April 2007 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 27, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MCTC to celebrate Law Day with ethics presentation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Legal Assisting program at Marshall Community and Technical College is celebrating Law Day by providing a complimentary lunch and an ethics presentation by Charles Jones of the Office of Disciplinary Counsel from noon to 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 1.

The event will take place at the Cooking and Culinary Institute, 917 3rd Ave., in Huntington. One hour of continuing legal education (CLE) credit in Ethics will be awarded. 

Seating is limited to the first 50 people to register.  To reserve a seat, contact Donna Donathan at (304) 696-3022.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 27, 2007
Contact: Beverly McCoy, , (304) 691-1713

Marshall ranked fifth nationally in producing family doctors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today was honored as the fifth-ranked school in the nation in producing family physicians, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced.

By ranking in the Top 10, the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall earned a "Family Medicine Top Ten Award" from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). Marshall's School of Medicine was the only West Virginia institution that earned the award.

The award was presented during the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine spring conference in Chicago. Dr. John B. Walden of the Department of Family and Community Health accepted the award for Marshall.

The ranking is based on the performance of all medical schools in the country over the past three years in placing graduates in family medicine residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Kopp said.

"This Achievement Award from the American Academy of Family Physicians recognizes the exceptional work of the School of Medicine at Marshall University in educating West Virginia's next generation of family doctors," Kopp said.

"When combined with this past year's 100 percent first-time pass rate by Marshall's graduating class on Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensure Examination, which is a very rare achievement for any public medical school, this Top 10 award demonstrates that our medical school graduates are exceptionally well-prepared to serve the medical needs of our state, region and nation in a wide array of specialties."

Although this year is the first for the Top 10 award, Marshall received at least 15 annual awards since the family physician group began in 1992 to recognize the schools producing the highest percentages of family physicians, according to Dr. Charles H. McKown, Jr., Marshall's vice president for health sciences and dean of the school of medicine.

The University of Kansas is ranked No. 1 in producing family medicine physicians. It is followed by the University of Missouri-Columbia, University of Arkansas, University of North Dakota, Marshall University, University of Minnesota, Michigan State University, East Carolina University, University of Oklahoma and Loma Linda University.

"It is a source of tremendous pride for us that Marshall is one of this elite group," McKown said. "This year's Top 10 award offers richly deserved recognition to the fine faculty members in our Department of Family and Community Health."

Producing well-prepared family physicians has long been one of the goals of Marshall's medical school, according to Dr. Robert B. Walker, associate dean and chair of the school's Department of Family and Community Health.

"Primary care and family practice are very important to West Virginia and West Virginia's people - these are the specialists they most often turn to for their health care; in many cases, family doctors are the only doctors in the area," he said. "It is very important that Marshall offers this specialty, encourages people to enter it, and trains them to a high level in the skills required for it. We feel that this is one of the ways we are meeting the needs of the people of West Virginia."

Family physicians from Marshall's medical school and family practice residency program span the state, from McDowell County to both panhandles, he said.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday April 26, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to award nearly 3,000 degrees on May 5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will award nearly 3,000 degrees as it celebrates its 170th commencement on Saturday, May 5 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

The total of 2,920 degrees includes 1,460 undergraduate degrees, 1,000 graduate degrees, 49 School of Medicine degrees, 98 associate degrees and 313 degrees from the Marshall Community and Technical College.

In all, 546 students are graduating from Marshall with honors, along with 78 from the Community and Technical College.

For the second consecutive year, each Marshall graduate attending commencement will be recognized during the ceremony. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2006 may participate in commencement.

Homer Hickam, a Coalwood, W.Va., native and author of the best-seller Rocket Boys: A Memoir, will deliver the commencement address and receive an honorary Doctor of Literature degree. Ken Hechler, former longtime U.S. Congressman and West Virginia Secretary of State, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree.

Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement.

Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, 18 students have completed or will complete their degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Four already are assured of 4.0s, while the other 14 - all graduating in May - will learn their final GPAs after commencement. Seventeen of the 18 students are from West Virginia.

The four already assured of 4.0s are Lora Beth Dickerson of Page, W.Va., Jacinda Spring Hurley of Man, W.Va., Matthew Craig Kellar of West Union, W.Va., and Laura Aleise Robbins of Beckley, W.Va.

The 14 with tentative 4.0s are Sean Eric Boyd of Bluefield, W.Va.; Jessica Rae Brown of Beckley, W.Va.; Ashley Dawn Chaddock of Huntington; Sara Lawson Chadwick of Elkins, W.Va.; Jessica Michelle Craig of Buffalo, W.Va.; Paul Jerid Dick of Wayne, W.Va.; Britani Nichole Keeney of Proctorville, Ohio; Aleksandra Barbara Kraszpulska of Huntington; Hannah D. McCullough of Pennsboro, W.Va.; Anne Kathryn Parlock of Vienna, W.Va.; Mary Christine Petrany of Huntington; Cynthia Brooke Schnably of Ranson, W.Va.; Sarah Brennan Sullivan of Charleston, and Jenna Suzanne Walker of Huntington.

Eighty-three students are graduating summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 189 are graduating magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA) and 265 are graduating cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

From the Marshall Community and Technical College, 25 are graduating with high honors (3.7 to 4.0) and 53 are graduating with honors.

Here is a list of commencement-related events next week:

  • Thursday, May 3 - 4 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Awards Ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Room
  • Thursday, May 3 - 7 p.m., College of Health Professions' Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Friday, May 4 - 11 a.m., LEAP Program graduation, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge
  • Friday, May 4 - 1:30 p.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge
  • Friday, May 4 - 3 p.m., International students graduation picnic, Buskirk Field
  • Friday, May 4 - 5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library Atrium
  • Friday, May 4 - 7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Friday, May 4 - 7 p.m., Marshall Community and Technical College commencement, Keith-Albee Theatre
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Education and Human Services ceremony and reception, Christ Temple Church
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts reception and ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business ceremony, Cam Henderson Center
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1 p.m., College of Science ceremony, Keith-Albee Theatre
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, College of Health Professions reception and ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, College of Fine Arts ceremony, The Palms, 314 9th St. Plaza
  • Saturday, May 5 - One hour after Marshall University commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering ceremony and reception, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
  • Saturday, May 5 - Immediately following Marshall University commencement, School of Extended Education Regents Bachelor of Arts ceremony, Harless Dining Hall
  • Saturday, May 5 - 1:30 p.m., School of Journalism and Mass Communications ceremony, Smith Recital Hall
  • Saturday, May 5 - 3 p.m., Forensic Science ceremony and reception, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

More information on Marshall's 170th commencement ceremony is available at http://www.marshall.edu/registrar/commencementresources.html.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 25, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Award winners, retirees to be honored at faculty meeting

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fifteen individuals will be honored by Marshall University with awards of distinction for the 2006-07 academic year during the spring general faculty meeting Friday, April 27 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Eight people will receive the Distinguished Service Award, two will receive the Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award and five will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. The meeting starts at 2 p.m., and includes remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Larry Stickler.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations.

Each of the Distinguished Service Awards winners receives $1,000. They include:

  • Earline Allen, Art
  • Gary Anderson, Chemistry
  • Leonard Deutsch, Dean of the Graduate College
  • Robert Edmunds, Communication Studies
  • Jane McKee, Associate Dean, College of Education and Human Services
  • H. Keith Spears,  Journalism
  • Donna Spindel, History
  • Michael Sullivan, Special Education

To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, a faculty member either must be tenured or hold a tenure-track appointment. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty.

The 2006-07 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

  • Professor Hongwei Yu (Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, microbiology), senior recipient in the field of Science and Technology
  • Professor Luke Eric Lassiter (Marshall University Graduate College, humanities), senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business
  • Assistant Professor Solen Dikener (College of Fine Arts, music), junior recipient among all faculty
  • Professor Ralph Oberste-Vorth and Associate Professor Bonita Lawrence (College of Science, mathematics), team recipients

Also Friday, Marshall is recognizing 17 retiring faculty who have a combined 415 years of service. They are:

  • Kenneth Paul Ambrose, Sociology & Anthropology, 32 years of service
  • L. Howard Aulick, Physiology, 23 years of service
  • Elwyn Bellis, Physics, 25 years of service
  • Lance Belville, Management & Marketing, 11 years of service
  • Dr. Stephen Fish, Anatomy, Cell & Neurobiology, 20 years of service
  • Dr. Gary G. Gilbert, Obstetrics & Gynecology, 15 years of service
  • Dr. John Lancaster, Mathematics, 34 years of service
  • Charles Lloyd, Classics, 35 years of service
  • Mary Marshall, Exercise Science, Sport & Recreation, 40 years of service
  • Marilyn McClure, Journalism, 13 years of service
  • Jane McKee, Associate Dean College of Education and Human Services,
    20 years of service
  • Edwina Pendarvis, Special Education, 28 years of service
  • William Rhoten, Anatomy, 16 years of service
  • John P. Sheils, Pathology, 4 years of service
  • Karen Simpkins, Sociology & Anthropology, 31 years of service
  • Ralph W. Taylor, Biological Sciences, 35 years of service
  • Cora Teel, Library Archives, 33 years of service

Other faculty to be honored Friday are Montserrat Miller, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Thelma "Sissy" Isaacs, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Pam Holland, Ronda Sturgill and Lachlan Whalen, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award.

A reception in the performing arts center lobby follows Friday's meeting.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday April 25, 2007
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff and Sr. Vice President for Communications, (304) 696-6713

Maier Foundation establishes permanent endowment for Marshall University Latin Awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The establishment of a $100,000 endowment fund which will ensure the continuation of the Latin Awards by Marshall University was announced last week by Ed Maier, President of the Maier Foundation, Inc., which has sponsored the awards since 1979. 

The announcement came at the annual awards ceremony that took place on the Huntington campus. During the ceremony outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions are recognized.

The endowment will fund the Maier Latin Cup Awards and the Maier Sight Translation Awards, both for high school students, and the Maier Latin Scholarship, which is given to a Marshall Latin major.  

"I  was delighted to learn of the Maier Foundation's generous support for classical studies at Marshall, which grows out of the Maier family's longstanding interest in promoting the study of the humanities in West Virginia," Dr. John Young, associate professor of English at Marshall, said.  "Such support is especially important in our contemporary climate, as the humanities teach, above all, how to communicate across and through differences of culture, place and history."

The Maier Latin awards were established by Ed Maier's father, William J. Maier, Jr., to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.  A high school graduate at the age of 16, the elder Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the State.  The elder Maier credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

During his academic career, William Maier, Jr. garnered top honors and graduated second in his class at Harvard.  He later received a prestigious Rhodes Scholarship and while teaching economics at Harvard earned a law degree from that institution.  Maier became a successful businessman and a noted philanthropist, establishing the Sarah and Pauline Maier Scholarship Foundation, named in honor of his mother and his wife, which has given millions of dollars to educational institutions, community, cultural and civic projects, and other worthy causes.

"What is particularly pleasing is that the foundation supports the work of high school students.  These students work very hard, as do their teachers, and it is very nice to see their efforts rewarded," said Dr. Caroline Perkins, chair of MU's Department of Classics.

"The annual gifts from the foundation are unique in the country," she said.  "Now that these annual gifts have become an endowed gift, I and members of the Department of Classics feel that the recognition will identify the achievement of West Virginia students even more.  We owe great thanks to Ed Maier and the Maier Foundation.  By honoring his father, a thing that the Romans would understand very well, he honors students in our state."

The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1973 by William J. Maier, Jr. in honor of his father.  These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall University.  Ranging from $100 to $500, the awards recognize and reward good and distinctive writing.     

In addition, the Department of Classics at Marshall sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation.  This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

Ed Maier personally presents the Latin and writing awards each spring.  This year's winners include:

Maier Latin Sight-translation Contest Winners

Latin I:  first place, Paresh Sovani, Linsly School; teacher, Nicoletta Villa-Sella; second place, Rachael Rohrbert, Cabell Midland High School; teacher, Linda Harbour.

Latin II:  first place, Rebecca Olsavsky, Linsly School; teacher, Nicoletta Villa-Sella; second place, Andrew Phillips, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

Latin III: first place, Corey Brady, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

Latin IV, first place, Erik Harless, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder.

The Maier High School Latin Cup Award Winners

First place: Andrew Phillips, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder

Second place: Natalie Tupta, Charleston Catholic High School; teacher, Robin Snyder

Third place: Wisam Khader, Huntington High School; teacher; Amy McElroy

Maier Latin Scholarship

John Matthew Baxter, a junior at Marshall University from Olive Hill, Ky., was the recipient of the Maier Latin Scholarship.

Maier Writing Award Winners 

Freshman Research:  first place, Erica Rice, "The Double Cross;" teacher, Professor John Van Kirk.

Freshman Non-Research:  first place, Shana Gillman; teacher; Chris Green; second place, MacKenzie Crigger; teacher, Mary Welch; third place, Chris Thompson; teacher, Mary Welch.

Undergraduate Fiction:  first place, Sara Blevins; teacher, John Van Kirk; second place, Jamie Dunkle; teacher, John Van Kirk; third place, Erin Felton; teacher, John Van Kirk; honorable mention, Kimberly Stone; teacher, A.E. Stringer.

Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose:  first place (tie), Christina Belcher; teacher, Sherri Smith; Zachary Ferrell; teacher, Edmund Taft; second place, Jeremy Cambridge; teacher, Sherri Smith; third place, Brittany Duncan; teacher, John Van Kirk.

Graduate Non-Fiction Prose:  first place, Hunter Stark; teacher, Sherri Smith; second place, Crystal Howell; teacher, John Young; third place, David Daniels; teacher, Lee Erickson.

Undergraduate Poetry: first place (tie): Amy Koutsunis; teacher, A.E. Stringer; Travis L. Michael; teacher, A.E. Stringer; second place, Sara Blevins; teacher, A.E. Stringer.

Graduate Poetry: first place, Beverly A. Cooper; teacher, A.E. Stringer; second place, Rachel Hicks; teacher, A.E. Stringer.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Annual Donning of Kente celebration is Wednesday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Many Marshall University African American students who graduated last semester or will graduate in May will take part in the school's annual Donning of  Kente celebration and processional at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 25 at Buskirk Field.

Maurice Cooley, director of MU's Center for African American Students' Programs, said about 70 undergraduate and graduate students are expected to participate. They will be donned with a Kente cloth, which is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries.

"The relevance of the event is to recognize the achievements of African American students who are completing their studies at Marshall," Cooley said. "The Kente has its origin as a gift presented to royalty and other natives of Ghana when they had achieved something extraordinary in their lives. Our students are honored in a similar way to the way their ancestors were honored for thousands of years."

Dr. Ingrid Laura J. St. Omer, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Kentucky, will be the featured speaker at the Donning of Kente celebration. Opening remarks will be given by Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Betty J. Cleckley, vice president for Multicultural Affairs.

The processional, which begins at 4 p.m. at the Memorial Student Center, will be led by Dr. George F. Kojo Arthur, associate professor in the College of Education and Human Services at Marshall.

Following the ceremony, which is open to the public, a reception will take place on the student center plaza.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 24, 2007
Contact: Vicki Stroeher, , (304) 696-6437

Fundraising event to honor, help local transplant patients

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A concert titled "An Evening of American Music" will take place at 5 p.m. Sunday, April 29 in the Smith Music Hall Recital Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University. The event will benefit Brayden and Trevin Saunders, two Huntington-area brothers who need bone marrow transplants. 

Nine-year-old Brayden and seven-year old Trevin were diagnosed with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Deficiency and are listed for life-saving bone marrow transplants at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N. C.  Funds are being raised to assist with their transplant-related expenses. The Saunders family needs an estimated $180,000 for the expenses.

Performers for the April 29 event include students and faculty from the Marshall University music department, as well as members of the national music fraternity, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, from both Marshall and Morehead State University. Admission to the concert is free.  Donations for Brayden and Trevin will be taken at the door and during the concert.

The Children's Organ Transplant Association (COTA), a national charity based in Bloomington, Ind., will be assisting the Saunders family in receiving and managing funds raised from concert and other fundraising events. COTA is dedicated to organizing and guiding communities in raising funds for transplant-needy patients. COTA's services are completely free of charge and 100 percent of funds generated by COTA fundraising campaigns are available for transplant-related expenses.

"The family and friends of Brayden and Trevin want to encourage everyone to attend our 'Evening of American Music' concert and help give Brayden and Trevin a second chance at life," said Jacob Wolfe, a Marshall University student and member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. "One hundred percent of the profits from the concert will assist with transplant-related expenses."

For more information about the "Evening of American Music," or other fundraising and volunteer opportunities, contact Vicki Stroeher, Public Relations Coordinator, "For the Boys," at (304) 696-6437.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 23, 2007
Contact: Angela Jones, Director of Marketing and External Affairs, Marshall Artists Series, (304) 696-3334

Marshall Artists Series Thanks Area Firefighters with Complimentary Tickets to 9/11 Drama The Guys - April 30th

A collaboration of WV professional artists will come together for the first time in May to present playwright Anne Nelson's true story of New York City and its people in the aftermath of 9/11, in the riveting drama, The Guys, directed by Cathey Crowell Sawyer, Artistic Director of the Greenbrier Valley Theatre in Lewisburg, WV. The production will be produced by the Marshall Artists Series and the Marshall University Department of Theatre. The intimate performance is comprised of a two person cast starring Beth McVey & Jack Cirillo.

 

The play will be staged for three performances - Monday, April 30 through Wednesday, May 2 at 8 p.m at the Francis Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

 

Everyday local firefighters put their lives on the line to protect their communities.  As a thank you for their hard work and dedication, the Marshall Artists Series is offering area firefighters and their families free tickets to the opening night performance of the 9/11 drama, The Guys on Monday, April 30th  at 8 p.m.  Firefighters should call the Marshall Artists Series at 304-696-3326 to reserve tickets for this special performance.  Proper ID required. Limited seating available.

 

The story takes place less than two weeks after the September 11th attacks. Nick (portrayed by Jack Cirillo), a fire captain who lost eight men in the collapse of the World Trade Center, must prepare eulogies for each of them. Feeling overwhelmed and unable to express his feelings, he enlists the help from an editor, Joan (portrayed by Beth McVey), to help him. They build a friendship as she helps him put together the difficult, heartfelt speeches that he must deliver with honor, humor and poise all the while, navigating his way though his own emotional response.

 

Huntington native and Broadway star Beth McVey will reprise the role of Joan. McVey, also a former Miss West Virginia, has appeared in numerous Broadway productions including "Annie," "Phantom of the Opera," and "Beauty and the Beast." Jack Cirillo, an associate theatre professor at Marshall University, will portray Nick. Cirillo has worked extensively in New York as well as in many of this country's finest regional theatres. He also has numerous television commercials to his credit and has appeared with the Radio City Rockettes.

 

Director Cathey Crowell Sawyer is the Artistic Director for the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, which was recently designated as WV's year-round professional theatre.  Ms. Sawyer was awarded the 2006 Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence in West Virginia. She will also direct two performances in Lewisburg, WV at the Greenbrier Valley Theatre on Thursday May 3 and Friday May 4.

 

The set and lighting will be designed by Lang Reynolds, Chair of the Marshall University Department of Theatre since 1999.  During his career Mr. Reynolds has served as a lighting/set designer, technical coordinator, and producer in numerous professional projects.  Additionally, his credits include consulting on theatre renovations and new theatre construction.

 

Tickets for the all three Huntington performances are available now. Tickets are $25. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted. Tickets purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. To order tickets for the performances in Lewisburg, please call the Greenbrier Valley Theatre box office at (304) 645-3838.

 

The Guys is sponsored by the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, the Marshall University Department of Theatre, West Virginia Lottery, My Z TV, the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications and the Marshall Artists Series.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday April 23, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Board approves tuition and fee increase for next year; meal plan adjustment means savings for students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors, in a meeting today in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus, approved a tuition and fee increase of $105 per semester for all full-time undergraduate students for fiscal year 2007-2008. Tuition and fee rates increases for part-time students are prorated accordingly.

The Board also approved an average residence hall increase of $163, bringing the total increase in tuition, room and board to $268 per student, per semester.

However, the Board also approved a proposal to reduce the cost of the Unlimited Meal Plan for students living on campus by $363 per semester, meaning that the net change in the 2007-2008 cost of attendance for students living on campus (tuition, room and board) will actually be decreased by $95 per semester relative to the current 2006-2007 rate.

The Unlimited Meal Plan will be required next year for all freshmen living on campus and will be priced at the current 19-meal plan rate, which is being discontinued.

Also today, the Board approved a resident, metro and non-resident fee increase of $268 per semester on average for students in the School of Medicine.

Lastly, the board also approved a Special Institutional Capital Fee of $75 for the new Fitness Center. However, the fee will not be assessed until the semester the Center opens, which is expected to be spring 2009.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday April 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Montserrat Miller named Hedrick Award winner; Reynolds, Pickens-Queen honorees also announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Montserrat Miller, associate professor of history at Marshall University, is MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2006-07, Dr. Elaine Baker, director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, announced today.

Miller will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.

Baker also announced two other awards honoring four faculty members. They are:

  • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Thelma M. Isaacs, associate professor, School of Education.
  • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Ronda Sturgill, assistant professor in the Division of Exercise Science, Sport, and Recreation (ESSR);  Dr. Lachlan Whalen, assistant professor in the English department; and Pamela J. Holland, assistant professor in the department of communications disorders.

All five award winners will be formally recognized during the spring general faculty meeting, which begins at 2 p.m. Friday, April 27 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Here is a brief look at the three awards and the five winners:

Hedrick Award

This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

Dr. Montserrat Miller has been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of history. She has been an associate professor of history since 2000. Previously, she was director of the World History Project with the Center for the Design of Educational Computing at Carnegie Mellon University from 1993 to 1994, and assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi from 1994 to 1996.

Miller received her bachelor's degree in International Affairs from Marshall University in 1983, a master's degree in history from Marshall in 1988, a master's in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon in 1990, and her Ph.D. in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon in 1994.

Miller, in describing her teaching philosophy, says her obvious aim is to awaken and develop students' historical consciousness and curiosity. Her larger goal, she says, is to promote greater appreciation for the life of the mind.

"Each course offers me a new opportunity to make a difference in the lives of my students, and through the pursuit of this goal, to experience personal and intellectual growth," Miller said.

Dr. Donna Spindel, chair of the department of history at Marshall, described Miller as tough and demanding, but said "her goal is to ensure that our majors have the necessary analytical, research, and writing tools we expect of our graduates."

"In the end they love her for it and she has created an enthusiastic following," Spindel said.

Dr. David E. Mills, associate professor of history at Marshall, raved about Miller when nominating her for the Hedrick Award. Mills said Miller "is truly an exemplary teacher, researcher, colleague, and human being."

In May 2006, Miller received the College of Liberal Arts (COLA) Outstanding  Teaching Award, which is voted upon by students in the college. COLA Dean Dr. Christina Murphy described Miller as "a distinguished scholar and a highly accomplished teacher."

Miller has received numerous other awards at Marshall, among them history department merit awards each year from 1997 through 2001, the 1998-99 Pickens-Queen Teaching Award and the 1998-99 Outstanding Student Advisor Award.

Reynolds Award

The Reynolds Award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed three or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Thelma M. Isaacs joined Marshall University in 1999 as an assistant professor. Previously, she taught high school English and seventh- and eighth-grade language arts in the Putnam County schools.

"Dr. Isaacs is truly one of our most outstanding professors in the School of Education," Dr. Carl S. Johnson, chair of the School of Education, said. "Her student ratings are always among the top three out of approximately 30 professors in the department.

Isaacs has earned five degrees, including her Ed.D. in Educational Leadership from West Virginia University, and her Ed.S. in Curriculum and Instruction from Marshall. She received her undergraduate degree in Secondary Education from Marshall in 1989.

Isaacs, in describing the most important concepts or ideas she would like students to gain from her courses, said she strives to help create teacher candidates capable of positively impacting student learning in K-12 schools.

"I want my students to be able to analyze how children learn best and appraise differences in learning styles," she said. "Furthermore, I hope they can create a positive learning environment where they use effective communications techniques and foster relationships with students, parents and colleagues."

Johnson said Isaacs is recognized by her peers as an excellent teacher and "she never toots her own horn. She goes about her business in a very quiet, efficient and professional manner," he said.

Pickens-Queen Award

Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All full-time, tenure-track faculty who are at the instructor/assistant professor rank and who have completed six or fewer years at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Ronda Sturgill said her teaching philosophy in the field of athletic training and health education centers around three main issues: utilizing a variety of teaching methods in the classroom, using current and up to date information, and focusing on a lifetime of success for the student.

"Ronda is passionate about her profession of athletic training education," said David Robertson, an assistant professor in ESSR. "I believe a credible measure of teaching success is what the students say about their professors. On a number of occasions I have heard students talk about what they did in 'Ronda's' class and what they are going to do, such as take field trips. Ronda fosters an approach to teaching that is based on knowledge concerning important concepts with a personal caring for the teaching and learning process."

Rudy Pauley, interim dean with Marshall's School of Education and Professional Development, said Sturgill is "a dynamic and creative instructor."

"She is active in the scholarly and creative arena and has continued to broaden her perspective and involvement through leadership activities," Pauley said.

Dan Martin, chair of ESSR, said Sturgill is "well organized, knowledgeable, and excited about her teaching."

Dr. Lachlan Whalen describes himself as a teacher-scholar. "My research influences my classroom and vice versa," Whalen said.

Dr. Jamie Warner, associate professor in the department of political science at Marshall, has twice teamed with Whalen to teach the 400-level honors course, "Postcolonial Theory and Literature."

"To put it simply, Lachlan is a very good teacher," Warner said. "In fact, teaming with him helps me be a better teacher, and I don't know any higher compliment that I could give him than that."

Suzanne R. Samples, an MU English graduate student, said she had no idea what to expect when she signed up to take English 433, which would be taught by Lachlan.

"After the first class, it was clear that Dr. Whalen was here for a reason," Samples said. "Over the course of the semester, he demonstrated his complete control over the classroom and his intensive knowledge of literature and writing; more importantly, he proved that his passion for the subject matter resonates so strongly throughout the classroom that his students can't help but to become zealous about the material as well."

Pamela J. Holland does not lecture her students. Instead, she shares her 11 years of experience and knowledge within the field of communication disorders.

"My goal is to ensure that all students, regardless of their particular dominant learning style (visual, auditory, tactile/kinesthetic), have ample exposure to the material presented," Holland said. "I have found that this method of delivering the course material has a much better chance of being successfully received by the students. The results are visible in course mastery as well as student enthusiasm."

Department of communications disorders chair Kathryn Chezik likes to refer to student evaluations when praising Holland, whom she described as "a dynamic and enthusiastic teacher."

"Comments such as "She is an awesome teacher," "Mrs. Holland makes us feel completely comfortable in asking questions, and her excitement for us to learn makes me excited to learn about communication disorders," and "I actually enjoyed coming to this class" were routinely found on her student evaluations," Chezik said.

Regardless of the class, Chezik said, student feedback remains the same. "Students are impressed with her knowledge, compassion, understanding and clinical experience," Chezik said.


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Award-winning poet to read from work at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Christopher Howell will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 26 in room 2w16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Howell is the author of eight poetry collections, most recently Light's Ladder (University of Washington Press).  His poems, translations and essays have been widely published in anthologies and journals, including Antioch Review, Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, Southern Review, Denver Quarterly, Field, Iowa Review, Gettysburg Review and Harper's

He has received three Pushcart Prizes, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and fellowships from the Washington Artist Trust, the Oregon Arts Commission, and the Massachusetts Council for the Arts. His work also has been awarded the Vachel Lindsay prize, the Washington State Governor's Prize for Literature, the Washington State Book Award and the Stanley W. Lindberg Award for Editorial Excellence.   

Howell teaches at Eastern Washington University, where he also is senior editor for EWU Press.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English department and the College of Liberal Arts.

For more information, contact MU English professor Art Stringer at (304) 696-2403.


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The Diary of Anne Frank' runs April 25-28 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre will present "The Diary of Anne Frank" by Francis Goodrich and Albert Hackett at 8 p.m. daily Wednesday, April 25 through Saturday, April 28 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The play was adapted from "Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl." It won the 1956 Pulitzer Prize for drama. It also has won the Tony Award, Critics Circle Award, and virtually every other coveted prize of the theatre.

Tickets, available at the Performing Arts Center's box office, are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and MU faculty and staff, $7 for youth 17 and under, and free to full-time Marshall students with their student IDs.

For more information, call (304) 696-2787.


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Wednesday April 18, 2007
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Marshall University SGA to conduct memorial service

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association will conduct a memorial service for the 33 victims of the Virginia Tech University tragedy at noon Thursday, April 19 near the Memorial Student Center Fountain on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Dominque Elmore, president of Marshall's student body, said the Marshall and Huntington communities are invited to join together to remember the students and faculty who lost their lives Monday at Virginia Tech.

"This is a very difficult time for so many people," Elmore said. "When one hurts we all hurt and we are pulling together as one body and remembering the loss at Virginia Tech. Our thoughts and prayers are with the students, staff, faculty, and families."

Condolence books and Virginia Tech ribbons will be available during the service. Marshall SGA representatives plan to deliver the books to Virginia Tech, which is located in Blacksburg, Va., next week.

The service will include remarks from several people, including Elmore, and special prayers will be offered. Thirty-three carnations in the Virginia Tech colors of maroon and orange, tied with black ribbons, will be placed on the wall around the Memorial Fountain.

For more information, call SGA Communications Director Rachel Sargent at (304) 696-6412.


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Tuesday April 17, 2007
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Student team representing Marshall wins business plan competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A student team representing Marshall University took first place in the technology category in the first West Virginia's Open For Business State Business Plan Competition Saturday, April 14, in Morgantown.

Will Starcher, a fine arts major at Marshall, along with his sister, Margie Starcher, a student at WVU-Parkersburg, saw their invention, the Spider Easel, and their company, Arachnovation, LLC, win $10,000 in cash and a package of resources to help launch their business.

The resources include legal services from Spilman, Thomas and Battle, PLLC; accounting services from Dixon Hughes, PLLC; physical or virtual office space at the WVU Business Incubator and business cards and letterhead from Signs Plus. The win is a result of all the hard work the team has put into the project, team leader and Spider Easel creator Will Starcher said.

"We have worked on it (the Spider Easel) long and hard for eight years," Starcher said.

According to Amy Anastasia, Marshall University's coordinator for the competition, the win serves a dual purpose for the team.

"This validates the hard work that Will and his sister put into this business," Anastasia said. "However, the journey towards creating a thriving business is still underway."

While the other project representing Marshall, the Independability Wheelchair-assistance Utility, did not win, the competition helped them and the other finalists bring their inventions and creations to a larger stage.

"The competition helped give some already existing concepts a leg up, and it gave birth to many more," said Independability team member Christopher Worth, a Marshall fine arts graduate.

For more information about the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition, visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc/ or contact Anastasia at (304) 696-4365.


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President Kopp issues statement on Virginia Tech tragedy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp issued the following statement on the shootings today at Virginia Tech University:

"We are deeply saddened to learn of today's tragic, horrific events at Virginia Tech University. Our heart-felt sympathy and prayers go out to the victims and their families."


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Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp issues statement on selection of Mike Garrison as president of WVU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, issued the following statement on the selection of Mike Garrison as president of West Virginia University:

"I believe Mike Garrison will continue the good work of David Hardesty at West Virginia University. We wish him great success as he enters this new position and look forward to working with him on the many collaborative programs that our institutions share."


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Annual Moffat Lecture features Appalachian historian Ronald Lewis

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ronald L. Lewis, the Stuart and Joyce Robbins Chair in History at West Virginia University, will deliver the 30th annual Moffat Lecture. The lecture, titled "Ethnicity and Change in Transnational West Virginia," will take place at 2 p.m. Friday, April 27 in Corbly Hall 105 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

This event, which is presented by Phi Alpha Theta, the student history honorary society, and the department of history at Marshall University, is named in honor of Dr. Charles Moffat, who taught history at Marshall from 1946 to 1977 and who recently was recognized as one of the top professors in Marshall history by Marshall Magazine.

Lewis, a prominent historian of Appalachia, is the author of, among other works, Transforming the Appalachian Countryside: Railroads, Deforestation, and Social Change in West Virginia, 1880-1920, and Black Coal Miners in America: Race, Class and Community Conflict, 1780-1980.

He recently co-edited Transnational West Virginia: Ethnic Communities and Economic Change, 1840-1940, with fellow WVU historian Ken Fones-Wolf, and currently is completing a study of Welsh coalminers in America. A reviewer of Transforming the Appalachian Countryside called it "a book that everyone interested in the process of development in the mountains should read - and read again."

A question-and-answer session will follow the talk, and Lewis' books will be available for sale and signing immediately thereafter.

The Moffat Lecture is made possible by funding from the Multicultural/Social Justice Visiting Scholars Program of Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs. Additional support comes from the department of history, Phi Alpha Theta, and the Office of Academic Affairs.


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COEHS and CIP announce Comparative Education Symposium and Awards Ceremony

Huntington, W.Va. - The College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) and the Center for International Programs (CIP) have announced Marshall University's Comparative Education Symposium and Awards Ceremony, Monday April 23 at 5:30 p.m. in room 402 of the Drinko Library on the Huntington campus.

This event, the first of its kind at Marshall, will feature visiting professor Dr. Christine Soulas from University of Rennes 2 in western France, who will discuss the differences in higher education between France and the United States.  Other presenters, graduate students enrolled in a graduate-level course in comparative education, will look at different aspects of education around the world, including student access to education and school accountability.

"We live in an increasingly flat world," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of the Center for International Programs, who is co-teaching the Comparative Education course with Soulas.  "Our students are no longer expected to learn to live in just their own society, but how to adapt to a variety of cultures around the world.  An important way to help understand why people in one country develop in a certain way is to look at how they educate their society."

The event also may offer some ideas on how education in the United States could be improved.

"As educators, we can learn a lot about how our own system works by looking at other systems," Egnor said.  "By taking a good look at how effectively or ineffectively goals are reached in different educational systems, we can find new ways of helping our own students learn."

Awards also will be presented to several students who will be receiving scholarships to study abroad in the 2007-2008 school year, including the first recipient of the Gloria Joan Brothers Memorial Scholarship.  This award will allow a student to study for a year in France and is only available to Marshall students.

The memorial scholarship was established by JA Fred Brothers and his wife, Paula, of Naples, Fla., in memory of Fred's sister, Gloria Joan Brothers, a 1960 Marshall University summa cum laude graduate and a Fulbright Scholar who was killed in a car accident in 1963. They earlier established two scholarships at Marshall in her memory, one general undergraduate scholarship and one for Yeager Scholars.

Fred and Paula Brothers wanted to establish an award to encourage study abroad.  The University of Rennes 2 was chosen because that was where Gloria was awarded a Fulbright to study French Literature.

The Clair Matz Memorial Study Abroad Scholarship also will be awarded at the ceremony.  The scholarship is named in memory of Dr. Clair Matz, professor of International Affairs and Political Science, who served as a member of the Marshall faculty beginning in 1970 and established the MU Office of Study Abroad in the mid-1980s.

The April 23 event is open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

For more information about the class, contact Elizabeth Lee, public relations assistant, at (304) 696-2465 or by e-mail at lee50@marshall.edu.


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Hickam to deliver address at Marshall's commencement, join Hechler as latest honorary degree recipients

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Coalwood, W.Va., native Homer H. Hickam, Jr., author of the best-seller Rocket Boys: A Memoir, will deliver the commencement address at Marshall University's 170th commencement, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 5 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Hickam will receive an honorary Doctor of Literature degree, and Dr. Ken Hechler, former longtime U.S. Congressman and West Virginia Secretary of State, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree during the ceremony. Honorary degrees have been conferred to highly distinguished recipients since 1928 when Dwight Whitney Morrow and Guy Fielding Yost each received honorary Doctor of Laws degrees.

Kopp said Marshall University is honored to have Hickam as its latest commencement speaker.

"One of Homer Hickam's friends from the Rocket Boys used to say, 'A rocket won't fly unless somebody lights the fuse,' " Kopp said. "A fuse was lit that stoked the ambition of Homer Hickam a long time ago in Coalwood, W.Va., and his career has been soaring ever since. From his days as a youngster building rockets in Coalwood, to his time as a NASA engineer and a best-selling author, Homer Hickam has lived a full, rewarding life and made all West Virginians proud. We look forward to hearing his inspirational story during commencement." 

Hickam said he is excited about the opportunity to speak to Marshall's 2007 graduating class. He was the featured speaker at Marshall's Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation in April 2002.

"I am pleased and honored to give the commencement address for the 2007 graduating class of Marshall University," Hickam said. "Marshall is known across the country for its excellence in education and West Virginians everywhere are proud of the university's accomplishments.  Many of my friends from Big Creek High School went on to graduate from Marshall and all have gone on to lead successful, honorable lives.  I will give my remarks with them in mind.  I will also be receiving an honorary doctorate from Marshall which will certainly please my mom, and perhaps astonish some of my teachers at Big Creek."

Rocket Boys: A Memoir is the story of Hickam's life in Coalwood. It was selected by the New York Times as one of its Great Books of 1998 and was an alternate "Book-of-the-Month" selection for both the Literary Guild and Doubleday book clubs.

In February 1999, Universal Studios released its critically-acclaimed film October Sky, which was based on Rocket Boys. Delacorte Press, which published Rocket Boys, subsequently released a mass market paperback of Rocket Boys, re-titled October Sky, which reached the No. 1 position on the New York Times' best-seller list.

Hickam graduated from Big Creek High School in 1960 and from Virginia Tech University in 1964 with a B.S. degree in Industrial Engineering. In 1967 and 1968, he served as a First Lieutenant in the Fourth Infantry Division in Vietnam, where he won the Army Commendation and Bronze Star medals.

Hickam has been a writer since 1969 after his return from Vietnam. His first book, Torpedo Junction, was published in 1989 by the Naval Institute Press and became a best-seller.

He also has written The Coalwood Way (2000), a memoir of his hometown; Sky of Stone (2001), which was a sequel to The Coalwood Way; and We Are Not Afraid: Strength and Courage from the Town That Inspired October Sky (2002).

During his writing career, Hickam was employed as an engineer for the U.S. Army Missile Command from 1971 to 1981. He began employment with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1981 as an aerospace engineer.

With NASA, Hickam worked in spacecraft design and crew training. His specialties included training astronauts on science payloads and extravehicular activities. He also trained astronaut crews for many Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions.

Hechler, who served on President Harry Truman's White House staff from 1949 to 1953, attributes the idea to pursue his own political career to the influence of students in his first classes at Marshall. He first taught political science at Marshall College in 1957. He also taught at Columbia and Barnard colleges.

Recently, Hechler taught an honors class at Marshall on Harry S. Truman: His Life and Times. In conjunction with a biographical analysis of Truman's career, the course studied certain American political institutions as reflected in Truman's actions and decisions, including such issues as presidential leadership, public opinion and pressure groups, Congressional relations, White House staffing, foreign policy, controlling bureaucracy, political parties and campaigns. The course also explored substantive issues such as civil rights, price control, and health care.

"Fifty years ago when I first stepped into the classroom at what was then Marshall College, I was immediately hooked on the spirit of the students and faculty," Hechler said. "That same indescribable spirit was there in greater measure on my recent return to teach a seminar for Yeager and Marshall Scholars."

Hechler served as a U.S. Congressman from 1959 through 1977 and as Secretary of State in West Virginia from 1985 through 2001. Hechler is the author and editor of several books, including Working with Truman: A Personal Memoir of the White House Years, and Bridge at Remagen. He served as a major in the U.S. Army, and was awarded the Bronze Star and five battle stars.

In 1965, Hechler was the only member of Congress to march with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., during the historic Selma (Ala.) March.

Hechler is a native of Roslyn, N.Y., which is 14 miles from Franklin D. Roosevelt's childhood home. He was named West Virginia Son of the Year in 1969. In 2001, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Commission awarded Hechler the Human Civil Rights Award "for advocating social change in the pursuit of equality for others." He received the Harry S. Truman Award for Public Service in 2002, and was named Mountaineer of the Year for 2003 by Graffiti magazine.


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Wednesday April 11, 2007
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A West Virginia Collaboration of The Guys: A tribute to New York's bravest

A collaboration of WV professional artists will come together for the first time in May to present playwright Anne Nelson's true story of New York City and its people in the aftermath of 9/11, in the riveting drama, The Guys, directed by Cathey Crowell Sawyer, Artistic Director of the Greenbrier Valley Theatre in Lewisburg, WV. The production will be produced by the Marshall Artists Series and the Marshall University Department of Theatre. The intimate performance is comprised of a two person cast starring Beth McVey & Jack Cirillo.

 

The play will be staged for three performances - Monday, April 30 through Wednesday, May 2 at 8 p.m at the Francis Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

 

The story takes place less than two weeks after the September 11th attacks. Nick (portrayed by Jack Cirillo), a fire captain who lost eight men in the collapse of the World Trade Center, must prepare eulogies for each of them. Feeling overwhelmed and unable to express his feelings, he enlists the help from an editor, Joan (portrayed by Beth McVey), to help him. They build a friendship as she helps him put together the difficult, heartfelt speeches that he must deliver with honor, humor and poise all the while, navigating his way though his own emotional response.

 

Huntington native and Broadway star Beth McVey will reprise the role of Joan. McVey, also a former Miss West Virginia, has appeared in numerous Broadway productions including "Annie," "Phantom of the Opera," and "Beauty and the Beast." Jack Cirillo, an associate theatre professor at Marshall University, will portray Nick. Cirillo has worked extensively in New York as well as in many of this country's finest regional theatres. He also has numerous television commercials to his credit and has appeared with the Radio City Rockettes.

 

Director Cathey Crowell Sawyer is the Artistic Director for the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, which was recently designated as WV's year-round professional theatre.  Ms. Sawyer was awarded the 2006 Governor's Award for Artistic Excellence in West Virginia. She will also direct two performances in Lewisburg, WV at the Greenbrier Valley Theatre on Thursday May 3 and Friday May 4.

 

The set and lighting will be designed by Lang Reynolds, Chair of the Marshall University Department of Theatre since 1999.  During his career Mr. Reynolds has served as a lighting/set designer, technical coordinator, and producer in numerous professional projects.  Additionally, his credits include consulting on theatre renovations and new theatre construction.

 

Tickets for the all three Huntington performances are available now. Tickets are $25. Tickets may be purchased through the Marshall Artists Series Box Office, located in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The box office is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Phone orders may be taken from the box office for patrons calling (304) 696-6656. All major credit cards are accepted. Tickets purchased through Ticketmaster by calling (304) 523-5757 in Huntington or (304) 342-5757 in Charleston. Tickets can also be purchased online at www.ticketmaster.com. To order tickets for the performances in Lewisburg, please call the Greenbrier Valley Theatre box office at (304) 645-3838.

 

The Guys is sponsored by the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, the Marshall University Department of Theatre, West Virginia Lottery, My Z TV, the Herald-Dispatch, Clear Channel Communications and the Marshall Artists Series.
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Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture series continues April 23 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Lorraine Bayard de Volo will present a lecture at Marshall University on Monday, April 23 in the Shawkey Room of Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Bayard de Volo's lecture, which is part of the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lecture series, begins at 7 p.m. Her topic is "Capturing Women's Hearts and Minds: Gender and War in Latin America and Beyond."

Bayard de Volo is associate professor of Women and Gender Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder.  She is author of Mothers of Heroes and Martyrs: Gender Identity Politics in Nicaragua, 1979-1999, and currently is researching women mobilized in support of and against war in Colombia, Cuba, and Mexico.

Dr. Christopher White, MU assistant professor of Latin American History, said, "Dr. Bayard de Volo's in-depth analysis of militarism in Nicaragua, Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, and the United States leaves no room for debate about the central role gender plays in mobilizing nations for war."

The lecture is made possible by the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies sponsored by the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee, and the Organization of American Historians

The program is free to the public.

For more information, contact Dr. Lynne Mayer, associate vice president of development at Marshall, at (304) 696-2239.


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'Empty Bowls' Fundraiser Set for Friday, April 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The fourth annual Empty Bowls, Fighting Hunger One Bowl at a Time, a fundraiser that benefits the Huntington Area Food Bank, is Friday, April 13  from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church at 1015 5th Ave., Huntington.
 
Almost 1,000 bowls, about 300 more than last year, have been made for Empty Bowls 2007 by Marshall University Keramos Potters Guild members, local artists and Hurricane, Spring Valley, Fairland and Cabell-Midland High School students. All proceeds from the event will go to the food bank.
 
 During the event, guests will have the opportunity to purchase a ceramic bowl and a soup lunch for a donation of $10. Live music will be performed Marshall University music students.
 
A silent auction will feature ceramic bowls made or autographed by several well-known local public figures and some nationally recognized ones as well. Their identities will be released later this week. Ceramic and other work by area artists also will be available for bidding. 
 
Each guest may purchase a maximum of 8 bowls. Several hundred bowls will be released at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. to try to ensure that everyone will have the opportunity to purchase one. Last year, all 700 bowls were sold in 75 minutes.
 
 Jon Rickey, executive director for HAFB, has high expectations for this year's event. 
 
"Empty Bowls grows each year, and I hope this year continues to create awareness of the hunger problem in the Tri-State area," Rickey said. "With increased donations and awareness, the end of hunger in our communities becomes more of a reality than just a dream."
 
HAFB is a non-profit organization that serves as the hub in a network of food donors and over 200 organizations that serve hungry people in 17 counties in western West Virginia, eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio. HAFB provides goods to food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, senior citizen programs, veterans programs and residential programs that directly serve the needs of hungry people.
 
Empty Bowls is a cooperative effort by Marshall University public relations and ceramics students designed to raise awareness of the hunger issue in the Tri-State region.
 
For more information regarding Empty Bowls or the Huntington Area Food Bank, please call (304) 523-6029 or visit the Web site at www.hafb.org.
 
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Marshall students ready for state Business Plan Competition finals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two student groups from Marshall University are among the 10 finalists competing in the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition.

The team that wins the competition, which takes place Friday and Saturday, April 13-14, in Morgantown, will receive $10,000 and a package of business resources aimed at helping turn their business plans into reality.

Marshall is represented by the Arachnovation Spider Easel (team members Will Starcher and his sister, Margie Starcher) and Independability Wheelchair-assistance utility (team members Christopher Worth and Brandi Hill).

Both teams have spent the past few months polishing both their products and the business and marketing plans they intend to use. According to Amy Anastasia, Marshall's coordinator for the Student Business Plan Competition, the winning team will be the one judged to be the best on specific criteria.

"The winning team must offer a novel product or service, and a business plan that can expose and market that product in a profitable way," Anastasia said.

Anastasia said she likes the chances of Marshall's two teams in the competition.

"Among a strong field of finalists, I think both (Arachnovation Spider Easel and Independability Wheelchair-assistance utility) have a great chance of doing well in the competition," she said. "More importantly, both teams are dedicated to their business plans and intend to start their businesses in West Virginia no matter the outcome of the competition.  They represent a tenacious group of future entrepreneurs."

Among the students themselves, anticipation and excitement is evident. "Arachnovation would like to be part of the solution to the state's economic problems and help the market to be Open for Business by the creation of new opportunities and new ideas," Will Starcher said.

For more information about the 2007 West Virginia's Open for Business - Student Business Plan Competition, visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc/ or contact Anastasia at (304) 696-4365.


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Eight MU students to take part in annual Posters on the Hill

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight Marshall University mathematics students will be on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., April 24-25 to display their work on the Marshall Differential Analyzer, a machine designed to solve a mathematical equation known as a differential equation.

The students will be taking part in the annual Undergraduate Research Posters on the Hill event, which is sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research.

The students are among 11 who make up the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team. The eight will visit offices of senators and congressmen from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky on the afternoon of April 25 and will present their research work at a poster session that evening in the U.S. Capitol. The team's abstract was one of only 60 selected nationally.

The students who are going to Washington, all mathematics majors, are: team leader Richard Merritt (senior, Huntington); William Morrison (graduate student, South Point, Ohio); Stacy Scudder (graduate student, Pikeville, Ky.); John Fishman (senior, Clearwater, Fla.); Saeed Keshavarzian (senior, Huntington); Tom Cuchta (freshman, Moundsville, W.Va.); Lin Yuan (graduate student, Fu Xin, Lial Ning, China); and Tue Ly (graduate student, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam).

Other student team members are Daniel Velazquez (junior, Guanajuato, Mexico), Caleb Sotak (senior, Beckley, W.Va.), and Keshav Pokhrel (graduate student, Magaragadi, Bardiya, Nepal). Dr. Bonita Lawrence, associate professor of mathematics, is the team's supervisor and Dr. Clayton Brooks, also an associate professor of mathematics, is a team member.

Lawrence said Marshall's Differential Analyzer Team began to take shape in 2004 after she spotted a static display of a portion of the Manchester Differential Analyzer machine at the London Science Museum. The machine she observed in the museum was built in the 1930s.

The Marshall Differential Analyzer Team since has built a small prototype model of this historic machine, and soon will begin work on a much larger version, Lawrence said.

"The goal of the project is to build a four-integrator model that can be used by mathematics teachers in the area - or whoever wants to come to visit us - to teach students about relationships between functions that describe, for example, position of a moving particle and its speed," Lawrence said. "My dream is to bring teachers in and train them to use the machine and then let them bring in their classes and let the students run problems of their own on it."

With the educational merit of the machine in mind, the Marshall team set out to build the model from parts similar to the Meccano parts - the British version of Erector Set - that Dr. Arthur Porter used more than 70 years ago in building the machine in England. The first differential analyzer was built by Dr. Vannevar Bush at M.I.T. in the early 1930s. After visiting M.I.T. in the mid 1930s, Dr. Douglas Hartree of Manchester University returned to England and suggested to Porter, then an undergraduate physics student, that a similar machine be built out of Meccano parts.

Porter, who is 96 years old, serves as the senior mentor and inspiration for the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team from his home in Advance, N.C. Tim Robinson, an electronics engineer originally from England and now living near San Francisco, is another important technical advisor and mentor, Lawrence said.

Robinson has a full-scale model of Porter's machine in his home. It is the only working differential analyzer in the country. The Marshall team's prototype model is the only publicly accessible differential analyzer in the United States, according to Lawrence. She said more than 500 people have observed the model in action.

"The Differential Analyzer can be used to construct beautiful curves from information about the way the curve changes, or its derivative," Lawrence said. "It offers a physical interpretation of a mathematics equation and solves the equation for your viewing pleasure.  You can watch the solution take shape and acquire an understanding of how it is constructed by watching and listening to the machine." 

While other methods for finding numerical solutions of differential equations have been developed over the years, the physical interpretation of a mathematical expression that the Differential Analyzer offers has never been matched, Lawrence said.

"When the machine is completed, it will certainly have the capacity to solve many complex differential equations, but the contribution it will make to mathematics learning is its greatest asset," she said.

Lawrence said the ultimate goal of the project is to offer a multifaceted perspective of a mathematical expression that includes visual, tactile and aural aspects.

For more information on the Marshall Differential Analyzer Team and its visit to Washington, D.C., call Lawrence at (304) 696-3040.

Photo: Seniors Saeed Keshavarzian, left, and Richard Merritt, right, reset the Differential Analyzer model in preparation for a demonstration as graduate student Stacy Scudder, middle, looks on.

 

 


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Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Receives $15,000 donation from HHS Class of 1960 & McVay Realty

HUNTINGTON - The Huntington High School Class of 1960, McVay Realty and Friends recently banded together to donate $15,000 to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Inc.(KAPAC) for restoration of the theatre.  A check will be presented to KAPAC co-presidents, Senator Bob Plymale and David Tyson at the Marshall Artists Series presentation of Mannheim Steamroller on April 10th at 8 p.m. 

 

"This is a wonderful result and a great memorial to the Huntington High School Class of 1960 and Friends" said Fred Charles of Matthews, NC.  "Everybody should be very proud to know that we are generously giving back to our old hometown of Huntington, West Virginia by supporting the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center."

 

"Many of our classmates have been very concerned about the future of the Keith-Albee Theatre," said Charles. "So concerned, in fact, that our class donated $5000 from our memorial fund to the Keith-Albee renovation project."  This resulted in a fund drive for all class members and friends that ultimately raised an additional $5000.

 

The group received a pledge from classmate Joe A. McVay, Jr. of Myrtle Beach, SC. to match all donations from the group. McVay kept his pledge and matched the group with a $5000 donation of his own to bring the grand total to $15,000. 

 

When asked about his pledge to match his classmate's donation, Joe A. McVay, Jr.  of McVay Realty said "I'm very honored to be able to help with the restoration of my favorite building in Huntington. I'm proud to have grown up in Huntington, and because of the efforts of a lot of people the Keith Albee will be remain as the premiere landmark of downtown Huntington....There isn't a theater on Broadway that has the elegance or beauty of OUR Keith Albee....It is a proud day for all of us."

 

Memories of the Keith-Albee among the class of 1960 are very vivid.  Classmate Sharon Ray of Sumpter, SC. sums it up best when she answered her question, What is so special about the Keith-Albee?  "It's laughter, tears, enthusiasm, stars, audiences, cartoons.  It's black and white, color, 3-D, Cinemascope, Stereo, and THX movies.  It's also live shows, concerts, Vaudeville, and pop music.  Last but not least, it's graduations for many senior class students.  The Keith-Albee was part of my life for as long as I can remember"

 

"Senator Plymale and I are deeply grateful to the Huntington High School Class of 1960 & McVay Realty for their generous contribution to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center" said David Tyson Co-President of KAPAC.  "This will certainly help in the ongoing restoration of Huntington's finest gem." 

 

"The Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, Inc. appreciates groups such as the Huntington High School Class of 1960 and individuals such as Joe A. McVay, Jr. that realize the importance of the future plans for revitalizing Downtown Huntington and we encourage other groups to follow their lead," said Senator Bob Plymale, Co-President of KAPAC.

 

The restoration process is ongoing, but the Keith-Albee Theatre still needs your help.  To make a contribution to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center Inc., please contact 304-696-3632.


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Associate professor Dan Hollis receives award at national convention

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the third time in the past four years, Marshall University associate professor Dan Hollis received the first-place award in the Video News category during the Professional Electronic Media Awards and Exhibition at the National Broadcasting Society's national convention, which took place March 28-31 in Chicago.

Hollis received the award for his work as executive producer of a special edition of "MU Report," Marshall's student television newscast, about the "We Are Marshall" movie.

"The real satisfaction is doing quality work that you can be proud of whether it's in or outside the classroom," Hollis said. "To win awards and receive recognition by others in your field is a bonus."

Hollis teaches in Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and is adviser to the student chapter of the National Broadcasting Society (NBS). He also received an honorable mention award for a video about Babcock State Park, which he presented at the convention.

For more information contact Hollis at (304) 696-2730.


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WMUL students presented with six awards at event in Chicago

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received four grand prize awards and two honorable mention awards at a recent ceremony in Chicago.

The awards were presented March 31 during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 16th annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 44th annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony at the Chicago Mart Plaza Hotel.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of electronic media management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

"No other school won more grand prizes than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters and only one (West Texas A&M University) as many," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities." 

National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 86 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media. Alpha Epsilon Rho (AERho) is the national honorary society composed of members selected from NBS chapters.

Marshall's grand prize award winning entries in scriptwriting were:

Audio Documentary Script: The script for the documentary program "Before the Bench:  The Formative Years of Chief Justice John Marshall," was written by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington.  The script was completed Friday, April 14, 2006.

The grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio Documentary Program: "Before the Bench:  The Formative Years of Chief Justice John Marshall," written and produced by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington. The documentary was broadcast during "Aircheck" Thursday, Sept. 21, 2006. 

Audio Promo: "Addicted," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotional Announcement rotation from Wednesday, May 1, 2006 through the present time, written and produced by Jen Smith, a recent graduate from Huntington.

Audio Public Service Announcement: "Cabell-Wayne Adopt-A-Pet," an in-house public service announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, May 1, 2006 through the present time, written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a sophomore from Montgomery, W.Va.

The honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio Magazine Program: "The Tri-State High School Football Report," with host of the program Ryan Epling, a senior from Wayne, that was broadcast Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2006.

Audio Sports Program: "Lasting Perfection:  The Tenth Anniversary of the 1996 Marshall Thundering Herd Football National Championship Season," written and produced by Dave Wilson, a recent graduate from St. Marys, W.Va., broadcast Monday, Dec. 11, 2006.


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Awards banquet highlights Alumni Weekend 2007 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven Marshall University alumni and students will be honored at the 70th annual Alumni Awards Banquet on Saturday, April 21. The event, which honors distinguished alumni and friends, highlights Alumni Weekend 2007, which runs April 19-21 and features the theme, "The Stars Are Out Tonight!"

The banquet will take place at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It will be preceded by the President's Social at 6 p.m. on the plaza of the student center. The cost to attend the banquet is $45 per person or $75 per couple. For more information or to reserve a seat at the banquet, persons may call Kimberly Hudson in the alumni office at (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869.

This year's Alumni Weekend activities are sponsored by MBNA and SODEXHO.

Here is a brief look at each award winner:

The Distinguished Alumni Award will be presented to NFL player Mike Bartrum. Regarded as one of the best long snappers in the league, his skill as a tight end has made him invaluable during his 13-year career with the Kansas City Chiefs, Green Bay Packers, New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles.

At Marshall, Bartrum was a two-year starter and three-year letterman (1989, 1991 and 1992), earning All-Southern Conference honors as a senior, guiding Marshall to a Division I-AA national title. He and his wife, Jennifer, have a daughter, Taylor Katherine, and three sons, Cody, Zachary and Ty. They reside in Pomeroy, Ohio.

This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.  

The Community Achievement Award will be presented to Dan M. Butcher. Butcher, a 1981 MU graduate and a native of Bear Creek in Lincoln County, has had successful careers with The Washington Post and other news outlets, as well as his multi-state landscaping firm. His devotion to his roots in Lincoln County has led to a number of community projects including Friends of the Arts, a group that brings cultural events to the area, and numerous projects benefiting Lincoln County High School and local 4-H clubs.

He currently resides in Celebration, Fla., with his wife, Kathy, and his daughter, Sophie. This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

The Distinguished Service to Marshall Award will be presented to Dr. Sarah N. Denman. Denman, currently Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, has been with the university in various capacities since 1975. She received both her bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall, and her doctorate in education from West Virginia University.

Denman is known as one of the greatest advocates for the mission of the university and her tireless devotion to promoting Marshall throughout the country. She is married to another well-known figure at Marshall, Dr. William Denman, retired professor of communications studies and past director of the Yeager Scholars Program. Their daughter, Kate, works for West Virginia Congressman Nick J. Rahall.

The Distinguished Service to Marshall Award is given for loyal and unselfish service to Marshall, and is not limited to Marshall alumni.

The Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award will be presented to Dr. Edwina Pendarvis. Pendarvis is a professor of special education, as well as an advocate for gifted education. She served as interim executive director of the John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence from 2005 to 2006, and received the Drinko Research Fellowship in 2001.

In addition to publishing numerous scholarly articles, she also is an accomplished poet. Her work has appeared in Appalachian Heritage, Appalachian Journal, Pine Mountain Sand & Gravel, Now & Then and Wind Magazine, among others. Pendarvis received Marshall's Distinguished Faculty Service Award in 2006.

Pendarvis has two children, a son, Damon, and a daughter, Penny. Damon lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Penny in Albuquerque, N.M.

The Hunter Award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees are evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

The recipients of the Nate Ruffin Scholarship are Jessica Nichole Slash and Kisha Latonya Joyner.

Slash is a sophomore in the College of Science with a GPA of 3.8. She is the great-niece of the first black superintendent in Cabell County, Joe Slash.

Joyner is a sophomore accounting major. Originally from Baltimore, Md., her family moved to Fort Ashby, W.Va., where she was the first African American to graduate from Frankfort High.

Ruffin was a member of the 1970 Marshall football team, but an injury kept him from making the trip to Greenville, N.C., for Marshall's game with East Carolina on Nov. 14, 1970. The plane carrying the team back from North Carolina crashed near Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 people aboard. Ruffin became an advocate for Black Alumni Inc. as well as the university until his death in 2001.

Two Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarships will be awarded to deserving students. They are Robyn Helton of Huntington and Christopher McDerment of Hurricane.

Helton is captain of the Marshall cheerleading squad. As a theater major, Helton has been involved in a number of productions, including roles in several independent films and commercials, and is a member of the stage crew for the Theater Department. In addition to working part-time, Helton has found time for a number of volunteer activities such as the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, the Lion's Club and the Ronald McDonald House.

McDerment is a member of the Marching Thunder. A music education major, McDerment also has performed with the Wind Symphony, the Symphonic Band and the Perpetual Motion Saxophone Quartet. He also volunteers to help raise money for breast cancer research.

This scholarship was established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors, in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds from the scholarship come from the proceeds from Herd Village.

The Cam Henderson Scholarship Award will go to Huntington native Andrew Blain. Blain, a graduate of Spring Valley High School, is a member of the Marshall baseball team, where he is known as the Herd's most dependable lefthander out of the bullpen. He earned Conference USA Commissioner's Honor Roll academic honors. Blain works as an academic tutor with the Student Athlete program and is a member of Campus Crusade for Christ and Golden Key Honor Society.

The Cam Henderson Scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

The Boone County (W.Va.) Friends of Marshall Club was chosen as the Alumni Association Club of the Year. Under the leadership of President Chris Howard, the club hosted numerous receptions, game-watching parties and other social functions throughout the year for the purpose of attracting new members and potential students to attend Marshall. A total of 15 new members were added to the roster last year.

The Young Alumni Award will be presented to Matthew G. White of Huntington. White has been with ZBA Financial Group for three years, and helped create Carsignment, an innovative Internet company, in 2006. He is involved with a number of business groups, including the Young Professionals Committee of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce. He spearheads the Lunch Program, a link with Marshall's College of Business where they educate students on local business culture.

While at Marshall on a baseball scholarship, he broke a team record for games played in a career, 184. White and his wife, Katrina, are expecting a baby girl in June.

The criteria for the Young Alumni Award are that the person must be 35 years old or younger; an active member of the Alumni Association; show outstanding achievement in his or her field of endeavor; have a personal commitment to the community, and demonstrate service to the Marshall University and its students.

The MUAA Board Member of the Year will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the awards banquet.

The Board Member of the Year must be successful in promoting the association's vision statement among students, alumni and friends, promote the association's core values, and work to move the association to the next level by bringing in new ideas.

Here is a complete list of Alumni Weekend events:

Thursday, April 19

Marshall's Annual Military Ball will take in the John Marshall Room in the Memorial Student Center. The Military Ball timeline is as follows - 5:30 p.m., arrival and cocktails; 6 p.m., begin ceremony and dinner. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey Stephens at (304) 696-6450.

Friday, April 20

The first official event of Alumni Weekend is the Champagne Reception, beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Cooking and Culinary Institute, 917 3rd Ave. Cost is $10 per person. This is an opportunity to see the new Culinary Arts program at its best while visiting with old and new friends. Phone (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869 to make reservations.

Saturday, April 21

An Estate Planning Seminar will take place from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the Spotts Dining Room, Memorial Student Center. Details will follow.

The Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1957). Those class members will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1957. Dr. Sam Clagg, former professor of geography and Marshall icon, will speak at the luncheon.  The event will be held from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. in the John Marshall Dining Room, Memorial Student Center. Cost is $20 per person. Lunch is complimentary for members of 50th reunion class. Phone (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869 to make reservations. Trolley tours of campus will be conducted after the luncheon.

The Spring Green and White Football Game will be played at 3 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. For tickets call (304) 696-HERD or (800) THE-HERD. Tickets are $5.

The Scholarship Honor Reception, which annually recognizes and honors Marshall's scholarship donors and recipients, is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center. For more information, call (304) 696-6214. 


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Sons of MU music professor focus of bone marrow drive Wednesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A bone marrow drive, the focus of which is to register bone marrow donors with the National Bone Marrow Donor Project, will be conducted from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 4 near the fountain on the Memorial Student Center plaza on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The goal of the event is to increase the likelihood of finding a bone marrow match for Brayden and Trevin Saunders, ages 9 and 7, respectively, and the sons of Martin and Gina Saunders. The boys were diagnosed with Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) deficiency, a very rare genetic disease. Martin Saunders is an assistant professor of music at Marshall.

The drive is sponsored by the Marshall University Music Student Organizations Council and the Student Government Association.  A to Z Rentals is loaning a tent and tables for the event, which is called the "For the Boys Bone Marrow Drive." 

Brayden and Trevin are the focus of the campaign to register bone marrow donors with the National Bone Marrow Donor Project.  PNP is an autosomal recessive disorder, so both the father and the mother must pass a defective gene on to their child.

PNP deficiency was initially described in 1975.  To date, only about 45-50 cases are known worldwide.  Their ages at onset vary from birth to 6 years and their outcome is usually fatal, terminating in viral infection or lymphoma. Patients with PNP deficiency may have recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and their disease may be diagnosed late in childhood.

Neurologic symptoms, including mental retardation and muscle spasticity, are major comorbid conditions affecting 67 percent of patients with PNP deficiency. Immune reconstitution with bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice to correct the T- and B-cell immune deficiency.

To find a donor, usually a hematologist will look for a "related," meaning within the family, donor first.  If there is no match within the family, the search continues for an "unrelated" donor.  The NMDP (National Marrow Donor Program) Registry lists more than 6 million potential volunteer donors and more than 50,000 cord blood units and provides access to an additional 4 million volunteer donors through agreements with international cooperative registries.

The HLA tissue type is used to match the patient to potential donors or cord blood units.  Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are proteins found on most cells in the body. The National Marrow Donor Program sets minimum matching levels that must be met before a donor or cord blood unit from the NMDP Registry can be used for a transplant.

These minimum requirements are based on research studies of transplant outcomes.  A well-matched donor is important to the success of the transplant.  It can take time to find a suitable donor or cord blood unit. Though it may take as little as a few weeks to select a cord blood unit, it can take a few months and often longer to find a suitable adult donor and set a date for transplant.

For Brayden, there is no perfect match, so the search for a better match is ongoing. For Trevin, there are several perfect matches.  No one in the family has been a Bone Marrow Donor, although some family members have been tested. The results do not reach the NMDP Registry for at least one month from the date they are tested.  At this point, the family does not know if any family members are a match.

For more information about the "For the Boys Bone Marrow Drive," or fundraising and volunteer opportunities, contact Vicki Stroeher at (304) 696-6437, or via e-mail at stroeherv@marshall.edu.


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