the future."

"This is a great day for Marshall University and an even greater day for the students," Denman said. "It is the perfect ending to the entire experience of 'We Are Marshall.' The most important thing an institution can do is provide opportunities for students to pursue degrees in higher education. One way to do that is through the generosity of donors for scholarships."

RJ Gimbl, associate athletics director for the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, said the organization is grateful for the $100,000 donation to athletic scholarships.

"We'd like to thank the friends and family of Marshall University that supported the 'We Are Marshall' premiere," Gimbl said. "The celebration of this special event will be felt for years to come, with these proceeds benefiting Marshall student-athletes of the present and the future."


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Wednesday July 11, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington Scottish Rite surpasses $200,000 in contributions to Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Foundation today presented a check for $43,000 to the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center in the Department of Communication Disorders, bringing to $201,000 the amount it has contributed to the center.

Gov. Joe Manchin joined Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Board of Governors Vice Chair Menis Ketchum at the presentation, which took place at the speech and hearing center in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Scottish Rite's partnership with Marshall began in March 2002.

Kathryn Chezik, chair of the Department of Communication Disorders, said the financial support from the Huntington Scottish Rite helps fund a clinical faculty position providing speech-language services in the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center.

"This position allows us to serve more children in the tri-state area and to assist in the clinical education of the students in the Department of Communication Disorders," Chezik said. "We're thankful for their hard work and generosity and their continued commitment to our program."

Amy Knell is the clinician whose position has been funded by Huntington Scottish Rite for the past three years.

"I'm very grateful and very thankful," said Knell, who earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Marshall. "Everything they do is from the heart and it really shows."

Knell said she sees pediatric patients with communication and swallowing disorders at the center.

"If not for the Scottish Rite, Marshall would not have the clinical program it has and the speech and hearing center would not be able to see as many children as it sees," Knell said.

Pat Oshel, president of the Huntington Scottish Rite, said raising funds and contributing to the speech and hearing center has been a "very rewarding experience" for the organization.

"We are quite proud of our accomplishments with the clinic and the fund-raising activities and we look forward to many more years of working with Marshall," Oshel said. "This is an excellent example of what can be accomplished when the university and the community work together. It's a fantastic partnership."

The money is raised locally through private donations and a major fundraising project each year. This year's project is a pig roast, scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 28 at the 4-H Camp on Alternate Route 10.

One of the features of the pig roast is a silent auction, with items up for bid including a week's vacation in Hilton Head, S.C., a basketball signed by Phoenix Suns Coach and former Marshall star Mike D'Antoni and his brother, Dan, also a coach with the Suns, and some NFL memorabilia.

For more information or to purchase tickets to the pig roast, call Larry Bolling at the Scottish Rite office at (304) 522-1430. Tickets are $25 each and are available in advance or at the gate. Children younger than 12 are admitted free.


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Thursday July 5, 2007
Contact: Pat Dickson, South Charleston campus, (304) 746-1971

Glenwood Project features information about Glenwood estate and its significance in the development of the Kanawha Valley

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Glenwood estate, a graceful Georgian-style mansion that sits on the corner of Orchard and Park streets on Charleston's west side, houses historically important gems of information about Charleston's earliest settlers who transformed the region from a bucolic rural landscape into a bustling urban center.

The estate will be the subject of a day-long seminar, which is open to the public, Saturday, July 28.

Now, through the Glenwood Project, funded by a grant by the West Virginia Humanities Council, the graduate humanities program at the Marshall University Graduate College seeks to acquaint the public with the rich history of the Glenwood estate.  Through the grant, the Glenwood Project plans to make information more readily accessible through public events like the seminar and the development of a Web site. The free seminar will take place at the Graduate College's South Charleston campus.

The mansion was built in 1852 by James Laidley, the founder of a local newspaper, the Western Register. Through the years it was home to members of some of Charleston's most prominent families, including the Laidley, Summers and Quarrier families.

At the time the house was constructed it was part of a vast estate that encompassed 366 acres that ran from Delaware Avenue to the bottomland along the Kanawha River.

Development of Charleston's west side began in 1870 after John Brisben Walker and William H. Playford purchased a 110-acre parcel from James and Sally Carr.  Subsequently, the bottomland was divided into lots and Charleston's transition from a rural to an urban region was underway.  College officials say Glenwood is of particular significance because it contains documents and archaeological information that sheds light on the transition.

The Glenwood estate was passed down through families until 1978 when the last owner, Lucy Quarrier, deeded it to the foundation of the institution then known as the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies, now part of Marshall University.

The seminar runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in room 319 of MUGC's administration building with a light lunch provided.  The event will be opened by Anne "Jake" Ferris, a Quarrier descendant, and will be followed by remarks about the Glenwood Project by Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, chair of the Marshall's graduate humanities program.  Kemp Winfree, vice president for regional operations at Marshall, will discuss the MUGC foundation and the Glenwood estate.

Other presentation topics include the significance of the Glenwood estate to local history by Henry Battle, KVH&PS president; the Glenwood database by Angelica Settle of the humanities program; Glenwood in the classroom by Leska Foster of Holz Elementary; and archeological materials from the Glenwood quarters by Will Updike, Cultural Resource Analysts Principal Investigator.

The morning keynote address, "Glenwood 1852. Why?  The Context for an Historic House," will be given by Eugene Harper of the humanities program.  Billy Joe Peyton of West Virginia State University will deliver the afternoon keynote address, "The Peculiar Institution at Glenwood:  Putting a Face on Slavery in the Kanawha Valley."

For those interested, Winfree will conduct a tour of the Glenwood estate following the symposium.

Seating is limited so anyone interested in attending should contact Sarah Funk at funk2@marshall.edu or leave a message at (304) 746-8975 no later than July 16.  Callers should leave a name and mailing address. For additional information, go to the Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/gsepd/humn/.


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Thursday July 5, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

HSTA Summer Institute attracts 80 students from West Virginia; 'Fun With Science' takes place July 15-20 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 80 rising ninth-grade students from throughout West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 15-20 to participate in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for the participating students. The students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools. The program is offered in 26 West Virginia counties.

The institute at Marshall, titled "Fun With Science," enables the students to learn more about science and the opportunities that are available to students majoring in science. It is one of three HSTA summer institutes, according to David Cartwright, program director of the event at Marshall. Others, he said, are at West Virginia University and West Virginia State University.

"Students participating in 'Fun With Science' will learn about digestion through working in wet labs and the effects of diabetes on the body and its prevention," Cartwright said. "They also will meet with local area doctors and learn about diversity in West Virginia."

Cartwright said College Night, scheduled for Wednesday, July 18, will be an opportunity for the students to see "the beauty of Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College."

"It is important that the HSTA students find Marshall a warm and friendly place so that in the future, they may choose us as their university," Cartwright said.

The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established in 1994 with 45 students from two counties.

The opening ceremony and dinner for the "Fun With Science" Institute is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 15 in the John Marshall Room on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center. "Fun With Science" teachers will be trained at Marshall during the week of July 9-13.

More information is available by calling Cartwright at (304) 696-6024 or by visiting the HSTA Web site at www.wv-hsta.org.


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Tuesday July 3, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Upward Bound Program sponsors blood drive July 10 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The American Red Cross will conduct the only blood drive at Marshall University this summer from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, July 10 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The drive is being sponsored by the Marshall University Upward Bound program, currently being conducted on the Huntington campus for high school students in grades 10-12 from Cabell, Mingo and Wayne counties in West Virginia.

Upward Bound sponsored a similar blood drive last year and collected 52 pints, beating its goal of 40 pints. The goal this year is to surpass last year's collection total.

The public is invited and encouraged to take part in the blood drive. For more information, call the Upward Bound Program at (304) 696-6846.


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Monday July 2, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Student Advertising Team places seventh at national event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) Team placed seventh early last month at the national championship event in Louisville, Ky., culminating a year of national recognition for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Marshall's finish was just three points out of the money awarded to the top four teams, and placed it in the top four percent nationally. There were 190 teams that began the NSAC competition in September.

At the district level, 150 teams competed with the top 18 teams moving on to the national competition. Marshall won District 5 in April and represented Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia at the national event.

The MU Ad Club used the money it won at the district competition plus donations from District 5 American Advertising Federation (AAF), the Advertising Association of West Virginia and several local donors to take five presenters and nine other students to the national competition and convention. Of the nine, seven were team members and two were observers. In all, 18 students worked on the campaign.

The five presenters were Krystal Profitt of Beckley, W.Va.; Whitney Jarrell of Barboursville, W.Va.; Tori Marra of Clarksburg, W.Va.; Lee Tabor of Huntington and Heather Boyles of Charleston, W.Va.

The students competed on Thursday, June 7 and Friday, June 8. After the competition, they met and talked with advertising professionals at the AAF National Convention.

The Ad Club's performance highlighted what Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, described as a "good year for national recognition of the entire program."


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Friday June 29, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU chemistry chair named one of CUR's Volunteers of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael Castellani, professor and chair of Marshall University's chemistry department, has been named one of two Volunteers of the Year by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR).

Castellani is one of almost 200 members of the legislative body of the Council on Undergraduate Research, a national organization whose goal is to strengthen science, mathematics and engineering research programs at predominantly undergraduate institutions.

CUR has nine disciplinary divisions: biology, chemistry, geosciences, mathematics and computer science, physics/astronomy, psychology, social sciences, undergraduate research program directors, and at-large/administrative.

"I am extraordinarily proud to receive this award," Castellani said. "It's always gratifying to have your work appreciated by such a terrific group of people."

Castellani has served on CUR's Chemistry Council for the past six years. He currently serves as chair of the organization's Outreach Committee, which considers new programs to interact with the organization's membership and community at large and evaluates approved programs.  He has helped coordinate CUR's annual Posters on the Hill event on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., for the past three years.

Posters on the Hill is an event similar to Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in West Virginia in which college students from throughout the state present their discoveries in poster format and talk to legislators about their findings. The target audience for Posters on the Hill is the U.S. Congress and involves students from across the United States.

Castellani also has served on CUR's Summer Research Fellowships Committee and the committe that selects recipients of the CUR Fellows Awards, which are based on participants' involvement and research activities.

For more information, call Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


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Tuesday June 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Foundation establishes James E. Gibson Scholarship

Huntington, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has established a scholarship to honor James E. Gibson through gifts from his family and friends.

The James E. Gibson Scholarship will be awarded each year to a full-time, undergraduate student from Summers County High School in West Virginia who has a minimum high school GPA of 2.50 and has demonstrated financial need.

Jason Mitchell, a 2007 graduate of Summers County High School, is the first recipient of the Gibson scholarship.

"I wanted to help some kids from Summers County who have the IQ and ability to go to college, but lack the finances," said Gibson, who attended grade school and junior high school in Hinton, W.Va., in Summers County, before moving to Huntington. "Not very many people from Summers County go to Marshall."

Summers County High School is a consolidation of four high schools, including Hinton High.

"It is a wonderful thing to be able to give back to the kids, to Marshall University and to the state of West Virginia," Gibson said. "Our whole future is in our kids. We need to get them educated in West Virginia and employed in West Virginia to keep them here."

Gibson, a lifetime member of the Marshall University Alumni Association, is currently serving on the boards of the Society of Yeager Scholars and The Marshall University Foundation Inc.

Gibson was honored with the MUAA Distinguished Service Award in 2006 and, along with his wife, Verna K. Lemaster Gibson, was inducted into the Marshall University Pathway of Prominence and President's Circle.


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Monday June 25, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cam Henderson documentary wins Emmy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Cam Henderson: A Coach's Story," a documentary on the life of the former Marshall College basketball and football coach, received an Emmy Award on Saturday, June 23 at the 43rd annual Midwestern Regional Emmy Awards.

The ceremony, hosted by the Ohio Valley Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, was held at the Hyatt Regency in Columbus, Ohio. The Emmy - television's highest honor - was awarded in the "Sports - One-time Special" category.

In all, 620 entries representing the work of more than 70 organizations yielded 253 nominations.  A complete list of Emmy recipients may be found at www.ohiovalleyemmy.org.

"Cam Henderson" is the result of three years of research and production. Regarded by many as West Virginia's greatest coach, Henderson invented basketball's zone defense and fast break. His basketball teams at Marshall won 358 games in 20 seasons.

Multiple Emmy-Award winners Deborah Novak and John Witek produced and directed the documentary. Other highly acclaimed documentaries credited to Novak and Witek include Ashes to Glory: The Tragedy and Triumph of Marshall University Football, Hearts of Glass, Blenko Handcraft, Blenko Retro and New Music.

"Cam Henderson" also has been honored with the prestigious first-place Platinum Award from Houston's international film festival, Worldfest-Houston.

A DVD of the program with four bonus features is available at Huntington-area bookstores.


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Friday June 22, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Governor's School for the Arts returns to Marshall for third year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eighty-four rising high school juniors living and attending school in West Virginia will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus for three weeks next month to take part in the 2007 West Virginia Governor's School for the Arts, a residential program providing individual and in-depth group instruction in the arts.

 

The School for the Arts runs Sunday, July 1 through Saturday, July 21. It also was at Marshall in 2005 and 2006. The school will begin a three-year stay at West Liberty State College in 2008.

 

"Marshall has done a wonderful job with the Governor's School for the Arts," said Sherry Keffer, Director of Governor's Schools for the Department of Education and the Arts. "It's the dedication throughout. Marshall does an outstanding job creating opportunities for the students."

 

The students chosen to take part in the school auditioned last winter in six artistic areas: creative writing, dance, instrumental music, theatre, visual art and vocal music. Auditions took place at South Charleston High School and East Fairmont High School.

 

Skilled artists and teachers will work with students who demonstrate potential in the six artistic areas. In addition, the Governor's School for the Arts attempts to broaden the students' understanding of the arts through interdisciplinary courses focusing on common elements in the arts disciplines.

 

"It is so good for those kids," Keffer said. "Many of these students have very limited opportunity to study arts. A lot of them feel like they are different. But at the School for the Arts, they find out there are 83 others as passionate about the arts as they are. It is truly a life changing experience. It's more than an eye opener; it's a heart opener."

 

Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music at Marshall and dean of the School for the Arts, and the Governor's Schools Advisory Council perceive the school as a chance for the arts to awaken and flourish in the hearts of the participants. A lively schedule of classes, special programming and an extended field trip are among the activities scheduled.

 

As students have done the past two years, this year's group will take a three-day trip to New York City during the second week of the school. The trip features visits to Broadway and museums along with other art experiences.

 

"They get to see places they've only read about in books," Keffer said. "The majority of them have not even had a chance to do something like this."

 

Students will arrive and check in at the Memorial Student Center from 1 to 3 p.m. July 1. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will welcome the students to campus during the opening ceremony, which starts at 3 p.m. at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

 

The names of each participant and a complete schedule of the events in this year's School for the Arts are available at www.marshall.edu/cofa/gsa.


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Thursday June 21, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners crowned in Stock Market Game conducted by Center for Economic Education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Cheat Lake Middle School in Morgantown and Woodrow Wilson High School in Beckley are this spring's winners of The Stock Market Game, a 10-week simulation played in the fall and spring and conducted by Marshall University's Center for Economic Education.

 

In the game, teams of students in the fourth through 12th grades have a mythical $100,000 to invest in any stock traded on the New York or NASDAQ exchanges. The winning team from Susan McCauley's class at Cheat Lake finished the game with $117,872 for an 18 percent return. Team members include Roman Taratini, Garrett Richardson, Michael Gibson and Phillip King.

 

The second-place team members from Doug Cipoletti's class at Woodrow Wilson are Joshua Presgraves, Terra Gardner and Brandie Criss. They finished the game with $114,107, a 14 percent return. Dr. Neil Arneson, director of Marshall's Center for Economic Education, said Cheat Lake wins $200 for finishing first and Woodrow Wilson wins $100 for placing second.

 

The Marshall center has been conducting the game in West Virginia since 1992. The simulation is funded by the Securities Industry Foundation for Economic Education. Arneson said the purpose of the simulation is to give students a chance to learn about investing, planning and goal setting.

 

"We try to get the students to see how this isn't just a game to play to see who wins," Arneson said. "We want them to see ways of learning about financial literacy and future planning through an activity that is fun as well as educational."

 

Arneson said 217 teams, made up of "a great mix of students," including some from elementary schools, vocational schools, student investment clubs and girls scout groups from the eastern panhandle, participated in the spring game. Of that total, 136 finished with a positive balance while 81 lost money.

 

"The activity fits in nearly every part of the school curriculum and is very easy to use in the classroom by teachers and students," Arneson said.

 

To learn more about The Stock Market Game, visit http://smgww.org/.

 


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Wednesday June 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Ronald G. Area named CEO of Marshall Foundation, Inc.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ronald G. Area, development director of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City the past two years, has been named Chief Executive Officer of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., and senior vice president for development for Marshall University, Dr. Joseph B. Touma, chairman of the foundation's board of directors, announced Monday, June 18.

 

Area replaces John Kinzer, who has served as CEO on an interim basis since June 1, 2006. Area will begin his duties at Marshall Monday, July 9. He and his wife, Beth, have two married daughters and one grandson.

 

"Ron is experienced, professional, a visionary and a people person," Touma said. "His wife, Beth, is enthusiastic and will be a great asset for the community and the foundation as well. They both will become part of our community very quickly."

 

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said he is pleased to welcome Area to Huntington at a time when Marshall University, like all institutions of higher education, is so dependent on fundraising.

 

"Ron and Beth are eager to move here and join the Marshall family," Kopp said. "With his experience and enthusiasm, I believe Ron is the perfect choice for this important position and will do a great job. I look forward to working closely with him to advance philanthropic giving to Marshall."

 

Area said he is looking forward to the transition to Huntington and being a part of the Marshall University community.

 

"I am pleased and honored to be joining Marshall University and its foundation at such a pivotal and exciting time in its history," Area said. "During my academic career, I visited the campus several times and took notice of Marshall's steady growth and development.  When I became aware of a key leadership vacancy, I eagerly applied and hoped I would have a chance to share my experiences and expertise. After meeting and visiting with many wonderful individuals, my wife and I were convinced that this was the place for us.

 

 "I believe that by partnering closely with President Kopp, the university community and committed volunteers to increase private support, we can chart an exciting course for the University's future," Area said of Marshall. "Marshall University is a treasure and is poised for greatness.  I am eager to be a part of such a dynamic academic community."

 

While he is looking forward to working with Area, Kopp said Kinzer did an exceptional job as interim CEO of Marshall's foundation.

 

"John did far more than just fill in while the search for a permanent CEO took place," Kopp said. "In fact, the foundation flourished under his leadership. John said when he was named interim CEO that one of his objectives was to have the foundation and development offices running smoothly when the new CEO comes in. He certainly achieved that objective and much, much more. We are very appreciative of his efforts."

 

Area has degrees from the University of Arkansas, Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y., and Oklahoma State. Before joining the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, he worked in higher education from 1978 through 2004. He started as assistant dean of continuing education at UT-Chattanooga, where he remained for 15 years. During that time he also was dean of continuing education, vice chancellor of development twice and executive vice chancellor.

 

While at UT-Chattanooga, Area completed the Summer Institute of Educational Management at Harvard University. He also gained experience and had oversight in the areas of credit and non-credit programs, evening college, public radio, legislative relations, marketing, public relations, athletics, alumni affairs and development.

 

From 1992 to 2004, Area was president and CEO of the Oklahoma State University Foundation. He was responsible for providing leadership, coordination and management for all private fund raising programs for the Oklahoma State University system.

 

Area and his administrative team designed, implemented and completed Oklahoma State's first comprehensive campaign, raising in excess of $260 million. He also provided leadership and senior management of two for-profit subsidiaries, two limited liability corporations and the OSU Foundation Holding Company.

 


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Monday June 18, 2007
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Marshall University to sponsor Habitat House

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is teaming with Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity to build a Habitat House this fall, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. The house will be built in a neighborhood near Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

A steering committee of Marshall faculty, staff and students will be working with Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity on fundraising, volunteering and logistics for the project. This is the first time Marshall and Habitat for Humanity have partnered on a project of this scale.

 

Kopp said he anticipates campus-wide participation in what he termed as a "challenging and rewarding endeavor."

 

"However, this service project will be an important part of the First Year Experience Program designed for members of the Class of 2011," he said. "This community service project will create a valuable opportunity for our students to become involved and have a direct impact on the problem of homelessness in our community."

 

Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, said he is "absolutely ecstatic" about the partnership with Marshall.

 

"Marshall University always has been and continues to be a leader in so many ways for this community," Kluemper said. "As the director of development for Habitat, a resident of the city of Huntington, and alumnus of Marshall University, I could not be more excited about the contribution they are going to make to this city by providing safe, decent and affordable housing. We are so blessed that the university has agreed to partner with us on such a landmark project."

 

"Service to our community is an important component of our long-range Strategic Vision," Kopp said. "It is also a longstanding part of the Marshall identity and mission. A meaningful and practical approach to educating our students in responsible civic engagement is to involve them in a community project that produces tangible benefits, like helping a family in our community build a home."

 

Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian ministry, whose mission is to partner with qualified families in need, and provide them the opportunity for safe, decent, affordable housing. To volunteer with the organization, visit www.huntingtonareahabitat.org.


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Math Workshop offered at Marshall as alternative to remedial courses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's University College, in partnership with the school's math department, has developed the Math Workshop as an effective and cost-efficient alternative to traditional remedial courses.
   
Remedial courses in math are required for students who score less than 19 on the math portion of the ACT, or less than 460 on the quantitative (math) part of the SAT. The courses must be completed before the student registers for any college-level math course.
   
The Math Workshop is a short, non-credit option designed to prepare students to take college-level math. Successful completion of the workshop eliminates all of a student's remedial math requirements and allows that student to immediately register for college-level math courses. 
   
The Math Workshop costs $185, which includes instruction, books, materials, tutoring and supplemental instruction. That is a savings of more than $419 for West Virginia residents who choose the workshop instead of the remedial math course. Out-of-state students will save more than $1,600.
   
Marshall University is offering the Math Workshop in the summer D 2007 session, which runs from July 10 to Aug. 10. The times are 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday. Students may attend the workshop at one of the Marshall University campuses in Huntington, South Charleston or Point Pleasant.
   
Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The priority registration deadline for summer D is June 29.
   
For more information, students may call (304) 696-3252 or send an e-mail to uc@marshall.edu. Additional information, the registration form and registration instructions can be found at http://www.marshall.edu/uc.


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New Works Festival brings new plays to campus of Marshall University

The first annual Robert Hinchman New Works Festival will be presented by Marshall University Theatre and the Marshall University College of Fine Arts.  The three night festival will present both staged and unstaged readings of five new plays over three consecutive evenings, June 28-30, 2007.  All readings will begin at 8:00PM in the Francis Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse.  Each evening's readings will be followed by a discussion/question and answer session with the playwright, director and cast.  Participation is both welcome and encouraged.  The schedule of events is as follows:

On June 28, 2007 three new one-act plays will be presented--two by student playwrights from Middle Tennessee State University--Wedding Bells by Adriana Echeverri, and Interrogation by M. A. Cantrell.  Also presenting that evening will be Lunch At the Fork n' Finger by published playwright and Marshall University Theatre Alumni, Jonathan Joy. 

On June 29th, a new screenplay: Serious Business by T. Michael Murdock will be presented.  Mr. Murdock is a Marshall University Alumni and a professional actor/director who currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

 

 Finally on June 30th a new musical, Collis P! -written by one of Huntington's most recognizable personalities, Clint McElroy; offers (in musical form) a biographic tale of the founding father of this great city.  As an added bonus, three new songs have been written for Collis P! by Mountain Stage's own Larry Groce, will be presented as part of the presentation. 

 

For further information or to purchase tickets, visit the Marshall University Theatre box office or call 696-ARTS (2787).  Tickets are priced at $5 per evening or a full festival pass (all three nights) @ $12.  Tickets go on sale Tuesday, June 22nd.


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Engineering Academy at Marshall attracts students from four states

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Thirty-two rising high school juniors from 20 schools in West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus June 17-22 to take part in the seventh annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE).

 

Dr. William E. Pierson, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science at Marshall, said the ultimate goal of the academy is to persuade the students to consider pursuing a degree in engineering.

 

"Of course, we know that not all of these students will select engineering as a career, so we hope that at the very least campers will leave the academy with a better understanding of what engineers do and the profound difference that engineers make in our everyday lives," Pierson said.

 

Pierson said students are selected for the camp based upon their interest in and aptitude for engineering. Grades, courses taken and letters of recommendation are taken into consideration. The camp primarily tries to attract rising high school juniors.

 

"Because of the low number of women in the profession, one objective of the camp is to introduce more girls to the opportunities in the engineering profession," he said.

 

The week's evens provide real examples of engineering, Pierson said. Each day is full of activities that showcase many different specialties in the engineering field.

 

Here is the complete schedule for the Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence:

 

Sunday, June 17

2-3 p.m.: Check-in, Marshall Commons, Willis Hall

2:10-2:40 p.m.: Campus tours from Willis Hall lobby every 10 minutes

3-5 p.m.: Welcome and presentation by Stuart Harshbarger from the Johns Hopkins University, Memorial Student Center.  Families of students are encouraged to stay for this event.

5-9 p.m.: Icebreaker exercises, dinner and team building exercises, Memorial Student Center and Gullickson Hall Room 5 (GH5)

 

Monday, June 18

8-11:30 a.m.: Introduction to CAD/CAM, using AutoCAD Inventor to make a CO2 racer, Gullickson Hall (GH) Room 206A

11:30 a.m.-Noon: Lunch, Harless Dining Hall

12:30-4:30 p.m.: Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering:  Surveying, GPS, and Environmental Sampling, Buskirk Field

4:30-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

5:30-6:30 p.m.: Concrete mixing, GH basement

6:30-8 p.m.: CO2  Racers, GH 5

 

Tuesday, June 19

8-9 a.m.: Introduction to trebuchet design, GH 5

9:30-11:30 a.m.: Trebuchet design and construction, Buskirk  Field

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Luncheon with Society of American Military Engineers members, Harless Cafeteria, Ed Grose Room  

12:30-2 p.m. : Complete trebuchet construction

2-3 p.m.: Trebuchet competition

3-4 p.m. : RTI ITS Research Project Presentation, GH 5

4-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

5:30-6:30 p.m.: GPS Scavenger Hunt, Memorial Fountain

6:30-8 p.m.: CO2  Racers, GH 5

 

Wednesday, June 20

8-9:30 a.m.: Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems (using Lego robotics), GH 5

9:30 a.m.-Noon: Work on robot design/construction, GH 5

Noon-12:30 p.m.: Lunch, Harless Dining Hall

 

1-2 p.m.: Finalize robot design, GH 5

2-3 p.m.: Robotics competition, GH 5

3-4:30 p.m.: Concrete testing, GH basement

4:30-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

5:30-8 p.m.: Complete work on CO2 Racers, GH 5

 

Thursday, June 21

8 a.m.-5 p.m.: Field trips and discussions with engineers:

9 a.m.-11:15 p.m.: Toyota Plant, Buffalo, W.Va.

11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Lunch at Golden Corral, Cross Lanes, W.Va.

12:30-1:15 p.m.: Travel to Memorial Tunnel

1:30-2:45 p.m.: Tour Memorial Tunnel

2:45-3:30 p.m.: Travel to Columbia Gas

3:30-5 p.m.: GIS presentation and panel discussion

5-6:15 p.m.: Travel to Water Ways

6:30-9 p.m.: Dinner and pool party, Water Ways

 

Friday, June 22

8:45-10:15 a.m.: CO2 Races, Gullickson Gym

10:30-11:15 a.m.: EEAE evaluation and wrap-up, GH 5

11:30-1 p.m.: Awards luncheon: John Marshall Room, Memorial Student Center - students, families, sponsors, staff and guests

 

Financial support for the camp is provided by Marshall University and sponsors from the engineering community, such as the Rahall Transportation Institute, Society of American Military Engineers Huntington Post and Learning for Life. In addition to financial support, these and other organizations provide volunteers and equipment for various activities throughout the week.

 

For more information on the camp, visit the academy's Web site at www.marshall.edu/eeae, send an e-mail to eeae@marshall.edu, or call (304) 696-6007 or (304) 696-5453.

 


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Ruth Flowers Thornton Scholarship established at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has established a scholarship to honor Ruth Flowers Thornton, a two-time Marshall graduate and former high school and junior high school teacher in Cabell and Wayne counties whose teaching career spanned 33 years.

 

The Ruth Flowers Thornton Scholarship will be awarded each year to a West Virginia resident who is a full-time Marshall student with a major in either English or Classics in the College of Liberal Arts (COLA).

 

On Thursday, June 7, Jonna Hughes with the Herschel C. Price Educational Foundation presented the Marshall Foundation with a check for $15,000 to endow the scholarship. It is the fourth scholarship established by the Price Foundation at Marshall.

 

"I was completely overwhelmed, deeply honored," Thornton said of the new scholarship. "I'm still walking around on cloud nine."

 

Other scholarships established at Marshall by the Price Foundation are the Herschel C. Price Scholarship in 2000, the E. Joann Price Memorial Scholarship in 2001 and the Theodore "Ted" Hundley III Scholarship in 2005.

 

Thornton received both her B.A. degree in 1943 and her master's degree in 1951 from Marshall. She taught Latin and/or English at Huntington High, Huntington East, Milton and Vinson high schools, and Cammack and West junior high schools. She also taught evening courses in English at Marshall University for eight years. In addition, Thornton taught in Baghdad, Iraq from 1955 through 1956 while her husband was in the military.

 

"The Price Foundation likes to honor someone who is very deserving and Ruth is very, very deserving," Hughes said. "We are very happy to honor Ruth."

 


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Work to place underground telecommunication duct bank begins Monday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students, faculty, staff and visitors are asked to avoid a specific area on the Huntington campus for at least four weeks beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, June 11 as preparation for construction of new housing continues.

 

Mike Meadows, director of facilities planning and management at Marshall, said work to place an underground telecommunication duct bank from Prichard Hall to the new housing project site will begin at that time. 

 

The work will begin at Prichard Hall, proceed east between Hodges Hall and the Marshall Community and Technical College building and cross 18th Street to the existing tennis courts. The work is scheduled to take four weeks.

 

Meadows said all students, faculty, staff and visitors should avoid the area as much as possible during the four-week period due to sidewalk removal and trench excavation.

 


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Marshall plans public sale of surplus computing equipment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct a special public sale, by written bid, of surplus computing equipment from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, June 11 at the Surplus Computer Processing Center at 201 21st St., across the street from the State Electric Supply Co. showroom.

 

Chuck Elliott with Marshall University Computing Services said about 150 computers will be sold in lots of five or more.  Ten Dell C840 laptops, with Windows XP Professional installed, will be sold as individual units.  Six of the best desktop computers will be sold as individual units and include a monitor, mouse and keyboard, and come with Windows 2000 Professional installed.

 

Many computers include a Windows license affixed to the case.  Monitors and possibly some networking equipment also will be sold.  Other than the individual units being sold, the computers have no software installed.

 

Registration and bid forms will be provided at the site, and sealed bids will be opened on Tuesday, June 12 in the Purchasing Department. Successful bidders will be contacted and required to pick up the items between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. no later than Thursday, June 14.  Cash payments or checks payable to Marshall University will be required before the property can be removed.

 

Marshall University reserves the right to reject any or all bids. While most of the computers have been operated and tested by staff, Marshall takes no responsibility and makes no guarantee for items sold. All property is offered for sale on an "as is-where is" basis. No warranties or guarantees are given or implied, and refunds or exchanges on defective equipment are not authorized.

 

More information along with an in-depth description of the computer equipment to be sold is available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucs/computersale.  Interested buyers may also visit the Web page and subscribe to e-mail notifications for detailed descriptions of equipment and future sales.  The next sale date is Sept. 17.

 


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Marshall's 8th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival to feature saxophonist Chris Vadala

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Chris Vadala, one of the country's foremost woodwind artists, will be the featured guest artist in Marshall University's 8th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz festival Wednesday, June 13 through Saturday, June 16.

 

Dr. Ed Bingham, Marshall's director of jazz studies, said Bluetrane, Marshall's faculty jazz ensemble, and the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band also will be featured in the festival.

 

"The festival is special because we spend an entire week totally devoted to learning and performing jazz," Bingham said. "We host high school students, many of whom have no previous experience in playing jazz, together with our Marshall jazz students and faculty to perform with professional jazz artists. It's a chance to interact with each other in a fun, informal setting and present the product of the week's work to the community."

 

Bingham said Vadala is one of the best jazz saxophonists in the world.

 

"He has a special gift for working with student groups and bringing their performance up to a high level," Bingham said. "He has a wonderful sense of humor and puts on a terrific show. He is a true virtuoso whose music speaks to a wide audience. Best of all, he is one of the nicest people you will ever meet. His enthusiasm for music is infectious."

 

Vadala is in demand as a jazz/classical performer and educator. He has appeared on more than 100 recordings to date, as well as innumerable jingle sessions, film and TV scores, performing on all the saxophones, flutes and clarinets.

 

His performing career has been highlighted by a long tenure as standout woodwind artist with the internationally recognized Chuck Mangione Quartet, which included performances in all 50 states, Canada, Australia, Japan, the Phillipines, China, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Bermuda, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Dominican Republic, England, Italy, France, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Poland, Belgium and Switzerland.

 

Vadala has performing credits on five gold and two platinum albums, plus two Grammy awards, one Emmy, one Georgie (AGVA) and one Golden Globe award.

 

In addition, he has performed and/or recorded with such greats as Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, B.B. King, Chick Corea, Ella Fitzgerald, Aretha Franklin, Placido Domingo, Sarah Vaughn, Natalie Cole, Herbie Hancock, Ray Charles, Henry Mancini, Doc Severinsen, Phil Woods, Joe Lovano and many others.

 

As one of the Selmer Company's requested Artist in Residence clinicians and D'Addarrio/Rico Artists, Vadala travels worldwide, performing with and conducting student and professional jazz ensembles, symphonic bands and orchestras. Within the past six years alone, Vadala has appeared with more than 200 groups across the nation and Canada.

 

Here is the schedule of Jazz-MU-Tazz events:

  • 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, Jomie Jazz Center, Bluetrane, MU's faculty jazz ensemble. Admission is free.
  • 8 p.m. Thursday, June 14, Jomie Jazz Center, student combo jam session. Admission is free.
  • 8 p.m. Friday, June 15, Jomie Jazz Center, Chris Vadala with Bluetrane. Admission is free.
  • 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 16, Harris Riverfront Park, Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band with Chris Vadala. Tickets are available from the Huntington Pops Orchestra (304) 525-0670, or at http://www.huntingtonsymphony.org.

 

For more information, contact Bingham at (304) 696-3147.

 


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Summer Learning Program begins June 11 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Summer Learning Program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. weekdays Monday, June 11 through Friday, July 6, according to Dr. Barbara P. Guyer, professor of special education and director emeritus of Marshall's H.E.L.P. Program.

 

The program is for students in grades kindergarten through six who have learning disabilities, mental impairments or behavior disorders.

 

Classes will be small, with no more than five students in each class, so that time will be available for individual attention, Guyer said. Emphasis will be placed on improving reading (decoding skills), reading comprehension, reading speed, arithmetic examples and story problems, improving self-esteem, improving organization skills, improving test-taking strategies and improving study skills.

 

Anyone interested in having his or her child participate in the program may call Guyer at (304) 696-6317 or 696-2851, or e-mail Gary Hatfield at HGary33861@aol.com. Cost is $175 for West Virginia residents, $195 for metro residents in Kentucky and Ohio and $275 for non-West Virginia residents.


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Tuesday June 5, 2007
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Marshall University to sponsor Habitat House

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Marshall University is teaming with Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity to build a Habitat House this fall, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. The house will be built in a neighborhood near Marshall's Huntington campus.

 

A steering committee of Marshall faculty, staff and students will be working with Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity on fundraising, volunteering and logistics for the project. This is the first time Marshall and Habitat for Humanity have partnered on a project of this scale.

 

Kopp said he anticipates campus-wide participation in what he termed as a "challenging and rewarding endeavor."

 

"However, this service project will be an important part of the First Year Experience Program designed for members of the Class of 2011," he said. "This community service project will create a valuable opportunity for our students to become involved and have a direct impact on the problem of homelessness in our community."

 

Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, said he is "absolutely ecstatic" about the partnership with Marshall.

 

"Marshall University always has been and continues to be a leader in so many ways for this community," Kluemper said. "As the director of development for Habitat, a resident of the city of Huntington, and alumnus of Marshall University, I could not be more excited about the contribution they are going to make to this city by providing safe, decent and affordable housing. We are so blessed that the university has agreed to partner with us on such a landmark project."

 

"Service to our community is an important component of our long-range Strategic Vision," Kopp said. "It is also a longstanding part of the Marshall identity and mission. A meaningful and practical approach to educating our students in responsible civic engagement is to involve them in a community project that produces tangible benefits, like helping a family in our community build a home."

 

Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity is a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian ministry, whose mission is to partner with qualified families in need, and provide them the opportunity for safe, decent, affordable housing. To volunteer with the organization, visit www.huntingtonareahabitat.org.

 


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New Marshall University clinical center opens

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The clinical addition of Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health opened its doors to patients today (June 4) on the heritage-rich site of the former Fairfield Stadium.

 

Now known simply as the clinical center, the building will be named during its formal dedication ceremony later this year.

 

Located at 1249 15th St. in Huntington, the center houses two departments of Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine: Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Services. Cardiovascular Services will have a new phone number - (304) 691‑8500 - but numbers will remain the same for Internal Medicine, including the Hanshaw Geriatric Center and the Diabetes Center.

 

The top three floors of the $24 million, 88,000-square-foot building will contain exam and treatment space. The ground floor has special teaching facilities for medical students. The center is expected to accommodate 250 patient visits per day.

 

The new building was funded through a federal appropriation secured by U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va.


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Wednesday May 30, 2007
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Orientation sessions to attract nearly 2,000 students to Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 2,000 incoming Marshall University students are expected to attend a series of orientation sessions this summer beginning in June.

University officials say the day-long sessions, filled with a variety of topics, are essential for easing first-time college fears experienced by parents and students.

"The main purpose of orientation is to allow all incoming students the opportunity to experience campus life before the start of the fall semester," said Jean Marie Gilman, director of recruitment at Marshall University.  "Students can visit campus buildings, discover extracurricular activities, meet new people and, most importantly, register for classes and meet with their academic advisors."

Dr. Sarah Denman, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, said orientation is the true beginning of the college experience.

"In a sense, the student and the institution are affirming the decision to attend Marshall University is the right one," Denman said. "Orientation is the beginning of the pathway that connects the new student to everyone on campus." 

Orientation sessions for students include academic advising, residence hall tours, a student services tour, a question and answer session, safety on campus issues and various other topics.   The sessions for parents include time with financial aid advisors, student services staff, campus safety issues and other academic and financial topics.

Orientation sessions are scheduled as follows:

  • June 20-21: Orientation for honors students only
  • June 22-23: Open to all students
  • June 25-29: (June 27 is for transfer students and June 28 for Marshall    Community and Technical College)
  • July 24-26: Open to all students
  • Aug. 16: Open to all students.

All programs run from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.   Students who have been admitted to Marshall University are encouraged to register for an orientation session.  This may be done either on line at www.marshall.edu  or by calling the orientation office at (304) 696-2354 or (800) 438-5392.

Gilman, in her first year at Marshall as director of recruitment, said she is excited at the prospect of meeting Marshall's newest students and their families.  

"It's a great feeling to see the students that we have recruited all year come to campus and becoming members of the Marshall family," she said. 


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Yeager Scholars Class of 2011 selected

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven students will begin their studies at Marshall University this fall as the newest members of the Society of Yeager Scholars.

The society is named for West Virginia native Ret. Brigadier General Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who piloted the first plane to break the sound barrier. This fall marks the 20th anniversary of the Yeager Scholars' first incoming class.

The 11 students were selected for their high aptitude test scores, excellent grades, interpersonal and communication skills, readiness to accept and meet challenges, and leadership potential.

They will join 29 other Yeager Scholars already on campus. Along with these students, they will participate in special interdisciplinary seminars and extracurricular activities designed to promote intellectual development and foster emerging leadership skills.

As Yeager Scholars, they are required to maintain a rigorous course load with a 3.5 GPA and participate in campus and community activities. Each also will have the opportunity to study literature, political science or history at Oxford University in the summer after their sophomore year, and will have another opportunity for study abroad in a program related to his or her major and/or foreign language minor.   

Competition for these scholarships was keen, with students applying from as far away as Michigan and Florida. The 11 students chosen were selected through three levels of review: examination of their applications and two interviews - one by local interviewers near their homes, and one by a panel of interviewers on the Marshall University Huntington campus.

The decision on selection of the 11 scholars was the result of hundreds of hours of work by many different people - university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars Board members and community members.

"We are in the enviable and difficult position of having a very talented and deep applicant pool. It is very hard to select only eleven," said Dr. Barry Sharpe, Executive Director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence. "They are an impressive group with exemplary academic records and strong indicators of leadership potential."

This group of scholars has a wide variety of academic interests, as does each year's entering scholars. While they were on campus for interviews in early March, they talked with professors about possible majors, such as biology, chemistry, English, history, journalism, music, nursing, political science and theater. Like many honors students, some of these scholars will end up with more than one major.

The following students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2011:

Ennis Ayla Barbery of Athens, W.Va. Barbery will graduate from PikeView High School and is interested in a career in journalism or law.

Laci Breanne Browning of Pineville, W.Va. Browning will graduate from Wyoming County East High School. She plans to major in biology and study medicine after graduation from college.

Brianna Cathleen Dickerson of Virginia Beach, Va. Dickerson will graduate from Princess Anne High School. She plans to major in psychology and pursue a career as a forensic investigator.

Elizabeth Anne Fleming of South Bend, Ind. Fleming will graduate from John Adams High School. She will play for the Marshall University volleyball team and plans to major in international affairs. She also would like to pursue a career as a United States Foreign Service Officer.

Rylee Grace Genseal of Sevierville, Tenn. Genseal will graduate from Gatlinburg-Pittman High School. She is planning to study medicine and serve as a general physician or pediatric oncologist.

Henry David Heisey of Worthington, Ohio. Heisey will graduate from Thomas Worthington High School. He plans to major in nursing and pursue a career in medicine or the health professions.

Megan Nicole Hunt of Ravenswood, W.Va. Hunt will graduate from South Charleston High School and plans to major in biochemistry and music. Her career interests include medical research and musical performance.

Sarah Elizabeth Ison of Greenup, Ky. Ison will graduate from Russell High School. Ison plans to major in biology and Spanish. Her career interests include medicine and veterinary medicine.

Ellen Kastner Moore of Knoxville, Tenn. Moore will graduate from Knoxville Catholic High School. She will play for the Marshall University women's tennis team and plans to major in biology in preparation for medical school or a career in the health sciences.

Margaret Maryann Stephens of Leon, W.Va. Stephens will graduate from Point Pleasant High School. She plans to major in biology and study medicine after graduation from college.

Zachary Dane Woods of Newnan, Ga. Woods will graduate from Northgate High School and plans to major in international affairs. He is interested in a career in government service.

For information about the Society of Yeager Scholars, contact Dr. Barry Sharpe, Executive Director, John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, by calling (304) 696-2475 or via e-mail, sharper@marshall.edu. Photos of each member of the Yeager Class of 2011 are available www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html.

###


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'Rendering the Landscape' students to present their work at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's joint Art-English course "Rendering the Landscape" will present their work at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 31, at the Birke Art Gallery in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The class brings writers and visual artists together to explore ways of representing landscape in all its manifestations - especially as a way of seeing the natural world.

Students and faculty spent a week at West Virginia State Park Twin Falls near Beckley, W.Va., staying in cabins, hiking the trails, identifying birds and other wildlife, and creating art.  The reading and art opening will feature works that originated from that experience, including drawings, photographs, poems, stories and more.

For more information contact John Van Kirk at (304) 696-6637 or via e-mail at vankirk@marshall.edu, or Emily Ritchey at (304) 696-2296 or via e-mail at ritchey3@marshall.edu.


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Friday May 25, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU professor Jean Edward Smith's biography of FDR published

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - FDR, a comprehensive biography of Franklin Delano Roosevelt by Marshall University professor Jean Edward Smith, was published last week by Random House.

Smith, who was one of three finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for his biography of Ulysses Grant, will present a lecture on FDR at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 5 at the Huntington Museum of Art. A reception and book signing will follow. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. Copies of the book will be available for sale in The Museum Shop.

Pre-publication reviews of FDR, an 880-page hardcover book, were ecstatic.

Publishers Weekly, in a boxed, starred review (its highest category), called FDR "a magisterial biography." Smith's "eloquent synthesis of FDR's complex and compelling life is remarkably executed and a joy to read," the review said.

Library Journal, in another starred review, labeled FDR "essential." "This page-turner is the best single volume biography available of America's 32nd president," it said.  

Kirkus Reviews also gave FDR a star and said, "An outstanding biography of 'the most gifted American statesman of the twentieth century'."

Other reviewers have been equally enthusiastic. John Meacham of Newsweek, author of Franklin and Winston, called FDR "a towering new biography." Syndicated columnist George Will wrote, "Jean Edward Smith, author of acclaimed biographies of John Marshall, the definer of the nation, and Ulysses Grant, whose sword saved the nation, now provides this study of Franklin Roosevelt, reviver of the nation. It will secure Smith's standing as today's foremost biographer of formidable figures in American history."

Random House apparently shares that view. It ordered a first printing of 75,000 copies - almost unprecedented for a scholarly biography.

Professor Smith said he remains cautious. "The Sunday New York Times has not yet printed its review, although it will soon," Smith said. "Until then, all bets are off."

For more information, call Jackie Dewald, program assistant with the Drinko Academy at Marshall University, at (304) 696-3183.


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Thursday May 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

More street, lane closures planned as church demolition continues

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - All lanes on 20th Street from 3rd Avenue to 5th Avenue in Huntington will be closed from 11 p.m. Tuesday, May 29 to 7 a.m. Wednesday, May 30 because of continuing demolition of the 20th Street Baptist Church, Jim Terry, Marshall University's director of public safety, announced today.

In addition, Terry said, the left three lanes of 5th Avenue from 19th Street to 20th Street also will be closed during that time. Only the right, or south, lane will be open during the eight-hour span.

Demolition of the church and the ensuing cleanup began Tuesday and is expected to take about 45 days. A Marshall University student recreation center will be built on the site.


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Thursday May 24, 2007
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Marshall University's Rahall Transportation Institute presents Rail-SORCE Partnership Award to CSX

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has selected John West, president of CSX Technology, as the first recipient of the Rail-SORCE (Railroad Safety and Operations Research Center of Excellence) Partnership Award.

Robert Plymale, director of the Rahall Transportation Institute (RTI) at Marshall University, announced the award today.

Rail-SORCE was established at the Rahall Transportation Institute at Marshall about a year ago to formalize industrial advisory and participation in research grants from the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA).

The award, created by RTI, recognizes outstanding contributions made by CSX Corporation and its subsidiaries ("CSX") in the furtherance of research conducted by the institute through its Rail-SORCE Advisory Board.  Most notable was subsidiary CSX Transportation's use of the Institute's R-Surveying Solution for use in hump yard engineering.

"It is with great pride that today we recognize CSX and its partnership with the Rahall Transportation Institute and Marshall University, which is furthering the development of new technologies for the rail industry," said Congressman Nick J. Rahall, for whom the Institute is named. "By revamping the way we evaluate the safety of our central hubs, RTI and CSX, with the help of Sen. Robert C. Byrd, are laying down the track-work towards a more secure, more efficient and faster railway. The emphasis on developing strong private-public partnerships between RTI and industry leaders was a founding vision of the Institute and today we celebrate that accomplishment."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the university "is proud to recognize the ongoing support and collaboration by the entire CSX team along with the personal contributions by CSX  Technology president, John West."

"With John's help the institute has had access to and use of CSX resources to conduct field tests which are a critical step in the evolution of any promising technology," Kopp said.

West said the partnership with the Rahall Transportation Institute at Marshall University is important to CSX.

"I and the entire CSX team are proud to accept it," West said of the award. "Advancing the research and development of technologies that solve railroading challenges will provide many benefits to CSX and the entire industry. For example, RTI has developed with our assistance an automated surveying tool for use in yards and rail corridors that is faster, cheaper and safer than the traditional methods of surveying the rail infrastructure.  We now use this tool at CSX Transportation."

The Rahall Transportation Institute at Marshall University is one of 12 National Transportation Institutes created by Congress in 1998.  RTI formed the Rail-SORCE Advisory Board in 2006 as a vehicle to engage with our nation's railroads and to seek their input and cooperation in research and development.


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Wednesday May 23, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Two Fundraisers hired at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John Kinzer, Interim Chief Executive Officer of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., today announced the hiring of two fundraisers.

Cory Dennison, a long snapper on Marshall's 2002 GMAC Bowl championship football team and a Cum Laude graduate of MU with a degree in political science, was hired as a Development Officer with the Marshall University Foundation. He reports to Rebecca Samples, Director of Annual Giving at Marshall University.

Larry Templeton, an adjunct professor the past two years in Marshall's College of Education and Human Services, was named Director of Development in the Lewis College of Business. He reports to Lance West, Vice President for Major Gifts at Marshall University.

Both Dennison and Templeton already are serving in their new positions.

"Cory is full of energy and enthusiasm," Kinzer said. "He relates well and will make a great fundraiser."

Dennison also is a former student body Vice President at Marshall and two-year member of the MU Board of Governors, in which he served as the student representative. He is a 2006 graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law, and has worked in the West Virginia Senate and with the Tyson and Tyson law firm in Huntington.

"I am really excited to have the opportunity to come back and work for my alma mater," Dennison said. "It is a great opportunity to help the university continue to grow."

Templeton is a 1974 graduate of Eastern Oregon University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in marketing. He was a high school teacher for 16 years and later served as Superintendent of Schools in three districts in Illinois.

"Larry brings a level of experience, maturity and understanding of business fundamentals that made him the obvious choice for this position," College of Business Dean Paul Uselding said. "At the level we want to operate there is a complex set of relationships among people and programs.  I think Larry will quickly learn this complex interplay and bring his own unique creativity and ideas to the Lewis College of Business."

Templeton said he looks forward to working for Marshall University and the Lewis College of Business.

"I am excited about working with the community of Huntington, the businesses, and leaders of the area in establishing a great working relationship," Templeton said. "In the time that I have been in the area I have found the people of West Virginia and especially the Huntington area to be extremely friendly."

Templeton may be reached at (304) 696-3421 and Dennison may be reached at (304) 696-2435.


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Monday May 21, 2007
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MU professor's book investigates Nazi policies of 'ethnic cleansing'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Phillip T. Rutherford, a Marshall University assistant professor of modern European history with expertise in the Nazi era, has written a book titled Prelude to the Final Solution: The Nazi Program for Deporting Ethnic Poles, 1939-1941.

The 344-page, hardcover book is published by University Press of Kansas. In describing the book, University Press writes that "Rutherford investigates Nazi policies of 'ethnic cleansing' to reveal the striking anti-Polish nature of the crusade to Germanize newly occupied territory and to show that these actions were a dress rehearsal for the Holocaust.

"Rutherford explores the origin and implementation of Nazi resettlement schemes in occupied western Poland, where Germany sought to reclaim territory for its expanding population by booting out the 'ethnically inferior' Poles who had lived there for generations. Focusing on the Wartheland region, he examines four major deportation operations carried out between December 1939 and March 1941, including the day-to-day logistics and actions overseen by the powerful German Central Emigration Office."

Rutherford, who earned his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 2001, has extensive teaching experience in European history, Twentieth Century Europe and German history. He also is the author of Absolute Organizational Deficiency:  The 1.Nahplan of December 1939 (Logistics, Limitations, and Lessons), and Central European History 2 (2003):  235-273." He also was a Charles H. Revson Foundation Fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies.

The following reviews are taken from the back cover of the book:

"Bit by bit, we are coming to understand the whole bizarre, cruel complex of Nazi racist policies. Rutherford has filled in an important section of that mosaic, illuminating the fate of those all-but-forgotten Polish victims and also showing us the links to the more deadly deportations to follow." - Geoffrey P. Megargee, author of Inside Hitler's High Command.

"Expertly exposes the conflict between the reach and grasp of Nazi resettlement policy in the East as ideology collided with wartime and economic realities on the 'parade ground of National Socialism.' " - Edward B. Westermann, author of Hitler's Police Battalions.

 "Carefully researched, engagingly written, with provocative and compelling arguments." - Doris L. Bergen, author of War and Genocide.

The book, which is part of the Modern War Studies series, is available for $34.95. Rutherford said it can be purchased available at Empire Books & News in downtown Huntington and Borders at the Huntington Mall.

Rutherford may be contacted at (304) 696-2719.


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Monday May 21, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Upward Bound program funded for four more years

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Upward Bound program has been notified by Congressman Nick Rahall's office that it has received funding for four more years with an initial annual budget of $344,012, according to Jackie Hersman, director of the program.

The program has been on Marshall's campus since 1972 and is funded by the United States Department of Education through a competitive grant that must be re-applied for every four years.  West Virginia's federal congressional delegation is instrumental in supporting these grants, Hersman said.

Upward Bound programs are designed to prepare and motivate low-income and/or first-generation high school students for a postsecondary education.  The program offers multiple services throughout the year and is best known for its intensive six-week summer program, when the students live on campus learning about college life and preparing for college level classes.

The Marshall University program serves 70 students from Cabell, Mingo and Wayne counties.  A highlight of this summer program is a partnership with the National Science Foundation that exposes the students to multiple areas of environmental science and culminates in a trip to Costa Rica in the summer of 2008. 

All students who make up the Upward Bound class of 2007 have been admitted to an institution of higher education with 90 percent of them planning to attend Marshall University.  Twenty-five percent of the class has received the PROMISE Scholarship.

For more information on the Upward Bound program, contact Hersman at (304) 696-6846 or at hersman@marshall.edu.


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Friday May 18, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Harold Blanco is first person from Marshall to finish SREB's state doctoral scholars program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Harold Blanco, the first person from Marshall University to be selected for the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) state doctoral scholars program, has been awarded a Ph.D. degree in technology education from Ohio University, thereby becoming Marshall's first nominee to finish that SREB program.

Blanco, a former faculty member in Marshall's department of Modern Languages, currently is coordinator of technology for MU's Higher Education for Learning Problems (H.E.L.P.) program and teaches part-time in the College of Education and Human Services. 

A native of Caracas, Venezuela, Blanco earned a master's degree in secondary education from Marshall in 2000.  He also has been a Minority Faculty Fellow at the Marshall University Graduate College in South Charleston.

SREB is a nonprofit organization that works with policymakers and leaders in 16 states to improve education at all levels.  The SREB-state doctoral program, in which Marshall participates, provides financial assistance and academic support to minority students who are admitted to doctoral programs.

Blanco was nominated into the SREB program by Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, vice president for Multicultural Affairs at Marshall.

"The collaboration between West Virginia and the SREB provides an incredible resource for eligible U.S. citizens to enroll in the SREB doctoral program, according financial assistance, mentoring and guidance while preparing for an academic career," Cleckley said.

For more information on the SREB doctoral scholars program or to request application materials, e-mail Feon Smith with Multicultural Affairs at Smithf@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/mcip.  


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Wednesday May 16, 2007
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Marshall University launches Progenesis Technologies, LLC

Huntington, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced establishment of the new biotech company Progenesis Technologies, LLC, the latest in a series of high-tech businesses entering the local economy after being created by university faculty.

The announcement took place during a news conference in the Maier Auditorium of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Progenesis is the brainchild of Drs. Hongwei Yu and Richard Niles, two basic scientists in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University. Yu is a microbial geneticist who has the capacity to alter the genome of bacteria to make commercially important products. Niles is an accomplished researcher with past experience in biotech start-up development.

"The establishment of Progenesis Technologies is another excellent example of how Marshall University is advancing research-based economic development," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "Our faculty and students are doing incredible research at Marshall. It is astounding to think how much more we could do with the creation of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) where we would have many more entrepreneurial researchers like Drs. Yu and Niles."

Marshall currently is seeking funding to create an endowment for MIIR, a new research and development program that will focus on biotechnology, biomanufacturing, nanotechnology and niche areas of applied molecular research.

Yu said the process of discovery takes thousands of hours of research to understand how bacterial genes work together to benefit an organism.

"What I do is make certain mutations in their genome so that they begin to manufacture useful products for us," Yu said.

In this case, alginate is the product.  Normally harvested from large brown seaweed, alginate has multiple applications (for items like beer and cosmetics, and for wound healing and drug delivery) with a worldwide market exceeding $88 billion annually.  Niles is helping Yu manage the multitude of business-related issues. 

"Using bacteria to manufacture useful products has incredible potential," Niles said, noting the business plan for Progenesis and future product lines. "With our current understanding of bacterial genomes and powerful gene manipulation techniques, we can produce new custom products such as biofuels, novel antibiotics and bacteria engineered to be super efficient at decontaminating waste products."

Progenesis licensed technology from the University invented by Yu and his post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Dongru Qiu, in which bacteria is used in the biomanufacturing of alginate.  The importance of this discovery is that it reduces the time and cost of production as well as environmental damage caused by the harvesting of seaweed.  It also allows the production of new kinds of alginate, not produced by seaweed, which will expand the market applications for this biopolymer.

"Professors Yu and Niles have developed a breakthrough technology for alginate production which will dramatically expand the scope and breadth of the commercial application of these materials," said John Maher, Ph.D., executive director of the Chemical Alliance Zone. "The entry of Progenesis Technologies, LLC into the CAZ Incubator will help lower the barrier to the successful commercialization of this exciting technology, and the success of Progenesis will have a dramatic economic development impact on the region as they tackle this significant market opportunity."

For more information about Progenesis Technologies, LLC, contact Niles at (304) 696-7323.


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Tuesday May 15, 2007
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MU doctoral clinical psychology students to participate in 'Give the Gift of Knowledge' event Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - On Wednesday, May 16, in recognition of National Women's Health Week, Marshall University doctoral clinical psychology students and health care providers from Ebenezer Medical Outreach, Inc., will be handing out literature related to women's emotional and physical health at a table sponsored by Empire Books and News at Pullman Square in Huntington.

The table will be set up outside Empire Books and News, which also will have a special display of books on the topics of women's health and self-help. The name of the event is "Give the Gift of Knowledge."

A proclamation by Huntington Mayor David Felinton, proclaiming the week of May 13-19 as National Women's Health Week in Huntington, also will be on display.

Tickets for a "no-charge raffle," with prizes that include a replica Louis Vuitton handbag, a variety of coffees, and an original painting by local artist (and Marshall University student) Bethany Wellman will be given out as long as they last. Those with winning raffle tickets do not need to be present to win.

The event begins at 10 a.m. and continues as long as materials and/or tickets remain to be disbursed, or until 7 p.m.

This event is being sponsored by the Marshall University Psychology Clinic, the College of Liberal Arts at Marshall University, Ebenezer Medical Outreach Inc., and Empire Books and News.

For additional information, contact Dr. Pamela Mulder at (304) 696-2770 or mulder@marshall.edu.


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Monday May 14, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Board of Governors votes unanimously to build student recreation center and two new residence halls

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - During a special meeting today, Marshall University's Board of Governors unanimously approved in principle a $94 million public-private project for the construction of a new 123,000 square-foot student recreation center, two new living/learning residence halls, and baseball and softball fields.

The resolution adopted by the Board authorizes the Chairman of the Board and the President of Marshall University to execute bond documents, ground leases, development agreements, management agreements, construction agreements and any other documents necessary to start, finalize and complete the project.

The project, which was developed jointly with Capstone Development Corp. and its partners, will involve construction of the student recreation center and two residence halls near the 5th Avenue and 20th Street section of Marshall's Huntington campus. Additionally, construction of new baseball and softball fields will occur in conjunction with this endeavor. However, their location and construction timeline will be the subject of a future announcement.

"I want to thank Chairman Menis Ketchum and the members of Marshall's Board of Governors for their unanimous support of this innovative plan for moving Marshall University forward," Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said. "These modern facilities will make us more competitive as we expand our student recruitment efforts and dedicate ourselves to growing full-time student enrollment at Marshall University. They will also help advance a more vibrant and engaged campus environment, one that fosters greater student achievement, retention and graduation rates."

Kopp said the residence halls are scheduled to open in August 2008, while the student recreation center is expected to open in January 2009.

"Capstone Development Corp. and their partners have been instrumental in the progress that has been made in the planning of this major project," Kopp said. "Through their experience, considerable expertise and tireless efforts, they have interpreted our vision for these new physical facilities and transformed them into futuristic facility plans that will meet the needs of our students for the foreseeable future."

"Capstone views our work with Marshall as not simply a 'project,' but as a long-term partnership to help transform the campus," said Michael A. Mouron, president of Capstone Development Corp.  "We are honored by the trust the University has placed in our team and look forward to a successful project for the Marshall students."

Mike Meadows, director of facilities planning and management at Marshall, said the general public and Marshall community need to be aware of changes that soon will take place on or near the construction sites.

Beginning on Monday, May 21, areas that no longer will be open to students and the public include the running track near 20th Street, the Marshall tennis courts and the MU softball field.

Demolition of the 20th Street Baptist Church, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 20th Street, will begin on May 21, Meadows said. Fence work to secure the demolition site will begin this week, he said.

Meadows also announced impending lane and sidewalk closures. The north, or left lane of 5th Avenue from 19th Street to 20th Street will be closed; two south-bound lanes of 20th Street, starting midway between 3rd Avenue and 5th Avenue and continuing to the 5th Avenue/20th Street intersection, will be closed; and, the sidewalk on the north side of 5th Avenue and a portion of the sidewalk on the west side of 20th Street will be closed during the duration of the project. Demolition of the church is expected to take about 45 days.

"Because of the street and sidewalk closures, we would like to ask everyone to exercise caution when they are near the work site and ask them to work with us during the duration of the project," Meadows said. 

Mascaro Construction of Pittsburgh, which built Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, is the contractor for the project. Master Mechanical Insulation, Inc., of Huntington is doing the church demolition.

###

For more information about Capstone Development Corp., contact Alton Irwin, (205) 414-6417 or Airwin@Capstone-Dev.com.

Links to the images provided by Capstone Development Corp. for the Student Recreation Center and new residence halls can be found at http://www.marshall.edu/www/images/rec/


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Friday May 11, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Marshall Artists Series Executive Director, Penny Watkins, Receives Order of the Arts and Historical Letters Award

Penny Watkins, Executive Director of the Marshall Artists Series, was recently awarded West Virginia Division of Culture and History's "Order of the Arts and Historical Letters" award in recognition of her outstanding service in the performing arts, which exemplifies the spirit of the people of the great state of West Virginia. "I was surprised and honored to have been recognized " said Ms. Watkins. 

 

The award was presented to Ms. Watkins by Randall Reid-Smith, Commissioner of the West Virginia Division of Culture and History on May 4, 2007 in Lewisburg, WV.  Mr. Reid-Smith was attending the final presentation of The Guys, a collaborative effort of three WV professional arts organizations: The Greenbrier Valley Theatre, Marshall University Department of Theatre and the Marshall Artists Series.


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Friday May 11, 2007
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Marshall Undergraduate Students Awarded Summer Research Funds

Eleven Marshall University undergraduate students will conduct original scientific research by participating in the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) beginning May 21 and continuing through July 27.

"We want students to know that research is not only for graduate students, but also for the undergraduates. This is the time when they start developing their research skills in preparation for grad school," said Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry at Marshall and director of the program.

Students will receive stipends totaling $4,000 each and supplies for their research for a period of ten weeks uninterrupted by classes during the summer.

Marshall has received funds for SURE from West Virginia's Research Challenge Fund to advance research in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics through the support of undergraduate research. This year, SURE will fund ten research projects that have been selected for support by the proposal evaluation committee.

This year, the awardees and their projects are:

  • Charles Lowe from Gilbert, W. Va. (Mathematics major), "Beta-Rayleigh Distribution in Reliability"
  • Christina Newsome from Dingess, W.Va. (Chemistry major), "Isolation and identification of Insulin C-Peptide Binding Proteins"
  • Deborah Preston from Huntington (Biology major), "Reversing Age-associated cardiac dysfunction"
  • Derek McKinney from Beckley, W.Va. (Environmental Science major), "Use of Substrate Mapping to Predict Bethnic Fish populations"
  • Jacob Kilgore from Kenova, W. Va. (Chemistry major), "Organometallic Complexes"
  • Megan Neal from Shreve, Ohio (Biology major), "Cardioprotective value of Chronic acetaminophen in the Aorta"
  • Reema Patel from Scott Depot, W.Va. (Biology major), and Mai-Lan Pham from Huntington (Biomedical Sciences major), "Role of PIWILA in Human Pancreatic Cancer"
  •  Robert Gibson from Salt Rock, W.Va. (Biology major), "Pokeweed Purification and Aptamer Development"
  • Samantha Newberry from Parkersburg, W.Va. (Biotechnology major), "Phylogenetic Analysis of  Black nose dace species"
  • Zachary Tackett from Chesapeake, Ohio (Biotechnolgoy major), "Resistance genes and proteins"

For more information, persons may visit the SURE program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/sure, or contact Norton at Norton@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday May 9, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Markteting and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Tango Master Class Offered in Conjunction with Luis Bravo's Forever Tango

The Marshall Artists Series' 70th season will come to a close as the sizzling rhythms and sultry moves of the critically acclaimed Forever Tango spice up the evening of Tuesday, May 15, 2007. The unforgettable performance will begin at 8 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Theatre.

 

In honor of the performance we are also offering a master class taught by guest artists from the Forever Tango dance company. The class will be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2007 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center room 224 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 per person and can be paid at the door. Cash only. For tickets reservations call the Marshall Artists Series at 696-3326. Space for this class is limited.

 

Created and directed by Luis Bravo, Forever Tango features a cast of 26 performers including 14 brilliant, exceptionally adept dancers who tango in their own unique styles, offering variety and dramatic insights. Led by musical director/arranger Victor Lavallen, the onstage 11-piece orchestra is anchored by the bandoneun, an accordion-like instrument imported to Argentina from Germany in 1886 to become a mainstay of tango music with a melancholy, longing sound unique to the tango. With only 200 bandoneun players in the world, Forever Tango is fortunate to have four bandoneun players on stage joined by the acclaimed Argentinean singer, Martin de Leon.

 

Pop cultural historians note that the tango helped catapult early screen actor Rudolph Valentino to stardom, and its influence can be seen in a variety of dance forms, including modern dance, jazz, hip-hop, and ballet. The tango has become one of the most enduring and influential popular dance styles of this century and may well be Argentina's best-known export. While it has a repertoire of definite steps, it also allows for a certain amount of improvisation, as well as tremendous latitude in personal interpretation. The tango is never danced the same way twice.

Forever Tango originally took San Francisco by storm and later moved to Broadway where it garnered multiple Tony and Drama Desk Award nominations. Along with touring the United States, the sultry performance has made appearances in London, Toronto, Mexico, Korea, Japan, and Germany.

 

A noted musician himself, Luis Bravo has been rewarded as one of the most successful Latin artists on Broadway. Bravo was a member of the Argentine National Symphony until he moved to the United States. He conceived Forever Tango in the belief that Argentine tango was an enduring worldwide phenomenon that needed a showcase.

 

The London Times said Forever Tango is, "Gloriously varied, stunningly performed and beguilingly sexy." "Superbly theatrical! Heart-stopping illusionDazzling dancing - fluid, unpredictable flashing footwork," said the Los Angeles Times.

 

Tickets for the performance are $48.50, $43.50, and $35. They can be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons by calling (304) 696-6656.  All major credit cards are accepted.

 

Tickets may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com.

This performance is sponsored by BB&T, University Physicians & Surgeons, Farrell, Farrell & Farrell, PLLC, WOWK-TV the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, and the Marshall Artists Series.


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Friday May 4, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL concludes banner year with awards in three contests

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Winning awards is nothing unusual for WMUL-FM students. Since Dr. Chuck Bailey, professor of electronic media management in Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, became faculty manager of the school's public radio station in 1985, WMUL students have won 751 awards.

But the past couple of weeks have been even more special than usual for Bailey and his student broadcasters. Bailey, in fact, received a prestigious award of his own. He and  WSAZ-3 sports director Keith Morehouse were presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

"This award was not given because of anything I have done on my own but is a reflection of all of the students who have labored long and hard as volunteers to make WMUL-FM one of the best examples of what a college radio station should be," Bailey said. "Their successes have brought great honor to Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and this Lifetime Achievement award signifies recognition of those accomplishments over the past two decades."

Here is a rundown of the honors WMUL garnered over the past couple of weeks:

  • Five first-place awards and four second-place awards in the 2006 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Mark of Excellence Contest for Region 4 in four radio categories and one online category. The awards were presented at the Region 4 SPJ Convention Saturday, April 14 at the Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center in Detroit.

  • One Best of Festival award, one first-place award and two second-place awards during the Fifth Annual Broadcast Educators Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony Friday, April 20 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nev.

  • Sixteen awards in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's Awards Saturday, April 21 at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington.
     

Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ)
Mark of Excellence Contest

The first-place award-winning entries in the SPJ contest were in the Best News Reporting, Best Feature, Radio In-depth Reporting, Radio Sports Reporting and Radio Newscast categories.

Students involved in the productions were Melanie Chapman, a graduate student from McConnell, W.Va., in the Best News Reporting, Radio Sports Reporting and Radio Newscast categories; Adam Cavalier, a sophomore from Montgomery, W.Va., in Best Feature and Radio Newscast categories, and Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington, in Radio In-depth Reporting and Radio Newscast categories.

In addition to Chapman, Cavalier and Smith, the Radio Newcast category involved the following students: Patrick Western, a senior from Nitro, W.Va.; Deven Swartz, a junior from Philippi, W.Va.; Brandon Millman, a senior from Huntington; Alex Reed, a graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va.; Alexis Stewart, a junior from Cyclone, W.Va., and Whitney Thomas, a sophomore from Wheeling.

The second-place award-winning entries were in the Best News Reporting, Best Feature, Radio Indepth Reporting and Best Affiliated Web Site categories.

Students involved in the productions were Cavalier, Best News Reporting; Chapman, Best Feature; Dave Wilson, a recent graduate from St. Marys, W.Va., Radio In-depth Reporting, and Swartz, Best Affiliated Web Site.

Bailey said there were more than 3,300 entries from across SPJ's 12 regions in the Mark of Excellence contest. 
 

Broadcast Educators Association
Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition

The Broadcast Educators Association and the Charles and Lucille King Family Foundation's Best of Festival award for audio went to WMUL-FM for its broadcast of the football game between Marshall and Tulane University on Nov. 4, 2006. Students participating in the broadcast were Reed, Wilson and Chapman.

"Alex Reed, Dave Wilson and Melanie Chapman have received the ultimate compliment for their on-air sportscasting at WMUL-FM by being presented the Best of Festival award," Bailey said.

The first-place award-winning entry in audio was in the Sports Play-by-Play category for the MU-Tulane game. The second-place award-winning entries were in the Audio Educational Program category, featuring Smith, and the Audio Drama category, featuring Scott Hall, a graduate student from Stephens City, Va.


West Virginia Associated Press
Broadcasters Association's Awards

WMUL-FM students competed directly against commercial stations, West Virginia Public Radio and their professional staffs for West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association awards, Bailey said.

Reed was named the Radio Broadcast Journalist of the Year and, along with Wilson and Chapman, won the Best Sports Play-By-Play award for the Marshall-Tulane football game. Also, Reed won the Best Radio Sportscaster award for a compilation of work for the second consecutive year and Wilson was the honorable mention award winner in this category.

Clark Davis, a graduate student from Huntington, won first place in the Best Sports Special category, Ryan Epling, a senior from Wayne, was named the state's Best Radio Talk Program Host and Swartz, Chris Anastasia, John Griffith and James Roach took first place for Best Talk Show, a call-in program titled "On The Table." Anastasia is a master's graduate from Huntington, Griffith is a sophomore from Huntington, and Roach is a freshman from Richwood, W.Va.

WMUL had 10 honorable mention award-winning entries in the state AP Broadcasters Association awards. Chapman, Cavalier, Smith, Epling, Reed, Swartz and Wilson contributed to those entries.

For the 2006-07 academic school year, WMUL's student broadcasters won 58 awards, including 23 for first place, according to Bailey. For more information, call Bailey at (304) 696-2294.


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Gift from BrickStreet paves way for engineering scholarship at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced the formation of a new engineering scholarship based on a $15,000 gift provided by BrickStreet Mutual Insurance.

The $1,000 "BrickStreet Safety Scholarship" will be awarded annually to at least one student enrolled as a safety major in the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE).

"We are very grateful to BrickStreet for its commitment to safety education and the engineering program at Marshall University," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said.  "Through the philanthropic support of West Virginia companies like BrickStreet, we are better able to educate the next generation of engineers." 

Criteria for recipients of the scholarship include a preferred West Virginia residency, a 3.0 grade point average, and a valid driver's license.   Another key component of the scholarship includes the opportunity to participate in a paid internship with BrickStreet.

"Workplace safety is a top priority at BrickStreet. Over the years, we have devoted considerable time, energy and resources to help West Virginia employers provide a healthy, injury-free environment for their workers," said BrickStreet President and CEO Gregory A. Burton. "To us, this scholarship represents a partnership with Marshall University to promote these ideals for the next generation."

A screening committee comprised of representatives from CITE, BrickStreet Insurance and the MU Office of Student Financial Assistance will be responsible for the selection process.  Applications for the BrickStreet Safety Scholarship must be received by the screening committee annually by April 15.  

###


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Marshall faculty member's article published in PNAS

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An article written by Dr. Hongwei Yu, associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, was published April 30 in an early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), one of the world's most-cited multidisciplinary scientific serials.

PNAS publishes cutting-edge research reports, commentaries, reviews, perspectives, colloquium papers and actions of the Academy.

"All those familiar with scientific literature are aware of the significance of such recognition," Dr. Howard Aulick, vice president for research at Marshall, said. "Four other PNAS papers of equal stature have involved MU investigators before, but none originated here or was directed by an MU scientist."

Yu's article, entitled Regulated proteolysis controls mucoid conversion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, describes the signal transduction pathway responsible for conversion of the non-mucoid, relatively harmless form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa - a Gram-negative, aerobic rod belonging to the bacterial family Pseudomonadaceae - to its pathogenic mucoid phenotype.

"Hongwei has discovered how a relatively benign form of common environmental bacteria becomes pathogenic," Aulick said. "This will not only have profound health benefits, but it may also introduce major economic development with biomanufacturing."

Yu, also an adjunct associate professor in the School of Medicine's Department of Pediatrics, said he has been working on this discovery, which is patent pending, since 1999 when he joined Marshall's faculty. He previously had extensive doctoral and postdoctoral training in molecular genetics.

"We are very excited because this is truly a major milestone for my lab," he said. "This national recognition by our peers is very important. It is equally important that this originated at Marshall."

Yu said the mucoid morphology is due to the overproduction of a large polysaccharide, called alginate, that forms a thick, slimy "biofilm" around colonies of bacteria, protecting them from the body's immune defense mechanisms.  The result is can be a life-threatening event when this occurs in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

"Unraveling the microbial genetics controlling this process required several years of painstaking and extremely complex research involving literally hundreds of experiments," Aulick said. "Dr. Yu, his students and collaborators identified three positive regulators of bacterial alginate biosynthesis." 

Immediately upon his arrival at Marshall, Yu began writing grants to support his research.  His work has been funded by NASA, NIH, USDA, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, biotech companies and the West Virginia NASA Space Grant Consortium.

"To a very great extent, it was NASA Space Grant support that helped him gain funding from the other federal and private sources," Aulick said. "Data collected with these resources enabled him to secure his first major NASA award.  When fiscal contingences forced NASA to reduce his third-year funding by $50,000, NASA Space Grant and Marshall University stepped up to fill this potentially devastating gap. This research formed the basis for the current PNAS article."

Aulick said this is a classic example of how EPSCoR and its affiliates enable scientists to achieve national research competitiveness. 

Yu's research resulted in three primary consequences.  First are the potential health benefits derived - knowledge of the control of muciody can lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment.  Second, the high standards set by Yu make his laboratory a fertile training ground for undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.  Last, the research described in this PNAS article led to a patent application and the development of a new biomanufacturing business for West Virginia. 

"It is clear that Dr. Yu is an extremely talented and very energetic scientist," Aulick said. "His excitement about his work and Marshall University is contagious.  This PNAS article is clear evidence that he is becoming a well-recognized international scholar.  Marshall University, West Virginia EPSCoR and the state of West Virginia have every right to be proud of Dr. Yu's accomplishments and realize that recognition by the National Academy of Sciences suggests the best is yet to come."

For more information, contact Yu at (304) 696-7356.


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Marshall Baseball Day at Appalachian Power Park is set for May 12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club of the Marshall University Alumni Association is sponsoring the second annual Marshall Baseball Day at Appalachian Power Park in Charleston on Saturday, May 12.

Fans paying $20 will get to see Marshall take on UAB at noon in a Conference USA baseball game, attend a picnic with the Marshall baseball players and coaches from about 3 to 4:30 p.m. in a reserved section of the park, then attend the West Virginia Power's 7:05 p.m. game with the Greensboro Grasshoppers.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will join Marco and other members of the Marshall family at the ballpark. Gates open at 11 a.m.

For more information or to RSVP, call Martha Hill, president of the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club, at (304) 744-5149 by Wednesday, May 9. Checks should be made payable to MUAA, c/o Martha Hill, 302 Hunters Ridge Road, Charleston, WV 25314.


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MCTC to celebrate Law Day with ethics presentation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Legal Assisting program at Marshall Community and Technical College is celebrating Law Day by providing a complimentary lunch and an ethics presentation by Charles Jones of the Office of Disciplinary Counsel from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 1.

The event will take place at the Cooking and Culinary Institute, 917 3rd Ave., in Huntington. One hour of continuing legal education (CLE) credit in Ethics will be awarded. 

Seating is limited to the first 50 people to register.  To reserve a seat, contact Donna Donathan at (304) 696-3022.


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Marshall ranked fifth nationally in producing family doctors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today was honored as the fifth-ranked school in the nation in producing family physicians, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced.

By ranking in the Top 10, the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall earned a "Family Medicine Top Ten Award" from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Marshall's School of Medicine was the only West Virginia institution that earned the award.

The award was presented during the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine spring conference in Chicago. Dr. John B. Walden of the Department of Family and Community Health accepted the award for Marshall.

The ranking is based on the performance of all medical schools in the country over the past three years in placing graduates in family medicine residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Kopp said.

"This Achievement Award from the American Academy of Family Physicians recognizes the exceptional work of the School of Medicine at Marshall University in educating West Virginia's next generation of family doctors," Kopp said.

"When combined with this past year's 100 percent first-time pass rate by Marshall's graduating class on Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensure Examination, which is a very rare achievement for any public medical school, this Top 10 award demonstrates that our medical school graduates are exceptionally well-prepared to serve the medical needs of our state, region and nation in a wide array of specialties."

Although this year is the first for the Top 10 award, Marshall received at least 15 annual awards since the family physician group began in 1992 to recognize the schools producing the highest percentages of family physicians, according to Dr. Charles H. McKown, Jr., Marshall's vice president for health sciences and dean of the school of medicine.

The University of Kansas is ranked No. 1 in producing family medicine physicians. It is followed by the University of Missouri-Columbia, University of Arkansas, University of North Dakota, Marshall University, University of Minnesota, Michigan State University, East Carolina University, University of Oklahoma and Loma Linda University.

"It is a source of tremendous pride for us that Marshall is one of this elite group," McKown said. "This year's Top 10 award offers richly deserved recognition to the fine faculty members in our Department of Family and Community Health."

Producing well-prepared family physicians has long been one of the goals of Marshall's medical school, according to Dr. Robert B. Walker, associate dean and chair of the school's Department of Family and Community Health.

"Primary care and family practice are very important to West Virginia and West Virginia's people - these are the specialists they most often turn to for their health care; in many cases, family doctors are the only doctors in the area," he said. "It is very important that Marshall offers this specialty, encourages people to enter it, and trains them to a high level in the skills required for it. We feel that this is one of the ways we are meeting the needs of the people of West Virginia."

Family physicians from Marshall's medical school and family practice residency program span the state, from McDowell County to both panhandles, he said.


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Marshall to award nearly 3,000 degrees on May 5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will award nearly 3,000 degrees as it celebrates its 170th commencement on Saturday, May 5 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

The total of 2,920 degrees includes 1,460 undergraduate degrees, 1,000 graduate degrees, 49 School of Medicine degrees, 98 associate degrees and 313 degrees from the Marshall Community and Technical College.

In all, 546 students are graduating from Marshall with honors, along with 78 from the Community and Technical College.

For the second consecutive year, each Marshall graduate attending commencement will be recognized during the ceremony. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2006 may participate in commencement.

Homer Hickam, a Coalwood, W.Va., native and author of the best-seller Rocket Boys: A Memoir, will deliver the commencement address and receive an honorary Doctor of Literature degree. Ken Hechler, former longtime U.S. Congressman and West Virginia Secretary of State, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement.

Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, 18 students have completed or will complete their degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Four already are assured of 4.0s, while the other 14 - all graduating in May - will learn their final GPAs after commencement. Seventeen of the 18 students are from West Virginia.

The four already assured of 4.0s are Lora Beth Dickerson of Page, W.Va., Jacinda Spring Hurley of Man, W.Va., Matthew Craig Kellar of West Union, W.Va., and Laura Aleise Robbins of Beckley, W.Va.

The 14 with tentative 4.0s are Sean Eric Boyd of Bluefield, W.Va.; Jessica Rae Brown of Beckley, W.Va.; Ashley Dawn Chaddock of Huntington; Sara Lawson Chadwick of Elkins, W.Va.; Jessica Michelle Craig of Buffalo, W.Va.; Paul Jerid Dick of Wayne, W.Va.; Britani Nichole Keeney of Proctorville, Ohio; Aleksandra Barbara Kraszpulska of Huntington; Hannah D. McCullough of Pennsboro, W.Va.; Anne Kathryn Parlock of Vienna, W.Va.; Mary Christine Petrany of Huntington; Cynthia Brooke Schnably of Ranson, W.Va.; Sarah Brennan Sullivan of Charleston, and Jenna Suzanne Walker of Huntington.

Eighty-three students are graduating summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 189 are graduating magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA) and 265 are graduating cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

From the Marshall Community and Technical College, 25 are graduating with high honors (3.7 to 4.0) and 53 are graduating with honors.

Here is a list of commencement-related events next week:

  • Thursday, May 3 - 4 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Awards Ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Room
  • Thursday, May 3 - 7 p.m., College of Health Professions' Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Friday, May 4 - 11 a.m., LEAP Program graduation, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge
  • Friday, May 4 - 1:30 p.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge
  • Friday, May 4 - 3 p.m., International students graduation picnic, Buskirk Field
  • Friday, May 4 - 5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library Atrium
  • Friday, May 4 - 7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Friday, May 4 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community and Technical College commencement, Keith-Albee Theatre
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Education and Human Services ceremony and reception, Christ Temple Church
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts reception and ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business ceremony, Cam Henderson Center
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Science ceremony, Keith-Albee Theatre
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, College of Health Professions reception and ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, College of Fine Arts ceremony, The Palms, 314 9th St. Plaza
  • Saturday, May 5 - One hour after Marshall University commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering ceremony and reception, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, School of Extended Education Regents Bachelor of Arts ceremony, Harless Dining Hall
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism and Mass Communications ceremony, Smith Recital Hall
  • Saturday, May 5 - 3 p.m., Forensic Science ceremony and reception, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

More information on Marshall's 170th commencement ceremony is available at http://www.marshall.edu/registrar/commencementresources.html.


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Award winners, retirees to be honored at faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fifteen individuals will be honored by Marshall University with awards of distinction for the 2006-07 academic year during the spring general faculty meeting Friday, April 27 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Eight people will receive the Distinguished Service Award, two will receive the Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award and five will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. The meeting starts at 2 p.m., and includes remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Larry Stickler.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

Each of the Distinguished Service Awards winners receives $1,000. They include:

  • Earline Allen, Art
  • Gary Anderson, Chemistry
  • Leonard Deutsch, Dean of the Graduate College
  • Robert Edmunds, Communication Studies
  • Jane McKee, Associate Dean, College of Education and Human Services
  • H. Keith Spears,  Journalism
  • Donna Spindel, History
  • Michael Sullivan, Special Education

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, a faculty member either must be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

The 2006-07 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Professor Hongwei Yu (Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, microbiology), senior recipient in the field of Science and Technology
  • Professor Luke Eric Lassiter (Marshall University Graduate College, humanities), senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business
  • Assistant Professor Solen Dikener (College of Fine Arts, music), junior recipient among all faculty
  • Professor Ralph Oberste-Vorth and Associate Professor Bonita Lawrence (College of Science, mathematics), team recipients

Also Friday, Marshall is recognizing 17 retiring faculty who have a combined 415 years of service. They are:

  • Kenneth Paul Ambrose, Sociology & Anthropology, 32 years of service
  • L. Howard Aulick, Physiology, 23 years of service
  • Elwyn Bellis, Physics, 25 years of service
  • Lance Belville, Management & Marketing, 11 years of service
  • Dr. Stephen Fish, Anatomy, Cell & Neurobiology, 20 years of service
  • Dr. Gary G. Gilbert, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 15 years of service
  • Dr. John Lancaster, Mathematics, 34 years of service
  • Charles Lloyd, Classics, 35 years of service
  • Mary Marshall, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 40 years of service
  • Marilyn McClure, Journalism, 13 years of service
  • Jane McKee, Associate Dean College of Education and Human Services,
    20 years of service
  • Edwina Pendarvis, Special Education, 28 years of service
  • William Rhoten, Anatomy, 16 years of service
  • John P. Sheils, Pathology, 4 years of service
  • Karen Simpkins, Sociology & Anthropology, 31 years of service
  • Ralph W. Taylor, Biological Sciences, 35 years of service
  • Cora Teel, Library Archives, 33 years of service

Other faculty to be honored Friday are Montserrat Miller, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Thelma "Sissy" Isaacs, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Pam Holland, Ronda Sturgill and Lachlan Whalen, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby follows Friday's meeting.


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Maier Foundation establishes permanent endowment for Marshall University Latin Awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The establishment of a $100,000 endowment fund which will ensure the continuation of the Latin Awards by Marshall University was announced last week by Ed Maier, President of the Maier Foundation, Inc., which has sponsored the awards since 1979. 

The announcement came at the annual awards ceremony that took place on the Huntington campus. During the ceremony outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions are recognized.

The endowment will fund the Maier Latin Cup Awards and the Maier Sight Translation Awards, both for high school students, and the Maier Latin Scholarship, which is given to a Marshall Latin major.  

"I  was delighted to learn of the Maier Foundation's generous support for classical studies at Marshall, which grows out of the Maier family's longstanding interest in promoting the study of the humanities in West Virginia," Dr. John Young, associate professor of English at Marshall, said.  "Such support is especially important in our contemporary climate, as the humanities teach, above all, how to communicate across and through differences of culture, place and history."

The Maier Latin awards were established by Ed Maier's father, William J. Maier, Jr., to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.  A high school graduate at the age of 16, the elder Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the State.  The elder Maier credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

During his academic career, William Maier, Jr. garnered top honors and graduated second in his class at Harvard.  He later received a prestigious Rhodes Scholarship and while teaching economics at Harvard earned a law degree from that institution.  Maier became a successful businessman and a noted philanthropist, establishing the Sarah and Pauline Maier Scholarship Foundation, named in honor of his mother and his wife, which has given millions of dollars to educational institutions, community, cultural and civic projects, and other worthy causes.

"What is particularly pleasing is that the foundation supports the work of high school students.  These students work very hard, as do their teachers, and it is very nice to see their efforts rewarded," said Dr. Caroline Perkins, chair of MU's Department of Classics.

"The annual gifts from the foundation are unique in the country," she said.  "Now that these annual gifts have become an endowed gift, I and members of the Department of Classics feel that the recognition will identify the achievement of West Virginia students even more.  We owe great thanks to Ed Maier and the Maier Foundation.  By honoring his father, a thing that the Romans would understand very well, he honors students in our state."

The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1973 by William J. Maier, Jr. in honor of his father.  These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall University.  Ranging from $100 to $500, the awards recognize and reward good and distinctive writing.     

In addition, the Department of Classics at Marshall sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation.  This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

Ed Maier personally presents the Latin and writing awards each spring.  This year's winners include:

Maier Latin Sight-translation Contest Winners

Latin I:  first place, Paresh Sovani, Linsly School; teacher, Nicoletta Villa-Sella; second place, Rachael Rohrbert, Cabell Midland High School; teacher, Linda Harbour.

Latin II:  first place, Rebecca Olsavsky, Linsly School; teacher, Nicoletta Villa-Sella; second place, Andrew Phillips, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

Latin III: first place, Corey Brady, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

Latin IV, first place, Erik Harless, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

The Maier High School Latin Cup Award Winners

First place: Andrew Phillips, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder

Second place: Natalie Tupta, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder

Third place: Wisam Khader, Huntington High School; teacher; Amy McElroy

Maier Latin Scholarship

John Matthew Baxter, a junior at Marshall University from Olive Hill, Ky., was the recipient of the Maier Latin Scholarship.

Maier Writing Award Winners 

Freshman Research:  first place, Erica Rice, "The Double Cross;" teacher, Professor John Van Kirk.

Freshman Non-Research:  first place, Shana Gillman; teacher; Chris Green; second place, MacKenzie Crigger; teacher, Mary Welch; third place, Chris Thompson; teacher, Mary Welch.

Undergraduate Fiction:  first place, Sara Blevins; teacher, John Van Kirk; second place, Jamie Dunkle; teacher, John Van Kirk; third place, Erin Felton; teacher, John Van Kirk; honorable mention, Kimberly Stone; teacher, A.E. Stringer.

Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose:  first place (tie), Christina Belcher; teacher, Sherri Smith; Zachary Ferrell; teacher, Edmund Taft; second place, Jeremy Cambridge; teacher, Sherri Smith; third place, Brittany Duncan; teacher, John Van Kirk.

Graduate Non-Fiction Prose:  first place, Hunter Stark; teacher, Sherri Smith; second place, Crystal Howell; teacher, John Young; third place, David Daniels; teacher, Lee Erickson.

Undergraduate Poetry: first place (tie): Amy Koutsunis; teacher, A.E. Stringer; Travis L. Michael; teacher, A.E. Stringer; second place, Sara Blevins; teacher, A.E. Stringer.

Graduate Poetry: first place, Beverly A. Cooper; teacher, A.E. Stringer; second place, Rachel Hicks; teacher, A.E. Stringer.


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Annual Donning of Kente celebration is Wednesday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Many Marshall University African American students who graduated last semester or will graduate in May will take part in the school's annual Donning of  Kente celebration and processional at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 25 at Buskirk Field.

Maurice Cooley, director of MU's Center for African American Students' Programs, said about 70 undergraduate and graduate students are expected to participate. They will be donned with a Kente cloth, which is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries.

"The relevance of the event is to recognize the achievements of African American students who are completing their studies at Marshall," Cooley said. "The Kente has its origin as a gift presented to royalty and other natives of Ghana when they had achieved something extraordinary in their lives. Our students are honored in a similar way to the way their ancestors were honored for thousands of years."

Dr. Ingrid Laura J. St. Omer, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Kentucky, will be the featured speaker at the Donning of Kente celebration. Opening remarks will be given by Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Betty J. Cleckley, vice president for Multicultural Affairs.

The processional, which begins at 4 p.m. at the Memorial Student Center, will be led by Dr. George F. Kojo Arthur, associate professor in the College of Education and Human Services at Marshall.

Following the ceremony, which is open to the public, a reception will take place on the student center plaza.


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Fundraising event to honor, help local transplant patients

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A concert titled "An Evening of American Music" will take place at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 29 in the Smith Music Hall Recital Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University. The event will benefit Brayden and Trevin Saunders, two Huntington-area brothers who need bone marrow transplants. 

Nine-year-old Brayden and seven-year old Trevin were diagnosed with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Deficiency and are listed for life-saving bone marrow transplants at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N. C.  Funds are being raised to assist with their transplant-related expenses. The Saunders family needs an estimated $180,000 for the expenses.

Performers for the April 29 event include students and faculty from the Marshall University music department, as well as members of the national music fraternity, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, from both Marshall and Morehead State University. Admission to the concert is free.  Donations for Brayden and Trevin will be taken at the door and during the concert.

The Children's Organ Transplant Association (COTA), a national charity based in Bloomington, Ind., will be assisting the Saunders family in receiving and managing funds raised from concert and other fundraising events. COTA is dedicated to organizing and guiding communities in raising funds for transplant-needy patients. COTA's services are completely free of charge and 100 percent of funds generated by COTA fundraising campaigns are available for transplant-related expenses.

"The family and friends of Brayden and Trevin want to encourage everyone to attend our 'Evening of American Music' concert and help give Brayden and Trevin a second chance at life," said Jacob Wolfe, a Marshall University student and member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. "One hundred percent of the profits from the concert will assist with transplant-related expenses."

For more information about the "Evening of American Music," or other fundraising and volunteer opportunities, contact Vicki Stroeher, Public Relations Coordinator, "For the Boys," at (304) 696-6437.


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Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Marshall Artists Series Thanks Area Firefighters with Complimentary Tickets to 9/11 Drama The Guys - April 30th

A collaboration of WV professional artists will come together for the first time in May to present playwright Anne Nelson's true story of New York City and its people in the aftermath of 9/11, in the riveting drama, The Guys, directed by Cathey Crowell Sawyer, Artistic Director of the Greenbrier Valley Theatre in Lewisburg, WV. The production will be produced by the Marshall Artists Series and the Marshall University Department of Theatre. The intimate performance is comprised of a two person cast starring Beth McVey & Jack Cirillo.

 

The play will be staged for three performances - Monday, April 30 through Wednesday, May 2 at 8 p.m at the Francis Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

 

Everyday local firefighters put their lives on the line to protect their communities.  As a thank you for their hard work and dedication, the Marshall Artists Series is offering area firefighters and their families free tickets to the opening night performance of the 9/11 drama, The Guys on Monday, April 30th  at 8 p.m.  Firefighters should call the Marshall Artists Series at 304-696-3326 to reserve tickets for this special performance.  Proper ID required. Limited seating available.

 

The story takes place less than two weeks after the September 11th attacks. Nick (portrayed by Jack Cirillo), a fire captain who lost eight men in the collapse of the World Trade Center, must prepare eulogies for each of them. Feeling overwhelmed and unable to express his feelings, he enlists the help from an editor, Joan (portrayed by Beth McVey), to help him. They build a friendship as she helps him put together the difficult, heartfelt speeches that he must deliver with honor, humor and poise all the while, navigating his way though his own emotional response.

 

Huntington native and Broadway star Beth McVey will reprise the role of Joan. McVey, also a former Miss West Virginia, has appeared in numerous Broadway productions including "Annie," "Phantom of the Opera," and "Beauty and the Beast." Jack Cirillo, an associate theatre professor at Marshall University, will portray Nick. Cirillo has worked extensively in New York as well as in many of this country's finest regional theatres. He also has numerous television commercials to his credit and has appeared with the Radio City Rockettes.

 

Director Cathey Crowell Sawyer is the Artistic Director for the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, which was recently designated as WV's year-round professional theatre.  Ms. Sawyer was awarded the 2006 Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence in West Virginia. She will also direct two performances in Lewisburg, WV at the Greenbrier Valley Theatre on Thursday May 3 and Friday May 4.

 

The set and lighting will be designed by Lang Reynolds, Chair of the Marshall University Department of Theatre since 1999.  During his career Mr. Reynolds has served as a lighting/set designer, technical coordinator, and producer in numerous professional projects.  Additionally, his credits include consulting on theatre renovations and new theatre construction.

 

Tickets for the all three Huntington performances are available now. Tickets are $25. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted. Tickets purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. To order tickets for the performances in Lewisburg, please call the Greenbrier Valley Theatre box office at (304) 645-3838.

 

The Guys is sponsored by the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, the Marshall University Department of Theatre, West Virginia Lottery, My Z TV, the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications and the Marshall Artists Series.


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Board approves tuition and fee increase for next year; meal plan adjustment means savings for students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors, in a meeting today in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus, approved a tuition and fee increase of $105 per semester for all full-time undergraduate students for fiscal year 2007-2008. Tuition and fee rates increases for part-time students are prorated accordingly.

The Board also approved an average residence hall increase of $163, bringing the total increase in tuition, room and board to $268 per student, per semester.

However, the Board also approved a proposal to reduce the cost of the Unlimited Meal Plan for students living on campus by $363 per semester, meaning that the net change in the 2007-2008 cost of attendance for students living on campus (tuition, room and board) will actually be decreased by $95 per semester relative to the current 2006-2007 rate.

The Unlimited Meal Plan will be required next year for all freshmen living on campus and will be priced at the current 19-meal plan rate, which is being discontinued.

Also today, the Board approved a resident, metro and non-resident fee increase of $268 per semester on average for students in the School of Medicine.

Lastly, the board also approved a Special Institutional Capital Fee of $75 for the new Fitness Center. However, the fee will not be assessed until the semester the Center opens, which is expected to be spring 2009.


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Friday April 20, 2007
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Dr. Montserrat Miller named Hedrick Award winner; Reynolds, Pickens-Queen honorees also announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Montserrat Miller, associate professor of history at Marshall University, is MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2006-07, Dr. Elaine Baker, director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, announced today.

Miller will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Baker also announced two other awards honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Thelma M. Isaacs, associate professor, School of Education.
  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Ronda Sturgill, assistant professor in the Division of Exercise Science, Sport, and Recreation (ESSR);  Dr. Lachlan Whalen, assistant professor in the English department; and Pamela J. Holland, assistant professor in the department of communications disorders.

All five award winners will be formally recognized during the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. Friday, April 27 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Here is a brief look at the three awards and the five winners:

Hedrick Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Montserrat Miller has been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of history. She has been an associate professor of history since 2000. Previously, she was director of the World History Project with the Center for the Design of Educational Computing at Carnegie Mellon University from 1993 to 1994, and assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi from 1994 to 1996.

Miller received her bachelor's degree in International Affairs from Marshall University in 1983, a master's degree in history from Marshall in 1988, a master's in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon in 1990, and her Ph.D. in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon in 1994.

Miller, in describing her teaching philosophy, says her obvious aim is to awaken and develop students' historical consciousness and curiosity. Her larger goal, she says, is to promote greater appreciation for the life of the mind.

"Each course offers me a new opportunity to make a difference in the lives of my students, and through the pursuit of this goal, to experience personal and intellectual growth," Miller said.

Dr. Donna Spindel, chair of the department of history at Marshall, described Miller as tough and demanding, but said "her goal is to ensure that our majors have the necessary analytical, research, and writing tools we expect of our graduates."

"In the end they love her for it and she has created an enthusiastic following," Spindel said.

Dr. David E. Mills, associate professor of history at Marshall, raved about Miller when nominating her for the Hedrick Award. Mills said Miller "is truly an exemplary teacher, researcher, colleague, and human being."

In May 2006, Miller received the College of Liberal Arts (COLA) Outstanding  Teaching Award, which is voted upon by students in the college. COLA Dean Dr. Christina Murphy described Miller as "a distinguished scholar and a highly accomplished teacher."

Miller has received numerous other awards at Marshall, among them history department merit awards each year from 1997 through 2001, the 1998-99 Pickens-Queen Teaching Award and the 1998-99 Outstanding Student Advisor Award.

Reynolds Award

The Reynolds Award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Thelma M. Isaacs joined Marshall University in 1999 as an assistant professor. Previously, she taught high school English and seventh- and eighth-grade language arts in the Putnam County schools.

"Dr. Isaacs is truly one of our most outstanding professors in the School of Education," Dr. Carl S. Johnson, chair of the School of Education, said. "Her student ratings are always among the top three out of approximately 30 professors in the department.

Isaacs has earned five degrees, including her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from West Virginia University, and her Ed.S. in Curriculum and Instruction from Marshall. She received her undergraduate degree in Secondary Education from Marshall in 1989.

Isaacs, in describing the most important concepts or ideas she would like students to gain from her courses, said she strives to help create teacher candidates capable of positively impacting student learning in K-12 schools.

"I want my students to be able to analyze how children learn best and appraise differences in learning styles," she said. "Furthermore, I hope they can create a positive learning environment where they use effective communications techniques and foster relationships with students, parents and colleagues."

Johnson said Isaacs is recognized by her peers as an excellent teacher and "she never toots her own horn. She goes about her business in a very quiet, efficient and professional manner," he said.

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the instructor/assistant professor rank and who have completed six or fewer years at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Ronda Sturgill said her teaching philosophy in the field of athletic training and health education centers around three main issues: utilizing a variety of teaching methods in the classroom, using current and up to date information, and focusing on a lifetime of success for the student.

"Ronda is passionate about her profession of athletic training education," said David Robertson, an assistant professor in ESSR. "I believe a credible measure of teaching success is what the students say about their professors. On a number of occasions I have heard students talk about what they did in 'Ronda's' class and what they are going to do, such as take field trips. Ronda fosters an approach to teaching that is based on knowledge concerning important concepts with a personal caring for the teaching and learning process."

Rudy Pauley, interim dean with Marshall's School of Education and Professional Development, said Sturgill is "a dynamic and creative instructor."

"She is active in the scholarly and creative arena and has continued to broaden her perspective and involvement through leadership activities," Pauley said.

Dan Martin, chair of ESSR, said Sturgill is "well organized, knowledgeable, and excited about her teaching."

Dr. Lachlan Whalen describes himself as a teacher-scholar. "My research influences my classroom and vice versa," Whalen said.

Dr. Jamie Warner, associate professor in the department of political science at Marshall, has twice teamed with Whalen to teach the 400-level honors course, "Postcolonial Theory and Literature."

"To put it simply, Lachlan is a very good teacher," Warner said. "In fact, teaming with him helps me be a better teacher, and I don't know any higher compliment that I could give him than that."

Suzanne R. Samples, an MU English graduate student, said she had no idea what to expect when she signed up to take English 433, which would be taught by Lachlan.

"After the first class, it was clear that Dr. Whalen was here for a reason," Samples said. "Over the course of the semester, he demonstrated his complete control over the classroom and his intensive knowledge of literature and writing; more importantly, he proved that his passion for the subject matter resonates so strongly throughout the classroom that his students can't help but to become zealous about the material as well."

Pamela J. Holland does not lecture her students. Instead, she shares her 11 years of experience and knowledge within the field of communication disorders.

"My goal is to ensure that all students, regardless of their particular dominant learning style (visual, auditory, tactile/kinesthetic), have ample exposure to the material presented," Holland said. "I have found that this method of delivering the course material has a much better chance of being successfully received by the students. The results are visible in course mastery as well as student enthusiasm."

Department of communications disorders chair Kathryn Chezik likes to refer to student evaluations when praising Holland, whom she described as "a dynamic and enthusiastic teacher."

"Comments such as "She is an awesome teacher," "Mrs. Holland makes us feel completely comfortable in asking questions, and her excitement for us to learn makes me excited to learn about communication disorders," and "I actually enjoyed coming to this class" were routinely found on her student evaluations," Chezik said.

Regardless of the class, Chezik said, student feedback remains the same. "Students are impressed with her knowledge, compassion, understanding and clinical experience," Chezik said.


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Award-winning poet to read from work at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Christopher Howell will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 26 in room 2w16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Howell is the author of eight poetry collections, most recently Light's Ladder (University of Washington Press).  His poems, translations and essays have been widely published in anthologies and journals, including Antioch Review, Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, Southern Review, Denver Quarterly, Field, Iowa Review, Gettysburg Review and Harper's

He has received three Pushcart Prizes, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and fellowships from the Washington Artist Trust, the Oregon Arts Commission, and the Massachusetts Council for the Arts. His work also has been awarded the Vachel Lindsay prize, the Washington State Governor's Prize for Literature, the Washington State Book Award and the Stanley W. Lindberg Award for Editorial Excellence.   

Howell teaches at Eastern Washington University, where he also is senior editor for EWU Press.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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Wednesday April 18, 2007
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The Diary of Anne Frank' runs April 25-28 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre will present "The Diary of Anne Frank" by Francis Goodrich and Albert Hackett at 8 p.m. daily Wednesday, April 25 through Saturday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The play was adapted from "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl." It won the 1956 Pulitzer Prize for drama. It also has won the Tony Award, Critics Circle Award, and virtually every other coveted prize of the theatre.

Tickets, available at the Performing Arts Center's box office, are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and MU faculty and staff, $7 for youth 17 and under, and free to full-time Marshall students with their student IDs.

For more information, call (304) 696-2787.


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Wednesday April 18, 2007
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Marshall University SGA to conduct memorial service

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association will conduct a memorial service for the 33 victims of the Virginia Tech University tragedy at noon Thursday, April 19 near the Memorial Student Center Fountain on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Dominque Elmore, president of Marshall's student body, said the Marshall and Huntington communities are invited to join together to remember the students and faculty who lost their lives Monday at Virginia Tech.

"This is a very difficult time for so many people," Elmore said. "When one hurts we all hurt and we are pulling together as one body and remembering the loss at Virginia Tech. Our thoughts and prayers are with the students, staff, faculty, and families."

Condolence books and Virginia Tech ribbons will be available during the service. Marshall SGA representatives plan to deliver the books to Virginia Tech, which is located in Blacksburg, Va., next week.

The service will include remarks from several people, including Elmore, and special prayers will be offered. Thirty-three carnations in the Virginia Tech colors of maroon and orange, tied with black ribbons, will be placed on the wall around the Memorial Fountain.

For more information, call SGA Communications Director Rachel Sargent at (304) 696-6412.


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Tuesday April 17, 2007
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Student team representing Marshall wins business plan competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A student team representing Marshall University took first place in the technology category in the first West Virginia's Open For Business State Business Plan Competition Saturday, April 14, in Morgantown.

Will Starcher, a fine arts major at Marshall, along with his sister, Margie Starcher, a student at WVU-Parkersburg, saw their invention, the Spider Easel, and their company, Arachnovation, LLC, win $10,000 in cash and a package of resources to help launch their business.

The resources include legal services from Spilman, Thomas and Battle, PLLC; accounting services from Dixon Hughes, PLLC; physical or virtual office space at the WVU Business Incubator and business cards and letterhead from Signs Plus. The win is a result of all the hard work the team has put into the project, team leader and Spider Easel creator Will Starcher said.

"We have worked on it (the Spider Easel) long and hard for eight years," Starcher said.

According to Amy Anastasia, Marshall University's coordinator for the competition, the win serves a dual purpose for the team.

"This validates the hard work that Will and his sister put into this business," Anastasia said. "However, the journey towards creating a thriving business is still underway."

While the other project representing Marshall, the Independability Wheelchair-assistance Utility, did not win, the competition helped them and the other finalists bring their inventions and creations to a larger stage.

"The competition helped give some already existing concepts a leg up, and it gave birth to many more," said Independability team member Christopher Worth, a Marshall fine arts graduate.

For more information about the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition, visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc/ or contact Anastasia at (304) 696-4365.


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Monday April 16, 2007
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President Kopp issues statement on Virginia Tech tragedy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp issued the following statement on the shootings today at Virginia Tech University:

"We are deeply saddened to learn of today's tragic, horrific events at Virginia Tech University. Our heart-felt sympathy and prayers go out to the victims and their families."


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Friday April 13, 2007
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Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp issues statement on selection of Mike Garrison as president of WVU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, issued the following statement on the selection of Mike Garrison as president of West Virginia University:

"I believe Mike Garrison will continue the good work of David Hardesty at West Virginia University. We wish him great success as he enters this new position and look forward to working with him on the many collaborative programs that our institutions share."


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Annual Moffat Lecture features Appalachian historian Ronald Lewis

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ronald L. Lewis, the Stuart and Joyce Robbins Chair in History at West Virginia University, will deliver the 30th annual Moffat Lecture. The lecture, titled "Ethnicity and Change in Transnational West Virginia," will take place at 2 p.m. Friday, April 27 in Corbly Hall 105 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

This event, which is presented by Phi Alpha Theta, the student history honorary society, and the department of history at Marshall University, is named in honor of Dr. Charles Moffat, who taught history at Marshall from 1946 to 1977 and who recently was recognized as one of the top professors in Marshall history by Marshall Magazine.

Lewis, a prominent historian of Appalachia, is the author of, among other works, Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920, and Black Coal Miners in America: Race, Class and Community Conflict, 1780-1980.

He recently co-edited Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, with fellow WVU historian Ken Fones-Wolf, and currently is completing a study of Welsh coalminers in America. A reviewer of Transforming the Appalachian Countryside called it "a book that everyone interested in the process of development in the mountains should read - and read again."

A question-and-answer session will follow the talk, and Lewis' books will be available for sale and signing immediately thereafter.

The Moffat Lecture is made possible by funding from the Multicultural/Social Justice Visiting Scholars Program of Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs. Additional support comes from the department of history, Phi Alpha Theta, and the Office of Academic Affairs.


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Thursday April 12, 2007
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COEHS and CIP announce Comparative Education Symposium and Awards Ceremony

Huntington, W.Va. - The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) and the Center for International Programs (CIP) have announced Marshall University's Comparative Education Symposium and Awards Ceremony, Monday April 23 at 5:30 p.m. in room 402 of the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus.

This event, the first of its kind at Marshall, will feature visiting professor Dr. Christine Soulas from University of Rennes 2 in western France, who will discuss the differences in higher education between France and the United States.  Other presenters, graduate students enrolled in a graduate-level course in comparative education, will look at different aspects of education around the world, including student access to education and school accountability.

"We live in an increasingly flat world," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs, who is co-teaching the Comparative Education course with Soulas.  "Our students are no longer expected to learn to live in just their own society, but how to adapt to a variety of cultures around the world.  An important way to help understand why people in one country develop in a certain way is to look at how they educate their society."

The event also may offer some ideas on how education in the United States could be improved.

"As educators, we can learn a lot about how our own system works by looking at other systems," Egnor said.  "By taking a good look at how effectively or ineffectively goals are reached in different educational systems, we can find new ways of helping our own students learn."

Awards also will be presented to several students who will be receiving scholarships to study abroad in the 2007-2008 school year, including the first recipient of the Gloria Joan Brothers Memorial Scholarship.  This award will allow a student to study for a year in France and is only available to Marshall students.

The memorial scholarship was established by JA Fred Brothers and his wife, Paula, of Naples, Fla., in memory of Fred's sister, Gloria Joan Brothers, a 1960 Marshall University summa cum laude graduate and a Fulbright Scholar who was killed in a car accident in 1963. They earlier established two scholarships at Marshall in her memory, one general undergraduate scholarship and one for Yeager Scholars.

Fred and Paula Brothers wanted to establish an award to encourage study abroad.  The University of Rennes 2 was chosen because that was where Gloria was awarded a Fulbright to study French Literature.

The Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Scholarship also will be awarded at the ceremony.  The scholarship is named in memory of Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, who served as a member of the Marshall faculty beginning in 1970 and established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

The April 23 event is open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

For more information about the class, contact Elizabeth Lee, public relations assistant, at (304) 696-2465 or by e-mail at lee50@marshall.edu.


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Hickam to deliver address at Marshall's commencement, join Hechler as latest honorary degree recipients

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Coalwood, W.Va., native Homer H. Hickam, Jr., author of the best-seller Rocket Boys: A Memoir, will deliver the commencement address at Marshall University's 170th commencement, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 5 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Hickam will receive an honorary Doctor of Literature degree, and Dr. Ken Hechler, former longtime U.S. Congressman and West Virginia Secretary of State, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree during the ceremony. Honorary degrees have been conferred to highly distinguished recipients since 1928 when Dwight Whitney Morrow and Guy Fielding Yost each received honorary Doctor of Laws degrees.

Kopp said Marshall University is honored to have Hickam as its latest commencement speaker.

"One of Homer Hickam's friends from the Rocket Boys used to say, 'A rocket won't fly unless somebody lights the fuse,' " Kopp said. "A fuse was lit that stoked the ambition of Homer Hickam a long time ago in Coalwood, W.Va., and his career has been soaring ever since. From his days as a youngster building rockets in Coalwood, to his time as a NASA engineer and a best-selling author, Homer Hickam has lived a full, rewarding life and made all West Virginians proud. We look forward to hearing his inspirational story during commencement." 

Hickam said he is excited about the opportunity to speak to Marshall's 2007 graduating class. He was the featured speaker at Marshall's Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation in April 2002.

"I am pleased and honored to give the commencement address for the 2007 graduating class of Marshall University," Hickam said. "Marshall is known across the country for its excellence in education and West Virginians everywhere are proud of the university's accomplishments.  Many of my friends from Big Creek High School went on to graduate from Marshall and all have gone on to lead successful, honorable lives.  I will give my remarks with them in mind.  I will also be receiving an honorary doctorate from Marshall which will certainly please my mom, and perhaps astonish some of my teachers at Big Creek."

Rocket Boys: A Memoir is the story of Hickam's life in Coalwood. It was selected by the New York Times as one of its Great Books of 1998 and was an alternate "Book-of-the-Month" selection for both the Literary Guild and Doubleday book clubs.

In February 1999, Universal Studios released its critically-acclaimed film October Sky, which was based on Rocket Boys. Delacorte Press, which published Rocket Boys, subsequently released a mass market paperback of Rocket Boys, re-titled October Sky, which reached the No. 1 position on the New York Times' best-seller list.

Hickam graduated from Big Creek High School in 1960 and from Virginia Tech University in 1964 with a B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering. In 1967 and 1968, he served as a First Lieutenant in the Fourth Infantry Division in Vietnam, where he won the Army Commendation and Bronze Star medals.

Hickam has been a writer since 1969 after his return from Vietnam. His first book, Torpedo Junction, was published in 1989 by the Naval Institute Press and became a best-seller.

He also has written The Coalwood Way (2000), a memoir of his hometown; Sky of Stone (2001), which was a sequel to The Coalwood Way; and We Are Not Afraid: Strength and Courage from the Town That Inspired October Sky (2002).

During his writing career, Hickam was employed as an engineer for the U.S. Army Missile Command from 1971 to 1981. He began employment with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1981 as an aerospace engineer.

With NASA, Hickam worked in spacecraft design and crew training. His specialties included training astronauts on science payloads and extravehicular activities. He also trained astronaut crews for many Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions.

Hechler, who served on President Harry Truman's White House staff from 1949 to 1953, attributes the idea to pursue his own political career to the influence of students in his first classes at Marshall. He first taught political science at Marshall College in 1957. He also taught at Columbia and Barnard colleges.

Recently, Hechler taught an honors class at Marshall on Harry S. Truman: His Life and Times. In conjunction with a biographical analysis of Truman's career, the course studied certain American political institutions as reflected in Truman's actions and decisions, including such issues as presidential leadership, public opinion and pressure groups, Congressional relations, White House staffing, foreign policy, controlling bureaucracy, political parties and campaigns. The course also explored substantive issues such as civil rights, price control, and health care.

"Fifty years ago when I first stepped into the classroom at what was then Marshall College, I was immediately hooked on the spirit of the students and faculty," Hechler said. "That same indescribable spirit was there in greater measure on my recent return to teach a seminar for Yeager and Marshall Scholars."

Hechler served as a U.S. Congressman from 1959 through 1977 and as Secretary of State in West Virginia from 1985 through 2001. Hechler is the author and editor of several books, including Working with Truman: A Personal Memoir of the White House Years, and Bridge at Remagen. He served as a major in the U.S. Army, and was awarded the Bronze Star and five battle stars.

In 1965, Hechler was the only member of Congress to march with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., during the historic Selma (Ala.) March.

Hechler is a native of Roslyn, N.Y., which is 14 miles from Franklin D. Roosevelt's childhood home. He was named West Virginia Son of the Year in 1969. In 2001, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Commission awarded Hechler the Human Civil Rights Award "for advocating social change in the pursuit of equality for others." He received the Harry S. Truman Award for Public Service in 2002, and was named Mountaineer of the Year for 2003 by Graffiti magazine.


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A West Virginia Collaboration of The Guys: A tribute to New York's bravest

A collaboration of WV professional artists will come together for the first time in May to present playwright Anne Nelson's true story of New York City and its people in the aftermath of 9/11, in the riveting drama, The Guys, directed by Cathey Crowell Sawyer, Artistic Director of the Greenbrier Valley Theatre in Lewisburg, WV. The production will be produced by the Marshall Artists Series and the Marshall University Department of Theatre. The intimate performance is comprised of a two person cast starring Beth McVey & Jack Cirillo.

 

The play will be staged for three performances - Monday, April 30 through Wednesday, May 2 at 8 p.m at the Francis Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

 

The story takes place less than two weeks after the September 11th attacks. Nick (portrayed by Jack Cirillo), a fire captain who lost eight men in the collapse of the World Trade Center, must prepare eulogies for each of them. Feeling overwhelmed and unable to express his feelings, he enlists the help from an editor, Joan (portrayed by Beth McVey), to help him. They build a friendship as she helps him put together the difficult, heartfelt speeches that he must deliver with honor, humor and poise all the while, navigating his way though his own emotional response.

 

Huntington native and Broadway star Beth McVey will reprise the role of Joan. McVey, also a former Miss West Virginia, has appeared in numerous Broadway productions including "Annie," "Phantom of the Opera," and "Beauty and the Beast." Jack Cirillo, an associate theatre professor at Marshall University, will portray Nick. Cirillo has worked extensively in New York as well as in many of this country's finest regional theatres. He also has numerous television commercials to his credit and has appeared with the Radio City Rockettes.

 

Director Cathey Crowell Sawyer is the Artistic Director for the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, which was recently designated as WV's year-round professional theatre.  Ms. Sawyer was awarded the 2006 Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence in West Virginia. She will also direct two performances in Lewisburg, WV at the Greenbrier Valley Theatre on Thursday May 3 and Friday May 4.

 

The set and lighting will be designed by Lang Reynolds, Chair of the Marshall University Department of Theatre since 1999.  During his career Mr. Reynolds has served as a lighting/set designer, technical coordinator, and producer in numerous professional projects.  Additionally, his credits include consulting on theatre renovations and new theatre construction.

 

Tickets for the all three Huntington performances are available now. Tickets are $25. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted. Tickets purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. To order tickets for the performances in Lewisburg, please call the Greenbrier Valley Theatre box office at (304) 645-3838.

 

The Guys is sponsored by the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, the Marshall University Department of Theatre, West Virginia Lottery, My Z TV, the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications and the Marshall Artists Series.
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Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture series continues April 23 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Lorraine Bayard de Volo will present a lecture at Marshall University on Monday, April 23 in the Shawkey Room of Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Bayard de Volo's lecture, which is part of the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture series, begins at 7 p.m. Her topic is "Capturing Women's Hearts and Minds: Gender and War in Latin America and Beyond."

Bayard de Volo is associate professor of Women and Gender Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder.  She is author of Mothers of Heroes and Martyrs: Gender Identity Politics in Nicaragua, 1979-1999, and currently is researching women mobilized in support of and against war in Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico.

Dr. Christopher White, MU assistant professor of Latin American History, said, "Dr. Bayard de Volo's in-depth analysis of militarism in Nicaragua, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, and the United States leaves no room for debate about the central role gender plays in mobilizing nations for war."

The lecture is made possible by the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies sponsored by the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, and the Organization of American Historians

The program is free to the public.

For more information, contact Dr. Lynne Mayer, associate vice president of development at Marshall, at (304) 696-2239.


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Marshall students ready for state Business Plan Competition finals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two student groups from Marshall University are among the 10 finalists competing in the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition.

The team that wins the competition, which takes place Friday and Saturday, April 13-14, in Morgantown, will receive $10,000 and a package of business resources aimed at helping turn their business plans into reality.

Marshall is represented by the Arachnovation Spider Easel (team members Will Starcher and his sister, Margie Starcher) and Independability Wheelchair-assistance utility (team members Christopher Worth and Brandi Hill).

Both teams have spent the past few months polishing both their products and the business and marketing plans they intend to use. According to Amy Anastasia, Marshall's coordinator for the Student Business Plan Competition, the winning team will be the one judged to be the best on specific criteria.

"The winning team must offer a novel product or service, and a business plan that can expose and market that product in a profitable way," Anastasia said.

Anastasia said she likes the chances of Marshall's two teams in the competition.

"Among a strong field of finalists, I think both (Arachnovation Spider Easel and Independability Wheelchair-assistance utility) have a great chance of doing well in the competition," she said. "More importantly, both teams are dedicated to their business plans and intend to start their businesses in West Virginia no matter the outcome of the competition.  They represent a tenacious group of future entrepreneurs."

Among the students themselves, anticipation and excitement is evident. "Arachnovation would like to be part of the solution to the state's economic problems and help the market to be Open for Business by the creation of new opportunities and new ideas," Will Starcher said.

For more information about the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition, visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc/ or contact Anastasia at (304) 696-4365.


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'Empty Bowls' Fundraiser Set for Friday, April 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The fourth annual Empty Bowls, Fighting Hunger One Bowl at a Time, a fundraiser that benefits the Huntington Area Food Bank, is Friday, April 13  from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church at 1015 5th Ave., Huntington.
 
Almost 1,000 bowls, about 300 more than last year, have been made for Empty Bowls 2007 by Marshall University Keramos Potters Guild members, local artists and Hurricane, Spring Valley, Fairland and Cabell-Midland High School students. All proceeds from the event will go to the food bank.
 
 During the event, guests will have the opportunity to purchase a ceramic bowl and a soup lunch for a donation of $10. Live music will be performed Marshall University music students.
 
A silent auction will feature ceramic bowls made or autographed by several well-known local public figures and some nationally recognized ones as well. Their identities will be released later this week. Ceramic and other work by area artists also will be available for bidding. 
 
Each guest may purchase a maximum of 8 bowls. Several hundred bowls will be released at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. to try to ensure that everyone will have the opportunity to purchase one. Last year, all 700 bowls were sold in 75 minutes.
 
 Jon Rickey, executive director for HAFB, has high expectations for this year's event. 
 
"Empty Bowls grows each year, and I hope this year continues to create awareness of the hunger problem in the Tri-State area," Rickey said. "With increased donations and awareness, the end of hunger in our communities becomes more of a reality than just a dream."
 
HAFB is a non-profit organization that serves as the hub in a network of food donors and over 200 organizations that serve hungry people in 17 counties in western West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. HAFB provides goods to food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, veterans programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of hungry people.
 
Empty Bowls is a cooperative effort by Marshall University public relations and ceramics students designed to raise awareness of the hunger issue in the Tri-State region.
 
For more information regarding Empty Bowls or the Huntington Area Food Bank, please call (304) 523-6029 or visit the Web site at www.hafb.org.
 
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Eight MU students to take part in annual Posters on the Hill

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight Marshall University mathematics students will be on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., April 24-25 to display their work on the Marshall Differential Analyzer, a machine designed to solve a mathematical equation known as a differential equation.

The students will be taking part in the annual Undergraduate Research Posters on the Hill event, which is sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research.

The students are among 11 who make up the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team. The eight will visit offices of senators and congressmen from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky on the afternoon of April 25 and will present their research work at a poster session that evening in the U.S. Capitol. The team's abstract was one of only 60 selected nationally.

The students who are going to Washington, all mathematics majors, are: team leader Richard Merritt (senior, Huntington); William Morrison (graduate student, South Point, Ohio); Stacy Scudder (graduate student, Pikeville, Ky.); John Fishman (senior, Clearwater, Fla.); Saeed Keshavarzian (senior, Huntington); Tom Cuchta (freshman, Moundsville, W.Va.); Lin Yuan (graduate student, Fu Xin, Lial Ning, China); and Tue Ly (graduate student, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam).

Other student team members are Daniel Velazquez (junior, Guanajuato, Mexico), Caleb Sotak (senior, Beckley, W.Va.), and Keshav Pokhrel (graduate student, Magaragadi, Bardiya, Nepal). Dr. Bonita Lawrence, associate professor of mathematics, is the team's supervisor and Dr. Clayton Brooks, also an associate professor of mathematics, is a team member.

Lawrence said Marshall's Differential Analyzer Team began to take shape in 2004 after she spotted a static display of a portion of the Manchester Differential Analyzer machine at the London Science Museum. The machine she observed in the museum was built in the 1930s.

The Marshall Differential Analyzer Team since has built a small prototype model of this historic machine, and soon will begin work on a much larger version, Lawrence said.

"The goal of the project is to build a four-integrator model that can be used by mathematics teachers in the area - or whoever wants to come to visit us - to teach students about relationships between functions that describe, for example, position of a moving particle and its speed," Lawrence said. "My dream is to bring teachers in and train them to use the machine and then let them bring in their classes and let the students run problems of their own on it."

With the educational merit of the machine in mind, the Marshall team set out to build the model from parts similar to the Meccano parts - the British version of Erector Set - that Dr. Arthur Porter used more than 70 years ago in building the machine in England. The first differential analyzer was built by Dr. Vannevar Bush at M.I.T. in the early 1930s. After visiting M.I.T. in the mid 1930s, Dr. Douglas Hartree of Manchester University returned to England and suggested to Porter, then an undergraduate physics student, that a similar machine be built out of Meccano parts.

Porter, who is 96 years old, serves as the senior mentor and inspiration for the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team from his home in Advance, N.C. Tim Robinson, an electronics engineer originally from England and now living near San Francisco, is another important technical advisor and mentor, Lawrence said.

Robinson has a full-scale model of Porter's machine in his home. It is the only working differential analyzer in the country. The Marshall team's prototype model is the only publicly accessible differential analyzer in the United States, according to Lawrence. She said more than 500 people have observed the model in action.

"The Differential Analyzer can be used to construct beautiful curves from information about the way the curve changes, or its derivative," Lawrence said. "It offers a physical interpretation of a mathematics equation and solves the equation for your viewing pleasure.  You can watch the solution take shape and acquire an understanding of how it is constructed by watching and listening to the machine." 

While other methods for finding numerical solutions of differential equations have been developed over the years, the physical interpretation of a mathematical expression that the Differential Analyzer offers has never been matched, Lawrence said.

"When the machine is completed, it will certainly have the capacity to solve many complex differential equations, but the contribution it will make to mathematics learning is its greatest asset," she said.

Lawrence said the ultimate goal of the project is to offer a multifaceted perspective of a mathematical expression that includes visual, tactile and aural aspects.

For more information on the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team and its visit to Washington, D.C., call Lawrence at (304) 696-3040.

Photo: Seniors Saeed Keshavarzian, left, and Richard Merritt, right, reset the Differential Analyzer model in preparation for a demonstration as graduate student Stacy Scudder, middle, looks on.

 

 


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Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Receives $15,000 donation from HHS Class of 1960 & McVay Realty

HUNTINGTON - The Huntington High School Class of 1960, McVay Realty and Friends recently banded together to donate $15,000 to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Inc.(KAPAC) for restoration of the theatre.  A check will be presented to KAPAC co-presidents, Senator Bob Plymale and David Tyson at the Marshall Artists Series presentation of Mannheim Steamroller on April 10th at 8 p.m. 

 

"This is a wonderful result and a great memorial to the Huntington High School Class of 1960 and Friends" said Fred Charles of Matthews, NC.  "Everybody should be very proud to know that we are generously giving back to our old hometown of Huntington, West Virginia by supporting the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center."

 

"Many of our classmates have been very concerned about the future of the Keith-Albee Theatre," said Charles. "So concerned, in fact, that our class donated $5000 from our memorial fund to the Keith-Albee renovation project."  This resulted in a fund drive for all class members and friends that ultimately raised an additional $5000.

 

The group received a pledge from classmate Joe A. McVay, Jr. of Myrtle Beach, SC. to match all donations from the group. McVay kept his pledge and matched the group with a $5000 donation of his own to bring the grand total to $15,000. 

 

When asked about his pledge to match his classmate's donation, Joe A. McVay, Jr.  of McVay Realty said "I'm very honored to be able to help with the restoration of my favorite building in Huntington. I'm proud to have grown up in Huntington, and because of the efforts of a lot of people the Keith Albee will be remain as the premiere landmark of downtown Huntington....There isn't a theater on Broadway that has the elegance or beauty of OUR Keith Albee....It is a proud day for all of us."

 

Memories of the Keith-Albee among the class of 1960 are very vivid.  Classmate Sharon Ray of Sumpter, SC. sums it up best when she answered her question, What is so special about the Keith-Albee?  "It's laughter, tears, enthusiasm, stars, audiences, cartoons.  It's black and white, color, 3-D, Cinemascope, Stereo, and THX movies.  It's also live shows, concerts, Vaudeville, and pop music.  Last but not least, it's graduations for many senior class students.  The Keith-Albee was part of my life for as long as I can remember"

 

"Senator Plymale and I are deeply grateful to the Huntington High School Class of 1960 & McVay Realty for their generous contribution to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center" said David Tyson Co-President of KAPAC.  "This will certainly help in the ongoing restoration of Huntington's finest gem." 

 

"The Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, Inc. appreciates groups such as the Huntington High School Class of 1960 and individuals such as Joe A. McVay, Jr. that realize the importance of the future plans for revitalizing Downtown Huntington and we encourage other groups to follow their lead," said Senator Bob Plymale, Co-President of KAPAC.

 

The restoration process is ongoing, but the Keith-Albee Theatre still needs your help.  To make a contribution to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Inc., please contact 304-696-3632.


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Associate professor Dan Hollis receives award at national convention

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the third time in the past four years, Marshall University associate professor Dan Hollis received the first-place award in the Video News category during the Professional Electronic Media Awards and Exhibition at the National Broadcasting Society's national convention, which took place March 28-31 in Chicago.

Hollis received the award for his work as executive producer of a special edition of "MU Report," Marshall's student television newscast, about the "We Are Marshall" movie.

"The real satisfaction is doing quality work that you can be proud of whether it's in or outside the classroom," Hollis said. "To win awards and receive recognition by others in your field is a bonus."

Hollis teaches in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and is adviser to the student chapter of the National Broadcasting Society (NBS). He also received an honorable mention award for a video about Babcock State Park, which he presented at the convention.

For more information contact Hollis at (304) 696-2730.


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WMUL students presented with six awards at event in Chicago

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received four grand prize awards and two honorable mention awards at a recent ceremony in Chicago.

The awards were presented March 31 during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 16th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 44th annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony at the Chicago Mart Plaza Hotel.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"No other school won more grand prizes than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters and only one (West Texas A&M University) as many," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities." 

National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 86 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media. Alpha Epsilon Rho (AERho) is the national honorary society composed of members selected from NBS chapters.

Marshall's grand prize award winning entries in scriptwriting were:

Audio Documentary Script: The script for the documentary program "Before the Bench:  The Formative Years of Chief Justice John Marshall," was written by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington.  The script was completed Friday, April 14, 2006.

The grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio Documentary Program: "Before the Bench:  The Formative Years of Chief Justice John Marshall," written and produced by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006. 

Audio Promo: "Addicted," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotional Announcement rotation from Wednesday, May 1, 2006 through the present time, written and produced by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington.

Audio Public Service Announcement: "Cabell-Wayne Adopt-A-Pet," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 1, 2006 through the present time, written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a sophomore from Montgomery, W.Va.

The honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio Magazine Program: "The Tri-State High School Football Report," with host of the program Ryan Epling, a senior from Wayne, that was broadcast Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2006.

Audio Sports Program: "Lasting Perfection:  The Tenth Anniversary of the 1996 Marshall Thundering Herd Football National Championship Season," written and produced by Dave Wilson, a recent graduate from St. Marys, W.Va., broadcast Monday, Dec. 11, 2006.


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Awards banquet highlights Alumni Weekend 2007 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven Marshall University alumni and students will be honored at the 70th annual Alumni Awards Banquet on Saturday, April 21. The event, which honors distinguished alumni and friends, highlights Alumni Weekend 2007, which runs April 19-21 and features the theme, "The Stars Are Out Tonight!"

The banquet will take place at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It will be preceded by the President's Social at 6 p.m. on the plaza of the student center. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. For more information or to reserve a seat at the banquet, persons may call Kimberly Hudson in the alumni office at (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869.

This year's Alumni Weekend activities are sponsored by MBNA and SODEXHO.

Here is a brief look at each award winner:

The Distinguished Alumni Award will be presented to NFL player Mike Bartrum. Regarded as one of the best long snappers in the league, his skill as a tight end has made him invaluable during his 13-year career with the Kansas City Chiefs, Green Bay Packers, New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles.

At Marshall, Bartrum was a two-year starter and three-year letterman (1989, 1991 and 1992), earning All-Southern Conference honors as a senior, guiding Marshall to a Division I-AA national title. He and his wife, Jennifer, have a daughter, Taylor Katherine, and three sons, Cody, Zachary and Ty. They reside in Pomeroy, Ohio.

This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.  

The Community Achievement Award will be presented to Dan M. Butcher. Butcher, a 1981 MU graduate and a native of Bear Creek in Lincoln County, has had successful careers with The Washington Post and other news outlets, as well as his multi-state landscaping firm. His devotion to his roots in Lincoln County has led to a number of community projects including Friends of the Arts, a group that brings cultural events to the area, and numerous projects benefiting Lincoln County High School and local 4-H clubs.

He currently resides in Celebration, Fla., with his wife, Kathy, and his daughter, Sophie. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

The Distinguished Service to Marshall Award will be presented to Dr. Sarah N. Denman. Denman, currently Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, has been with the university in various capacities since 1975. She received both her bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall, and her doctorate in education from West Virginia University.

Denman is known as one of the greatest advocates for the mission of the university and her tireless devotion to promoting Marshall throughout the country. She is married to another well-known figure at Marshall, Dr. William Denman, retired professor of communications studies and past director of the Yeager Scholars Program. Their daughter, Kate, works for West Virginia Congressman Nick J. Rahall.

The Distinguished Service to Marshall Award is given for loyal and unselfish service to Marshall, and is not limited to Marshall alumni.

The Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award will be presented to Dr. Edwina Pendarvis. Pendarvis is a professor of special education, as well as an advocate for gifted education. She served as interim executive director of the John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence from 2005 to 2006, and received the Drinko Research Fellowship in 2001.

In addition to publishing numerous scholarly articles, she also is an accomplished poet. Her work has appeared in Appalachian Heritage, Appalachian Journal, Pine Mountain Sand & Gravel, Now & Then and Wind Magazine, among others. Pendarvis received Marshall's Distinguished Faculty Service Award in 2006.

Pendarvis has two children, a son, Damon, and a daughter, Penny. Damon lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Penny in Albuquerque, N.M.

The Hunter Award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees are evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

The recipients of the Nate Ruffin Scholarship are Jessica Nichole Slash and Kisha Latonya Joyner.

Slash is a sophomore in the College of Science with a GPA of 3.8. She is the great-niece of the first black superintendent in Cabell County, Joe Slash.

Joyner is a sophomore accounting major. Originally from Baltimore, Md., her family moved to Fort Ashby, W.Va., where she was the first African American to graduate from Frankfort High.

Ruffin was a member of the 1970 Marshall football team, but an injury kept him from making the trip to Greenville, N.C., for Marshall's game with East Carolina on Nov. 14, 1970. The plane carrying the team back from North Carolina crashed near Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 people aboard. Ruffin became an advocate for Black Alumni Inc. as well as the university until his death in 2001.

Two Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarships will be awarded to deserving students. They are Robyn Helton of Huntington and Christopher McDerment of Hurricane.

Helton is captain of the Marshall cheerleading squad. As a theater major, Helton has been involved in a number of productions, including roles in several independent films and commercials, and is a member of the stage crew for the Theater Department. In addition to working part-time, Helton has found time for a number of volunteer activities such as the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, the Lion's Club and the Ronald McDonald House.

McDerment is a member of the Marching Thunder. A music education major, McDerment also has performed with the Wind Symphony, the Symphonic Band and the Perpetual Motion Saxophone Quartet. He also volunteers to help raise money for breast cancer research.

This scholarship was established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors, in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds from the scholarship come from the proceeds from Herd Village.

The Cam Henderson Scholarship Award will go to Huntington native Andrew Blain. Blain, a graduate of Spring Valley High School, is a member of the Marshall baseball team, where he is known as the Herd's most dependable lefthander out of the bullpen. He earned Conference USA Commissioner's Honor Roll academic honors. Blain works as an academic tutor with the Student Athlete program and is a member of Campus Crusade for Christ and Golden Key Honor Society.

The Cam Henderson Scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

The Boone County (W.Va.) Friends of Marshall Club was chosen as the Alumni Association Club of the Year. Under the leadership of President Chris Howard, the club hosted numerous receptions, game-watching parties and other social functions throughout the year for the purpose of attracting new members and potential students to attend Marshall. A total of 15 new members were added to the roster last year.

The Young Alumni Award will be presented to Matthew G. White of Huntington. White has been with ZBA Financial Group for three years, and helped create Carsignment, an innovative Internet company, in 2006. He is involved with a number of business groups, including the Young Professionals Committee of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce. He spearheads the Lunch Program, a link with Marshall's College of Business where they educate students on local business culture.

While at Marshall on a baseball scholarship, he broke a team record for games played in a career, 184. White and his wife, Katrina, are expecting a baby girl in June.

The criteria for the Young Alumni Award are that the person must be 35 years old or younger; an active member of the Alumni Association; show outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor; have a personal commitment to the community, and demonstrate service to the Marshall University and its students.

The MUAA Board Member of the Year will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the awards banquet.

The Board Member of the Year must be successful in promoting the association's vision statement among students, alumni and friends, promote the association's core values, and work to move the association to the next level by bringing in new ideas.

Here is a complete list of Alumni Weekend events:

Thursday, April 19

Marshall's Annual Military Ball will take in the John Marshall Room in the Memorial Student Center. The Military Ball timeline is as follows - 5:30 p.m., arrival and cocktails; 6 p.m., begin ceremony and dinner. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey Stephens at (304) 696-6450.

Friday, April 20

The first official event of Alumni Weekend is the Champagne Reception, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Cooking and Culinary Institute, 917 3rd Ave. Cost is $10 per person. This is an opportunity to see the new Culinary Arts program at its best while visiting with old and new friends. Phone (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869 to make reservations.

Saturday, April 21

An Estate Planning Seminar will take place from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the Spotts Dining Room, Memorial Student Center. Details will follow.

The Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1957). Those class members will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1957. Dr. Sam Clagg, former professor of geography and Marshall icon, will speak at the luncheon.  The event will be held from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. in the John Marshall Dining Room, Memorial Student Center. Cost is $20 per person. Lunch is complimentary for members of 50th reunion class. Phone (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869 to make reservations. Trolley tours of campus will be conducted after the luncheon.

The Spring Green and White Football Game will be played at 3 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. For tickets call (304) 696-HERD or (800) THE-HERD. Tickets are $5.

The Scholarship Honor Reception, which annually recognizes and honors Marshall's scholarship donors and recipients, is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center. For more information, call (304) 696-6214. 


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Sons of MU music professor focus of bone marrow drive Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A bone marrow drive, the focus of which is to register bone marrow donors with the National Bone Marrow Donor Project, will be conducted from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 near the fountain on the Memorial Student Center plaza on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The goal of the event is to increase the likelihood of finding a bone marrow match for Brayden and Trevin Saunders, ages 9 and 7, respectively, and the sons of Martin and Gina Saunders. The boys were diagnosed with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, a very rare genetic disease. Martin Saunders is an assistant professor of music at Marshall.

The drive is sponsored by the Marshall University Music Student Organizations Council and the Student Government Association.  A to Z Rentals is loaning a tent and tables for the event, which is called the "For the Boys Bone Marrow Drive." 

Brayden and Trevin are the focus of the campaign to register bone marrow donors with the National Bone Marrow Donor Project.  PNP is an autosomal recessive disorder, so both the father and the mother must pass a defective gene on to their child.

PNP deficiency was initially described in 1975.  To date, only about 45-50 cases are known worldwide.  Their ages at onset vary from birth to 6 years and their outcome is usually fatal, terminating in viral infection or lymphoma. Patients with PNP deficiency may have recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and their disease may be diagnosed late in childhood.

Neurologic symptoms, including mental retardation and muscle spasticity, are major comorbid conditions affecting 67 percent of patients with PNP deficiency. Immune reconstitution with bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice to correct the T- and B-cell immune deficiency.

To find a donor, usually a hematologist will look for a "related," meaning within the family, donor first.  If there is no match within the family, the search continues for an "unrelated" donor.  The NMDP (National Marrow Donor Program) Registry lists more than 6 million potential volunteer donors and more than 50,000 cord blood units and provides access to an additional 4 million volunteer donors through agreements with international cooperative registries.

The HLA tissue type is used to match the patient to potential donors or cord blood units.  Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are proteins found on most cells in the body. The National Marrow Donor Program sets minimum matching levels that must be met before a donor or cord blood unit from the NMDP Registry can be used for a transplant.

These minimum requirements are based on research studies of transplant outcomes.  A well-matched donor is important to the success of the transplant.  It can take time to find a suitable donor or cord blood unit. Though it may take as little as a few weeks to select a cord blood unit, it can take a few months and often longer to find a suitable adult donor and set a date for transplant.

For Brayden, there is no perfect match, so the search for a better match is ongoing. For Trevin, there are several perfect matches.  No one in the family has been a Bone Marrow Donor, although some family members have been tested. The results do not reach the NMDP Registry for at least one month from the date they are tested.  At this point, the family does not know if any family members are a match.

For more information about the "For the Boys Bone Marrow Drive," or fundraising and volunteer opportunities, contact Vicki Stroeher at (304) 696-6437, or via e-mail at stroeherv@marshall.edu.


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Writer Laura Treacy Bentley to read from her work at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet and fiction writer Laura Treacy Bentley, recipient of a Fellowship Award for Literature from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 5 at the Birke Gallery in Smith Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Bentley's first poetry collection, Lake Effect, appeared in December 2006 through Bottom Dog Press.  Noted author Ray Bradbury wrote of Bentley, "Everywhere I look these days no poetry is being written. There is a lot of pretend poetry, but nothing really fine. With this book it makes it very easy for me to say: Laura Bentley, I dub thee poet supreme."

Her work has been published in Ireland and the United States in The New York Quarterly, Poetry Ireland Review, Rosebud, The Stinging Fly (Ireland), Antietam Review, Nightsun, Kestrel, Now & Then, Wind, and in nine anthologies including Wild Sweet Notes: Fifty Years of West Virginia Poetry and Appalachian Love Stories.

Bentley's appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public.

For more information, contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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Second annual Assessment Day is April 4 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's second annual Assessment Day, which is designed to determine how well the university is meeting its goals, is Wednesday, April 4 on the Huntington campus.

"Assessment is really at the heart of the teaching and learning process," Frances Hensley, Marshall's associate vice president for academic affairs and chair of the Assessment Day Committee, said.

Classes will not meet as scheduled most of the day Wednesday, which allows students and faculty to participate in Assessment Day activities. The normal class schedule resumes at 4 p.m. for afternoon and evening classes.

"Assessment Day is an opportunity for faculty and students to evaluate the things they care about most: teaching and learning and the services that support those two," Hensley said. "I can't imagine that a student has no interest in providing feedback to his or her institution. Here is the chance."

Hensley said numerous activities are planned for Assessment Day, some of which are university wide and some departmental. Two national tests will be given on the morning of Assessment Day: the Measure of Academic Performance and Proficiency (MAPP) and the Collegiate Learning Assessment.

"Students were pre-selected for these tests and received e-mail invitations," Hensley said. "But, there are many surveys that students can take that day, such as those given by Student Government, Student Health, Residence Services, etc."

All students and faculty participating in Assessment Day activities will receive a free Buddy's BBQ lunch. Also, students and faculty will be eligible to win prizes donated by area businesses and other groups.

The prizes include a Wii game system, Greenbrier Resort getaway, laptop computers, a whitewater rafting trip, ski lift tickets, rounds of golf, a YMCA membership, priority registration, parking ticket forgiveness, gift cards and more.

Hensley said she encourages everyone who participates Wednesday to fill out an Assessment Day assessment form, which will be available in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center.

"The Assessment Day Committee has worked really hard to put this event together and we welcome everyone's input to help us build a better Marshall through assessment," Hensley said.

In addition to Hensley, committee members include from the faculty, Chris Cassidy, Neil Arneson, Marjorie Keatley and Susan Imes; students Dominique Elmore and Chris Childers; and staff members Jenny Lauhon, Karen Barker and Carla Lapelle.

For more information, visit http://www.marshall.edu/assessment/assessmentday2007/.


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Spring Major Expo is April 3 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to aid Marshall University students in selecting or changing a major, the Spring Major Expo 2007 will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus.

The expo, featuring a theme of "Time to Choose a Major," is a semi-annual event that allows students to find out about majors offered by Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College.

Representatives from various academic departments will be on hand to discuss the requirements and opportunities in their areas.  Students who want to declare or change their majors will have the opportunity to do so.

Randolph Cullum, academic adviser for the University College, said the expo makes it easy for students to obtain information about majors in one place while giving them the opportunity to talk with faculty members in person about fields of study.

Refreshments, including cotton candy, sno-cones, popcorn and sodas provided by Pepsi, will be provided.  In addition, door prizes will be awarded.

In case of rain, the expo will be moved to a location in the Memorial Student Center. 

For additional information, contact Cullum at (304) 696-3252 or via e-mail at cullum@marshall.edu.


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Marshall University Forensic Science Center co-sponsoring National Institute of Justice Applied Technologies Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. − The Marshall University Forensic Science Center is co-sponsoring the National Institute of Justice Applied Technologies Conference which showcases tools and technologies designed to improve community safety.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will be among the speakers kicking off the national conference with welcome and opening remarks between 8 and 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 3 at the Hyatt Regency Orange County in Garden Grove, Calif.

Topics include responding to mass fatalities including identification involving mass graves and a mass disaster train derailment, increasing success rates in solving cold cases, solving property and other crimes using DNA, reviewing technology that makes schools safer, and the "CSI Effect" and its implications for crime scene collection and presentation to juries.

The NIJ is sponsoring the Applied Technologies Conference April 3-5 in partnership with MUFSC and the Sheriff's Association of Texas. Attendees will include managers and supervisors in law enforcement, forensics and corrections.

The Forensic Science Center is providing support for the conference as a member of the Forensic Resource Network, a program of the NIJ. The Forensic Science Center provides DNA testing and training services in support of state and local forensic laboratories though a cooperative agreement administered by the NIJ. DNA laboratory services provided include forensic casework, databasing, paternity/relationship testing and human identification through medical examiners.

This project is supported by cooperative agreement 2005-MU-BX-K020 awarded by the NIJ, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. 


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WVAS meetings, state Science and Engineering fair take place this weekend at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This Friday and Saturday, March 30-31, for the first time in more than 25 years, the annual meetings of the West Virginia Senior and Junior Academies of Science (WVAS) will occur jointly on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The Junior Academy oversees the West Virginia State Science and Engineering Fair (WVSSEF), which also takes place Friday and Saturday at Marshall. The fair is expected to attract more than 80 high school students in grades 9-12 who will be recognized and rewarded. Marshall has hosted the state science and engineering fair since 2000.

The top winners will compete with more than 1,000 high school students from around the world at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, the world's largest pre-college science competition.

The WVAS meetings will feature undergraduate and graduate research in both oral and poster sessions. This year's theme is West Virginia conservation, including topics such as endangered amphibians and invasive species.

"Marshall University is honored to have this opportunity to showcase scientific achievement in West Virginia," Marcia Harrison, director of the WVSSEF and president of the West Virginia Junior Academy of Science, said. "The fair offers important acknowledgement and recognition for creativity and effort in math, science and engineering research from our students from high school to graduate students throughout the state."

Presentations begin at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center. The WVAS poster session begins at 2 p.m. on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center, followed by an open house. An awards ceremony takes place at 4 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The WVAS will present awards to an outstanding teacher as well as undergraduate and graduate students. WVSSEF prizes include a four-year tuition waiver to Marshall and cash prizes for high school students.

The Dow Corporation is the fair's primary sponsor.

For more information, contact Harrison at (304) 696-4867.


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Spots still available for Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp March 30-31 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Spots are still available for anyone interested in participating in the first Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp, named for the former Marshall University and current New England Patriots standout wide receiver. The camp takes place Friday and Saturday, March 30-31, at MU's Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The cost of the camp is $1,000 per person and includes professional football training from Brown, Chad Pennington of the New York Jets and Mike Bartrum of the Philadelphia Eagles. Each participant also will receive a two-night stay at the Pullman Plaza Hotel, meals and a DVD of the weekend.

The weekend begins Friday, March 30 with a kickoff reception in the stadium's Big Green Room. The football camp begins the next day with a full-game day experience. The day starts with a coach's meeting, drills and practice, a draft and a flag football game at the stadium. The evening concludes with a banquet and awards ceremony.

The fantasy camp is a fundraiser for Marshall's Child Development Academy, which provides quality care and education to young children of the Marshall community. It also provides learning opportunities for MU students, especially those pursuing degrees in education. Proceeds from the camp will help to endow the academy and create scholarships for at-risk children.

Participants must be at least 23 years old. The flag football game at 3 p.m. Saturday is open to the public. For more information or to register for the Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp, visit www.troybrownfantasyfootball.com.


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Dr. Lynda Ann Ewen keynote speaker at Woodson banquet

Dr. Lynda Ann Ewen keynote speaker at Woodson banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Lynda Ann Ewen, professor emerita at Marshall University, will be the keynote speaker for the Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation's 15th annual fundraising banquet, which begins at 6 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at the Big Sandy Super Store Arena in Huntington.

Ewen, who taught in Marshall's sociology department before retiring and was co-director of MU's Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender from 1996 through 2006, has titled her speech "You have gifts that can change others' lives. How do you choose to use them?"

She currently is co-editor of the Ohio University Press' Series in Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia, a member of the CONTACT of Huntington (Rape Crisis Center) board of directors and a member of the Huntington-Cabell NAACP. Ewen also is an adjunct faculty member with the Marshall University Graduate College and Union Institute in Cincinnati.

Ewen co-edited, with Dr. Ancella Bickley, Memphis Tennessee Garrison: The Remarkable Story of a Black Appalachian Woman.

The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Committee was formed in 1986 to recommend a fitting memorial to Dr. Woodson.  These include a life-size statue, a scholarship endowment and a collection of works by and about Dr. Woodson.

Dr. Woodson worked as an educator, author, editor, administrator and historian and is known as the Father of Negro History. He founded the Study of Negro Life and History and was founder and editor of the Journal of Negro History and the Negro History Bulletin, both of which still are being published.  In 1926, he founded Negro History Week which is now celebrated as Black History Month.

The foundation is requesting a $30 donation for the banquet and corporate table reservations are available.  For more information and tickets, persons may contact Newatha Myers at (304) 894-5772; Loretta Hagler at (304) 525-5651, or Karen Nance at (304) 736-1655.


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Expert on human development and children's rights is keynote speaker for Honors Convocation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. James Garbarino, a nationally recognized expert on human development and children's rights, will be the keynote speaker for the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, part of Marshall University's 13th annual Celebration of Academics.

The convocation, which recognizes Marshall students participating in honors programs, will take place at 7 p.m. Friday, April 13 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The Celebration of Academics also features the annual Drinko Symposium, which takes place at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 12 in the Joan C. Edward Performing Arts Center. This year's symposium will feature Dr. Linda Spatig, Marshall professor in education and leadership studies who has been the Drinko Fellow for 2006-2007,  speaking on the topic, "Like a Mountain: Youth Development in Rural America."

Garbarino's presentation is titled "Origins of Aggression and Violence in Boys and Girls." He holds the Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology and is Director of the Center for the Human Rights of Children at Loyola University Chicago.

Previously he was Elizabeth Lee Vincent Professor of Human Development and Co-Director of the Family Life Development Center at Cornell University. He earned his B.A. from St. Lawrence University in 1968, and his Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies from Cornell University in 1973. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Garbarino has authored or edited a wide range of publications, most recently See Jane Hit: Why Girls Are Growing More Violent and What We Can Do About It (2006); And Words Can Hurt Forever: How to Protect Adolescents from Bullying, Harassment, and Emotional Violence (2002); and, Parents Under Siege: Why You Are the Solution, Not the Problem, in Your Child's Life (2001).

Both events are free to the public. For more information, contact Jackie Dewald, program assistant with the Drinko Academy, at (304) 696-3183.

Here is the schedule of public events for the 13th annual Celebration of Academics: 

Thursday, April 12

2 p.m. - The Drinko Symposium, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center; speaker: Dr. Linda Spatig; topic: "Like a Mountain:  Youth Development in Rural America"

3 p.m. - Public reception, lobby of Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Friday, April 13

7 p.m. - The Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center; speaker: Dr. James Garbarino; topic: "Origins of Aggression and Violence in Boys and Girls"

8:30 p.m. - Public reception, lobby of Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center


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'We Are Marshall' Issue of Huntington Quarterly Benefits Marshall Alumni Association

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Alumni Association received its first check last week from the Huntington Quarterly magazine based on sales of the publication's 140-page special edition about the Warner Bros. picture, "We Are Marshall." The publisher of Huntington Quarterly pledged $3 per copy of the issue sold through the Marshall University Web site.

"The Marshall University Alumni Association is very appreciative of the efforts of Jack Houvouras and HQ Publishing," said Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations at Marshall. "We were thrilled to partner with him in this project. Jack is an excellent example of a successful Marshall alumnus and we thank him for his generosity."

"We are happy to support the university through sales of this special issue," said Jack Houvouras, a 1988 graduate of Marshall and the publisher of Huntington Quarterly. "The movie was a once-in-a-lifetime experience for the entire Huntington community, and we wanted to publish a keepsake edition of the magazine so people could remember this time for years to come. And it only seemed fitting to share the proceeds with the university."

Houvouras said the issue was extremely popular with the local Huntington community as well as Marshall alumni throughout the U.S., necessitating several re-printings. The magazine was the fastest selling item in the history of Empire Books in downtown Huntington and to date has sold 15,000 copies nationwide.

On Jan. 10, a fire completely destroyed the office building where Huntington Quarterly's offices were located, but fortunately some 15,000 copies of the special edition were being stored at a different location across town. The magazine staff has relocated to temporary office space for the time being and are busy filling orders each day for the special "We Are Marshall" issue.

The magazine is being sold locally at Empire Books, Borders, the MU Bookstore and Jim's Restaurant.

For more information on the magazine, persons may call Publisher Jack Houvouras at (304) 529-6158.


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WVU students donate $750 worth of Wal-Mart gift cards to Marshall students affected by Emmons fire

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia University's Student Government Association and Student Organization Services donated $750 worth of Wal-Mart gift cards to Marshall University students affected by the Jan. 13 Emmons apartment fire in Huntington.

Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs at Marshall, said he received in early March the  gift cards along with letters to people impacted by the fire. Hensley said WVU's students, in less than one week, raised nearly $700 in a campus-wide fundraising drive, which went toward purchase of the gift cards for the Marshall students.

"It was a very, very generous gesture by our friends at West Virginia," Hensley said. "I would expect we would do the same thing for them if a similar situation arose. It shows that rivalries are one thing, but generosity is something else. They are our rivals, but they are our friends and colleagues, too."

Nine people died in the Emmons fire, including three Marshall students. Many others lost everything they owned.

For more information on the gift from WVU, call Hensley at (304) 696-6423 or Lisa Costello, chief of staff with West Virginia University's Student Government Association, at (304) 670-1030. Costello also may be reached via e-mail at Lisa.Costello@mail.wvu.edu.


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WVMEA Conference is March 22-24 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 61st annual West Virginia Music Educators Association State Conference takes place Thursday, March 22 through Saturday, March 24 at Marshall University. 

Marshall professor Dr. Larry Stickler, president-elect of WVMEA, is the program chair. Steve Barnett, director of athletic bands at MU, is the local chair for the conference.

Events include clinics specifically for elementary music, instrumental music and vocal music teachers from throughout West Virginia. Honors concerts will be presented by select concert bands, jazz bands, concert choirs, show choirs and madrigal singers. A group or groups from each category have been selected to perform based on a review of audition tapes.  Solo and ensemble concerts also will be presented by West Virginia students chosen by tape audition.

The All-State Children's Choir Concert at 7:30 pm Friday, March 23, at Cam Henderson Center is open to the public. More than 500 students from throughout West Virginia will participate in the All-State Orchestra, All-State Choir and All-State Band performances.  Students were auditioned and selected earlier in the year.

The All-State Orchestra, Choir and Band Concert takes place at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at Cam Henderson Center.  The event is open to the public, and admission is $5 per person or $10 per family.

More information on the conference is available at http://members.tripod.com/~wvmea/.

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Marshall researcher receives post-doctoral award from Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University post-doctoral researcher Dr. Gabriela Ion and her mentor, Dr. Elaine Hardman, have received a two-year post-doctoral research award from the Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation.

The award allows Ion to conduct studies to determine how the interactions between the adipocytes (fat cells) found in breast tissue and breast cancer cells may be altered by the consumption of omega 3 fat instead of omega 6 fat. MU graduate student Juliana Akinsete also is taking part in the study.

Hardman, an associate professor in the department of biochemistry and microbiology at Marshall, said the award is specifically to support the research of young researchers who plan a career in nutrition/behavior-linked cancer prevention research.

"This study will be the foundation for further work by Dr. Ion to understand how dietary change can prevent cancer with a goal of recommendations for cancer prevention in humans," Hardman said.

Ion, a native of Romania, said she was very surprised she received the grant. "It was my first grant proposal and I got it," she said. "It is a very important study, which is why I applied for the grant."

The award, which took effect in January 2007, was announced by the Marshall University Research Corporation and the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at the Marshall University School of Medicine.

According to Hardman, omega 3 fats are found in fish, leafy green vegetables and canola oil whereas omega 6 fats are found in corn or soybean products and in the meat from animals (beef, pork, or chicken) fed those foods.

Hardman said previous research showed that the incidence of mammary (breast) cancer is reduced and the growth of existing tumors is slower if the diet of mice or rats includes some omega 3 fat. She said the reduction of cancer risk due to omega 3 fat consumption does not result from changing one single significant mechanism but is a combination of benefits from several mechanisms that together suppress tumor growth. Results of previous studies in mice showed that a diet containing canola oil instead of corn oil slowed breast cancer growth, she said.

Hardman said the goal of the new study is to better define the mechanisms for suppression of breast cancer formation by omega 3 fats.

"In this study we will investigate the effect of canola oil (rich in omega 3 fatty acids) versus corn oil (rich in omega 6 fatty acids) on the communication between preadipocytes/adipocytes (fat cells) and breast tumor cells," Hardman said. "We know that cell signals produced by fat cells can influence the growth of breast cancer cells. We hypothesize that canola oil and corn oil will differentially affect cell-cell communication by changing the signals produced by both fat cells and cancer cells, especially the inflammatory signals produced by these cells."

She said the research can open new avenues for breast cancer prevention by a better understanding of how foods, especially dietary fat, influence cancer formation.

For more information on the post-doctoral award, contact David Ice with the Marshall University Research Corporation at (304) 696-4837.


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Private donations to Yeager program increase by 80 percent in 2006

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars program, spurred in part by a reconnection with original donors, showed an 80 percent increase in private donations in 2006, Bob Galardi, director of major gifts, said today.

"In 2006, we established 'The Founder's Club,' made up of individuals, corporations and foundations that made significant gifts to initiate the SYS program in the late 1980s," Galardi said. "Many of our earliest 'founding' donors reestablished their private contributions in 2006 to the Society of Yeager Scholars."

Another reason for the increase was the response of Yeager alumni to a financial challenge established by the Hugh I. Shott Jr. Foundation. By raising more than $50,000 in less than six months, the net result of the "Triple Your Investment for Future Yeager Scholars Campaign" was more than $150,000 for the program.

Since the goal was met, the program has continued to receive gifts from Yeager alumni that now total more than $60,000 toward the campaign.

"Yeager Scholars are presented with extraordinary learning opportunities. It would be impossible to provide this kind of enriched academic experience without the dedication and support of our donors," said Barry Sharpe, executive director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence.

Galardi said personal appeals and regional donor receptions were implemented in an effort to reconnect with the program's original donors.

"The use of regional receptions allowed us to invite past and present regional supporters of the Yeager program to hear about the many successes of our program and to take the opportunity to connect with one another," Galardi said. "The regional receptions have been very effective in keeping folks up to date and in generating new gifts to the program."

Galardi said the program, founded in 1989 and named for Brig. Gen. (Retired) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, needs continued financial assistance to be successful. He said he hopes donations will continue to increase.

"Many planned giving opportunities are available and mutually beneficial to our Yeager donors and the program," Galardi said. "And, with every gift we come closer to inviting an additional bright student to our unique program."

For more information on giving to the program, call Galardi at (304) 696-3336.


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Friday March 16, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

The Fresh Aire Music of Mannheim Steamroller makes Huntington debut!

The Marshall Artists Series is excited to announce The Fresh Aire Music of Mannheim Steamroller is making their only area appearance at the Keith-Albee Theatre Tuesday, April 10, 2007 at 8 p.m.

 

The show was originally booked at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.  However, the performance was an immediate sellout when tickets went on sale in September.  The Marshall Artists Series decided to move the show to a larger venue to allow more fans to see the highly anticipated performance.

 

Fresh Aire is the GRAMMY award-winning music series from Mannheim Steamroller composer Chip Davis.  In Fresh Aire, Davis has created groundbreaking music that is an innovative blend of classical themes with pop elements that he calls, "18th century rock-n-roll." 

 

Each of the eight Fresh Aire albums explore different topics; the first four Fresh Aire albums were inspired by the beauty and uniqueness of the four season, while Fresh Aire five through eight deal with man's curiosities about the world in which we live.

 

 

The tour features a cast of the most talented and versatile musicians touring the world.  The performance will feature the famous, original Mannheim Steamroller multi-media images, synchronized lighting, special effects, and the world renowned music of Mannheim Steamroller.

 

Tickets for the performance are $50 and $35 and can be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons by calling (304) 696-6656.  All major credit cards are accepted.

 

Tickets may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com.

 

This performance is sponsored by St. Mary's Medical Center, WOWK-TV, the Herald Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, and the Marshall Artists Series.

 

For more information on The Fresh Aire Music of Mannheim Steamroller, visit www.manheimsteamroller.com.


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Documentary on Cam Henderson to be shown again Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Cam Henderson: A Coach's Story," a documentary by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Deborah Novak and John Witek, will be re-aired at 8 p.m. Sunday, March 18, by West Virginia Public Broadcasting. The documentary aired for the first time on Tuesday, March 13.

Henderson is the winningest coach in Marshall University basketball history with 362 victories from 1935 to 1955 and the second-winningest coach in Marshall football history with 68 wins from 1935 to 1949. Before going to Marshall College, he coached football and basketball from 1923 to 1935 at Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, W.Va.

Novak and Witek made the Emmy Award-winning "Ashes to Glory," which first aired in 2000 on the 30th anniversary of the Marshall plane crash. They also have created three documentaries on Blenko Glass for Public Broadcasting.

The documentary looks at the life of the man who is credited with inventing basketball's fast break and zone defense. The program features rare footage, both in color and black and white, of Henderson in action. The clips were obtained from private collectors and have not been seen publicly in more than 50 years.


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Graduate exhibition on display March 26-29 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Past Beyond Memory," a graduate exhibition showcasing works by artists Betty Gay, Staci Leech and Megan Smith, will be displayed Monday, March 26 through Thursday, March 29 at Marshall University's Birke Art Gallery, located in Smith Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

A reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 28 will feature gallery talks by the three artists who work in a diverse array of media including photography, sculpture and painting. The event is free to the public.

For more information, contact Gallery Director Emily Ritchey at (304) 696-2296 or Leech at (304) 634-5652 or via e-mail at Leech1@marshall.edu.


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Events planned in observance of Holocaust Remembrance Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will be host in April to three events on its Huntington campus planned in observance of Holocaust Remembrance Month, Dr. Lynne Mayer, MU's associate vice president for development, said today. Two additional events in Huntington also are part of the observance.

The events, all open to the public, are sponsored by Marshall's College of Liberal Arts and department of theatre, Federated Jewish Charities of Huntington and B'nai B'rith Lodge #795. Here is the schedule:  

Thursday, April 5: 7 p.m., Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre at Marshall - "Holocaust Denial," a panel with Rabbi David Wucher, Victor Winston (visiting Professor of International Affairs, Marshall University) and a speaker still to be determined from the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C.

Sunday, April 15: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., B'nai Sholom Congregation (10th Street and 10th Avenue) - "Yom Ha-Shoah," of "Day of Remembrance of the Holocaust," is commemorated locally be reading the names of Holocaust victims one after another, dramatizing the unfathomable notion of six million deaths.

Wednesday, April 18: 7 p.m., Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre at Marshall - "The Eternal Jew," a 60-minute Nazi propaganda film and discussion led by Dr. Phil Rutherford, MU assistant professor of European history. This event is not recommended for children under 16.

Sunday, April 22: 2 to 4 p.m., Cabell County Public Library - Film showing of "Night and Fog," award-winning French documentary, and book discussion of "Night," by Eli Wiesel, recipient of Nobel Peace Prize, political activist and Holocaust survivor. "Night" is a memoir that describes Wiesel's experiences during the Holocaust and his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps.

Wednesday, April 25: Night of dinner, discussion and theatre at Marshall to support Faces of Appalachia: Studies in Ethnicity and Gender, a National Endowment for the Humanities initiative at MU.

  • 5:45 p.m., dinner in support of Faces of Appalachia - providing scholarly efforts and K-12 continuing education on diversity on Marshall's campus and in the region. The dinner takes place in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Room.
  • 7 p.m., "Coffee and Conversation," with Director Gene Anthony and Rabbi David Wucher on the theatre production, Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre.
  • 8 p.m., Marshall University Theatre performance of "The Diary of Anne Frank," Joan C. Edwards Playhouse. The performance also will take place at 8 p.m. daily April 26-28.

A $100 donation per person to the Faces of Appalachia project reserves a place for the evening of dinner, discussion and theatre. Reservations may be made by calling Kristi Arrowood, director of special projects with the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., at (304) 696-3505.


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Thursday March 15, 2007
Contact: Beverly McCoy, Director of Public Relations, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

Marshall Medical grads continue primary care trend

This year's graduating medical students at Marshall University will enter postgraduate training in 13 specialties at medical centers from New Hampshire to California, results released March 15 show.

Nearly half of Marshall's medical graduates will enter West Virginia training programs. The school again is above the national average in the percentage of graduates (70.8) entering the primary care fields of family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics/gynecology.

Fifteen students will enter the fields of pediatrics and medicine/pediatrics, a rate more than 2.4 times the national average. Marshall students also were above the national average in the percentage entering family medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, emergency medicine, psychiatry and neurology.

"We're very pleased with the match results this year," said Dr. Marie C. Veitia, associate dean for medical student affairs. "We're happy that a number of excellent students have chosen to stay at Marshall, and that students will be representing Marshall in prestigious residencies across the country. We're very proud of all of them."

Among the medical centers choosing Marshall students were the Cleveland Clinic, Vanderbilt University and the University of Virginia. Seven students were chosen for residencies in the especially competitive specialties of emergency medicine, anesthesiology, orthopedics and radiology, Veitia said.


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Monday March 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Psychology Clinic forming group to help people experiencing shyness or social phobia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Psychology Clinic is offering a free Shyness/Social Phobia Group led by doctoral-level psychology students Danielle Hemmings and Billy Rutherford.

The group will meet at 6 p.m. Monday evenings in the Psychology Clinic beginning on March 26. It is being formed now and space is limited.

Any Marshall students, staff, or community members experiencing shyness or social phobia are welcome to call either Hemmings, Rutherford or the Psychology Clinic to sign up. These difficulties can include, but are not limited to, public speaking fears, performance anxiety, fears of speaking in class or participating in social activities.

"Many people's lives are impacted by shyness or fear of being evaluated by those around them," Hemmings said.

Rutherford said one of the goals of the group is to encourage greater understanding of the factors related to social anxiety. "This will be a unique opportunity for people to explore factors related to their shyness in a supportive environment of others who all share common challenges," he said. 

To contact Hemmings, call (304) 696-2772, option 2, ext. 37435, or contact her via e-mail at Fridley@marshall.edu. To contact Rutherford, call (304) 696-2772, option 2, ext. 78843, or contact him via e-mail at rutherford3@marshall.edu.

The contact number for the Psychology Clinic/administrative assistant is (304) 696-2785, and the clinic is located in Harris Hall Room 449 on Marshall's Huntington campus.


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Thursday March 8, 2007
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Brown-bag lecture series planned as part of Women's History Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - To honor Women's History Month, students and professors from Marshall University will participate in a brown-bag lecture series throughout March.  Each of the five hour-long presentations will occur in Harris Hall and is open to the public.  

The lecture series is sponsored by the Marshall University Women's Studies Program and the Women's Center.  All presentations are free.  Three students and two professors will present the following lectures:

  • "Women, Work Culture, and Resistance in Huntington, West Virginia's Glass Industry," 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 13, Harris Hall 229. Lecturer: Ginny Young.
  •  "Reprogramming Systems: Women in 'High-Tech' Work," 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 14, Harris Hall 134. Lecturer: Dr. Dan Holbrook.
  • "The Beguines: Medieval Sisters Doing it for Themselves," 1 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, Harris Hall 229. Lecturer: Dr. David Winter.
  • "Ladies on the Label: Gender Stereotypes in Advertising," 1 p.m. Wednesday, March 28, Harris Hall 134. Lecturer: Valerie Spears.
  • "The Catholic Church and Birth Control: An Analysis of Patristic Attitudes toward Contraceptive and Abortive Practices," 1 p.m. Friday, March 30, Harris Hall 137. Lecturer: Megan C. Corley.

For more information, contact Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, assistant professor in the department of history, at (304) 696-2955.

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Wednesday March 7, 2007
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Student elections rescheduled for March 12-13

Marshall University's Student Government Association elections, originally scheduled for today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday, March 7-8), have been postponed until next week.
 
Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, said the elections will take place from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, March 12-13. Votes will be cast by paper ballot at a centralized polling station in the Memorial Student Center.
 
Hensley said he has suspended use of the electronic voting system indefinitely due to longstanding accusations of impropriety in Student Government elections. "Whether or not these can be proven is uncertain, but it is quite certain that many students at Marshall University have lost confidence in the E-Voter system," Hensley said. "Thus, until I am assured that the electronic voting system can be used in a manner free of fraud, I am suspending its use."


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Documentary on Cam Henderson debuts March 13 on Public Television

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Cam Henderson: A Coach's Story," a documentary three years in the making by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Deborah Novak and John Witek, airs for the first time at 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 13, on West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Henderson is the winningest coach in Marshall University basketball history with 362 victories from 1935 to 1955 and the second-winningest coach in Marshall football history with 68 wins from 1935 to 1949. Before going to Marshall College, he coached football and basketball from 1923 to 1935 at Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, W.Va.
 
Novak and Witek made the Emmy Award-winning "Ashes to Glory," which first aired in 2000 on the 30th anniversary of the Marshall plane crash. They also have created three documentaries on Blenko Glass for Public Broadcasting.
 
The Henderson documentary looks at the life of the man who is credited with inventing basketball's fast break and zone defense. The program features rare footage, both in color and black and white, of Henderson in action. The clips were obtained from private collectors and have not been seen publicly in more than 50 years.
 
"One of the pleasures of this project is seeing the old film," said Novak, the documentary's director. "I really hope people enjoy the 1930s Marshall football film at Fairfield Stadium."
 
Witek, the producer, discovered what he says could be the earliest college basketball footage of the 1920s. "College basketball was rarely filmed," Witek said, "because arenas were dimly lit. But we managed to find a reel of film, and the differences in the game are quite startling."
 
According to Novak and Witek, Henderson beat bigger, stronger, nationally-ranked teams year after year while coaching at Davis & Elkins College and Marshall College. Recruiting his players from coal fields and steel mills, from family farms and Indian reservations, he gave poor country boys their only chance at a better life through sports, and by so doing, propelled both colleges into the national spotlight. Breaking the color line in West Virginia by recruiting Hal Greer to play basketball at Marshall was his final major achievement. 
 
To tell Henderson's story and dispel the many rumors surrounding him, Witek and Novak said they visited 25 libraries and conducted dozens of interviews with former Henderson athletes, acquaintances, and historians. What emerged, they said, is a vivid portrait of a stoic and misunderstood man who died from complications brought about by diabetes. 
 
Among those interviewed were Dr. Sam Clagg, Andy Tonkovitch, Bill Toothman, Ernie Salvatore, Andrew D'Antoni, Robert P. Alexander, Don Gibson, Danny Clark, Lewis Wilcox, Herndon Wilks, Paul A. Lewis, Bob Wright, Frederick J. Altizer, Bill Staats, Dick Smarr, Woody Woodrum, Dr. C. Robert Barnett, Walter K. Yates, M.D., Margaret (Polly) Bell, Elinor McDermott Miller, and Charlie Slack.
 
To recapture Henderson's life during the golden age of sports, Witek and Novak also recreated events for which no film records exist. Scenes of a one-room school house, a 1913 basketball game, and a vintage newsreel, cartoon, and bouncing ball sing-along were developed for the documentary, together with an original musical score by Jay Flippin. Scrapbooks, news clippings, photos, letters, and home movies were generously contributed by the people of Huntington making the Cam Henderson documentary a genuine community effort, according to Novak and Witek.
 
Novak said a DVD of the Henderson documentary, along with four bonus features, will be available next week. The bonus features include a nostalgic look at Huntington in the 1950s, "The Cam Stories," anecdotes from former players, and tributes to Clagg, Henderson's biographer, and Salvatore, a longtime sports columnist with The Herald-Dispatch.
 
Novak said the DVD will be available in several places, including the Marshall Bookstore, Stadium Bookstore and Borders Books Music Movies & Caf at the Huntington Mall. During the broadcast on Tuesday, West Virginia Public Broadcasting will offer it as part of its pledge drive.
 
For more information, contact Novak at (304) 638-0681 or via e-mail at Novak1@marshall.edu, or Witek at (304) 697-0681 or via e-mail at Jcwitek@aol.com.

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Poet Rose Solari to read from her work March 14 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Rose Solari will read from her work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 in Room 2w16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Solari is the author of four books of poetry, most recently Orpheus in the Park, published in 2005, and Difficult Weather, winner of the Columbia Book Award for Poetry.  Poet Stanley Plumly has written that she is "a poet of accomplished emotion ... whether she is speaking in the tongues of gods or for those she loves. In whatever terms, nothing can disguise the tenderness at the heart of her story."

Her poetry has appeared in many publications, including Parnassus: Poetry in Review, Minimus, and on the IOTA CD Series.  She also has received grants from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the Maryland State Arts Council.

Solari has written and performed in the multi-media play Looking for Guenevere, an Arthurian retelling, and is currently at work on an historical novel. She is Visiting Writer at the Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis, Md., and has been on the faculty of the Writer's Center in Bethesda, Md., for 15 years.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public.

For more information, contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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Monday March 5, 2007
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Marshall meets National Information Security standards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been re-designated by the Information Assurance Courseware Evaluation center as meeting the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS) National Standard 4011.

The CNSS represents a broad cross-section of federal departments and agencies, which set the training standards for information assurance professionals in government and industry. 

These standards reflect the federal awareness that consistency in training and education for information assurance is critical to our national infrastructure.   The curriculum in Information Systems within the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) at Marshall University was approved for re-certification through 2012. 

Dr. Patricia Logan, associate professor in the College of Information Technology and Engineering, will receive an official CNSS certificate, signed by the CNSS Chair,
during the June 5, 2007 CNSS Awards Ceremony at the 11th Colloquium for
Information Systems Education (CISSE) at Boston University in Boston, Mass. The conference is attended by more than 200 representatives from federal departments and agencies, private industry, and academia. 

For more information, contact Logan at (304) 746-1951 or via e-mail at loganp@marshall.edu.


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'Third House,' annual state government satire show, is Monday, March 5 at West Virginia Cultural Center in Charleston

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) and its alumni association are sponsoring the 18th annual "Third House" fundraiser at 8 p.m. Monday, March 5 in Charleston.

The Capitol news media who cover state government will present the "Third House" at the West Virginia Cultural Center Auditorium. The production will feature skits and musical satire about current issues in the West Virginia Legislature. A reception catered by the Marshall Community and Technical College Culinary Arts School will follow the show.

"The School of Journalism and Mass Communications is pleased to have such an active alumni organization to help us sponsor this event," SOJMC Dean Corley Dennison said. "We also very much appreciate the efforts of the Capitol press corps in helping us raise money for the school's greatest needs."

Susan Nicholas, WSAZ-TV news anchor and president of the SOJMC Alumni Association, described "Third House" as "a fun night."

"It's an opportunity to share a laugh with your legislators, Gov. Joe Manchin and local reporters," Nicholas said. "It really is a great event with a great cause."

"Third House" is organized by the SOJMC Alumni Association and the school. It is the school's largest fund-raising effort each year and the money raised is used to benefit students in the journalism school. Admission is a $25 contribution per person.

Tickets are available at the Governor's press office, the State Senate clerk's office and the House of Delegates clerk's office, all at the state Capitol. Tickets also are available in the School of Journalism office at Marshall.

For more information, call the SOJMC at (304) 696-2360.


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Friday March 2, 2007
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Women of Color Program set for March 6 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Patricia Kusimo, Chief Executive Officer of the West Virginia Center for Professional Development, will be the keynote speaker next week at Marshall University's Women of Color program.

The program, which is free to the public, begins at noon on Tuesday, March 6 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus. Women of Color awards will be presented and a reception will follow.

The Women of Color program activities are coordinated by Fran L. Jackson, Program Assistant II, Center for African American Students' Programs; Leah Tolliver, director of the Women's Center; Taella Hill, Developmental Advising Specialist, and Lisa Allen, Program Assistant I, Student Development.

Vendors and displays will be set up in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center throughout the day. For more information, contact Jackson at (304) 696-6705.


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Wednesday February 28, 2007
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William C. Campbell, insurance executive and golfing great, to speak to Marshall community on March 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington resident William C. Campbell, an insurance executive for nearly 60 years, a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame and the only person ever to have headed both governing bodies of the game of golf, will speak at Marshall University next week.

"A Chat with Bill Campbell" will take place at 2 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 in the Alumni Lounge on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Members of the Marshall University community are invited to attend.

Steve Hensley, Marshall's dean of student affairs, said he believes those who attend will benefit from hearing Campbell discuss his experience in leadership and the challenges young people face today.

"I hope after the discussion with Mr. Campbell that our students will be more motivated to seek their own path toward outstanding accomplishments," Hensley said. "I have always admired Mr. Campbell not only for his accomplishments, but for the dignity and humility he has displayed throughout his life. I believe he will be a true inspiration to our students, faculty and anyone else who attends."

Campbell, who was born on May 5, 1923 in Huntington, enjoyed a phenomenal career as an amateur golfer. He won the West Virginia Amateur 15 times; competed in 37 U.S. Amateurs, 15 U.S. Opens and 18 Masters; won the West Virginia Open three times, won the U.S. Senior Amateur championship twice and won the U.S. Amateur once.

He served as president of the U.S. Golf Association from 1982 through 1984, and was captain of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews in 1987 and 1988.

Campbell's civic leadership includes terms as president of the Huntington Chamber of Commerce, the Huntington YMCA and the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. He also was chairman of the Marshall University Advisory Board and a member of the Cammack Children's Center board of directors. Campbell also is a past president of the Central Ohio Valley Industrial Council and past regional vice president of the Ohio Valley Improvement Association.

He served in combat in World War II with the 100th Infantry Division, rising in rank to Captain. Campbell was awarded the Bronze Star for Valor and three Battle Stars. He began his college career in 1941 at Princeton University, took a 3 1/2-year break to serve in the military, then returned to Princeton and graduated in 1947. Campbell has been with John Hancock Life Companies since, and is a life member of the Million Dollar Round Table.

Campbell was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1990. He still works at his office in Huntington and tours the world as a speaker and champion of golf.

Anyone interested in attending "A Chat with Bill Campbell" is asked to call Hensley at (304) 696-6423.


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Wednesday February 28, 2007
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'Angels on the Head of a Pin,' a one-woman theatrical performance, to be staged March 5 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Angels on the Head of a Pin," a one-woman theatrical performance written by nationally renowned playwright, poet and author Elaine Blue of Huntington, will be presented at 7 p.m. Monday, March 5 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre at Marshall University.

The play is being presented by Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs. It is free to the public.

The play depicts a homeless woman's struggle to survive while living on the streets and shows the distinct difference between the "haves" and "have nots," according to the author.

Through strong, emotional, witty and at times frightening dialogue, the character (Missy Lundsford, played by local actress Angela Victoria Walker) recounts her childhood and her personal struggles.  As expressed by Blue, "The forsaken lot should be counted amongst the fortunate and we are all angels under the watchful eye of God." 

Blue was the guest artist and performer at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., for Women of Color Day in March 2006.  "Angels on the Head of a Pin" won the Casey Award for Best Workshop Production in 1992.

Walker is the minister of Young Chapel A.M.E. Church in Huntington. She received her Master of Divinity degree at Payne Theological Seminary in 2000. In November 2000, she accepted the appointment as pastor of St. Paul A.M.E. Church in Morgantown, W.Va. She currently is a doctoral candidate in Educational Leadership Studies at West Virginia University.

For more information on the play March 5 at Marshall, contact Maurice R. Cooley, director of MU's Center for African American Students' Programs, at (304) 696-5430, or via e-mail at cooley@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday February 27, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, (304) 696-3334

Menopause the Musical: FREE Pre-Show Discussions Now Available

The Marshall Artists Series and Cabell Huntington Hospital's Women & Children's Services are pleased to announce the opening of Menopause the Musical Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2007.  The heartwarming musical will run for eight performances at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse.

 

And that's not all!  The Marshall Artists Series and Cabell Huntington Hospital are teaming up to offer ticket holders FREE presentations about a particular aspect of menopause before three of the performances.

 

Thursday, March 1 from 6:45-7 p.m. Linda Savory, MD will discuss "The Basics of Menopause."  The presentation will focus on the basic hormonal and biochemical changes that cause and accompany menopause.

 

Friday, March 2 from 6:45-7 p.m. Shawn McKinney, MD will present on "Oncology & Menopause."  The presentation will focus on the relationship between cancer and menopause and how reaching menopause may change a woman's risk factors for getting cancer.

 

Saturday, March 3 from 6:45-7 p.m. Joseph Assaley, MD will present on "Herbal and Hormonal Medications & Menopause."  The presentation will focus on the risks and effectiveness of various menopause medications in relieving the symptoms many women experience during menopause.

 

In the side-splitting hit, Menopause the Musical, four women with seemingly nothing in common but a black lace bra meet in a Bloomingdale's department store and soon find out lingerie isn't the only thing they share.

 

Since 2001, this slide-splitting musical has entertained audiences from coast-to-coast and around the world. Patrons will laugh and cheer along with a joyful parody of 25 re-lyricized baby boomer hits including "I Heard It Thru the Grapevine You No Longer See 39" "Puff, My God I'm Draggin" and the disco favorite "Stayin' Awake! Stayin' Awake!"

 

Evening performances are February 27-March 3 at 7:30 p.m. There will also be three matinee performances February 28 and March 3 at 2 p.m. and March 4 at 3 p.m.  All performances and pre-show discussions are at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse.

 

Tickets for the shows are available now. Tickets are $39. Groups of 20 or more people will receive a $5 discount off each individual ticket. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted.

 

Tickets for all shows may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can pick up tickets at any Ticketmaster outlet, including select Kroger stores.

 

This show is sponsored by Cabell Huntington's Women & Children's Services, WSAZ, the Herald Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, and the Marshall Artists Series.

 

-end-


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Notre Dame associate professor to speak at Marshall as part of Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture Series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Gail Bederman, an associate professor of history and gender studies at the University of Notre Dame and an award-winning teacher, will speak at Marshall University at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8.

Bederman will speak in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus as part of the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture series.

Her topic, "Contraception and its Advocates in the USA, 1831-1965:  A Revisionist History," reflects her research in the history of women, gender and sexuality in the United States.  The lecture is part of the Marshall University Celebration of Women's History Month.  It is made possible by the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies sponsored by the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, and the Organization of American Historians.

Bederman's book, Manliness and Civilization:  A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917, "is a brilliant exploration of American culture at the turn of the 20th century," said Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, assistant professor of history and interim director of Women's Studies at Marshall.

"It has altered the way historians have thought about the relationship among gender, race and power in the period," Rensenbrink said. "We are delighted with support of the Schmidlapp Fund, which is making this opportunity possible."

Bederman's current research centers on the earliest precursors of the English and American reproductive rights movement from Mary Wollstonecraft and T.R. Malthus through Fanny Wright and Madame Restell.

The program is free and open to the public.


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Tuesday February 27, 2007
Contact: Linda Dobbs, Professor of Music, (304) 696-2347

Mythology comes alive in Marshall University operas

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local opera-goers will have an opportunity to brush up on their Greek mythology this weekend as Marshall University Opera Theatre presents a double dose of the classics with "Fair Galatea" and "Dido and Aeneas," on Friday, March 2 and Saturday, March 3.

Both performances begin at 8 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Dr. E. Del Chrol, assistant professor of classics, will present a pre-performance lecture "Dido and Aeneas: Passion and Destiny" at 7 p.m. Friday, March 2, also in Smith Recital Hall.

"The Fair Galatea" by Franz von Supp, a delightful comic operetta, is a satire of Ovid's story from his "Metamorphoses" from the 1st century A.D., in which he recounts the Greek myths.  This is the same tale George Bernard Shaw used for his "Pygmalion," which served as the basis for the classic Lerner and Loewe musical, "My Fair Lady." 

Von Supp's operetta is in the Viennese style, and he is generally credited with bringing the genre, much like today's musical with its spoken dialogue, to Vienna. "The Fair Galatea" was his most successful work and is well known for its delightful overture. Kristin Pino, Mitchell Spurlock, Adam Stephenson and Blake Racer perform this romp through the classical myth.

 "Dido and Aeneas," by Henry Purcell, is a masterpiece of English lyric opera. The plot is adapted from one of the great epic poems, "The Aeneid," by Vergil, and depicts the tragic conflict between love and duty. Purcell's music nobly portrays the intense passions felt by both Dido, the Queen of Carthage, and Aeneas, who is destined to leave her.

Purcell composed the opera in 1689. It was first performed at a girl's boarding school run by the renowned dancing master Josiah Priest and it contains some of the period's most eloquent choral writing. A cast led by Victoria Landgrave, Leeah Weber, David Patrick and Angela Moore is joined by the MU Chamber Choir to present this Baroque tour de force.

Tickets are $10 for regular admission and $7 for seniors, MU faculty and staff and those17 and under. MU students are admitted free with ID. For further information, contact the department of music at (304) 696-3117.


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Tuesday February 27, 2007
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First Friday Filmfest continues with Dixie Chicks documentary

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The First Friday Filmfest will feature the 2006 documentary Shut Up and Sing as its March film. For the first time in the Filmfest series, the film will show at two times, 7:15 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., on Friday, March 2.

Funded through Marshall University's Student Affairs, the films are free to members of the Marshall community with ID and $5 for all non-MU patrons. Filmgoers are encouraged to arrive early for seats. No previews will be shown before the film. The Cinema Theater on 4th Avenue in downtown Huntington will once again host the film.

Directed by Barbara Kopple and Cecilia Peck, Shut Up and Sing documents the Dixie Chicks' attempts to fight the fallout from lead singer Natalie Maines' now infamous onstage criticism of George W. Bush on the eve of the Iraq War. Standing on a stage in London in 2003, Maines casually told the crowd, "Just so you know, we're ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas." That statement almost instantaneously brought down the wrath of the country music world on the trio's heads.

The film follows the Dixie Chicks from the time of Maines' comment through to the completion of their most recent album, Taking the Long Way, which just earned five GRAMMY Awards, including Album of the Year. Music from the album - and the process and personal costs of making it - is as much a focus of the film as the controversy itself.  The film is rated R for language.

In his review for The Chicago Tribune, Michael Phillips remarks on the relevance, and power, of the film: "There's no more soul-stirring way to relive the last three years, in all their miserable divisiveness, than to see 'Shut Up and Sing.' " He goes on to note, "We've had some fine music documentaries in recent years and some fine documentaries dealing with the Iraq invasion. 'Shut Up and Sing,' a seriously entertaining highlight" of the fall season, "bridges those two genres."

Questions and comments concerning the documentary can be sent to firstfriday@marshall.edu.


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Monday February 26, 2007
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Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp March 30-31 benefits Marshall's Child Development Academy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp, named for the former Marshall University and current New England Patriots standout wide receiver, will take place Friday, March 30 and Saturday, March 31 at MU's Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The fantasy camp is a fundraiser for Marshall's Child Development Academy and allows participants to learn from professional football players including Brown, Mike Bartrum and Chad Pennington. Brown and his wife, Kim, and their two sons live in Huntington.

"My family has a very strong and special connection with Huntington and Marshall University," Brown said. "When Kim and I chose to raise our children in Huntington they enrolled at the Child Development Academy at Marshall University and the academy became a major positive force in their early development."

Bartrum, who plays for the Philadelphia Eagles, and Pennington, who plays for the New York Jets, also are former Thundering Herd stars.

Marshall's Child Development Academy provides quality care and education to young children of the Marshall community. It also provides learning opportunities for MU students, especially those pursuing degrees in education. Proceeds from the camp will help to endow the academy and create scholarships for at-risk children.

"The academy positions itself as a model of best practice for early care and education in the community," Troy Brown said. "It is their focus on early childhood development that led us to the academy."

The weekend begins Friday, March 30 with a kickoff reception in the stadium's Big Green Room. The football camp begins the next day with a full game-day experience. The day starts with a coach's meeting, drills and practice, a draft and a flag football game at the stadium.

The evening concludes with a banquet and awards ceremony. The package also includes a two-night stay at the Pullman Plaza Hotel, meals and a DVD of the weekend.

The cost of the camp is $1,000 and participants must be at least 23 years old. For more information or to register for the Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp, persons may visit www.troybrownfantasyfootball.com or call McRae Pennington, director of corporate and foundation relations with the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., at (304) 696-3512.

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Wednesday February 21, 2007
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Marshall receives first royalty checks for patented product

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today announced that the university has received its first-ever payment resulting from its effort to spur economic growth through support of intellectual property created by faculty.

Since December 2006, Marshall has received two royalty checks totaling $292.16 from Ecer Technologies, LLC, of Lewisburg, W.Va., Kopp announced in a news conference at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center's Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre.

The checks were paid as part of a licensing agreement between Marshall and Ecer, which specializes in the creation and application of ultra energy efficient Solid State ElectroCeramescent Lighting, the patented product for which the agreement was formed.

"Today, we celebrate the opening of a new chapter in the continuing evolution of Marshall University," said Kopp, who in today's news conference was presented with a framed dollar bill representing the first royalty checks. Firefly Lighting Innovations of Roanoke, Va., is marketing and distributing the product.

"I predict this dollar bill will be followed by many more as Marshall intensifies its commitment to research-based economic development," Kopp said. "We are already working on future developments, so you can be certain that today is only the beginning."

This technology was created via partnerships with the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute (RTI) and the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing, along with Marshall University. U.S. Rep. Nick J. Rahall, II said news of the royalty checks makes this "truly a landmark day in the history of Marshall University."

"Edison made over 2,000 attempts to find the best filament for his incandescent light bulb," Rahall said. "I don't know that we will ever know how many tries brought us here today. But we, as West Virginians, all realize hard work pays off. Today is only a glimmer of RTI's growing role in our economy, but at the same time, it's also a brilliant crystal clear beacon to light our future for the next several generations."

Rahall thanked those involved in the entire process, dating back to the cooperative research and development effort that began in the late 1990s.

"I commend President Kopp, whose vision for Marshall molds research to an emerging marketplace, and Senator (Robert) Plymale, director of the Rahall Transportation Institute, whose leadership in promising research promotes job development," Rahall said. "We are also again indebted to our own Senator Robert C. Byrd and the RCBI led by the capable Charlotte Weber, who first understood the promise here, and then worked to help secure the initial $2 million grant from the Department of Energy to develop this light technology. Thanks also to The Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and the Pittsburgh Gateways Corporation, who are helping bring this technology to market.

"Last but certainly not least, I commend the inventors, the thinkers, and the experimenters, Dr. Richard Begley, associate director of RTI, and Dr. Michael Norton, and the companies Ecer Technologies and Firefly Lighting Innovations who are investing not only in this useful safety lighting technology, but in West Virginia."

Weber, director and CEO of RCBI, said RCBI is extremely proud to have played an important role in the project.

"It's truly exciting to think about the tremendous impact this new patent promises to have - lighting the way to new manufacturing jobs for West Virginians while reducing energy costs for the nation's businesses and consumers," Weber said.

ElectroCeramescent Lighting, also known as LECD (light emitting ceramic device), is a flat ceramic-on-steel light-emitting bulb or device useful in signs for transportation and traditional advertising. Advantages of the new technology include improved durability and visibility during inclement weather and at night with smaller power requirements, according to Begley, one of two MU professors involved in the research and development of the product. Norton, a Marshall chemistry professor, also helped develop the device.

"We are at the forefront of a large commercialization opportunity resulting from a multi-disciplinary research success story," Begley said. "The combination of federal funding programs to support this and other types of research that have been masterfully established over the years by Senator Byrd and Representative Rahall were the catalyst for this project. And when we combine those programs with the support and enthusiasm of President Kopp for expanding engineering and multi-disciplinary research here at Marshall, our institution is on track for many other success stories like this in the years ahead."

Ron Graf, Firefly's marketing and sales director, said Firefly was "very impressed with LECD technology (Light Emitting Ceramic Device) the first time we saw it as a transportation safety application."

"We saw infinite possibilities for commercial and retail products this light source can be applied to," Graf said. "Firefly Lighting Innovations created our first marketing strategy for several non-transportation applications, a continuing process to discover new applications for commercial use. Our first product campaign for the Bedside Light Tray had many marketing challenges as a unique and unknown product.  Today we are delighted to announce the successful results of our marketing efforts and share the proceeds from the sales of the first product line with Marshall University. We are encouraged that sales will continue to increase as we expand our marketing efforts regionally and then nationally."

Eric Gould, chairman of the board of Ecer Technologies, LLC, said the research support provided by Marshall University combined with the partnerships they helped Ecer develop with other state and federal agencies allowed Ecer to diversify its production line.

"These partnerships gave Ecer the ability to complete its research and development on Light Emitting Ceramic Devices (LECD) while continuing its metal manufacturing business," Gould said. "As sales for the LECD continue to grow, we are looking to establish a new production facility in West Virginia closer to Huntington that will continue to work with Marshall University, the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing, and the Nick J. Rahall, II Appalachian Transportation Institute to help maintain competitive manufacturing costs and further develop the LECD technology and its applications."

Begley joined with Norton, researchers from Alfred University College of Ceramics in New York and Meadow River Enterprises, Inc., a Lewisburg, W.Va., small manufacturing firm, in developing the ceramic-on-steel light-emitting device.

"There is a certain satisfaction in creating something new, in being a part of a creative team," Norton said. "I believe this is only the start of a great new trend for Marshall and I hope these events ignite the imagination of our students and faculty, reassuring them that great things can be done here at Marshall."

For more information on the product, contact Begley at (304) 696-6660 or Norton at (304) 696-6627.


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Tuesday February 20, 2007
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Unveiling of U.S. Postal Service Black Heritage Commemorative Stamp set for Feb. 26 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2007 edition of the United States Postal Service Black Heritage Commemorative U.S. Postage Stamp will be unveiled in a ceremony beginning at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 26 at Marshall University.

The ceremony, in which the Ella Fitzgerald 2007 Black Heritage Commemorative U.S. Postage Stamp will be unveiled, takes place in the Alumni Lounge on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. The event is open to the public.

Fitzgerald, who was widely known as "The First Lady of Song," is the 30th subject in the Postal Service's Black Heritage stamp series. Her stamp portrait is based on a photograph taken around 1956.

"Marshall University welcomes the opportunity to partner with the Huntington U. S. Postal Service in observing the 2007 unveiling of the Ella Fitzgerald stamp," Dr. Betty Jane Cleckley, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall, said. "She was one of America's remarkably talented human beings whose impact on society will persist long after this occasion."

Ella Jane Fitzgerald (1917-1996) had extraordinary vocal range and flexibility which, combined with her gift for pitch, rhythmic sense and flawless diction, made her a favorite of fans, songwriters and other singers.

Her success as an amateur brought Fitzgerald to the attention of bandleader and drummer Chick Webb, who hired her to sing with his orchestra. In 1938, she and Webb had a number one hit record with "A-Tisket, A-Tasket," a novelty song Fitzgerald wrote with Van Alexander.

In 1956, Fitzgerald began recording the Cole Porter Songbook, a best-selling album that launched a timeless series of "Songbook" recordings of the works of great American songwriters. She recorded more than 200 standards for the "Songbook" albums.

Fitzgerald broke many racial barriers. She was the first black artist to appear in various exclusive clubs around the United States, including the famed Copacabana in New York in 1957. She sang at the inaugural gala for President John F. Kennedy in 1961.

Fitzgerald won 13 Grammy Awards and many other honors, including the National Medal of Arts in 1987. She was one of five artists awarded Kennedy Center Honors in 1979. In 1989, the Society of Singers created an award for lifetime achievement, called it the "Ella," and made her its first recipient.

Dr. Charlotte Giles, professor and chair of the department of music at West Virginia State University, will be the keynote speaker at the unveiling ceremony. Special music will be performed by school choirs from Kellogg Elementary and Spring Hill Elementary.

Handouts and door prizes will be provided, and a reception will follow the program.


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Faculty Senate to celebrate 20th anniversary with series of events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Faculty Senate will celebrate its 20th anniversary with a series of events beginning Monday, Feb. 26, according to Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music and chair of the senate.

"For Monday, Feb. 26, we've planned a reception with a program that will observe the anniversary in a very special way," Stickler said. The reception will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center. The program will include a video presentation of the senate's history and remarks from some of those who were instrumental in the senate's founding, including Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, who served on the constitution committee; Dr. Rainey Duke, retired professor of English, who was the first president of the senate; and Dr. Dale Nitzschke, who was president of the university when the senate was established.

On Tuesday, Feb. 27, Faculty Senate members will participate in "Marshall University Day at the Capitol" in Charleston. In addition, the university bookstores on the Huntington and South Charleston campuses have scheduled an appreciation day, which allows faculty and staff with IDs to receive a 20 percent discount on Marshall clothing, gifts, and general reading books. There will also be a drawing for door prizes. On the Huntington campus, Sodexho has scheduled a "Faculty/Staff Appreciation Pasta Bar Buffet" for $3.99 in the John Marshall Dining Room.

"Right around this time, faculty members should be watching their university mailboxes for a commemorative gift from the Faculty Senate," said Bernice Bullock, administrative secretary senior for the senate. "We think it is something that everyone can use."

On Wednesday, Feb. 28, plaques honoring faculty award winners will be unveiled at 11 a.m. at the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus. A reception will follow the unveiling. The plaques will carry the names of the recipients of the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award, the Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award, the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award, and the Marshall University Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

The public is invited to the events, according to Bullock. For more information, persons may contact the Faculty Senate office at (304) 696-4376.


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Seventh annual Diversity Breakfast is Feb. 23 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's seventh annual Diversity Breakfast takes place from 7:30 to 8:50 a.m. Friday, Feb. 23 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on MU's Huntington campus.

Dr. T. Maurice Lockridge, an assistant professor in Marshall's Lewis College of Business, will deliver the keynote address. MU President Stephen J. Kopp will extend greetings to those attending.

The event is presented by Black United Students in collaboration with Marshall University Multicultural Affairs, Office of Student Affairs, College of Liberal Arts, Office of Academic Affairs, Student Activities Planning Office and International Programs.

"At this stage of time in the history of the world, down to the smallest communities in which we live, the need to recognize, accept and to proactively seek understanding of our differences is imminent," said Maurice Cooley, director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs. "Increasing the stability of the lands in which we live is based upon recognizing the true value of myriad schools of thought, ideology, beliefs, values and ethnic differences.  Marshall University embraces these concepts and the annual Diversity Breakfast is a moment when we join together in fellowship to promote these beliefs."

The breakfast features special music and Muslim, Jewish and Christian blessings of the food.

Lockridge, whose area of teaching is accountancy, previously taught at Lander University, the University of Texas at Dallas and Texas Christian University. He received his doctor of philosophy degree with a concentration in accountancy from the University of Memphis, his MBA from Memphis State University and his Bachelor of Science degree from Chicago State University.

Lockridge was one of the first eight African Americans to enroll in an undergraduate degree program at Vanderbilt University, just four years after the infamous Nashville lunch counter sit-in that occurred less than two miles away. He has been a quiet trailblazer for diversity since. He was the first African American to rise to the position of Division Controller within Household International, a Fortune 100 company, and within GATX Corporation in San Francisco. He was the first African American to hold the Chief Financial Officer position at the Oakland (Calif.) Public Schools.

Cost to attend the Diversity Breakfast is $11 per person, or $105 for a table of eight. Payment in advance is preferred, but not required. To pay in advance, persons may visit Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs in Room 1w25 of the Memorial Student Center. Or, call Fran Jackson at (304) 696-6705.


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Thursday February 15, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Menopause the Musical: A Celebration of Women and The Change!

The Marshall Artists Series and Cabell Huntington Hospital's Women & Children's Services are delighted to bring eight performances of the hilarious and heartwarming hit, Menopause the Musical, to the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center! Evening performances are February 27-March 3 at 7:30 p.m. There will also be three matinee performances February 28 and March 3 at 2 p.m. and March 4 at 3 p.m.

 

In the hit musical, four women with seemingly nothing in common but a black lace bra meet in a Bloomingdale's department store and soon find out lingerie isn't the only thing they share.

 

Since 2001, this slide-splitting musical has entertained audiences from coast-to-coast and around the world. Patrons will laugh and cheer along with a joyful parody of 25 re-lyricized baby boomer hits including "I Heard It Thru the Grapevine You No Longer See 39" "Puff, My God I'm Draggin" and the disco favorite "Stayin' Awake! Stayin' Awake!"

 

Huntington native Joanne Cummings Grant is the national director of production for the musical. She will return home for the Huntington debut. Grant is a Marshall University alumna. She served as promotions and acting director at the Huntington Civic Center from 1980-1982. Currently, Grant is responsible for booking and putting together cast and crew for the musical in six countries and fifteen cities.

 

A dinner theatre option is available before the March 3 evening show and a brunch prior to the March 4 matinee. The meals will begin two hours before show time. Tickets for the pre-show meals are $20 per person. Seating availability is limited. Patrons should call the Marshall Artists Series at (304) 696-3326 for reservations.

 

Tickets for the shows are available now. Tickets are $39. Groups of 20 or more people will receive a $5 discount off each individual ticket. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted.

 

Tickets for all shows may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can pick up tickets at any Ticketmaster outlet, including select Kroger stores.

 

This show is sponsored by Cabell Huntington's Women & Children's Services, WSAZ, the Herald Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, and the Marshall Artists Series.

 

-end-


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Marshall Operates on Delay Code A for Wednesday, Feb. 14

Marshall University's Huntington campus will operate on a 2-hour delay Code A for Wednesday morning, Feb. 14. This means a 2-hour delay for classes only.

Marshall's policy for delays and closings due to inclement weather and other emergencies may be found at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/weather.html.

 

 


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Heart Health Walk Feb. 28

The Heart Health Walk that was originally scheduled for February 14th will be held tomorrow, February 28, from 11 AM - 1 PM beginning at the Memorial Student Center.

Healthy snacks will be waiting on the participants who complete the walk. In addition, everyone who completes the walk will receive a prize.

We are encouraging everyone to wear red and walk for a healthy heart!
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More than 150 students expected to attend United High School Media convention at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2007 United High School Media convention takes place Friday, Feb. 16, at Marshall University.

The convention will bring about 150 high school media students and their advisors to the Huntington campus with the goal of improving high school journalism programs. It features workshops, the Media Challenge Trivia Game, the annual meeting of the West Virginia Journalism Teachers Association and the 2007 UHSM convention awards ceremony.

The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University has sponsored UHSM since 1927. The convention is supported by a grant from the West Virginia Press Association.

"United High School Media has a long tradition here at Marshall," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, said. "The awards banquet is a great way for us to recognize excellent work in journalism at high school newspapers and yearbooks."

The featured speaker for this year's awards ceremony is Jerry Mitchell, an investigative reporter with The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Miss. He also will speak to the public at 4:30 p.m. Thursday in the Don Morris Room at the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Mitchell's work has reopened cases involving high-profile murders from the civil rights era. Most recently, he covered the arrest of a Klansman in Mississippi who was involved in the 1960s murder of two other civil rights workers. He was on ABC's Nightline last week.

The awards ceremony, which begins at 5:30 p.m. Friday, also takes place in the Don Morris Room. Awards, judged by professional journalists, will be presented for best entries in broadcast, newspaper and yearbook production in the categories of design, writing and overall quality. Robert Fouch, assistant news editor at Newsday, coordinated the newspaper judging with his staff. He is a graduate of the Marshall journalism school. H. L. Hall, a past president of the national Journalism Education Association, judged the yearbooks.

The workshops, which take place throughout Smith Hall, cover newspaper, yearbook and broadcast topics. The workshop leaders are Marshall faculty and students, and yearbook representatives.

Ernie Anderson, founder and moderator of the Quiz Bowl at Marshall's SCORES Academic Festival, is to again host the Media Challenge, which tests students' knowledge about journalism. The winning high school team receives a trophy.

For more information, contact Dennison at (304) 696-2809.


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Friday February 9, 2007
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Bill Bissett named Chief of Staff and Senior Vice President of Communications for Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Effective March 1, 2007, Bill Bissett will assume the duties of Chief of Staff and serve as Senior Vice President of Communications for Marshall University.

"With his background in both the private and public sector, Bill is the right person to help us move Marshall forward," Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said. "He brings great ability and professionalism to this dual role. I have been impressed by the leadership aptitude and acumen I have observed in Bill. He now brings these qualities to a very important leadership position in this administration. Bill Bissett will serve Marshall University, our students and staff exceptionally well as Chief of Staff and Senior Vice President of Communications."

Bissett, who received his Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Arts in Journalism from Marshall University, said he looks forward to the challenges of this new position with great expectation and enthusiasm.

"I greatly appreciate the confidence of President Kopp and will work hard to make his vision for Marshall a reality," Bissett said. "Marshall University played a tremendous role in the success I have had thus far in my career, and it is an honor to be a part of this institution's future."

Previously, Bissett served as Director of Public Relations on Marshall University's South Charleston campus.

For more information, contact Bissett at (304) 746-2038.


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West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall provided data for health officials' study on autism

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University played a major role in a study to determine the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in multiple areas of the United States, the results of which were made public this week.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funded the study, which resulted in a report that showed an average of 6.7 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in six communities assessed in 2000, and an average of 6.6 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in 14 communities included in a 2002 study. Marshall University's Autism Training Center was involved in both studies.

According to prevalence data obtained through the study, approximately one in 150 children in the United States has an ASD. Those numbers, higher than previously reported, mean autism is now considered "a major public health concern," the report said.

Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall, said this is the first-ever multi-site collaborative study of the prevalence of autism.

"We are excited to have been a part of this collaborative research," Becker-Cottrill said. "We feel we have made a significant contribution to understanding the magnitude of the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Monitoring of the ASDs must continue. Most importantly, we need to use this prevalence information to ensure we are planning appropriately for the lifespan needs of people with ASDs."

Becker-Cottrill said developmental delays were detected before age 3 in a majority of the children with ASD, but the average age of diagnosis was not until 4.5 and 5.5 years.

"We hope that this study has also served to inform the public about the early signs and symptoms of autism so that if parents have any concerns about developmental delays, they will seek professional advice," she said. "The earlier a developmental delay or an Autism Spectrum Disorder is detected, the sooner a child can receive early intervention. We know that early intervention is critical for good child outcomes."  For a list of developmental milestones from three months to five years, Becker-Cottrill recommends the CDC's Learn the Signs Web site at www.cdc.gov/actearly.

Marshall University has a pediatric assessment clinic that specializes in ASDs, Becker-Cottrill said.

Read complete story at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/RELEASE/2007/pr020607.htm.

 


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Wednesday February 7, 2007
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MU graduate students benefit from tennis tournament in Charleston; deadline to enter is Sunday, Feb. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni and Friends Tennis Tournament, an annual fundraising event in the Kanawha Valley for the past 20 years, takes place Feb. 16-18 at the Charleston Family YMCA. The event is sponsored by the law firm of Hunt and Serreno.

Deadline to enter is Sunday, Feb. 11. Entry forms are available at the Charleston Family YMCA, which is located at 100 YMCA Dr. in Charleston, and checks should be made payable to the Kanawha Valley MU Alumni Association.

Proceeds, which usually average from $1,500 to $2,000, go to the Marshall University Graduate College in South Charleston for direct financial assistance to students. The Kanawha Valley Marshall University Alumni Association donates the tournament earnings to the school and faculty members nominate recipients for the funds on an annual basis.

In addition to the usual junior singles, men's and women's singles and doubles, and mixed doubles events, players can choose from two new ways to play. One is the inlaws or outlaws category - each player must be related to or divorced from his or her partner. The other is the couch potato category - if a person doesn't want to play, he or she can simply make a tax deductible donation to the Kanawha Valley MU Alumni Association.

For more information, call Martha Hill at (304) 744-5149 or contact her via e-mail at mhill1975@hotmail.com. Or, call Mindy White at (304) 340-3533 or contact her via e-mail at tennis@ymcawv.org.


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'A Chat with Ken Hechler' planned for Feb. 15 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ken Hechler, former longtime U.S. Congressman and Secretary of State from West Virginia, will celebrate a 50-year milestone this month by hosting a special event at Marshall University.

At 3 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 15, Hechler will host a reunion of students, faculty and staff who were at Marshall College in 1957 - 50 years ago - when Hechler taught his first class in political science there. The event, titled "A Chat with Ken Hechler: Reminiscences of Marshall College, 1957," will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Alumni Lounge on the Huntington campus. It is open to the public.

Hechler, who served on President Harry Truman's White House staff from 1949 to 1953, attributes the idea to pursue his own political career to the influence of students in his first classes at Marshall.

He served as a U.S. Congressman from 1959 through 1977 and as Secretary of State in West Virginia from 1985 through 2001. Hechler is the author and editor of several books, including Working with Truman: A Personal Memoir of the White House Years, and Bridge at Remagen.

Hechler is a native of Roslyn, N.Y., which is 14 miles from Franklin D. Roosevelt's childhood home. He was named West Virginia Son of the Year in 1969, received the Harry S. Truman Award for Public Service in 2002, and was named Mountaineer of the Year for 2003 by Graffiti magazine.

For more information on the Feb. 15 event at Marshall, or to RSVP, contact Barbara Winters, Marshall's dean of libraries, at (304) 696-2318 or wintersb@marshall.edu.

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Wednesday February 7, 2007
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Medical Schools Have Large Economic Impact: $2.77 Billion in West Virginia; 21,000 Jobs

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Medical schools and their associated teaching hospitals were responsible for more than $2.77 billion in economic activity in West Virginia in 2005, including nearly 21,000 jobs, according to an in-depth analysis sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

"The economic benefit of today's medical school is far-reaching and multifaceted," said  Charles H. McKown Jr. M.D., dean of Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "With its expanding facilities, large number of skilled employees, and access to research funding, medical education may easily be considered the best growing industry for West Virginia in the last half century. The broad spectrum of health care services we provide at Marshall through our skilled faculty and affiliated medical institutions, coupled with the work of our graduates, decreases overall health care costs and lost productivity by West Virginians."

"Medical education is expensive -- but it pays dividends to the state in many ways," said John Prescott, M.D., dean of the medical school at West Virginia University. "In addition to training urgently-needed physicians to care for the people of the state, the medical schools and teaching hospitals create economic activity and jobs. WVU's three medical campuses, in Morgantown, Charleston and Martinsburg, are vital parts of these communities."

"In addition to the impact of the medical school, the three other schools at WVU - dentistry, nursing and pharmacy - also add to the state's healthcare workforce and economic success," said Robert D'Alessandri, M.D., WVU vice president for health sciences.

The report found that the 125 accredited U.S. medical schools and more than 400 major teaching hospitals represented by the AAMC employ nearly 1.7 million people and are directly and indirectly responsible for more than 3 million full-time jobs one out of every 48 wage earners in the United States. This $451.6 billion overall impact on the national economy takes into account the direct and indirect business volume generated by these institutions, including institutional spending; employee spending; and spending by patients, their families, and visitors (excluding spending for patient care and medical services).

AAMC members in West Virginia include the medical schools at WVU and Marshall University, WVU Hospitals, West Virginia United Health System, Charleston Area Medical Center, CAMC Health System and Cabell Huntington Hospital.

Statewide, the report found that AAMC's West Virginia members had a $1.2 billion in direct business volume and an estimated $1.5 billion in indirect impact.

According to the report, every dollar spent by a medical school or teaching hospital indirectly generates an additional $1.30 when it is "re-spent" on other businesses or individuals, resulting in a total impact of $2.30 per dollar.

The study also showed that state and local governments in West Virginia collected some $208 million in taxes as a result of medical school and teaching hospital activities.

The AAMC report, "The Economic Impact of AAMC-Member Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals," does not account for the economic benefits of the community service programs and physician training programs that are the hallmark of academic medical institutions. This report was prepared for the AAMC by the consulting firm, Tripp Umbach.

For a copy of this report, go to: www.aamc.org/economicimpact .  

The online version does not include a breakdown of West Virginia economic activity; that information is below:

Economic Impact of Medical Education in West Virginia

Source: Association of American Medical Colleges (2005 data) 

 

Total State Business Volume Impact

$2,774,834,295

Direct State Business Volume Impact

$1,206,449,693

Indirect State Business Volume Impact

$1,568,384,601

Total State Employment Impact

20,978

Total State Government Revenue

$208,412,912

Clinical Impact

$1,883,266,973

Medical Education Impact

$792,323,386

Research Funding Impact

$99,243,935

 

 

 

 

State Business Volume Impacts

 

 

 

Total State Business Volume Impact

$2,774,834,295

Spending for capital improvements, goods, supplies, services

$738,151,221

In-state staff spending

$279,238,660

In-state total physician & faculty (employed and contract) spending

$58,634,691

In-state resident & student spending

$19,721,849

Out-of-state patient in-state spending

$9,689,154

In-state spending by out-of-state patient visitors

$13,534,404

In-state spending by other out-of-state visitors

$87,479,713

 

 

Government Revenue Impacts

 

 

 

Total Government Revenue Impact

$208,412,912

Individual income tax revenues

$52,313,117

Sales & gross receipts tax revenues

$112,468,055

Corporate net income tax revenues

$15,075,516

Other tax revenues

$28,556,224


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Monday February 5, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Distinguished poet to read from work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. John McKernan, a Marshall University English professor for 40 years, will celebrate the publication of his new book of poems in a reading at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

McKernan is the author of five poetry collections, including Resurrection of the Dust, his selected poems, just out from The Backwaters Press.  His work has appeared in hundreds of national literary journals over the years, notably The New Yorker, Paris Review, the Ohio Review, The New England Review, Atlantic Monthly, Antaeus and Field.  He edited The Little Review for 12 years and now edits the new journal ABZ.

Poet David Young has written that McKernan's poems are full of "elegant wit and humane generosity."  As Greg Orr adds, his work is "frightening and glorious in equal parts."

Professor McKernan's poetry has been recognized by grants from the Benedum Foundation, the West Virginia Commission on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Poetry Society of America recently presented him the Robert H. Winner Award. He also is a distinguished teacher who was named West Virginia Professor of the Year in 2000 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact Marshall English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.

###


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Thursday February 1, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Annual Fund increases by nearly 30 percent in 2006

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Annual Fund contributions at Marshall University increased by nearly 30 percent in 2006, Rebecca McPhail Samples, director of annual giving, announced today.

Samples said the Annual Fund total for 2006 was $309,664, with an average gift increase of more than 27 percent.  She said Marshall had growth of 13 percent in direct mail revenues, online contribution tripled and Marshall Link - a student-staffed phone program connecting MU students and alumni - grew by 5 percent.

"We are fortunate to work with a talented group of Marshall students who serve as ambassadors to our alumni," Samples said. "They represent the essence of Marshall University and have made a significant difference in how our alumni view giving back to their alma mater."

The growth of the Annual Fund is due to increased efforts by the offices of Development and Alumni Relations to reach out to alumni via mail, phone and e-mail communications, Samples said.

"I am pleased with the increased commitment of our alumni who recognize the importance of the continued growth of Marshall," Samples said. "Their contributions make an immediate difference in the lives of Marshall students by providing scholarship funding and program enhancements that bring a higher standard of quality to Marshall."

Tish Littlehales, recently named Marshall's director of alumni relations, said she has noticed a collective desire of the alumni community to be involved in the university's growth. "Alumni are experiencing a renewed connection to Marshall University," Littlehales said.

The Annual Fund provides unrestricted funding that contributes to the greatest needs of the university and individual colleges. The Annual Fund is a component of Annual Giving at Marshall University.  For more information on the Annual Fund, call Samples at (304) 696-3292.


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Wednesday January 31, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Guyer named finalist for top professor award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara P. Guyer, special education professor at Marshall University, has been chosen as one of three finalists for Professor of the Year, the Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia, Inc., announced.

"The Faculty Merit Foundation exists for one purpose only - to recognize and reward excellence in college teaching," Ken Sullivan, secretary of the foundation, said. "Guyer made a strong showing."

To be among the finalists is quite an honor in itself because of the competition offered from all the public and private higher education institutions in the state, Sullivan said.

"We regard all the finalists as very strong teachers," he said. "Something such as this is just a capstone to a lot of good work she (Guyer) has done throughout her career."

Guyer said the nomination makes her feel unworthy because she knows there are numerous professors at Marshall and in other parts of the state who are as dedicated as she is.

"We all work very diligently with little encouragement and few rewards other than the gratitude of our students and some administrators," she said. "However, I do feel very honored to be in the top three nominees, and I look forward to learning who will be the winner of the Professor of the Year award."

Guyer said she believes the one accomplishment that most stands out in her career at Marshall is the founding of the Higher Education for Learning Problems (HELP) program, which she started in 1981 with a budget of about $5,000. Since then, the program has grown to employ 45 graduate assistants, 40 part-time employees, and 15 full-time employees and has an annual budget of $1 million.

The Faculty Merit Foundation will honor the three finalists March 6 in Charleston, beginning with a reception at the Governor's Mansion at 6 p.m. An awards banquet follows the reception at 7:15 p.m. in the Cultural Center, where the foundation will announce the recipient of the Professor of the Year award.

Sullivan said anyone from the Marshall community who wishes to support Guyer by attending the reception at the Governor's Mansion and dinner at the Cultural Center may do so by calling the foundation in advance.  The professor who wins the top award receives a $10,000 cash prize, courtesy of United Bank.

For more information, contact the foundation at (304) 346-8500.  Its e-mail address is marsh@wvhumanities.org.


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Wednesday January 31, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

The Marshall Artists Series Announces: 2007 Spring International Film Festival

The Marshall Artists Series brings the week-long 2007 Spring International Film Festival to Huntington February 9 - 15, 2007.   The festival was originally scheduled to take place at the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, but has been relocated to the Keith-Albee Theatre.  Please see the attached schedule for film times.

This year's Spring Film Festival features six films from six countries.  The films include The Death of Mr. Lazarescu (Romania), L'Enfant (France), Three Times (Taiwan), Don't Tell (Italy), Quinceanera (USA), and Sophie Scholl-The Final Days (Germany). 

The Death of Mr. Lazarescu is a story anyone who has waited for treatment in an emergency room or chafed under the less than devoted care of a disinterested doctor can relate to.  The film is the story of Mr. Lazarescu, a 60-ish widower, living alone in Bucharest with his cats.  One evening he feels sick enough to call an ambulance and his Dantesque odyssey deep into the bowels of a big city medical establishment begins.  It's a story that could take place anywhere and Mr. Lazarescu could be your next door neighbor - or he could be you.  The film is presented in Romanian with English subtitles and is 154 minutes in length.

L'Enfant begins with the birth of a child, but its real story is the moral rebirth of a man.  Dispossessed twenty-year-old Bruno lives with his eighteen-year-old girlfriend Sonia, in an eastern Belgian town.  They live off Sonia's unemployment benefits and the panhandling and petty theft committed by Bruno and his gang.  Their lives change forever when Sonia has a baby. The film is presented in French with English subtitles and is 95 minutes in length. 

In Three Times, Hou Hsiao-hsien delivers one of the most rapturously beautiful and romantic movies of the year.  The film is told as three love stories, each set in a different era - a 1966 pool hall, a 1911 brothel, and present day Taipei.  The film stars the same actors in all three sections.  In these three potent miniatures, Hou Hsiao-hsien suggests that time passes differently when you are deeply in love.  He captures the mystical quality of that time on film, making us feel as if we're living it, rather than simply watching it.  The film is presented in Mandarin and Taiwanese with English subtitles and is 130 minutes in length.

Academy Award nominee, Don't Tell, is based on the celebrated Italian novel "La Bestia nel Cuore."  The film brings to life the mesmerizing story of a woman's journey into her past and the aftermath of confronting personal demons long hidden beneath the surface of her psyche.  The film often has the eerie feel of a Hitchcock film - "Vertigo" in particular - where you're not always sure if what you're seeing is really happening.  The film is presented in Italian with English subtitles and is 120 minutes in length.

Winner of the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize in Drama at Sundance, Quinceanera, is a fresh, spirited film focused around a Latino community celebration.  When a girl turns fifteen in the Latino community a Quinceanera is held to honor her entry into womanhood.  As Magdelena's fifteenth birthday approaches, her life is consumed by thoughts of her boyfriend, her Quinceanera dress, and the Hummer limo she hopes will show up on her special day.  Life seems so simple until fate delivers an unwelcome surprise - she is pregnant.  The film is in English and Spanish with English subtitles and is 90 minutes in length.

The true story of Germany's most famous anti-Nazi heroine is brought to life in Germany's official Foreign Language Film selection for the 2005 Academy Awards.  In Sophie Scholl-The Final Days, Julia Jentsch stars in a luminous performance as the young coed turned fearless activist.  Armed with long-buried historical records of her incarceration, director Marc Rothemund expertly re-creates the last six days of Sophie Scholl's life: a heart stopping journey from arrest to interrogation, trial and sentence.  The film is in German with English subtitles and is 117 minutes in length.

Season ticket holders are admitted 30 minutes prior to each film.  Individual film tickets are available at the door 15 minutes prior to each film, and admission is $7.  Full-time Marshall University students are admitted free with a valid university ID, and part-time students may purchase half-price tickets.  Faculty and staff tickets are $5.

The 2007 Spring International Film Festival is sponsored by Marshall University Multicultural Affairs, Pullman Plaza Hotel, the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, and the Marshall Artists Series.  Additional information about the festival is available at www.marshallartistsseries.org or by calling the Marshall Artists Series at (304) 696-6656.

Spring International Film Festival Schedule

Friday, February 9

Monday, February 12

5:30 L'Enfant

5:30 Quinceanera

7:30 Three Times

7:30 Three Times

9:45 Don't Tell

 

 

Tuesday, February 13

Saturday, February 10

5:30 L'Enfant

2:30 Death of Mr. Lazarescu

7:30 Death of Mr. Lazarescu

5:30  Quinceanera

 

7:30 Sophie-Scholl-Final Days

Wednesday, February 14

9:45 L'Enfant

5:30 Don't Tell

 

7:30 Sophie Scholl-Final Days

Sunday, February 11

 

2:30 Sophie Scholl-Final Days

Thursday, February 15

5:30 Don't Tell

5:30 Quinceanera

7:30 Three Times

7:30 Death of Mr. Lazarescu

9:45 Death of Mr. Lazarescu

 

                                                                         -end-


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Tuesday January 30, 2007
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Series of events at Marshall planned in February in conjunction with American Heart Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A series of events sponsored by Marshall University's College of Health Professions and the Student Health Education and Women's Centers will take place on MU's Huntington campus during February in conjunction with American Heart Month.  All events are open to the public.

The kickoff is scheduled for 2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 2 in the John Marshall Room of the Memorial Student Center.  Friday is designated as national "Go Red for Women" day to help increase awareness of the dangers of heart disease in women.  In keeping with the day's theme, everyone is being encouraged to wear red apparel of some sort.

Each week during February a group of activities designed to increase awareness of heart disease and to educate participants about heart disease prevention will be offered.    The schedule of events includes:

       Feb. 2 - Kickoff of American Heart Month activities, 2:30 p.m., John Marshall Dining Room, Memorial Student Center

       Feb. 6 - Trainer talk, noon, Memorial Student Center cafeteria. Interested participants are encouraged to bring lunch and discover the benefits of supervised exercise.

       Feb. 7 - Lunch seminar, "The Good and Bad Cholesterol:  An Interactive Learning Workshop," 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., John Spotts Room, Memorial Student Center. Clinical Lab Sciences Professor Jennifer Perry will lead a discussion of cholesterol.

       Feb. 8 - Health foods demonstration, time to be announced, Corbly Hall 101. Dietetic interns will demonstrate how to prepare heart healthy foods.  Seating is limited so interested individuals are encouraged to contact Marilyn Fox at (304) 696-2620 or cohp@marshall.edu, or Kelli Williams at (304) 696-4336 or dietetics@marshall.edu, to reserve seats.

        Feb. 13 - "Genetics and Cardiovascular Disease," 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., John Spotts Room, Memorial Student Center. Marshall Community and Technical College Associate Dean Jean Chappell will present her research on these topics.

        Feb. 14 - Heart Health Walk, 11 a.m. - l p.m., Memorial Student Center lobby. Participants are encouraged to walk the campus wearing red. Information on exercise activities will be available and those who complete the walk will receive a prize.

       Feb. 14 - Trainer talk, noon - 1 p.m., Memorial Student Center cafeteria. After completing the walk, particpants can bring a lunch and hear what trainers can do for them.

       Feb. 15 - Dean Ornish foods demonstration, time to be announced, Corbly Hall 101. Dietetic interns will demonstrate how to prepare foods that are part of the Dean Ornish diet and will provide information on how lifestyle changes can reduce the risk of heart disease.  Seating is limited, so interested individuals are encouraged to contact Marilyn Fox or Kelli Williams to reserve seats.

       Feb. 21 - Heart Health Fair, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., Memorial Student Center lobby. Information on how to prevent heart disease will be offered and glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure testing will be available.


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Tuesday January 30, 2007
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First Friday Filmfest continues Feb. 2 at the Cinema Theatre

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - First Friday Filmfest resumes at 7:15 p.m. Friday, Feb. 2 at the Cinema Theatre in downtown Huntington. The opening film of the spring semester series is The U.S. vs. John Lennon.

Funded through Marshall University's Student Affairs, the films are free to members of the Marshall community with ID and $5 for all non-MU patrons. Tickets are available in advance from the Student Activities Programming Board office, which is located in room 2w29 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Admission at the door is on a space-available basis.

The U.S. vs. John Lennon is a documentary film written and directed by David Leaf and John Scheinfeld. As the title suggests, it chronicles John Lennon's anti-war activism in the early 1970s and the government's subsequent efforts to deport him. While told through a mixture of interviews and historical film footage, the story is given additional texture by its score, which consists of 40 Lennon songs threaded throughout the film.

The San Francisco Chronicle describes it as an "excellent documentary" with wide appeal. "Even fans (of Lennon) who think they've seen everything will see things here they haven't seen. ... For non-fans, those not familiar with Lennon, particularly young people, the movie might even be a revelation, an introduction to a great talent and one of the most likable and singular personalities of the modern era."

Two films are still to be added to the spring semester Filmfest schedule. Those titles will be announced soon.


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Monday January 29, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mine safety graduate courses offered online

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an attempt to meet regional, national and international demand, Marshall University is now offering courses from its successful mine safety graduate program online.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, a registered professional mining engineer, interim dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering and the program director, said students from West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Alabama who are pursuing a graduate degree in mine safety can take some of the courses online.

"This is an exciting initiative," Szwilski said.  "We at Marshall are grateful to Senator Robert C. Byrd for his passion and commitment to improving mine safety and health, which in large part led to the birth of this program.  Thanks to Senator Byrd, this program is today a thriving part of mine safety and health education in West Virginia."

The program was created 27 years ago when Marshall and the Mine Health and Safety Academy in Beckley, W.Va. entered into a partnership that has resulted in graduate degrees opportunities in mine safety. To date, more than 130 people, including Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), state government and industry personnel, have participated in the program.

U.S. Rep. Nick J. Rahall, D-W.Va., said Byrd's lifelong commitment to education shines throughout the mine safety graduate program.

"Senator Byrd's vision was to allow technology and training to keep pace with the production of coal for the protection of our nation's miners," Rahall said. "We have made great strides thanks to this program, and we all realize we have to put this program to work for enhanced safety of our miners."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said offering the mine safety graduate courses online to students in other states is a key step in making sure mine safety nationwide continues to improve.

"It is exciting for Marshall University to be able to use the latest distance learning technologies to offer this important program," Kopp said. "The demand for the program is clear and we hope and expect that many students will take advantage of this opportunity."   

Szwilski said the program provides MSHA inspectors, engineers, managers, instructors and technical support staff a unique forum to discuss and research the latest advances in mining in a relaxed environment that encourages creative thinking.

Chris Hamilton, senior vice president of the West Virginia Coal Association, said many of the association's members have completed the program and are placed in key safety and mine operating positions throughout the industry.

"They are all equipped with the knowledge and proficiency level expected of today's mine safety professional," Hamilton said.

The program provides MSHA personnel and mining industry professionals the opportunity to interact in a neutral setting and learn about current critical mine safety and engineering issues, said Edmund (Pat) Brady, superintendent of safety academy in Beckley.

"These classes provide an excellent opportunity for students to exchange information and experiences and discuss mine safety issues with peers who have a wide variety of mining backgrounds," Brady said.

Rahall praised Szwilski for his leadership of the program.

"Dean Szwilski understands coal mining and the coal miner," Rahall said. "His leadership is a winning combination for both."

For more information, contact Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering at (304) 696-5453.


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Friday January 26, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Mannheim Steamroller performance moves to Keith-Albee Theatre

Due to unprecedented demand, St. Mary's Medical Center's presentation of Mannheim Steamroller show moves to Keith-Albee Theatre for one night only!

HUNTINGTON - The Marshall Artists Series has secured permission to move the Mannheim Steamroller show, Fresh Aire from the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center to the Keith-Albee Theatre on Tuesday, April 10, 2007 at 8 p.m. The show was an immediate sellout when tickets went on sale in September. Moving to a larger venue will now allow more fans to see the highly anticipated performance.

The show was initially booked at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, as the Keith-Albee Theatre was slated to be undergoing renovations. Those renovations have been pushed back to the summer enabling the Marshall Artists Series to move not only Mannheim Steamroller to the Keith-Albee Theatre, but also the Spring International Film Festival and the season closer,  Luis Bravo's Forever Tango.

Fresh Aire is the GRAMMY Award-winning music series from Mannheim Steamroller composer Chip Davis.  In Fresh Aire, Davis has created groundbreaking music that is an innovative lend of classical themes with pop elements that he refers to as "18th century rock and roll." 

Each of the eight Fresh Aire albums explore different topics; the first four Fresh Aire albums were inspired by the beauty and uniqueness of the four seasons, while Fresh Aire five through eight deal with man's curiosities about the world in which we live. 

One of the world's top selling artists, the incomparable Mannheim Steamroller have been awarded 16 gold records, 7 platinum records and 4 multi-platinum records.  They have sold over 5 million albums from the Fresh Aire series alone. 

Patrons who had tickets to the performance at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center were mailed replacement tickets to the Keith-Albee Theatre.  If you have not received replacement tickets please contact the Marshall Artists Series office at 304-696-3326.

Tickets prices for Fresh Aire at the Keith-Albee Theatre are $50 and $35 and are on sale now.  Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons with a Visa or MasterCard by calling (304) 696-6656.

Tickets may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.marshallartistsseries.com. Patrons may also pick up tickets at any Ticketmaster outlet.

The show is sponsored by St. Mary's Medical Center, Clear Channel Communications, WOWK-TV, Herald Dispatch and Marshall Artists Series.

####
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Thursday January 25, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lewis College of Business achieves 'universal standard of quality' with maintenance of business accreditation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Lewis College of Business recently learned it is one of 15 schools nationwide this year to have achieved Maintenance of Business Accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

The maintenance of business accreditation was awarded to schools that showed a continued commitment to education and fulfillment of their missions. Overall, Marshall is one of 540 schools around the world accredited by the AACSB.

"The AACSB reviews our programs by standards they set, the purpose of which are to ensure overall educational quality and to make sure we have adequate faculty to support our programs in terms of their levels of preparation and intellectual activities," Dr. Paul Uselding, dean of the LCOB, said.

The AACSB is the foremost accrediting body for business accreditation. The LCOB has been accredited since 1997, but that status must be maintained every five years by a major review.

"It's a universally accepted measure of quality," Uselding said. "It means we are in compliance with the standards."

Those who are graduates of accredited programs are more likely to succeed when attempting to find employment, he said.

"A frequent hiring criterion in the business world is whether a potential employee is a graduate of an accredited business school," Uselding said.

Only about one in four schools in the U.S. are accredited through the AACSB. Uselding said Marshall's accreditation status is owed largely to the faculty of the LCOB and the university administration.

For more information, contact Uselding at (304) 696-2615.


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Wednesday January 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West named vice president for major gifts at Marshall; Littlehales takes over as director of alumni relations

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Lance West, vice president for alumni development and director of alumni relations at Marshall University for the past 4 years, has been named vice president for major gifts at MU, John Kinzer, interim CEO with the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., announced today.

"Lance enjoys fundraising and he's good at it," Kinzer said of West. "He meets people well and people like him and respond to him. I think he will do a great job as a major fundraiser."

Littlehales came to Marshall from Guyan Golf and Country Club, where she was membership and marketing director for nearly three years.

Tish Littlehales"Tish coordinated the gala at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena for the 'We Are Marshall' premiere and did an excellent job," Kinzer said. "She's outgoing and organized and I think will do a great job cultivating Marshall's alumni."

West has been at Marshall since 1995, when he was hired as associate vice president of athletic and university development. He was named director of athletics in 1996, a position he held until 2002 when he was named vice president for alumni development and assistant to the president.

"This is a wonderful opportunity to be able to work with various individuals throughout the United States and the world with one common purpose - to see Marshall advance and prosper in the future," West said. "I am excited about Tish Littlehales coming in as alumni director and think the alumni association is poised to do wonderful things, especially coming off the movie 'We Are Marshall.' "

Littlehales is a native of South Charleston, W.Va., and a 1983 Marshall graduate.

"I look forward to maximizing our efforts to involve the alumni community in the continued growth of Marshall University," Littlehales said. "As a Marshall graduate, I am excited to be joining this great university at an opportune time in its history."


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Monday January 22, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Twenty-five MU students taking part in Undergraduate Research Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty-five Marshall University students will take part in the fourth annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston on Thursday, Feb. 8.

Twelve colleges and universities will be represented at Undergraduate Research Day, which runs from 8:45 a.m. to noon in the Capitol Rotunda. In all, 106 students will participate.

Undergraduate Research Day allows students to present their discoveries in poster format and talk to legislators about their findings. The projects are original research and the posters have been designed for a general audience. 

Students will present their posters in the areas of biology, psychology, computer science and information technology, forensic science, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, sociology/social work, engineering, history, African studies, political science, English, environmental studies and geology.

In addition to Marshall, other schools represented are Bethany College, Fairmont State University, Glenville State College, Ohio Valley University, Shepherd University, the University of Charleston, West Liberty State College, West Virginia University, WVU Institute of Technology, West Virginia Wesleyan College and Wheeling Jesuit University.

"This event offers a great opportunity for members of the state Legislature to interact with students attending the state's colleges and universities and have the opportunity to see the kinds of one-on-one activities that take place between students and faculty," said Michael Castellani, professor and chair of Marshall's chemistry department.

Castellani, co-chair of the event's organizing committee, said legislators have shown a lot of interest in the students and their projects in the three previous years.

"We've been thrilled with the interest shown by members of the state Legislature," Castellani said. "Visits with the students have increased each year, showing the level of interest legislators have in higher education in West Virginia."

The following is a list of Marshall's participants, along with their home counties, disciplines, research posters and advisors:

  • Angella Anderson, Cabell County, and Stephanie Wemm, Gilmer County (Psychology) - "When Does Life Begin? New Birth of an Old Issue."  Joseph Wyatt, advisor.
  • Caitlin Burgess, Cabell County, and John Frazier, Cabell County (Psychology) - "Attachments and Their Effects on Juvenile Delinquency." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Heather Butts, Taylor County, and Zachary Grambos, Cabell County (Chemistry) - "Molecular Lithography on DNA Substrates." Michael Norton, advisor.
  • Aimee Casto, Mason County (Psychology) - "Weight Gain in College Freshmen: An Analysis of Potential Problems and Attachment Patterns." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Sarah Chadwick, Randolph County, and Adam Sweeney, Cabell County (Biology) - "Investigation of the Distribution of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in the Ohio River." Charles Somerville, advisor.
  • Danielle Clark, Cabell County (Chemistry) - "The Nonenzymatic Effects of Glucose Binding on the Structural Properties of Human Hemoglobin." Jaroslava Miksovska and Menashi Cohenford, advisors.
  • Jacqueline Decker, Putnam County, Sarah Kelly, Wayne County, and Jeremy Cumberledge, Kanawha County (Biology) - "Bioreactor Production of Plant Pharmaceuticals." Jagan Valluri, advisor.
  • Andrea Gilman, Mingo County (Psychology) - "Risky Business: An Analysis of Risky Behaviors and their Interrelationships." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Jacob Kilgore, Wayne County (Chemistry) - "Gas-Phase Chemistry of Hyperbranched Polymers." William Price, advisor.
  • Stephanie Knight, Kanawha County (Psychology) - "Characteristics that Result from Physical Abuse." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Jessica Moore, Cabell County, and Tiniza Koone, Fayette County (Psychology) - "Memory for Location: Is it Automatic or Effortful?" Steven Mewaldt, advisor.
  • David Sovic, Jackson County, and Leanna Lester, Kanawha County (Biochemistry) - "A Novel Colorimetric Assay for the Detection of Dehydrogenases." Menashi Cohenford, advisor.
  • Erin Lilly, Putnam County (Psychology) - "A Study of Resiliency: Why Do Some Sexual Abuse Victims Bounce Back from the Abuse and Why Do Others Develop Psychopathology?" Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Marisa Rubio, Berkeley County (Chemistry) - "Characterization of the Reaction Mechanism of Urea Release from Caged Urea Compound." Jaroslava Miksovska, advisor.
  • Taylor Saunders, Cabell County (Psychology) - "Violence in the Home: The Effects of Witnessing Domestic Violence." Marc Lindberg, advisor.
  • Benjamin Wilson, Putnam County, and Nicholas Smith, Mason County (Chemistry) - "Synthesis of a Tethered Metallocene." Michael Castellani, advisor.

For more information on Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol, contact Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


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Friday January 19, 2007
Contact: Megan Barbour, SGA Communications Director, (304) 696-6412

Marshall SGA to host 'Bring a Buck to Campus Day;' donations will go to Student Disaster Relief Fund

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association is hosting "Bring a Buck to Campus Day" on Tuesday, Jan. 23 on the Huntington campus. Funds collected that day will help relief efforts for students affected by the Emmons apartment building fire that occurred Saturday, Jan. 13.

The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Marshall University Memorial Student Center. Buckets also will be placed throughout campus as a means of collecting donations from those students and faculty members who do not regularly use the student center.

David Kluemper, SGA Campus Development Director, said many students already have shown an interest in helping their fellow students.

"The students care because this tragedy has displaced and taken members of our own campus and community," Kluemper said. "This gives students the opportunity and avenue in order to assist our peers who have lost so much and hopefully contribute to getting their lives back to normal."

SGA President Ben Sandy said he is optimistic that a large number of people will contribute during "Bring a Buck to Campus" day.

"This event is somewhat of a copycat effort of the 'Bring a Buck Thunder Relief' which resulted in donations of over $521,000 for victims of Hurricane Katrina back in September 2005," Sandy said. "We are optimistic that this relief fund will be extremely successful as well."

All donations received will be given to the Marshall University Student Disaster Relief Fund that was established this week. For more information or to make a donation to this fund directly, please contact the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., at (304) 696-6264. Checks or money orders should be made payable to the Marshall University Foundation, Attention- Student Disaster Relief Fund

For more information, persons may contact Kluemper at (304) 696-6412, or Sandy at (304) 696-6436.


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Friday January 19, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Reception planned for Thundering Herd fans before Capital Classic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A pre-game reception for the Chesapeake Energy Capital Classic, hosted by the Marshall University Alumni Association, will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 24, in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center.

The event, which is free to the public, is being sponsored by EZ To Use Big Book Ogden Directories and Pepsi Bottling. "We appreciate our sponsors and are grateful for their generosity," said Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations.

In addition to a live band performing, the reception will feature giveaways, complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar.

The reception coincides with a basketball doubleheader between Marshall University's and West Virginia University's women's and men's basketball teams in the Charleston Civic Center Coliseum. The women tip off at 5:30 p.m., followed by the men's game at 8 p.m.

Representatives from many Marshall colleges and departments will take part in the reception, setting up displays and sharing information with visitors. Marshall's cheerleaders, along with Marco and the pep band, also will make an appearance.

"The annual pre-game reception is the perfect opportunity for Thundering Herd fans to socialize and get fired up for the basketball games," Littlehales said. "Everyone knows how Marshall fans love to tailgate. This event is like a tailgate, only indoors. We're looking for a big crowd of excited Herd fans on the 24th!"

For more information, contact Nancy Pelphrey with the Alumni Association at (304) 696-3134.


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Wednesday January 17, 2007
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, (304) 550-1546

Statement from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp on the recent developments in the Emmons apartment fire

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The following statement is from Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp:

"Having received confirmation that three of our students perished in this recent fire at the Emmons apartment building, our thoughts and prayers go out to the families who are dealing with this terrible loss. We continue to work diligently to rebuild the lives of those students who escaped this tragedy, but do so with heavy hearts."

Marshall University is not releasing the names of these students until it has permission from the students' families.

Information regarding memorial services will be released when available.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 17, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Memorial service for Marshall student planned; memorial fund established in her memory

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A memorial service for Lauren Simpkins Damron, a Marshall University graduate student who died last fall, will take place at 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 20 in the Campus Christian Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Damron, who was 23 when she died on Oct. 25, graduated with honors from Marshall's Lewis College of Business in May 2006 with a degree in business administration.

She was the daughter of Dennis and Cathy Damron of Jacksonville, Fla. Dennis Damron is an executive with CSX in Jacksonville, and Cathy Damron is a former counselor with the Cabell County School System.

The Lauren Simpkins Damron Memorial Fund has been established in her memory. The fund will benefit full-time students at Marshall who have financial and other special needs.

For more information, call (304) 696-6214.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 15, 2007
Contact: Bill Bissett, Director of Public Relations, (304) 550-1546

Marshall announces relief efforts following Emmons fire

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Following the fire that consumed the Emmons Jr. apartment building on Saturday, Jan. 13, Marshall University is announcing relief efforts for students who have been affected by this tragedy in our community.

"This is a sad time for both Huntington and Marshall University," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "We want to do everything we can to help any Marshall student whose life has been disrupted by this destructive event. It is important to remember that these students, in most cases, have lost everything. Our foremost concern is assisting our students with their basic needs, including counseling, then addressing how they resume their education."

At this time, Marshall University can confirm that one student has perished as the result of this fire. Out of respect for the student's family, the name of the student is not being released.

Seven students have been relocated to Marshall's residence halls. Food and personal items are being provided through emergency funds. Other students are currently staying with friends and family.  Additional relief efforts are being implemented to meet the needs of these students as classes resume tomorrow. Any Marshall student needing assistance is asked to contact either Marshall's Department of Public Safety at (304) 696-4357 or Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, at (304) 696-6422.

To donate to the student relief fund, please make checks or money orders payable to the Marshall University Foundation, Attention - Student Disaster Relief Fund. For more information, please contact the Foundation at (304) 696-6264.


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Friday January 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall professor again receives NATO grant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ashok Vaseashta, a professor in Marshall University's College of Science, has received an award in excess of $80,000 from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) that will enable him to conduct an advanced study institute (ASI) in Romania.

The ASI, which takes place June 4-15, is titled "Functionalized Nanoscale Materials, Devices, and Systems for Chemical and Biological Sensors, Photonics, and Energy Generation and Storage." The grant is to be supplemented by several federal and international agencies to support student participations from NATO and partner countries.

This is the second time that Vaseashta has received a grant from NATO to conduct a study institute. He received a similar award by NATO in July 2003 to direct an ASI titled "Nanostructured and Advanced Materials for Applications in Sensors, Optoelectronic and Photovoltaic Technology" in Sozopol, Bulgaria in September 2004.

The NATO ASI will take place in Sinaia, Romania, located in the scenic Prahova Valley, about 120 kilometers north of Bucharest and 44 kilometers from Brasov. One of Romania's oldest, most famous mountain resorts, Sinaia often is referred to as the "Pearl of the Romanian Carpathians." 

Graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and other scientists will hear lectures from 12 to 14 internationally known lecturers and several focused session speakers and present their own research work at the ASI.

The NATO award is highly competitive and is approved only after a rigorous review by researchers from many NATO countries. Vaseashta said he was "pleasantly surprised" when he received the letter from NATO, indicating the grant was approved.

In addition to the NATO ASI, he is co-chairing an international symposium on Nanotechnology in Environmental Pollution Prevention with the Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum, Australia. One of the common themes of both the meetings is the use of nanomaterials in detection, monitoring, and remediation of environmental pollution.

"The topic is of personal interest to me," Vaseashta said. He said that following the loss of a family member, possibly due to pollution, a couple of years ago, he got more involved in this topic. He since has delivered several invited and keynote lectures worldwide promoting education highlighting the adverse affects of pollution and how these nano dimensional materials can help mitigate the problem.

In addition to the ASI, he is scheduled to deliver several lectures in eight countries this year. Dr. Andrew Rogerson, dean of Marshall's College of Science, said he is impressed with the international exposure that such meetings bring to Marshall University.

Vaseashta said that more than three million people die each year from the effects of air pollution. He noted that emission from fuel-operated machinery is one of the leading causes of pollution, even though more than one-third of the entire world population does not have access to fuel-operated machinery.

Citing a quote from the World Energy Congress (WEC), he said that if the world continues to use fuels at the current rate, the damage from environmental pollution in 2025 will reach a "point of no return."

Long-term exposure to air pollution provokes inflammation, accelerates atherosclerosis, and alters cardiac function. These illnesses are further magnified for people suffering from diabetes, chronic pulmonary diseases, and inflammatory diseases, Vaseashta said.

According to the American Lung Association (ALA), Charleston, W.Va., ranks 16th in U.S. metropolitan areas most polluted by year-round particle pollution. "One of the objectives of this research is to gather enough data to convince the policymakers to implement changes to reduce pollution sooner rather than later," Vaseashta said.

Rogerson said recent advances in nanoscale materials, devices, and systems have provided new opportunities for scientific and technological developments.

"However, behavior of nanoscale materials in the environment, their transport through air and water, mode of entry into living organisms, and impact on human health are poorly understood," he said. "Safe handling of nanomaterials and intensive investigation of their environmental impact is indispensable."

Vaseashta can be reached at (304) 696-2755 and by e-mail: prof.vaseashta@marshall.edu.


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Friday January 12, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Faculty Senate seeks items for 20th anniversary celebration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Officers and staff of the Marshall University Faculty Senate are seeking anecdotes, pictures, news articles, or other items of interest relating to the creation and first 20 years of the organization, as well as the writing of The Constitution of the Marshall University Faculty.

"We are planning a reception to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Faculty Senate on Feb. 26," said Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music and chair of the senate. "The items we receive will assist us in creating scripts and displays for the event."

The reception is scheduled from 3 to 5 p.m. Feb. 26 in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. It is the first of several events that week designed to honor faculty.

On Tuesday, Feb. 27, faculty members will participate in Marshall University Day at the Legislature, and at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 28 in the Drinko Library 3rd floor atrium, plaques listing award-winning faculty will be unveiled.

Persons may send any items to Bernice Bullock, Memorial Student Center room BW14. If  item(s) are to be returned, lenders are asked to be sure to label them with name and address.

For further information, contact Bullock at (304) 696-4376.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 11, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Wonderful Town Making Huntington Debut

The Marshall Artists Series is delighted to announce the Tony winning New York City musical, Wonderful Town, is coming to the wonderful town of Huntington Monday, January 22 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m.

From Leonard Bernstein, composer of West Side Story, and the writers of Singin' in the Rain, this wildly entertaining show brings to life the true adventures of Ruth and Eileen, two sisters from Ohio that move to New York City in 1935 bursting with dreams of making it big and falling in love in the big city.

Since its Broadway debut in 1953 Wonderful Town has been an instant hit, winning Five Tony Awards including Best Musical. The New York Times called it "Wonderfula sizzling revival!" and the New York Magazine said "Bernstein has given us an immortal scorelong may it wave and weave its life-enhancing enchantment." Wonderful Town is guaranteed to be a wonderful time for the whole family.

Tickets for the show are available now. Tickets are $55 and may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office by calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted.

Tickets may also be purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. Patrons can pick up tickets at any Ticketmaster outlet, including select Kroger stores.

Wonderful Town is sponsored by Huntington Testing & Technology, Huntington Federal, Verizon, the Herald Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications, WSAZ, and the Marshall Artists Series.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 10, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

DIVA Jazz Orchestra headlines annual Jazz Festival at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sherrie Maricle and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra, a band steeped in the history of jazz but infused with the progressive harmonies of today, will be featured in 38th annual Jazz Festival Feb. 1-3 at Marshall University.

Festival events, sponsored by MU's department of music, will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Tickets may be purchased at the center's box office, or by calling (304) 696-2787.

Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall, said the Jazz Festival has been an important part of West Virginia's artistic community since its beginning in 1970.

"It attracts nationally recognized artists and supports the MU Jazz Studies Program in its efforts to educate students, to entertain the public and to preserve the rich heritage of jazz," Bingham said.

Artists who have performed at Marshall and with the MU Jazz Ensemble comprise a veritable "Who's Who" among important jazz musicians, Bingham said. Included among them are Joe Farrell, Phil Wilson, Clark Terry, Gary Burton, Rich Matteson, Art Pepper, Jamey Aebersold, Maynard Ferguson and Orchestra, Stan Kenton and Orchestra, Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd, Herbie Mann, Gary Burton, Ed Soph, Dominic Spera, the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra with Buddy Morrow, the Count Basie Orchestra, Bob Thompson, Mike Vax, Chris Vadala, Bill Watrous, Eddie Daniels, Oliver Nelson, Dave Valentin, Alvin Batiste, Terry Gibbs, Denis DeBlasio, Conrad Herwig, James Dapogny, Louis Bellson, Arturo Sandoval, The Columbus Jazz Orchestra, Paquite D'Rivera and the Dizzy Gillespie All Stars.

Sherrie Maricle and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra are based in New York City and play contemporary, mainstream big band jazz composed and arranged by band members and other renowned writers including Tommy Newsom, Ellen Rowe, Rich Shemaria, and Scott Whitfield.

DIVA's special sound is a result of its repertoire being composed expressly for the individual personalities of the musicians themselves. What audiences can expect to hear is powerful ensemble playing and creative soloists playing with all the spontaneity, originality and finesse of the jazz masters who have preceded them, Bingham said.

DIVA was founded by Stanley Kay, a former manager and relief drummer for the Buddy Rich Big Band. In 1990, Kay was conducting a band where Maricle was playing drums. Impressed by her skill, Kay wondered if there were other women musicians with a similar caliber of musicianship. A nationwide audition of players produced a core group of musicians who performed their first concert in March of 1993.

DIVA has performed in some of the world's most prestigious music venues, where they have received critical acclaim. Some of those venues are: Carnegie Hall with the New York Pops Orchestra at a sold-out concert; John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.; Verizon Jazz Festival at Lincoln Center in New York; Lionel Hampton Jazz Room at Le Meridien Hotel in Paris; Teatro de Sistina in Rome, Italy; Hollywood Bowl; Blue Note in New York; Harrah's in Lake Tahoe; Berlin, Germany, Jazz Festival; and Bern, Switzerland, Jazz Festival

Nancy Wilson, Joe Williams, Diane Schuur, DeeDee Bridgewater, Rosemary Clooney, Jack Jones, Clark Terry, Dr. Billy Taylor, Terry Gibbs, Tommy Newsom, and Randy Brecker have performed with DIVA in the United States and abroad.

Television appearances include multiple features on CNN's Arts Break, CBS Sunday Morning, a spotlight presentation on the Kennedy Center's 25th anniversary special, a feature on Japanese television's NHK network, as well as various local cable programs.

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