July 2007 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 31, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Early Education Center offers development institute for West Virginia Pre-K educators

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Early Education Center Outreach Program will offer its Inquiry Support System summer professional development institute for West Virginia Pre-K educators Aug. 6-10 at Pullman Plaza in Huntington.

The summer institute will include Pre-K educators from Boone, Calhoun, Clay, Logan, McDowell, Mingo, Roane and Wyoming counties, and will focus largely on the integration of 21st Century skills into West Virginia public Pre-K classrooms. 

The West Virginia Pre-K initiative, mandated in 2002, requires that each county have a functioning Pre-K program by 2012.  In an effort to assist counties with the development of their programs, the MUEEC has designed an outreach program which will offer educators a 10-month professional development program.

The five-day summer institute will be followed by learning community meetings, quarterly workshops, electronic support and various other forms of correspondence and assistance to help educators learn how to integrate critical thinking and other 21st Century skills into their curricular framework.

"The summer institute is a wonderful opportunity for West Virginia Pre-K educators to begin their year-long journey with the MUEEC Outreach Program and to integrate 21st Century learning skills into their preschool classrooms," MUEEC Director W. Clayton Burch said. "The educators attending the institute will receive training in digital photography, technology literacy and a holistic approach to cultivating critical thinking and problem-solving skills for young children."

During the summer institute, participants will attend workshops at Pullman Plaza, and also will spend time at the MUEEC, which is a model classroom for the state of West Virginia.  Participants also will learn about integration of technology into the early childhood classroom by attending workshops at Marshall's Drinko Library computer lab, where they will learn to utilize the digital camera they will receive for participation.

"At the institute, participants will be grouped into learning communities, and will also begin work on their classroom strategic plans, which will be utilized by the participants throughout the school year to gauge the successes and/or challenges they experience," said Outreach Coordinator Monica DellaMea.  "A primary focus of the Inquiry Support System is to assist Pre-K educators in the state to think critically about their teaching methods.  Ultimately, the impact will be seen in the young children who are served by Pre-K programs throughout the state."

A strategic plan has been established which will make the professional development system available to all 55 West Virginia counties by 2012.  The strategic plan can be found on the MUEEC's Web site at www.marshall.edu/coehs/mueec

The MUEEC is a service program of the Marshall University College of Education and Human Services.  The outreach program is funded by the support of a Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation grant, as well as contributions from the participating school districts/agencies.   For more information, call (304) 696-6301 or e-mail mueec@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 31, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans can win tickets to WVU-Marshall game at Paint the Capital City Green pep rally

CHARLESTON - Two lucky Marshall University fans have an opportunity to win tickets to watch their Thundering Herd face off with the West Virginia University Mountaineers at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington. All they have to do is show a little green and a lot of spirit.

All tickets to the 10th anniversary of Paint the Capital City Green, which takes place Wednesday, Aug. 15 in Charleston and is presented by Friends of Coal, will be entered into a drawing. The winner will get two tickets to the Friends of Coal Bowl Sept. 8.

Tickets are on sale now for $35 per person.

Paint The Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel. This annual event is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Marshall fans will get to meet President Stephen J. Kopp, head football coach Mark Snyder and other members of the university's coaching staff.  The event begins with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7:15 p.m.

"I always look forward to Paint the Capital City Green," Snyder said. "I hope that all Herd fans in Charleston will come out and support this great event."

For ticket information, call (304) 696-7138.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 27, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lockridge named Senior VP for Finance and Administration; Fox promoted to Senior VP for Information Technology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Anita Lockridge, who has held numerous senior-level financial positions in the healthcare field over the past 16 years, has been named Senior Vice President for Finance and Administration at Marshall University, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Lockridge replaces Herb Karlet, who is now serving as Dean of Business Services with the Marshall Community and Technical College.

Kopp also announced that Dr. Jan Fox has been promoted from Vice President for Information Technology/Chief Information Officer to Senior Vice President for Information Technology/Chief Information Officer.

"Both of these individuals are highly accomplished and bring proven talent, experience and expertise in their respective fields to their new roles," Kopp said. "Beyond their considerable talents, they also bring an abiding dedication to the continued success of Marshall University. I look forward to the leadership and contributions both will make as members of the senior staff."

Lockridge, a Certified Public Accountant (CPA), began her career as an auditor for the McDonald's Corporation in 1980. She has more recently served in the healthcare field as the Chief Financial Officer of the largest public hospital in the state of Tennessee located in Memphis, as Vice President of Finance at a hospital in Fort Worth, Texas, and as Senior Vice President, CFO at a hospital in Greenwood, S.C.

"I am thrilled to be here and to have the opportunity to work in higher education, to carry out the mission of the university and to help students succeed," Lockridge said. "Both healthcare and higher education serve a specific group of people for the public good. I am confident that my skill set will transition into higher education, and that I will make a positive impact."

Lockridge, who was born and raised in Chicago, received a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from Chicago State University, and a Master of Science degree in accounting from the University of Memphis. Her husband, Dr. T. Maurice Lockridge, is an assistant professor in Marshall's Lewis College of Business.

Fox has been at Marshall since 1984 and CIO since 1996. She is a tenured faculty member in the School of Medicine. Fox received her Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Biology from Marshall and her Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration from West Virginia University.

Her administrative responsibilities include the integration of Information Technology into all aspects of education, administration and research throughout the Marshall community.  Her principal management responsibilities include Computing Services, University Libraries and Distributed Education.  

Fox serves as chair of several technology committees, is the previous chair of the statewide Information Technology Council of State CIO's and is the state representative to the Southern Growth Policy Technology Committee. In addition, she serves on the Governor's West Virginia Broadband Committee, is Secretary of the West Virginia TeleAlliance, and is a board member of the West Virginia Network for Telecomputing and MissionWV. 

"We will continue to utilize the power of Information Technology to implement our bold strategies at Marshall," Fox said. "These strategies will continue to position Marshall University as a national leader in American higher education for the 21st Century. I, and all of my team, appreciate Dr. Kopp's support of our efforts."

Fox is married to William Cremeans, Jr., a biologist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. They have two children.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cotroneo new president of Marshall Community and Technical College

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Keith J. Cotroneo, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs at Quincy College in Quincy, Mass., for the past two years, is the new president of the Marshall Community and Technical College (MCTC).

John Hess, chair of the Marshall University Board of Governors' Community and Technical College Committee, said Cotroneo was offered and accepted the job today. He starts at MCTC Sept. 1.

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted Friday, July 20 to approve the recommendation of the MCTC Board of Advisors that Cotroneo be offered the presidency. Today, the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education approved the recommendation.

"We're excited to have Dr. Cotroneo join us," Hess said. "He brings a lot of experience in education administration to our Community and Technical College, and will be a great asset as we move forward and grow this institution."

Cotroneo replaces Dr. Robert B. Hayes, who has served as the college's interim president since November 2006.

"I'm really excited," Cotroneo said of his new job. "It's an important time for the community college and the university. I'm looking forward to being at the community college and providing greater access to the citizens of West Virginia and to assisting the local community and the state in economic development."

Cotroneo was one of three finalists for the position. The other two were Dr. Kathy J. D'Antoni, Vice Chancellor for the West Virginia Community and Technical College System, and Dr. Susan D. Huard, Dean of Learning and Student Development at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson, Conn.

"I'm really impressed with the community," Cotroneo said of Huntington. "Things are headed in a positive direction."

Before going to Quincy in 2005, Cotroneo served as:

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs at Broome Community College in Binghamton, N.Y., from 1998 to 2005;
  • Dean of Instruction and Chief Academic Officer at Treasure Valley Community College in Ontario, Ore., from 1995 to 1998;
  • Associate Dean and Assistant to the President at Hagerstown Community College in Hagerstown, M.D., from 1992 to 1995;
  • Associate Dean at Hagerstown Community College from 1988 to 1995.

Cotroneo received a Bachelor of Science degree from Auburn University in 1976, a Master of Education from the University of Georgia in 1979, a Specialist in Education from the University of Georgia in 1985, and a Doctor of Education from the University of Georgia in 1987.

The Marshall Community and Technical College offers 11 certificate and 23 associate degrees. Enrollment in fall 2006 was 2,580.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 24, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall computer science students conduct robotics research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University computer science students, as well as faculty from the Colleges of Science and Information Technology and Engineering, are participating in a multi-disciplinary project to build a sensor suite for the U.S. Navy to be used on autonomous marine vehicles.

Through the efforts of U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, Spatial Integrated Systems (SIS) of Rockville, Md., and its partners were awarded a four-year, $24.7 million contract in to build a sensor suite for the United States Navy to be used on autonomous marine vehicles.

The project is referred to as Autonomous Maritime Navigation (AMN) and all of the software development will take place in West Virginia.  Marshall University is one of the research partners. The three Marshall professors involved in the project are Joe Fuller, associate professor of computer science, Dr. Venkat Gudivada, professor of computer science, and Dr. Peter Saveliev, associate professor of mathematics.  The three Marshall computer science students working on the project are Camden Clutter of Clarksburg, W.Va., Shawn Cotton of Huntington and Brad Fitzwater of Eleanor, W.Va.

According to Gudivada, the goal of the AMN project is to develop a set of integrated hardware and software that will enable boats and ships to autonomously navigate in waterways. This requires intelligent data fusion from an array of sensors including sonar, radar, GPS and digital cameras (stereo vision), Gudivada said.

Though humans have the innate ability for exceptional vision perception, endowing computers with human vision is still an elusive problem even in a laboratory environment, according to Gudivada. He said choppy waters of the oceans and uncontrolled lighting conditions of the outdoors only make the computer vision even more elusive.

Fuller, who also serves as a consultant for SIS states, said for years he has seen students educated in computer science in West Virginia forced to leave the state to find employment in high-tech positions.

"I am delighted that Senator Byrd was able to secure funding for this project that will allow high tech to grow in West Virginia," Fuller said. "The work the computer science students do will be extremely valuable to the project and the experience they gain may lead to eventual employment in a rewarding job located in West Virginia."

Gudivada and Saveliev are focusing on approaches and algorithms for generating 3D points using stereo vision. This capability is needed to accurately estimate the distance of obstacles such as ocean vehicles and coast line so that a marine vehicle can steer itself clear from the obstacles.

Clutter, Cotton and Fitzwater are spending the summer working on a variety of efforts in support of the project.  These efforts include 3D viewing, 3D point generation using cameras, sonar, GPS, system integration and sensor fusion. The three students are conducting their research and developing software under the direction of Gudivada and Saveliev.

"There is no dispute that computers and software have fundamentally touched all our lives both at work and home to varying degrees," Gudivada said. "The next wave of advances in computers and software will unfold many new applications, one of them being robots. Though robots have been widely used in manufacturing industry for a while, their full potential will be realized when they are capable of performing hazardous tasks such as bomb diffusion, search-and-rescue operations and hostage recovery.

"It is timely and very exciting for Marshall to be involved with robotics research," Gudivada continued. "We are grateful to Senator Byrd for securing funding for this project. The AMN project not only helps to establish a strong robotics research program at Marshall, but, more importantly, helps to mentor and train our bright students in this exciting field that has numerous commercial applications. Furthermore, the research that will result from the AMN project will help us to showcase our college to attract inspired high school students to study computer science at Marshall."

Fitzwater said he believes robotics research area is interesting for a variety of reasons. 

"The problems that we have encountered so far are unlike anything that I have been exposed to," he said. "Hence, there is a new learning experience at each progression.  The concept of dealing with problems that are both extremely difficult and have not been solved yet excites me. As I progress, I find that I am constantly challenged, which makes me inspired and intrigued."

Shawn Cotton said the project has allowed him to experience what it would be like to have a software development job out in the real world.

"This project is challenging and intriguing," Cotton said. "Solutions to the problems that I am working on have the potential for high impact. The project has allowed me to see how many possibilities are there to expand our horizons with research."

Clutter said, "Doing robotics research has been a great experience so far and can only get better. The research that I and the others are doing is consistently challenging, pushing us to think differently. I hope that, through this research, we pave the way to a greater emphasis on robotics engineering and automated systems here at Marshall."

Dr. Tony Szwilski, interim dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the project is "another indication of the quality of our students and academic programs in the College of Information Technology and Engineering."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 20, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Recent School of Journalism grads receive prestigious awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two recent graduates of Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications received prestigious awards earlier this summer.

Paul Gessler, a broadcast journalism major, placed second in the National Television Broadcast News division of the Hearst Championships, held in June by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation Journalism Awards Program. Gessler won $4,000 for his second-place finish.

Jen Smith, a former student with WMUL-FM, Marshall's public radio station, received a Gold Award in The Hermes Creative Awards 2007 competition. The winners were named in a letter dated Saturday, June 30 from Arlington, Texas.

"This is the second year in a row we have placed someone in the top five in that category," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's School of Journalism, said of Gessler's award. "The Hearst awards are considered the collegiate Pulitzers. Paul began the year competing against at least 100 other top programs from around the country."

The Hearst Championships were the culmination of the 2006-07 College Journalism Awards Program, with 107 undergraduate colleges and universities competing under the auspices of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Smith's Gold Award winning entry, "Addicted," was an in-house promotional announcement she wrote and produced. It has been used in WMUL's rotation from May 1, 2006 through the present time.

"This is a noteworthy accomplishment for WMUL-FM to be recognized for writing and producing an effective media self-promotional announcement," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM. "I am proud for the honor this award bestows on WMUL-FM, the School of Journalism and Marshall University."

The Hermes Creative Awards were created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media.  All entries are judged on a point system in areas including creativity, design, innovation, presentation and technical merit.  There were more than 3,000 entries in The Hermes Creative Awards 2007 Competition.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 19, 2007
Contact: Sonja G. Cantrell, Director of Recruitment, Marshall Community and Technical College, 304-696-2243

MCTC to Host Credit Fair

The Marshall Community and Technical College (MCTC) will host an Adult Credit Fair on Monday, July 23 in Room 101 of Cabell Hall.

Staff members from several departments will be available to evaluate for college credit any previous work experience, certifications, college courses, military training and continuing education courses.  On hand to answer questions and provide information will be  representatives from Admissions, Financial Aid, associate deans, program coordinators and faculty.

Although the event is primarily aimed at nontraditional students, incoming freshmen are also being encouraged to attend. 

Marshall employees are invited to drop by from 4-5 p.m. and the public is welcome from 5-7 p.m.  Refreshments will be provided and there will be door prizes.

For additional information, call ext. 66282 or contact CTC@marshall.edu.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 17, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall sponsors free electronic prescribing to help state doctors improve patient safety

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Through a partnership in a national initiative known as National ePrescribing Patient Safety InitiativeSM (NEPSISM), Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health is offering West Virginia doctors free use of software that will let them write prescriptions electronically.

"Electronic prescribing is one of the best steps to improve patient safety, and now it will be one of the easiest as well," said Dr. Gretchen E. Oley, associate dean for clinical affairs for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "E-prescribing is an effective way to avoid the use of duplicate drugs or adverse drug interactions, and it provides physicians with instant access to warnings about allergies and drug contraindications. It's more efficient for patients as well, because the order goes directly to the pharmacy, and the pharmacy can contact the doctor when refills are needed."

The program also can help curb the abuse of prescription medications, noted Jennifer T. Plymale, director of the Center for Rural Health.

Through the program, Marshall is providing West Virginia doctors free use of the eRX NOWTM software developed by Allscripts (Nasdaq: MDRX), the leading provider of clinical software, information and connectivity solutions that physicians use to improve healthcare.  This software already is used by more than 30,000 physicians to write millions of electronic prescriptions each year.

"Medication errors represent a significant challenge for our nation and we can and must do better by taking action - right now," said Glen Tullman, Co-Chair of NEPSI and Chief Executive Officer of Allscripts. "We welcome Marshall as our newest regional supporter and commend them for their strong commitment to this simple yet remarkable idea - that providing free electronic prescribing for every physician will ultimately reduce errors and improve care."

In addition to providing financial support for the program in West Virginia, Marshall and the Center for Rural Health will help the state's physicians get up and running with the necessary software as needed. Physicians can find out more by going to www.wverx.com and by visiting www.nationalerx.com.

National ePrescribing Patient Safety Initiative Fact Sheet

        According to the Institute of Medicine, each year more than 1.5 million Americans are injured and more than 7,000 die from preventable medication errors. In addition, the problems related to paper prescriptions cost billions of dollars each year. NEPSI brings together a who's who of the leading technology and healthcare stakeholders with one joint purpose: to provide every physician in America with safe, secure, free software they can learn to use in less than 30 minutes.

        NEPSI is led by Allscripts, the leading provider of clinical software, information and connectivity solutions that physicians use to improve healthcare, and by Dell Computers, the world's leading computer company. Other technology companies sponsoring NEPSI include Cisco Systems, Fujitsu Computers of America, Microsoft and Sprint Nextel. Google is the search sponsor for NEPSI while SureScripts is the connectivity sponsor and Wolters Kluwer Health provides the content. Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health is the regional sponsor making the program available free to West Virginia physicians.

        The eRx NOW web-based software is designed to appeal to physicians in solo practice or small groups who may not be ready to move to a comprehensive Electronic Health Record. It is available to every healthcare provider with legal authority to prescribe medications, and requires no download, no new hardware and minimal training.

        eRx NOW  includes the ability to quickly generate secure electronic prescriptions that can be sent computer-to-computer or via electronic fax to 55,000 retail pharmacies - more than 95 percent of all U.S. pharmacies - via SureScripts.

        All prescriptions are instantly checked for potentially harmful interactions with a patient's other medications using a real-time complete medication database provided by Wolters Kluwer Health, as well as real-time notification of insurance formulary status from leading payers, plans and pharmacy benefit managers.

        eRx NOW  also includes the ability for physicians to search and find targeted health-related information for themselves or patients using a custom search engine from Google. The NEPSI Custom Search Engine was created for medical professionals and enables those using the eRx Now product to get search results tailored for the medical community.

        eRx NOW offers physicians and patients the highest levels of security available, with multiple redundant layers of firewall, deep-packet inspection, SSL encryption, database encryption, intrusion detection and virus, spyware and malware protection for the program's remote servers. To ensure patient privacy, all patient information is stored on remote servers in a secure location, so information cannot be compromised even if a physician's computer or phone is stolen.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to host 110 Booth Scholars from Wayne County

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host 110 Wayne County students in the ninth through 12th grades for two weeks beginning Sunday, July 15 as they participate in the annual Booth Scholars Summer Program on the Huntington campus.

 

The Booth Scholars Program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia in their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College with students from Wayne County, Kentucky and Virginia participating. The Wayne County portion of the program moved to Marshall in 2004.

 

"The lack of exposure outside the traditional classroom is limited in Wayne County," said Brenda Napier, the program's director. "We are trying to fill that gap."

 

The first week is for the 30 freshmen in the program only. The 80 returning sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the freshmen on campus the second week. All Booth Scholars qualified by having at least a 3.0 GPA and scoring above average on the WESTEST.

 

During their first week at Marshall, the freshmen will take classes in public speaking, photography, theatre performance and electronic portfolio. They also will receive laptops and graphing calculators.  All of the students will take part in a variety of academic, social and cultural activities, according to Napier.

 

Napier said she and her staff have received a lot of good feedback from previous participants.

 

"My mentors are now former scholars, and my former mentors are now instructors (in the program)," Napier said. "That says a lot about the integrity of the program, that we are able to sustain such a good reputation."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 13, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to host 110 Wayne County students participating in Booth Scholars Summer Program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host 110 Wayne County students in the ninth through 12th grades for two weeks beginning Sunday, July 15 as they participate in the annual Booth Scholars Summer Program on the Huntington campus.

The Booth Scholars Program is designed to assist academically promising youth in a selected region of Appalachia in their preparation for entrance into and success in higher education. The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College with students from Wayne County, Kentucky and Virginia participating. The Wayne County portion of the program moved to Marshall in 2004.

"The lack of exposure outside the traditional classroom is limited in Wayne County," said Brenda Napier, the program's director. "We are trying to fill that gap."

The first week is for the 30 freshmen in the program only. The 80 returning sophomores, juniors and seniors will join the freshmen on campus the second week. All Booth Scholars qualified by having at least a 3.0 GPA and scoring above average on the WESTEST.

During their first week at Marshall, the freshmen will take classes in public speaking, photography, theatre performance and electronic portfolio. They also will receive laptops and graphing calculators.  All of the students will take part in a variety of academic, social and cultural activities, according to Napier.

Napier said she and her staff have received a lot of good feedback from previous participants.

"My mentors are now former scholars, and my former mentors are now instructors (in the program)," Napier said. "That says a lot about the integrity of the program, that we are able to sustain such a good reputation."

For more information, contact Napier at (304) 696-5205 or visit www.marshall.edu/bsp.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 11, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'We Are Marshall' premiere proceeds presented to Keith-Albee, MU Foundations; Marshall academics, athletics also benefit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Proceeds from the Dec. 12, 2006 premiere of "We Are Marshall" in Huntington were distributed today in presentations at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center, Inc., in downtown Huntington.

West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III, Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, former Marshall University Foundation Inc. interim Chief Executive Officer John Kinzer and Curtis McCall, president and CEO of Marquee Cinemas, presented checks totaling $431,500.

The $400,000 in proceeds from the premiere event at the Keith-Albee were split evenly between the Keith-Albee and Marshall scholarships. The Keith-Albee received $200,000, and Marshall received $100,000 for academic scholarships and $100,000 for athletic scholarships.

The Marshall University Foundation Inc. received $31,500 from McCall for the new Marquee Cinemas Scholarship. Those funds came from the premiere shown Dec. 12 on all 16 screens at Pullman Square's Marquee Cinemas.

"On December 12th, 2006, we witnessed firsthand the power of collaboration as the City of Huntington was transformed into Hollywood," Kopp said. "Beyond wonderful memories, the many individuals and organizations that worked together to make the Huntington premiere a success can take great pride in our announcement of funding for both the Keith-Albee and scholarships at Marshall University. Not only are we preserving our past with this historic venue, but we are also investing in the future education of our students who have demonstrated their ability in academics and athletics."

David Tyson, co-president of the Keith-Albee Foundation, said the performing arts center's future brightened instantly with the donation of $200,000 from the premiere.

"This is a huge day for the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center," Tyson said. "This is the first step towards our renovation project to make this a tri-state arts center."

Kinzer was interim CEO of the Foundation at the time of the premiere. Dr. Ron Area was recently hired as the permanent CEO of the Foundation and senior vice president for development at Marshall, and assumed his duties two days ago.

"We were very pleased that Marquee Cinemas agreed to partner with us on the premiere and it was very generous of them to use their net proceeds to endow a scholarship," Kinzer said.

The Marquee Scholarship goes to full-time, undergraduate theatre majors in Marshall's College of Fine Arts who have an overall minimum GPA of at least 2.50.

Dr. Sarah Denman, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost at Marshall, said academic scholarships funded by the $100,000 from the Keith-Albee premiere "will continue to build on the legacy of those who have already given to provide even more opportunities for students in the future."

"This is a great day for Marshall University and an even greater day for the students," Denman said. "It is the perfect ending to the entire experience of 'We Are Marshall.' The most important thing an institution can do is provide opportunities for students to pursue degrees in higher education. One way to do that is through the generosity of donors for scholarships."

RJ Gimbl, associate athletics director for the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, said the organization is grateful for the $100,000 donation to athletic scholarships.

"We'd like to thank the friends and family of Marshall University that supported the 'We Are Marshall' premiere," Gimbl said. "The celebration of this special event will be felt for years to come, with these proceeds benefiting Marshall student-athletes of the present and the future."


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 11, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington Scottish Rite surpasses $200,000 in contributions to Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Huntington Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Foundation today presented a check for $43,000 to the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center in the Department of Communication Disorders, bringing to $201,000 the amount it has contributed to the center.

Gov. Joe Manchin joined Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Board of Governors Vice Chair Menis Ketchum at the presentation, which took place at the speech and hearing center in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Scottish Rite's partnership with Marshall began in March 2002.

Kathryn Chezik, chair of the Department of Communication Disorders, said the financial support from the Huntington Scottish Rite helps fund a clinical faculty position providing speech-language services in the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center.

"This position allows us to serve more children in the tri-state area and to assist in the clinical education of the students in the Department of Communication Disorders," Chezik said. "We're thankful for their hard work and generosity and their continued commitment to our program."

Amy Knell is the clinician whose position has been funded by Huntington Scottish Rite for the past three years.

"I'm very grateful and very thankful," said Knell, who earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees at Marshall. "Everything they do is from the heart and it really shows."

Knell said she sees pediatric patients with communication and swallowing disorders at the center.

"If not for the Scottish Rite, Marshall would not have the clinical program it has and the speech and hearing center would not be able to see as many children as it sees," Knell said.

Pat Oshel, president of the Huntington Scottish Rite, said raising funds and contributing to the speech and hearing center has been a "very rewarding experience" for the organization.

"We are quite proud of our accomplishments with the clinic and the fund-raising activities and we look forward to many more years of working with Marshall," Oshel said. "This is an excellent example of what can be accomplished when the university and the community work together. It's a fantastic partnership."

The money is raised locally through private donations and a major fundraising project each year. This year's project is a pig roast, scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 28 at the 4-H Camp on Alternate Route 10.

One of the features of the pig roast is a silent auction, with items up for bid including a week's vacation in Hilton Head, S.C., a basketball signed by Phoenix Suns Coach and former Marshall star Mike D'Antoni and his brother, Dan, also a coach with the Suns, and some NFL memorabilia.

For more information or to purchase tickets to the pig roast, call Larry Bolling at the Scottish Rite office at (304) 522-1430. Tickets are $25 each and are available in advance or at the gate. Children younger than 12 are admitted free.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 5, 2007
Contact: Pat Dickson, South Charleston campus, (304) 746-1971

Glenwood Project features information about Glenwood estate and its significance in the development of the Kanawha Valley

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Glenwood estate, a graceful Georgian-style mansion that sits on the corner of Orchard and Park streets on Charleston's west side, houses historically important gems of information about Charleston's earliest settlers who transformed the region from a bucolic rural landscape into a bustling urban center.

The estate will be the subject of a day-long seminar, which is open to the public, Saturday, July 28.

Now, through the Glenwood Project, funded by a grant by the West Virginia Humanities Council, the graduate humanities program at the Marshall University Graduate College seeks to acquaint the public with the rich history of the Glenwood estate.  Through the grant, the Glenwood Project plans to make information more readily accessible through public events like the seminar and the development of a Web site. The free seminar will take place at the Graduate College's South Charleston campus.

The mansion was built in 1852 by James Laidley, the founder of a local newspaper, the Western Register. Through the years it was home to members of some of Charleston's most prominent families, including the Laidley, Summers and Quarrier families.

At the time the house was constructed it was part of a vast estate that encompassed 366 acres that ran from Delaware Avenue to the bottomland along the Kanawha River.

Development of Charleston's west side began in 1870 after John Brisben Walker and William H. Playford purchased a 110-acre parcel from James and Sally Carr.  Subsequently, the bottomland was divided into lots and Charleston's transition from a rural to an urban region was underway.  College officials say Glenwood is of particular significance because it contains documents and archaeological information that sheds light on the transition.

The Glenwood estate was passed down through families until 1978 when the last owner, Lucy Quarrier, deeded it to the foundation of the institution then known as the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies, now part of Marshall University.

The seminar runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in room 319 of MUGC's administration building with a light lunch provided.  The event will be opened by Anne "Jake" Ferris, a Quarrier descendant, and will be followed by remarks about the Glenwood Project by Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, chair of the Marshall's graduate humanities program.  Kemp Winfree, vice president for regional operations at Marshall, will discuss the MUGC foundation and the Glenwood estate.

Other presentation topics include the significance of the Glenwood estate to local history by Henry Battle, KVH&PS president; the Glenwood database by Angelica Settle of the humanities program; Glenwood in the classroom by Leska Foster of Holz Elementary; and archeological materials from the Glenwood quarters by Will Updike, Cultural Resource Analysts Principal Investigator.

The morning keynote address, "Glenwood 1852. Why?  The Context for an Historic House," will be given by Eugene Harper of the humanities program.  Billy Joe Peyton of West Virginia State University will deliver the afternoon keynote address, "The Peculiar Institution at Glenwood:  Putting a Face on Slavery in the Kanawha Valley."

For those interested, Winfree will conduct a tour of the Glenwood estate following the symposium.

Seating is limited so anyone interested in attending should contact Sarah Funk at funk2@marshall.edu or leave a message at (304) 746-8975 no later than July 16.  Callers should leave a name and mailing address. For additional information, go to the Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/gsepd/humn/.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 5, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

HSTA Summer Institute attracts 80 students from West Virginia; 'Fun With Science' takes place July 15-20 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 80 rising ninth-grade students from throughout West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 15-20 to participate in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for the participating students. The students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools. The program is offered in 26 West Virginia counties.

The institute at Marshall, titled "Fun With Science," enables the students to learn more about science and the opportunities that are available to students majoring in science. It is one of three HSTA summer institutes, according to David Cartwright, program director of the event at Marshall. Others, he said, are at West Virginia University and West Virginia State University.

"Students participating in 'Fun With Science' will learn about digestion through working in wet labs and the effects of diabetes on the body and its prevention," Cartwright said. "They also will meet with local area doctors and learn about diversity in West Virginia."

Cartwright said College Night, scheduled for Wednesday, July 18, will be an opportunity for the students to see "the beauty of Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College."

"It is important that the HSTA students find Marshall a warm and friendly place so that in the future, they may choose us as their university," Cartwright said.

The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established in 1994 with 45 students from two counties.

The opening ceremony and dinner for the "Fun With Science" Institute is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 15 in the John Marshall Room on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center. "Fun With Science" teachers will be trained at Marshall during the week of July 9-13.

More information is available by calling Cartwright at (304) 696-6024 or by visiting the HSTA Web site at www.wv-hsta.org.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 3, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Upward Bound Program sponsors blood drive July 10 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The American Red Cross will conduct the only blood drive at Marshall University this summer from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, July 10 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The drive is being sponsored by the Marshall University Upward Bound program, currently being conducted on the Huntington campus for high school students in grades 10-12 from Cabell, Mingo and Wayne counties in West Virginia.

Upward Bound sponsored a similar blood drive last year and collected 52 pints, beating its goal of 40 pints. The goal this year is to surpass last year's collection total.

The public is invited and encouraged to take part in the blood drive. For more information, call the Upward Bound Program at (304) 696-6846.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 2, 2007
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Student Advertising Team places seventh at national event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) Team placed seventh early last month at the national championship event in Louisville, Ky., culminating a year of national recognition for the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

Marshall's finish was just three points out of the money awarded to the top four teams, and placed it in the top four percent nationally. There were 190 teams that began the NSAC competition in September.

At the district level, 150 teams competed with the top 18 teams moving on to the national competition. Marshall won District 5 in April and represented Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia at the national event.

The MU Ad Club used the money it won at the district competition plus donations from District 5 American Advertising Federation (AAF), the Advertising Association of West Virginia and several local donors to take five presenters and nine other students to the national competition and convention. Of the nine, seven were team members and two were observers. In all, 18 students worked on the campaign.

The five presenters were Krystal Profitt of Beckley, W.Va.; Whitney Jarrell of Barboursville, W.Va.; Tori Marra of Clarksburg, W.Va.; Lee Tabor of Huntington and Heather Boyles of Charleston, W.Va.

The students competed on Thursday, June 7 and Friday, June 8. After the competition, they met and talked with advertising professionals at the AAF National Convention.

The Ad Club's performance highlighted what Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, described as a "good year for national recognition of the entire program."


Direct Link to This Release