All 2008 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 22, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University history professor authors The History of El Salvador

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Christopher M. White, an assistant professor of Latin American history at Marshall University, has written a book titled The History of El Salvador, which was published as part of the Greenwood Histories of the Modern Nations series.

More than 40 volumes of this series, which was launched in 1998, have been published. The series is intended to provide students and interested lay people with up-to-date, concise and analytical histories of many of the nations of the contemporary world.

For each nation, an author who was recognized as a specialist in the history of that nation was selected to write the book, according to series editors Frank W. Thackeray and John E. Findling.

At Marshall, White teaches courses on Latin America, the developing world, and U.S. foreign relations. He also is the author of Creating a Third World: Mexico, Cuba, and the United States during the Castro Era, published in 2007.

"I jumped at the chance to write the book because I have had a special place in my heart for the Salvadoran people ever since I made friends with Salvadoran refugees 17 years ago," White said. "This is primarily a book for American students because, among other reasons, the U.S. government supplied more military aid to the Salvadoran military than to any other Latin American military until then (1980s), and the result was at least 70,000 murdered civilians."

"The importance of history is that it allows us to shine a bright light on our recent and distant past in the hope of better understanding the consequences of historical events," said Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "Dr. White's book provides a timely account of El Salvador's history and the United States' involvement in that country's evolution. Although the history is stark, it provides us the opportunity to reflect upon our nation's role in international affairs and the autonomy of sovereign states."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 22, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners announced in holiday card, commemorative plate design contests

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual design contests sponsored by MU President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp have been won by a Marshall alumna and a current student in the University's College of Fine Arts.

Courtney Kania of Oak Hill, W.Va., a 2008 Marshall University graduate, is the winner of the 2008 Holiday Card Design Contest. Kania designed the winning card while she was a senior in the Department of Art and Design's Graphic Design program.

Allyson Eyermann of Ashland, Ky., a Marshall senior in the Department of Art and Design's Ceramics program, won the 2008 Commemorative Plate Design Contest.

The winners received $700 each for their designs.

President and Mrs. Kopp began the card design and plate design competition in 2007 as a way of recognizing the talent of Marshall's students. The card designed by Kania is being mailed to everyone on President Kopp's mailing list.  

Kania's card design features Marco in a green sleigh, complete with the Marshall logo, being pulled in the snow by four bison.

Eyermann's plate design is divided into four sections and features line drawings of four new facilities on Marshall's Huntington campus - the student recreation center, which will open in February; the First Year Freshman Residence Halls, the Dot Hicks Softball Complex and the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories.

In the card design contest, 2008 graduate Casey Pauley was the second-place winner and received $400, and Melissa Moran, a senior, was third and received $150.

In the commemorative plate design contest, William Andrew Burgess was the second-place winner and received $400, and third place went to Erin Brown, who won $150. Both Burgess and Brown are sophomores.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 19, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Executive director of WV Autism Training Center at Marshall discusses work of center on international talk radio show

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University, was a guest recently on a popular international talk radio show that will air this weekend on the Internet.

Becker-Cottrill was interviewed on the show titled "Adults on the Autism Spectrum: TODAY!" The show will air at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 20 at http://www.autismone.org/radio.

"This was a wonderful opportunity to discuss the work of the West Virginia Autism Training Center with both a national and international audience," Becker-Cottrill said. "Our family-focused, positive behavior support model is such an effective way to work with families, educators and friends of individuals on the autism spectrum. I was also happy to be able to share information about the Marshall University College Program for Students with Asperger's Syndrome."

The show airs on the third Saturday of each month. The general themes addressed include: planning for the future; how to access adult services; effective transition approaches; wills/trusts/guardianship; self-advocacy; state and national advocacy; service development; employment opportunities; supported living; recreation/leisure activities; and personal stories of success and struggle.

Its host, Dr. David L. Holmes, is board certified in Forensic Science, Behavioral Science and Psychology. He is a certified/licensed chief school administrator/supervisor/principal and teacher.  He is immediate past president and founder of The Eden Family of Services and the longest standing chairman of the Panel of Professional Advisors of the Autism Society of America.

Becker-Cottrill received her doctorate in education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She has been involved in education and developmental disabilities for the past 28 years, serving as a behavior analyst at the Margaret Chapman School in Hawthorne, N.Y., and as the executive director of the statewide West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall for the past 18 years. She also is an adjunct graduate professor at Marshall University, teaching courses related to autism, and co-author of the book "Autism: A Primer for Educators."

Becker-Cottrill has served as the principal investigator for the West Virginia Autism Monitoring Project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She is a co-director of the Network of Autism Training and Technical Assistance Programs (NATTAP) and co-founder of the College Program for Students with Asperger's Syndrome at Marshall University. She serves on the Autism Society of West Virginia Board of Directors and the Autism Society of America Board of Directors. She recently was appointed as co-chair of the Panel of Professional Advisors for the Autism Society of America.

For more information, contact Becker-Cottrill at 304-696-2844.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 18, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Services available at Marshall University during holiday break

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Although Marshall University officially will be closed for holiday break from Tuesday, Dec. 23 through Thursday, Jan. 1, selected departments, offices and facilities at the Huntington campus will be open at various times during the break.

Services will be available not only to assist Marshall's returning students, but those considering attending MU in the future.

Departments and facilities scheduled to be open and offering assistance from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 23 and Monday-Tuesday, Dec. 29-30, include Academic Affairs, Academic Advising, Admissions, the Bursar's Office, Financial Aid, the Registrar's Office and the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center.

The Marshall Bookstore will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 23, Monday, Dec. 29 and Tuesday, Dec. 30, and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 31. Marshall's mailroom will be open from 1 to 4 p.m. Dec. 23, and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 29, 30 and 31.

Also, the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.'s office in Old Main 323 will be open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dec. 30-31 to answer calls, accept gifts and other requests. The days of Dec. 23, 25, 26 and 29, the Foundation's main phone lines will be answered by Foundation and Development staff from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Here is a list of some services that will be available during the break:

  • Academic Affairs (Old Main 110, 304-696-6704): All services available
  • Academic Advising: in the Registrar's Office (Old Main 106B, 304-696-6410)

  • Admissions (Old Main 102, 304-696-3160): Phone and walk-in inquiries; credentials and applications

  • Bursar's Office (Old Main 101, 304-696-6620): Payment of tuition and fees; parking permits; loan counseling; payment plans, telephone correspondence and general student counseling

  • Financial Aid (Old Main 116, 304-696-3162 or 800-438-5390): All services available

  • Registrar's Office (Old Main 106B, 304-696-6410): All services available

  • Welcome Center (1601 5th Ave., 304-696-6833): Answering phones, meeting with prospective students and scheduling campus tours


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 16, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students win three silvers in Davey Awards Competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received three Silver Awards this fall in the Fourth Annual International Davey Awards Competition for 2008.  The winners were named in a letter to WMUL-FM from the International Academy of the Visual Arts (IAVA) in New York, N.Y.

The International Davey Awards are creative awards focused exclusively on honoring outstanding creative work from the best small firms worldwide. There were more than 4,000 entries in the International Davey Awards Competition for 2008 from ad agencies, radio stations, production firms, in-house creative professionals, graphic designers, design firms and public relations firms. 

Entries are judged by the International Academy of the Visual Arts and are underwritten by Advertising Age Small Business Network.  The International Davey Awards offer gold and silver awards.

"This is an accomplishment for WMUL-FM to be recognized for writing and producing a noteworthy newscast, an enlightening news feature package and an impressive play-by-play call of Marshall basketball," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

"I am proud for the honor these International Davey Awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University.  These silver awards indicate the respect the IAVA judges have for the writing, reporting and production skills of our motivated student radio staff that was exhibited during this worldwide competition against professional practitioners in similar sized organizations."

The Silver Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the categories Radio Newscast, Radio Feature Package and Radio Sports Play-by-Play.

Radio Newscast

The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with producer Griffin McElroy, a senior from Huntington; news anchors Matthew Gajtka, a recent graduate from Weirton; Kimberly Burcham, a recent graduate from Huntington; and sports anchor Robert Iddings, a junior from St. Albans; broadcast Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007.

Radio Feature Package

"The Pumpkin House: Trick or Treat Night," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, a feature package that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2007.

Radio Sports Play-by-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus University of Memphis men's basketball game at Cam Henderson Center in Huntington Saturday, Jan. 12, 2008. The students calling the game broadcast over FM 88.1 were basketball play-by-play announcer Adam Cavalier, color commentator Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen, and engineer Justin Prince, a freshman from Kenova.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 15, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Buses available for Marshall students wanting to attend Chesapeake Energy Capital Classic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association and Alumni Association are sponsoring two buses for MU students wanting to attend the annual Chesapeake Energy Capital Classic basketball games in Charleston.

The Capital Classic, featuring men's and women's games between Marshall University and West Virginia University, will be played Wednesday, Jan. 14 at the Charleston Civic Center Coliseum. The women's game begins at 5:30 p.m., and the men play at 8 p.m.

The first of the two buses leaves Marshall from the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus at 4:30 p.m. and should arrive at the Civic Center in time for the start of the women's game. The second bus leaves at 5:30 p.m. and should arrive at the Civic Center in time for fans to attend a pre-game reception in the South Hall or watch the second half of the women's game.

Each bus has 49 seats. Students wanting to reserve a seat on either bus may do so by e-mailing SGA President Matt James at matt.james@marshall.edu. The first 49 people to respond for each time slot will have the opportunity to ride. Students e-mailing James need to specify which bus they want to ride - the one that leaves at 4:30 p.m. or the one that leaves at 5:30 p.m.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 10, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University students from WMUL, 'Up Late' win awards


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- Students from Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications won several awards this fall in the 87th Annual National College Media Convention/2008 Collegiate Broadcasters Inc. (CBI) National Student Radio Production Awards Ceremony in Kansas City, Mo., including a first-ever award for the television program, "Up Late," and six for WMUL-FM, Marshall's public radio station.

WMUL-FM also received a first-place Podcast Best of Show award at the 87th Annual National College Media Convention/2008 Associated Press (ACP) Annual College Competition Ceremony, also in Kansas City.

In winning its first award, "Up Late" was helped by an appearance by head baseball coach Jeff Waggoner along with some unorthodox batting practice for his team, a look at a Herd Home, and a little student competition of Hallway Olympics.

"Up Late" is a show that grew out of last year's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors Jamie LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy. LoFiego hosts the show to give it a consistent feel, since the students working on the show change each semester. He said he believes the award reflects not only the good work of the "Up Late" crew, but also the entire radio and television program in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

"It is awesome to see that with all of the work that our students put into the show that people outside of our viewing area think we are doing a good job," LoFiego said. "I believe we are developing a following for our show. Every now and then you will hear people say, 'Oh yeah, Up Late - I've seen that show.' Our students do really great work."

Students involved in the class, as well as volunteers who worked on the award-winning Episode 18 include: Ryan Vance, Ryan Zipperian, Andrew Colegrove, Emily McKenna,Will Sutherland, Adam Ede, Chris Atkins, Jeremy Edwards, Lawren Hightower, Stacey Renner, Stephanie Bartram, Stephen Frail, Tiffney Henson, Travis Caffray, Kimberly Burcham, Erin Downard, Francesca Karle, Adam Cavalier and Ben Gibson.

"Up Late" airs on Saturdays from 11 to 11:30 p.m. on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications airs the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" also can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The first-place "Up Late" show may be seen online at www.marshall.edu/uplate/myz_sp08/myz_sp08_show18.asp.

In addition to the "Up Late" award, Marshall students received three first-place awards and three finalist awards at the CBI ceremony, which took place in Royal Hall at the Kansas City Marriott Downtown Hotel in Kansas City.

Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the School of Journalism at Marshall and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

"This contest, in its seventh year, is sponsored by the CBI which administers the contest in cooperation with College Media Advisers Inc. (CMA), the nation's oldest and largest college media organization," Bailey said. "It is an honor to win three out of the 12 first-place radio awards granted by these prestigious organizations."

Bailey said Marshall's radio students have established at WMUL-FM a tradition of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional, or state level with other student-operated college radio stations.

"No college won more first-place awards from CBI than Marshall University," he said. "So this performance is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students." 

The first-place award winning entries were:

Best Radio Newscast
"The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, April 4, 2008. The newscast featured Chelsea Clinton's visit to Marshall's Huntington campus. The students who participated in the newscast were:  

Ryan Vance, senior, Culloden, W. Va. (producer); Kimberly Burcham, a recent graduate, Huntington, W. Va.; (news anchor); Adam Cavalier, senior, Montgomery, W.Va. (news anchor); Andrew Ramspacher, junior, Dublin, Ohio (sports anchor); Meagan Sellards, graduate student, Chapmanville, W.Va. (live drop reporter), and Neera Doss, junior, Milton, W.Va. (live drop reporter).

Best Radio Sports Play-By-Play
WMUL-FM's broadcast of Marshall University versus East Carolina University played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium, Huntington, W.Va., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2007.  The students calling the football game were:

Ryan Epling, graduate student, Wayne, W.Va. (football play-by-play announcer); Brian Dalek, senior, McMechen, W.Va.  (color commentator); Andrew Ramspacher (sideline reporter); Scott Hall, recent master's graduate from Stephens City, Va. (engineer), and Boom Madison, sophomore, Olympia, Wash. (engineer).

 Dalek also was managing editor this fall of The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper.

Best Radio Promotion
"Hair from the Herd" was an event to benefit Locks of Love, a nonprofit that makes real-hair wigs for children who have chronic diseases that result in hair loss, and highlights WMUL-FM's public service commitment.  The haircuts for "Hair from the Herd" were provided by the Huntington School of Beauty Culture.   "Hair from the Herd" resulted in more than 300 inches of hair being donated to Locks of Love.  Meagan Sellards, WMUL-FM's station manager, headed up the event for the campus radio station.

The finalist award winning entries were:

Best Radio News Reporting 
"The Pumpkin House: Trick or Treat Night," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2007.

Best Radio Sports Reporting
"Wood versus Metal," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, March, 13, 2008.

Best Regularly Scheduled Program
"The Last Show Tonight: Best Show Ever," written and produced by Adam Cavalier and Brian Dalek, broadcast Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2007.
 

WMUL's first-place Podcast Best of Show award from the 2008 Associated Press (ACP) Annual College Competition was for a 30-minute special titled "The Conference USA Report-70s Edition," broadcast for the first time Friday, Oct. 24, 2008. It was a 70s-themed edition of a regular sports program that airs Friday and Saturday during Marshall University football weekends.

Students who participated in the winning show were host Brian Dalek; and reporters Adam Cavalier; Ryan Epling; Tom Bragg, a senior from Nitro, W.Va.; James Roach, a junior from Richwood, W.Va., and Tony Viola, a freshman from Follansbee, W.Va.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 4, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Students learn science and math during LEGO robotics competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from several area schools will compete Saturday, Dec. 6 to show off their skills in building and programming LEGO robots at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO League program is offered each year to local students to make learning fun and to help students improve their creative thinking.

This year's theme centers on the earth's climate and how it affects the environment around us.  Many of the tasks programmed by the robots center on this theme and the students also have done research to learn the information needed for their projects.

The competition also helps students learn math, since they must use their math skills to program the robots to perform certain tasks. The contest measures the students' abilities to get their robots to perform the tasks in a limited amount of time, and points are based on formulas related to how much of the task was performed.

Teams that win at the local level will go on to the state competition in Wheeling later this month.

The schools involved Saturday include Barboursville Middle School, Milton Middle School, St. Joseph Middle School, Village of Barboursville Elementary, Spring Hill Elementary, St. Joseph Elementary, Kellogg Elementary, Central City Elementary and Southside Elementary.

Public demonstrations and competitions begin at 11 a.m. on the first floor of the Morrow Library on 3rd Avenue.  The event ends at 2 p.m. with an awards presentation.

For more information contact Linda Hamilton, LEGO specialist at Marshall, at 304-696-7166, or parent volunteer Lena Burdette at 304-634-1951


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 3, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Director of Graduate Humanities Program edits journal of collaborative research in anthropology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first volume of a journal edited by Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program at the Marshall University Graduate College and professor of humanities and anthropology, has been published by the University of Nebraska Press.

The journal will be published annually. Volume 2 is scheduled to be released in October 2009, according to Lassiter.

He said "Collaborative Anthropologies" is a forum for dialogue on collaborative research in anthropology and closely related fields.

"But, importantly, the journal goes beyond the kind of interdisciplinary collaboration that implies 'collaborative research' as that between academic colleagues or two or more professional researchers," Lassiter said. "Although it includes discussion about these kinds of collaborative research, the journal has a special focus on the complex collaborations between and among researchers and the communities with which they work - such as when an ethnographer designs a project with research participants who are engaged not as 'subjects' or 'informants' but as partners in a collaborative research effort."

He said many anthropologists have done this kind of collaborative research for a long time, and there are lots of examples, such as his "Other Side of Middletown" book, written by a team of faculty, students, and members of the African American community in Muncie, Ind.

"This journal will provide a collective space for featuring descriptions of such partnerships and projects (as well as many others kinds, including those that don't fit neatly into this type); ultimately, however, it is concerned with charting new theoretical terrains, ones that address broader philosophical questions about the collaborative (and ethical) production of knowledge, the role of community engagement in scholarly production and dissemination, and, importantly, the value of collaborative research to a wider public," Lassiter said.

Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, said the new journal is an important contribution to the discipline and "a considerable achievement" for Lassiter.

"Interesting problems in science are best answered from many perspectives rather than from a single academic discipline," Pittenger said. "Eric's work should do much to help social scientists use interdisciplinary perspectives when examining complex human behavior.

"Of course, all of us in the College of Liberal Arts are proud of Eric's many accomplishments. The University is dedicated to promoting scholarship at the highest level. Eric's work demonstrates that the College has much to offer the academic community."

The journal is available for $61 for institutions and $36 for individuals. Checks should be made payable to the University of Nebraska Press and mailed to:

The University of Nebraska Press
P.O. Box 84555
Lincoln, NE 68501-4555

For more information, contact Lassiter at 304-746-1923.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 2, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Children's self-portrait display in Drinko part of student's final project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A children's self-portrait display, featuring paintings by the children of Ebenezer Community Outreach Center, is planned from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Dec. 8 in the third-floor atrium of Marshall University's Drinko Library on the Huntington campus.

The paintings are part of a project by Taylor Saunders, a Marshall University graduate student in psychology. Saunders has been volunteering with the children as part of a service learning course on the Psychology of Women & Gender, in which students have to complete a final project. Dr. Wendy Williams is the faculty member supervising Saunders' project.

Saunders' final project with the children includes the reading of a book titled "I Like Myself" by Karen Beaumont and helping them paint self-portraits to promote a positive self image through art.

For more information, contact Saunders at Saunders45@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 2, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Choirs, Orchestra to Perform Schubert Mass No. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Singers from the Marshall University Choral Union, University Chorus and Chamber Choir, together with the Marshall University Orchestra, will present two performances of Franz Schubert's Mass No. 6 in E-Flat Major, D. 950 this weekend in Smith Recital Hall at Marshall University. Dr. David Castleberry, professor of music and director of choral activities, will conduct.

Performances are Saturday, Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. Both will take place in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. Tickets will be available at the door for $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Marshall students with IDs are admitted free.

"Its beautiful melodies, dramatic settings of text, and fascinating construction make it a rare and exciting listening experience," Castleberry said.

The Marshall University Choral Union joins community and student singers for two performances each year. Members have the opportunity to learn and perform works by great choral composers and to sing side by side with student musicians from Marshall University.  It is an energizing musical collaboration for the students and the community members, according to Castleberry. 

Franz Schubert, known best for his songs, symphonies, and chamber music, composed six settings of the Mass during his brief life. This is his largest, most mature work, Castleberry said, and was written just months before he died.

For further information, contact the Marshall University Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 2, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Construction on men's and women's basketball locker rooms to get underway soon at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Construction on much-needed new locker and team meeting rooms for Marshall University's men's and women's basketball programs will begin within the next couple of weeks, Athletic Director Bob Marcum announced today.

Marcum said the locker rooms will be located under the south stands in Cam Henderson Center, Marshall's basketball home since 1981. Each locker room will be 3,100 square feet.

"This project will assist our men's and women's basketball programs in being more competitive in Conference USA," Marcum said. "It is a continued effort to improve our venues to make us more competitive in the conference. We all know that new facilities can assist in recruiting efforts."

Exact cost of the new locker rooms has not yet been determined, but Marcum said it could be in the range of $2 million. Bids on the project are due in by 3 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3.

Marshall has about $800,000 of the money in hand - $600,000 from its facility enhancement fee included in ticket sales and $200,000 from a donor. The Marshall athletic department and the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., will begin a major fund-raising effort to pay off the balance.

"The locker room project just goes to show the commitment our University has to our basketball program," men's Coach Donnie Jones said. "When kids come on campus, their first impression of commitment is usually the facilities. This will showcase to our players and incoming recruits not only our commitment to success, but that of Marshall University."

Marcum said it has been several years since the current locker rooms were last "spruced up." The new ones, he said, will be first class. Plans call for theater film rooms, lounges for players and coaches, locker rooms for players and coaches, flat screen TVs, kitchens and large storage areas to be included in the new locker rooms.

"Not only is this a really-needed project, but it also will allow us to improve the accommodations for the visiting teams," Marcum said. "We will take the present home locker rooms and turn them into the visiting locker rooms."

Women's Coach Royce Chadwick said the new locker rooms are important for a number of reasons.

"This is another side to our joining Conference USA," he said. "We travel to places like UCF and see their outstanding facilities. Now, when UCF comes here, they will leave here saying Marshall's facilities are second to none. They will be in our old locker rooms and they will say, 'they've got really nice facilities at Marshall.' Perception is reality."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 1, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Theatre students lead production of 'The Zoo Story'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A student-directed production of Edward Albee's "The Zoo Story" will be performed  Friday and Saturday, Dec. 5 and 6, at 8 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Admission is free and open to the public.

Actors Chris Ferris and Eric Woods, students in Marshall's Department of Theatre, are collaborating with fellow students, director Sean Watkins, stage manager Rachel Kenniston, and lighting designer Erika Courtney, to bring to life a drama observers consider one of Albee's greatest works.

 " 'The Zoo Story' is a psychological thriller in the sense that it makes you think," Watkins said.  "It is Albee's first play, and I think one of his finest.  He has created a situation between two people that causes us as human beings to question ourselves about how we treat one another."

Ferris said of the production, "It provides a social mirror in which the audience can see all aspects of themselves - things they may not want to notice, but are almost certainly there."

The Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre is located on the first floor of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. 

For further information about this play and/or the performance at the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, please call 304-696-ARTS or e-mail Sean Watkins at watkins32@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 1, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Up Late' hosts Huntington's mayor-elect

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This week's "Up Late" features the only guest to appear on the show carrying a gun.

Longtime Huntington policeman and Cabell County Sheriff Kim Wolfe joins host Jamie LoFiego and the cast of "Up Late." Wolfe was recently elected as Huntington's next mayor.

This week's doorkeeper is Gerry T. Troll and musical guest is Fletchers Grove.

Ryan "Zippy" Zipperain enjoys his last appearance as the show's co-host. The crew looks back at his appearances in previous episodes as well as sharing the outtakes from this season of the award-winning show.

The cast reveals potential new looks after it learns that WSAZ newsman Tim Irr may be getting a makeover.

"Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 29 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 1, 2008
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

'Grow With Music' registering for spring

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Spring registration for "Grow With Music," a popular program for children ages birth to 5 and their parents, is underway. A discount applies to registrations that take place before Jan. 10, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University.

"My 3-year-old daughter is currently enrolled in her second session of 'Grow With Music' and continually looks forward to attending every week," said Lisa B. Ross, parent of one of the participants. "I have seen her laugh, sing and dance so happily and with joy."

Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3 year olds, and 4 and 5 year olds. Parent participation is required in the classes for the baby, toddler and 3-year-old categories and optional for the 4- and 5-year-old category. Classes take place in the daytime and early evenings on Mondays through Wednesdays. A maximum of eight children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

" 'Grow With Music' "has afforded our 21-month-old a fun and caring place to learn new communication skills through song, dance, musical instruments and even sign language," said Charlotte Hoffman Norris, another parent-participant. "It has also given me, a working mom, a great opportunity to watch and participate in my son's play and interaction with other children and their parents/grandparents."

Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Iowa. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

For information on "Grow with Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at http://www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing mailto:pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at (304) 697-0211.


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Monday November 24, 2008
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

Food drive continues until Dec. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music students, in coordination with the College of Fine Arts, are hosting a food drive in order to help support the Cridlin Food Pantry during the coming holiday season.

The drive began Wednesday, Nov. 12 and will continue until Saturday, Dec. 6. Items collected will be taken to the pantry before Thanksgiving and again before Marshall's winter break begins.

The food drive is targeting the students and staff within the College of Fine Arts; however, donations from others will be accepted. Collection sites are located in Smith Music Hall, Smith Hall Atrium, Smith Hall Art Department, Jomie Jazz Center, the Theatre Department in Joan C. Edwards Playhouse, Memorial Student Center lobby, and Old Main.

Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, Chair of the Department of Music, came to the presidents of the music department organizations with the idea of a department-wide community service project.

Pappas stated, "Our students give so much to our university and the Huntington community through their musical talents. I just wanted all of us to be aware that we can give in other ways as well…I was not surprised at all when the presidents of each of our organizations not only took to the idea, but immediately began planning it and distributing responsibilities. I'm certainly proud that our students are aware that as citizens of a community they play a role in bettering that community."

The music department organizations - Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Fraternity; Kappa Kappa Psi Honorary Band Fraternity; Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity; Collegiate Music Educators' National Conference (CMENC); Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI); and Jazz Education Network (JEN) - came together to organize this food drive. Many of the organizations have done individual community service projects, but this is one of the first projects on which all of the organizations have worked together, according to Pappas.

Matthew Murphy, president of CMENC, stated, "I think that this provides the music department organizations the chance to utilize the resources and leadership they have to reach out to hungry families in the Huntington area."

 "I can't tell you how timely this is," said Diana Van Horn, director of the Cridlin Food Pantry, "because the USDA commodity program, which distributes a lot of free food to the pantry, has not been able to give much in the last few months."

The Cridlin Food Pantry supports approximately 250 people per month. Each family is given enough food for three meals a day for five days.

The pantry has been in operation since 1970 and is supported by many churches. However, the demand is rising due to the increasing number of individuals coming in for help, Van Horn said.


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Monday November 24, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University students to design lounge in Corbly Hall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students in a promotion management class at Marshall University have an opportunity to hone their design and promotion skills by participating in the Corbly Lounge Project, a competition in which they design a student lounge which is tentatively scheduled to be built in the spring of 2009.

Two teams have been challenged to come up with plans for a new lounge to be located in the northeast area of the lobby in Corbly Hall on the Huntington campus. Corbly Hall currently houses the Lewis College of Business (LCOB).  The teams must factor in such real-life considerations as student comfort, budget and vendor constraints, university rules and regulations and space limitations.

The three-member teams consist of students in Dr. Deanna Mader's Promotion Management class.  The Corbly Hall lounge will be a 15-foot by nearly 12-foot space with a budget of approximately $15,000.  The teams will develop ideas for utilizing the lounge as a promotional vehicle for the Lewis College of Business, Young Professionals Committee (YPC) and the various LCOB student organizations.

The LCOB plans to use elements of the winning group's vision as a basis for the design and implementation of the actual lounge. All Marshall students, not just business majors, will be free to use the lounge. Specifications currently call for comfortable seating arrangements with tables, a television to promote sponsors of various LCOB and student groups along with announcements and information, and a Wi-Fi network. The new lounge will permit students to sit comfortably and to be able to use the Internet to do homework.

Team members are:

Team Thunder - Travis Mount, Josh Runyon and Justin Weis.
Team LCOB - Mark Facetti, Seungeob Baek and Kenny Taig.   

Beginning at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 5, each team will make a 15-minute presentation to a judging panel that tentatively will be composed of MU President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp; Dr. Deanna Mader, Professor of Management and Marketing; Dr. Chong Kim, Interim Dean of the Lewis College of Business; Matthew DeMaria, an LCOB Instructional Technologist; Larry Templeton, Director of Development in the LCOB; and Matt White, YPC liaison. The presentations will take place in the fourth-floor auditorium of the Drinko Library. 

For additional information, contact Larry Templeton at 304-696-3421 or Ben Eng at 818-720-4470.


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Monday November 24, 2008
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Pennsylvania writer Tom Noyes to read from his work Dec. 3 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pennsylvania writer Tom Noyes will read from his work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3 in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Noyes' second story collection, Spooky Action at a Distance and Other Stories, was published in March 2008 by Dufour Editions. His first book, Behold Faith and Other Stories (Dufour, 2003), was shortlisted for Stanford University Libraries' William Saroyan International Prize for Writing, and praised in the New York Times Book Review for its "macabre wit and startling confessions of frailty and delusion."

His work has appeared in Ascent, Colorado Review, Elixir, Eureka, Image, Laurel Review, Mid-American Review and other journals.

Noyes has taught in the creative writing programs at Indiana State University and Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn. Now a consulting editor for Lake Effect, he teaches at Penn State-The Behrend College in Erie, Pa.

His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Art Stringer in the Marshall English Department at 304-696-2403.


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Friday November 21, 2008
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, , (304) 696-2967

Respected CNN newsman joins cast of 'Up Late' (for one show, anyway)

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Award-winning journalist Joe Johns joined the cast of "Up Late" while on campus serving as Grand Marshal of Marshall University's homecoming festivities.

Johns, a 1980 Marshall alumnus, is a CNN correspondent based in the network's Washington, D.C., bureau. Before joining CNN as a congressional correspondent in 2004, he covered Capitol Hill for NBC News for more than 10 years. He reports on government accountability, waste and fraud for Anderson Cooper 360° and other programs throughout the network as well as playing a key role in the network's "America Votes 2008" coverage. With "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego, though, he shows his funny side.

This week's doorkeeper is senior public relations major Erin Thompson of Fayetteville, W.Va. Musical guest is Brandon Mitchell, who plays his song, "Shot Down."

Ryan "Zippy" Zipperain does a man-on-the-street segment where he asks students about their New Year's resolutions.

A new feature, one the cast calls "one of the funniest bits we have done all year," is a soap opera called "The Hand You Were Given." In this episode, Margaret tells James her true feelings about him.

"Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Tuesday November 18, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Scholarship honors former Herd kicker who died in plane crash

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., has established the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship in memory of the former Thundering Herd place kicker/punter from Lyndhurst, N.J., who died in the Nov. 14, 1970 Marshall plane crash.

Lajterman was 19 when he, along with 74 other people, died in the crash. His brother, Mo Lajterman, who began a fundraising campaign to establish the scholarship, attended Friday's annual memorial service at Marshall, along with other brothers Tito Lajterman and Abe Lajterman, and cousin Adrian Steingart.

The family presented a check for $1,000 to the Marshall Foundation to start an expendable merit scholarship under Marcelo Lajterman's name. The family's goal is to create an endowment at Marshall to honor Lajterman's memory. The fund will become endowed when a minimum of $15,000 is received. Until then, the foundation will support a yearly $1,000 merit scholarship.

While in Huntington, the family also presented a gift of a miniature statue of Marcelo Lajterman to Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

During what he called "a very special moment" after attending the premiere of "We Are Marshall in December 2006," Mo Lajterman said he and his family began talking about what they could do to honor their late brother's memory.

They created the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship Fund which resulted in raising enough funds through a golf outing to award two scholarships in their home state of New Jersey.

"The next thing we thought about was doing an endowment for Marshall University," Mo Lajterman said. "We (the Lajtermans and Marshall) became family. We wanted to do something more special. Marcelo would love this … and his name lives on. This scholarship helps keep his name alive."

The recipient of the one-time award will be a full-time undergraduate student with a 3.0 or higher GPA and financial need, as determined by the Office of Student Financial Assistance. The award may also be used to cover academic expenses beyond tuition.

"We are so honored and humbled to think that this family from so far would still consider giving back to Marshall University in this scholarship manner," said Kristi Arrowood, director of special projects for the foundation. "It also shows that 'We Are Marshall' extends beyond just being an alum or current student. The entire Lajterman family is Marshall family and for generations to come, students who receive this scholarship will learn the history of Marcelo Lajterman and his contribution to the athletic program as well as Marshall University as a whole."

Persons may contribute to the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship by visiting www.marcelo23.com. For more information, contact Arrowood at 304-696-3505.


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Thursday November 13, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Holly Berry Festival returns to Marshall Nov. 22

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The fourth annual Holly Berry Festival returns to Huntington and the Marshall University campus in grand tradition Saturday, Nov. 22 with what organizers say will be a bigger and better event than in recent years.

The festival, sponsored by the Marshall University Library Associates, takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Marshall's Memorial Student Center. More vendors, artists and crafters will be participating and more general and holiday-themed items will be for sale.

"Whether you're looking for hand-crafted jewelry or paintings, art, quilts, aprons, kitchen towel sets, scarves, prints or books, chances are excellent you'll find what you're looking for at the Holly Berry Festival," said Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall Libraries.

She says visitors to this year's festival also will be able to pick up a few pointers about woodworking or pottery from master crafters who will demonstrate both techniques during the course of the day.

Organizers say shoppers will be treated to an expanded variety of gift ideas presented by a wide variety of tri-state artisans and crafts persons.  In addition, for the first time ever, the event will include a used book and record sale. Winters said four boxes of long-play (LP) record albums will be for sale.

Special guests at this year's event include Dave Lavender, a reporter and columnist with The Herald-Dispatch, and former Herald-Dispatch editorial page editor Jim Casto, both of whom will be signing books they have written.

From 9 a.m. to noon, Lavender will sign copies of "Dave Trippin: A Day Tripper's Guide to the Appalachian Galaxy of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia," while from 10 a.m. to noon, Casto will sign his local history books, including "Marshall University," a photo history of the school.

Books about West Virginia and the Civil War and related items will be on display for sale as well.

Winters said 10 percent of all sales will be donated to the Library Associates endowment fund, which supports the ongoing development of the Marshall University Libraries book collections.

Admission is free, and free parking is available on the Marshall parking lot across 5th Avenue from the student center. Food will be available for purchase, and proceeds from the sale of food will go to Marshall's Student Nurses Association and the Libraries.

For more information, contact Winters at 304-696-2318 (wintersb@marshall.edu) or Dr. Lynne Welch at 304-523-8327.


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Thursday November 13, 2008
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Five Criminal Justice students place second in state-wide competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five Marshall University Criminal Justice students who took part in the West Virginia Criminal Justice Educators Association's recent annual conference placed second in the state-wide crime scene competition.

The students included undergraduates Michelle Cunningham, Patrick Hernandez and William "Andy" Walker, and graduate students Lauren Copley and Pallavi Samariya.

In addition, Marshall University Criminal Justice majors won two of the four awards for the student paper competition.  Copley, of Ona, W.Va., took first place in the graduate student competition and Hernandez, of Ashland, Ky., placed first in the undergraduate competition. Each received a $100 award.

"The Criminal Justice Department is pleased that once again our students have taken a lead at the state level," said Kimberly DeTardo-Bora, associate professor of Criminal Justice. "They continue to prove that our program is not about handcuffs and high-speed chases; instead, our students have the solid ability to present research and write effectively."

Five Marshall graduate students along with two undergraduates presented papers during the conference, which took place Nov. 6-7 at Fairmont State University. Graduate papers included, Copley, "Medillin v. Dretke: The United States' Judicial response to Avena and Other Mexican Nationals;" Jonathan Clemins, "Playing with Fire:  The Juvenile Weapon of Choice as Explained by Hirschi's (1969) Social Control Theory;" Krystal Mayville, "Firearms Trafficking:  A Rational Choice;" Jessica Napier, "Plagiarism Among Criminal Justice Students and the Utility of Turnitin.com;" and Samariya, "Explaining Domestic Violence through Marxist Feminism Theory."

Undergraduate students presenting papers were Hernandez, "Techniques of Neutralization and Arson;" and Katheryne Staats, "The Transition from Barbie Dolls and Tonka Trucks to Juvenile Delinquent:  Peer Deviance as Examined by Sutherland's Differential Association Theory."  


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Wednesday November 12, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

Broadway Workshop Students to Present Theatre Evenings

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - It's not every day that a student can take a class from a Broadway star, but  Marshall University students interested in music and theatre have been attending workshop sessions taught by actress and former Miss West Virginia Beth McVey this semester.

"I'm thrilled to get to be a part of the beginning of something at Marshall - to use the years of experience I have and work with students sharing my love of musical theatre - with inquiring young minds who want to experience the same thing," McVey said. "It's very fulfilling for me. I'm very honored to be so welcomed into the Marshall community."

Next week the workshop concludes with two performances: one Tuesday, Nov. 18 at the Cultural Center in Charleston at 7 p.m., the other Thursday, Nov. 20 at the Jomie Jazz Center on Marshall's Huntington campus at 8 p.m.

Bringing McVey to teach at Marshall is part of the Joan C. Edwards Distinguished Professors of the Arts initiative, which brings accomplished artists to campus to enhance learning opportunities.

Department of Music chair Dr. Jeffrey Pappas notes that having McVey as a visiting faculty member is an exceptional opportunity for students. "Anytime we can supplement our current curriculum with another outstanding faculty member, who not only has experience in the field but is able to translate that experience to students in an academic setting, everyone at Marshall wins," Pappas said.

According to Dr. Julie Jackson, chair of the Department of Theatre, McVey's presence on campus will allow the Department of Theatre the long-sought opportunity to develop a musical theatre emphasis within the professional training program.  

"The fact that a person with Beth's Broadway credentials and extensive professional experience has chosen to make Huntington her home base is truly remarkable," Jackson said.

The students echo Jackson's sentiment regarding studying under McVey.

"She's got such great experience, which is nice," senior Acting/Directing major Emily Chapman said, "and she comes right from what we're all trying to achieve."

As for the performances, Chapman, of Winfield, said, "Expect a good time, in a fun, relaxed atmosphere with a variety of songs, monologues, duets and group performances that will be interesting."


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Wednesday November 12, 2008
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Marco makeover to be revealed before homecoming game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fans attending Marshall University's homecoming football game Saturday, Nov. 15 with UCF at Joan C. Edwards Stadium are encouraged to be in their seats at least 15 minutes before the 4:30 p.m. kickoff for the unveiling of the updated Marco.

The university's beloved mascot has undergone a Marco makeover, thanks to a fundraising effort this fall headed by the Marshall University Alumni Association in conjunction with the MU athletic department. His new costume was crafted by Dale Morton Studios in Hurricane.

"Marshall University and the Alumni Association want to thank everyone who participated in financially supporting Marco's makeover, especially the following donors: Susan and Ed Maier; Verna and Jim Gibson; the West Virginia Coal Association; Jed Smith, Smith Company Motor Cars; Carolyn and David Haden; Clear Channel Communications; Big Sandy Superstores; Pam and Steve Ellis, Elco Inc.; and Jason Moses and Moses Auto Mall," said Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations.

"We also want to thank everyone else who contributed to the makeover as well," she said. "We received many $5, $10 and $25 gifts. Marco is most appreciative of every gift."

For more information, contact Littlehales at 304-696-2523.


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Tuesday November 11, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

MU Chamber Choir in Concert at Marshall

Huntington, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, a select 33-voice ensemble under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 16 in Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

The performance will feature music that the Chamber Choir presented recently at the West Virginia Cultural Center, including selections by Monteverdi, Schubert, Distler, Whitacre, and others.

"We had a very successful concert at the cultural center and look forward to repeating the program here at Marshall," Castleberry said.

Singers in the choir are chosen each year through competitive audition and come from throughout the Marshall University community. Many of the group's members are preparing for careers in music. "For a number of students this will be their first concert in the chamber choir and we'll also be featuring several singers who are showcasing senior voice recitals - so we have both ends of the spectrum in this performance," Castleberry said.

The Chamber Choir has been featured in numerous performances at Charleston, S.C.'s Piccolo Spoleto festival, on West Virginia Public Radio, and in performances for the American Choral Directors Association. Next spring, the Chamber Choir will travel to Washington, D.C., as part of a concert tour.


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Monday November 10, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

45th annual 2008 International Festival at Marshall University kicks off International Education Week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University kicks off International Education Week Sunday, Nov. 16 with the 45th annual International Festival in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on MU's Huntington campus.

International Education Week is a joint initiative of the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of State to promote international awareness and international education skills.

The theme of this year's International festival, which takes place from 3 to 7 p.m., is "Living in a Global Society," which emphasizes the pressing need for universities in the United States to prepare their students to live and work globally.

The International Festival features exotic foods, traditional music and dance, along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures. All of this will be provided by Marshall University international students and international community individuals and groups.  Admission to the International Festival is free and open to the public.

Other events to take place during International Education Week include the Festival of Flags and the Study Abroad Expo.

The Annual Festival of Flags takes place throughout November in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center, the Drinko Library and other buildings throughout campus featuring a spectacular display of flags from all of the countries where Marshall University draws international students or sends students to study abroad.  This semester's festival features flags from more than 60 countries and regions of the world.  

On Tuesday, Nov. 18, Marshall will host the 5th annual MU Study Abroad Expo in the lobby of the Student Center from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 20 study abroad providers are expected to take part in the fair.  MU students and faculty will have the opportunity to discuss the programs directly with the providers, apply for a passport, and get assistance with immunizations.   Study abroad scholarships and other prizes will be given away at the fair.

Dr. Clark M. Egnor, Executive Director of Marshall's Center for International Programs, said the International Education Week events are the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to enjoy the international diversity and global opportunities found on the Marshall campus and in the surrounding community.

Dr. Nancy Person, Director of Marshall's Office of International Students and Scholars, said the International Festival provides an opportunity for Marshall's international students to share their cultures and customs with others, thereby utilizing Marshall's valuable international diversity to promote a global awareness in the community.

Currently, Marshall has 451 international students from 61 countries, a five percent increase over fall semester 2007.  The university also sends about 150 students each year to study abroad.  Marshall students can choose from more than 125 sites in 40 countries to study for a summer, semester or year at approximately the same cost as studying at home.

For further details about the International Festival and International Education Week activities, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-2465, cip@marshall.edu, or visit the Marshall University Center for International Programs office in Old Main 320 on the Huntington campus.


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Monday November 10, 2008
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Marshall Music Department gets "All Jazzed Up" for Homecoming Weekend

Huntington, W. Va. - Students from Marshall University's Department of Music will present the second annual Homecoming Cabaret during Homecoming weekend. Shows are at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15 in the Jomie Jazz Center on the Huntington campus, and are free and open to the public.

The program of vocal jazz ensembles and solos with a combo of seasoned jazz instrumentalists is a collaboration of Linda Dobbs, professor of voice, and Dr. Sean Parsons of Marshall's jazz studies faculty.

Under their direction singers have spent the fall semester exploring the language and nuance of jazz singing and are excited to share the fun, according to Dobbs. "Join us for our renditions of tunes made famous by Piaf, Ella Fitzgerald, New York Voices, The Andrews Sisters and more," she said.

For further information, contact the Marshall University Department of Music at 304-696-3117.


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Friday November 7, 2008
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Convocation for December Graduates set for Saturday, Dec. 6

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will honor its December 2008 graduates with a formal academic program on Saturday, Dec. 6, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center in downtown Huntington.

The Convocation for December Graduates will take place at 2 p.m. and allow those prospective graduates to be recognized before they leave campus at the end of the term. Although their degrees will not be conferred until the spring 2009 commencement, they will be wearing caps and gowns and be recognized individually during the ceremony.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will greet the students as their names are read and they make their way across the platform in front of the Keith-Albee stage. A photographer will take their pictures as they are presented with a representative scroll.

"So many of our December graduates are unable to return for the regular commencement," said Roberta Ferguson, Marshall's registrar. "The convocation is a chance for them, along with their families, to celebrate this major milestone in their lives."

Ferguson said in past years only 20 percent of the December graduates have returned in May for commencement. December graduates attending the convocation are still invited to take part in Marshall's 172nd commencement, scheduled May 9, 2009 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Dr. Montserrat Miller, an associate professor of history at Marshall University, will be the keynote speaker at the convocation. She was named 2007 Professor of the Year by the Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia.

"I feel deeply honored and privileged to be offered the opportunity to speak to the December 2008 class of Marshall graduates," Miller said. "Commencement ceremonies are vital rituals because they commemorate student achievement and allow us to reflect on the transformative power that higher education has on our lives.  President Kopp should be commended for introducing this new Convocation for December Graduates."

Miller has been a member of the Marshall History Department since 1996. She has won several awards during that time, including the Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award in 2007, the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher Award in 2006, and the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award in 1999.

She received a Ph.D. (1994) and M.A. (1990) in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon University, and an M.A. in History (1988) and a B.A. in International Affairs (1983) from Marshall.

A reception for everyone taking part in the convocation will take place after the event at a site still to be determined.


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Friday November 7, 2008
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Senator joins 'Up Late' this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Guests on "Up Late" don't typically have to give Marshall University $800,000 to get a coveted spot on the show, but it's nice when they do, said Jamie LoFiego, host of the student-produced late night show.

LoFiego finally gets to talk with Sen. Bob Plymale about the State of West Virginia grant that he helped award the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications last month. The money will go to fund the conversion of its television studio from analog to digital standards so students will be learning on the most current equipment available in their field.

Also making an appearance on this week's show is Jack Houvouras, editor of the Huntington Quarterly.

The big news on the show this week is that one of the students, Will Sutherland, will be running for president in 2012. "Mind Blown" with Jonathan Slade is a new element on "Up Late." Without revealing too much, his trick involves a brown paper bag and his head.

Musical guest Traci Ann Stanley plays her new song "One Day of Heaven." Doorkeeper is Oak Hill student Miranda Rosiek.

"Up Late" will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Suddenlink Communications is also airing the show on Channels 19 and 22 in its different markets. "Up Late" can be found online at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Friday November 7, 2008
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Journalism Faculty to Look Back at 1968

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In a year with a history-making presidential election, faculty at the Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) will reflect on another year that changed America: 1968.

"The SOJMC faculty did not want the 40th anniversary of an important year to get away without paying due respects -- in what we are calling " '1968 Revisited,' " said Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the SOJMC.

The public is invited to the symposium, which will take place Thursday, Nov. 13 from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. in room 402 of the Drinko Library. A reception follows the event.

It was a year in which people clashed on all sides of issues such as free love, clenched fists at the Olympics, poverty, civil rights for black Americans, equal rights for women, an unpopular war in Vietnam and an unpopular president because of the war. The media were in the thick of it, and they were changed with America, too, said Robert Rabe, assistant professor of journalism and one of the organizers of the symposium. Journalism faculty and other researchers at the symposium will highlight the impact of such major issues from 1968 and their impact on America 40 years later.

Here is a lineup of presenters at the symposium:

  • Rabe will present issues involving the 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago:  violence against journalists, news coverage of the convention and public opinion that followed the convention.
  • Dr. Christopher Swindell, a Marshall assistant professor of journalism and mass communications will discuss news coverage of the Tet Offensive, a Vietnam battle, and its implications for politics and journalism.
  • Julie Lane, a doctoral candidate in mass communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an expert on postwar political journalism, will provide a study of 1968's impact on the women's movement.
  • Cicero Fain, a Marshall assistant professor of history, will present a reaction to Tommy Smith and John Carlos, two black athletes famous for raising "Black Consciousness" during their award ceremony at the Mexico City Olympics.
  • Philip Carter, a Marshall professor of social work, a 1960s civil rights activist and athlete at Marshall and a CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) executive in 1968, will discuss the civil rights movement.
  • Burnis Morris, Marshall's Carter G. Woodson professor of journalism and mass communications, will moderate a panel and discuss the impact of the Kerner Commission Report, regarding the 1967 race riots, on the journalism profession.
  • Dennison will remind the audience of other issues that surfaced in 1968 and that many people may not remember.

For further information, persons may contact Rabe by phone at 304-696-4636 or by e-mail at rabe@marshall.edu, or Morris by phone at 304-638-3322 or by e-mail at morrisb@marshall.edu.


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CNN correspondent Joe Johns grand marshal of MU homecoming parade

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - CNN correspondent Joe Johns, a 1980 Marshall University graduate, will serve as grand marshal of Marshall's homecoming parade, Student Body President Matt James announced today.

The homecoming parade on Saturday, Nov. 15, featuring the theme "Go Green…Go Herd!" and sponsored by the Student Government Association, begins at noon downtown at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena and ends at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

Johns, who was a four-year standout track and field performer while consistently earning dean's-list honors at Marshall, joined CNN as a congressional correspondent in January 2004 after covering Capitol Hill for NBC News for more than 10 years.

For CNN, he reports on government accountability, waste and fraud for Anderson Cooper 360° and other programs throughout the network. In addition to his bachelor of arts degree in political science from Marshall, Johns has a law degree from American University.

Homecoming activities begin Monday, Nov. 10 and continue through Saturday, Nov. 15. Highlights include the homecoming concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, featuring the Steve Miller Band, and the Marshall Thundering Herd's Conference USA football game with the University of Central Florida at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15 at the stadium.

Here is a look at some of the other activities planned during homecoming week Nov. 10-15:

Monday, Nov. 10

Employees are asked to decorate their offices to promote homecoming 2008, using the theme, "Go Green...Go Herd!" Prizes will be awarded at the Coaches' Breakfast Friday morning.

Students can get short-sleeved t-shirts airbrushed from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2 to 4 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Also, electronic voting for Mr. and Miss Marshall begins at 10 a.m. for Marshall students.

Tuesday, Nov. 11

Voting for Mr. and Miss Marshall continues until 4 p.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 12

 

Students can get their t-shirts airbrushed from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the student center plaza.

 

The naming of the homecoming court will take place in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center between noon and 1:30 p.m.

 

From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., students will have the opportunity to enter a money machine in the student center and grab as much money as they can.

 

Thursday, Nov. 13

 

Office decoration judging will begin at 1 p.m.

 

From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., students can play games such as NCAA Challenge, Rock Band, Mario Kart and cornhole on the student center plaza. 

Friday, Nov. 14
Green & White Day

The first official Marshall University Alumni Association event of homecoming weekend is the Coaches' Breakfast at the Erickson Alumni Center from 6 to 10 a.m. This live radio broadcast lets those present as well as radio listeners get to know some of Marshall's coaches. The DAWG 93.7 FM will start broadcasting at 6 a.m.; the coaches will join in throughout the broadcast. The winner of the office decorating contest will be announced.

The Pi Kappa Alphas of the '50s will have their traditional biennial reunion with a dinner-dance at 6 p.m. at the Palms Room, 314 9th St. (second floor).

The homecoming concert featuring the Steve Miller Band starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore arena in downtown Huntington. The concert is sponsored by the Alumni Association and the Student Activities Programming Board. A pre-concert reception, featuring hors d'oeuvres and a wine and beer cash bar, will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Hall of Fame Café. Cost for the reception is $10 per person.  

Saturday, Nov. 15

The MU Alumni Association's Lunch Under the Tent will take place at the corner of 5th Avenue and 20th Street. The tailgate begins at 1 p.m. and tickets are $10 per person. Call 304-696-2901 for reservations.

The College of Health Professions is having an "elegant tailgate" from noon to 2:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center Shawkey Dining Room. Guests are invited to watch the homecoming parade from the student center balcony, visit with faculty and other alumni, share memories and look around campus at all the changes that have occurred since they graduated. The tailgate is the kickoff of the 10-year celebration of the COHP as a college.

The Step Show, sponsored by the National Pan-Hellenic Council, will take place after the game at 8 p.m. in the Jean Carlo Stephenson Auditorium in Huntington City Hall. Tickets are $15. Call 304-696-2283.

The Pi Kappa Alpha post-game BBQ party will take place at the Palms Room, 314 9th St. (second floor).

Alumni Association and homecoming sponsors include: West Virginia Delegate Doug Reynolds, Bank of America, Marshall University Bookstore, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Pepsi Bottling Group, West Virginia Steel and Marshall's Student Activities Programming Board.

"We have an exciting homecoming planned," said Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations at Marshall. "We're looking forward to having alumni and friends back to campus to enjoy homecoming 2008 festivities where there truly will be something for everyone."


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Victims of 1970 Marshall plane crash to be honored in memorial service

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash will be remembered in the annual memorial service conducted in their honor at noon Friday, Nov. 14 on the Huntington campus.

The service, which is presented by Marshall's Student Government Association, takes place on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the 38th anniversary of the crash. The victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with a flight crew of five.

"Our annual memorial service is a reflection of the sympathy and grief that we continue to feel as a Marshall University community 38 years after the tragedy," said Matt James, president of Marshall's student body. "The service is an example of how important the memories of those lost are to us, and we feel that their story must always to be told to every incoming student and staff member to our campus.  November 14, 1970 is a date that ties all of us together and we must never forget." 

CNN correspondent Joe Johns, a 1980 Marshall University graduate, will be the keynote speaker. During his years at Marshall in the late 1970s, Johns was a standout student-athlete, excelling in the shot put and discus while consistently earning dean's list honors in the classroom.

Johns also will serve as grand marshal in the Marshall homecoming parade, which starts at noon on Saturday, Nov. 15 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Other speakers at the memorial service include Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall head football Coach Mark Snyder, former Provost Dr. Sarah Denman, Marshall Alumni Association President Nancy Campbell and student body Vice President Sean Hornbuckle. James will deliver welcome and closing remarks.

The service will conclude with the traditional placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.

The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970 occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down.


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Raffle of movie memorabilia at Jim's Steak & Spaghetti House supports Marshall University Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jim's Steak & Spaghetti House in Huntington is sponsoring a raffle to raise money for the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

The "We Are Marshall" movie memorabilia raffle began today (Wednesday, Nov. 5) and will continue until 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22 when the winner of the items will be announced. Raffle tickets, which cost $5 each or $20 for five, are available at Jim's, which is located at 920 5th Ave.

Most items to be raffled were used in "We Are Marshall." They include one football jersey, one basketball jersey and two game tickets (Marshall vs. Morehead State). Also included in the raffle is a DVD of the movie autographed by actor Arlen Escarpeta, who played quarterback Reggie Oliver in the movie.

Jim's General Manager Jimmie Carder said the items are being raffled as a package deal. One person will win all of the items.

"Over the years we've had fun doing raffles or giveaways, with the proceeds going to charities such as the Ronald McDonald House," Carder said. "When we were presented with the idea of doing this raffle, we jumped on it. We have fun doing these things."

Kristi Arrowood, Director of Special Projects for the foundation, said she is thrilled to have Jim's hosting the raffle.

"Knowing the history of Jim's Steak & Spaghetti House and the ties it has with our Marshall family, the raffle is a perfect fit," Arrowood said. "Timing for the raffle couldn't be better, with Marshall's homecoming next week guaranteed to draw a large crowd back to Huntington and, of course, Jim's.

"When pre-filming started for the 'We Are Marshall' movie, the crew spent one entire day in the restaurant, taking photographs and talking to Jimmie and the staff in order to capture the essences of Jim's for the design of Boone's Restaurant in the film."

Arrowood said the Foundation is always pleased when it can partner with locally owned businesses in support of Marshall University.

"We look forward to great participation in the raffle," Arrowood said.


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Marshall music faculty to perform 'L'Histoire du Soldat' Nov. 9

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music faculty members will perform "L'Histoire du Soldat" ("The Soldier's Tale") by Igor Stravinsky at 8 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9 in the Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

The piece, a 1918 theatrical work to be read, played, or danced, is the folk tale of a soldier who is going home from the war and trades his fiddle for a book that predicts the economy. The story is told by three characters: the soldier (played by Dr. Larry Stickler), the devil (played by Dr. David Castleberry) and the narrator (Dr. Jeffrey Pappas).

Prior to the performance, Dr. Vicki Stroeher, who teaches music history at Marshall, will speak about Stravinsky and "L'Histoire du Soldat."

"Igor Stravinsky is one of the most interesting composers of the early 20th century, both in terms of his works and his life story," Stroeher said. " 'L'Histoire du Soldat' dates from that time during World War I when composers were having difficulties finding enough musicians to perform their large-scale works. Stravinsky answered that problem with a chamber work - which is the perfect medium to showcase Marshall music faculty.  The story is captivating for all audiences, and the music, written in the 'café style' of Paris, is universally appealing."

Dr. W. Edwin Bingham, professor of music, will conduct the performance, which will also include Marshall faculty members Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, violin; Dr. Ann Marie Bingham, clarinet; Kay Lawson, bassoon; Martin Saunders, trumpet; Dr. Michael Stroeher, trombone; and James Steven Hall, percussion. They will be joined by Marshall alumnus Jason McNeel, contrabass.

For more information about this performance, contact Vicki Stroeher by phone at 304-696-6437 or by e-mail at stroeherv@marshall.edu


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Tuesday November 4, 2008
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Marshall University's Up 'Til Dawn to host 'Write for Life' for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Up 'Til Dawn student organization will host "Write for Life" to raise money for the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

"Write for Life" is a letter-writing campaign designed to raise money for the life-saving work of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, as well as increase the participants' own awareness. All materials, including envelopes and letters, will be provided by Up 'Til Dawn with students only responsible for bringing mailing addresses.

The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5 in Marco's in the basement of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Food will also be provided throughout the day for those participating.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering work in finding cures and saving children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases. Founded by the late entertainer Danny Thomas and based in Memphis, Tenn., St. Jude freely shares its discoveries with scientific and medical communities around the world.

Families without insurance are never asked to pay. In addition, no family ever pays for treatment not covered by insurance. For more information, call 1-800-822-644 or visit www.stjude.org.


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Manchin appoints Touma to MU Board of Governors

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin III announced today that Huntington physician Joseph Touma has been appointed to the Marshall University Board of Governors, effective Nov. 1, 2008. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Touma served as the Chair of the Marshall University Foundation Board of Directors.

"Dr. Joe Touma has demonstrated visionary leadership during his service with our Foundation, and I am certain that he will bring that same ability to his appointment with the Marshall University Board of Governors," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "He is an accomplished physician and business leader, and I look forward to working with him in this new capacity."


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'Graduation Celebration' for December graduates set for Nov. 4-5

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - All prospective December 2008 graduates of Marshall University are invited to attend a "Graduation Celebration" next week in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The purpose of the event is to give students the opportunity to purchase caps and gowns, class rings, announcements and other items to commemorate their graduation. They also will be able to meet with representatives from the Office of the Registrar, the Marshall Bookstore, Jostens, Alumni Relations, the MU Graduate College, Career Services, the Office of the Bursar and Financial Aid.

The celebration will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4 and from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5.

The following services will be available at this event:

Registrar's Office - Students may verify their graduation status, degree record, name format and mailing address for December 2008 diploma. They also will receive information related to a new event at Marshall - the Convocation for December graduates, which will take place Dec. 6 at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

Marshall University Bookstore - Students may purchase or pre-order their "official" Marshall University gown, cap and tassel and purchase a custom diploma frame. They also may order personalized graduation announcements and class rings.

Classic Photography - Cap and gown portraits will be taken during the Graduation Celebration.

Alumni Relations - Students will have the opportunity to learn about the benefits of joining the Marshall University Alumni Association.

Graduate College - Students will be able to meet with a Graduate Admission Counselor to discuss graduate programs and the admission process.

Career Services - Information will be available on resume writing, cover letters and interview skills. 

Office of the Bursar - Students can discuss account holds and account balances and take part in loan counseling sessions. To complete a loan counseling session, a student needs to bring his or her driver's license and Marshall ID card.

Financial Aid - Personnel will answer questions and provide procedures regarding consolidation of student loans.

For more information, call the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Beam Signing Ceremony celebrates construction of Erickson Alumni Center and Marshall University Foundation Hall


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrated construction of the new Erickson Alumni Center and Marshall University Foundation Hall with a Beam Signing Ceremony today at the John Marshall Statue on MU's Huntington campus.

Those attending the event signed a steel beam that will be used in construction of the 33,220-square-foot, state-of-the-art building, which is located at the intersection of 5th Avenue and John Marshall Drive.

The three-story facility is expected to be completed in fall 2009. In addition to the Office of Alumni Relations and Marshall University Foundation, Inc., the building will house the University Development Office. The building is one of three projects funded through Marshall's Bridge Campaign.

Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall Foundation, said the facility is much needed on campus.

"In addition to bringing our fundraising and alumni operations together in one campus location, this facility is going to give us a well defined identity within the university," he said. "We will be accessible and accountable to our alumni, donors and friends. I believe people feel very good about the investment they have made to this important project and we are poised to offer additional opportunities for support. For us, it is all about fostering positive relationships with our alumni while continuing to advance the growth and financial position of the University." 

Tish Littlehales, Director of Alumni Relations, said her office, along with the Development Office, have outgrown the current Erickson Alumni Center.

"This fantastic new building will be larger than our current facility, allowing us ample room for growth and a place to stage events showcasing the University," Littlehales said. "It will be a beautiful building, a source of pride for our alumni and a comfortable gathering place - a home away from home when they come to visit."

In addition to three floors of office space, the features of the building include conference facilities, casual gathering areas, and spaces which will feature Marshall University memorabilia.

Neighborgall Construction Co. of Huntington is the contractor of the facility designed by architects Sherman, Carter, and Barnhart of Lexington, Ky. To view a rendering of the facility, go to http://www.marshalluniversityfoundation.com/bridge/alumni.html.

For more information, contact Rebecca Samples, Assistant Vice President for Development, at 304-696-3292.


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From Zimbabwe with Love: 'Bongo Love' to Perform Nov. 6 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bongo Love, a musical group from Zimbabwe, will perform Thursday, Nov. 6 at 8 p.m. at the Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University. The concert is free and open to the public.

The quartet has fused styles from all over the world with the sounds of their native Zimbabwe to create music, combining theatrics, dance and impromptu call-and-response vocal styles. concert organizers say it will appeal to people with an interest in traditional music, jazz, reggae, pop or just a night of great dancing.

"It will be great to have the opportunity to see and hear a group performing a genre of music we rarely get to experience," said Marshall percussion student James Hairston. "Needless to say this music is strongly influenced by the current difficult political and economic situation in Zimbabwe." 

The members of Bongo Love utilize instruments native to their culture, including the mbira, an instrument with between 22 and 28 metal keys affixed to a sounding board.

"We have shared the same passion for music since we were kids," says lead singer John Mambira."We survive through this music."

After traveling to perform and teach in Mozambique, Sweden and the Dominican Republic, they toured the United States in the summer of 2007, playing clubs and festivals and teaching marimba, mbira, drumming and singing.

Bongo Love's first CD, "Afro-Coustics," was released in 2006. They are currently working to complete their second CD, "Rwendo Rwedu" ("Our Journey").

For more information on Bongo Love, e-mail bongolovemusic@gmail.com or visit their Web site at www.bongolovemusic.com for music clips and photos.

For more information contact Steve Hall at 696-6468 or at hallj@marshall.edu


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Musical Weekend at Marshall features marching festival, Music Educators conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will have a busy weekend beginning Saturday, Nov. 1, when it hosts the Tri-State Marching Festival, and continuing Sunday, Nov. 2, when the West Virginia Collegiate Music Educators Association state conference begins on the Huntington campus.

Thirty-eight high school bands are slated to perform in the marching festival, which will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday in Joan C. Edwards Stadium. According to Marshall's band director, Steve Barnett, this is the largest band festival of its kind in this part of the country. Bands from West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio and Virginia have been separated into categories based on the number of performers.

Scoring for the festival will be based on Music Performance (35%), Marching Performance (30%), General Effect (30%), and Percussion (5%). Trophies will be awarded to the 1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-place bands in each category, as well as recognition of percussion, drum major, color guard, and featured twirlers. 

Admission to the festival is $5 per person of school age and up. Public parking will be available for $2 in the south end of the west stadium parking lot until the lot is full.  After that, patrons may park in the garage on 3rd Avenue and any other available spaces near the stadium.

"The Tri-State Marching Festival is a tremendous opportunity to showcase Marshall University," Barnett said. "We expect to bring more than 10,000 to the stadium, many of whom are prospective college students with their parents."

The West Virginia Collegiate Music Educators Association state conference begins Sunday with a concert by the Jay Flippin Trio at 8 p.m. in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus. Flippin, a noted local jazz performer who teaches part-time in the Marshall department of music, will be featured on piano and will be joined by Kevin Lampson on bass and Nick Diedrichsen on drums. The concert is free and open to the public. Donations to the WVCMEA will be accepted.

Rebecca Murphy, a Marshall University graduate student in music education, is the president of the state committee that coordinates the conference.

"Our clinicians are some of the foremost music educators in West Virginia and throughout the country. We also invite the community to join our cause for music education by joining us for the Sunday evening concert," Murphy said. "We would be delighted to see a full house of music supporters!"

The conference, which gathers future music educators from around West Virginia, will continue through Tuesday, Nov. 4.


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Record number of runners, walkers entered in Marshall Marathon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 5th annual Marshall University Marathon, presented on Sunday, Nov. 2 by HealthyHuntington.org, will feature a record number of participants, race director Tom Dannals said today.

Dannals said more than 800 runners and walkers from 37 states have pre-registered for the event, which starts at 7:30 a.m. on 3rd Avenue in front of Cam Henderson Center and ends on the Joan C. Edwards Stadium playing field.

"Based on the number of pre-registrations, we will have a record number this year," Dannals said. "We're still hoping for 1,000 at race time."

Dannals said people can still register for any of the events - the 26.2-mile marathon, the 13.1-mile half-marathon, the half-marathon relay or the 5-mile walk - by going to Huntington Physical Therapy at 2220 5th Ave. between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1. The race expo/packet pickup will take place at that time. There is no race-day entry.

The mostly flat course, which extends to west Huntington and back, is USA Track and Field (USATF) certified. The finish at the football stadium, in which the runners have a chance to carry a football down the final stretch, is one of the highlights of the event.

This year, former Marshall and NFL star Mike Bartrum will be a special guest at the marathon. He will be tossing footballs to the runners as they near the finish line.

"Having Mike Bartrum on the field for the finish is sure to be a big hit since competitors have always loved the final 100 yards carrying a football to the Marshall goal line," Dannals said.

Dannals said he is "very impressed" with the support he has received from the city of Huntington, including the Huntington Police Department and Marshall University, as the event continues to grow in numbers and quality.

He said a recently released book titled "50 in 50" by the Ultramarathon man, Dean Karnazes, has a chapter devoted to the Marshall Marathon and is on its way to making the best-seller list.

"This shows that the direction the marathon is heading is tremendous in only our fifth year," Dannals said.

Dannals said race fans are encouraged to line the streets and cheer the runners and walkers on.

"One other nice thing people can do is to bring out stereo speakers and play music, or roll down the windows of the car and play music," he said. "26.2 miles is a long way and the music helps."

For more information, contact Dannals via e-mail at president@healthyhuntington.org.  


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Tuesday October 28, 2008
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Marshall University's SGA to host Paint the Plaza Pink! in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association will be hosting Paint the Plaza Pink! for Breast Cancer Awareness Month on Wednesday, Oct. 29.
 
The event, which will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus, will include distribution of pink ribbon and literature on breast cancer awareness.
 
In conjunction with Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Student Government Association also participated in the annual Huntington Breast Cancer Walk on Oct. 19.
 
Everyone is encouraged to wear pink Wednesday to show their support.


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Symposium at Marshall University showcases cutting-edge research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Cell Differentiation and Development Center (MU CDDC) will host its first symposium on Friday, Nov. 14.

The event, titled "Advances in Cell Differentiation and Development," will take place in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus and is open to the public.  The day-long symposium will showcase cutting-edge research across many disciplines including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders and stem cells.

The Cell Differentiation and Development Center was created through support from the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research and Marshall's College of Science.  The research focus of the MU CDDC is to understand the epigenetic links between cell development and health, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to life-threatening disease.

In a series of short talks, researchers from Marshall University and neighboring institutions will present their latest discoveries.  In addition, the meeting will provide an opportunity for undergraduates and graduate students to talk about their own research projects, giving this future generation of scientists an opportunity to highlight their work.

The keynote speaker, Dr. R. Michael Roberts, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, will present his most recent work on reproductive biology, signaling and stem cells. Roberts is Curators' Professor of Animal Science at the University of Missouri.

In addition to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, his accomplishments include Scientific American's top 50 list for accomplishments in research and technology leadership and an NIH MERIT award.

Scientists from the extended Tri-State area and neighboring states have been invited to attend the symposium.

"We expect that this symposium will lead to new research collaborations between individuals who would otherwise never meet," said Dr. Philippe Georgel, associate professor in Marshall's department of biological sciences, and one of the event organizers. "Such interactions will lead to enhanced research productivity and grant funding, which is one of the main goals of the MU CDDC."

Georgel said the symposium will be capped off by scientific presentations by undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows. It will be followed by a reception and awards ceremony at the end of the day.

Here is the schedule of activities for the symposium:

7:45 to 8:30 a.m.: registration, poster set-up and continental breakfast

8:30 a.m.: introductory remarks

8:30 to 10:30 a.m.: oral presentations, Session 1

10:30 a.m. to noon: poster viewing and judging

Noon to 1 p.m.: lunch

1 to 2 p.m.: keynote lecture, Dr. R. Michael Roberts

2 to 3 p.m.: oral presentations, Session 2

3:30 to 4:30 p.m.: poster viewing judging

4:30 to 5:30 p.m.: reception and poster awards, lobby of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center.

For more information, contact Kristen Sutherland at: bradley57@marshall.edu.


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University Chorus to perform, start tradition Nov. 4

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chorus will perform a concert at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4 in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The 56-voice choir, under the direction of Robert Wray, assistant professor of choral music education, will perform selections ranging from baroque music of Antonio Vivaldi to contemporary works by Gawthrop, Estévez, and Olatunji. 

The featured work, Antonio Vivaldi's "Gloria," will be performed in its entirety using both a chamber ensemble comprised of Marshall University faculty and students and student soloists. Two other pieces, Estévez's "Mata Del Anima Sola" and Olatunji's "Betelehemu," bring focus to the music of Venezuela and Nigeria, respectively.

"This performance is a great opportunity to hear a wide variety of choral music sung by an energized group of university students," said Wray. "From the brilliant baroque writing of Vivaldi and the heart-wrenching text of Jane Griner in Gawthrop's 'Sing Me to Heaven' to the sounds of a Venezuelan dance and the joy and optimism found in the Nigerian carol, this concert has something to offer to any listener."

This concert will also include a re-introduction of the Marshall University Alma Mater to the campus and community as the University Choir begins its Alma Mater initiative.

"Last year, students in University Chorus remarked on how very few people seem to know the tune or words of the Alma Mater," Wray explained. "I discovered that there was not one choral arrangement that lined up with what the band plays at athletic events.  So, I created a new arrangement that would work with or without the band."

He added that it is the goal of University Chorus to sing (and teach) the Alma Mater to its concertgoers, students and other members of the community. They hope to establish a tradition of singing it at all their concerts. 

The singers that comprise University Chorus come from all corners of the campus of Marshall University. Though some are pursuing degrees in music education or performance, most are involved with studies outside the music department and are looking to simply to enhance their educational experience while at Marshall.

Admission is free and the concert is open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, please call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Wray at wrayr@marshall.edu.


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Friday October 24, 2008
Contact: Tim Ward, Communications Director, Student Government Association, (304) 696-2289

Marshall University's Student Government Association to host a Drunk Driving Course with MUPD on Buskirk Field

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Student Government Association will host a Drunk Driving Course operated by the Marshall University Police Department in continuation of its Alcohol Awareness and Drunk Driving Prevention initiative.

The event will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27 on Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus. Participants will attempt to drive golf carts between cones on the field while wearing goggles that simulate the level of impairment alcohol can cause.

The purpose of the event is to help students understand the dangers of drinking and driving.

WMUL-FM will be doing a live remote broadcast from the site.


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Friday October 24, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL-FM to host carnival before Houston game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM 88.1, Marshall University's public radio station, will host a carnival from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 28 on Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus.

Herd Hoopla is an event designed to boost school spirit before the Thundering Herd's nationally televised Conference USA football game with the University of Houston, which starts at 8 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"WMUL-FM has so many things to offer at this event," Jason Van Meter, WMUL-FM promotions director, said. "We just want students to come out and have fun before that night's 'green-out.' "

The game is being promoted by the Marshall athletic department as a "green-out." Every Herd fan attending is encouraged to wear Marshall green.

The carnival will include six inflatables provided by M & M Inflatables from Ironton, Ohio. Music will be provided by WMUL-FM disc jockeys.

Prizes will be given away to winners of various contests by both WMUL-FM and the Marshall University Bookstore, which provided gift cards in the amounts of $5, $10 and $25.

"The campus radio station is going green for the green-out as well," Van Meter said. "We're hooking students up with water bottles as well as mesh backpacks if they win. WMUL-FM purchased white water bottles and the bookstore donated some, too."

The cost of joining in the fun of Herd Hoopla is $2.  In addition to Marshall students, the event is also open to the public.

For more information about Herd Hoopla, contact Meagan Sellards, WMUL-FM station manager, at 304-696-2295.


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Thursday October 23, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Selby Wellman to give Executive in Residence Lecture at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - F. Selby Wellman, retired Senior Vice President of Cisco Systems, Inc., will deliver the Ruth E. Butler Executive in Residence Lecture Monday, Oct. 27 at Marshall University.

Wellman, a Williamson, W.Va., native and 1963 graduate of Marshall University, will speak at 11 a.m. in the Alumni Lounge on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. His speech is titled, "Getting that job in today's business climate." The event is open to the public, but seating is limited.

"The faculty, staff and students of the Lewis College of Business are excited about the return of Mr. Wellman, an influential graduate of the college, as a lecturer for the Executive in Residence program," said Larry Templeton, director of development with the College of Business. "Mr. Wellman will be able to provide our students with some valuable information concerning that initial job search.  He has some insight into what is expected of students by a major corporation and hopefully can assist them in successfully reaching their goal of attaining employment."

The Executive in Residence program was created in 1984 by Dr. Robert P. Alexander, then-dean of the Lewis College of Business, with the purpose of providing students with the opportunity to hear and interact with successful business executives. The program provides role models with outstanding business experience related to students through lectures, discussions and informal dialogue.

Wellman spent his entire career in the high technology industry. Prior to joining Cisco, worldwide leader in networking for the Internet, he spent five years as Corporate Vice President of Sales, Marketing and Operations at FiberCom. He also was Corporate Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Paradyne, a Florida-based networking company. Wellman started his career at IBM, where he spent 15 years in various marketing and management positions.

Wellman took early retirement to pursue other business and personal interests. For the past five years, he has followed up his many years of amateur auto racing by competing at the professional level in the Grand-Am Rolex Series throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Wellman's current activities include involvement in West Virginia education through his private family Foundation. This includes many scholarships that make it possible for West Virginia students in need to attend Marshall University. His Foundation also has funded the SAS Curriculum Pathways software students in grades 8-12 in all West Virginia schools.


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Thursday October 23, 2008
Contact: Randy Burnside, Assistant Athletic Director for Media Relations, (304) 696-4660

Marshall football program recognized by the American Football Coaches Association for graduation success

WACO, Texas - Marshall University's football program was one of 47 programs in the nation recognized by the American Football Coaches Association on Thursday for having a graduation rate of 70 percent or better. Marshall joins UCF, Rice and Southern Miss as the only Conference USA institutions to obtain this distinction.

"This is an honor we are very proud of and we are committed to seeing that number continue to go up," Marshall Head Coach Mark Snyder said. "Our goal is to graduate 100 percent of our players and this is an indication that we are on our way to reaching that goal."

Snyder says there are many reasons for Marshall's graduation success and that the hard work of the student-athletes and the emphasis the coaching and support staff places on academics are just some of them.

"A lot of the credit goes to our student-athletes for the work and dedication they put into their studies," Snyder said. "Also, our academic support staff, coaches and administration as a whole share in this success. Our coaching staff puts a heavy emphasis on academics and our players understand that and are responding. This is a key part of the plan we implemented when I arrived here and we are getting closer in all three phases - academic achievement, community outreach and winning."

The University of Colorado will receive the AFCA Academic Achievement Award for a 100 percent graduation rate for members of its freshman football class of 2001. This year's award marks the first time the NCAA's Graduation Success Rate (GSR) formula has been used to select the winner. From 1981 to 2007, the award was presented based on a formula used by the College Football Association and AFCA.

Forty-six other institutions will be recognized for graduating 70 percent or more of their football student-athletes. Six of those institutions Cincinnati, Duke, Navy, Notre Dame, Rutgers and Vanderbilt achieved a rate of 90 percent or better. The remaining 40 institutions are: Air Force, Akron, Alabama, Arkansas State, Army, Baylor, Boston College, Bowling Green, Central Florida, Central Michigan, Colorado State, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana Tech, Marshall, Miami (Ohio), Middle Tennessee State, Nevada, North Carolina, Northwestern, Ohio, Oregon State, Penn State, Rice, Southern Mississippi, Stanford, Syracuse, TCU, Texas Tech, Toledo, UCLA, Utah State, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Wake Forest, Washington, Washington State and Wisconsin.

The Academic Achievement Award was established by the College Football Association in 1981. The award recognized the CFA-member Football Bowl Subdivision institution with the highest graduation rate among members of its football teams. When the CFA disbanded in 1997, the AFCA stepped in to present the award and conduct a graduation rate survey that encompassed all members of the FBS. The GSR is based on a six-year graduation window for student-athletes which is a change from the five-year window used by the CFA and AFCA.

The GSR was developed by the NCAA as part of its academic reform initiative to more accurately assess the academic success of student-athletes. The GSR holds institutions accountable for transfer students, unlike the federal graduation rate. The GSR also accounts for mid-year enrollees. Marshall's GSR for the current six-year window is 74.

Under GSR calculation, institutions are not penalized for outgoing transfer students who leave in good academic standing. These outgoing transfers are passed to the receiving institution's GSR cohort. By counting incoming transfer students and mid-year enrollees, the GSR increases the total number of student-athletes tracked for graduation by more than 37 percent. The NCAA also calculates the federal graduation rate for student-athletes because it is the only rate by which to compare student-athletes to the general student body.


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Wednesday October 22, 2008
Contact: Leah Edwards, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University marks 10th anniversary of Drinko Library and Information Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Drinko Library and Information Center with a private reception at the library Friday, Oct. 24 and public tours of the facility on Saturday, Oct. 25.

As part of the public celebration on Saturday, local authors James E. Casto and Jack Dickinson will be available to sign their books, both of which feature Marshall University. Casto is scheduled to sign books at 10 a.m. and Dickinson at noon. The signings will take place in the Drinko Library lobby. Also, artist Gerald W. "Jerry" Sutphin will sign his pen and ink drawings at 11 a.m.

Light refreshments will be served during Saturday's event, which is scheduled from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.

Officially dedicated on Oct. 24, 1998, the Drinko Library and Information Center is a 118,000-square-foot facility named in honor of Dr. John Deaver Drinko. Drinko was a Marshall University graduate, philanthropist and supporter of higher education who died earlier this year.

"We as a campus, as a community, owe a debt of gratitude to John and Libby Drinko for their vision that we have this wonderful opportunity for our students," said Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall University Libraries.

The interactive facility has more than 200,000 books, hundreds of computers and ports, connections to thousands of electronic global resources, a 24-hour study facility and a café.  University statistics show more than 500,000 visits to the library last year.

The Drinko Library and Information Center is a four-story building that houses University Libraries, Computing Services, Telecommunications, and the Center for Instructional Technology and Information Technology.

For more information, contact Winters at 304-696-2318.   


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Tuesday October 21, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Steve Miller Band to perform in Marshall University's homecoming concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Steve Miller Band, which over the past four decades has recorded 20 chart records including top 10 hits "The Joker," "Rock 'n Me," "Fly Like an Eagle," and "Jet Airliner," will perform in Marshall University's 2008 homecoming concert Friday, Nov. 14.

The Marshall University Alumni Association and Student Activities Programming Board are sponsoring "An Evening with the Steve Miller Band" at 7:30 p.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Tickets are available to the general public for $55 and $45 at the arena box office, all Ticketmaster locations and at www.ticketmaster.com. Tickets may be charged by phone by calling 304-523-5757 in Huntington and 304-342-5757 in Charleston.

A limited number of discounted tickets have been set aside for Marshall students. By showing their Marshall IDs at the arena ticket office, they may purchase tickets for $22 while supplies last.

A limited number of discounted tickets also are available for active Marshall alumni by calling the Alumni Association at 304-696-2901 or 800-682-5869. Prime seats (regularly $55) are available for $35 each, limit four per person, while supplies last.

The Steve Miller Band's visit to Huntington is part of the group's fall tour. In April of this year, the band received the prestigious Golden Note Award, acknowledging lifetime achievements, at the 25th annual ASCAP Pop Music Awards.

"We are absolutely thrilled to have the Steve Miller Band perform in our homecoming concert," said Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations. "They have been recording and performing for more than 40 years and many of their songs are classics. Response has been great and tickets are going fast. We are looking forward to a great evening with the Steve Miller Band."

For more information, contact Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs, at 304-696-3134.


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Friday October 17, 2008
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Communications, (304) 746-2038

Health & Wellness Fair set for Tuesday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 7th Annual Marshall University Health & Wellness Fair will take place Tuesday, Oct. 21 on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Free testing will be available to students, staff and faculty.  The tests will include step test, flexibility, body composition, blood pressure and others. There will be wellness and other informational booths, as well as fitness center class demonstrations. In addition, displays of a MASH tent and critical care ambulance, as well as a climbing wall, will be on Buskirk Field during the fair.

The PEIA Worksite Health Screening will also be held for PEIA-insured students, staff, and faculty in 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center from 7 until 9:30 a.m. Tests will include blood pressure, bone density, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, Total Cholesterol/HDL ratio, triglycerides, glucose, and PSA (for men over 45). Optional tests will be available for fees.  For best results, fasting 8-12 hours is recommended. Please call 696-6839 to schedule an appointment.

Only those who participate in a health screen (may include one or all of the following: blood pressure, osteoporosis screening or blood work) will be eligible to participate in the Lifestyle Change Programs. For more information about PEIA's Lifestyle Change Programs, visit www.peiapathways.com on the Web.

This event is sponsored by the MU Wellness Coalition, Student Health Education Programs, Recreational Sports and the College of Health Professions.

For further information, persons may contact Amy Saunders by telephone at (304) 696-4800 or by e-mail at saunde22@marshall.edu.


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Friday October 17, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tribute to John Marshall is Oct. 21 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two theatrical performances of "A Tribute to the Great Chief Justice John Marshall," featuring the Honorable John Laidley narrating a segment called "Meet John Marshall," and special music from Marshall University music faulty, will take place Tuesday, Oct. 21 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The first performance starts at 5 p.m. and is for Marshall students. The second performance, at 8 p.m., is for the Marshall community and the general public. Admission to both performances is free.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp also will take part in the performances. Kopp was in the first tribute to John Marshall in 2006, which was staged as part of Marshall's 251st birthday celebration.

"Dr. Kopp has long encouraged the development of a better understanding of our namesake, John Marshall," said Dr. Alan B. Gould, executive director of Marshall's John Drinko Academy. "We hope everyone will join Dr. Kopp as he pays tribute to the great Chief Justice."

Laidley was a local lawyer who founded Marshall Academy in 1837 and named the school for his friend and colleague, United States Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall.

Music Professor Wendell Dobbs said musical commentary will accompany the recounting of John Marshall's life by Laidley. Music faculty performing will be singers Linda Dobbs, soprano, and David Castleberry, tenor;  Leslie Petteys, piano; Kay Wildman, harpsichord; Elizabeth Reed Smith, violin; Kay Lawson, bassoon; Stephen Lawson, horn; Ben Miller, field drum, and Wendell Dobbs, flute.


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Thursday October 16, 2008
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

Marshall University mascot in need of a makeover

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The rough-and-tumble costume of Marshall University's beloved mascot Marco has seen better days, but that's about to change.
 
 The Marshall University Alumni Association has kicked off the Marco Make-Over fundraising effort to raise money to acquire a new costume for the University's nationally recognized mascot. This costume will be crafted by Dale Morton Studios in Hurricane.
 
 Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations, said this fundraising effort is a great opportunity for fans of the furry bison.
 
 "In each and every appearance he makes, Marco embodies the traditions of the Thundering Herd," Littlehales said. "He's well-loved, but right now, that costume is really well-worn."
 
 Beatrice Crane-Banford, associate director of athletics, agreed.
 
 "We all love Marco," Crane-Banford said. "So it's really tough to see him working the sidelines and the crowds in a costume that is, quite literally, falling apart. We are hoping fans of the big guy will help us give him a fresh costume and make him the best-dressed mascot in the nation."
 
 Fans who shop at S&K Menswear also can participate in the effort. When they make a purchase online or at any S&K Menswear store, fans can choose to have 5 percent of their purchase amount credited to the Marshall University Alumni Association Marco Make-Over through the "S&K Gives Back" program. For more information, go to www.skmenswear.com.
 
 To make a direct financial gift, mail it to the Marshall University Alumni Association, Marco Make-Over, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755. For more information, visit www.marshall.edu/alumni, call (800) 682-5869, or e-mail alumni@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday October 15, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University receives $800,000 from State of WV to help fund mandated conversion from analog to digital TV standards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications has received a major grant from the State of West Virginia to help fund the conversion of its TV studio from analog to digital TV standards, as mandated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The announcement of the $800,000 grant was made during a news conference today on MU's Huntington campus.

At the request of Sen. Robert Plymale, chair of the Senate Education Committee, the West Virginia Legislature appropriated the money during the June 2008 special session for the School of Journalism's digital conversion. By February 2009, all full-power television stations must convert from analog to digital.

"It will improve production quality and techniques for the School and the University and enhance the educational experience of the students participating in TV production classes," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, said of the conversion to digital.

The grant was announced in Studio A in the Communications Building. In addition to Plymale and Dennison, participants in the news conference were Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Kay H. Goodwin, West Virginia Secretary of Education and the Arts. West Virginia Public Broadcasting is an agency of the Department of Education and the Arts, which served as a conduit in transferring the funds to Marshall.

"This allocation is very important as we continue the ongoing effort to upgrade the facilities for future Marshall students as they pursue careers in broadcast journalism, much like (CNN correspondent) Joe Johns was able to do," Plymale said. "I'm certainly glad that Governor Manchin and the legislative leadership recognize that."

Dennison said the funding to upgrade Studio A will enable journalism and mass communications students to work in digital high definition productions that will be the same technology the students will encounter in the marketplace.

"This allocation is really workforce development as students are able to work in the same TV format they will face in the commercial marketplace," Dennison said. "The students, faculty and staff of the Marshall University School of Journalism and Mass Communications are very appreciative of the efforts of Senator Plymale, the Legislature, Governor Manchin and all involved in making this technology available to us.

"With the FCC mandate forcing all TV to go digital in February of 2009, it was essential that the School and the University stay current with industry trends," Dennison said.

Goodwin praised Plymale for his efforts in securing the funds for Marshall.

"This venture is a wonderful example of Senator Robert Plymale's special ability to recognize projects that will be beneficial to West Virginia's college students as we strive to provide new opportunities and keep our graduates in West Virginia," she said.


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Monday October 13, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

MU Chamber Choir to perform at Cultural Center in Charleston

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir will perform in a concert at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23 at the Cultural Center in Charleston.

The 32-voice choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, Director of Choral Activities, will perform selections ranging from renaissance music of Claudio Monteverdi to contemporary works by Eric Whitacre, Stephen Chatman, Rihards Dubra, Trond Kverno, and others, with a focus on music that explores "ethereal" themes and sonorities. The concert will preview music the group will perform later this year in a tour to Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia.

"This performance is a marvelous opportunity to hear exceptional choral music sung by an accomplished, enthusiastic group of university singers," Castleberry said. "The choir plans to visit with students during an informal reception following the concert."

Chamber Choir singers are drawn from the entire campus of Marshall University through competitive auditions each fall. Many are pursuing degrees in music education or performance. Others participate simply for the love of music and the chance to continue an activity they enjoyed during their high school experience.

The Chamber Choir has received accolades for its many performances on West Virginia Public Television and Radio, recordings, concerts at Charleston, S.C.'s Piccolo Spoleto Festival, and frequent tour and convention presentations.

Castleberry, professor of music, has served as Director of Choral Activities since 1990 and is currently president of the Southern Division of the American Choral Directors Association.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about this concert or music at Marshall University, call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Castleberry at castlebe@marshall.edu.


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Monday October 13, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University student body president elected chair of West Virginia State Advisory Council of Students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Matt James, Marshall University's student body president, was recently elected chair of the West Virginia State Advisory Council of Students at the first annual meeting of the council.

The council is made up of representatives from all undergraduate institutions and community and technical colleges (CTC) in the state as well as the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine. All schools voted in the election.

As chair, James is responsible for the agenda and initiatives of the council throughout the school year.  For example, James will present on behalf of the Advisory Council of Students at the regular meeting of the West Virginia Council for Community and Technical College Education at 9 a.m. Friday, Oct. 17 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre at Marshall's Huntington campus.

"It is an honor to have been selected to lead this group and I am thrilled at the possibilities we have as a council throughout the upcoming year," James said. "We hope to address the various student issues that are common on the majority of our campuses.  But, it is more of an honor to represent Marshall University to the rest of our state, as we are the host institution of the CTC Council this week."

James said the council has outlined its main initiatives this year around the financial strain placed on average West Virginia students living in difficult economic times.

"We will make points related to financial aid, affordable textbook costs, and rising tuition costs," James said. "We will also tackle various funding issues related to the "together but separate" university/CTC split due to West Virginia Senate Bill 448.  In addition, we hope to update the commission on what is going on as related to energy policies and "going green" recycling initiatives on each of our West Virginia campuses as this is presently a "hot issue" with students.  As well, we hope to briefly outline how a university-backing of health and wellness initiatives can turn around the trends in our state."

For more information, contact James at (304) 696-6436.


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Monday October 13, 2008
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

Drummer Liberty DeVitto in residence at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Liberty DeVitto, who recorded multi-platinum albums and toured the world for 30 years as Billy Joel's drummer, is in residence on the Huntington campus of Marshall University this week through Oct. 16.

DeVitto, who is designated a Sabian artist by the cymbal manufacturer of the same name, appears as a result of being named a Joan C. Edwards Distinguished Professor of the Arts by Donald Van Horn, Dean of the Marshall University College of Fine Arts.

"Clearly, Mr. DeVitto will bring extraordinary opportunities to our students and the university community and that is exactly what is intended through the Edwards Distinguished Professors program," Van Horn said when announcing the residency.

While in Huntington, DeVitto will present lectures to 10 different sections of music appreciation classes about the creative process of composing and recording rock/pop music. He also will present several lecture/discussions to jazz studies and commercial music students, will host a seminar on performance preparation and career development for music majors, work with Marshall percussion students and present a drum set clinic for the general public.

DeVitto's drum set clinic is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16 in the Jomie Jazz Building located on 5th Ave across from the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Admission is $5. Free parking is available in lots on either side of the building.

Dr. Ben Miller, Professor of Music and Percussion Instructor at Marshall University and a Sabian Educational Clinician, helped create the residency.  Concerning DeVitto's visit to Marshall, Miller said, "When Liberty left Billy Joel's Band I was informed that Liberty was interested in sharing his knowledge and experience with university students and I jumped at the opportunity. That led to a two-day visit in the summer of 2006 that was very successful.  We are expanding on the sessions that Liberty did then. So many students only know famous rock/pop performers through tabloid magazines, stereotypical TV shows and Hollywood movies.  By having Liberty on campus for a week interacting with students from all over campus I hope that they will get to know Liberty not only as a famous musician, but also as a sincere musician who is passionate about making music and sharing it with others and, most importantly, as a really wonderful person."

DeVitto's residency at Marshall University is being made possible by corporate assistance from Pro-Mark Corporation, Sabian Cymbals, Evans Drum Heads and Mapex Drums. Jungle Drums, located at 2701A 5th Ave. in Huntington, W.Va., is providing the drum set for the Thursday clinic.

In 1992 Joan C. Edwards established an endowment, bearing her name, with the intent of enabling the College of Fine Arts at Marshall University to bring distinguished educators in the arts to campus to enhance learning opportunities for students, staff, faculty and the community.

For more information, please contact Miller at (304) 696-2377.


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Wednesday October 8, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall announces top 10 scoring seniors on Collegiate Learning Assessment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last spring, 101 Marshall University seniors voluntarily took the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA), a test that assesses students' critical thinking, analytic reasoning, problem solving and written communication skills.

"We give the test at Marshall not to assess individuals, but to assess how we are doing in educating students," said Dr. Mary Reynolds, director of assessment at Marshall.

Reynolds said the CLA is an open-ended test in which the students do a lot of writing and solve real-world problems. The following 10 students scored the highest on the test. They are listed in alphabetical order with their hometown, major and college:

  • Karen E. Bohne of Rochester, Mich., History and Modern Languages, College of Liberal Arts
  • Jennifer M. Cook of Ballard, W.Va., Nursing, College of Health Professions
  • Megan C. Corley of Charles Town, W.Va., History and Political Science, College of Liberal Arts
  • Cade Elkins of Yawkey, W.Va., English, College of Liberal Arts
  • Matthew Graves of Barboursville, W.Va., Computer and Information Technology, College of Science
  • Michaela M. Hanna of Millersburg, Ohio, English, College of Liberal Arts
  • Sarah N. Johnson of Huntington, Geography, College of Liberal Arts
  • Kristin R. Lyttle of Huntington, Elementary Education, College of Education and Human Services
  • Ashley N. Radcliffe of Sissonville, W.Va., Finance, Lewis College of Business
  • Whitney Thomas of Wheeling, W.Va., Secondary Education - English, College of Education and Human Services and College of Liberal Arts.
For more information, contact Reynolds at (304) 696-2987.
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Wednesday October 8, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol abstracts due Oct. 17

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students interested in submitting abstracts of their research to be considered for display at the 6th annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston on March 12, 2009 have until Friday, Oct. 17 to do so.

The Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol Steering Committee is calling for students to submit an abstract of their research that represents any of the following 26 disciplines:

African Studies, Anthropology, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Communications, Criminal Justice, Economics, Engineering, Computer Science/Information Technology, English, Foreign Language, Forensic Science, Geography, Geosciences, History, International Studies, Mathematics, Native American Studies, Philosophy, Physics/Astronomy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology/Social Work and Women's Studies.

The 5th annual Research Day last January attracted 100 students from 13 West Virginia colleges and universities. Eighteen Marshall students participated. During Research Day, students present their discoveries in poster format and talk to legislators about their findings. The projects are original research and the posters are designed for a general audience.

Dr. Michael Castellani, chair of Marshall's chemistry department and co-chair of the Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol Steering Committee, said the event helps members of the Legislature understand the importance of undergraduate research and encourages any students who are interested in participating to apply.

"It's a great way for students to participate in the democratic process and involves their education at the same time," Castellani said.

For information on how to submit abstracts, students may visit www.marshall.edu/urdc, or contact Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


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Wednesday October 8, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University launches United Way campaign Oct. 13 with kickoff on plaza

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will begin its 2008 United Way campaign Monday, Oct. 13 with a kickoff celebration from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The campaign runs through Friday, Nov. 7.

Numerous activities are planned at the kickoff, including a hot dog lunch, cornhole competition, inflatables, live music from WMUL FM, raffles and massage therapy, which is courtesy of I-N Touch School of Massage Therapy.

Bernice Bullock, chairperson of the President's Blue Ribbon committee, which represents different departments and campuses, said the Marshall "Live Green, Live United" campaign is part of the West Virginia State Employee Combined Campaign (WVSECC). The goal at Marshall, Bullock said, is to raise $50,000.

"Making a pledge to United Way is one way of giving back that requires little effort from us other than making a donation or completing a pledge card," Bullock said. "I am very grateful that the United Way helps me to take care of so many. All I have to do is make a donation and they spread my money where it will do the most good for my community."

The United Way's four focus areas are Families & Children, Learning & Earning, Health & Wellness and Basic Needs & Unforeseen Hardships. Those who choose to donate may target their contribution to a specific agency listed in the WVSECC brochure. The Huntington community is represented by United Way of the River Cities, Inc., which has 33 partner agencies.

In addition to annual pledges and payroll deductions, Marshall University employees may contribute by participating in numerous fund-raising activities planned over the four-week campaign.

One of the most popular special activities is the opportunity for Marshall employees to wear jeans to work. An expanded version of "I'm wearing Jeans for United Way" days has been approved by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp for the upcoming campaign.

Participants will be "permitted" to wear jeans to work on selected days, depending on which days they choose and how much they donate to the campaign. Jeans days are Oct. 14, 16, 21, 23, 28 and 30, and Nov. 4 and 6.

"I'm Wearing jeans for United Way" stickers may be purchased during the campaign kickoff on the student center plaza. Cost is $3 for one day, $5 for two days, or $20 for all eight days. Stickers also will be available throughout the campaign at the following locations: Old Main basement mailroom; Old Main 207; Memorial Student Center 2W6; Holderby Hall 109; Gullickson Hall 112; Shewey Athletic Building 217; Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center 301Q, and the Marshall Medical Center 3408 (dean's office).

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22, a Zesty Taco Bar lunch will be available for $3.99 in the John Marshall Room in the Memorial Student Center. Members of the Blue Ribbon committee will be accepting donations to the United Way campaign as persons enter or exit the dining room. Everyone will have the opportunity at that time to purchase raffle tickets for a sports package that includes two tickets to Marshall's home football game with Houston on Tuesday, Oct. 28, two Marshall University t-shirts and a hat.

Another campaign activity is a pumpkin decorating contest and silent auction, which is open to all students, staff, faculty and administration. Faux pumpkins at least 7 inches by 9 inches in size must be used. Ten percent discount certificates to purchase faux pumpkins and decorating supplies from A.C. Moore Inc. may be obtained by contacting Bullock at (304) 696-4376 or via e-mail at bullock@marshall.edu. The certificates also will be available at the kickoff.

Entries must be submitted by noon Monday, Oct. 27 to room BW14 in the student center. The pumpkins will be displayed in the student center lobby from 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27 until 4:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 31. A donation jar will be placed beside each entry, and the entry receiving the largest amount of donations will be the winner. All proceeds go to the United Way campaign.

The winning entry will be announced Monday, Nov. 3 Prizes include $40 worth of certificates to Stewarts Hot Dogs and $40 worth of Strike Zone bowling certificates.

Several raffles will take place throughout the campaign, including one during the kickoff. Entrants to that raffle will be those university employees completing their 2008 pledge cards or students who make at least a $2 monetary donation. Prizes include a $25 gift card to the Marshall Hall of Fame Café, and a Marshall University t-shirt and hat. Winners will be announced after the kickoff.

For all raffles, tickets will be 1 for $1, 5 for $4, 10 for $8, or 12 for $10.

Marshall students also will be participating in the United Way campaign. They will sponsor several events, details of which will be announced later.

To monitor the progress and increase awareness of Marshall's campaign, large thermometer posters will be placed outside the university's Huntington campus. Progress also will be posted on the Marshall University/United Way Web site at www.marshall.edu/unitedway. The complete calendar of events also is posted on the Web site.


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Tuesday October 7, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Poet Devon McNamara to read from her work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Devon McNamara will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16 in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Her poems, essays and reviews have appeared in The Hiram Poetry Review, The Laurel Review, Dark Horse: Boston Poetry and Fiction, Trellis, The Christian Science Monitor and other publications. She is the recipient of a fellowship in non-fiction from the Ohio Arts Council as well as one from the Yaddo Arts Community in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

McNamara has taught writing in schools, prisons and reform facilities in West Virginia and the midwest.  Also a dancer and choreographer, she has had her poems performed by dancers from The Dayton Ballet and the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company.  She has served on the West Virginia Governor's Task Force on Arts in Education and has conducted five cultural tours of the Republic of Ireland for students.

McNamara teaches at West Virginia Wesleyan College where she also co-directs the Honors Program. 

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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Tuesday October 7, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Mirek Bialk joins MU's Career Services Center as Senior Career Counselor

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mirek Bialk, who has more than 10 years experience in student administration and academic advising, training and career counseling, has joined Marshall University's Career Services Center as Senior Career Counselor.

Career Services Director Denise Hogsett said Bialk, who also is experienced in Web technology management, came to Marshall from Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pa. He also has worked at Union County College in Cranford, N.J.

"Mirek enjoys working one on one with students and especially enjoys working on development of the first-year student career plan," Hogsett said. "He is very pleased with his position and feels that he fits in well with the Marshall community."

Hogsett said Bialk is taking appointments, presenting workshops and providing assistance to students Monday through Friday at Marshall's Career Service Center.

Anyone interested in making an appointment with Bialk or any other staff member may do so by calling (304) 696-2370. The Career Services Center will assist students and alumni with resume writing, career assessments and mock interviews.


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Monday October 6, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Pi Sigma Alpha and SGA to host drinking age debate and forum

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha (the National Political Science fraternity) and the Student Government Association are hosting a debate and forum on the current discussion for lowering or upholding the national drinking age.

The debate was originally started among university presidents, and has continued among students across college campuses.

The event will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7 in Corbly Hall 117 on Marshall's Huntington campus. The debate will be brief with both sides represented, and then the floor will be opened for attendees to participate in an open forum.

This event is open to the public and the Marshall University community is encouraged to attend.


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Monday October 6, 2008
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-2038

Marshall's Leadership Studies Program to Host Regional Conference

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Educators from 14 states will attend the annual conference of the Southern Regional Council on Educational Administration (SRCEA) Oct. 23-26 at the Embassy Suites in Charleston, W.Va. These educators represent a broad range of responsibilities and roles, including public school administrators and teachers, professors at colleges and universities and doctoral students in education.

Dr. Teresa Eagle, professor of leadership studies at Marshall University and president-elect of SRCEA, is chairing the conference.

"We are looking forward to welcoming more than 100 of our colleagues to the Charleston area," Eagle said. "We have an interesting array of presentations that were selected to help administrators face the current challenges in leading educational institutions at all levels."

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones is scheduled to welcome the group to Charleston, and West Virginia State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Steven L. Paine will also address the conference. Other presentations include those covering studies done in local school districts in West Virginia, principal preparation plans across the region and the relationship between higher education and elementary and secondary education.

According to the group's Web site, SRCEA provides a forum for presentation and discussion of research and ideas among individuals with a professional interest in the field of educational administration and leadership at all levels of the education system.

For further information on the conference, persons may contact Eagle at (304) 746-8924 or by e-mail at t.eagle@marshall.edu .


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Friday October 3, 2008
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

'Up Late' is up and running this weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This weekend, "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego learns a lot about running from Sharon Stanton of the Marshall University's Recreational Sports Department.

Stanton also shares information about the new student recreation center currently under construction.

This week's show includes a musical performance by Brandon Mitchell who plays his song, "Red Lipstick Love Song." Doorkeeper is 2007 Marshall graduate Amanda LoFiego of Orlando, Fla. She is a public relations director for Disney's Hollywood Studios. As the successful sibling, she brings interesting pictures of brother Jamie to share with viewers.

The host shares his video diary of his trip to Morgantown last weekend for the Coal Bowl. In other video elements, students talk about Halloween and the staff has another installment of Classic Audio.

The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Shows are also available for viewing at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The student-produced show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Thursday October 2, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tailgate for students, their families set for 4 p.m. Friday on practice field

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A tailgate for Marshall University students and their families will take place as part of Parents' Weekend at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3 before the Thundering Herd's home football game with the University of Cincinnati.

The tailgate, hosted by Marshall University in conjunction with the Student Activities Programming Board, the Student Government Association and the Marshall Maniacs, will take place on the grass practice field located behind the Joan C. Edwards Stadium east stands and next to Marshall's soccer field.

The game, which will be televised on ESPN and begins at 8 p.m., has been designated WHITEOUT '08. White t-shirts and rally towels will be distributed at the tailgate, and free soft drinks, food and music will be provided.


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Wednesday October 1, 2008
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

Marshall University's accounting programs earn international accreditation distinction

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The international organization that accredits accounting and business programs has announced that Marshall University's Division of Accountancy and Legal Environment has achieved accounting accreditation and is now one of 169 institutions in the world with such a distinction.

AACSB International, or the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, is the longest-serving and largest global accrediting body for business schools that offer undergraduate, master's, and doctoral degrees in business and accounting. It is an association of more than 1,100 educational institutions, business and other organizations in 70 countries that are dedicated to the advancement of management education worldwide.

Dr. Loren Wenzel, head of the Division of Accountancy and Legal Environment in the Lewis College of Business, is pleased with the AACSB distinction.

"Credit for this accomplishment should be given to the Accounting Advisory Board who gave of their time, their talent and their treasure to make this achievement possible. The advice they gave our world-class accounting faculty over the years was instrumental in helping us develop a world-class curriculum. 

"The accreditation effort was entirely financed by employers, alumni and other supporters.  The division, the business college and the university are fortunate to have so many people who care about Marshall's success," said Wenzel, who is also the Elizabeth McDowell Lewis Endowed Chair.

Achieving accreditation is a process of rigorous internal review, evaluation, and adjustment and can take several years to complete. During these years, the school develops and implements a plan to meet the 21 standards requiring a high quality teaching environment, a commitment to continuous improvement and curricula responsive to the needs of business.  Accounting accreditation further requires the satisfaction of an additional set of 15 standards that are specific to the discipline and profession of accounting.

Dr. Chong W. Kim, interim dean of the Lewis College of Business, is proud of the work of the faculty and staff in the accounting program.

"Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the faculty and staff in our accounting program as well as the tremendous leadership of Dr. Loren Wenzel, our students are now part of an internationally distinguished program," Kim said. "I know that our students are going to benefit from earning a degree from a program that is part of an elite group of educational institutions."

Institutions that earn AACSB accreditation confirm their commitment to quality and continuous improvement. By choosing to enter into this voluntary process, AACSB-accredited schools have made a public statement that their leadership, faculty, staff and students choose to be held accountable for higher expectations and educational quality. Once confirmed, accreditation stands as an externally validated hallmark of excellence, and the process is ongoing with maintenance reviews every five years.  The AACSB accreditation of Marshall's Lewis College of Business programs was maintained in 2007.

Jerry Trapnell, executive vice president and chief accreditation officer of AACSB International, said it takes a great deal of commitment and determination to earn this accreditation.

"These schools have met rigorous standards of excellence as well as made a commitment to ongoing improvement that ensures that they will deliver a high quality education to students," Trapnell said.


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Wednesday October 1, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Fans encouraged to take part in WHITEOUT '08 at Friday's game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's home football game Friday, Oct. 3 with the University of Cincinnati is being promoted by the MU athletic department as WHITEOUT '08, a chance for Marshall fans to show their Herd pride on ESPN.

Every Thundering Herd fan attending the game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium is encouraged to wear a white shirt. The game is being nationally televised by ESPN and kicks off at 8:06 p.m.

The Marshall athletic department will distribute 7,500 white T-shirts to fans attending the game. Marshall's cheerleaders will be off campus promoting the game and the whiteout and distributing shirts from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday. Also, 1,000 Marshall students will receive white rally towels at the game.


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Friday September 26, 2008
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

Volleyball coach, players serve up some fun on 'Up Late'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This weekend, "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego talks with Marshall University head volleyball coach, Mitch Jacobs.

Jacobs talks about his new record for most wins as a Marshall volleyball coach - 139 so far. He also brings two players with him on set - Elizabeth Fleming and Cameron Yoho - to see how "Up Late" director Ryan Vance can handle having volleyballs spiked at him.

This week's show includes a musical performance by Jimi Mitchell, who plays his song, "Chamber of Secrets." Doorkeeper for the show is Oak Hill junior Miranda Rosiek, a public relations major.

After the two major power outages in Huntington that forced the cancellation of classes, the "Up Late" crew thought it would be a good idea to collect money from students, faculty, staff and even Marshall University's president, Stephen J. Kopp, to keep the lights on. While on a trip to Las Vegas, LoFiego promotes "Up Late" as producers decide to break some laws in the tri-state area. Example: In Ohio, it is illegal to participate in or conduct a duel. The crew found this an entertaining law to break.

The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Shows are also available for viewing at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The student-produced show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Thursday September 25, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Three awarded Friends of Coal scholarships for 2008

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University freshmen from southern West Virginia counties have been awarded the Friends of Coal scholarships for 2008.

The recipients are Justin D. Browning, a 2008 graduate of Gilbert High School in Mingo County; Frances Alicia Ashley, a 2008 graduate of Huntington High School in Cabell County; and Savannah L. Michelle Hodges, a 2008 graduate of Lincoln County High School. Browning is majoring in science, Ashley in psychology and Hodges in business.

Students eligible to receive the scholarship must have had high GPAs in high school, live in southern West Virginia and demonstrate financial need. Each student receives a $2,500 scholarship, which is the result of the sponsorship provided by the Friends of Coal for the Marshall-West Virginia University football series. The series continues Saturday when Marshall plays at WVU at 3:30 p.m. in Morgantown.

"The recognition of these deserving students is the centerpiece of excitement for Friends of Coal everywhere," said Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association. "They truly represent our future and pave the way for increased confidence that the coalfields will be in good hands as we move forward.  Keeping the best and the brightest close to home insures the preservation of our strong values and our proud heritage.  We're proud to be joined with these young leaders as they chart a positive course for our industry and the State of West Virginia."

Steve Hensley, Marshall's dean of student affairs, said the Friends of Coal scholarships are beneficial to the recipients and the state of West Virginia.

"It's a wonderful benefit of this football game to be able to award these worthy students a scholarship to support the costs of their education," Hensley said. "Marshall University sincerely appreciates the hard work and cooperative spirit that makes this possible."


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Wednesday September 24, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Record number of participants expected for Marshall Marathon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Registration is reaching record levels for the 5th annual Marshall University Marathon, which will be run at 7:30 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2 in Huntington.

Race director Tom Dannals said more than 400 runners and walkers have signed up to participate, which is 80 more than this time last year. Dannals said he is confident last year's totals will be surpassed.

"Last year 800 people were on the starting line for the various events," Dannals said. "We're hoping to hit 1,000 people this year. We're still looking for runners, walkers and volunteers. This event is all about exercise, and we hope everyone will participate."

No major changes from last year have been made to the 26.2-mile flat, USA Track and Field (USATF) certified course. The marathon begins on 3rd Avenue near Marshall's Cam Henderson Center and runs through downtown Huntington past Pullman Square, next to the Ohio River and through Ritter Park, among other places.

Participants will finish the race by running through the Marshall University campus on their way to a goal-line finish on the turf at Joan C. Edwards Stadium, home of Marshall's Thundering Herd football team.

Former Marshall and NFL star Mike Bartrum will be a special guest at the marathon. Bartrum, a native of Pomeroy, Ohio, will toss footballs to the runners as they near the finish line, which Dannals said is always a highlight of the marathon.

Bartrum played football at Marshall from 1988 through 1992. He was a two-year starter and three-year letterman (1989, 1991 and 1992) and totaled 109 career receptions for 1,187 yards. In 1992, he earned consensus All-Southern Conference and NCAA Division I-AA All-American honors.

In the NFL, Bartrum was widely regarded as the league's best long snapper. He played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 2000 to 2007 before retiring. He also played for the Kansas City Chiefs, Green Bay Packers and New England Patriots.

Race events this year include the marathon, half-marathon (which may be run or walked), half-marathon relay run and 5-mile walk. Participants can register online at www.active.com before 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 25.

Entry Fees are:

·         Marathon: $65

·         Half-marathon: $40

·          Half-marathon relay: $75 per team

·          5-mile walk: $15.

The only in-person registration will take place at the race expo/packet pickup from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 1 at Huntington Physical Therapy, which is located at 2240 5th Ave.

For more information on the 2008 Marshall University Marathon, visit www.healthyhuntington.org.


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Wednesday September 24, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Ashdown Lecture Cancelled

The lecture by West Virginia University law professor Gerry Ashdown at 1 p.m. today in the Drinko Library has been cancelled.

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Wednesday September 24, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Shuttle to and from stadium available to Herd fans attending tailgate before Marshall-WVU game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Shuttle service to and from Milan Puskar Stadium in Morgantown will be available Saturday, Sept. 27, for fans attending a pre-game tailgate party sponsored by the Marshall University Alumni Association and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

The tailgate party begins at 12:30 p.m. at Krepps Park, which is located near the WVU Coliseum, less than a mile from Milan Puskar Stadium. Kickoff for the Friends of Coal Bowl between Marshall University and West Virginia University is at 3:30 p.m.

Shuttle service to the stadium will begin at 2:30 p.m. and continue until the game begins. Shuttle service back to Krepps Park will start at the beginning of the fourth quarter and continue until an hour after the game is over. Cost is $3 per person for a round-trip ticket.

Tish Littlehales, director of alumni relations, said the shuttle service is a convenient and easy way for Herd fans at the tailgate to get to and from the stadium.

Admission to the tailgate party is $20 per person, which covers meal, soft drinks and beer, music and giveaways. Parking is available on a first-come, first-served basis for $5 per car.

Music will be provided by the Angie Fletcher Band and 93.7 The DAWG will be broadcasting live from the tailgate. The first 500 people attending the event will receive free T-shirts, courtesy of The DAWG and ISP Sports.

For more information or to RSVP, call the Marshall University alumni office at (304) 696-2901.

Directions to Krepps Park: Off Interstate 79, take Exit 155. Bear right at the end of the exit ramp. Travel to the Coliseum at the top of the hill and get in the left lane. At the traffic light, turn left onto Patteson Drive and look for Marshall banners on the left to take you into Krepps Park.


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Tuesday September 23, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, Marshall University College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

Marshall University's 12.0 Jazz Ensemble selected to perform in Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland


HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  
-The Marshall University 12.0 Jazz Ensemble has been selected to perform at the Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland in July 2009. Considered the best-known music festival in Switzerland, the festival has hosted classic musical acts like Ella Fitzgerald and Marvin Gaye and contemporary artists like Alanis Morrisette and Alicia Keys since its inception in 1967.

In addition, the group will play at the Jazz e Juan festival in Juan les Pins, France.

"The opportunity to go to the Montreux Jazz Festival is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for most of the students in the ensemble," Dr. Ed Bingham, Director of Jazz Studies at Marshall, said. "This festival is one of the best-recognized events in the world of jazz. The preparation for the concerts in Europe will be a year-long effort that will bring the students to a new performance level. As the jazz studies program at Marshall continues to grow, festivals such as Montreux and Jazz e Juan will showcase the talents of the students and help Marshall increase its prominence."

In addition to the musical growth gained by participating in the festival, the trip will enhance the cultural awareness of the students, Bingham said. Seeing different countries and experiencing life in unfamiliar cultures is an education in itself.

"The memories of a first trip to Europe last forever," Bingham said. "I clearly remember my first trip 'across the pond,' where seeing the landscape and meeting people in different countries helped me make sense of the history and art appreciation classes that I studied in college. Similarly, I expect that the members of Marshall's Jazz Ensemble '12.0' will carry memories of the trip with them throughout their lives."

Bingham's enthusiasm has spread to his students as well.

"Having the opportunity to travel with the jazz ensemble to Europe is a great educational opportunity both musically and culturally," said senior Chris Clark.  "Jazz, as an art form, is thriving in most western European countries, and it will be a unique chance for the ensemble's members to learn about the European take on American music.  Having never traveled to Europe personally, I look forward to the diverse cultural array Switzerland, Italy and France have to offer, and I feel both privileged and excited to take part in this endeavor."

The invitation to play at the Montreux festival coincides with the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Marshall University College of Fine Arts. As part of the celebration, COFA has organized a trip to Europe, July 4-13, 2009, built around the Montreux Jazz Festival and the Jazz e Juan festival, according to Melanie Griffis, Director of Development for the College of Fine Arts.

The trip includes stops in Geneva, Lyon, and Provence, as well as other popular cities. In addition to the infusion of jazz, the trip includes four-star accommodations, visits to museums, and the wine and cuisine of France.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, along with COFA Dean Don Van Horn and his wife, Diana, will host the trip for Marshall alumni and friends. 

Further information about this travel opportunity can be found on the COFA Web site at www.marshall.edu/cofa.  Persons may also contact Griffis at griffism@marshall.edu or by calling (304) 696-3686.


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Monday September 22, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Classes canceled on Huntington campus Monday, Sept. 22

Due to a power outage, all classes on Marshall University's Huntington campus have been canceled for the remainder of today and this evening, Monday, Sept. 22.  
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Friday September 19, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington Classes Cancelled Friday, Sept. 19

Due to a significant power outage, classes on the Huntington campus are cancelled today, Friday, Sept. 19.
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Friday September 19, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Student Government Association and Student Ambassadors to host 2008 MU v. WVU blood drive

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association and Student Ambassadors are teaming up to host the 2008 MU v. WVU blood drive for the American Red Cross.

The annual competition is held at both schools simultaneously in an effort to increase donor turnout among students, faculty and staff on campus.

Marshall's event will take place on the Huntington campus Monday, Sept. 22 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room and Tuesday, Sept. 23 in Marco's, which is located in the basement of the student center. The drive is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

All donors will be entered in a drawing to win a $1,000 gasoline card.

This event is open to the public and the Marshall University community is encouraged to participate.

For more information, contact Tim Ward, Student Government Association communications director, at (304) 696-2289 or via e-mail at tim.ward@marshall.edu.


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Friday September 19, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans invited to tailgate at Krepps Park before Marshall-WVU game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation are sponsoring a joint pre-game tailgate party in Morgantown prior to the Friends of Coal Bowl Saturday, Sept. 27.

The tailgate party begins at 12:30 p.m. at Krepps Park, which is located near the WVU Coliseum, less than a mile from Puskar Stadium. Kickoff for the football game between Marshall University and West Virginia University is at 3:30 p.m.

Admission to the tailgate party is $20 per person, which covers meal, soft drinks and beer, music and giveaways. Parking is available on a first-come, first-served basis for $5 per car.

Music will be provided by the Angie Fletcher Band and 93.7 The DAWG will be broadcasting live from the tailgate. The first 500 people attending the event will receive free T-shirts, courtesy of The DAWG and ISP Sports.

For more information or to RSVP, call the Marshall University alumni office at (304) 696-2901.

Directions to Krepps Park: Off Interstate 79, take Exit 155. Bear right at the end of the exit ramp. Travel to the Coliseum at the top of the hill and get in the left lane. At the traffic light, turn left onto Patteson Drive and look for Marshall banners on the left to take you into Krepps Park.


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Thursday September 18, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

President Kopp's State of the University address, introduction of new faculty on General Faculty Meeting agenda

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's fall General Faculty Meeting will take place at 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22 in the Playhouse of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

Highlighting the event will be President Stephen J. Kopp's annual State of the University address, along with the introduction of 65 new faculty by Dr. Cam Brammer, Faculty Senate chair, and by Dr. Darshana Shah, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Assistant Dean of Professional Development in Medical Education.

Brammer also will deliver welcoming remarks and a State of the Faculty address. Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs, will introduce the new deans.

All faculty, staff and students, along with members of the public, are invited to attend. After the meeting, a reception to honor the new faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

New academic administrators to be introduced are:

Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs - Dr. Gayle Ormiston.

Deans - Dr. Betsy Ennis Dulin, College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), and Dr. David Pittenger, College of Liberal Arts (COLA).

New faculty to be introduced are:

College of Education & Human Services - Gina Evans, Jeffrey Garrett, David Ruiz, Jarrod Schenewark, Feon Smith and Gregg Twietmeyer.

College of Fine Arts - Hans Gindlesberger, Julie Jackson and Heather Stark.

College of Health Professions - Thomas Stevens.

College of Liberal Arts - Kelly Broce, Lindsay Calhoun, Angela Crews, Gordon Crews, Kathleen Cutler, Mark Davis, Laura Diener, Whitney Douglas, Magdalene Fry, April Fugett-Fuller, Markus Hadler, Ikuyo Kawada, Anders Linde-Laursen, Thomas Linz, Marie Manilla, Steven Pauley and Paul Rutledge.

College of Science - Scott Day, Curt Foltz, Annette Howells, David Hyeon, Laura McCunn, Mike Morrison, Anna Mummert, Carl Mummert, Gary Schultz, Stacy Scudder, Joung Min Song and Jayme Waldron.

Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business - Alberto Coustasse, Terry Polen, M. R. Shollapur and Amanda Thompson.

Marshall University Graduate College - Jerry Garrett, Anduamiak Meharie and Carol Mitchell Smith.

University Libraries - Sophie Bogdanski.

W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications - Terry Hapney.

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Fadi Alkhankan, Shannon Browning, Yolanda Campbell, Sarmad Chaudhry, Felix Cheung, Hasan Ercan, Saba Faiz, Marina Flaskas, Jose-Mario Fontanilla, Frezghi Kebreab, Farid Mozaffari, Parveen Nagra, Keith Pitzer, Tipu Saleem, Vikram Tarugu, Douglas Tice and Lawrence Wyner.

For more information, call Bernice Bullock at (304) 696-4376.


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Thursday September 18, 2008
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

'Up Late' focuses on Marshall University Artists Series

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This weekend, "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego talks with Angela Jones from the Marshall Artists Series about this season's upcoming events.

Jones said the season gets off to a hilarious start with a stop at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center by comedian Jim Gaffigan on Oct. 1. "Jim Gaffigan: The Sexy Tour" is the comedian's second. The DVD from his first tour, "Beyond the Pale," went platinum.

Also on tap for the Marshall Artists Series: Blues Journey, Fall International Film FestivalGolda's Balcony, Kool & the Gang: Dance Party Extravaganza, Nunsense, Oliver, Sergio Mendes, Spring International Film Festival, Sweeney Todd, The 5 Browns, The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Wizard of Oz.

This week's show also includes a musical performance by Traci Ann Stanley. Doorkeeper for the show is Sara Hodges, a freshman from Darby, Mont. Also, "Up Late" cast member Patrick Stanley goes to Marshall University's career fair to interview possible replacements for "Up Late's" co-host. Andrew Colegrove gives his spin on what's new in the news and student producer Emily McKenna shares her pirate bunny flipbook cartoon. In a death-defying segment, Morgan Shillingburg shows two freshmen how to relieve stress by sword fighting. 

The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Shows are also available for viewing at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The student-produced show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Wednesday September 17, 2008
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MU professor offers input about work being done by Chinese researchers during visit to South China Botanical Garden

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University ecologist has returned from China where he worked with a group of Chinese scientists who are studying, among other things, the effects of nitrogen on plant life.

Dr. Frank S. Gilliam, professor of biological sciences, was invited to visit the South China Botanical Garden (SCBG) in Guangzhou, China's third-largest city. The invitation came after Chinese researchers who had read several of his scientific publications contacted him and asked for his input about research they are doing on the effects of excessive nitrogen on plant life.

Gilliam was able to study the pristine 400-year-old Dinghushan Forest, a rare tract which, under the supervision of Buddhist monks, has been protected from any kind of agriculture, forestry or other human activity.

"It's the finest example of undisturbed tropical forest you can find.  The site is so old, anything that is done there will be new.  We don't have anything like it in the United States," Gilliam said.

The extensive botanical garden, one of the largest of its type in the world, consists of a series of smaller gardens, each with its own ecological stamp.  Among others, there is an Australian garden with native plants including towering Eucalyptus trees, a magnolia garden where imported tulip trees from the U.S. have bred with native Chinese trees to form hybrids, and a tract that features several acres of camellias.  In the center, there is a glassed-in conservatory where scientists simulate a series of diverse environments including arctic, arid dessert and tropical rainforest.

A paper Gilliam wrote last year examined the effect of nitrogen-laced rainfall, snow or fog on plant growth and diversity. He likens the effect to home gardeners over-fertilizing their gardens.

"Excess nitrogen in rainfall is basically pollution," Gilliam explains.  "It can come from a variety of things, for example, auto exhaust or industrial activity.  Nitrogen gets into the atmosphere and falls to the earth as rain with the result that it over-fertilizes the plants.  This nitrogen saturation creates problems because too much nitrogen causes imbalances in plants.  There is less diversity and species are disappearing, not because they're being dug up or destroyed but because they can't handle the extra nitrogen."

Actually, both West Virginia and Marshall University have a connection to China's research.  Marshall researchers, including Gilliam, have been studying a forest in Tucker County for more than 20 years.  The nearly 90-acre tract has been set aside so that the effect of nitrogen on a forested ecosystem can be studied on a large scale.  With funding through the National Science Foundation and under the auspices of the National Forest Service, it has been a valuable outdoor laboratory, according to Gilliam.

"We're adding nitrogen to an entire watershed with a helicopter three times a year," he said. "We want to know how the nitrogen moves through the soil and how plants respond to it. The Chinese are studying the same thing only on a much smaller scale.  They spray small plots.  It's a good simulation; we're just doing it on a larger scale.  And now the Chinese team is familiar with West Virginia."

As part of his trip, Gilliam presented a research seminar and he is collaborating with his Chinese counterparts on a research paper to be published in a major journal.  He and his hosts had academic exchanges and discussed how to further strengthen international collaboration between China and the U.S.

Gilliam said he received a warm welcome in Guangzhou.  "The Chinese were wonderfully warm and I made fast friendships even in such a short period of time," he said. "It was difficult to say goodbye.  Unlike Beijing and Shanghai, it is not an international city.  It's a city of 10 million people but there are not many foreigners to be seen. As a tall, balding West Virginian I definitely stood out in a crowd!"

For more information, call Gilliam at (304) 696-3636.


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Wednesday September 17, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Program teaches students about their online lives

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A program designed to teach students everything they need to know about their online lives, including their rights, how the laws operate and potential liabilities, will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

Andy Hermansdorfer, director of Student Activities and Greek Affairs at Marshall, said students who have Facebook or MySpace sites, in particular, are encouraged to attend.

Hermansdorfer said the advent of social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook have put students in a precarious and largely undefined space.  Add to that the fact that students are commonly accused of online harassment, electronic stalking, copyright infringement, and software piracy, and it is clear that cyberspace can be a dangerous place, he said.

When students leave the program Thursday, Hermansdorfer said, they will know how to protect themselves both legally and personally when they log on.

For a preview of the presentation, go to

http://www.bass-schuler.com/video.php4?artist=C.L.%20LindsayFB.

For more information, contact the Student Activities Programming Board at (304) 696-6770 or e-mail student-activities@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 17, 2008
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Intuit CEO Brad Smith speaks Oct. 3 in Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brad Smith, president and CEO of Fortune 1000 software company Intuit and a 1986 graduate of Marshall University, will participate in two public events on Friday, Oct. 3 at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington.

First, Smith will be the featured speaker at the Lewis College of Business' presentation of the City National Bank Lectureship Series at 11 a.m.  Then, at noon, the College of Business and the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce will present "Lunch with Brad Smith," an opportunity for those in attendance to network with Smith. Both events will take place in the hotel's Grand Theatre.

"The Lewis College of Business is excited about having Brad Smith, the CEO of such a large and well-known company, and one of our graduates, coming to speak to students, faculty, and the community," said Larry Templeton, director of development with the College of Business. "This will showcase the college, curriculum, and potential for success of our students here at Marshall."

In January 2008, Smith, a Kenova, W.Va., native, became CEO of Intuit, the company that developed Quicken, QuickBooks and Turbo Tax. Previously, he was senior vice president and general manager of Intuit's Small Business Division from May 2006 to December 2007. In this position, Smith was responsible for the company's portfolio of QuickBooks, Quicken and payroll products, serving seven million small businesses and producing $1.1 billion in revenue.

Smith, who joined Intuit in February 2003, earned his master's degree in management from Aquinas College in Michigan and his bachelor's degree in business administration from Marshall.

Earlier this year, Smith was the keynote speaker at the Charleston Area Alliance Annual Celebration. At that event, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp presented Smith with the Expect the Best from West Virginia Award.

While admission to the lecture is free, cost to attend the lunch is $120 for a table of eight. For more information, call Templeton at (304) 696-3421, or e-mail him at TempletonL@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday September 17, 2008
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Parthenon adds Monday edition, features and distribution sites

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Parthenon, Marshall University's campus newspaper, is adding content at a time when many community and campus newspapers are doing the opposite.

The four-day daily will go five days a week Sept. 29 with special coverage of the Friends of Coal Bowl. Most Monday editions will highlight Herd weekend sports.

"Going to five days a week puts a little more work on us, but I think it provides a good opportunity to do more sports coverage, which I don't think we get enough of and which the students enjoy," said Parthenon executive editor Aaron McVey.

Parthenon adviser Nerissa Young said, "Our business partnership with The Herald-Dispatch is allowing Marshall to buck the national trend. Other universities are eliminating summer print editions or reducing days of the week. Community newspapers are cutting pages and print editions amid employee layoffs of up to 30 percent."

Since the semester began, The Parthenon has added a daily Sudoku puzzle and editorial cartoons from Rob Rogers, a cartoonist with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette who is distributed by United Features Syndicate.

McVey said, "I think Sudoku's great. The point of reading the newspaper is not just to be informed but to increase your intelligence. Having Sudoku provides another opportunity to challenge our readers and make them more intelligent."

The paper added 10 racks around campus to expand distribution to all campus dormitories, the engineering and biotechnology buildings, and medical school buildings. Once the new recreation center opens, a rack will be placed there.

"Expanded distribution allows for some of the areas we're covering to read about the coverage they're getting that they might not be aware of," McVey said.

Journalism school dean Dr. Corley Dennison said, "Our students are showing dedication and professionalism in their desire to expand news and information services to the campus and community."

The Parthenon began in November 1898, making it one of the oldest university newspapers in the country.


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Tuesday September 16, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, Marshall University College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-7153

'Multiples and Collaborations' on display in Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Multiples and Collaborations, an exhibition of artwork Marshall University Professor Peter Massing completed and produced during his sabbatical, is currently on display in the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University where Massing is the professor of printmaking.

The show presents a variety of prints, drawings, and mixed media objects that engage a collaborative effort between artists and individuals who share a common goal or idea. The work represents a broad range of creative experiences that expose unique concepts and process.

"The show has to do with multiple images that expose how artists work together on a common theme," Massing said. "Each artist contributes his or her individual sensibility collectively to express various points of view about a topic or a specified theme. Collaboration requires printmakers to draw upon a wide range of solutions for printing and utilizing the methods and techniques that are performed in the print shop environment. The work on display in the Birke Art Gallery is intended to inform viewers about how artists or printmakers share possibilities for promoting an idea."

The exhibition opened Monday, Sept. 15 and runs through Thursday, Oct. 2. An opening reception will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17 with a lecture by Massing at 7 p.m. in Smith Hall Room 154.

A closing reception hosted by visiting artist Brandon Gardner from the University of Alabama-Huntsville is planned for 7 p.m. Oct. 2 in Smith Hall Room 154. His lecture will provide information about the collaborative aspects of printmaking.

The Birke Art Gallery, located in Smith Hall on the Huntington campus, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.


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Monday September 15, 2008
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Conference on race issues in West Virginia politics to be held at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The presidents of Marshall University, West Virginia State University and West Virginia Wesleyan College are sponsoring a conference to spur a discussion on the issue of race in politics.

The Race, Politics & Stereotypes in West Virginia Conference, scheduled for noon to 4:15 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus, is a much-anticipated event that organizers believe should be of interest among voters and the media.

"After extensive national media coverage of the state's Democratic primary election in May, questions linger about the issue of race and stereotypes in Appalachia and how they could affect the outcome of West Virginia's presidential vote in November," said Marybeth Beller, conference coordinator. "This is a unique opportunity to have a conversation on an issue important not only to the voters in Appalachia, but voters across the nation as well."

Carnegie Mellon University's Dr. Joe Trotter, the Giant Eagle Professor of History and Social Justice and head of the Department of History, will deliver the keynote address.

Topics include "Does Racism Play a Part in West Virginia Politics? Where, What and Why: An Assessment of Whether and What Forms of Racism Exist in West Virginia," and "If Racism is a Part of West Virginia Politics, What Can Be Done?"

The event is open to the public and a lunch will be provided to all registered participants. Participants must register for the conference by e-mail to beller@marshall.edu by close of business Tuesday, Sept. 16.

Sponsors include Stephen J. Kopp, president, Marshall University; Hazo W. Carter, Jr., president, West Virginia State University; Pamela Balch, president, West Virginia Wesleyan College, and the West Virginia Humanities Council.

The Race, Politics & Stereotypes in West Virginia Conference agenda

Lunch and welcome: Noon to 12:45 p.m.

Keynote address: 12:45 to 1:30 p.m.

Panel discussion I: "Does Racism Play a Part in West Virginia Politics? Where, What and Why: An Assessment of Whether and What Forms of Racism Exist in West Virginia:" 1:30 to 2:45 p.m.

Panel discussion II: "If Racism is a Part of West Virginia Politics, What Can Be Done?" 3 to 4:15 p.m.


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Saturday September 13, 2008
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Grand opening of new residence halls celebrated at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrated the grand opening of its First Year Freshman Residence Halls today with a ceremony at the site of the two new buildings, which are located on the east end of the Huntington campus.

The 161,000-square-foot, 782-bed residence halls have been open since the Aug. 25 start of the fall semester. They were developed and constructed as part of an $82 million public-private venture managed by Capstone Development Corp. of Birmingham, Ala., and its partners.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp praised all who were involved in the project, from the early planning stages through construction by Mascaro Construction Company of Pittsburgh. Work began on May 21, 2007 and was completed less than 15 months later on Aug. 15, 2008.

Kopp also thanked West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III, who attended today's ceremony, for signing into law in 2005 Senate Bill 603, which grants greater self-governance to Marshall and West Virginia University. Because of that enhanced flexibility, Marshall was able to partner with Capstone on this special project. The result, Kopp said, are modern facilities that will meet the needs of Marshall's students for many years to come.

"The passage of Senate Bill 603 gave Marshall University's Board of Governors the flexibility to enter into a private, revenue-based venture in order to plan and build new facilities based on the needs of the University," Kopp said. "With the opening of these fabulous new residence halls and the obvious progress in the construction of the Student Recreation Center, we are beginning to experience one of the benefits of greater governance flexibility. Today's grand opening is another milestone in the long history of Marshall University. Witnessing the completion of this project inspires renewed resolve toward fulfilling the promise of a better future, both here and across our beloved State of West Virginia."

Capstone Development will own the new residence halls until 2038, at which time Marshall will take over ownership.

"We congratulate Dr. Kopp and all in leadership at Marshall University for your vision and commitment in achieving this new housing facility," said Michael A. Mouron, president of Capstone Development Corp. "Marshall is truly 'on the move' and Capstone is honored to serve as your development and management partner for this exciting new housing community. We look forward to our continued work together, as we use this facility to enhance residential life for the Marshall students."

Ron May, Manager of Project Operations at Marshall, said the housing project came together as planned because of the efforts of everyone involved.

"The new student housing project was completed on time and within budget due to the joint efforts of Marshall University, Capstone Development, Mascaro Construction Company, Design Collective, Inc., and the local Trade Unions," May said. "It was a pleasure for the Facilities Planning & Management staff to be involved in this project and to have had the opportunity to help make this great improvement on campus."

Each building, named the North and South Residence Halls, is four floors. Specialty areas include a theater, conference room, classroom, laundry, study areas and a lounge/café.

The residence halls feature up-to-date technology, including one wired port per bed, wireless accessibility in all areas, VoIP security phones, video surveillance, card swipe entry access and multimedia in specialty rooms.

First-time freshman students are assigned to live in the First Year Freshman Residence Halls. Research indicates that students who live on campus for two years or more have higher GPAs and are 25 percent more likely to graduate than those who live off campus.

"The value of an education is in how it changes us. Education makes us better citizens and enriches our lives," said Steve Hensley, Marshall University's dean of student affairs. "Our experience confirms that students who live within the boundaries of the University are best situated to make full use of University services and facilities, and thus to gain the benefits of being a member of this community of scholars and learners."

The First Year Freshman Residence Halls are staffed by a general manager, two assistant general managers and 22 resident assistants. The goal is to provide a safe and positive community where residents are able to meet their academic and personal goals.


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Friday September 12, 2008
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Quoits tournament among features of annual Constitution Week at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will continue a tradition that began in 2005 by observing Constitution Week 2008 with several special activities on the Huntington campus, including a quoits tournament, celebration of John Marshall's 253rd birthday and guest lecture.

Constitution Week is designed to recognize the signing of the United States Constitution and the birthday of Marshall University's namesake, John Marshall. Constitution Week officially runs from Wednesday, Sept. 17 (Constitution Day) through Wednesday, Sept. 24, which was John Marshall's birthday. The Constitution was signed on Sept. 17, 1787.

Constitution Week activities at Marshall actually begin at 11 a.m. Monday, Sept. 15 with an introduction to the game of quoits on Buskirk Field. Quoits is an ancient and little-known sport related to horseshoe pitching that dates back to the early days of Olympic discus throwers. Quoits are donut shaped and as literature from Marshall's John Deaver Drinko Academy relates, "If you can play horseshoes, you can play quoits."

"Quoits was John Marshall's favorite game," said Dr. Alan Gould, executive director of the Drinko Academy. "He played quoits every Saturday and was an expert member of the Richmond Quoits Club."

Teams are forming now to play in a quoits tournament that begins Tuesday, Sept. 16 and concludes Thursday, Sept. 18. Faculty, staff and students may participate, and the deadline for team registration is 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15. For more information, go to www.marshall.edu/recsport.

 "A Game of Quoits" Presidential Press Challenge, featuring MU President Stephen J. Kopp and members of the media, will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 18.

At 11 a.m. that same day, preceding the Press Challenge, President Kopp will cut a giant birthday cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza.

Constitution Week activities conclude at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24, when Gerry Ashdown, James H. (Buck) and June M. Harless Professor of Law at the West Virginia University College of Law, lectures on the topic, "John Marshall and Judicial Review." The lecture will take place in Drinko Library room 402 and is open to the public.

"Gerry is an excellent speaker and has great knowledge of the subject," said Cory Dennison, Director of Development for Marshall's College of Science and a former student of Ashdown's at WVU. "The courts would not be as strong as they are without judicial review."

The case of Marbury v. Madison formed the basis for the exercise of judicial review in the United States. John Marshall wrote the landmark decision which established the power of the court to declare acts of Congress unconstitutional.


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Friday September 12, 2008
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Marching Thunder to perform Sept. 21 at halftime of Jacksonville-Indianapolis NFL game at Lucas Oil Stadium

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marching Thunder, Marshall University's marching band, has accepted an invitation to perform as part of the halftime show at the Indianapolis Colts vs. Jacksonville Jaguars football game on Sunday, Sept. 21 in Indianapolis.

The Marching Thunder, along with band director Steve Barnett, will have the honor of being one of the first bands to perform in the new Lucas Oil Stadium in downtown Indianapolis. 

This invitation resulted from recommendations the Colts had received about the Marching Thunder and after viewing a sample DVD of past performances. A generous donation from a Marshall University benefactor made it possible for the band to go to Indianapolis.

"I am very proud of the members of the Marching Thunder," Barnett said. "Their excellence in both performance and citizenship have earned a national reputation for excellence.  I am proud to be a part of such a first-class organization."

A somewhat whirlwind trip, this performance is a part of a very busy time for the Marching Thunder.

On Saturday, Sept. 20, the band will perform an exhibition at the Spring Valley Marching Band Contest at Spring Valley High School in Huntington.  After the performance, the band will travel by bus to Indianapolis.

On Sunday, Sept. 21, it will rehearse in Lucas Oil Stadium at 11:15 a.m.  After the rehearsal, the band will have lunch downtown and prepare for the performance.  Kickoff for the football game, which will be televised on CBS, is at 4:15 p.m. After the game the band will have dinner and board buses to travel back to Huntington.

On Tuesday, Sept. 23, the Marching Thunder will travel to Charleston, W.Va., for an exhibition performance at the Kanawha County Band and Majorette Festival at Laidley Field.  Every high school band in Kanawha County will participate in the festival. On Saturday, Sept. 27, the band will perform in Morgantown during the Marshall-WVU football game.


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Thursday September 11, 2008
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Hispanic Heritage Month at Marshall features four events

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a series of special events on the Huntington campus beginning Wednesday, Sept. 17.

Hispanic Heritage Month, which celebrates the culture of Latin America and Latinos in the United States, is being presented by Marshall's Latin American Studies program.

As a national event, Hispanic Heritage Month begins in mid-September to commemorate the independence of many Latin American nations from Spain in the 1810s and 1820s, and ends in mid-October.

"Marshall students and faculty will enjoy a variety of events sponsored by Latin American Studies and several departments during our Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations such as musical performances and scholarly presentations," said Dr. Chris White, a Marshall history professor and member of the Hispanic Heritage Month planning committee. "These events will provide attendees with greater knowledge about Latin America as well as encourage them to explore more about the wonders that Latin American culture has to offer."

Here is the schedule of events, all of which are free to the public:

  • 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, Drinko Library 402 - "Guernica: Art and War, the last 70 years," by Dr. Oscar Ballester. Ballester, who is originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina, is an oncologist and researcher, and member of the faculty at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He has been active in various academic and community organizations exploring issues related to Latin American and Spanish history and culture.
  • 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, Drinko Library 402 -- "Conducting 'Conjunctive' Anthropology: Ethnohistory, Archaeology, and Ethnographic Research among the Maya of Highland Guatemala," by Dr. Robert Carmack. Carmack has been a professor emeritus at the University of Albany since 2002. He and others recently began a project in Costa Rica to investigate the social changes taking place within a rural community in the Pacific South region of that country. Carmack is one of the most notable archaeologist-anthropologists in the U.S. with expertise in Mayan and Mesoamerican issues. In addition to his outstanding scholarly production, he has been a passionate advocate of the human and civil rights of Mayans today living in Guatemala and Chiapas.
  • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, Drinko Library 402 - "De-colonizing portraying-narratives and texts: the Maya-Kiche' example," by Dr. Carlos Lopez. Lopez, a native of Uruguay, teaches in the Department of Modern Languages at Marshall, where he is an Associate Professor of Spanish. His research is focused on the Popol Wuj, the only Mayan "narrative" to survive the 500 years of colonization. Lopez participates actively in national and international conferences on Colonial Latin American literatures and the impact of global culture on regional Latin American cultures.
  • 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27, Smith Hall 154 - Grupo Sur performance (interpreters of Latin American popular music). Grupo Sur's performers are Christina Burgueno, a Modern Languages professor at Marshall, Ballester and Maurice Saleme. Grupo Sur performs mostly popular and folk music from South and Central America.

Hispanic Heritage Month at Marshall is sponsored by International Programs, Multicultural Affairs, College of Liberal Arts, College of Fine Arts, Department of History, Department of Modern Languages, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology and Anthropology and the Department of Music.

For more information on Hispanic Heritage Month at Marshall, contact Chris White (696-2722, whitec@marshall.edu) or Carlos Lopez (696-2749, lopez@marshall.edu).


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Non-alcoholic student tailgate, music fest planned Saturday at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association, Student Activities Programming Board and the Marshall Maniacs are sponsoring a non-alcoholic student tailgate and music fest at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13 before the Thundering Herd's home football game with the University of Memphis. The game kicks off at 7 p.m. at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

The tailgate and music fest will take place at the First Year Freshman Residence Halls between the two buildings on the east end of Marshall's Huntington campus. Free hamburgers, hot dogs and soft drinks, along with pizza from Papa John's Pizza and food from Mac-Reedo's, will be available, and the first 200 students in attendance will receive free green T-shirts.

Music will be provided by Jeff Ellis, Bud Carroll, Attack Flamingo, The Turn Around, The Excitement, The Red Velvet and more.

For more information, contact Matt Goddard at (304) 696-4629 or (304) 222-5523, or Sam Turley at (304) 696-4629 or (304) 208-5859.


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Thursday September 11, 2008
Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff and Sr. Vice President for Communications, (304) 696-6713

Allied Realty Company of Huntington first to donate to Marshall University under 'Bucks for Brains' initiative

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Allied Realty Company of Huntington has made the first donation to the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) as part of West Virginia's "Bucks for Brains" initiative.

The gift of $100,000, announced by Allied Realty Company's CEO/President Lake Polan III, is the first the University has received since the passage of the Research Trust Fund Bill, which allocates $15 million to Marshall University and $35 million to West Virginia University as research endowment trust funds to be matched by contributions from each institution's foundation.

Polan said Allied Realty Company has been committed to the City of Huntington and to Marshall University since the company was founded in 1922 by Walter H. Lewis. Its second President and CEO, Lake Polan, Jr., was a member of the Marshall University Foundation for more than 20 years, also serving as its president.

"Allied's Board of Directors is pleased to donate $100,000 to the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, which will strengthen the University as a research institution while serving as an engine of growth for the community at large," Polan said.

The research endowment is modeled after a highly successful program in Kentucky.  As envisioned, the principal funds in each endowment would not be touched, but the interest income from each account would fund research grants in specialized fields such as biotechnology and biometrics.  The goal is for the universities to create new spin-off businesses and high-paying jobs as research results in breakthroughs, patents and products.

Governor Joe Manchin said the contribution is important for Marshall University as well as businesses in the state.

"Thanks to support from businesses such as Allied Realty, Bucks for Brains is already facilitating the public-private partnerships that will build Marshall's research pedigree, as well as stimulate the economy and help to create jobs in the future," Manchin said. "This is truly a win-win for the State of West Virginia and its business partners."

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp commented on the importance of this gift.

"Marshall University is extremely grateful to Lake Polan III and Allied Realty Company for this gift in support of research at Marshall University through the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research," Kopp said. "Lake is a community business leader who understands the importance of research-based economic development to the future of our state and region. His gift on behalf of Allied Realty Company affirms the vision and commitment we have toward creating new, high-value job opportunities that add to the diversification of our economy and help us progress toward a larger common goal: to fulfill the promise of a better future for all West Virginians."

Allied Realty is a third-generation family owned business with headquarters in Huntington.  Its holdings include commercial buildings in downtown Huntington and Allied Logistics, a family of companies providing global logistics services, which is located in Huntington, Kenova, Nitro and Parkersburg, as well as Waynesboro, Va., and Harrisonburg, Va.


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Thursday September 11, 2008
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Herald-Dispatch columnist Dave Lavendar featured on 'Up Late'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Entertainment abounds this weekend on Marshall University's "Up Late" talk show featuring local newspaper columnist Dave Lavendar of The Herald-Dispatch. 

"Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego talks with Lavender, author of "Dave Trippin: A Day Tripper's Guide to the Appalachian Galaxy of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia," about his book, his travels, writing for The Herald-Dispatch in Huntington and  local fairs and festivals going on in the area.

This week's show also includes a performance by the acoustic blues band from Ona, Blues Crossing, featuring Michael Lyzenga and Ray Hensley. Doorkeeper for the show is Courtney Coberly of Elkins.

Adam "The Challenger" Ede attempts the Gallon Challenge with the director of "Up Late" Ryan Vance, a senior from Ona, and two of Jamie's friends, Cory Richardson and Charles Peak, both of Barboursville.  The challenge involves drinking a gallon of milk in less than an hour and keeping it down. Warning: those with weaker stomachs than the participants should not watch this segment.

Student producers also challenge the cast with a game of "Name that Tune" and students with a new cross-campus game of "What the Hell is That?"

The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the week. Shows are also available for viewing at www.marshall.edu/uplate.

The student-produced show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Wednesday September 10, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Writer Jane Varley to read from her work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Jane Varley will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

She is the author of Flood Stage and Rising, a memoir of the 1997 Grand Forks, N.D., flood, which has been praised as "a riveting narrative of lyrical imagery and documentary intensity."

Varley's poems and reviews have been widely published in literary journals and magazines, and she is the recipient of a fellowship in nonfiction from the Ohio Arts Council. She coordinates the creative writing program at Muskingum College in Ohio.

Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

For more information, call Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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Monday September 8, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's annual Day of Service planned Saturday, Sept. 20

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students, faculty and staff will take part in an organized cleanup of the Huntington campus and the community Saturday, Sept. 20 in the annual Marshall Day of Service, sponsored by the Student Government Association.

UNI 101 and Honors 101 classes, along with student organizations, will participate, along with faculty and staff wanting to get involved in the cleanup. The day begins at 9:15 a.m. with registration and a continental breakfast on the Memorial Student Center plaza. Projects begin at 10 a.m. and will conclude by 1 p.m. Anyone who participates in the Day of Service will receive a T-shirt.

"Day of Service celebrates a single day out of our academic year where we, as a Marshall family, give back to the campus and community in which we all take great pride," said Matt James, president of Marshall's student body. "This year we have expanded our efforts even further into the city of Huntington so that our spirit of service to others can be spread beyond the walls of our school."

Typical on-campus projects include washing windows, pulling weeds, sweeping, dusting, painting and picking up trash. Off campus, workers will pick up trash along city streets and choose specific locations at which to work.

As part of the Day of Service, workers also will be washing automobiles in the West Lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium, beginning at 10 a.m. Donations to Marshall's upcoming United Way campaign will be accepted.

A new activity this year is the preparation of care packages for troops deployed overseas and veterans at the Veterans Home in Barboursville and the VA Medical Center in Huntington. This activity is planned in connection with the Marshall One Book Program which features the book, "The Things They Carried."

For more information on the Day of Service, call Amber Bentley with Marshall's Career Services Center at (304) 696-6785.


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Monday September 8, 2008
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Volunteer Fair set for Wednesday, Sept. 10 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual Volunteer Fair, an event designed to inform MU clubs, organizations and students about opportunities to volunteer, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10 in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Sponsored by the Office of Volunteer Services, the Volunteer Fair will offer students an excellent opportunity to meet with recruiters and discuss volunteer opportunities, according to Amber Bentley, interim coordinator with Marshall's Student Activities Office of Volunteer Services.

"Instead of considering volunteering as something you do for people who are less fortunate or as a club requirement, we want students to begin to think of it as an exchange," Bentley said. "Today, you may be the person with the ability to help, but tomorrow you may be the recipient of someone else's volunteer effort."

Seventeen organizations have registered for the fair. Among them are American Red Cross, Contact of Huntington, Huntington Area Food Bank, Tri-State Literacy Council and Southwest Community Action.

The fair is open to all Marshall students, and no pre-registration is required. For more information, contact Bentley at (304) 696-6785.


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Thursday September 4, 2008
Contact: Jamie LoFiego, , (304) 696-2967

First 'Up Late' show of the season has gone to the Dawgs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Returning to the air after a summer hiatus, Marshall University's "Up Late" weekend talk show will be back this weekend on MyZTV featuring radio personality Rocky Smith from The Dawg 97.3.

Smith is a native of Huntington and a Marshall University alumnus. She's been with the radio station since the early 1990s as an original Dawg member and officially since 2001 as a radio personality.

"Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego also talks with Smith about her groundbreaking work as the first female sideline reporter for an NCAA BCS Division football radio network in 2005.

This week's show also features the band, Fletcher's Grove, which is made up of local musicians from Hurricane and Winfield including Ryan Krofcheck, Matt Marion, Wes Hagar, Adam Green and Benji Lewis. Fletcher's Grove has a folk/funk sound with an eclectic feel. Doorkeeper for the show is Laura Hatfield, a freshman journalism major from Chapmanville.

This semester's student producers share a special visit from the Marshall University Drinko Library Book Clappers and Kazoo Players as well as Public Services Announcements, "Up Late" style.  They also introduce a new segment, Classic Audio With our Announcer Adam Cavalier, the 2007 West Virginia Associated Press Radio Broadcast Journalist of the year.  Emily McKenna also entertains the audience with one of her many Flipbook cartoons.

The show will air Saturday, Sept. 6, from 11 to 11:30 p.m. on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

The student-produced show grew out of Marshall's Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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Thursday September 4, 2008
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'Make Your Dollar Herd' family campaign begins Sept. 8 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will kick off a four-week campaign designed to promote giving by the MU family during a staff/faculty picnic on Monday, Sept. 8, on the Memorial Student Center plaza at the Huntington campus.

The kickoff event for the 2008-2009 Marshall University Family Campaign called "Make Your Dollar Herd" is scheduled from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on the plaza. In case of rain, it will be moved to the lobby inside the student center.  Lunch will be served and guests will receive information about supporting the university.

Participants may designate their contributions to the University Fund, a specific college/school, or to a select special project.

"The Family Campaign is a great way for faculty and staff to come together and say with one voice that we believe in Marshall University," said Rebecca McPhail Samples, assistant vice president of development at MU. "High levels of participation by the Marshall family set a great example to alumni as well as current students, demonstrating that we know how important it is to give back to a university that has made such a difference in our lives."

Additional events are planned Monday, Sept. 15 at the South Charleston and Mid-Ohio Valley Center campuses to continue the activities planned during the campaign period. Prizes will be awarded throughout the campaign, which runs Sept. 8 through Oct. 3. Among the prizes are two tickets to the September 27th Marshall/WVU football game at West Virginia University, free gasoline, Marshall Artists Series tickets and Marshall Bookstore gift cards.

For more information, contact Samples at (304) 696-3292.


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Wednesday September 3, 2008
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

'Bodywork' exhibited in conjunction with Feminist Art Project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve regional women artists are exhibiting their art in Bodywork in the Birke Art Gallery at Marshall University in conjunction with the Feminist Art Project.

The Feminist Art Project is a collaborative national initiative celebrating the Feminist Art Movement and the aesthetic, intellectual and political impact of women on the visual arts, art history, and art practice, past and present.

Former Marshall Assistant Professor Claire Sherwood is the Feminist Art Project coordinator for this region.  She started holding open meetings at the Huntington Museum of Art in May 2008.

The artists of Bodywork were chosen by Sherwood and Katherine Cox, Director of Education at the Huntington Museum of Art, and were based on representation of a variety of geographic areas, ages and life experiences. Both Sherwood and Cox are displaying art in the exhibition. For Sherwood, inspiration is found in materials discarded by industry.

"After the industrial world digs, loads, ships, burns, crushes, pours, refines, processes and manipulates, I reclaim," Sherwood said.  "My current work begins with materials collected from industrial factories, along train tracks and in gravel pits. It is my desire that once reclaimed these materials have the ability to gain a new life, raising questions about purity, masculinity and womanhood. 

"When sifted through lace, coal has the ability to adapt into something as nostalgic as antique linens or as evocative as a piece of negligee. Through this sifting and stenciling process I am interested in constructing invented territories in which the complexities of industrial materials and ultra feminine emblems can be examined in one shared space."

For Kathleen Kneafsey, another Bodywork artist, her son is the inspiration behind her work.

"My recent work is the culmination of observing my son, over the last seven years, explore and construct many impressive structures with various toys and found materials," Kneafsey said. "On a daily basis, he pulls from his imagination to create fantastic cities, railroads and buildings.  All of this is done with everything from wooden blocks, Legos and cardboard boxes to clay.  These house structures that I have created are made in such a way as to make reference to his use of toys and found objects to construct something more elaborate.  Pieces and parts are used, just as in his play construction, and they are just as precarious.  I find him to be an unending source of inspiration and motivation."

The exhibition runs through Thursday, Sept. 11, culminating with a slide jam and closing reception. Some of the artists will attend the closing reception, allowing the audience an opportunity to learn more about them and their work. The reception is at 7 p.m. in Smith Hall Room 154.

The Birke Art Gallery, located in Smith Hall on the Huntington campus, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.

In addition to Sherwood, Cox and Kneafsey, other artists participating in the exhibition are Adrian Blackstock, Ann Silverman, Cigdem Slankard, Dawn Gavin, Emily Ritchey, Linda Helgason, Poochie Myers, Rebecca Holbrook and Ruth Bowler.

The Feminist Art Project meetings are scheduled to resume this fall, beginning Thursday, Oct. 9, in studio 5 of the Huntington Museum of Art.


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Tuesday September 2, 2008
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MU Career Services offering JobTrax to students and alumni; Fall Career Expo set for Sept. 10 in student center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services is offering a new, more functional Web-based career management system called Marshall JobTrax, a powerful tool that allows students and alumni to search for on- and off-campus part-time jobs, internships, and full-time career opportunities.

"Hundreds of employment opportunities are at our students' fingertips," said Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services.  "The improved system provides greater ease of use for students and employers and the management of recruiting programs, contact databases, and job postings."

Marshall JobTrax has a variety of additional information, according to Hogsett. Career Services events are listed in the calendar and workshop sections. All of the open jobs received from employers are posted on JobTrax as well. Any information students and alumni need to schedule an appointment during on-campus interviewing is just a mouse click away.

Hogsett said JobTrax also allows students to upload and store job-search documents such as resumes and sample cover letters, and to apply for available positions on-line. In addition, it allows students to explore employer contact information for those employers participating in Marshall's career fairs or that they have a personal interest in learning more about.

Returning students registered with the former system, EASE, received a user name and a new password by e-mail.  New students may register by going to www.marshall.edu/career-services and clicking on the JobTrax logo.  A verification message will be sent to their e-mail addresses.  Once verified, students must complete their profiles to be fully active in JobTrax.

"With JobTrax, employers have the ability to post jobs for free for students and alumni to view 24 hours a day, seven days a week," Hogsett said.

Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach with Career Services, encourages employers to register for Marshall JobTrax by taking the following steps:

·         Using an Internet Browser, go to: http://www.marshall.edu/career-services

·         Click on the "Marshall JobTrax" logo

·         Complete the employer information that is requested

·         Click the "Submit" button

Stoler said employers may register to subscribe to Marshall JobTrax free of charge.  Each contact has a user name and password to allow access to the resources on the system, the ability to post its own job openings and immediate access to applications and interview schedules during the on-campus interview scheduling period.  Employers have the ability to update their own contact information, thus having more control over the authenticity of their data.

Career Services will send an e-mail to the contact confirming its registration and containing its personal user name and password. Contacts may then return to the JobTrax employer site and log in.

In addition to offering JobTrax, Career Services also has scheduled its Fall Career Expo for Wednesday, Sept. 10. Marshall students and alumni may explore new job opportunities at the expo, which runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Nearly 90 employers representing the corporate, government and nonprofit sectors are expected to attend. 

Employers and organizations will provide a range of opportunities, including jobs in banking, computer information technology, criminal justice, financial advising, health care, hospitality, insurance, recreation, retail and security.

Hogsett said participants are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes and dress to impress interviewers at this free event.  She invites any business or industry that is in need of or will have a need in the future for entry-level employees.

"Marshall students are very marketable in the workforce with experiences through internships, part-time jobs and graduate assistant positions," Hogsett said.

The Career Services staff is available to support students in their preparation for this and other events with resume assistance, printing, mock interviewing and professional suiting. A Career Expo Success Workshop, in which these and other topics will be discussed, takes place at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3, in the Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge. All students are welcome to attend.

The staff also is available to work with any employer that is interested in attending the Fall Career Expo and making it a successful recruitment tool.

For more information about the Fall Career Expo, JobTrax or any other service provided by Career Services, call (304) 696-2370.


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Saturday August 30, 2008
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Additional male cheerleaders, students to portray 'Marco' needed at MU; tryouts will be conducted Sept. 2 and 4 at Henderson

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Cheerleaders will be conducting tryouts for additional male cheerleaders and additional male and/or female students to portray "Marco" at assigned events.

All students who are interested in trying out are asked to attend practice from 7:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 2 and Thursday, Sept. 4 in the Henderson Center main arena. The squad has a complete allotment of female cheerleaders, but still needs some male cheerleaders.

The coaching staff will evaluate all interested students and make possible selections by the end of the week. Male students interested in the cheering positions should come dressed appropriately and be prepared to learn stunting skills for their tryouts.   Students (male or female) interested in trying out for "Marco" should come with a one-minute skit that can be performed in the suit for their tryout.

The cheer positions and the mascot position do come with the possibility of earning some scholarship while a member of the program. The cheerleaders and Marco provide support to the University, the alumni office and the athletic department at all home/away football games, home volleyball matches and  home men's and women's basketball games.

Any questions concerning tryouts can be e-mailed to the Marshall cheerleading staff at herdcheerzone@aol.com


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Friday August 29, 2008
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TV debut of Hechler documentary planned for Sept. 9 and 11 on WV PBS

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The television premiere of "Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice," a two-hour documentary focusing on the career and legacy of the former West Virginia congressman and secretary of state, will take place beginning Tuesday, Sept. 9 on West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

The two-part, two-hour examination of the role of political office in 20th century America was created by filmmakers Russ Barbour and Chip Hitchcock, who began work on the project in July 2005. Part 1 of the documentary will be shown at 8 p.m. Sept. 9 and Part 2 will be shown at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11.

A DVD of the biopic will also be used as a "premium" for donors during the station's fall fund-raising effort. Marshall University Libraries served as fiscal agent for the film and Barbara Winters, dean of libraries, was executive producer.

Winters said the program also documents the development of Hechler's views on government and his commitment to helping individuals through public service and political office. The production traces Hechler's political philosophy and subsequent actions to the progressive movement of the 1900s, and to the model President Theodore Roosevelt presented through his efforts on behalf of impoverished and disenfranchised Americans.

Considerable insight is provided by Hechler's former colleagues, including such notable public officeholders as U.S. Senators Tom Harkin, Bob Dole and George McGovern, as well as U.S. Congressmen John Brademas and James Symington. The documentary also features labor historians, reporters and several of Hechler's former students, staffers, constituents, friends and family.

The production also makes use of archival photographs, motion pictures and sound recordings, including rarely viewed news film. The documentary employs excerpts from numerous addresses, including speeches by Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman and John F. Kennedy.

"Ken Hechler's life provides a great backdrop for illustrating President Theodore Roosevelt's progressive ideals in a real and practical manner," Barbour said. "The son of devout believers in progressivism, Hechler enthusiastically embraced and put into practice the governmental principles popularized by TR and his cousin, President Franklin Roosevelt. Through the extensive use of archival images, Hechler's journey through the 20th century also presents an ideal opportunity to document significant events in 20th century America, from beginning to end, in a compelling and remarkably visual manner." 

Winters said Marshall University's partnership role in the project included assisting the filmmakers in accessing materials located in the Ken Hechler collection at the Marshall Libraries.   The university also provided an intern to work with the filmmakers during the research and filming phases.

Winters said Marshall will receive all the original field tapes at the end of the project, and intends to distribute copies of the tapes containing interviews with Hechler to other archives, most notably the State of West Virginia Archives, as well as to the West Virginia Collection located at West Virginia University.

For further information about "Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice," call Winters at (304) 696-2318.


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Thursday August 28, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia Brownfields Conference is Sept. 10-11 in Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The third annual West Virginia Brownfields Conference will take place Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 10-11, at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington.

The conference is sponsored by the West Virginia Brownfield Assistance Center at Marshall University, the West Virginia Brownfield Assistance Center at West Virginia University, the Land Restoration Division of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, the West Virginia Development Office, and the West Virginia Chapter of the Air and Waste Management Association.

The title of this year's conference is "A Path to Progress." The event includes multiple tracks on redevelopment and revitalization of brownfield properties in the state. Brownfields are properties "the expansion, redevelopment or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant or contaminant."

Randy Huffman, secretary of the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, will deliver the keynote address at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10.  Other conference speakers include Huntington Mayor David Felinton at noon Wednesday, Sept. 10 and EPA Region III Brownfields Program Administrator Susan Janowaik at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 11.

A site tour of area brownfield properties and a reception are scheduled for the evening of Tuesday, Sept. 9.  For agenda and conference registration information, visit the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center Web site at  www.wvbrownfields.org.

For additional information, contact George Carico, program coordinator, at (304) 696-5456.  The West Virginia Brownfield Assistance Center at Marshall University is a program of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS).


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Thursday August 28, 2008
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Vendor registration opens for 4th annual Holly Berry Festival

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local and tri-state area artisans and crafters wishing to participate as vendors at the 4th Annual Holly Berry Festival have until Tuesday, Sept. 30, to register, Barbara Winters, dean of libraries at Marshall University, said today.

Winters said vendors interested in exhibiting their wares during the one-day festival should contact her by phone at (304) 696-2318 or by e-mail at wintersb@marshall.edu by Sept. 30.

This year's Holly Berry Festival will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22 in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus. Sponsored by the Marshall Library Associates, the festival will again feature hand-made items designed and made by local and area crafters. There will also be books for sale.

While a number of festival favorite vendors from last year have indicated that they will return this year, Winters said that space is still available for first-time artisans and crafters wanting to join in on the now-traditional Huntington festival.

"We're thrilled that the number of people attending the festival keeps increasing, and we're honored that the number of artists and craftspeople who keep coming back each year is increasing, too," said Dr. Lynne Welch, chair of the Festival Planning Committee. "We're looking forward to seeing a lot of familiar friendly faces at this year's festival, as well as a whole lot of new friendly faces of those celebrating here with us for the first time." 

Welch said 10 percent of the sales at the Festival will be donated to the Library Associates endowment fund, supporting development of the Marshall University Libraries book collections. Festival goers will again enjoy free admission, parking and snacks throughout the event.

For more information about the 4th Annual Holly Berry Festival, call or e-mail Winters.


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Wednesday August 27, 2008
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Summer concert series on Thursday includes Marshall pep rally

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The final event in the Heiner's Summer Concert Series at Pullman Square, which takes place from 6 to 10 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, will include a pep rally featuring Marshall University football Coach Mark Snyder, the MU cheerleaders, dance team and pep band.

The concert/pep rally is sponsored by 93.7 The Dawg and the Marshall University Alumni Association. Nancy Pelphrey, coordinator of alumni programs for the Alumni Association, said the pep rally is to help Thundering Herd fans get excited for the team's season-opener with Illinois State, which kicks off at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

"It's going to be a great evening with the concert series and the pep rally," Pelphrey said. "We're looking for a big crowd of Herd fans to gather at Pullman Square to show their spirit and support of Coach Snyder and the team. The pep rally is a great way to get the football season under way."

Events begin at 6 p.m. with a performance by John Eric Booth. The Alumni Association will be selling raffle tickets for a chance to win a print from the "We Are Marshall" movie signed by Red Dawson and Matthew Fox. Several other items will be included in the raffle, such as gift certificates from Max & Erma's and the Marshall Hall of Fame Café.

A performance by Joe Lambiotte starts at 7 p.m. Beginning at 8:15 p.m., the cheerleaders and band will perform and interact with the crowd before Snyder arrives at about 8:30 p.m. Snyder will speak and draw the winning raffle ticket for the Marshall print. Individuals must be present to win the print and the other prizes.

Stephen Salyers will wrap up the concert series with a performance beginning at 9 p.m.

The Tri-State Transit Authority will run a free shuttle from Marshall's Huntington campus to Pullman Square and back throughout the evening. Passengers may board the bus at the corner of John Marshall Drive and 5th Avenue and at the corner of 18th Street and 5th Avenue.

For more information, call Pelphrey at (304) 696-3134.


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Dr. Eric Kmiec named Director, Lead Research Scientist of Marshall University Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR)

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eric Kmiec, Professor of Biology at the University of Delaware and Director of Applied Genomics at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, has been named the first Director and Lead Research Scientist of the Marshall University Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. Kmiec begins his duties at Marshall in January 2009.

MIIR is a new research and development program at Marshall that will focus on biotechnology, biomanufacturing, nanotechnology and niche areas of applied molecular research. It is expected to intensify and accelerate the rate at which Marshall's research reaches the marketplace, thus benefiting the University and the state of West Virginia. Kmiec will be responsible for assembling the team of interdisciplinary research scientists who will comprise the core of the Institute.

The passage this year of a legislative initiative to create a $50 million endowment fund to be invested in research at Marshall and West Virginia University and patterned after Kentucky's highly successful "Bucks for Brains" program was a major factor in Kmiec's decision to accept the position at Marshall.

"Certainly, it is extremely attractive to know that the state and particularly President Kopp have advanced this idea, building on other programs around the country," Kmiec said. "The research endowment and the state support, particularly from the Legislature and Gov. Joe Manchin, was an important part of the decision to join the team here."

Kmiec is widely recognized as a pioneer of gene repair, a technique in which synthetic DNA molecules are used to patch or repair mutations in human chromosomes. He has trained numerous postdocs and graduate students in the field of molecular medicine.

He also has received numerous research and community service awards.  Research in his laboratory is supported through multiple grant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), private research foundation and Discovery program at High Q foundation.  He owns more than 60 issued patents or patent applications and has founded several biotechnology companies. Kmiec also is managing editor of Frontiers in Bioscience, and recently joined the editorial board of the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

Kopp said he is "ecstatic" that Kmiec has agreed to serve as MIIR's first director. He said he expects, under Kmiec's leadership, that a focused program of pioneering research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs will be developed. Importantly, this program will build on existing areas of strength and provide opportunities for pioneering research collaborations with scientists already working at Marshall University.

"If you look at Dr. Kmiec's experience in applied research leading to research-based economic development, he has been very successful," Kopp said. "His area of expertise fits exactly what we need in the development of the biosciences. He is a grant-funded scientist who has the ability to build a successful team, leading to discoveries that are patentable and communicably viable. He has tremendous leadership qualities and incredible interpersonal skills."

Kmiec said that he expects to assemble a strong team of scientists at Marshall.

"We should be able to seriously impact the economic development programs in the state by creating high paying jobs, by engaging good talent around the country," he said. "A bunch of my colleagues are aware that I have taken this position and already I've gotten calls from folks that are very curious about Marshall and what's going on here. The word is spreading very rapidly. I hope to nucleate a group of people to spend a little more time looking at coming and joining our team. I think that immediately breeds more talent and stronger jobs and higher paying jobs in the state and for this institution."

At the University of Delaware, Kmiec runs a research lab that looks at some of the therapies for diseases such as Huntington's Disease, Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Muscular Dystrophy. He said years ago he became very interested in moving beyond the basic discovery side of his work and pushing it into the more applied translational side.

He explained translational programs as those "that take the bench to bedside approach. For many years, basic science has driven great discoveries that have impacted diagnostics, optics, wonderful types of advances in human health and agriculture and many other areas," he said.

"But, there's been a tendency to stay locked at the bench. Now, the pressure from the federal government, state government and health institutions in general is to move those discoveries toward treating human disease and human afflictions."

He said his work at Delaware hinges on developing therapies and products toward human health.

"We've been at Delaware for about 10 years and have, I think, advanced the field in conjunction with a lot of good collaborations and openings," Kmiec said.

Kmiec said he believes MIIR will grow "cautiously in a progressive manner."

"We're going to ground ourselves in very good discoveries," he said. "I think we're going to expand in a very strong way. I don't think we're going to try to recreate the world in the first year. But, I see a solid progression employing a lot of new technicians, a lot of new people impacting the economic development part of the economy and advancing the biotechnology licensing opportunities."

Kmiec received his B.A. in Microbiology from Rutgers University in 1978 and his M.S. in Microbiology from Southern Illinois University in 1980. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1984 and, after completing his postdoctoral work at the University of Rochester, held faculty positions at the University of California Davis and Thomas Jefferson University.

Kmiec is a co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of OrphageniX, Inc., an innovative biotechnology company focused on correcting genes that cause "orphan diseases." At Marshall, he will report to MIIR's Board of Directors, headed by Kopp, and Dr. John Maher, Vice President for Research with the Marshall University Research Corp.

"I have met and worked with a lot of people in scientific research, and he is by far the most impressive because of the array of expertise and skills he brings to Marshall University," Kopp said.

Maher described Kmiec as a world-class researcher who has had significant entrepreneurial success.

"What we are putting in place in MIIR is unique in both its structure and its focus," Maher said. "It requires an individual with unique and exceptional talents to head it. We feel Dr. Kmiec has the scientific and leadership skills to make MIIR the scientific and economic development success the president envisioned. We are grateful for the state's commitment to the Bucks for Brains program which enabled us to attract a scientific leader of his caliber to Marshall."

Kmiec and his wife, Jennifer, have two sons, Tyler and Sam.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday August 26, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall supporters urged to wear green on College Colors Day, every Friday during the school year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans, students, faculty and staff often wear green in support of the Thundering Herd, particularly at athletic events.

This Friday, however, the day before MU opens the 2008 football season against Illinois State, the entire Marshall community is urged to wear green in celebration of the fourth annual National College Colors Day. 

College Colors Day, organized by the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), coincides with "back to school" and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics.

Earlier this month, Gov. Joe Manchin III proclaimed Friday, Aug. 29, as College Colors Day in West Virginia. Manchin's proclamation states in part that College Colors Day seeks to celebrate and promote the traditions and spirit of the college experience by encouraging fans, alumni and students to wear the colors of their favorite college throughout the day of Aug. 29.

Marshall is participating in College Colors Day for the third consecutive year and is continuing a tradition begun last year of encouraging faculty, staff and students to wear green every Friday during the school year.

Two College Colors Day kickoff games will be played on Thursday, Aug. 28 (N.C. State at South Carolina and Oregon State at Stanford). The College Colors Day logo will be on the field at both games, which will be televised by ESPN and ESPN 2, respectively. In addition, Rice University will host the third annual College Colors Day Classic football game against in-state rival SMU on Aug. 29.

A 30-second College Colors Day television spot will run nationally on sports and news networks this week. This includes all of the ESPN networks, CNBC, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and many others.

For more information on College Colors Day, visit www.collegecolorsday.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday August 20, 2008
Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

Marshall University Graduate College hosts open house Saturday

SOUTH CHARLESTON - Marshall University Graduate College is opening its doors this Saturday to give busy professionals an opportunity to learn about the variety of advanced degrees conveniently offered at the South Charleston campus.

Doors will be open from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 23, in the Administration Building on campus, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., South Charleston.

Depending on career goals and experience, potential students can apply to a variety of programs. Faculty and staff representing the following programs will be on hand during the open house event:

BUSINESS - Master of Business Administration, Executive MBA,  Master of Science in Human Resource Management and Master of Science in Health Care Administration and the doctoral program in Management Practice in Nurse Anesthesia (DMPNA).

EDUCATION - Elementary and Secondary Education, Reading, Special Education, Counseling, School Psychology, Leadership Studies (School Administration/Leadership Specialist), Graduate Humanities program, and Doctor of Education program

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING - Engineering, Environmental Science, Information Systems, Technology Management and Safety.

Admission and financial aid experts also will be available to answer questions.

***

Following the open house, Marshall University's One Book author for 2008, Tim O'Brien, will be speaking to students, faculty, staff and community members from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at a small reception at the South Charleston Campus. This will be his only engagement in the Kanawha Valley.

O'Brien is the author of The Things They Carried, which was a finalist for both the 1990 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. He also will be the featured speaker Sunday, Aug. 24, at Marshall's Freshman Convocation in Huntington, which highlights Welcome Weekend and begins at 3 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

O'Brien is a native of Worthington, Minn. He graduated in 1968 from Macalester College in St. Paul and served as a foot soldier in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970, after which he pursued graduate studies in government at Harvard University. He later worked as a national affairs reporter for the Washington Post and now lives in Massachusetts. His other works include: Going After Cacciato, In the Lake of the Woods, July, July, If I Die in a Combat Zone: Box Me Up and Ship Me Home, Tomcat in Love, and The Nuclear Age.

One Book is part of Marshall's First Year Experience, a program used nationwide by many universities to help assure that students have a successful first year and will want to remain in school. The One Book committee selected The Things They Carried from about 50 books that were suggested by faculty, staff and students as possibilities for the 2008 program.


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Tuesday August 19, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL students, faculty manager receive 11 awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students and the faculty manager from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received five awards in the Omni Intermedia Awards Spring 2008 Audio Production Competition and six in the Millennium Awards 2008 Competition, results of which were announced this summer.

MU students received one Silver Omni Award and four Bronze Omni Awards in the Omni competition. The winners were announced by Media Corp. Inc. in Lexington, Ky. Marshall students and Faculty Manager Dr. Chuck G. Bailey received two Gold Awards and four Silver Awards in the Millennium competition. Those winners were named in a letter from Snoqualmie, Wash.

The Silver Omni award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was:

Radio News

"The Pumpkin House: Trick or Treat Night," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a senior from Montgomery, W.Va., broadcast during "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88."

The four Bronze Omni award-winning entries were:

Radio News

"Storytime for West Virginia," written and produced by Kimberly Burcham, a recent graduate from Huntington, broadcast during "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88."

Radio Public Service Announcement

"Intolerance," an in-house public service announcement, written and produced by Terry Bartley, a senior from Foster, W.Va., broadcast in Public Service Announcement rotation.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University-East Carolina football game played Saturday, Nov. 10, 2007 at Marshall. Students calling the game were play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; color commentator Brian Dalek, a senior from McMechen, W.Va.; sideline reporter Andrew Ramspacher, a sophomore from Dublin, Ohio; and engineers Scott Hall, a recent master's graduate from Stephens City, Va., and Boom Madison, a freshman from Olympia, Wash.

Radio Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall-UAB football game played Saturday, Nov. 24, 2007 at Marshall. Students calling the game were Cavalier, who did play-by-play; Hall, who was the color commentator; sideline reporter Robert Iddings, a sophomore from St. Albans, W.Va.; and engineer Deven Swartz, a senior from Philippi, W.Va.

The Omni Intermedia Awards are owned and operated by Media Corp Inc., which exists to recognize outstanding media productions that engage, empower and enlighten. Media Corp Inc. is also dedicated to educating and training higher education students. Winners of the Omni Awards come from radio stations, production facilities, advertising and public relations agencies, government entities, technicians, narrators, writers, and other professionals associated with the production of audio broadcasts and materials.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment," Bailey said. "I am proud of the honor these Silver and Bronze Omni Intermedia Awards bestow on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University."

The two Gold Awards in the Millennium competition were in the following categories:

Feature Package

"The Pumpkin House: Trick or Treat Night."

Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University-East Carolina football game played Saturday, Nov. 10, 2007 at Marshall.

The four Silver Awards were in the following categories:

Publication/Manual Training

"WMUL-FM Promo and PSA Production Manual," written by Bailey and Cavalier, WMUL-FM Production Director. The manual was written for the student and community volunteer staff members of the campus radio station and was published in December 2007.

Public Service Announcement

"Captain Pollution," an in-house public service announcement, written and produced by Cavalier, Luke Williams, a freshman from Cross Lanes, W.Va., Leannda Carey, a freshman from Wellsburg, W.Va., and Mark Swinkels, an international student from Nieuwleoop, Holland, broadcast in Public Service Announcement rotation.

Documentary

"The Quest for Healthy Breasts," written and produced by Blair Morse, a recent graduate from Shelbyville, Ky., broadcast during "Aircheck."

Sports Play-By-Play

WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University-University of Memphis men's basketball game played Saturday, Jan. 12 at Marshall. Students calling the game were Cavalier, who did play-by-play; Dalek, who was the color commentator, and engineer Justin Prince, a freshman from Kenova.

The Millennium Awards were created to honor outstanding creativity, skill, craft and talent in television/film/video/commercials, print, advertising, Web design, audio and radio. Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals who raise the bar of excellence. There were more than 1,200 entries in the 2008 competition.

"This is a noteworthy accomplishment for WMUL-FM to be recognized as having broadcast one of the best feature packages as well as one of the best play-by-play calls of a college football game in the country," Bailey said. "Adam Cavalier's feature package has received multiple awards and this latest gold award further validates the quality of his news reporting skills. Likewise, Marshall fans are treated to superb coverage of Thundering Herd sports by the 88 FM sports team."

For more information on WMUL's awards, contact Bailey at (304) 696-2294.


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Saturday August 16, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories dedicated

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The planned accreditation of Marshall University's engineering program moved closer to reality today with the dedication of the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The $4.2 million, 16,000-square-foot facility containing the engineering laboratories, which sits across 3rd Avenue from Smith Hall, is named in honor of philanthropists Arthur and Joan Weisberg of Huntington. Signage revealing the name of the building was unveiled during today's event.

The Weisbergs also joined Marshall's Pathway of Prominence today. Donors who present gifts of $1 million or more to Marshall are honored with a plaque on the Pathway, which is located at the center of the Huntington campus between Old Main and the Memorial Student Center. The plaque was unveiled during the ceremony.

"This new facility is a tremendous milestone in the history of the University, and without Art and Joan, we would not be where we are today," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "Their most recent gift has been one of the most important factors in our ability to move forward on the construction and development of the new engineering laboratories."

In January 2006, Marshall University's Board of Governors approved a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering (BSE), to be offered in the College of Information Technology and Engineering's Division of Engineering and Computer Science. One of the most important steps in establishing a four-year, Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredited engineering degree is construction of new facilities.

In May 2006, the Weisbergs, owners of State Electric Supply Company in Huntington, contributed $2.5 million in support of Marshall's Division of Engineering and Computer Science. The division was renamed the Arthur and Joan Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science to honor their many years of supporting Marshall.

In December 2007, the Weisbergs increased their commitment to engineering at Marshall by expanding their 2006 pledge to $5 million. According to the revised commitment, as much of the funds as needed went toward construction of the engineering laboratories, with any remaining funds going to the Weisberg division to provide support for future needs of the program. Additional funds for the project were raised through Marshall's Bridge Campaign.

Currently, the Marshall BSE offers an area of emphasis in civil engineering, and the new facility will house laboratories to support courses in material testing, soil mechanics, hydraulics, and environmental engineering. There also is room for expansion as the program adds other emphasis areas such as mechanical engineering.

The building also will have an electronic classroom, offices, a technician room, a balance room and a visualization lab, where simulated environments will be created for specialized training and research. The new facility provides essential resources for accreditation of the engineering program, which Marshall plans to seek in the 2009-2010 academic year.

Art and Joan Weisberg have demonstrated on many occasions their commitment to continuing education and to helping Marshall and the community grow together. They have been major contributors to Marshall for many years, supporting the Arthur and Joan Weisberg Chairs in Software Engineering and the Arthur and Joan Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science. In recognition of their dedication, both Art and Joan Weisberg received Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees from Marshall last spring.

"Marshall is a major asset to the community," Art Weisberg said. "Marshall is the vehicle we are going to use to keep up in the future. Huntington is a great place to start a business and raise a family. Why shouldn't Huntington succeed? Marshall helps by training people who give back to Huntington."

Art Weisberg said he believes that his success with State Electric, which began in Huntington in 1952 and has grown to 41 branches in five states, proves that the future is unlimited for Marshall and the community.

"I'm a hardware salesman," he said. "Huntington people and Marshall people have been very kind to me. Why have I come this far? Hard work, dedication and believing in ideas. I started this business with no money, no future and no inventory. But I got immersed in it. In six months, I loved it."

Joan Weisberg described the new engineering lab building as "wonderful" and important to the future of Marshall and Huntington.

"Good schools are a hallmark of a fine community," she said. "The best thing you can do is help people help themselves at a higher economic and intellectual level. (Through the engineering program) people will be getting training for intellectually challenging and beneficial jobs."

Dr.  Betsy Dulin, dean of CITE, acknowledged the impact of the Weisbergs' support of the engineering program at Marshall.

"With their unerring vision for the future of technology and their unsurpassed community spirit, Art and Joan Weisberg have been with the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) from the beginning," Dulin said. "Their early support for our faculty and students and the naming gift for the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science were major catalysts for the development and growth of the college.  Their most recent gift enables us to pursue the next important steps of our growth, including further development of the engineering and computer laboratory components of our program in preparation for an accreditation visit next year.  We're honored and privileged to name the new facility in recognition of their generosity."

Sen. Robert Plymale, chair of the Senate Education Committee, was the lead sponsor of legislation in 2004 that led to the restart of Marshall's engineering program.

"The opening of this building is a defining moment in the engineering program at Marshall University," Plymale said. "I equate this to when I was a student here and the medical school was established, and the impact it has had on the university and community. I believe the engineering school can have that same impact."


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Thursday August 14, 2008
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Picnic, Freshman Convocation highlight Welcome Weekend activities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students arriving soon at Marshall University for the start of the fall 2008 semester no longer need to look at artist's renderings to get a glimpse into the future of the Huntington campus.

That future, at least in part, has arrived. At the east end of campus, construction of the 161,000-square-foot First Year Residence Halls is finished. At the west end of campus is the 16,000- square-foot engineering laboratory, construction of which also was completed this summer.

The massive Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center, located just east of the new residence halls, also is taking shape. The 123,000-square-foot building will open in February 2009. And, early construction of the 38,000-square-foot Foundation and Alumni Center on 5th Avenue, which will open in fall 2009, is well under way.

Fall classes begin on Monday, Aug. 25, preceded as usual by Welcome Weekend activities, which start at 9 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 22 when freshmen can begin moving into their rooms. Although everything is new for the freshmen, returning students can't help but notice the physical changes and the excitement that accompanies the start of another school year.

"This time of year is the most exciting to be a part of the Marshall family," said Matt James, president of Marshall's student body. "Our campus and community are filled with plenty of activities and individuals who have worked tirelessly to welcome our students.  Construction is continuing on the highly-anticipated health and recreation facility and, of course, football season is right around the corner."

Welcome Weekend is a three-day event highlighted by a family picnic from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22 on Buskirk Field, and the Freshman Convocation, which begins at 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 24 at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

Tim O'Brien, author of The Things They Carried, will be the featured speaker at the Freshman Convocation. Other speakers include MU President Stephen J. Kopp, head football Coach Mark Snyder, and James. New Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gayle Ormiston will introduce the deans and vice presidents to the students.

The Things They Carried is the book chosen this year for Marshall's common reading program called One Book Marshall, which is part of MU's First Year Experience program. O'Brien's book is fiction, but is based on people he knew in the Vietnam War. Barbara Winters, dean of libraries at Marshall, said O'Brien will be "a very powerful speaker."

The freshman class will meet at the Memorial Student Center plaza at 2:30 p.m. Sunday for a group photograph, then walk west on 4th Avenue to the Keith-Albee for the convocation. The students will be led by to the convocation by the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps.

"The convocation is just like the first day of class. It's the most important time of the year when students get their game faces on and figure out what they are doing," said Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs. "The convocation is a practical and realistic beginning to the semester. The students learn what their obligations are and get started the next day."

The construction on campus this summer was not limited to the new buildings. Many repairs and renovations took place as well. Some of these include:

  • Complete renovation of the registrar's office in Old Main
  • Upgrading of the 7th floor offices in Smith Hall
  • multiple repairs to sidewalks
  • repaired benches
  • exterior lighting updates
  • installation of new projection screens in seven classrooms in the Science Building
  • new air conditioning units in Gullickson Hall classrooms 120 through 130
  • conversion of all water faucets in Harris Hall to motion activated faucets
  • installation of safety eye wash units on each floor of the Science Building
  • painting and repairs in buildings throughout campus, such as Corbly Hall, Drinko Library, Henderson Center, Smith Hall, the Science Building and Prichard Hall
  • Stripping and waxing of floors in all academic buildings
  • Renovations to the Shewey Athletic Building

Marshall also hired four administrators over the summer. They include:

  • Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), who returned as dean effective June 1. Before being named dean, she was a professor at Marshall.
  • Dr. Shari Clark, vice president of multicultural affairs, effective June 1. Before coming to Marshall, Clark was the associate vice president for student affairs at Temple University in Philadelphia.
  • Dr. Chong Kim, interim dean of the Lewis College of Business (LCOB), effective June 13. He is head of the Management and Marketing Division of the College of Business, and previously served as interim dean of the LCOB.
  • Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, effective Aug. 18. Ormiston was associate provost for faculty affairs and curriculum at Kent State University before coming to Marshall.

In addition, 37 new faculty have been hired at MU, according to Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs.

Marshall also is offering new undergraduate majors this fall. They are Hospitality Management (in the Family and Consumer Sciences program), Environmental Chemistry (in the Department of Chemistry) and International Business (in the Division of Finance and Economics).

New areas of emphasis, all within the Family and Consumer Sciences program, are Food Service Management, Hotel/Lodging and Culinary Arts.

Here is a look at the Welcome Weekend 2008 schedule:

Friday, Aug. 22

9 a.m. - New student move-in

Noon to 3 p.m. - Dodgeball tournament in Gullickson Hall

4:30 to 6:30 p.m. - Family picnic on Buskirk Field and the Memorial Student Center plaza. MU deans and faculty will serve ice cream. The Marshall University Marching Thunder also will perform.

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. - Wal-Mart bus ride with Student Activities (leaving from the student center)

9 to 11 p.m. -We Are Marshall, the movie, will be shown on Buskirk Field. Those attending are encouraged to bring blankets.

Saturday Aug. 23

9 a.m. - New student move-in

9 to 11 a.m. - Continental Breakfast Social at the Memorial Student Center

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Wal-Mart bus ride with Student Activities (leaving from the student center)

1 to 4 p.m. - Target bus ride with Student Activities (leaving from the student center)

5 to 8 p.m. - Welcome Weekend Showdown on Buskirk Field and the Memorial Student Center plaza. This event is full of fun activities, free food and opportunities for students to socialize with each other. Students may:

  • Tie dye their own Marshall T-shirt
  • Participate in a cornhole competition
  • Listen to the sounds of DJ Money
  • Eat free pizza and food from Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, Pita Pit and McDonald's

5:30 to 6 p.m. - Stewarts Hot Dog Eating Contest on Memorial Student Center plaza or Buskirk Field

6 to 7 p.m. - Speed Meet on the Green. This event is intended for new students to get better acquainted with other new students and make new friends on campus.

Prizes to be given out include gas cards, Max and Erma's gift cards, Wendy's coupons, Cold Stone Creamery coupons, Applebee's gift cards and much more.

8 to 10 p.m. - "Luau," hosted by the fraternities and sororities, on the Memorial Student Center plaza and Buskirk Field. Students may enjoy the dunking booth, win door prizes and participate in X Box tournaments.

The following offices will be open on Saturday:

  • Admissions, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Registrar, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Bursar, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • I.D., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Parking, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Financial Aid, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Recruitment/Welcome Center, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

Sunday,  Aug.  24

9 a.m. - New student move-in

Noon to 2 p.m. - Class walk-through. Returning Marshall students will assist in guiding new students through their class schedules (meet at Memorial Student Center plaza).

2:30 p.m. - Freshman class picture. New students will meet at the Memorial Student Center plaza for the entering 2008 class photo.

2:40 p.m. - Students will leave campus and walk west on 4th Avenue to the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

3 p.m. - The President's Freshman Convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

4:30 to 5 p.m. - Post-convocation reception hosted by the One Book Marshall committee. Tim O'Brien, author of The Things They Carried, will autograph his book at the Memorial Student Center.

5 to 6:30 p.m. - Residence Services picnic on the plaza of the Marshall Commons residence halls.

The following offices will be open on Sunday:

  • Bursar, noon to 4 p.m.
  • I.D., noon to 4 p.m.
  • Parking, noon to 4 p.m.
  • Recruitment/Welcome Center, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday August 13, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    MU Early Education Center begins enrolling children for 2008-2009

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Early Education Center has begun registering Pre-K children (ages 3 and 4) for the 2008-2009 school year, according to Kelly Walker, who has just begun work as lead teacher for the facility. Classes begin August 25. Limited spaces are available, with preference given to four year olds as well as three year olds who qualify for Pre-K special needs services. 

    Walker is a master's-level, early-childhood-certified educator with more than 10 years of experience working with young children. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees from Marshall and has taught in both public Pre-K and Head Start programs since.

    "I am extremely excited to become a member of the Marshall University family again," Walker said. "I look forward to serving the children and families of the MUEEC as well."

    The MUEEC is a nationally accredited training and research facility for pre- and in-service early childhood educators, and will also be a collaborative site for the Cabell County Pre-K program for the upcoming year. It places strong emphasis on the study of children's and teachers' development of critical thinking, technology, and other 21st Century skills. The children and teachers work collaboratively in an active, play-based environment to co-construct learning.

    The MUEEC is licensed by the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and maintains compliance with the Cabell-Huntington Health Department, the West Virginia State Fire Marshal and Marshall University. 

    "Faculty and staff work hard to make the MUEEC a quality, innovative program from which children will both benefit and reap hours of enjoyment,"  said Dr. Janet Dozier, faculty advisor for the center. "We continue to work diligently to develop teaching methods, support, and resources for pre-service educators, seeking to incorporate a rich, child-centered approach to learning."

    For additional information about enrolling their children at the MUEEC, persons may contact Walker at (304) 696-3498.


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    Wednesday August 13, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

    Tickets on sale for Paint the Capital City Green pep rally

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Tickets are still available for Marshall University's Paint the Capital City Green pep rally Wednesday, Aug. 20 in Charleston.

    Advance only tickets are on sale now for $35. To order tickets, call (304) 696-7138.

    Paint the Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel.

    Friends of Coal returns this year as the event's title sponsor. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

    Marshall fans will get to meet President Stephen J. Kopp and hear from head football Coach Mark Snyder and other members of the university's coaching staff as well as key players on the team. The event begins with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7:15 p.m.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 12, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Parthenon writers, editors win awards, scholarships

    WHEELING, W.Va. Editors and writers for The Parthenon, Marshall University's campus newspaper, picked up three first-place awards and three scholarships at the West Virginia Press Association annual convention at Oglebay Resort on Friday and Saturday.

    The Better Newspaper Contest honors the best in West Virginia journalism with awards in six divisions based on circulation, three for dailies and three for weeklies. The Parthenon competes in Division III with daily newspapers such as the Times-West Virginian in Fairmont and The Inter-Mountain in Elkins. Awards were for 2007 work, and the contest included 2,525 entries.

    "We constantly tell our students that The Parthenon is a real newsroom and that we are just as much a part of the Tri-State media market as any other outlet," said Nerissa Young, Parthenon adviser. "These awards validate that and validate the quality of work our students are doing to serve the Huntington community. This quality is why two of our students doing summer internships were offered full-time jobs on the spot."

    The Parthenon staff won first place for service to the community for its United Way series that ran in the fall. Editors and writers from the JMC 301 class collaborated to cover every agency that receives money from United Way of the River Cities.

    "The Parthenon is the only media outlet equipped to do this series," Young said. "We sent two dozen reporters into the community to talk with representatives from each agency and individuals who received services from those agencies. I commend my colleague Burnis Morris for designing the series."

    Lauren Eubank and Holly R. Rice picked up first-place awards for best coverage of legal issues and the courts and sports newswriting, respectively.

    Eubank, a senior broadcast journalism major from South Charleston, won for her story about the lawsuit involving the Warner Bros. film "We Are Marshall" and the producers of the documentary "Ashes to Glory," which tell the story of the 1970 football team plane crash.

    "Lauren did an excellent job of breaking down the components of a complicated civil lawsuit and writing a story anyone could understand," Young said. "Her story was the first to cover some aspects of the case, and she has continued to cover it even though she is not required to through a class."

    Rice, a senior broadcast journalism major from Kenova, won for her story about a local connection to the Marion Jones doping scandal that broke last fall. Jones is sitting out the Beijing Olympics.

    "Holly's story is an excellent example of enterprise reporting in finding a local angle to a national and international story," Young said. "She found out about and developed this story on her own."

    Editors earned second place in the newspaper design category for their Halloween Day issue. Senior print journalism major Kristin Steele from Wayne and May print journalism graduate Melissa Newman from Shepherdstown earned second place for best editorial page.

    Parthenon writers Leann Dickens, Casey D. Rowe and Sarina LoPresti received honorable mention for their news package about the Emmons fire. Dickens is a May public relations graduate from Orgas. Rowe is a senior public relations major from Ceredo. LoPresti is a senior print journalism major from Poughquag, N.Y.

    Young picked up a third-place award for columnist in Division I, which includes the Charleston, Huntington and Beckley newspapers. She writes "The Back Porch," a Saturday column for The (Beckley, W.Va.) Register-Herald. Young is just one of 23 Marshall journalism alumni who won more than 60 awards at the convention.

    Summer executive editor Tom Bragg, former managing editor Kristin Steele and former staff writer Morgan Unger received three of the press association foundation's five $1,000 memorial scholarships.

    Bragg, a senior print journalism major from Cross Lanes, received the scholarship in memory of Cecil B. Highland Jr., president of the Clarksburg Exponent and Telegram and Southern Newspaper Publishers Association.

    Steele received the scholarship in memory of Phil Fourney, publisher of the Ravenswood News and past president of the state press association.

    Unger, a junior print journalism major from Berkeley Springs, received the scholarship in memory of Roy G. Owens, owner and publisher of the St. Marys Oracle.

    George Wallace, vice president of the foundation and publisher of the Brooke County Review, said the selection committee had a difficult time choosing five students from among the 44 outstanding applications.

    Young said, "I've worked closely with each of these students. They are among our best. I was not surprised that the foundation chose them."

    Scholarships were handed out at Friday's luncheon and the newspaper awards were handed out at Saturday evening's banquet.

    ###


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday August 8, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars program receives $15,000 grant from Conrad N. Hilton Foundation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A grant of $15,000 from the Board of Trustees of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation will help support Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars.

    "This gift, as stipulated in our proposal, will be deposited into the Society of Yeager Scholars Endowment for the Society of Yeager Scholars program at Marshall," said Bob Galardi, Director of Major Gifts for the Society of Yeager Scholars. "The grant will assist us in our efforts to compete with the rising costs of our Yeager Scholars' studies at Marshall."

    The donation is a first-time gift from the California-based Hilton Foundation, which was established in 1944 by hotel entrepreneur Conrad N. Hilton. Offices are located in Los Angeles, Calif., and Reno, Nev.

    "The grant demonstrates the importance of securing the new funding sources needed to grow our program in the 21st Century," Galardi said.

    For more information or to contribute to the Society of Yeager Scholars, contact Galardi at (304) 696-3336 or e-mail him at galardi@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday August 7, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Three Marshall BOG members reappointed for four years

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin has reappointed three members of Marshall University's Board of Governors to four-year terms.

    Those reappointed to terms ending June 30, 2012 include Letitia Neese Chafin of Williamson, W.Va., John G. Hess of Barboursville and Verna K. Gibson of Sarasota, Fla.

    Chafin is an attorney with the H. Truman Chafin Law Firm, PLLC, in Williamson, W.Va.

    Hess, a certified public accountant, is a partner with the Certified Public Accounting firm of Hess, Stewart & Campbell, PLLC, which has offices in Huntington and Beckley.

    Gibson is nationally known for her career and leadership in the retail fashion clothing industry. She was the first woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company.


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    Friday August 1, 2008
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    Marshall University assistant professor receives Camille and Henry Dreyfus Faculty Start-up Award

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Laura R. McCunn, an assistant professor in Marshall University's Department of Chemistry, has been named one of eight recipients of a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Faculty Start-up Award. The unrestricted five-year grant provides $30,000 to begin her research program.

    McCunn, a native of northeast Ohio, was hired at Marshall last spring and will begin teaching at MU this fall. She is one of only five faculty from a public institution in the past five years to receive the start-up award, according to Dr. Michael Castellani, professor and chair of Marshall's Department of Chemistry.

    "It's really a great thing to help get her started," Castellani said.

    McCunn, a physical chemist, received her B.S. degree in biochemistry from Ohio Wesleyan University and her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Chicago. She also received a postdoctoral fellowship at Yale University.

    Her research interests include the structure, stability and other properties of radicals, which are reactive chemical species created during combustion. McCunn is building a matrix-isolation instrument to measure the vibrational spectra of the radicals.  The apparatus will also be used to learn about the photochemistry of halogenated hydrocarbons, such as CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons).

    "We're extremely pleased that Laura received this award," Castellani said. "The money will allow her to hire undergraduate students to study in her research lab and so increase the educational opportunities for our students.  This program is very competitive and the award also raises the stature of both our department and the College of Science nationally."

    Dr. Wayne Elmore, interim dean of Marshall's College of Science, said he is "very pleased" that McCunn has been awarded this prestigious award.

    "Her addition to the Chemistry Department improves an already excellent academic and research intensive program," Elmore said. "I am sure she will have a long and productive career at Marshall University."

    McCunn said she is "thrilled" to receive the award.

    "It is great for my research program and the department, and especially the students who will be able to work with me," she said. "I knew my application would be competitive, but it is a very difficult award to get."

    The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation supports the scholarly activity of new faculty in chemistry at primarily undergraduate institutions with the award to help initiate their independent research programs.

    The Faculty Start-up Awards Program is open to academic institutions in the states, districts and territories of the United States that grant a bachelor's or master's degree, but not a doctoral degree, in the chemical sciences, including biochemistry, materials chemistry and chemical engineering.


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    Wednesday July 30, 2008
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    Dr. Sherri Smith named interim executive director of Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Sherri Smith, an associate professor of English at Marshall University, will be the interim executive director of the university's Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning for academic year 2008-2009, according to Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president of academic affairs.

    In addition to her teaching and scholarly activities, Smith has directed the Service Learning Program since its inception in 2003. In that capacity, she has created faculty development workshops to assist faculty in incorporating service learning projects across the disciplines and at all course levels. The program has grown in a short period of time to include 18 service-learning trained faculty who collectively have worked with more than 1,000 students in six colleges/schools.

    Hensley said Smith leads by example, and has one of the most successful service learning courses, WS 101, in which students work on the development and operation of Huntington's Dress for Success program.

    Smith will assume her new role Aug. 18 as host of New Faculty Orientation. She will be contacting chairs, deans and faculty to assess the faculty development needs for this academic year.


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    Wednesday July 30, 2008
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    Jean Edward Smith to write biography of George W. Bush

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University professor and noted biographer Jean Edward Smith, whose most recent book FDR won the Francis Parkman Prize and was a national bestseller, will write a one-volume biography of George W. Bush to be titled W, it was announced today by Gina Centrello, President and Publisher of the Random House Publishing Group.

    Random House Executive Editor Bob Loomis, who edited Smith's FDR biography, acquired world rights from the author.

    Smith is currently writing a biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower, to be delivered in 2009. The Bush biography, which will be a comprehensive look at the man and president from a longer perspective, will be delivered in 2012.

    "We are so pleased to be continuing our association with Jean Smith, and to publish what will undoubtedly be the definitive biography of George W. Bush," Centrello said.

    "Jean Smith is able to take subjects of enormous complexity and refine them into beautifully lucid, sensitive and lively narratives," said Loomis. "He is an exceptional writer whose single-volume biographies have been praised over and over as the best of their kind."

    "To write the biography of a living person is quite a challenge," Smith said. "George W. Bush is already one of the most controversial presidents in American history, and he is likely to become more so. The dust will have settled by 2012, the first wave of memoirs will have subsided, and there will be sufficient distance for informed, historical judgment to set the record straight."

    Smith is the author of 12 books, including highly acclaimed biographies of Chief Justice John Marshall, General Lucius D. Clay, and Ulysses S. Grant (a 2002 Pulitzer Prize finalist). He taught at the University of Toronto for 35 years before joining the faculty of Marshall University, where he is the John Marshall Professor of Political Science.


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    Tuesday July 29, 2008
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    Niles receives international award for nutrition and cancer research; MU, Italian universities finalize exchange agreements

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Richard M. Niles, chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Marshall University, received the 2008 international award Sebetia-Ter for his achievements in nutrition and cancer research during a ceremony held in Naples, Italy this past May.

    The Sebetia-Ter award is given to internationally renowned scientists and many other professionals in the fields of architecture, aeronautics, medicine, biotechnology, engineering, politics, military service, literature, music and philosophy.

    Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology and the Department of Surgery at Marshall University, received the same honor in 2007, during the 25th annual presentation of the Sebetia-Ter international award for his achievements in gene therapy and cancer research.

    During their trip to Italy, Drs. Niles and Claudio also gave talks at the regional Medical Center of Fondi, sponsored by the International Lions Club of Fondi, and finalized an exchange agreement between the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, and the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Naples "Federico II" in Italy.

    This exchange agreement will allow graduate students and faculty of the two universities to travel, visit and participate in research conducted at the two institutions. Additionally, another agreement has been signed between the "Ceinge" Research Institute for Biotechnology in Naples, Italy (a semi-independent research institute similar to the MIIR envisioned by Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp) and the Biomedical Sciences Program at Marshall University.

    Additional graduate program exchanges are currently being developed with the University of l'Aquila, Italy, with the National Research Council (CNR) in Italy, and with universities in France and China.

    "The exchange agreements between Marshall University and the University 'Federico II' and the Ceinge Research Institute for Biotechnology in Naples, Italy is the first international research agreement for Marshall University," Claudio said. "The exchange agreements will allow Marshall students and faculty to form international scientific collaborations with one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in Europe. Not only will there be a free exchange of ideas, but also cultural enlightenment and travel opportunities on both sides of the world, promising scientific and technological advancements as well as academic fortification and enrichment of the local communities of Naples, Italy and Huntington, West Virginia."

    Niles, too, said he is elated with the exchange agreement with the University of Naples.

    "Although I felt very fortunate to receive the 2008 Sebetia-Ter International award in Biomedical Sciences, I was even happier that my institution, Marshall University, was also receiving international attention," Niles said. "The trip to Italy and my hosts were wonderful.  A lasting accomplishment of this trip is the exchange agreement with the University of Naples and its Biotechnology Research Institute.  I am very grateful to my colleague, Dr. Claudio, for helping set up this agreement."

    For more information, call Diana Maue, Graduate Admission Counselor for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) programs, at (304) 696-3365. Or, e-mail Niles at niles@marshall.edu, or Claudio at claudiop@marshall.edu.


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    Tuesday July 29, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

    Herd fans can win tickets to Marshall-WVU game at Paint the Capital City Green pep rally

    CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Marshall University fans attending the 11th annual Paint the Capital City Green pep rally will have an opportunity to win tickets to watch their Thundering Herd face off with the West Virginia University Mountaineers in the Friends of Coal Bowl this fall.

    All advance-paid tickets to the 11th Annual Paint the Capital City Green pep rally, which takes place Wednesday, Aug. 20 in Charleston, will be entered into a drawing for two tickets to the Sept. 27 game in Morgantown. Advance-only tickets are on sale now for $35 and must be purchased by close of business on Friday, Aug. 8, to qualify for the drawing.

    Paint the Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Festivities start at 6 p.m. at Charleston's Embassy Suites Hotel.

    Friends of Coal returns this year as the event's title sponsor. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Greater Kanawha Valley Alumni Club and the Charleston Quarterback Club. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

    Marshall fans will get to meet President Stephen J. Kopp and hear from head football coach Mark Snyder and other members of the university's coaching staff as well as key players on the team.  The event begins with a pep rally and tailgate spread featuring entertainment by Marco and the cheerleading squad, as well as music from members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. A formal program begins at 7:15 p.m.

    "I always look forward to Paint the Capital City Green," Snyder said. "It's a great opportunity to take our show to the Capital City and meet our Kanawha Valley Herd fans. I look forward to introducing some of our great players to our fans there."

    To order tickets, call (304) 696-7138.


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    Monday July 28, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'The Things They Carried' chosen for One Book Marshall program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Things They Carried, a collection of short stories by Tim O'Brien, was chosen for Marshall University freshmen to read this summer as part of a required, common reading program called One Book Marshall, which debuted last year at MU.

    Freshmen attending orientation sessions at Marshall this summer were given copies of The Things They Carried and encouraged to read it before classes start on Monday, Aug. 25. Once school begins, the students will take part in discussions and events focused on issues introduced in The Things They Carried as part of their University Studies and Honors 101 courses.

    Community members, as well as Marshall faculty and staff, are also being encouraged to read the book and participate in discussions, according to Barbara Winters, dean of libraries at Marshall and chair of its One Book committee.

    One Book is part of Marshall's First Year Experience, a program used nationwide by many universities to help assure that students have a successful first year and will want to remain in school. Winters said last year's initial One Book Marshall program "was greatly successful."

    "It is a great transition from high school," Winters said.

    The One Book committee selected The Things They Carried from about 50 books that were suggested by faculty, staff and students as possibilities for the 2008 program. The list was trimmed to four before the committee settled on The Things They Carried.

    "The students on the One Book committee loved this book," said Michelle Duncan, director of University College and coordinator of First Year Experience. "I thought if these students are excited about TTTC, we hope our freshmen will be excited."

    Winters said O'Brien's book is fiction, but it is based on people he knew in the Vietnam War.

    "It is a great discussion initiator," she said. "It will open cross-disciplinary discussions on a lot of issues students face or are going to be facing. It's a good book to use in this election year, as well.  There are so many links between the 1968 and 2008 elections to link events of today with historical events in the minds of our students."

    Duncan agreed, noting some of the messages from the book are related to courage, patriotism, friendship and decision making.

    "We were looking for a book that would teach a lesson to students, something the students might be able to relate to," she said. "The students coming in are showing a lot of courage by leaving their comfort zone. They are venturing off. The title is like a metaphor. He talks about physical things he carried in Vietnam in only one chapter, and then he talks about a lot of emotional things … just like freshmen coming into college, coming from different backgrounds, they are carrying a lot of emotional baggage as well. What were his internal struggles? What are some of our students' internal struggles?"

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp encouraged the university to implement the One Book program last year.

    "One of the major goals of the university under President Kopp's leadership is to inculcate critical thinking abilities," Winters said. "The goal of the First Year Experience is to provide an environment that nurtures critical thinking."

    O'Brien, a native of Worthington, Minn., graduated in 1968 from Macalester College in St. Paul. He served as a foot soldier in Vietnam from 1969 to 1970, after which he pursued graduate studies in Government at Harvard University. He later worked as a national affairs reporter for the Washington Post and now lives in Massachusetts.

    The Things They Carried was a finalist for both the 1990 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. O'Brien will be the featured speaker Sunday, Aug. 24 at Marshall's Freshman Convocation, which highlights Welcome Weekend and begins at 3 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

    "I'm delighted that people at Marshall will be reading my work and look forward to my visit," O'Brien said. "As a fiction writer, I don't have a 'message' as such, but must rather rely on the stories I tell to cast the spell that stories must always cast.  I plan to talk about what stories do in our lives - console, heal, inspire, embolden, and so on.  And of course I plan to tell a few stories of my own." 

    Winters said she is looking forward to hearing O'Brien address the students.

    "He will be a very powerful speaker," she said.

    Dr. David Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts, heard O'Brien speak to about 300 people at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga, where Pittenger worked before coming to Marshall.

    "He was mesmerizing," Pittenger said of O'Brien. "He started out talking about the craft of writing and how he got into it, and he slowly began to segue into his writing of The Things They Carried. That all was fiction, but it was a way for himself and others to come to terms with the reality of the Vietnam War."

    Following the Freshman Convocation, O'Brien will conduct a book signing in the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    For more information on the One Book Marshall program, contact Winters at (304) 696-2318.


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    Wednesday July 23, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    'Grow With Music' announces fall schedule

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - "Grow With Music," a popular program for children ages birth to 5 and their parents, will resume this fall beginning the week of Sept. 1. An early registration discount is available until Aug. 1, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University.

    "Parents and their kids are having a great time at these classes," Pappas said. "I recommend early registration to assure getting a space in the right class, in addition to taking advantage of the discount."

    Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; 3 year olds, and 4 and 5 year olds. Parent participation is required in the classes for the baby, toddler and 3-year-old categories and optional for the 4 and 5-year-old category. Classes take place in the early evenings on Mondays and during the day on Mondays and Tuesdays. A maximum of 8 children is accepted per class and children with special needs are welcome.

    Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

    Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

    For information on "Grow with Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at (304) 697-0211.


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    Wednesday July 23, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Becker-Cottrill named co-chair of Autism Society of America's Panel of Professional Advisors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University, has been named co-chair of the Autism Society of America's Panel of Professional Advisors (PPA).

    The volunteer members of the PPA, along with the Panel of People on the Spectrum of Autism, serve in an advisory capacity to the Autism Society's Board of Directors. Their varied experiences and expertise help ASA advance its mission of improving the lives of all affected by autism. Co-chairs of the PPA also serve on the ASA Board of Directors.

    "I am honored to have been selected for this position," Becker-Cottrill said. "ASA is the oldest advocacy group for autism in the nation and they have had a major influence on public awareness, advocating for appropriate services, supporting important research and advancing critical autism legislation. I am eager to contribute and to work with the dedicated individuals of the PPA and the ASA Board of Directors."

    Becker-Cottrill received her doctorate in education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She has been involved in education and developmental disabilities for the past 28 years, serving as a behavior analyst at the Margaret Chapman School in Hawthorne, N.Y., and as executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall for the past 18 years.

    Becker-Cottrill also is an adjunct graduate professor at Marshall, teaching courses related to autism. She has served as the principal investigator for the West Virginia Autism Monitoring Project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She is a co-director of the Network of Autism Training and Technical Assistance Programs (NATTAP) and co-founder of the College Program for Students with Asperger's Syndrome at Marshall. Becker-Cottrill also serves on the Autism Society of West Virginia Board of Directors. She recently co-authored the book Autism: A Primer for Educators.

    Dr. James Ball of Cranbury, N.J., was selected as the other co-chair of the PPA. He is President/CEO of JB Autism Consulting and has been in the autism field for more than 20 years.

    For more information, call Becker-Cottrill at (304) 696-2844.


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    Tuesday July 22, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Samples promoted to Assistant VP for Development; Mayer named Resident Development Consultant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Rebecca McPhail Samples, former Director of Annual Giving at Marshall University, has been named Assistant Vice President for Development at MU, Marshall Foundation Inc. CEO Dr. Ron Area announced today. Samples assumed her duties on July 1.

    Also, Dr. Lynne Mayer, recently eligible for retirement, will continue to serve the university. She is moving from Associate Vice President for Development, a position she has held since 2002, to the part-time position of Resident Development Consultant, Area said.

    Samples, who has been at Marshall since October 2004, now oversees all of Marshall's development operations, including the University Fund, donor relations, development services and prospect management.

    "Rebecca is a very talented professional," Area said.  "She definitely has the ability to not only oversee this area, but also to be a major player in the raising of significant gifts."

    Samples came to Marshall from the University of Charleston, where she was Director of Development. She previously was Development and Grant Research Manager and interim Director of Development for the YMCA of Greater Cleveland.

    "I am pleased to accept an expanded role within the Development Office here at Marshall University," Samples said.  "The vision of our leaders, the commitment of our alumni, and the continued growth of the university have created a strong institution with a limitless future."

    In her new role, Mayer reports to Area, assisting in identifying and researching major gift prospects. Having been responsible for Marshall's planned giving program as well as the donor relations areas of scholarship and endowment development for more than eight years, she will now serve as consultant to these programs.

    "Before my arrival at Marshall one year ago, Dr. Mayer had planned to retire on May 1, 2008," Area said. "As we worked together, I soon became aware of her high value to our operation - knowledge, experience and organizational history. Not wanting to lose her corporate memory, we discussed a revision of her role that would be satisfactory to her and allow Development and the Foundation to continue to benefit from her expertise. I honestly feel having Lynne in this role will significantly increase our major gift potential."

    Mayer has been at Marshall since 1970 when was she was hired as Research Specialist of Information Services in the West Virginia Research Coordinating Unit for Vocational Education. She has been with the Development Office since 1991.

    Mayer has served in numerous roles at Marshall, including Special Assistant to the President (1987-1991) and Director of Planning/Assistant to the President (1984-1987).


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    Monday July 21, 2008
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    Massey Energy completes $250,000 commitment to Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The final payment of a $250,000 commitment to Marshall University has been made by Massey Energy. The funds, which are designated for the Fred and Christine Shewey Athletic Building, will assist with recent renovations to the facility that will be completed prior to the beginning of the 2008 football season.

    "From their Doctors for our Communities (DOC) program to their support of the Lewis College of Business, Massey Energy's commitment to Marshall University is very much appreciated," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "We thank them for completing this commitment to the Fred and Christine Shewey Athletic Building, and hope that their generosity will continue for the benefit of future generations of Marshall students."

    "We are proud to be part of the Fred and Christine Shewey Athletic Building Project," said Don Blankenship, Massey Energy Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. "With more than 75 percent of Marshall University students being from West Virginia, this learning institution is changing lives within the Mountain State by allowing them to earn an education to better themselves and provide for their families. Our support of both academic and athletic programs at Marshall University is a sense of pride for everyone at Massey Energy."


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    Friday July 18, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

    Second Creek Technologies, Marshall team up to present Electronic Discovery 101 CLE credits

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Marshall University's forensic science program and Second Creek Technologies LLC have teamed up again to offer a day of Continuing Legal Education focusing on the new federal rules of electronic discovery.

    Electronic Discovery 101: Understanding the New Federal Rules will be offered at Marshall's Forensic Science Center on the Huntington campus Friday, Aug.1 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. The West Virginia-approved CLE credits offered are 7.2, including 7.2 ethics credits.

    The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure underwent a major overhaul in December 2006. Electronic Discovery 101 focuses on first-hand information from practitioners, computer experts and forensic analysts about these changes and their effects. Professionals who want to stay ahead of the curve in the new digital age will gain critical knowledge of the inner workings of computers for a tactical advantage in litigation. The course also will address unique problems presented by electronically stored information in the context of civil and criminal litigation as well as how and when to use computer forensic assistance to preserve electronic documents and electronic discovery.

    For a $150 fee, each registrant will receive course materials (including practice forms) and lunch.

    This information-packed course includes:

    ·         What judges will expect from you

    ·         How to guard against spoliation and sanctions

    ·         Drafting an effective preservation letter

    ·         Strategies for "meet and confer" sessions

    ·         Why deleted information remains discoverable

    ·         When to use computer forensics, what it reveals, and how much it costs

    ·         Authentication and chain of custody issues

    ·         Analyzing your data and their data

    ·         Preparing and responding to requests for electronic records

    ·         Expert opinions regarding what is "reasonably accessible" electronic data

    ·         Voluminous data, de-duplication and back-up tapes

    ·         Potential pitfalls hidden in the rule changes

    ·         Keeping the costs of electronic discovery under control.

    Barboursville-based Second Creek Technologies LLC has an ongoing partnership with Marshall's Computer Forensic Section of the Forensic Science Center, which occupies a state-of-the art facility boasting digital evidence laboratories and cutting-edge computer equipment. The university's Forensic Science Graduate Program was founded in 1994 and is one of only seven such Master of Science degree programs in the country and one of only three to be accredited by the Forensic Science Education Program Accreditation Commission.

    This is a repeat course and is not open for credit to previous attendees.

    For additional details, please visit http://2ndcreek.net/cle.htm. To register, call Second Creek Technologies LLC at (304) 736-5454 or toll-free at (877) 523-3253.


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    Thursday July 17, 2008
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

    Marshall medical school professor helps lead course at Harvard

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Dr. Darshana Shah of Marshall University's School of Medicine recently served as an invited faculty member for the Program for Leading Innovations in Health Care and Education at the Harvard Macy Institute of Harvard Medical School. This is the fourth year that Shah has been invited to return to Harvard as a faculty member at the institute.      

    As a faculty member, Shah served as a consultant and project group leader for an international group of participating faculty who came to the program with innovative educational projects specific to their institutions.

    Shah first participated in the leadership program in 2004 while she was developing Marshall's Academy of Medical Educators, a cadre of faculty members and medical residents who work together to develop a pool of knowledge and skills that will lead to innovation in teaching and learning in medical education. Now with 25 members and growing, Marshall's flexible program has drawn interest from medical schools as far away as Germany and Singapore.

    Shah has presented her work on Marshall's academy at national and regional conferences of the Association of American Medical Colleges. She also serves as an external reviewer for the academies at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center.     

    In July, she facilitated three career-mapping seminars for the Association of American Medical Colleges as part of its 2008 Early Career Women Faculty Development Conference.

    A member of the Marshall faculty since 1993, Shah is assistant dean for professional development in medical education and a professor of pathology.


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    Thursday July 17, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Scottish Rite picnic benefits Marshall's Childhood Language Clinic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Childhood Language Clinic will benefit from the Huntington Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Foundation's annual picnic Saturday, July 26 at the 4-H Camp on Alternate Route 10 in Huntington.

    Admission to the event, scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m., is $25 for adults. Children 12 and under are admitted free.

    "The Huntington Scottish Rite Masons have been a tremendous support to the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center," said Karen McNealy, director of Clinical Development. "This partnership provides a wonderful service for the communicatively impaired children of the entire tri-state area."

    The Scottish Rite has contributed more than $200,000 to the center since 2002. The funding specifically supports a clinical position within the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center (MUSHC) in the Department of Communication Disorders.

    McNealy said the financial contribution helps the department in two distinct ways.

    "The establishment of a clinical position allows the MUSHC to expand services to all children without placing a financial burden on families," she said. "The position also provides observation and training opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in Communication Disorders."

    The picnic includes several activities and features, such as a dunking machine and country store. A trip to Hilton Head, S.C., will be auctioned and live music will be provided.

    For more information on the picnic, contact the Scottish Rite at (304) 522-1430 or the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center at (304) 696-3641.


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    Tuesday July 15, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Foundation honored for 2006-2007 Annual Report

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - The Marshall University Foundation, Inc. was recognized this spring with two Addy Awards for its 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    In the Color Annual Report category, the foundation's Annual Report was the highest scoring among the almost 500 entries in the Western Virginia region. The foundation also received the district award for best Annual Report in the Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina district. The publication was produced by Access Public Relations in Roanoke, Va.

    The 2006-2007 Annual Report was designed from the movie, "We Are Marshall." The cover was based on the movie poster and the inside photos were recreated from some of the movie's scenes.  The actors were replaced in the photos with people associated with the university. Marshall students, faculty, staff, alumni and investors were featured. Warner Bros. gave the foundation permission to use the scenes from the movie and to recreate the scenes to fit with the Annual Report.

    "With the 'We Are Marshall' movie premiere being a part of the 2006-2007 fiscal year, it was a natural fit for our Annual Report to tell the next chapter in our continuing story," Kristi Arrowood, Director of Special Projects for the foundation, said. "We wanted to recognize how the story that was shared by the movie is so special."

    The Annual Report was the most in-depth in several years, Arrowood said. In past reports, only the foundation's major contributors were listed. The 2006-2007 Annual Report listed every foundation donor for the year.

    "The Annual Report is one of the many great tools the foundation uses to highlight the year's success and allows us to thank each and every one of our investors," Arrowood said. "We had not listed all of our donors in a long time and doing so is a very important step in acknowledging and saying thank you."

    The purpose of the annual report is to give the foundation's financial statement/audit and to showcase the many achievements over the past year. The foundation sent the 2006-2007 Annual Report to more than 6,000 people.

    "We want all of Marshall's family and friends to realize the importance of every dollar given to the foundation," Arrowood said. "No matter the size of the gift it always makes a difference in the lives of our current and future students."

    The Annual Report was designed by Todd Marcum, owner of Access Public Relations and a Marshall graduate. Marcum also has done many other publications and public relations for the foundation including The Bridge Campaign publications, logo and promotional DVD.

    Arrowood said Marcum is a perfect example of how Marshall's alumni are giving back. He not only gives of his time, but talents and resources as well, she said. Marcum is a member of the John Marshall Society, Big Green and Thunder Club.

    His most recent investment to the Marshall University Foundation has been through The Bridge Campaign. An area in Marshall's new softball complex clubhouse is named for Access Public Relations.  Also, a call center in the new Marshall University Foundation, Inc./Alumni Center, currently under construction on the Huntington campus, will be named after Marcum and his wife, Rhonda.

    In addition to the Addy Awards, the foundation also was recognized by Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) for the "We Are Marshall" premiere in Huntington. The recognition was given during an awards ceremony in Puerto Rico. The foundation received the honor for District Two in the events category.

    For more information, persons may contact Arrowood at (304) 696-3505 or by e-mail at arrowoodk@marshall.edu.


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    Ormiston named Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Curriculum at Kent State University since July 1, 2002, has been named Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall University, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

    Ormiston replaces Dr. Sarah N. Denman, who retired in May. He will begin his duties at Marshall Aug. 18.

    "Dr. Ormiston's academic astuteness and inspiring leadership acumen, which he demonstrated during the search process, combined with his impressive portfolio of accomplishments in public higher education make him the right choice to assume the position of Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost at Marshall University," Kopp said.  "This important and demanding leadership position requires a person committed to advancing the interests of Marshall University and our community. I believe we have found that person in Dr. Gayle Ormiston. Jane and I look forward next month to officially welcoming the Ormiston Family to our Marshall community."  

    Ormiston said he was attracted to Marshall in large part because of the vision for the university developed by President Kopp through the Strategic Plan and Signature Initiatives. He said he found the decision to involve a broad range of constituencies in developing the vision to be "a marvelous idea on President Kopp's part."

    "Based upon the vision in the Strategic Plan, Marshall is in a very good position to continue growing at a time when every university is worried about enrollment," Ormiston said. "The way the Strategic Plan is written, along with the Signature Initiatives, distinguishes Marshall from other universities."

    Maurice Cooley, Director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs and a member of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost search committee, said he is elated with the choice of Ormiston.

    "I am so excited that out of all of the excellent candidates that were considered, Dr. Gayle Ormiston was selected," Cooley said. "I am certain that our community and university will be soundly impressed by his wisdom, store of knowledge, and wonderful personality. I certainly look forward to working closely with him."

    Although Kent State is much larger than Marshall with about 34,500 students - 23,000 at the Kent campus and another 11,500 at its seven regional campuses, Ormiston said the two universities do have similarities.

    "The student body mix is fairly similar and Kent and Marshall have similar retention rates," he said. "Kent has by sheer size more academic programs. A real strength at Marshall is the commitment of faculty to continuing excellence in teaching and additional growth in research."

    Ormiston, who was chair of the Department of Philosophy at Kent State from 1996 to 2002, has held a full-time faculty appointment in philosophy - as tenure-track and then as tenured - since 1989. Ormiston said he was recruited by Kent State from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs to help rebuild Kent's B.A. and M.A. degree programs in philosophy.

    At Colorado, he held a tenured faculty appointment as associate professor of philosophy and several administrative appointments, including department chair and director of academic program review from 1984 to 1989. He was a core member of the interdisciplinary humanities faculty as a member of the philosophy department.

    Ormiston collaborated with other humanities and non-humanities faculty to implement an NEH-funded program that focused on the humanities from interdisciplinary perspectives. He also held a full-time faculty appointment as assistant professor of philosophy at Denison University, a small liberal arts college in central Ohio, from 1982 to 1984.

    Ormiston earned his B.A. in philosophy from Kent State in 1972, his master's in philosophy from Kent State in 1973 and his Ph.D. in philosophy from Purdue University in 1981. He and his wife, Lynn, have three children - Rachel, 23, and twins Michael and Anna, 20.

    "I enjoyed my visits to Marshall and look forward to working with everyone," Ormiston said. "I think it will be a great partnership."


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    Monday July 7, 2008
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    About 180 high schools students to attend 'Fun With Science' at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 180 rising ninth- and 10th-grade students from throughout West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 13-18 to take part in the Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute.

    HSTA is an internationally recognized, community-based program that provides academic enrichment for the participating students. It is offered in 26 West Virginia counties. The students take part in the program throughout the school year by being involved with clubs in their high schools.

    The opening ceremony and dinner for the summer institute at Marshall, which is titled "Fun With Science," is at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 13 in the Don Morris Room, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center.

    David Cartwright, program director of the event at Marshall, said other summer institutes are at West Virginia University and West Virginia State University. The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established in 1994 with 45 students from two counties.

    Cartwright said the number of participating students attending "Fun With Science" is expected to more than double from last year's total of about 80 because rising 10th graders are included this year. Previously, the summer program was for rising 9th-graders only.

    The emphasis this year, Cartwright said, is on diabetes.

    "West Virginia is the number one state for diabetes," he said. " 'Fun With Science' will expose the students to the dangers of diabetes. They will learn different things that can be done to prevent diabetes and then be able to teach their family members what they learned."

    In addition, Cartwright said, "Fun With Science" will help students develop  critical thinking skills and study skills that will help them as they advance through high school and college. Their days on the Huntington campus are important as they get closer to deciding where they will attend college, he added.

    For more information, contact Cartwright at (304) 696-6024.


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    Booth Scholars Summer Program returns to Marshall July 13

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will open its Huntington campus to 115 Wayne County high school students beginning Sunday, July 13 as they take part in the annual Booth Scholars Summer Program.

    The Booth Scholars Program is composed of students with academic potential from a specific region of Appalachia, in this case Wayne County. It is designed to help them prepare for college and to have future success in higher education. In order to qualify for the program, the students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and an above-average score on the WESTEST. 

    The program began in 2001 at Pikeville (Ky.) College with students from Wayne County, Kentucky and Virginia participating. The Wayne County portion of the program moved to Marshall in 2004.

    "The goal of the program is to open the students' eyes to the rest of the world, to expose them to different cultures and ideas and to make them hungry to learn more," said Brenda Napier, the program's director.

    This year's theme for the program is "Living the Dream." It is directed to educate the students on subjects related to history since it is an election year. The students also will be involved in classes that are created to help them prepare for their specific needs in the future, and take part in social and cultural activities.

    The first week of the program, the 25 freshman participants will be staying in Gibson Hall on the Huntington campus beginning July 13 while the 90 sophomores, juniors and seniors will be commuting to campus, beginning July 14.

    The second week will be a travel week for all 115 students. They will leave for Boston on July 21 and return on July 25.

    "Our theme is 'Living the Dream,' and Boston is a historical city," Napier said. "We have students here interested in MIT and Harvard, and we will be touring both of those schools."

    Napier said the program has made tremendous progress and more students want to become involved each year.

    "All students strive to get into this program because it is like being a Yeager Scholar of Wayne County," Napier said.

    For more information on the program, contact Napier at (304) 696-5205.


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    Beekeepers to meet at Marshall University for annual conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Heartland Apiculture Society's seventh conference, an annual event dedicated to the education of beekeepers, will take place July 10-12 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    The conference, hosted by the West Virginia Department of Agriculture and the Cabell Wayne Beekeepers, is expected to attract about 300 beekeepers, 40-50 presenters and 12 vendors, according to Dan O'Hanlon, conference coordinator co-chair along with Wade Stiltner, a bee inspector with the Department of Agriculture.

    West Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Gus R. Douglass said the department is very honored to host the Heartland Apicultural Society's annual conference.

    "Beekeeping is well-suited to West Virginia because it's not dependent on large tracts of flat land, and our large, diverse forests provide an excellent food source for bees," Douglass said. "We've put great emphasis on apiculture here at the Department of Agriculture and our staff and local beekeepers have worked hard to help coordinate this conference. I hope it results in more West Virginians becoming interested in bees and beekeeping."

    Gabe Blatt, president of the Heartland Apiculture Society, said the event will mark the second time a national bee conference has been held in West Virginia. The other time, he said, was in the 1950s. The honeybee is West Virginia's state insect.

    The Heartland Apiculture Society was founded in 2001. Previous conferences took place at Goshen (Ind.) College in 2002; Midway (Ky.) College in 2003; Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn. (2004); Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Ill., in 2005; Vincennes (Ind.) University in 2006, and Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Ky., in 2007.

    "It's always at a university and everyone is invited," said Blatt, who lives in Huntington. "Anyone can register. It will be a special treat for people who have never kept bees."

    Registration will take place from 2:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, July 9 and from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. July 10-12 at the Memorial Student Center. Persons also may register on the Web at www.heartlandbees.com.

    The conference will begin at 8:30 a.m. Thursday, July 10 with a welcome by Blatt in the student center's Don Morris Room.

    The cost to attend is $15 per day or $40 for all three days (Thursday through Saturday).

    "It is basically a chance to learn about bees and also about how important bees are to our whole environment and livelihood," Blatt said. "One-third of everything we eat is directly a result of the pollination of bees. This conference gives people a chance to learn how important bees are and what would happen if we didn't have them."

    Conference participants will be taking part in two local tours during the event. The first is at 1 p.m. Thursday, July 10 at Heritage Farm Museum and Village. The second is at 1 p.m. Friday, July 11 at Blenko Glass Co. in Milton.

    Blatt said the honeybee population nationwide is about half the size it was at its peak. Reasons for the bee loss are many, including the arrival in the United States of varroa mites and tracheal mites, parasites that kill honeybees. Blatt said the mites made their way into the U.S. in the mid-1980s. 

    Research also is being done to find the cause of colony collapse disorders (CCD), Blatt said.

    "Even research people do not know what causes this," he said. "A colony of bees can be looking fine and then, two weeks later, they are just gone, vanished. It is so important that even our U.S. military is investigating CCD. Experts will be talking at the conference about the disappearing bees and researchers will share their latest findings."

    Among the presenters is state apiarist George Clutter, who will give "bee beard" demonstrations for visitors at 11:15 a.m. Thursday and 2:45 p.m. Friday. His sessions will take place in Buskirk Field, which will serve as the Bee Yard during the conference.

    Other presenters will focus on subjects such as how to build a honey house; the art of making beeswax candles; quick snacks made with honey; apitherapy, how bee stings can improve quality of life; and back care for beekeepers. Presentations will take place in the student center lobby and the Science Building.

    Here is the complete list of presenters:

    • Dennis vanEngelsdorp, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture
      Update on CCD - 8:30 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. Thursday, and 1:15 p.m. Friday

    • G. W. Hayes, Jr., Assistant Chief, Bureau of Plant Inspection
      The classroom (questions and answers by Jerry) - 2:45 p.m. Thursday and 9:45 a.m. Friday and Saturday;
      Where are the African Bees now? - 8:30 a.m. Friday

    • Clarence H. Collison, chair Entomology Department, Mississippi State University
      Factors affecting drone production - 11:15 a.m. Thursday, 1:15 and 4:15 p.m. Friday;
      Queen quality - 8:30 a.m. Saturday

    • Carl Marcum, West Virginia extension agent - Wayne County
      BEE friendly insect control in the home landscape (pesticide use) - 1:15 p.m. Thursday, 2:45 p.m. Friday and Saturday

    • Adam Finkelstein, queen breeder and Sarah Grant recipient
      Boutique queen breeding: the selection and breeding of hardy local queen stock - 2:45 p.m. Friday

    • Will Montgomery, queen rearing
      The cell punch method of rearing queens - 9:45 a.m. Thursday, 11:15 a.m. Friday and 1:15 p.m. Saturday

    • Tom Hatfield, insurance agent - American National Insurance Co.
      Insurance for beekeepers - what you need to know - 9:45 a.m. Thursday and Friday, 11:15 a.m. Saturday

    • Bill Ferguson, Buckfast queen breeder from Canada
      Keeping the true Buckfast queens on the market - 4:15 p.m. Friday and 9:45 a.m. Saturday

    • Janet Clayton, master beekeeper in West Virginia
      Building a honey house from the floor up - 1:15 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    • Allen Leadmon, longtime beekeeper and candle maker
      The art of making beeswax candles - 11:15 a.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    • Tom Fist, EMT
      Back care for beekeepers - 2:45 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    • James and Debbie Copenhaver, master beekeepers in West Virginia and honey judges
      Starting a master beekeeping program in your state - 1:15 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    • Margaret Reid, Reid Apiary and longtime beekeeper
      So you want to be a beekeeper - information and help for the beginner - 9:45 to 10:45 a.m., 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Saturday;
      Teaching bees to school students - 2:45 p.m. Friday

    • Tom Webster, apiculture specialist at Kentucky State University
      Update on nosema ceranae and nosema apis - 9:45 a.m. Thursday and 1:15 and 4:45 p.m. Friday

    • Indiana honey queen and princess
      Cooking with honey - 11:15 a.m. Thursday;
      Quick snacks made with honey - 11:15 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Saturday

    • Rhonna Blatt, beekeeper and scrapbooker
      Scrapbooking for beekeepers - 9:45 a.m. Thursday and Friday

    • Ken Cole, West Virginia beekeeper
      How to use everyday or inexpensive items in beekeeping - 2:45 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    • Jane Yochum, beekeeper wife and crafter
      Greeting and gift cards (tags) - 4:15 p.m. Thursday, 11:15 a.m. Friday and 2:45 p.m. Saturday

    • Dr. Jim Amrine, professor emeritus, acarology, West Virginia University
      Allegany protocol for saving the bees - 2:45 p.m. Thursday, 1:15 p.m. Friday and 9:45 a.m. Saturday

    • Wade Stiltner, West Virginia apiary specialist, currently keeping around 200 hives
      Using bricks on top of the hive to mark what is going on inside the hive - 1:15 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 2:45 p.m. Saturday

    • Joe Koveleski, EAS master beekeeper, certified Ohio state beekeeper
      Reading the frame for information about the bees - 11:15 a.m. Thursday and Friday, and 4:15 p.m. Friday

    • Gordon Vernon, past president of the Kentucky State Beekeepers Association
      Raising your own queens, all you need to know - 11:15 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. Thursday;
      Queen banking - 2:45 p.m. Friday

    • Paul Poling, West Virginia apiary specialist, currently keeping around 500 hives
      How to move bees safely - 11:15 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. Thursday;
      Making splits to increase your numbers - 11:15 a.m. Saturday;
      Getting bees ready for pollination - 11:15 a.m. Friday

    • Shane Gebauer, Brushy Mountain Bee Farm, general manager
      What Brushy Mountain has to offer in equipment and supplies - 1:15 p.m. Thursday

    • Clay Guthrie, Dadant & Sons Frankfort branch manager
      Using apiguard for mite control - 11:15 a.m. Thursday

    • Laura Tyler, "Sister Bee" Movie
      Learn the ins and outs of making a bee movie about woman beekeepers - 4:15 p.m. Thursday and 11:15 a.m. Friday

    • Kelly Rausch, Queen Bees/Instrumental Insemination Service
      Overview of instrumental insemination in bee breeding - 9:45 a.m. Friday

    • Roger Hoopingarner, taught entomology and apiculture for 38 years at Michigan State
      Two queen colonies - 4:15 p.m. Friday and 2:45 p.m. Saturday;
      Marking clipping and introducing queens - 11:15 a.m. Saturday

    • Tammy Horn and co-presenter Hanna Watts, author of "Bees in America" and chair of Appalachian Studies at Berea College
      The lost Mt. Honey project and GP System to locate good sites for bees - 1:15 and 4:15 p.m. Thursday, and 1:15 p.m. Friday

    • Dr. Larry Connor, published and co-edited many bee books since 1988
      A model bee breeding plan for sideline beekeepers - 9:45 a.m. Thursday and Friday, and 11:15 a.m. Saturday

    • Robin Mountain, longtime queen raiser and beekeeper from South Africa
      Beekeeping in South Africa - 1:15 p.m. Thursday and Saturday

    • Earl King and Jane Burgess, managers of the Walter Kelley Company
      What's new with the Walter Kelley Company (bee equipment) - 2:45 p.m. Friday

    • David Barnes, Florida State Bee Inspector
      Living with the African Honey Bee - 9:45 a.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday;
      Moving honey bees - 2:45 p.m. Friday

    • Phil Craft, Kentucky state apiarist
      American foulbrood - identification, eradication and control - 9:45 a.m. Thursday, 11:15 a.m. Friday and 2:45 p.m. Saturday

    • Michael Bush, Nebraska beekeeper for more than 30 years. Noted for doing small-cell and natural-cell beekeeping
      Swarm control and splits - 1:15 p.m. Thursday;
      Over wintering nucs - 4:15 p.m. Thursday and 9:45 a.m. Friday;
      Laying workers in the hive - 9:45 a.m. Thursday and Saturday

    • Ed Levi, Arkansas apiary specialist
      IPM for Varroa Mite control - 1:15 p.m. Thursday and 4:15 p.m. Friday;
      What's in your comb - 4:15 p.m. Thursday

    • Duane Rekeweg, has kept bees for more than 25 years, and is the owner of Rekeweg Honey Company in northern Indiana
      Finding the queen - 9:45 a.m. Friday and 1:15 p.m. Saturday

    • John Marra, Cabell County extension agent
      Building a good bee club - 4:15 p.m. Friday and 1:15 and 2:45 p.m. Saturday

    • Dana Stahlman
      Small hive beetle traps - 1:15 p.m. Friday and 2:45 p.m. Saturday;
      Beekeeping 101, 201 and 301 - 2:45 and 4:15 p.m. Thursday

    • George Clutter, West Virginia state apiarist
      Learn how to do a bee beard - 11:15 a.m. Thursday and 2:45 p.m. Friday.
      Autoclave, the best treatment method for American foul brood - 11:15 a.m. Friday and Saturday

    • Jim Garrison
      How to market your honey and wax - 2:45 p.m. Thursday and 9:45 a.m. and 1:15 p.m. Saturday

    • Gerry Fitzgerald, EAS master beekeeper from West Virginia
      Basic hive inspection - 9:45 a.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday

    Also, one movie and two documentaries will be shown in the Don Morris Room during the conference. The movie "We Are Marshall" will be shown at 7 p.m. Thursday; the 28-minute documentary "Sister Bee," the story of women in beekeeping, will be shown at 9 a.m. Friday by director Laura Tyler; and "Pollen Nation," a 30-minute documentary about a family that moves its hundreds of beehives to pollinate the almonds in California each winter, will be shown at 9 a.m. Saturday.

    For more information on the conference, contact Blatt at (304) 429-1268.


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    Tuesday June 24, 2008
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    WMUL student wins Award of Distinction; total of 62 awards for 2007-2008 ties record for second-most in one school year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Terry Bartley, a student from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received an Award of Distinction in the 14th annual Communicator Awards 2008 Audio Competition.

    The winners were named earlier this month in Ashland, Ky. This is the 10th year for this competition to include an audio component for judging.

    WMUL students, along with the faculty manager, also received one Platinum Award, one Gold Award and one Honorable Mention Award in the Hermes Creative Awards 2008 Competition. Those winners were announced in May.

    These latest awards gave WMUL 62 during the 2007-2008 school year, tying its record for second-most in a year. WMUL, which also won 62 last year, won 77 awards in 2005-2006, its best year ever.

    "Terry continues the winning ways of our students," Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of Marshall's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said of Bartley's Award of Distinction. "For the journalism students and student volunteers at WMUL to win more than 200 state, regional and national awards in three years is truly an accomplishment worth noting."

    The Communicator Awards come from the International Academy of Visual Arts which recognizes outstanding work in the communications field. Entries are judged by industry professionals who look for companies and individuals whose talent exceeds a high standard of excellence and whose work serves as a benchmark for the industry. The 2008 contest had more than 8,500 entries.

    The Award of Distinction winning entry by WMUL-FM was in the following category:

    Radio Public Service Announcement: "Intolerance," an in-house public service announcement, broadcast in WMUL-FM's Public Service Announcement rotation from Monday, April 16, 2007 through the present time, was written and produced by Bartley, a senior from Foster, W.Va.

    "It is a noteworthy accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best PSAs in the country," said Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the School of Journalism and Mass Communications and faculty manager of WMUL-FM. "I am proud of the honor this Award of Distinction bestows on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University. This success by Terry Bartley demonstrates to our student staff that dedication and hard work do pay off in the end as they have done for Terry."

    The Platinum Award-winning entry by WMUL-FM in the Hermes Creative Awards 2008 Competition was in the Publication/Manual/ Training category. The winner was the "WMUL-FM Promo and PSA Production Manual," written by Bailey and junior Adam Cavalier, WMUL-FM's production director from Montgomery, W.Va. The manual was written for the student and community volunteer staff members of the campus radio station.

    The Gold Award-winning entry was in the category Radio Public Service Announcement. Bartley won for "Intolerance."

    The Honorable Mention Award-winning entry by WMUL-FM was in the category Podcast. "Herd Roundup" for Friday, Sept. 28, 2007 was the winner. The students who participated were Cavalier, co-host and producer; Andrew Ramspacher, a sophomore from Dublin, Ohio, co-host and producer; Brian Dalek, a junior from McMechen, W.Va., reporter; and Cathleen Moxley, a senior from Chapmanville, W.Va., reporter.

    Bailey said winning the Hermes Creative Awards was "an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best training manuals in the country as well as a highly regarded public service announcement and a quality podcast."

    "This production manual's success demonstrates to our student and community volunteer staff that their training materials are first rate," Bailey said. "Combined with their dedication and hard work, WMUL-FM will continue to be one of the top college radio stations in the country. The Gold Award is a tribute to the public service commitment of our broadcast students in competition with professional practitioners."

    The Hermes Creative Awards are administered and evaluated by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals.

    The WMUL students' grand total of 62 awards this year included 23 first-place awards, 11 second-place awards, five third-place awards and 23 honorable mention awards. Since 1985, WMUL-FM student broadcasters have won 817 awards.


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    Tuesday June 24, 2008
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    2nd annual New Works Festival begins June 26 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's second annual Robert Hinchman New Works Festival will be presented this week by Marshall University Theatre and the Marshall University College of Fine Arts. 

    The three-night festival will present both staged and unstaged readings of six new plays over three consecutive evenings - Thursday, June 26 through Saturday, June 28. All readings will begin at 8 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. 

    Each evening's readings will be followed by a discussion/question-and-answer session with the playwrights, director and cast.  Participation is both welcome and encouraged.  The schedule of events is as follows:

    Thursday, June 26, four new one-act plays:

    "Lunch At the Fork n' Finger" by published playwright and Marshall University Theatre alumnus, Jonathan Joy. It is a one-act comedy about a man who returns to his boyhood home to find that his single mother has fallen in love with his old high school gym coach.

    "Things Get Done" by Louisville, Ky., native Paul Deines. Brooklyn is burning.  In the city, three men share drinks, make Molotov cocktails, and await the approaching mob.  As the riot draws nearer, they wrestle with the ghosts of their pasts, and the collective past of a country born out of revolution.

    "Knight-Owl" by well-known Huntington personality, Clint McElroy. When he stumbles upon the long-lost secret headquarters of Knight-Owl, a costumed crime-fighter from the 1940's, con man Del Copperthwaite sees a moneymaking opportunity. Anticipating millions of dollars in endorsements, licensing deals and action figures, Del takes on the super-hero mantle of Knight-Owl, hampered only by his complete lack of talent, experience, morals, and honesty. What he does have is a quick wit, an even quicker tongue, and that strong sense of self-preservation that no scoundrel should be without.

    "Stealing Romance" by T. Michael Murdock, a Marshall University alumnus and a professional actor/director.  "Stealing Romance" is a short play about finding love in the most unexpected of places.  On a dark, rainy night, a man robbing a video store reunites with the woman he has loved since grade school, and is immediately locked in the store with her.  Throughout the next few hours, he encounters feelings he thought were gone forever and the woman's jealous ex-boyfriend, and must face down not only his fear of lightning, but also of heartbreak.                   

    Friday, June 27, premiere of a new full-length comedy:

    "A Sheep Among Wolves" by Jonathan Joy, who is the author of 16 plays.  He has won regional and national awards for his writing.  His work has been produced off-Broadway in New York City and on stages in seven states.

    In "A Sheep Among Wolves," the Rev. Donald Daniels attempts to reconcile his brother's fourth broken marriage and save the soul of a young prostitute while his congregation revolts against him.  Those familiar with Joy's "The Princess of Rome, Ohio" will enjoy the further adventures of Dicky Daniels. 

    Saturday, June 28, a new full-length comedy:

    "The Three Temptations of Jennifer Pierce" was written by Lee Shackleford, who is a writer for stage, screen, and radio with more than 100 produced scripts to his credit. He is perhaps best known for his script "Holmes & Watson," which enjoyed a successful run off-Broadway with Shackleford in the role of Sherlock Holmes. His adaptation of the classic Czech play "R.U.R." has been widely praised and is gaining acceptance as the definitive English version.

    "The Three Temptations of Jennifer Pierce" is the story of smart-alecky loner Jennifer Pierce, who makes a wager with her annoyingly square housemate Cindy - a challenge that Jennifer takes only to escape paying several months of rent she already owes to Cindy.

    The bet involves the atheist Jennifer sequestering herself in her apartment and waiting for God's "still small voice" to make itself heard. But instead of being alone for three days, Jennifer finds herself the focus of nationwide media attention when she apparently starts to undergo the exact temptations presented to Jesus during his 40 days in the wilderness. The result is a clash between evidence and faith, prejudice and acceptance, and pride and humility.

    Tickets are on sale in the Marshall University Theatre box office in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Box office hours are 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and tickets for the New Works Festival are $8 per evening or $20 for a full festival pass (all three nights). Tickets also may be purchased by calling (304) 696-2787.

    For more information, call Sam Kincaid at (304) 696-6395.


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    Monday June 23, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Senior Show Exhibition presented this week at Birke Art Gallery

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The summer 2008 Senior Show Exhibition of Amelia Boslaugh, Julie Conner and Connie Weber will be presented this week in the Birke Art Gallery on the first floor of Smith Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Exhibition dates are Tuesday, June 24 through Saturday, June 28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. The opening reception is from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. The artists will be available to meet the public during the reception.

    The exhibition is presented by Marshall University and the College of Fine Arts.


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    Thursday June 19, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    New class of Erma Byrd Scholars selected

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The new class of Erma Byrd Scholars at Marshall University, which consists of six incoming freshmen from West Virginia, has been selected.

    Dr. Barry Sharpe, executive director of Marshall's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, said the new class of Erma Byrd Scholars includes Karen Barnett of Craigsville in Nicholas County; Erin Dzaack of Davis in Tucker County; Laura Good of Charleston and Sahana Fischer of Cross Lanes in Kanawha County; Veronica A. Loss of Fairmont in Marion County; and Alicia Petrarca of Sandstone in Summers County.

    Every year two scholars are selected from each of the state's three congressional districts. Dzaack and Loss represent District One, Good and Fischer represent District Two and Barnett and Petrarca represent District Three.

    The program, which was established in 1994, honors Erma Byrd, the late wife of West Virginia's senior United States Senator, Robert C. Byrd.

    The scholars are selected on the basis of an essay, which they wrote during the application process, their high school grade point average and two recommendations. They are required, while at Marshall, to maintain a grade point average of 3.5. The scholars also will have the opportunity, when schedules permit, to visit Washington, D.C., and meet Senator Byrd.

    Erma Byrd Scholars are not limited to a particular field of study at Marshall. Current and past scholars have been majors in physics, chemistry, biology, English, history, integrated science and technology, communications studies, political science and teacher education.

    For more information, contact Sharpe at (304) 696-2475.


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    Wednesday June 18, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Kim named College of Business interim dean for second time

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Chong Kim, head of the Management and Marketing Division of Marshall University's Lewis College of Business, has been named interim dean of the college, MU President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

    Kim, who began his new duties on June 13, replaces Dr. Paul Uselding, who resigned. Uselding had been dean of the College of Business since July 2005. Kim served as interim dean of the college from 2003 until Uselding was hired.

    Kim said serving as interim dean with the LCOB will keep him busy. 

    "I am willing to help the university and the College of Business in any way that I can," said Kim, who has been at Marshall since 1977. "We have many challenges and critical issues in the College of Business. It is an important unit of Marshall University, and one of the best business colleges in the region, so I am happy to help as interim dean for a second time."

    Kopp said the College of Business is fortunate to have a person of Kim's experience available to take over immediately on an interim basis.

    "With his 30-plus years of experience at Marshall, including two years as interim dean, Dr. Kim was the obvious choice to lead the College of Business while a search for a permanent dean takes place," Kopp said. "We are grateful to him for assuming the leadership role of the College of Business at this important time."


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    Thursday June 12, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Orientation sessions for new Marshall students begin June 18

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 2,000 students will be attending orientation sessions on Marshall University's Huntington campus this summer, beginning Wednesday, June 18.

    Sessions are scheduled June 18-21, June 25-28, July 16-18 and Aug. 21. The Wednesday, June 18 session is for honors students only, while the other dates are open to all new students.

    "Orientation is a fun and exciting time for our new students and their parents," said Jean Gilman, Marshall's director of recruitment. "Our goal is that all students will get all of the important information that they will need for the upcoming year and leave knowing they are now members of the Marshall family."

    All sessions run from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. They include academic advising, a student services tour, a question-and-answer session,   campus safety issues and various other topics. Students also will have their identification cards made.

    The sessions for parents include time with financial aid advisors and student services staff, as well as discussions of campus safety issues and other academic and financial topics.

    Students who have been admitted to Marshall University are encouraged to register for an orientation session. This may be done either online at www.marshall.edu/orientation, or by calling (304) 696-2354 or (800) 438-5392.


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    Thursday June 12, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

    Marshall University, CAMC to offer Doctoral program in Management Practice in Nurse Anesthesia

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Elizabeth McDowell Lewis College of Business Graduate School of Management and the Charleston Area Medical Center Health Education and Research Institute School of Nurse Anesthesia have received national accreditation for a clinically oriented Doctoral program in Management Practice in Nurse Anesthesia (DMPNA).

    The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs accredits nurse anesthesia programs and has recently approved the Marshall-CAMC program. This unique doctorate combines current nurse anesthesia skills with state-of-the-art entrepreneurial business management education, according to Dr. Nancy Tierney, director of the CAMC School of Nurse Anesthesia.

    "Since 1955, CAMC has been educating Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) for the region and the State of West Virginia.  It existed first as a certificate program and then, in joint partnership with the Marshall University Graduate College, as a Master of Science in Health Care Administration program," Tierney said. "Pushed by advancing professional accreditation requirements, future CRNAs will need to become doctoral-qualified.  CRNAs who practice at the doctorate level will offer additional value to the health care system with their expertise in advanced leadership, policy, management and interdisciplinary practice.  Graduates of our program will become respected health care leaders and promote and enhance the delivery of cost-efficient, high quality, evidence-based health care services to the public."

    The DMPNA, a 36-month program, is in an integrated classroom and clinical format designed to prepare certified registered nurses for a career in the ever-evolving field of nurse anesthesia. At the end of the program, graduates will have completed 127 hours of study and clinical practice as well as a comprehensive doctoral research project. Students attend classes at Marshall's campus in South Charleston as well as CAMC's medical facilities in Charleston.

    Students in the program learn competencies and knowledge required for advanced nurse anesthesia practice; develop general management skills related to running a private practice or entrepreneurial business; and meet state and regional needs for advanced-level anesthesiology in diverse health care environments.

    The DMPNA is the first and only management practice in nurse anesthesia doctoral degree housed inside a business school within the United States, according to Dr. Andrew Sikula, Sr., director of the Graduate School of Management.

    "The DMPNA expands Marshall University's very successful Master of Science in Health Care Administration degree into a doctoral program," Sikula said. "This graduate professional program is a unique partnership between a public teaching hospital and a public research university. We are extremely proud of the Council on Accreditation's approval and the opportunity to continue our important work with CAMC as we train outstanding health care providers for the Appalachian region and beyond."

    Applicants must have a current, valid professional nursing license which satisfies the West Virginia Board of Examiners for Registered Professional Nurses and have at least one year of experience in an acute care setting in which the applicant has had the opportunity to develop as an independent decision maker and is able to demonstrate specific required skills. Applicants also must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 and a minimum combined score of 950 on the Graduate Records Examination. No provisional or conditional admission status is possible in the Marshall-CAMC DMPNA program.

    Program and admission specifics may be found at www.anesthesiaschool.org  or by calling the Anesthesia Education Office at (304) 388-9950.


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    Tuesday June 10, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    36 students from 26 high schools in 6 states to take part in Engineering Academy at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-six students from 26 high schools in Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas and West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Sunday, June 15 through Friday, June 20 to participate in the eighth annual Exploring Engineering: Academy of Excellence (EEAE).

    Dr. Betsy Dulin, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the engineering academy is one of highlights of summer for the college.

    "The engineering academy provides an excellent opportunity for high school students to explore engineering as a career, to meet practicing engineers, and to experience living on Marshall's campus," Dulin said. "We've been pleased and honored during the past eight years to host the students participating in the camp, and look forward to meeting the outstanding students participating in the 2008 camp."

    One of the features of Sunday's opening session is a presentation by Mike Masterman from Extreme Endeavors, a company based in Philippi, W.Va., that has designed engineering systems for extreme environments. Beth Wolfe, coordinator of STEM Outreach at Marshall, said Masterman organized the first emergency medical air drop at the South Pole to help a doctor who had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Wolfe also said a record number (15) of this year's campers are female. Dr. William E. Pierson, chair of the Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science at Marshall, said one objective of the camp is to introduce more girls to the opportunities in the engineering profession.

    "The theme of our activities is teamwork: the importance of teamwork in planning and in working together to achieve a common goal," Pierson said. "The academy is a good way to make students aware of what engineers do and what an exciting profession it is."

    Students are selected for the camp based upon their interest in and aptitude for engineering. Grades, courses taken and letters of recommendation are taken into consideration. The camp primarily tries to attract rising high school juniors.

    The 2008 participants include:

    David Balakaw of Louisa, Ky.; Ronald Beatty of South Charleston, W.Va.; Will Blair of Chagrin Falls, Ohio; Jason Camarano of Williamsport, Md.; Cody Case of Williamsport, Md.; Kirsten Cook of Culloden, W.Va.; Shane Daly of Hurricane, W.Va.; Staci Duncan of Portsmouth, Ohio; Henry Emanuel of Missouri City, Texas;

    Morgan Ferguson of Kenova, W.Va.; Kandice Gibson of Bancroft, W.Va.; Daniel Gilmore of Hurricane, W.Va.; Eric Gindlesperger of Catlettsburg, Ky.; James Goble of Inez, Ky.; Taylor Hare of Charleston, W.Va.; Mandy Hiler of Bethel, Ohio; Ben Lee of Cincinnati, Ohio; Michelle Maiden of St. Marys, W.Va.;

    Jaclyn Marcum of Ironton, Ohio; Ben McCarty of Barboursville, W.Va.; Justin Messinger of Charleston, W.Va.; Timothy Moffett of Crittenden, Ky.; Ben Noffsinger of Vienna, W.Va.; Rylan Pyciak of Harrisville, Ohio; Jessica Roberts of Nitro, W.Va.; Elise Shen of Charleston, W.Va.; Sean Shriner of Bessemer City, N.C.;

    Lara Smith of St. Marys, W.Va.; Tawnni Taylor of Princeton, W.Va.; Molly Terry of Milton, W.Va.; Jennifer Testerman of Bluefield, W.Va.; Autumn Ward of Minford, Ohio; Alex Wilson of Hurricane, W.Va.; Samuel Wood of South Charleston, W.Va.; Shelley Yang of Charleston, W.Va.; and Steve Young of Charleston, W.Va.

    Here is the schedule for this year's Exploring Engineering:  Academy of Excellence:

     

    Sunday, June 15

    2-3 p.m.: Check-in at Willis Hall, Marshall Commons

    2:20-2:40 p.m.: Campus tours (Leave from Willis Hall lobby at 2:20, 2:30 or 2:40)

    3-5 p.m.: Welcome and presentation by Mike Masterman, Extreme Endeavors - Smith Hall, Room 154.  Families of students are encouraged to stay for this event.

    5-9 p.m.: Icebreaker exercises, dinner, and team building exercises, Memorial Student Center and Gullickson Hall Room #5 (GH 5)

     

    Monday, June 16

    8-11:30 a.m.: Introduction to CAD/CAM, using AutoCAD Inventor to make a CO2 racer - Gullickson Hall (GH) Room 206A

    11:30-noon: Lunch, Harless Dining Hall

    12:30-4:30 p.m.: Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering:  Surveying, GPS, and Environmental Sampling - Buskirk Field

    4:30-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

    5:30-6:30 p.m.: Concrete mixing - 7th Avenue Lab

    6:30-8 p.m.: CO2  Racers - GH 5

     

    Tuesday, June 17

    8-9 a.m.: Introduction to trebuchet design - Drinko 402

    9:30-11:30 a.m.: Trebuchet design and construction - Buskirk Field

    11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Luncheon with Society of American Military Engineers members - Harless Dining Hall, Ed Grose Room  

    12:30-2 p.m.:   Complete trebuchet construction

    2-3 p.m.: Trebuchet competition

    3-4 p.m.: Computer Science Student Presentation (GH 5)

    4-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

    5:30-6:30 p.m.: Intelligent Transportation Systems Presentation (GH5)

    6:30-8 p.m.: CO2  Racers - GH 5

     

    Wednesday, June 18

    8-9:30 a.m.: Introduction to Intelligent Transportation

    Systems (using Lego robotics) - GH 5

    9:30-11:30 a.m.: Work on robot design/construction - GH 5

    11:30-12:30 p.m.: Lunch, Harless Dining Hall

    12:30-2 p.m.: Finalize Robot Design - GH 5

    2-3 p.m.: Robotics Competition - GH 5

    3-4:30 p.m.: Concrete Testing - 7th Avenue Lab

    4:30-5 p.m.: Dinner, Harless Dining Hall

    5:30-8 p.m.: Complete work on CO2 Racers - GH 5

     

    Thursday, June 19

    8 a.m.-5 p.m.: Field trips and discussions with engineers:

    9-11:15 a.m.: Toyota Plant, Buffalo, W.Va.

    11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.: Lunch at Golden Corral, Cross Lanes

    12:30-1 p.m.: Travel to West Virginia American Water

    1-2:45 p.m.: Tour West Virginia American Water

    2:45-3:10 p.m.: Travel to Chesapeake Energy

    3:30-5 p.m.: GIS Presentation & Panel Discussion

    5-6:15 p.m.: Travel to Waves of Fun

    6:30-9 p.m.: Dinner and pool party, Waves of Fun

     

    Friday, June 20

    8:45-10:15 a.m.: CO2 Races - Gullickson Gym

    10:30-11:15 a.m.: EEAE evaluation and wrap-up - GH 5

    11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: Awards luncheon, Big Green Room, Joan C. Edwards Football Stadium - students, families, sponsors, staff and guests

     

    Sponsors of the 2008 engineering academy are:

    Nick J. Rahall, II, Appalachian Transportation Institute; Marshall University's College of Information Technology and Engineering; the Huntington Post of the Society of American Military Engineers; Learning for Life; Huntington District Corps of Engineers; Kanawha Stone/Terradon; West Virginia Research Challenge Fund; Toyota Motors; West Virginia American Water; The Dow Chemical Company; Dupont; Bayer; J.H. Fletcher & Co.; the West Virginia Section of American Society of Civil Engineers; and Chesapeake Energy.

    For more information, call Wolfe at (812) 361-4377.


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    Tuesday June 10, 2008
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

    Marshall diabetes education program earns continued recognition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Education Recognition Program of the American Diabetes Association has awarded continued recognition to the Marshall University Diabetes Center.

    The association said the Recognition Certificate reflects its conclusion that Marshall's staff is made up of knowledgeable health professionals who can provide patients with comprehensive information about diabetes management. The certificate also assures that Marshall's educational standards meet the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs.

    Marshall's self-management teaching is provided by two certified diabetes educators: program coordinator Anise Nash, a registered nurse and certified pump therapist, and Tracy Hawthorne, a registered and licensed dietitian. Nash is a graduate of the Holzer School of Nursing and Ohio University. Hawthorne earned her dietetics degree at Marshall.

    The American Diabetes Association requires that recognized diabetes education programs meet the standards on an ongoing basis and provide documentation every three years to support a high level of practice. Marshall's program was originally recognized in 1992.


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    Monday June 9, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall's 9th annual jazz festival to feature saxophonist Craig Treinen

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jazz-MU-Tazz, Marshall University's summer jazz festival, will present guest artist Craig Treinen, the faculty combo Bluetrane, and the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band in concert at the Jomie Jazz Center and at Pullman Square beginning Wednesday, June 18. All events are free and open to the public.

    Treinen is the director of jazz studies/applied saxophone at Washburn University in Topeka, Kan. He performed in Kansas City as the lead alto saxophonist for the Kansas City Boulevard Big Band, with which he recorded three albums. He was a member of the United States Air Force as a saxophone specialist in the Heartland of America Band in Omaha, Neb. He was the principal alto saxophonist in the symphonic band and served as the musical director, staff arranger and lead alto saxophonist with the Heartland of America "Noteables" Jazz Ensemble. For his work with the "Noteables," Treinen received the Air Force Commendation Medal, the Airman of the Year, the Outstanding Airman Bandsman of the United States Air Force and the Air Force Achievement Medal.

    Treinen has performed with legendary performers such as Lee Greenwood, Shirley Jones, Crystal Gayle, Bob Denver, Frank Mantooth, Karin Allison, Kevin Mahogany, Todd Strait, George Duke, Bobby Watson, Eric Marienthal, and many others worldwide. He continues to be an active performer and clinician throughout the Midwest, working with high school and college jazz ensembles.

    Bluetrane, Marshall's faculty jazz combo, will perform with Treinen Friday, June 20. The group was created to provide a professional model for the students at Marshall and to establish a musical ensemble devoted to the performance of what has been termed "America's National Treasure," jazz. Bluetrane's personnel include Dr. Ed Bingham, saxophone, professor of music and director of jazz studies; Martin Saunders, professor of trumpet; Dr. Mike Stroeher, professor of trombone and music education; Dr. Sean Parsons, assistant professor of jazz piano; Dr. Mark Zanter, guitar, associate professor of music and head of theory and composition; and Steve Hall, associate professor of percussion.  Joining them will be Jimmy Lykens, bass, who is a music performance major at Marshall.

    In the Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band, college and high school students develop their skills in improvisation and learn about the history and theory of jazz, Bingham said. The collegiate members of the festival are primarily current students at Marshall, while the high school participants represent many schools throughout the area including Spring Valley, Cabell Midland, Bridgeport, Winfield, Sherman and Calhoun High Schools.

    Here is a complete schedule of events for the 2008 festival:

    • Wednesday, June 18, 7:30 p.m., Jomie Jazz Center: Bluetrane, MU Jazz Faculty.
    • Thursday, June 19, 7:30 p.m., Jomie Jazz Center: Student Combo Jam Session.
    • Friday, June 20, 7:30 p.m., Jomie Jazz Center: saxophonist Craig Treinen with Bluetrane.
    • Saturday, June 21, 5 p.m., Pullman Square: Jazz-MU-Tazz Festival Big Band with Craig Treinen.

    Jazz-MU-Tazz was founded in 2000 to celebrate the opening of the Jomie Jazz Center at Marshall and to foster jazz in Huntington, according to Bingham. "Professional musicians, Marshall University faculty, collegiate and high school musicians combine their talents to preserve America's true musical art form," he said.

    For further information on the 9th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz, persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-3147 or by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu.


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    Monday June 9, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    R. Scott Anderson named MU Foundation's Chief Financial Officer

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - R. Scott Anderson has joined the Marshall University Foundation Inc. as Chief Financial Officer, Dr. Ron Area, the Foundation's Chief Executive Officer and Senior Vice President for Development, announced today.

    Anderson, who earned his Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Marshall in 1992, was a member of the Society of Yeager Scholars' second class at Marshall, and recently was accepted into MU's Executive MBA program. He began his duties with the Foundation on Monday, June 2.

    Anderson was CFO with CompreCare, a home care pharmacy and respiratory company in Huntington, from 2000 to 2008, and was a CPA with Hess, Stewart & Campbell in Huntington from 1994 to 2000. From 1992 to 1994, he was a staff accountant with Price Waterhouse in South Bend, Ind.

    "We are absolutely delighted to have Scott join our management team of the Foundation," Area said. "His skills, expertise and experience will add significant value to our organization and help us in the growth and development of all aspects of the Foundation."

    Anderson said Marshall has been "a special place" to him since he arrived on campus as a student in 1988.

    "I am just anxious to be a part of the team as the Foundation grows," he said. "It is an exciting time for both the Foundation and the University."

    Anderson, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, is 38 years old. He and his wife, Maribeth, have two children - son Brooks, 8, and daughter Tess, 6. They live in Huntington.


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    Friday May 30, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Band Fraternity Takes on Renovation Project

    Huntington, W.Va. - Members of Marshall University's chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, the national band honorary fraternity, are renovating the band room in Smith Music Hall with the support of their national organization.

    Ashley Gilbert, a Marshall music student who is president of the local chapter, said that the group is painting the walls and floor, as well as the cabinets that house percussion instruments. In addition, a ramp for percussion instruments will be built with the assistance of parents of some of the members.

    "This is a project that is long overdue," said Marshall Director of Bands Steve Barnett. "I am so proud of these students.  Their efforts will be much appreciated by all of the faculty and students."

    At the North Central District Convention of Kappa Kappa Psi this spring, the chapter applied for and won a grant of $400 given by the district called Special Project Assistance Monies (S.P.A.M.). In order to receive this grant, they presented a project description, projected budget and timeline. 

    "We also had to present a skit for the officers of the district to help them decide on the winners of the grant," Gilbert said.

    In conjunction with the project, the group created an inventory database of the percussion instruments that were removed and purchased wipe-off "white boards" to be installed on the closets in the front of the band room.

    They expect to be finished around June 4. As funds permit, the group hopes eventually to commission a musically themed mural for the room and make other improvements.

    For further information, persons may contact Gilbert at Gilbert26@marshall.edu or Melanie Baldwin at Baldwin37@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday May 29, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Site preparation begins for Alumni Center and Foundation Building

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Site preparation began Tuesday, May 27 on Marshall University's Huntington campus for construction of a new Alumni Center and Foundation Building.

    Construction of the 33,220 square-foot building, to be located at the intersection of 5th Avenue and John Marshall Drive, is expected to take about 16 months, according to Rebecca McPhail Samples from the Marshall University Office of Development.

    The facility, which also will house the university's Office of Development operations, is the last of three projects funded through Marshall's Bridge Campaign to begin construction. The first two were the MU softball complex (Dot Hicks Field), which opened in March, and the Engineering Laboratory, which is scheduled to open in August.

    Samples said the university is still raising funds for the Bridge Campaign, and that naming opportunities are still available for all three projects.

    Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., said the new Alumni Center and Foundation Building will be many things to many people.

    "Most of all it will be a reflection of Marshall's past, a symbol of its present, and a doorway to the future of this great institution," Area said.

    Samples said the design of the complex addresses needs critical to Marshall's continued growth. The new facility, she said, will provide a place for alumni to interact with current students, teaching them the responsibility associated with being a top-notch alumnus, while shaping the future and membership of the Marshall University Alumni Association. 

    Expanded conference and meeting facilities will provide the backdrop for community activities, events and special occasions, Samples said.

    "It also will provide a great location for potential employers to meet, recruit and interview our future graduates," she said.

    For more information on the Bridge Campaign and the new building, call (304) 696-3292.


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    Thursday May 22, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall Names New VP of Multicultural Affairs

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Shari Clarke, most recently the associate vice president for student affairs at Temple University in Philadelphia, has been named vice president of multicultural affairs at Marshall University. She will begin her duties June 1.

    "The search committee was impressed with Shari's commitment to diversity and with her enthusiasm and energy," said Marshall Dean of Student Affairs Steve Hensley, who chaired the committee.

    At Temple, Clarke's responsibilities included the administrative oversight of the offices of career development services, counseling services, disability resources and services, international student services and academic support. She also served as a liaison to the student health services operation.

    Clarke has extensive experience in higher education administration, including serving as Associate to the President for Diversity for the University of Nebraska Central Administration Offices.  In this position she was responsible for the diversity and gender equity initiatives for all four campuses comprising the University of Nebraska. Clarke also served as Vice President for Student Affairs at Mansfield University in Pennsylvania, where she oversaw the areas of multicultural affairs, residence life, Greek Affairs, student activities and the women's center.

    She created the award-winning Dialogues In Diversity during her tenure at the University of Maine as associate dean for multicultural affairs. At Nebraska, she developed the regionally acclaimed SHE Leadership Academy for young women. 

    "I encourage faculty, staff and the students equally to get excited about diversity; it touches and changes lives," Clarke said. "I am looking forward to the opportunity at Marshall."

    Clarke and her husband John have two sons, Austin, 20, and Iain, 10. Clarke says she enjoys reading, antiquing, Jazzercise and basketball and describes herself as a "power shopper." Clarke served on the YWCA Board of Directors in Walla Walla, Wash. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. and the American Association of University Women.

    Clarke earned her B.A. degree in sociology from Lane College in Jackson, Tenn.; her M.A. in college student personnel from Bowling Green State University in Ohio; and her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska. She also participated in the HERS Summer Institute for Women in Higher Education at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania.


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    Wednesday May 21, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 746-1989

    Marshall names Dulin dean of College of Information Technology and Engineering

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has named Dr. Betsy Dulin dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE). She will begin June 1.

    Dulin, currently a professor at Marshall, is a civil engineer with a master's degree in environmental engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and an attorney who received a Doctor of Jurisprudence from Washington and Lee University.  She has thirteen years of academic experience as well as extensive practice as an environmental engineer and environmental attorney.

    "After a competitive and thorough search process, we were pleased to find the perfect fit for our College of Information Technology and Engineering at this time in the evolution of the college," said Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall University president. "Betsy Dulin will lead us where we need to go to create a first-class engineering program for our students, our community, our state and beyond. She is the right person to propel us forward."

    Prior to returning to Marshall last fall, Dulin worked in private practice with the Charleston law firm Bowles Rice McDavid Graff and Love LLP. In her total of nine years with Marshall, Dulin has served as an engineering faculty member, department chairperson, associate dean, and dean of CITE. During the past academic year, she taught undergraduate and graduate engineering courses while also working on projects for the Marshall University Research Corporation and the President's office.   She recently served as chair of the West Virginia Consortium on Undergraduate Research and Engineering, a collaborative initiative of the state's research universities aimed at reviewing the status of and making recommendations regarding the state's science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs.

    "I am looking forward to working with CITE's outstanding faculty and staff to continue the rapid progress of our programmatic and building initiatives," Dulin said. "It's an exciting time for the College as engineering and other academic programs continue to grow exponentially.  I'm very happy to be a part of it, and am eager to get started with my colleagues on the work that needs to be done."

    This spring, Dulin was inducted as a member of the Academy of Distinguished Alumni of the Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She is the second woman to ever be inducted into this academy. She is a registered Professional Engineer, is licensed to practice law in West Virginia and Ohio, and is a Registered Patent Attorney.

    Dulin replaces Dr. Tony Szwilski who has served as interim dean since 2006.


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    Tuesday May 20, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall University Students Receive Research Funds

    Huntington, W.Va. Ten Marshall University undergraduate students have been selected to receive funds from West Virginia's Research Challenge Fund to advance research in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. They began their research projects this week.

    The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) is aimed at undergraduates who are interested in doing research, according to Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry at MU.

    "We want undergraduate students to know that research is not only for graduate students, but also for them," said Norton, who is director of the program.  "This is the time when they start utilizing their research skills in preparation for graduate school."

    Students who will receive funds and their faculty mentors are:

    • Adam Short, Charleston, W.Va.; Biology; Genomic Comparison of Acanthamoeba Isolates from Diverse Environments; mentor, Dr. Wendy Trzyna.
    • Brian Bridgewater, Huntington, W.Va.; Integrated Science & Technology; Small Benthic Fishes of the Upper Kanawha with Substrate Characterization; mentor, Dr. Tom Jones.
    • Camilla Overup, Koege, Denmark; Psychology; Media Priming and Perception of Violent Victimization Risk; mentor, Dr. Paige Muellerleile.
    • Danielle Clark, Huntington, W.Va.; Integrated Science & Technology; Susceptibility of Amino Acids in Albumin and Hemoglobin to Nonenzymatic Attack By D-Galactose and D-Glucose; mentor, Dr. Menashi Cohenford.
    • Eric Martin, Parkersburg, W.Va.: Chemistry; Modeling Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) and Polypropylene Imine (PPI) Dendrimer Fragmentation Patterns Using Ab Inito Methods and Calculations; mentor, Dr. William Price.
    • Joshua Titlow, South Charleston, W.Va.; Biology; Designing a Virtual Postural System with Optimal Compensatory Response to Perturbation; mentor, Dr. Brian Antonsen.
    • Laura Mitchell, Rock Hill, S.C.; Biology; Role of Familiarity in Determining Group Dynamics among Crayfish; mentor, Dr. Brian Antonsen.
    • Terry Boyce, Huntington, W.Va.; Biology; Role of Pten in Oocyte Development; mentor, Dr. Guo-Zhang Zhu.
    • William Kelly, Huntington, W.Va.; Biology; Growth of Chorella for Biological Life Support System; mentor, Dr. Jagan Valluri.
    • William Peterson, Hurricane, W.Va.; Biology, Prostate Cancer and Epigenetics; mentor Dr. Philippe Georgel.

    Students will receive stipends totaling $4,000 each and supplies for their research for a period of ten weeks uninterrupted by classes during the summer.  The SURE program, now in its third year, began Monday, May 19 and ends July 28.

    For additional information about the SURE program, persons may visit the program Web site at www.marshall.edu/SURE or e-mail Norton at norton@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday May 15, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Children can 'Grow With Music' this summer

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Children ages birth to 5 and their parents can participate in "Grow With Music," a developmental music program this summer. Sessions begin the week of May 26 and will continue through the week of June 23, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University.

    Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; and children from 3 to 5 years of age. Parent participation is required in the classes for the baby and toddler categories and optional for the 3-5 year category. Classes take place in the early evenings Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Daytime sessions may be added according to demand, according to Pappas. A maximum of 10 children is accepted per class.

    "Music is very motivating for children of these ages," Pappas said. "We assist them in learning through play." She noted that children with special needs are welcome.

    Pappas said the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

    Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

    For information on "Grow with Music," persons may visit the program's Web site at www.marshall.edu/commdis/music, contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or call her at (304) 697-0211.


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    Tuesday May 13, 2008
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    CITE students honored for academic excellence in Safety Technology

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two students in Marshall University's College of Information Technology (CITE) at Marshall University have received safety technology awards for the academic year 2007-2008.

    Gary Forman, a senior, received the Outstanding Safety Technology Student Award, and James Hockenberry, a sophomore, received the Honorable Mention Safety Technology Student Award.

    Awardees were selected by faculty based on academic excellence in the field of Safety Technology. Dr. Allan Stern, chair of CITE's Division of Applied Science and Technology, presented the awards.

    "These students represent the vast interest we receive in our program," Stern said. "Their education and commitment to the profession will mean safer workplaces for their future employers and colleagues."

    Forman received the award for achieving the highest GPA and demonstrating exceptional leadership among his fellow students. A retired sergeant first class, Forman served more than 20 years in the U.S. Army before attending Marshall University to study safety technology. Upon graduating with a B.S. in Safety Technology, Forman plans to work in the area of hospital safety or within the federal government.

    "Safety has always been an important part of my career," Forman said. "When you can take 30 soldiers into the desert with temperatures at 150 degrees and not have any heat injuries or any other type of injuries, then you know you are safety minded.  I felt the safety profession would be a good fit for me."

    Hockenberry, who graduated from Wheeling Park High School, received the honorable mention award for high academic performance and determination to perform well.

    "Entering college I had trouble picking my major, and the associate dean of CITE, Elizabeth Hanrahan, mentioned the B.S. in Safety Technology program," Hockenberry said. "I took a look at the curriculum and never looked back. The Safety program was a perfect fit, because it is such a rewarding job in which you get to help people every day."

    The B.S. in Safety Technology degree program is one of about eight in the country accredited by ABET (Applied Science Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). Students take a variety of science courses and apply that knowledge to safety and environmental concerns found in such areas as the mining, hospital, and construction industries, as well as in industrial hygiene.  

    For more information contact the College of Information Technology and Engineering at (304) 696-5453, or online at http://www.marshall.edu/cite.


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    Monday May 12, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps to perform at Colonial Williamsburg Drummer's Call

    Huntington, W.Va. - Marshall University's John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps has been invited and will perform at Colonial Williamsburg's Drummer's Call Muster Saturday, May 17. Drummer's Call will feature 13 corps from the United States and Canada, including the The Army's Third United States Infantry Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps from Washington, D.C.

    All participating corps will be in the Grand March at 11:45 a.m., the Grand Review (on stand) at 12:45 p.m. and the Torchlight Tattoo March at 7:45 p.m.

    From 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., the Grand Review will be Webcast live and may be viewed by visiting http://www.history.org/drummerscall/.

    "This is a great honor to be part of such a prestigious assembly of fife and drum corps after only one year of existence," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall and director of the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps. "It's an excellent endorsement of the work and professionalism of our Marshall University music students."

    The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps was created as an initiative of the John Deaver Drinko Academy and the Department of Music of Marshall University. During the past year the group has performed for sporting, civic and cultural events at Marshall University as well as in Charleston, W. Va., Columbus, Ohio and as far away as Richmond, Va.

    The creation of the corps was inspired by two Marshall University alumnae, Lutricia Tampa Fields and Jennifer Raczok Bailey, who now perform with the world-renowned Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps in Washington, D.C.


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    Monday May 12, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall psychology department sponsors Women's Wellness Day at Pullman Square

    Huntington, W. Va. - Marshall University's psychology department will sponsor Women's Wellness Day at Pullman Square in Huntington Saturday, May 17 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Women attending the event will have the opportunity to receive free health education and screenings.

    The event is being held in connection with National Women's Health Week, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health.

    "National Women's Health Week is important because it encourages women to make their health a top priority," said Dr. Pamela Mulder, professor of psychology at Marshall "Often, women are the caregivers for their families and forget to take care of themselves. With National Women's Health Week we remind women that they too need to visit the doctor, make sure their screenings are up-to-date and just take a minute to think about their health."

    Numerous community healthcare organizations will be participating. Cabell Huntington Hospital Breast Health Center will provide free osteoporosis screening, healthy breast education, and massage therapy. Dr. Linda Savory from Cabell Huntington's Women's and Family Medical Center will provide confidential screening results. Savory's office will also provide basic health screens, including blood pressure, pulse oximetry and glucose. The Marshall University Psychology Clinic will offer information about women and mental health, including postpartum depression and weight management. Prestera Center will offer information about women and addiction. CONTACT and Branches will distribute information concerning women and sexual assault and domestic violence.  The Marshall University Biomedical Sciences Department will present their latest research findings regarding nutrition and cancer.  Curves will educate women about the importance of regular, healthy exercise.  Shawn Bresnahan will be offering two Healthy Heart Cooking demonstrations at noon and 1 p.m. at LeCook Store.

    In addition, Pullman Square merchants, including Empire Books & News, Inspired, Heels, Runway Couture, Merle Norman, Edible Arrangements, Cold Stone Creamery and Benny's Cheesesteak, will offer promotional specials during the hours of the event. In addition, Pullman Square and downtown merchants, including Inspired, Heels, Runway Couture, LeCook Store, Mug & Pia, Cold Stone Creamery, Benny's Cheesesteak, Starbuck's and Max & Erma's have provided door prizes to be given away to women participating in the wellness event.

    National Women's Health Week is a nationwide initiative that calls attention to the importance of women's health. During the week, families, health organizations, businesses, communities, the government and individuals come together to raise awareness about women's health issues and educate women about simple steps they can take for a longer, healthier and happier lives. The theme for National Women's Health Week 2008 is "It's Your Time: Get Inspired. Get Healthy."  

    To learn more about Women's Wellness Day at Pullman Square, please contact either Penny Koontz at (740) 354-8005 or Sallie Richards at (304) 733-4233.


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    Friday May 9, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Yeager Scholars Class of 2012 selected

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced the 12 newest members of its Society of Yeager Scholars, which includes five students from West Virginia.

    Dr. Barry Sharpe, Executive Director of MU's John R. Hall Center for Academic Excellence, said the members of the newest class of scholars come from seven states in all. He said they were chosen after a stringent selection process that involved three levels of review: examination of their applications and two interviews - one by local interviewers near their homes and one by a panel of interviewers on the Marshall University Huntington campus.

    Competition was keen, Sharpe said, with students applying from as far away as Oregon and Colorado. He said the final selection came at the culmination of hundreds of hours of work by many different people - university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars board members and community members.

    "These students are recruited by many other institutions," Sharpe said. "We are fortunate to be able to attract such talented students. "They are an impressive group with exemplary academic records and strong indicators of leadership potential."

    As Yeager Scholars, they are required to maintain a rigorous course load with a 3.5 GPA and participate in campus and community activities. They also will have the opportunity to study literature, political science, or history at Oxford University in England in the summer after their sophomore year, and they will have another opportunity for study abroad in a program related to their major and/or their foreign language minor.

    Sharpe said the newest group of scholars has a wide variety of academic interests, as does each year's entering scholars. During Finalist Weekend, which took place at Marshall University in early March, they talked with professors about possible majors, such as biology, chemistry, education, history, music, psychology, theater and visual arts. They will join 31 other Yeager Scholars already on campus.

    Along with these students, they will participate in special interdisciplinary seminars and extracurricular activities designed to promote intellectual development and foster emerging leadership skills.

    The Society of Yeager Scholars is named for West Virginia native Ret. Brigadier General Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who piloted the first plane to break the sound barrier.

    The following students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2012:

    Emily Elizabeth Beckelhimer of Milton, W.Va. She will graduate from Cabell Midland High School and is interested in a career as an epidemiologist or immunologist.

    Shelby E. Brewster of Colorado Springs, Colo. Brewster will graduate from Liberty High School. She plans to major in history and theater and work as an historian or museum curator.

    Timmeka L. Brice of Salisbury, Md. Brice will graduate from James M. Bennett High School. She plans to major in elementary education and pursue a career as an elementary school teacher.

    Kyle Matthew Burner of Huntington, W.Va. Burner will graduate from Spring Valley High School. He plans to study biotechnology and work in the fields of biotechnology or molecular genetics.

    Emily Cline of Shreve, Ohio. Cline will graduate from Triway High School. She plans to major in forensics chemistry and pursue a career as a forensics scientist.

    Ian Keller Ferrell of Union Bridge, Md. Ferrell will graduate from Francis Scott Key High School. He plans to major in secondary education-social studies and pursue a career as a high school social studies teacher or college professor in history.

    Jordan Patrick Hilgefort of Hebron, Ky. Hilgefort will graduate from Saint Henry District High School. He plans to major in pre-medicine (chemistry) and study medicine after college. He would like to work as a general practitioner or a pediatrician.

    Samuel Kelch of Washington, W.Va. Kelch will graduate from Parkersburg South High School. He plans to major in pre-medicine (biology) and study medicine after college. He would like to pursue a career as a surgeon.

    Rachel Annette Lewis of Huntington, W.Va. Lewis will graduate from Spring Valley High School. She plans to major in biology or biomedical science and pursue a career as a physical therapist.

    Delaney McLemore of Philomath, Ore. McLemore will graduate from Philomath High School. She plans to major in secondary education and pursue a career as a high school history teacher or college professor in women's studies.

    Patricia Jane Wheaton of Fairmont, W.Va. Wheaton will graduate from Fairmont Senior High School. She plans to major in art (painting) and pursue a career in art therapy or art education.

    Benjamin Dean Woodworth of Trafalgar, Ind. Woodworth will graduate from Indian Creek High School. He plans to major in biochemistry and study medicine after college. He would like to work as an orthopedic surgeon or a research scientist.


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    Thursday May 8, 2008
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    Marshall University commencement to be streamed live

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 171st commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Internet Saturday, May 10, beginning at 9 a.m.

    Internet viewers may access the stream by visiting www.marshall.edu and then clicking on the icon. The ceremony, which takes place at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, also will be televised live on Channel 25 in the Comcast viewing area.

    "We are pleased to provide this live feed to the Marshall University family located around the world," MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said. "There are many people who, for various reasons, can't attend commencement.  We feel privileged to make this service available to them."

    More than 2,600 students will graduate from Marshall this year.


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    Tuesday May 6, 2008
    Contact: Leah Edwards, Media Communications Specialist, (304) 696-6397

    MU broadcast journalism student receives first Leah Hickman Memorial Scholarship

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University broadcast journalism student Griffin McElroy has been awarded the first Leah Hickman Memorial Scholarship in Journalism, according to Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

    Leah Hickman was a Marshall journalism student who died in December 2007.

    "Griffin is a fine young student journalist and a very worthy recipient of the first Leah Hickman Memorial Scholarship," Dennison said. "The School of Journalism and Mass Communications is honored to help keep Leah's memory alive with the annual presentation of this scholarship. I also wish to recognize the student staff at WMUL-FM which raised an additional $200 for the scholarship through contributions from the distribution of the memorial blue wrist bands."

    McElroy, who is on the dean's list, has worked with the Parthenon and WMUL. He is serving as an online reporter for MTV covering the presidential campaign in West Virginia. The $500 scholarship presentation to McElroy was made by Leah Hickman's mother, Sherri Russell, at the annual JMC awards ceremony in April.

    Dennison said the blue wrist bands are available by calling WMUL at (304) 696-2295 or the SOJMC at (304) 696-2360. Contributions of at least $1 are being requested for the wrist bands.

    Nearly two dozen scholarships were awarded during the JMC ceremony. The following list includes the name of the scholarship, followed by the recipient and the amount of each award:

    • Marvin Stone/Outstanding Contribution as a College Journalist - Kyle Dyer, $400
    • Norman and Joanne Haddad - Brian Dalek, $500
    • George Andrick/WSAZ - Adam Cavalier, $1,000
    • Cathryn Gibbs Harris Public Relations - Jessica Wintz, $1,000
    • James E. Casto - Morgan Unger, $1,000
    • Margie Crabtree Coltrane - Federica Fornaciari, $1,000
    • G. Terry Turner - Chris Adkins, $500
    • Marvin Stone - Megan Bryant, Whitney Burdette, Leannda Carey, Marlowe Hereford and Beth Wilson, $1,000 each
    • J.D. "Jack" Maurice - Kara Busse, Kacie Chambers, Erin Deegan and Angela Marie Sundstrom, $500 each
    • Manley Keith Ray - Justin Minsker, $500
    • Ezra Cochran - Tom Bragg, $500
    • Dorothy Goodman - Molly Grove, $1,000

    Dyer, who is from Wayne, W.Va., served as editor of the Parthenon and raised more than $5,000 for the School of Journalism through his fundraising efforts with the J-Walk, an annual homecoming walkathon that supports the school's greatest needs.  Dyer is also on the dean's list.   The award is named for Marvin Stone, a JMC alumnus and former editor of U.S. News and World Report.

    Also, in addition to receiving the Cathryn Gibbs Harris Public Relations Award, Jessica Wintz received the Ralph Turner Outstanding Performance as an Intern award.


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    Tuesday May 6, 2008
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    Marshall University announces honorary degree recipients

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Arthur and Joan Meyer Weisberg, founders of State Electric Supply Co., Arthur's Enterprises and Service Wire Co., and West Virginia Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin will receive honorary doctoral degrees from Marshall University during commencement Saturday, May 10.

    The university's 171st commencement begins at 9 a.m. at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Tomblin will deliver the keynote address.

    The Weisbergs will each receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree while Tomblin will receive an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. Honorary degrees have been conferred by Marshall University to highly distinguished recipients since 1928 when Dwight Whitney Morrow and Guy Fielding Yost each received honorary Doctor of Laws degrees.

    Here is a look at each 2008 honorary degree recipient:

    Arthur Weisberg

    Weisberg is a native of Brooklyn, N.Y., and a 1950 graduate of City College of New York with a degree in electrical engineering. He founded State Electric Supply Co., a retail/wholesale distributor of electrical and electronic supplies with showrooms and warehouse facilities, as a one-man operation in 1952 by selling light bulbs, extension cords and fuses out of the back of his truck to grocery and hardware stores.

    Today, under the corporate umbrella of Arthur's Enterprises, State Electric has 41 branches in five states - West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and North Carolina. In 1968, Weisberg and his wife, Joan, established a specialty wire fabrication company called Service Wire Co. that now has customers throughout the world.

    Joan Meyer Weisberg

    Joan Weisberg co-owns State Electric Co. and Service Wire Co. with her husband, Art. In addition, she is owner and manager of Twelve-O-Six Virginia Inc., a real estate holding company in Huntington. She was born in Charleston, W.Va., and earned a Bachelor of Science degree from The Ohio State University.

    Together, the Weisbergs established the Arthur and Joan Meyer Weisberg Distinguished Professorship, an endowed chair in Marshall University's College of Science. They also established the Arthur and Joan Weisberg Division of Engineering and Computer Science in Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering. In 2007, they received the John Deaver Drinko Distinguished Service Award at Marshall. Both are members of the Marshall University Business Hall of Fame.

    Earl Ray Tomblin

    Tomblin is the longest-serving Senate president in West Virginia history. A native of Chapmanville in Logan County, he has been president of the Senate since Jan. 11, 1995, having since been reelected six times. He began his legislative career in the House of Delegates in 1974, the same year he graduated from West Virginia University. He earned his Master of Business Administration from Marshall in 1975.

    Tomblin has held just about every major Senate post, including Chairmanship of the Senate Finance Committee. During his legislative service, he has sponsored a number of important legislative initiatives, including the School Building Authority, the state's Rainy Day Fund, Tort Reform, Ethics Reform, Coal Mine Safety Legislation and more recently, the "Bucks for Brains" legislation to create the West Virginia Research Trust Fund.

    Tomblin began his career as a public school teacher, while also developing private business interests. He is married to the former Joanne Jaeger, a distinguished Marshall alumna who serves as president of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College.


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    Friday May 2, 2008
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    Marshall to graduate more than 2,600 students at 171st commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 2,600 students will graduate from Marshall University on Saturday, May 10 when the university celebrates its 171st commencement at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

    The total of 2,622 students receiving degrees includes 1,529 undergraduates, 946 graduates, 43 from the School of Medicine and 104 receiving associate degrees.

    In all, 591 students will graduate with honors. Ninety will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 177 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 306 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). One student receiving an associate degree will graduate with high honors, and 17 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

    Continuing a practice that began in 2006, each Marshall graduate attending commencement will be recognized during the ceremony. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association. Anyone who has earned a degree since July 2007 may participate in commencement.

    Marshall also will recognize its graduating honor students during commencement.

    Based on tentative grade point averages calculated through seven semesters, 15 students have completed or will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. Two already are assured of 4.0s, while the other 13 - all May graduates - will learn their final GPAs after commencement.

    The two already assured of 4.0s are Dustin Michael Simpson of Scott Depot, W.Va., and Daniel C. Teters of Washington, W.Va.

    The 13 with tentative 4.0s are Karen Elizabeth Bohne of Rochester, Mich.; Linsey Marie Cushing of Charleston, W.Va.; Holley Elizabeth Harris of Huntington; Susan Elaine Harvey of Huntington; Katelyn Marie Holliday of Paw Paw, W.Va.; Justin Michael Kearns of Wheeling, W.Va.; Allison Marie Kleiner of Wheeling, W.Va.; Joshua Aaron Lynn of Millbrook, Ala.; Kala Jean Melchiori of Huntington; Katherine Lee Mohn of Huntington; Lauren Mikaela Perry of Proctorville, Ohio; Jodi Marie Pitsenbarger of Franklin, W.Va.; and Alyssa Marie Zirille of Gallipolis, Ohio.

    LeEtta Rae Brillhart of Point Pleasant, W.Va., who will receive an associate degree, has a 4.0 as well.

    West Virginia Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin will deliver the commencement address and receive a Doctor of Laws honorary degree. Arthur and Joan Weisberg, founders of State Electric Supply Co., Arthur's Enterprises and Service Wire Co., will receive Doctor of Humane Letters honorary degrees.

    Here is a list of commencement-related events next week:

    Wednesday, May 7

    10 a.m., student-athlete graduation brunch, Big Green Room, Joan C. Edwards Stadium

    Thursday, May 8

    4:15 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Awards Ceremony, Harless Auditorium, MU Medical Center

    7 p.m., College of Health Professions' Nursing recognition ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    Friday, May 9

    11 a.m., LEAP Program graduation, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge

    1 p.m., ROTC commissioning ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Alumni Lounge

    3 p.m., International students graduation picnic, Buskirk Field

    5 p.m., Society of Yeager Scholars Medallion Ceremony, Dinko Library, third-floor atrium

    6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing recognition, MOVC

    7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Investiture, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, followed by reception in Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Saturday, May 10

    9 a.m., 171st commencement, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    1 p.m., College of Liberal Arts graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    1 p.m., Forensic Science reception and open house, Forensic Science Center

    1 p.m., College of Health Professions graduation ceremony, Big Sandy Superstore Grand Ballroom

    1 p.m., CITE graduation ceremony, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, followed by reception, Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    1 p.m., College of Education and Human Services graduation ceremony, Henderson Center arena.

    1 p.m., College of Science graduation ceremony, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

    Immediately following Marshall commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms, 314 9th St. Plaza.

    1:30 p.m., Lewis College of Business graduation ceremony, Christ Temple Church

    1:30 p.m., School of Journalism graduation ceremony, Smith Recital Hall, followed by reception, Smith Hall atrium.

    The main commencement ceremony will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu and it will be televised live on Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25.

    ###

    NOTE: The graduation numbers are for Marshall University only, and do not include the Marshall Community and Technical College.


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    Friday May 2, 2008
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    Reds game among features of Great American ThunderFest in Cincinnati; MU president to throw out first pitch

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association, the MU Alumni Club of Cincinnati and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation are sponsoring the 2008 Great American ThunderFest and the Big Green Coaches Tour Weekend Saturday, May 31 and Sunday, June 1 in Cincinnati.

    Several events involving the Marshall community will take place over the two days, including a baseball game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Atlanta Braves at 3:55 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at Great American Ballpark. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will throw out the first pitch at the game.

    A pre-game reception will take place at the ballpark with guests from MU and the Reds' organization. The ThunderTones, a Huntington vocal ensemble, will perform during the seventh-inning stretch.

    Several price levels are available for the weekend, ranging from $29.99 per person for a package that includes a ticket to the game, a ThunderFest T-shirt, a Reds Hall of Fame pass and early admission to the Herd FanZone area, to $799.99 for a complete weekend package for four that covers all events Saturday and Sunday. Details of the different packages are available online at www.greatamericanthunderfest.com. Tickets also may be purchased at that Web site.

    The weekend will continue on Sunday, June 1 with the Big Green Coaches Tour and a golf scramble at the Legendary Run Golf Course in Cincinnati. A reception and dinner will follow the golf scramble at the course.

    Marshall coaches and former MU athletes will be participating in the golf scramble and the dinner. Among them are Mike Bartrum, former Thundering Herd football player and NFL long snapper, and former Marshall basketball player Mark Dorris. Participants will receive an update on Herd athletic programs from Marshall coaches.

    "With the ThunderFest accompanying the 2008 Big Green Coaches Tour event on Sunday, we are bringing together a number of things Marshall alumni and Herd fans love and enjoy - Cincinnati Reds baseball, golf, great food and most of all the Marshall University Thundering Herd," said John Chafin, MU Cincinnati Club secretary and a former Marshall baseball player. "We have put together a weekend that has something for every Marshall University fan and we expect a large turnout."

    Individuals may also purchase a baseball bat autographed by Marty Brennaman, the Hall of Fame broadcaster for the Reds. The bat features the saying "and this one belongs to the Herd!" and the Marshall logo. The Great American ThunderFest offers hotel and shuttle services for the event. Participants can purchase discounted Reds Hall of Fame tickets, and also may purchase T-Shirts for the event.

    For more information, contact Chafin at (513) 404-8484 or by e-mail at jchafin7@hotmail.com.


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    Winners of Maier Latin, writing awards announced at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Winners of the Maier Awards, sponsored annually by the Maier Foundation, Inc., were announced Monday, April 28 in the Memorial Student Center's Alumni Lounge on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions were recognized during an awards ceremony.

    The Maier Latin awards were established by William J. Maier, Jr., father of Maier Foundation President Ed Maier, to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.

    A high school graduate at the age of 16, the elder Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the state. The elder Maier credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

    The William J. Maier Writing Awards were established in 1973 by William J. Maier, Jr., in honor of his father. These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall. Ranging from $100 to $500, the awards recognize and reward good and distinctive writing.

    Also, Marshall's Department of Classics sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation. This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

    Here are the winners of this year's Latin and writing awards.

    Maier Latin Sight-Translation Contest Winners

    Latin I

    First place: Stephanie Rice, Covenant School. Teacher - Lois Merritt

    Second place: Samara Pollock, Linsly School. Teacher - Nicoletta Villa-Sella

    Latin II

                First place: Jayan Nair, Home-Schooled. Teacher - Lois Merritt

                Second place: Joseph Tyler Williams, George Washington High School. Teacher - Ruth Diller

    Latin III

                First place: Natalie Tupta, Charleston Catholic High School. Teacher - Robin Snyder

    Latin IV

                First place: Ceilidh McIntire, Robert C. Byrd High School. Teacher - Judy Dolan

    Maier High School Latin Cup Award Winners

                First place: Jared M. Jones, George Washington High School. Teacher - Ruth Diller

                Second place: Stephanie Werning, Charleston Catholic High School. Teacher - Robin Snyder

                Third place: Kayla D. Chappelle, Huntington High School. Teacher - Amy McElroy


    Maier Latin Scholarship Recipient

                Mark Kalen Lee Ballard, New Martinsville, W.Va., junior, Marshall University


    Maier Writing Award Winners 2007-2008

    First-year Research

                First place: Walter Goff, "Strengthening Economies: A Proposal Regarding the US-Mexico Border Issue (Professor Jennifer Cavender)

                Second place: Amanda Saguansin, "Homeschooling: Attacking the Myth About Socialization" (Professor Jennifer Cavender)

                Third place: Maggie Stonestreet, "The Government's Role in American's Obesity Epidemic" (Professor Jennifer Cavender)

    First-year Non-Research

                First place: Syreeta Njoka, "The Undetected Truth of the Tale of Alamo" (Professor Angell Stone)

    Undergraduate Fiction

                First place: Travis Forshee, "The Last Days of Melanie Speranza" (Professor Anthony Viola

                Second place: Erika Tharp, "A Pair of Pale Blue House Slippers" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Third place: Rebecca Childers, "Following Rudolph's Nose" (Professor Anthony Viola)

                Honorable mention: Amanda Koncelik, "Oreo Cookies" (Professor Chris Green)

    Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose

                First place: (tie) Miriam Reasons, "Chaucer's 'Clerk's Tale' and Petrarch's 'Story of Griselda' " (Professor Kateryna Schray); and, Rebecca Fox-Gieg, "New Historicism and the Demonization of the Jews in Chaucer's 'The Prioress's Tale' " (Professor Kateryna Schray)

    Graduate Non-Fiction Prose

                First place: Ryan Sarver, "The Mind of a Killer: A Psychological Exploration of Rorschach, Watchmen's Noir Detective" (Professor Mary Moore)

                Second place: Allison Massey, "The Faoade of Power: Exclusionary Factors of Discourse in Ann Pancake's 'Strange as this Weather Has Been' " (Professor Chris Green)

                Third place: Cooper Childers, "Bridge of Ivory, Bridge of Horn" (Professor Mary Moore)

                Honorable mention: Kelly Broce, "A Familiar Schizophrenia: Personalities That Shape" (Professor Anthony Viola)

    Undergraduate Poetry

                First place: (tie) Chelsea Elmore, "Office Space" (Professor A.E. Stringer); and, Grant Vandervort, "Trying to Stand" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Second place: Kaydee Diemler, "Let Your Tongue Dance" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Third place: Amanda Stephens, "L is not for Love" (Professor Anthony Viola)

    Graduate Poetry

                First place: Sara Blevins, "A Woman Walking in the Desert" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Second place: Nicole Lawrence, "Spin Cycle" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Third place: Sarah Grubb, "Lost and Found" (Professor A.E. Stringer)

                Honorable mention: Joshua Mattern, "Because the Moon will Go Down" (Professor A.E. Stringer)


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    Donning of Kente celebration, processional is May 1 at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs has invited African and African American graduates to the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement. 

    This traditional and historically significant event takes place at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 1, on Buskirk Field at the center of the Huntington campus. The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will commence with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans and Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University. 

    The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate Thursday along with university deans, faculty and staff.

    "Wearing the Kente cloth is a symbol that our students wear with pride," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "Each cloth is unique in its design and color and will represent the different levels of degrees our students have earned."

    The following woven cloths will be awarded: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

    Keynote speaker will be the Bishop Samuel Moore, an educator and recent recipient of the Milken Award, a national award acknowledging an educator's crucial contributions to our national well-being.

    Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs, will participate in the event. Senior Christabel Danbey-Cobbina will make remarks on behalf of the undergraduates. Marshall alumna Janis Winkfield also will speak. Dr. Alfred Akinsete, an associate professor of math, will make closing remarks and lead the processional.

    African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble. A reception will follow on the Memorial Student Center plaza for all participants and those in attendance.

    In the event of rain, the ceremony will be held in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center.


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    Marshall University Executive MBA students honored during special hooding ceremony in Charleston

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. -  Fifteen business professionals in the current Marshall University Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) class were honored last weekend during a special hooding ceremony in Charleston.

    The students were formally hooded in their academic regalia by Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs, after having successfully completed all the requirements of the Marshall EMBA program that included a recent study abroad trip to the Czech Republic. Don Channell of Hurricane was individually recognized as the top EMBA graduate.

    "This ceremony recognized the accomplishments of our professional business students in a formal setting in the Kanawha Valley befitting the hard work and dedication that went into earning their EMBA degrees," said Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University. "We are proud of them and this recognition event was our way of letting our EMBA students know that we understand and appreciate the sacrifices they made to advance their education and careers."

    The Marshall University Executive MBA program is the only Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business -- International (AACSB) accredited Executive MBA program physically located in the Kanawha Valley providing face-to-face interaction with professors and peers in every course. The AACSB-International represents the gold standard for business schools worldwide and is the hallmark of excellence in management education, with only the top 15 percent of all business schools in the nation and less than 6 percent worldwide having merited this distinction.

    Classes are held on Saturdays at our South Charleston campus allowing professionals to earn an AACSB-accredited degree in person within a classroom setting without interrupting their current careers. This cohort of students sacrificed up to 86 Saturdays to earn this degree.

    The Marshall EMBA curriculum has been designed for small class interaction using state-of-the-art technology and hands-on experiential learning that focuses on business ethics, leadership and global issues, along with management skills and tools.

    Phyllis Arnold, West Virginia State President and West Virginia Central Regional President of BB&T, served as keynote speaker. Arnold earned her MBA from Marshall and has been inducted into the Lewis College of Business Hall of Fame. She based her speech on raising the standards of practicing business including recruitment and retention of employees, attention to employee wellness, celebrating workplace diversity, high standards of ethics, the nobility of earning profits and the value of economic freedom.

    "Sometimes it's as simple as taking each problem you encounter in business and kicking it up a notch," Arnold told the EMBA recipients.

    The Marshall EMBA Class of 2008 includes: Denise Baker of Winfield; Don Channell of Hurricane; Charles D. Childers of Ransom, Ky.; Jeremy Dolan of Catlettsburg, Ky.; Laura Davis Ellis of Charleston; Clifford Johnson of West Alex, Ohio; Donna R. Lusher of Ona; Jason Mastrangelo of Huntington; Kerry Kim Matthews Jr. of Yawkey; William M. McDaniel II of Scott Depot; James Howard McKee of Nitro; Philip Richmond of Huntington; Katrina Spaulding of Crown City, Ohio; Michael Paul Winter of Logan; and Richard D. Wiseman of Point Pleasant.

    The students will have their official degrees conferred at Marshall's formal commencement ceremony May 10.

    ###

    Cutlines (Photos available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/muphoto.html):

    Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president of academic affairs at Marshall University, hoods EMBA graduate Katrina Spaulding of Crown City, Ohio.

    Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp presents top EMBA graduate Don Channell of Hurricane with a plaque. Channell earned a 4.0.

    Keynote speaker Phyllis Arnold of BB&T congratulates EMBA graduate Laura Davis Ellis of Charleston.


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    Marshall University launches cellular phone plan Web page

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has launched a new Web page that provides a "one-stop" destination for students, faculty and staff shopping for discounted cellular phone plans.

    Beginning this summer, students living in campus residence halls will be responsible for choosing their own cellular phone plans and will have a selection of cell phone providers from which to choose.

    Recognizing that greater numbers of students coming to campus arrive on campus with their personal cellular phones and phone plans already in place, Marshall University administrators decided that providing students with cell phone options from many carriers instead of just one was a more efficient and cost-effective way of serving the university community.

    By clicking on www.marshall.edu/mobileplans/, Marshall University students, faculty and staff can view discounted cellular plans offered by AT&T, Alltell and nTelos. Other cellular providers also will have the opportunity to have their plans linked to this page.

    For more information, contact Arnold Miller, Assistant Vice President for Technology, at (304) 696-2677.


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    Awards of distinction to be presented, retiring faculty to be honored Tuesday, April 29

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 29 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

    The meeting begins at 2 p.m., and will include remarks from Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Dr. Larry Stickler.

    Seven people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

    To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

    • Dr. Martin Amerikaner, Psychology, 20 years of service
    • Dr. C. Robert Barnett, Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation, 36 years of service
    • Prof. Kathryn Chezik, Communication Disorders, 37 years of service
    • Dr. Ronald B. Childress, School of Education, 33 years of service
    • Dr. Stan Maynard, School of Education, 28 years of service
    • Dr. Tony Williams, School of Education, 37 years of service
    • Dr. Gary Wright, Physiology, 29 years of service

    To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members either must be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The 2007-08 Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

    • Dr. Yoram Elitsur (Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, pediatric gastroenterologist), senior recipient in the field of Science and Technology
    • Dr. William Palmer (College of Liberal Arts, History), senior recipient in the field of Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education and Business
    • Dr. Ronda Sturgill (College of Education and Human Services), junior recipient among all faculty

    Marshall is recognizing 17 retiring faculty who have a combined 528 years of service. They are:

    • Dr. Gary Anderson, Physical Sciences, 27 years of service
    • Dr. Elaine Baker, Psychology, 36 years of service
    • Dr. C. Robert Barnett, ESSR, 36 years of service
    • Dr. W. Blaker Bolling, Management/Marketing, 23 years of service
    • Dr. D. Stephen Cupps, Political Science, 35 years of service
    • Dr. Robert Edmunds, Communications Studies, 27 years of service
    • Dr. Thomas E. Ellis, Psychology, 6 years of service
    • Prof. Pamela W. Ford, Library, 33 years of service
    • Prof. Robert Forgét, Accountancy. & Legal Environment, 18 years of service
    • Dr. Ron Gain, Biological Science, 39 years of service
    • Dr. Mary Etta Hight, Biological Science, 32 years of service
    • Dr. Carl Johnson, School of Education, 33 years of service
    • Dr. John Larson, Chemistry, 40 years of service
    • Dr. John McKernan, English, 37 years of service
    • Dr. Charles Peele, Mathematics & Applied Sciences, 40 years of service
    • Dr. Tony Williams, School of Education, 37 years of service
    • Dr. Gary Wright, Physiology, 29 years of service

    Other faculty to be honored at the meeting are Dr. David Mills, Dr. Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award; Dr. Evelyn Pupplo-Cody, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award; and Dr. E. Del Chrol, Dr. Phillip T. Rutherford, and Dr. David Winter, Pickens-Queen Teacher Award; Dr. Katharine Rodier, Faces of Appalachia Award; Dr. Tom Hankins and Dr. Thomas Pauley, Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award; and Dr. Montserrat Miller, Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia Professor of the Year Award.

    A reception in the performing arts center lobby will follow the meeting.


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    WMUL-FM students win three awards in BEA competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received one first-place award, one second-place award, and one third-place award during the Sixth Annual Broadcast Education Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony Friday, April 18 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said the students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States.

    "Winning never comes easy, but for Marshall University, the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities," Bailey said.

    Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, also noted how the WMUL students continue to be competitive at a national level.

    "More than 500 entries were received for the audio and video awards and we won or placed in three different categories," Dennison said. "Furthermore, Adam Cavalier won the largest scholarship available in the amount of $5,000 (in BEA's 2008-2009 competition).  We are truly proud of the work of our students."

    The first-place award winning entry in radio news was:

    Radio News - Newscast

    "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" with producer Griffin McElroy, a junior from Huntington; news anchors Matthew Gajtka, a recent graduate from Weirton; Kimberly Burcham, a senior from Huntington; and sports anchor Robert Iddings, a sophomore from St. Albans; broadcast Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007.

    The second-place award winning entry in audio was:

    Sports play-by-play

    WMUL-FM's broadcast of the football game between Marshall University and East Carolina University played at Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington, W.Va., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2007.  The students calling the football game broadcast over 88.1 were: football play-by-play announcer Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne; color commentator Brian Dalek, a junior from McMechen; sideline reporter Andrew Ramspacher, a sophomore from Dublin, Ohio; and studio producers Scott Hall, a graduate student from Stephen City, Va., and Boom Madison, a freshman from Olympia, Wash.

    The third-place award winning entry in radio news was:

    Radio news - feature news story

    "The Pumpkin House: Trick or Treat Night," written and produced by Adam Cavalier, a junior from Montgomery, that was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of  Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2007.

    Broadcast Education Association (BEA) has more than 1,400 academic and professional members, and 250 academic institutional members.  It was founded in 1955, and its mission is to prepare college students to enter the radio and television business.  BEA's members share a diversity of interests involving all aspects of telecommunication and electronic media.


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    Marshall Habitat House dedicated Thursday, April 24

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and the local Habitat for Humanity organization dedicated the Marshall Habitat House, which Marshall University students, staff and faculty helped build, today at 1930 Artisan Ave. in Huntington.

    Teddy Kluemper III, director of development and communications for Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity, said the recipient of the 64th Habitat home is Deidre Joplin, who will share it with her 4-year-old daughter, Aashana.

    "We not only celebrate the completion of a project, but we celebrate the dream of home ownership," Kluemper said. "Because of the efforts of Habitat, Marshall University and the City of Huntington, we have successfully begun the process of turning a once-blighted neighborhood into an area that our new partner families can call home!"

    Guest speakers at the dedication were Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; MU student Megan Barbour; David L. Michael, Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity Executive Director and CEO; Steve Nord, Huntington Area Habitat for Humanity board president; and Huntington Mayor David Felinton.

    Refreshments and a tour of the house followed the dedication.

     


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    Alumni association plans pre-game tailgate party Saturday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association and its Young Alumni Committee are sponsoring a pre-game tailgate from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 26 in the west parking lot at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

    The tailgate will precede the Thundering Herd's annual Green-White spring football game, which starts at 3 p.m. There is no charge to attend the tailgate, and complimentary hamburgers, hot dogs and chicken from Hillbilly Hot Dogs will be served.

    Water and soft drinks also will be available, and music will be provided by the band of Joe Eddins and Jason Smith.

    The tailgate will take place near the corner of 20th Street and 3rd Avenue in the west lot. Weather permitting, the Marshall blimp will be flying above the tailgate.

    For more information, contact Nancy Pelphrey with the alumni association at (304) 696-3134.


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    Marshall University Orchestra to Premiere New Work by WV Composition Fellow Mark Zanter

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Marshall University's orchestra will premiere a new work by faculty member Dr. Mark Zanter at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 in the Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus.

    The work, Short Symphony, was produced during Zanter's tenure as recipient of a 2007 West Virginia Artist Fellowship in music composition. It was composed for the group at the request of orchestra director Dr. Sölen Dikener, who will conduct the premiere.

    The Marshall Orchestra concert will also feature performances by the winners of the student concerto competition, John Galloway and Andrew Tilley. Galloway will play the first movement of the Trombone Concerto by Gordon Jacob and Tilley will play two movements of the Marimba Concerto by Ney Rosauro.

    The event is free and open to the public.

    For further information, contact the Marshall Department of Music at (304) 696-3117.


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    Mills is Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner; Reynolds, Pickens-Queen winners also announced


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    Graduate seminars involving Glenwood development to be offered this fall by MU Graduate Humanities program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two graduate seminars which will involve the development and construction of a traveling exhibit of Glenwood, the historic estate on Charleston's west side, will be offered beginning this fall by Marshall University's  Graduate Humanities program.

    The Graduate Humanities program is housed on Marshall's South Charleston campus. The program director is Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, who along with Dr. Billy Joe Peyton, is co-directing Phase II of the three-phase project about the 156-year-old estate.

    The Glenwood Project is funded in large part by the West Virginia Humanities Council and also will involve the creation of an educational Web site detailing the history of the estate.

    Glenwood is a pre-Civil War mansion that was home at various times to the Laidley, Summers and Quarrier families, three of Kanawha County's most prominent families. The house was built in 1852 on a vast estate with 366 acres that extended over much of what is now the West side of Charleston.

    The estate is now owned and maintained by the newly established Historic Glenwood Foundation Inc., which formerly was the Marshall University Graduate College Foundation.  The foundation is a partner with the Graduate Humanities program in this effort.

    The seminars will offer three hours of credit.  This fall Mark Tobin Moore, a noted artist and designer who also is an instructor at the Marshall University Graduate College, will teach Museum Studies and Exhibit Design.  Moore's class will focus on the design, development and construction of the exhibit.

    The class will work collaboratively with the second seminar, Historical Studies, taught by Peyton, assistant professor of history at West Virginia State University.  Peyton's seminar will involve students in the organization of historical materials to be used in the exhibit. 

    The exhibit will consist of six panels with an accompanying extensive Web site which will give a detailed look at the estate, its complex history and the impact it has had on the Kanawha Valley both historically and culturally.  Plans call for the exhibit to travel to several locations in the area.

    For additional information about the seminars or the project, call (304) 746-2022 or 746-2023, e-mail at lassiter@marshall.edu or visit http://www.marshall.edu/gsepd/humn/.   


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    Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin to speak at Marshall University's 171st commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Earl Ray Tomblin, the longest-serving Senate president in West Virginia history, will be the featured speaker at Marshall University's 171st commencement, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

    Commencement begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 10 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

    "As both an alumnus and a respected state leader, President Tomblin is well deserving of this honor, the highest that Marshall University can bestow," Kopp said. "He has built an enduring legacy of outstanding leadership and public service as president of the West Virginia Senate. We thank him for his dedication to the citizens of West Virginia and for being a part of this year's commencement."

    Tomblin, a native of Chapmanville in Logan County, has been president of the Senate since Jan. 11, 1995, having since been reelected six times. He began his legislative career in 1974, the same year he graduated from West Virginia University. He earned his Master of Business Administration from Marshall in 1975.

    "Marshall University has honored me with its invitation to address the 2008 graduating class at its commencement exercises this year," Tomblin said. "I am particularly proud of the fact that this comes at a time when the Legislature gave its approval for the 'Bucks for Brains/Bucks for Jobs' program which will have a tremendous impact on future MU graduates.

    "As an alumnus, it is also especially gratifying to be able to return to campus in a much different role. It is my great hope that the few words I will offer on this important day will have a significant effect on the graduates, and that they will consider committing themselves to lifetime careers in West Virginia. Our state needs their energy and intellect if we are to make the progress to which Marshall and our state government are also committed."

    Tomblin has held just about every major Senate post, including Chairmanship of the Senate Finance Committee. During his legislative service, he has sponsored several important legislative initiatives including the School Building Authority, the state's Rainy Day Fund, tort reform, ethics reform, coal mine safety legislation and more recently, the 'Bucks for Brains/Bucks for Jobs' program.

    Tomblin began his career as a public school teacher, while also developing private business interests. A devoted family man, he is married to the former Joanne Jaeger, a distinguished Marshall alumna who serves as president of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College. Their son Brent will be a senior next year at Sen. Tomblin's alma mater, Chapmanville High School.

    Recognized nationally as one of the country's most capable and knowledgeable legislative leaders, Tomblin has held a number of important positions including those of chairman of the Southern Legislative Conference and chairman of the Council of State Governments.


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    'Let Your Voice Be Herd' event is Tuesday at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College of Education and Human Services (COEHS) Dean's Student Advisory Board (SAB) will conduct its second annual "Let Your Voice Be Herd" event from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 22 on the Huntington campus.

     

    The goal of the event, which will take place on Buskirk Field, is to create awareness for the Student Advisory Board and promote to students that their voice counts. In last year's first event, 147 students completed surveys. COEHS students who fill out a survey Tuesday will receive a raffle ticket and be eligible to win prizes, including iPod nanos.

     

    Other features this year, which are available to all students - not just those in the COEHS, include an inflatable obstacle course and free food.

     

    For more information, contact Brean Stewart in the College of Education and Human Services at (304) 696-3131.


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    Pullman Jazz Festival Set for April 26

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The distinctive sounds of brass and jazz will fill the air in downtown Huntington when the Third Annual Jazz Festival comes to Pullman Square Saturday, April 26 from 2 to 7 p.m.

    The event is held in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution and the International Association of Jazz Educators to observe National Jazz Appreciation Month.

    Open to the public, the free event will take place on the Pullman Square "greenspace" and will feature local and regional jazz artists such as Bluetrane, the Marshall University Faculty Jazz Ensemble; the Zanter Trio, the MU 12 O'clock Big Band and guest artists Reggie Watkins, trombone, and Mike Tracy, saxophone.

    Sponsors are Community Trust Bank, Marshall University and the American Federation of Musicians Music Performance Fund.

    For additional information, visit www.pullman-square.com  on the World Wide Web or contact Dr. Mark Zanter, associate professor of music at Marshall, by e-mail at zanter@marshall.edu.


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    Wednesday April 16, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Relay for Life' comes to Marshall this weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The American Cancer Society will host the 2008 Relay for Life of Marshall University at 6 p.m. Friday, April 18 on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The event will last throughout the night and will end at 6 a.m. on Saturday, April 19.

    "Cancer does not sleep, so neither do Relay for Life participants," said Kristina Isaacs, co-chair of the event.

    According to Isaacs, Relay for Life is a fun-filled event designed to celebrate survivorship and raise money for research and programs of the American Cancer Society. Teams of family members, friends, co-workers, and others join together each year to raise funds for the American Cancer Society and make a difference in the community. In honor of those who battle cancer 24 hours a day, team members typically take turns walking around Buskirk Field throughout the day and night.

    For those not walking, there are other activities including entertainment, food, games, remembrance ceremonies and stories of inspiration.

    "Every unique Relay for Life is truly a community event, where new friends are made, old friends are hugged and hearts are touched by the magic that is Relay," Isaacs said.  "It is an event like no other."

    As at every Relay for Life event, cancer survivors are recognized through the Survivor's Lap. Participants can also remember loved ones lost to the disease with the Luminaria Ceremony.

    "We fight back against cancer because everyone has been touched by cancer and we want to put an end to the disease," Isaacs said. "Relay helps individuals make a commitment to save lives by taking up the fight."

    The American Cancer Society is the nationwide, community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives and diminishing suffering from cancer through research, education, advocacy and service.

    For more information, persons may call Isaacs at (304) 419-2810 or visit the event Web site at http://events.cancer.org/rflmarshalluniversity.


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    Tuesday April 15, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'The Merry Wives of Windsor' runs April 23-26 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre will present William Shakespeare's "The Merry Wives of Windsor" at 8 p.m. daily April 23-26 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

    Tickets are $14 for adults, $12 for seniors, Marshall faculty and staff, $7 for children 17 and under and free to Marshall students with a valid I.D. They are on sale at the performing arts center box office, which is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

    For more information, call (304) 696-2787.


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    Tuesday April 15, 2008
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    Community-based research expert visits Marshall April 21-22

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Carolyn Jenkins from the Medical University of South Carolina, a well-known investigator utilizing community-based participatory research, will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus April 21-22 to discuss her research.

    Jenkins, the Ann Edwards Endowed Chair with Medical University's College of Nursing, will share her expertise through two presentations which are free and open to anyone who wants to learn more about community-based research. Her visit is presented by Marshall's College of Health Professions.

    "We are delighted to sponsor Dr. Jenkins' visit. Her work with communities in reducing the burden of diabetes could serve as a model for our region," said Dr. Shortie McKinney, dean of the college.

    Jenkins' presentations will take place as follows:

    Monday, April 21, noon to 2 p.m., Drinko Library 402: Jenkins will present "Community-Based Participatory Research and Chronic Care."  During this presentation, she will share her experiences in working with the REACH program in South Carolina. Her presentation will include tips on how to begin a community-based participatory research project; maintaining community involvement after the "thrill" is gone; and the role chronic care plays in participatory research.  She also will discuss the pros and cons of this style of research and the implications for the future. 

    Tuesday, April 22, 10 a.m. to noon, Drinko Library 402: Jenkins will share her experiences working with Southern African Americans in the presentation "Reducing disparities for Southern African Americans with Diabetes."  She will outline her approach and some of her successes and failures as she developed the REACH program in South Carolina

    Dr. Chuck Hossler, associate dean of the College of Health Professions, worked with Jenkins before he came to Marshall. He believes her research techniques would work for almost any project and not just for health-related ones.

    "We are really excited about her willingness to share her expertise in community-based participatory research with us," Hossler said. 

    Jenkins has more than 25 years of experience working with community-based research.  Her work focuses on improving health outcomes related to diabetes and its complications, reducing racial disparities, and creating effective academic community partnerships. 

    Two major initiatives led by Jenkins are the statewide South Carolina Diabetes Initiative and Charleston's Enterprise/MUSC Neighborhood Health Program which she founded in 1995.  Both initiatives included three-pronged approaches of care delivery, research and education.

    For more information on Jenkins' visit to Marshall, contact Marilyn Fox with the College of Health Professions at (304) 696-2620 or via e-mail at foxm@marshall.edu.


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    Monday April 14, 2008
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    Elected SGA officials to be inaugurated Friday at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's elected student government officials will be inaugurated at a ceremony at 5 p.m. Friday, April 18 on the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center plaza on MU's Huntington campus.

    The inauguration will be for students who were elected during the student government elections, which took place March 18-19 on campus. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center. 

    Matt James, a senior from Bluefield, W.Va., was elected president of Marshall's student body, and Sean Hornbuckle, a graduate student from Huntington, was elected vice president. The team of James and Hornbuckle was unopposed in the election.

    "Sean and I are very excited to have been blessed with the opportunity to lead our student body throughout the next year," James said. "We hope to focus on improving school spirit and attendance at events, continuing to develop our safety procedures on campus, and overwhelming students through our commitment to serve the community by giving back and being as visible as possible."

    Marshall students elected Randall Tomblin, a sophomore from Huntington, as the student representative to Marshall's Board of Governors. These elected student officials will serve one-year terms. Marshall students also elected senators representing colleges throughout the university.

    The following are the elected senators for student government:

    College of Science - Craig Riccelli
     
    College of Health Professions - Kelly Armstrong and Kati Bailey
     
    School of Journalism and Mass Communications - Samantha Turley
     
    College of Liberal Arts - Catherine Staley and Randall Tomblin
     
    College of Information Technology and Engineering - Andrew Copley
     
    College of Education and Human Services - Kim Roth, Molly Gallagher and Mary Hatfield
     
    Graduate School - Sara Belknap
     
    Lewis College of Business - Olivia Morris and Josh Cremeans


    For more information, persons may contact Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, at (304) 696-6423.


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    Saturday April 12, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Welcome Center renaming honors Joseph M. Gillette

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Welcome Center was renamed the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center today in an official naming ceremony. The event took place at the center, which is located at the corner of Hal Greer Boulevard and 5th Avenue on the Huntington campus.

    Joe Gillette, a 1973 Marshall graduate now living in Atlanta, and his wife, the former Pam Adams of Bluefield, W.Va., made a financial commitment to the university which resulted in the renaming of the center. While Gillette and his late father share the same name, he said the center's new name is a way "to memorialize my wonderful father."

    "The financial commitment and the naming of the center are to honor my father, and to symbolize my father's love of Marshall University as well as mine," Gillette said.

    Joe's father never attended Marshall, but grew up in Huntington and often visited the campus to play softball. Joe said his father had a lifelong passion for Marshall, even though he spent most of his adult years living and working in Johnstown, Ohio. In 1962, the family moved to Johnstown where Joe's two sisters, Deborah Dauber and Sandra Bare, still live. Joe's brother, Frank, lives in the Atlanta area.

    "It was my dad's dream that I would go to Marshall University," Gillette said. "That dream was fulfilled. I later talked to my dad a lot about his love for Marshall, and my love for Marshall grew even more. Then I started thinking about giving back and I told dad, 'I'm going to do something special for you at Marshall.' The dedication of this building is really a promise kept."

    Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., said the university is honored to rename the center after Joseph M. Gillette.

    "As a very successful businessman and entrepreneur as a Wendy's franchisee, Joe understands the importance of first impressions," Area said. "I agree with Joe when he says the welcome center is the front door of the campus and where prospective students and their families are given a taste of the exciting adventure they will experience at Marshall.

    "Joe is thrilled and honored to be associated with the welcome center and to help with the recruitment of students for years to come. We are grateful for Joe's and Pam's continuing generosity and support of Marshall University."

    Joe said his father was proud to show his loyalty to Marshall by flying Marshall flags outside his home in Johnstown.

    "I cannot tell you how many flags I bought my dad," Gillette said. "He flew a flag outside his home for 50 years. He loved Marshall even before I went there and continued to love Marshall until the day he died." 

    Joe and Pam Gillette have supported Marshall for many years. In addition to generous financial support, Joe Gillette has provided dedicated leadership by serving on many boards of directors, including the Society of Yeager Scholars, the MU Alumni Association, and the Marshall Foundation, and is president of the Thunder Club.

    In 2006, he established the Joseph M. Gillette Scholar award, also named in memory of his late father. The scholarship goes to a student selected to be a Yeager Scholar.


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    Friday April 11, 2008
    Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

    Governor Manchin stars on 'Up Late' this weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gov. Joe Manchin roars onto the set of "Up Late" this weekend. Actually, the motorcycle he rides through the Communications Building on Marshall University's Huntington campus does most of the roaring.

    Manchin talks about football, research at the university and motorcycles, among other things.

    Jamie LoFiego, host of the Marshall University student-produced show, said viewers can expect to see a laid-back leader of the state on the show.

    "It took a lot of time to get ready to have him roll into our studio and we took all the necessary safety measures," LoFiego said. "And he was cool with everything. His bodyguard is another story entirely."

    The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    Aaron-Michael Fox, a senior from Ansted, W.Va., does his stand-up comedian routine and musical guest Bud Carroll and the Southern Souls perform their song, "Stand Up and Be Counted." Samantha Richer, a junior communications major from northern Virginia,  serves as doorkeeper. Richer was recently featured in US Magazine as a ringer for American Idol winner Carrie Underwood.

    Two more shows are planned for the semester including an hour-long season finale featuring WSAZ reporters and anchors. Throughout the summer, the "Up Late" crew will continue to tape elements and local musical talent. For more information on how to be a part of the show, contact LoFiego at (304) 696-2967 or e-mail lofiego1@marshall.edu.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    Thursday April 10, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Poet Joanie Mackowski to read from her work at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Joanie Mackowski will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 17 in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Mackowski's book of poems The Zoo won the 2000 Associated Writing Programs Award in Poetry and was published by the University of Pittsburgh Press.  She also was awarded the Kate Tufts Discovery Prize in 2003, which recognizes an exceptional "first book" of poems published in a given year.

    Mackowski's poems have appeared in The Yale Review, Poetry, New England Review, The Paris Review, Southwest Review, The Kenyon Review, and in other journals. She was a Wallace Stegner Fellow in Poetry at Stanford University from 1998 to 2000 and has taught at the college level since 1993.

    In addition to teaching, she has worked as a journalist, a French translator, and a juggler. Originally from Connecticut, she now teaches in the writing program at the University of Cincinnati.

    Her appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free and open to the public.

    For more information, contact Art Stringer in Marshall's English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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    Tuesday April 8, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Memorial Fountain to be rededicated Wednesday, April 9

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Rededication of the Marshall University Memorial Fountain will take place at 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 9, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus.

    Gov. Joe Manchin III, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and others will speak during the ceremony, which will conclude with the turning on of the fountain for the summer. The fountain is silenced each Nov. 14 during the annual memorial service honoring the victims of the 1970 Marshall plane crash.

    Since January, the fountain and its foundation have undergone extensive repairs. Most noticeable is the new granite surface, both inside and out, of the foundation; a copper catch tray for the water to flow into from the fountain; and a higher spray of water, similar to the original output when the fountain was installed in 1972.

    WHAT: Rededication of the Memorial Fountain
    WHEN: 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 9
    WHERE: Memorial Student Center plaza

    The media are welcome to attend and cover the event.


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    Tuesday April 8, 2008
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    Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble to Perform April 17

    Huntington, W.Va. -  Tubonium, an ensemble of tuba and euphonium players from Marshall University, will present a concert at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 17 at the Huntington Renaissance Center, formerly Huntington High School, located between Ninth and Tenth Avenues on Eighth Street.

    George Palton, instructor of tuba at Marshall, will conduct the program, which will include works by Bliss, Palestrina, Bach, Handel, Tchaikovsky, Holst, Frackenpohl and others.

    Members of the group are music majors and minors at Marshall, as well as members of the greater Huntington community.

    The April 17 concert is free and open to the public. For more information, persons may visit  www.georgepalton.com/marshall on the World Wide Web.


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    Monday April 7, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Latina producer, writer and director to speak at Marshall April 10

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Barbara Martinez Jitner, a Latina producer, writer and director, will speak on the humanitarian crisis in Juarez, Mexico Thursday, April 10 at Marshall University.

    Martinez Jitner's talk, titled "Femicide at our U.S. Border: To Be a Woman in Juarez is a Death Sentence," begins at 7 p.m. in the Shawkey Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Hosts of the event, which is free to the public, are Marshall University Doers and Changers (MUDAC) and the Women's Center.

    Martinez Jitner is the real-life hero of the film Bordertown, starring Jennifer Lopez, in which she poses as a factory worker on the U.S./Mexico border in order to uncover a dark world of grueling poverty and sexual abuse that leads to murder.

    Bordertown is a political thriller about the murdered factory workers in Juarez, Mexico. The film was inspired by Martinez Jitner's critically acclaimed documentary, La Frontera, which was released in 2007.

    Martinez Jitner is one of the first Latina executive producers of a primetime network television series. The Emmy nominated American Family made history when it debuted in 2002 as the first Latino drama on broadcast television. Writer/director Martinez Jitner wrote the PBS premiere episode that garnered unanimous critical acclaim. She went on to write 10 and direct seven of the show's first 22 episodes.

    Martinez Jitner also is the first Latina ever to be nominated for both a Golden Globe and an Emmy as an executive producer/writer/director for a miniseries, which she received for American Family.

    Raised by her grandmother, a Mexican immigrant, Martinez Jitner's mission is to bring the untold stories of Latinas to both television and film.

    For more information on Martinez Jitner's visit to Marshall, contact Dr. Greta Rensenbrink, an assistant professor of history at Marshall, at (304) 696-2955.


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    Monday April 7, 2008
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    Ed Zimmerman named Director of Planned Giving at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ed Zimmerman, a Marshall University graduate and lifelong resident of Huntington, has joined the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., as Director of Planned Giving.

    Foundation Chief Executive Officer Ron Area said Zimmerman, who assumed his new position on Tuesday, April 1, is responsible for overseeing the development and administration of planned gifts for the university.

    "I am very pleased to have Ed Zimmerman join the Foundation staff as Director of Planned Giving," Area said. "His 36 years of experience in building relationships in the financial arena will be invaluable to the future of private gift support for the university. As a Marshall graduate and longtime resident of Huntington, his passion and love for the university are very apparent. He is a welcomed addition to the university advancement team."

    Zimmerman's background is in insurance and financial planning. He has been in the insurance business for the past 36 years, starting as an agent with the Jefferson-Pilot Insurance Company in 1972.

    In 1990, after several years of management successes and professional development with other major financial organizations, Zimmerman established a sole proprietorship, Zimmerman & Company.

    Recognition of growth opportunities and the need for a stronger business vehicle led to the formation of ZBA (Zimmerman-Bates & Associates) in 1992. Zimmerman said ZBA is the culmination of many successful years of enterprise and career growth in the insurance and financial services industry.

    He said he is looking forward to the challenge of his new job with Marshall.

    "They want me to enhance the planned giving program where Marshall's alumni and friends generously provide for the university's future through their estate plans," he said. "I look forward to broadening awareness of planned giving opportunities at Marshall and to working with the gift officers and developing tools they can use."

    Zimmerman received his B.A. degree from Marshall in 1971, his Charter Life Underwriters (CLU) designation from the American College, Byrn Mawr, Pa., in 1981, and his Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) designation in 1985. He is a lifetime member of the Marshall University Alumni Association and Big Green, and is active in the community.

    Zimmerman and his wife, Rebecca - a two-time Marshall graduate - have been married for 36 years. They are the parents of three grown children. Son Britt is a surgeon; daughter Elizabeth Anne is a teacher; and daughter Laura is an interior designer. They also have two grandchildren.


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    Monday April 7, 2008
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    Tickets available for red-carpet premiere of Marshall student filmmaker's docudrama on alcoholism

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tickets are on sale for the upcoming premiere of "Back to The Bottle," a docudrama on alcohol addiction directed by Francesca E. Karle, a Marshall University student.

    The premiere will be Thursday, April 17 at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center and will feature a special filmed introduction from a major Hollywood motion picture star. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership.

    The film is being presented on opening night of the Appalachian Film Festival and is Karle's second social justice film. "On The River's Edge," her documentary about the homeless, debuted in 2005.

    Tickets are $25 per person and may be purchased at the United Way on Madison Avenue, Midway Barber Shop on 1st Street-4th Avenue, and First Sentry Bank 8th Street. To charge tickets by phone, call (304) 523-2764.

    A Hollywood-style red carpet event featuring Rick Dayton of WOWK-TV as the Master of Ceremonies will be open to the public at 5 p.m. for seating in the bleachers. There will be free refreshments, prizes and a live radio remote. For general seating, ticketholder dress is semiformal or formal attire. Ticket holders may enter onto the red carpet at 6:15 p.m. at the corner of 10th Street and 4th Avenue (4th Avenue will be closed between 9th and 10th streets).

    A Mediterranean dinner will be served beginning at 6:15 p.m. in the theater and is provided by Rocco's Restaurante, Sodexho at Marshall University, Pullman Plaza Hotel Catering, Brunetti's Bakery, Uno Chicago Grille, Bob Evans Restaurants, Heiner's Bakery, Pepsi and Starbucks.

    The VIP red carpet entrance will commence at 7:15 p.m. Among the celebrities will be Ashley McNeely of MTV's "A Shot at Love" and "That's Amore" and David "Punk" Otunga of VH1's "I Love New York 2."

    The program begins at 7:45 p.m. with Tim Irr as the Master of Ceremonies. Opening remarks will be made by a representative from Gov. Manchin's office, Ann McGee of the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership and Tim White, Youth Empowerment Leader for Cabell County.

    The film's theme song, which was written by Karle, will be performed by Rick Ruggles of the Saturday Night Jamboree. Local artists Eddie Riffe and Tony Maynard of ETA also will perform. National recording artist George Huff of American Idol fame will be performing selections live from his current CD, "Miracles."

    "Back To The Bottle" will begin at 9 p.m. and run for approximately 35 minutes.

    Major sponsors for the premiere include Wal-Mart Supercenter Route 60, St. Mary's Medical Center, Trifecta Productions, Clear Channel Communications-WKEE and WTCR, The Herald-Dispatch, BrickStreet Mutual Insurance, Bulldog Creative Services, Huntington Regional Film Commission, Oasis Behavioral Health Services and Prestera Mental Health Services.


    PLEASE NOTE:

    • Media space for red carpet coverage must be pre-registered by April 15. Please call Ken Bannon at (304) 697-4222 to reserve your spot.
    • Immediately following the premiere, there will be a private meet-and-greet event for the media, VIPs and their guests at the Apex Reception Hall, 734 4th Ave.
       

    Additional Information for the Media

    Schedule

    6:15 - 7:15 p.m.
    Ticket holders proceed on the red carpet/dinner provided in the theater.
    Organ interlude by Bob Edmunds.

    7:15 p.m.
    Celebrities and special guests enter on the red carpet (viewed from inside the theater on the screen).

    7:45 p.m.
    Introductions…….Master of Ceremonies: Tim Irr, WSAZ-TV
    Tim White……… Residence Services Supervisor
    Coordinator of Cabell County Youth Empowerment Program
    Huntington Housing Authority

    8 p.m.
    ETA - Eddie Riffe and Tony Maynard……………Too Drunk To Two-Step (BMI)
    Rick Ruggles ……………………………….......……....When You Don't Have A Home (BMI)
    Rick Ruggles……………………………………............Back To The Bottle (BMI) 
                                                               Theme Song written by Francesca E. Karle
    Jessica Cline
    Russell Akerley
    Sam St. Clair

    Special Guest:  George Huff…………………….....selections from Miracles (TBA)

    9 p.m.
    Back To The Bottle

    9:35 p.m.
    Closing Remarks………Ann McGee, Director, Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership

    For more information, go to www.francescafilms.com.


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    Friday April 4, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall to kick off campus WALKITUP! campaign Tuesday, April 8

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has joined the Cabell-Huntington Health Department in a community-wide program to help reduce the area's obesity rate.   The health department recently announced the WALKITUP! campaign, which is an effort to encourage residents to start a six-week walking program.

    Marshall kicks off its campus campaign with a one-mile walk at 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 8, beginning at the Memorial Student Center plaza.

    "Maintaining a daily regimen of physical exercise, like walking, has many health and life benefits. Walking just 20 to 30 minutes a day can help relieve stress, improve weight management and lower the likelihood of developing chronic conditions like diabetes, obesity and heart disease -  diseases known to be associated with sedentary lifestyles," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, who will lead Marshall's campus walk.   "I am excited to participate in this one-mile walk around campus to help encourage our faculty, staff and students to begin their own daily routine of exercise."

    Dr. Shortie McKinney, dean of the College of Health Professions, said her department began working with the health department last year on developing an area-wide campaign to encourage daily physical activity.

    "This campaign is the result of many hours of commitment by the health professionals at the health department, Marshall University and many other community organizations.  This is a good way for everyone to increase their level of physical activity," McKinney said.

    "We are proud to partner with Marshall University in the effort to raise awareness of the importance of physical activity," said Elizabeth Ayers with the Cabell Huntington Health Department.

    Ayers said anyone interested in pre-registering for the Marshall University walk may do so by logging on to www.walkitup.org.

    Event organizers said giveaways, including t-shirts, will be available the day of the walk at Marshall for registered participants. Registration is available on site the day of the walk.


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    Friday April 4, 2008
    Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

    Chad Pennington stays 'Up Late' for Marshall student television show

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fans of Chad Pennington won't want to miss this weekend's "Up Late" show, said host Jamie LoFiego.

    Pennington, a New York Jets quarterback and former Marshall University football standout, was in Huntington to promote his 1st and 10 Foundation, a program he started with his wife Robin in 2003. The foundation funds grant programs and institutions that aim to improve life in West Virginia, Tennessee and the New York metropolitan area. He was also in town to participate in the Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp.

    "Chad was amazing," said LoFiego, host of the Marshall University student-produced show, "Everyone just has to watch Saturday. You will not be disappointed. We had a lot of fun with him."

    Marshall University men's basketball coach Donnie Jones also joins the cast for a recap of this season and a look at next year's possibilities.

    The "Up Late" cast and crew share footage from a bittersweet trip to Los Angeles for the National Undergraduate Student Electronic Media Competition where they were entered in best comedy segment, best comedy show, best live studio musical performance and best comedy script.

    "At least the food out there was good," said LoFiego.

    This week's musical guest is local artist Traci Stanley, who performs her new song. Tara Holmes, Sissonville sophomore, is doorkeeper.

    The show will air Saturday, April 5, from 11 to 11:30 p.m. on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    Thursday April 3, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall to Host Concert of Traditional Japanese Music

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Masayo Ishigure, a visiting musician who plays the koto, will give a concert of traditional Japanese music at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 9 in room 133 of Smith Music Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Joining Ishigure on the program will be Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of flute at Marshall.

    The koto is a variety of East Asian zither with 13 strings stretched over 13 moveable bridges. It is found in a number of traditional Japanese households, but now is not as popular as the piano in contemporary society. Therefore, this concert is a very special occasion, according to Dr. Natsuki Fukunaga Anderson, assistant professor and coordinator of the Japanese program at Marshall.

    "This is an unusual opportunity for West Virginians to hear performances on this instrument," Anderson said. "Musicians and those who are studying Japanese culture will be especially interested."

    Ishigure is from Gifu, Japan, and currently resides in New York. She has performed at a number of events all over the world, especially since arriving in the United States in 1992. She recorded music for the soundtrack of the movie "Memoirs of a Geisha" by John Williams in 2005 along with Itzhak Perlman, Yo Yo Ma, and others.

    Dobbs joined the Marshall University faculty in 1985. He performs regularly in solo and chamber music settings, ranging from the Huntington Symphony Orchestra and the Ohio Valley Symphony (principal flute in both) to Blackbirds and Thrushes, a Celtic band.

    Doors open at 7:30 for the concert, which is free and open to the public. The event is sponsored by the Toyota Foundation of West Virginia, as well as the Center for International Programs and the Japan Club at Marshall, and was organized by the Japanese program in Marshall's Department of Modern Languages and the Japan Club.

    For further information, contact Anderson by e-mail at andersonn@marshall.edu, or by phone at (304) 696-3543.


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    Third annual Assessment Day is April 9 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's third annual Assessment Day, which is designed to determine how well the university is meeting its goals overall and by academic and service units, will take place Wednesday, April 9.

    "Assessment is really at the heart of the teaching and learning process," said Dr. Frances Hensley, associate vice president for academic affairs. "Marshall is unusual in dedicating a full day to this process."

    Classes will not meet as scheduled most of that day, which allows students, faculty, and staff to participate in Assessment Day activities. The normal class schedule resumes at 4 p.m. for late afternoon and evening classes.

    Dr. Mary Beth Reynolds, Interim Director of Assessment, is heading up the Assessment Day activities this year. "We have a variety of activities scheduled throughout the day, and more are being added as we work up to the day of the event."

    Reynolds said that among the activities planned, some are university wide and some are departmental. University-wide activities include student satisfaction surveys by the admissions office, financial aid office, residence services, career services department, bursar's office, student health services, the women's center, and the registrar's office; a student development survey by Student Affairs; an SGA survey; surveys from Sodexho and the MU Bookstore; surveys on individual services offered by University College; and a Major Expo. Departmental activities, which vary by unit, include "town hall" meetings for majors, portfolio presentations and exit interviews for seniors.

    "Based on responses received from students to survey items last year, we were able to implement customer-service training for our staff and we reorganized our Web site," said Roberta Ferguson, Marshall Registrar. "We are planning to participate again this year and hope to gain valuable insight from student responses."

    Reynolds said that she encourages everyone who participates Wednesday to complete an Assessment Day evaluation form, which will be available on the MyMU portal from April 14 - 18.  This will be used as a guide in planning future Assessment Days.

    All students and faculty participating in Assessment Day activities will receive a free lunch catered by Buddy's BBQ, Sodexho and Pepsi.  The Marshall University Fife and Drum Corps, under the direction of Dr. Wendell Dobbs, the 2007-2008 Drinko Fellow, will give a special performance at 12:15 p.m..  Also, students and faculty will be eligible to win prizes donated by area businesses and other groups.

    The prizes include laptop computers with webcams, a Nintendo Wii, an iPod, a printer, rounds of golf, movie passes, gift certificates, a massage, and much more. 

    "Assessment Day is an opportunity for faculty and students to evaluate the things they care about most: teaching and learning and the services that support those two," Hensley said. "I can't imagine that a student has no interest in providing feedback to his or her institution. Here is the chance."

    "The Assessment Day Committee has worked hard to put this event together and we welcome everyone's input to help us build a better Marshall through assessment," Reynolds said.

    In addition to Reynolds, Hensley and Ferguson, committee members include from the faculty, Dr. Dallas Brozik, Dr. Marjorie Keatley, Dr. Cal Meyer, Dr. Caroline Perkins, Donna Robinson, and Dr. Larry Stickler; student David Kluemper; and staff members Karen Barker, Michelle Duncan, Dr. Karen Kirtley, Jenny Lauhon, Carla Lapelle, Molly McClennan, Homer Preece and Terri Tomblin-Byrd.

    For more information, visit http://www.marshall.edu/assessment/AssessmentDay_2008.


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    Language professor is newest Drinko Academy Fellow

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A professor of Spanish at Marshall University has been named the Drinko Academy Fellow for 2008.

    Maria del Carmen Riddel, Ph.D., has worked in the Department of Modern Languages since 1983 teaching everything from introductory language classes to Spanish culture, literature, history and honors courses. She has served as chairwoman of the department since 2002.

    "Being named a Drinko Fellow is a welcome recognition of my professional skills and of my intellectual capabilities and is quite an honor," Riddel said. "I am also humbled because I am surrounded by many colleagues who deserve this acknowledgement as much as I do."

    Faculty members from various departments at Marshall are appointed annually as Drinko Fellows. They receive a stipend and carry reduced teaching loads for an academic year and summer to undertake original research or curriculum development. The announcement was made during the Drinko Symposium earlier today.

    During her fellowship, Riddel plans to write a book about Cuban-Americans from materials compiled over the past five years while working with now-retired Marshall history professor David Duke.  Their book will investigate and consider the cultural effect that Cuba and the United States have had on each other since Fidel Castro's rise to power in 1959.

    "Having the time to research and to determine the effects of the encounter of two cultures will provide me with new perspectives which always result in healthy skepticism," she said. "I believe new perspectives to be a fundamental feature of critical thinking and immediately transferable to the courses I teach and, even if indirectly, a definite benefit to my students."

    Riddel, a native of Spain, earned her doctorate from The Ohio State University in 1988, her Master's degree from Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain, in 1977, and her bachelor's degree from Marshall University in 1975.

    She follows this year's Drinko Fellow, Wendell Dobbs, D.M.A., a professor in Marshall's music department. He and his wife Linda, also a music professor, formed the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps in 2007.

    The Academy is named for the late Dr. John Deaver Drinko, a 1942 Marshall graduate and former senior managing partner of Baker & Hostetler, one of the nation's largest law firms. He and his wife, Dr. Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, have been long-time supporters of academic programs at Marshall.


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    Marshall University Libraries to celebrate life and career of famed science fiction author Nelson S. Bond

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Libraries will host a week-long retrospective on the life and career of legendary science fiction writer and Marshall University alumnus Nelson S. Bond beginning Monday April 14, Barbara A. Winters, dean of the Marshall Libraries, announced today.

    Among the highlights of the retrospective titled "Nelson S. Bond: From WV to TV and Beyond" are vintage video presentations on the Marshall campus from television shows produced from Bond's scripts, and the dedication of the Nelson Bond Room on the third floor of the Morrow Library scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday, April 19.

    "Nelson Slade Bond may be the only graduate of the Page Pitt School of Journalism to have had a career in each of the seven specialties taught in the school," Winters said. "He studied under Page Pitt himself, and his writing career spanned seven decades. In just 23 years, from 1935 to 1958, he published 258 stories in 68 different magazines. These included crime, mystery and sports pieces as well and fantasy and science fiction."

    Vintage TV shows based on Bond's work to be shown in Drinko Library Room 402 are:

    Monday, April 14 - "Al Haddon's Lamp," first published as a short story in Unknown Worlds, June 1942. Adapted as a live radio play for CBS' Escape, 1949. Adapted for live television on NBC's Gruen Guild Playhouse, 1952.  Stars Buddy Ebsen.

    Tuesday, April 15 - "Bacular Clock," first published as a short story in Blue Book, 1942. Adapted for live radio on NBC's The World's Greatest Stories and Stories of Nelson Olmstead, 1942. Adapted for live television, Revue Productions, 1949. Stars Buddy Ebsen.

    Wednesday, April 16 - "Mask of Medusa," first published as a short story in Blue Book, December 1945. Adapted for live radio on NBC's Peter Lorre's Mystery on the Air, 1947. Adapted for live television, and first broadcast on NBC's Radio City Playhouse, 1949. Marshall's version televised on NBC's Tales of Tomorrow, 1953.  Stars Raymond Burr.

    Thursday, April 17 - "The Night America Trembled," first full-length (60 minutes) live television play on CBS's Studio One, 1957. Stars Edward R. Murrow, Ed Asner, James Colburn, Warren Beatty, Warren Oats, Vince Gardenia. A dramatization of the events of Oct. 30, 1938, when Orson Welles scared the United States witless with his adaptation of "The War Of The Worlds,"  the Nelson Bond-authored television play stars Edward R. Murrow, Ed Asner, James Colburn, Warren Beatty, Warren Oats and Vince Gardenia. Bond's script for "The Night America Trembled" brought Studio One the highest ratings in its history.

    Each video presentation will be introduced by Lisle Brown, curator in Marshall University Libraries Special Collections, who will provide attendees with little-known facts and historical perspective about Bond and the programs produced from his writings. All videos are 30-minutes long, except for "The Night America Trembled."

    Winters said members of Nelson Bond's family scheduled to attend the dedication of the Nelson Bond Room include his widow, Betty Bond, and his son, Lynn Bond.

    Nelson Bond began transferring his literary papers to the University Libraries Special Collections Department at Marshall in 2003 and continued the process up to his death on Nov. 4, 2006, just 19 days short of his 98th birthday.

    "The collection contains all of his output as an author:  his radio and TV scripts and plays, the original pulp fictions magazines, tear sheets, manuscripts, and the index cards and daybooks recording publication details," Winters said.

    The collection also includes correspondence (including fan mail), contracts, agent correspondence and financial records - as well as a full run of the Nelson Bond Society's Newsletter and copies of his antiquarian book catalogs. 

    For further information, contact Winters at (304) 696-2318.


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    'Building on the Past, Building for the Future' theme of annual Alumni Weekend at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Building on the Past, Building for the Future" is the theme of Marshall University's Alumni Weekend 2008, highlighted as always by the annual Alumni Awards Banquet and Celebration.

    Alumni Weekend activities run Thursday, April 10 through Sunday, April 13. The 71st annual awards banquet starts at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Marshall University students and alumni will be honored at the banquet. Cost to attend the banquet, which will be preceded by a social at 6 p.m., is $45 per person or $75 per couple. Music will be provided during the social by the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps.

    This year's Alumni Weekend activities are sponsored by Bank of America and SODEXHO.

    Here is a brief look at each alumni award winner:

    The Distinguished Alumni Award will be presented to Beth McVey, who has enjoyed a successful 28-year career performing and starring in numerous shows on Broadway and across the country.

    McVey attended Marshall from 1971 through 1975 before transferring to the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, where she earned her bachelor of fine arts degree in musical theatre. In 2004, McVey moved back to Huntington to broaden her life to include teaching, directing and serving as executive director on the board of ARTS. She also is on the executive board of the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

    This award is given to Marshall alumni for outstanding national achievements in their particular fields of endeavor.

    Mark George will receive the Distinguished Service to Marshall Award. George, unit manager for Pepsi Bottling Co., serves as president of the Marshall University Quarterback Club and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation.

    This award is given for loyal and unselfish service to Marshall University.

    The Distinguished Service to the Community Award will be presented to Dr. Jeffrey St. Clair, assistant clinical instructor in emergency medicine at New Oreleans' Charity Hospital. He is being honored for his contribution to the community of New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and his excellent representation of the Marshall community. He is a 1992 graduate of Marshall's School of Medicine.

    This award is given to alumni for success in their fields of endeavor and personal contributions to their respective communities.

    Rachel Folden of Riverside, Calif., a senior history major and standout catcher on Marshall's softball team, will receive the Cam Henderson Scholarship Award. Folden is a three-time National Fastpitch Coaches Association's All-American, was Mid-American Conference Freshman of the Year, was Conference USA Player of the Year and is a two-time first-team all-Conference USA member.

    This scholarship was established by the Alumni Association in the name of legendary football and basketball coach Cam Henderson. It is given yearly to the student athlete who best exemplifies the spirit of scholarship while participating in athletics.

    Dr. Michael Little, chairperson of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology at Marshall, will receive the Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award. Little has been with Marshall for 34 years and has taught a variety of courses in the Biological Sciences department.

    He was the 2002-2003 Drinko Fellow at Marshall and recipient of a National Award for Innovative Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Technology presented at the Ninth International Conference on College Teaching and Learning.

    This award was created by the MUAA for the purpose of recognizing outstanding achievements and providing incentives for continued service from faculty to the community, the university and students in their respective fields. Award nominees are evaluated on their professional service to the community and their service to the university and its students.

    The Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship will be awarded to Huntington native Kristen O'Neal, a 2004 graduate of Spring Valley High School. O'Neal, who has played clarinet for the Marshall Marching Thunder for three years, graduated with her first degree (medical transcription) from the Marshall Community and Technical College in 2007. She will finish her degree in medical assisting in summer 2008.

    This scholarship was established in 1998 by the MUAA board of directors in honor of Nancy Pelphrey, Herd Village coordinator. Funds from the scholarship come from the  proceeds from Herd Village.

    Jennifer Pritt of Atlanta will receive the Young Alumni Award. She is an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher at South Cobb High School, which was recently featured on Good Morning America for its many honors and awards. At Kennesaw State University, she teaches ESL Literacy to students from Brazil, Columbia, El Salvador, Mexico and even Bulgaria.

    The criteria for the Young Alumni Award are that the person must be 35 years old or younger; an active member of the alumni association; show outstanding in his or her field of endeavor; have a personal commitment to his or her community; and demonstrate service to Marshall University and its students.

    Joshua L. Curry and Kacy R. Winans will receive the Nate Ruffin Scholarship Award. Curry, a sophomore from Ranson, W.Va., is a criminal justice major with a 3.73 GPA. He is a member of the Society of Black Scholars at Marshall.

    Winans, a sophomore from Detroit, Mich., is majoring in physical therapy and athletic training and has a 3.5 GPA. She started a new organization at Marshall called Stepping by Faith, which is sponsoring a child from Jerusalem. Winans is the niece of gospel singer CeCe Winans.

    Ruffin was a member of the 1970 Marshall football team, but an injury kept him from making the trip to Greenville, N.C., for Marshall's game with East Carolina on Nov. 14, 1970. The plane carrying the team back from North Carolina crashed near Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 people aboard. Ruffin became an advocate for Black Alumni Inc., as well as the university, until his death in 2001.

    Margaret Frances Shrewsbury Brooks will be first recipient of the College of Education and Human Services' Distinguished Education and Human Service Award. Brooks attended Marshall in the early 1940s, but did not complete her degree because of World War II. Using an emergency certification, she left Marshall and helped fill a grave shortage of teachers. She ended up teaching several years on a permanent certification and moving with her husband, who was in the military.

    Brooks will be given an honorary undergraduate degree by the COEHS during the awards banquet, as well as receive the Distinguished Education and Human Service Award. The award honors a deserving COEHS alum who has excelled in his or her field and is representative of the accomplishments and dedication of alumni from Marshall University.

    The 2008 Distinguished Alumnus in Manufacturing Award will go to Hank Cox, vice president of media relations with the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). Cox is responsible for translating the NAM's viewpoint on complex manufacturing issues into clear language and conveying the information to the news media, the association's members and the general public.

    This award is presented by the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing in recognition of individuals who have made outstanding achievements in and contributions to the manufacturing sector.

    The Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Club will receive the Alumni Association Club of the Year award. The club has worked endlessly to promote Marshall throughout the southwestern Ohio area. Last fall, the members held a major tailgating event at the football game between the Thundering Herd and the University of Cincinnati Bearcats, feeding and providing entertainment for the fans attending the game. The club later presented a check with proceeds raised at the tailgate to be split between the MUAA and the Big Green.

    The MUAA Board Member of the Year will be announced at the MUAA board meeting and recognized at the awards banquet.

    Here is a complete list of Alumni Weekend events:

    Thursday, April 10

    Marshall University's annual Military Ball will be held at the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center. The Military Ball timeline is as follows: 5:30 p.m., arrival and cocktails; 6 p.m., begin ceremony and dinner.

    The cost is $40 per person and $75 per couple. For more details, visit http://www.marshall.edu/rotc/. For more information, contact Maj. Jeffrey Stephens at (304) 696-6450.

    Friday, April 11

    A meeting of the board of directors of the MU Alumni Association will take place at the Erickson Alumni Center from noon until 4 p.m.

    Alumni Weekend will officially begin Friday evening with a Welcome Champagne Reception from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Culinary Institute at 917 3rd Ave. to celebrate the 50th Reunion Class of 1958 and university accomplishments.

    At 10 p.m., national comedic talent Greg Hahn will be featured at the Funny Bone Comedy Club. The show is rated corporate friendly with a soft R rating. The balcony will be reserved for the Alumni Association. Tickets are $12, but the first 50 to make reservations will receive a free ticket.

    Attendees may order from the menu and a there will be a cash bar. Call the alumni office for reservations ((304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869. Tickets may be picked up at any time in the alumni office or at the Champagne Reception preceding the show. This event is co-hosted by the MU Alumni Association and the Young Alumni Committee.

    Saturday, April 12

    An Estate Planning Seminar will take place at 9:30 a.m. in the John Spotts Room, Memorial Student Center. The topic will be: Estate Planning: 2008 and Beyond with guest speakers Howard R. "Buck" Crews Jr. and James G. Graley from Campbell Woods, PLLC of Huntington.

    The Class Luncheon will honor the 50th reunion class (1958). It will be joined by the Grand Class - those who graduated before 1958. The event will take place from 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. in the John Marshall Dining Room, Memorial Student Center. The cost is $20 per person. Lunch is complimentary for members of 50th reunion class.

    A Trolley Tour of campus will follow the luncheon.

    The annual Alumni Awards Banquet and Celebration starts at 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It will be preceded by a social at 6 p.m.

    Sunday, April 13

    The Scholarship Honor Reception, which annually recognizes and honors Marshall's scholarship donors and recipients, is scheduled for 2 p.m. in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center. For more information, call (304) 696-6781.

    For more information about Alumni Weekend events or to reserve a seat at the banquet, persons may call (304) 696-2901 or (800) 682-5869.


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    Stadium west lot to reopen Thursday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The west parking lot at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium will reopen Thursday, April 3.

     

    Jim Terry, Marshall's Director of Public Safety, said resurfacing and striping of the lot has been completed.


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    Marshall University honors Sheweys for gift used to establish Shewey Learning and Research Center

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mingo County business and education leader C. Fred Shewey and his late wife, Christine, were inducted into Marshall University's Pathway of Prominence in a ceremony today at the Pathway.

    Donors of $1 million or more to Marshall are honored with a plaque on the pathway, which is located at the center of the Huntington campus between Old Main and the Memorial Student Center. The Sheweys' plaque is the 19th on the Pathway of Prominence.

    The Sheweys were honored for their recent gift of $1 million to Marshall University. The funds will be used to establish the Shewey Learning and Research Center to assist with rural educational research and development. Specifically, the goal is to increase the mathematics and science achievement in middle school students through improved mathematics and science instruction in the middle schools in southern West Virginia, with a preference to Mingo County.

    Fred Shewey, formerly of Kermit, W.Va., now lives in Gainesville, Fla., but remains concerned about the future of Mingo County students. Having served 18 years as a member of the Mingo County Board of Education, he says middle school students in Mingo County and other southern West Virginia counties often lacked the direction needed at that pivotal time in their lives.

    "They weren't being guided in the right direction," Shewey said. "I felt like they were not getting enough steering in the right direction at a time when they had to make up their minds. We have to put our best foot forward and make sure they don't get out of step."

    He said he hopes the Shewey Learning and Research Center will help equip middle school students in Mingo County and other counties, such as Logan and Wayne, with the skills they need to make the right career choice.

    "I could see something was needed to help the folks in Mingo County, and Wayne and Logan counties," Shewey said. "I'm just happy to put my two cents worth in." 

    Marshall's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, under the guidance of its director, Dr. Stan Maynard, is responsible for developing the first 21st Century Model School in West Virginia with a focus on mathematics and science.

    "It is an honor and a privilege to associate the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development with the mission and reputation of the Shewey family in a collaboration that will enhance and improve the learning opportunities of rural West Virginia," Maynard said. "It also enables Mingo and surrounding counties to enrich the economic climate of the area through the education of West Virginia's next generation of learners and workers."

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the Sheweys' latest gift is another example of their love of southern West Virginia and Marshall University. They have been honored before for their longtime generous support of the University. The building that houses many of Marshall's athletic department offices, located at the north end of Joan C. Edwards Stadium, is named the Fred and Christine Shewey Athletics Building in their honor.

    "Marshall University and southern West Virginia are once again indebted to the Sheweys for their extraordinary generosity," Kopp said. "Fred and Christine Shewey, having seen firsthand the need for intervention in Mingo and other southern West Virginia counties, have given their financial support to this important learning and research center and placed their trust in Marshall's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development to provide the direction needed to make a difference in the lives of these young students."

    A needs assessment revealed that Mingo County demonstrates a compelling need for intervention in the form of high-quality professional development for teachers, which in turn impacts student motivation and achievement.

    It was determined that a high quality professional development program in the STEM area of science and mathematics instruction is necessary if goals of the Shewey Learning and Research Center are to be met, according to Maynard. The measurable goals/objectives are to:

    • Increase the number of highly qualified middle school teachers of science and mathematics content through professional development sessions during the academic year, including Collegial Professional Learning Communities (CPLC) and summer sessions;
    • Increase middle school teachers' science and mathematics content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge;
    • Increase collaboration between Marshall University and middle school educators in southern West Virginia, especially Mingo County;
    • Increase student achievement in science and mathematics in middle school grades as measured by WESTEST, ACT scores, the number of students taking AP mathematics and science and classroom assessment;
    • Increase the number of students taking AP courses in mathematics and science;
    • Increase positive attitudes of teachers and students toward the value of standards-based mathematics and science;
    • Increase integration of existing and emerging technology in middle school science and mathematics classrooms;
    • Increase college-going rates of Mingo County students;
    • Increase the number of Mingo County students enrolling in college majors involving mathematics and science core curriculum;
    • Increase college graduation rates of Mingo County students

    Among the strategies and methods that will be used to reach these goals are week-long annual summer Mingo STEM Extravaganzas. The first of those is the Shewey Science Academy June 16-19 at Kermit Area School.

    It involves an investigation of a contrived murder in which students will gather data, evaluate evidence, prepare and test hypotheses and communicate the results of their investigations. The week will culminate in a mock trial to attempt to resolve the evidence for the murder.

    Fred Shewey has been a major force in West Virginia's coal, gas, oil and timber  industries for years, and helped establish International Industries, Inc., with business partner and fellow Marshall supporter James H. "Buck" Harless.

    For more information on the Shewey Learning and Research Center, contact Maynard at (304) 696-2890.


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    Stadium's west lot to remain closed through Wednesday, April 2

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The west parking lot at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium will remain closed at least through Wednesday, April 2.

    Jim Terry, Marshall's Director of Public Safety, said he is hopeful resurfacing and striping of the lot will be completed Wednesday.

    Terry said students and employees who normally park on the west lot are asked to park in another permitted lot, preferably the one at the site of the former Weiler Steel, located in the 1600 block of 2nd Ave., or the Marshall parking garage on 3rd Avenue.


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    Marshall Chamber Choir, University Chorus to Perform Saturday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  Marshall University's Chamber Choir and University Chorus will give their spring semester concert Saturday, April 5 at 8 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church in Huntington.  The concert is free and open to the public.

    Both ensembles will be under the direction of Robert Wray, assistant professor of choral music education at the university.

    "It is a very good mix of music styles from the Renaissance to the 20th and 21st Centuries," Wray said. Included on the program will be works by Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Johann Sebastian Bach, Benjamin Britten, Gabriel Fauré, Norman Dello Joio, Moses Hogan and Eric Whitacre. The concert will also feature violinists Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, professor of music at Marshall, and Korey Jividen, her student, and organist Yuri McCoy.
     
    The church is located at 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington. For further information, persons may call Wray at (304) 696-2399 or e-mail wrayr@marshall.edu.


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    City National Bank/Steven J. Day Lectureship to be delivered Friday by Thomas W. Dunfee

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thomas W. Dunfee, a vice dean/professor at the University of Pennsylvania, will deliver the City National Bank/Steven J. Day Lectureship Friday, April 4 at the Pullman Plaza Hotel in Huntington.

    The lectureship, which started in 1998, is made possible through funds provided by City National Bank to Marshall University's Lewis College of Business, which is sponsoring the event. Dunfee will speak from 11 to 11:50 a.m. in the hotel's Virginia Room. The event is free to the public.

    "Anyone interested in business ethics and social responsibility is encouraged to attend," said Larry Templeton, Director of Development in the Lewis College of Business.

    Dunfee, a 1963 Marshall University honor graduate, is the Joseph Kolodny Professor of Social Responsibility at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

    He received his J.D. in 1966 from New York University and his L.L.M. (Master of Laws) in 1969, also from New York University.

    At the University of Pennsylvania, Dunfee is chair of the Legal Studies and Business Ethics Department, whose 18 full-time and 24 affiliated faculty teach courses related to business law and ethics.

    From 2000 to 2003, he was responsible for the Wharton Undergraduate Division. Dunfee served as president of the Academy of Legal Studies in Business (1989-90), was editor-in-chief of the American Business Law Journal (1975-77), and received the Distinguished Senior Faculty Award for Excellence from the Academy of Legal Studies in Business in 1991. He also served as president of the Society for Business Ethics in 1995 and 1996.

    Dunfee's current research interests focus on a social contract-based approach to business and professional ethics and global business ethics. He has been a visiting professor at several universities and has lectured at many European and Asian universities. He also is the author of several books and has written many published articles.

    While at Marshall, Dunfee was a member of the debate team and a member of Omicron Delta Kappa and Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He received a Distinguished Alumni Award from the Marshall University Alumni Association in 1994.


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    Stadium's west lot still closed at least through Tuesday, April 1

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The west parking lot at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium will remain closed at least through Tuesday, April 1.

     

    Jim Terry, Marshall's Director of Public Safety, said rain Monday again caused delays in resurfacing and striping of the lot.  He said he is hopeful the work will be completed Tuesday.

     

    Terry said students and employees who normally park on the west lot are asked to park in another permitted lot, preferably the one at the site of the former Weiler Steel, located in the 1600 block of 2nd Ave., or the Marshall parking garage on 3rd Avenue.


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    Winners announced in Marshall's 'Fit to Lift' competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The third annual "Fit to Lift" weight lifting competition took place on Tuesday, March 11 at the Marshall University Fitness Center in Gullickson Hall on MU's Huntington campus.

    The competition was organized by the Marshall University Fitness Center and Fitness Club. The event was sponsored by Huntington Physical Therapy and Marshall University's Student Government Association.

    The competition had 27 participants, including Marshall students and members of the public. All participants received a T-shirt and prizes were awarded to the first-, second- and third-place winners. The names of the winners will be included on the "Fit to Lift" Wall of Fame, which is located in the fitness center.

    The event also had team competition. "Fit to Lift" teams included Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, which had three participants, The Has Benz, which had one participant, and Delta Chi sorority, which had four participants. All participating teams received intramural points.

    Proceeds from the event were donated to local nonprofit organizations. "Fit to Lift" raised $500 for the American Cancer Society and $150 for the Sue Niestroy-Wilson Memorial Fitness Leadership Scholarship, which is awarded to a Marshall student and fitness center staff member.

    Here are the winners from the competition:

    Best Bench Press - Adam Marshall, 385 pounds

    Best Squat - Chris McKenzie, 585 pounds

    Best Deadlift - Chris McKenzie, 600 pounds

    Overall Female Winners - First place: Allison Webb; Second place: Susan Zappin; Third place: Freya Hannevig

    Overall Male Winners - First place: Chris McKenzie; Second place: Matt Marshall; Third place: Joshua Crum.

    For more information, persons may contact Heather Smith, Marshall University Fitness Center Program Coordinator, at (304) 696-3653 or by e-mail at wyatt6@marshall.edu.


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    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Spring 2008 Major Expo set for April 2 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Spring 2008 Major Expo will take place on Wednesday, April 2 on the Huntington campus.

     

    The event, hosted by University College, runs from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the lobby and Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center.

     

    The expo enables students to obtain information, at a convenient one-stop location, on the various majors offered at Marshall University.  Many representatives from Marshall's schools and colleges will be attending.  They will bring with them information on the majors offered by their areas and the possible career paths associated with those majors. 

     

    For more information, contact University College at (304) 696-3169 or via e-mail at uc@marshall.edu.


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    'Up 'til Dawn' fund-raiser set for April 8 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will be participating in a fund-raiser for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital called "Up 'til Dawn" on Tuesday, April 8.

     

    The fund-raiser will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room and is expected to last about 3 ½ hours or until about 11 p.m. The "Up 'til Dawn" program is dedicated to the life-saving work of St. Jude.

     

    To participate in the event, students are invited to send 10 letters to their friends and families asking for donations on behalf of St. Jude.  Students may pick up letters prior to the event in the Greek Affairs Office, located in Room 2W29 of the Memorial Student Center, or they can complete the letters at the event.  Students who participated in the "Write for Life" event in the fall are not required to write additional letters.

     

    The event is designed as a celebration to thank students for their hard work and fund-raising efforts.  Some of the features and activities planned during "Up 'til Dawn" include a band, contests/games, karaoke, casino games, video games, awards and speeches for patients.

     

    Last fall, more than 120 students participated in the "Write for Life" fund-raising event, and more than 2,000 letters were sent to students' friends and families requesting donations. The previous year, approximately 80 Marshall students raised more than $10,000 for the hospital which helped offset the $1.2 million a day cost of operating St. Jude. This money was raised through activities on campus, student efforts and sponsors.

     

    This year's proud sponsors are A to Z Rental and Sales; Best Buy; Buddy's All American Bar-B-Que; Buffalo Wild Wings; Chili Wili's; City Heat; Cold Stone Creamery; Fazoli's; Funny Bone Comedy Club; Glenn's Sporting Goods Inc.; Hometown Sportswear Inc.; Jim's Steak & Spaghetti House; Jimmy John's; M&M Inflatables; Moe's; Panera Bread; Papa John's Pizza; Pepsi Cola Company; Red Bull Energy Drink; Rio Grande; Sonic Drive In; Stadium Bookstore; Stewarts Original Hot Dogs, and MU SAPB.

     

    St. Jude Children's Research Hospital is internationally recognized for its pioneering work in finding cures and saving children with cancer and other catastrophic diseases. Founded by late entertainer Danny Thomas and based in Memphis, Tenn., St. Jude freely shares its discoveries with scientific and medical communities around the world.

     

    No family ever pays for treatment not covered by insurance and families without insurance are never asked to pay. St. Jude is financially supported by ALSAC, its fundraising organization. For more information, call (800) 822-644 or visit www.stjude.org.

     

    For more information on "Up 'til Dawn," call Emily Schoen at (304) 590-0461 or e-mail her at Schoen2@marshall.edu.


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    WMUL receives 18 awards in national competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, received seven grand prize awards and 11 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 17th Annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 45th Annual Audio/Video Production Awards Competition ceremony.

    The event took place Saturday, March 15 at the Disney Paradise Pier Hotel in Anaheim, Calif.

    In addition to the student awards, Marshall Associate Professor of Journalism Dan Hollis' video feature about Bridge Day 2007 titled "A View from the Bottom" was awarded first place in the News, Sports or Public Affairs category.

    And, "Up Late," Marshall's student-run, late-night television show, received an honorable mention in the Best Television Musical Performance category for the performance of "A Nickel Ain't Worth a Dime" by The Good Ol' Boys and a Girl. Jamie LoFiego, instructor in the "Introduction to Vide Production" class, is host of "Up Late."

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM,   said that the WMUL students competed with other broadcasting students from colleges and universities throughout the United States. 

    "No other school won more grand prizes or overall awards than WMUL-FM's student broadcasters in the NBS scriptwriting, audio and online categories," Bailey said. "Winning speaks well for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, as the student broadcasters of WMUL-FM consistently earn top honors in direct competition with nationally recognized colleges and universities."

    The award for Hollis marked the fourth time in the past five years he has won first place in the category at the NBS convention.

    "I use the videos as a teaching tool in my classes," Hollis said, "but it's always nice when others recognize the quality of your work."

    National Broadcasting Society-Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) has more than 1,500 student and professional members and has chapters on 88 college campuses.  The National Broadcasting Society (NBS) was founded in 1943, and its mission is to enhance the development of college and university students in telecommunication, broadcasting, cable and other electronic media.  Past and present members of the society number more than 35,000.  Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) Chapters.

    A list of the award winners may be found at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/release/2008/pr032708.htm.

     


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    Local old-time music concert to be presented as part of Appalachian Studies Association Conference at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three natives of Wayne and Cabell counties will present a concert of old-time music as part of the Appalachian Studies Association Conference, "The Road Ahead: The Next Thirty Years of Appalachian Studies," scheduled March 28-30 at Marshall University.

     

    The evening presentation will take place at 9 p.m. Saturday, March 29 in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus. Bernard Cyrus and Tim and Dave Bing, three outstanding performers of traditional music, will perform at this free public event. 

     

    Cyrus, who is from Fort Gay in Wayne County, is a banjo and dulcimer player and maker. His fascination as a youth with the dulcimer and banjo came from two older players, Ezra and Benny Bartram, who lived near his home-place on Big Hurricane Creek.

     

    It was their inspiration that led to his lifetime interest in old-time string music. Cyrus is a highly skilled wood worker whose dulcimers and banjos are appreciated by players for their outstanding craftsmanship. He will bring some of his instruments to show at the event.

     

    Cyrus also has a fascination with wild orchids. He has combed the region while identifying more than 40 varieties of the orchid family. He has documented wild flowers through photography and has amassed a collection of more than 10,000 slides. Some of his photographs will be presented at his concert performance as well.

     

    Cyrus' love of traditional music, craftsmanship, native plants, storytelling, the occasional sip from a jug, and old-time mountain ways in general will come through in his performance. He describes the music he plays as having an "ancient sound." He will play locally learned tunes on both banjo and dulcimer and tell a story or two.

     

    Dave and Tim Bing are natives of Cabell County with deep roots in the East Lynn section of Wayne County, where they spent a lot of growing-up time. Both are outstanding musicians, a fact proven by their many first-place finishes on fiddle and banjo at West Virginia's state-sponsored Vandalia Gathering in Charleston.

     

    They spread old-time music far and wide, recently returning from a tour in England, where their brand of mountain music garnered rave reviews. When not winning contests, Tim Bing works as an ironworker in Huntington, while Dave stays busy playing and teaching old-time music. Dave is now well known as a violin maker, working out of his shop at his home in Roane County.

     

    After they quickly became proficient on fiddle (Dave) and banjo (Tim), people responded to their music and demanded that they play publicly. Both performed and recorded as members of the Bing Brothers Band, and Dave now plays and has recorded with the old-time string band, Gandydancer.

     

    Since doing an apprenticeship for fiddle making through the Augusta Heritage Center program, Dave has been improving his fine woodworking skills to the point where his instruments are in high demand. When not playing or teaching music, Dave works at filling the orders he has for his hand-crafted fiddles.  

     

    For more information, contact Chris Green, Appalachian Studies Association Conference program chair, at (304) 696-6269.

     


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    First of five BFA exhibitions from Department of Art & Design will be on display March 31-April 3 in Birke Art Gallery

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's Department of Art & Design will exhibit their works from Monday, March 31 through Thursday, April 3 in the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall's Huntington campus.

     

    The artwork of Matt Crutchfield, Jonathan Maxwell, Daniel Ray and Chris Sullivan will be displayed as the first of five BFA exhibitions from the Department of Art & Design for spring 2008.

     

    A reception for the artists will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 1 in the foyer of Smith Hall. The gallery will be open and the event is free and open to the public.


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    Friday March 21, 2008
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    Marshall University students excel in SPJ awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from Marshall University's W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications were honored with several awards from the Society of Professional Journalists on Saturday, March 15 during the Region 4 Spring Conference in Pittsburgh.

    Marshall students received 14 Mark of Excellence Awards at the conference, which took place at the William Penn Hotel. Journalism students from Michigan, Ohio, western Pennsylvania and West Virginia participated in the conference. Students from 18 public and private universities in Region 4 submitted 377 entries in different categories.

    The winners received certificates and the first-place regional winners will advance to the national competition in April. National awards will be announced in May.

    "Marshall students have always performed well, both in print and radio categories," said Nerissa Young, advisor of The Parthenon, Marshall University's student newspaper. "We know we have good students; these awards validate that claim."

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the School of Journalism, said Marshall's radio students have established a tradition of being able to successfully compete at the national, regional or state level with other student-operated college radio stations.

    "This solid performance in SPJ's Mark of Excellence Contest is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications," Bailey said.

    The Society of Professional Journalists works to improve and protect journalism. The organization is the nation's most broad-based journalism organization. Members of the society are dedicated to encouraging the free practice of journalism and stimulating high standards of ethical behavior.

    The organization was founded in 1909 as Sigma Delta Chi. The Society of Professional Journalists promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry; works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists; and protects First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and press.

    The following are Marshall's award winners:

    Breaking News Reporting

    Second place: Casey Rowe, a senior from Scott Depot, W.Va.; Sarina Lopresti, a senior from Poughquag, N.Y.; and Leann Dickens, a senior from Orgas, W.Va., "Emmons fire kills 9, including students"

    Editorial Writing

    First place: Kristin Steele, a junior from Wayne, W.Va., and Brad Bader, a graduate student from Winfield, W.Va.

    Breaking News Photography

    First place: Jennifer Chapman, a senior from Barboursville, W.Va., "Stirring up campus"

    Radio News Reporting

    First place: Kimberly Burcham, a senior from Huntington, "Storytime for West Virginia"

    Second place: Adam Cavalier, a junior from Montgomery, W.Va., "Redefining education at Marshall"

    Third place: Kimberly Burcham, "Abortion on campus: Views from the right and left" 

    Radio Feature

    First place: Adam Cavalier, "A mellow fellowship: Mark Zanter feature"

    Second place: Adam Cavalier, "Pumpkin house: trick or treat night"

    Third place: Kimberly Burcham, "Harmonica musings"

    Radio In-Depth Reporting

    First place: Blaire Morse, a recent graduate from Shelbyville, Ky., "The quest for healthy breasts"

    Second place: Angela Bradley, a recent graduate from Winfield, W.Va., "The growing minority on college campuses: the single parent"

    Radio Sports Reporting

    First place: Adam Cavalier, "The name's pronounced Due-biss-ee"

    Third place: Ryan Epling, a graduate student from Wayne, W.Va., "Yulia Kashelkina" feature

    Radio Newscast

    First place: WMUL-FM Staff, Marshall University, "Newscenter 88"

    For more information, persons may contact Young at (304) 696-2736.


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    Thursday March 20, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall Music Student Nominated for National Symphony's Summer Music Institute

    Huntington, W.Va. - Austin Seybert, a freshman trombone major at Marshall University from Bridgeport, has been named one of four finalists from West Virginia to attend the Summer Music Institute conducted by the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C.

    Seybert and the other three were selected through a process led by the Appalachian Education Initiative. The group solicited auditions and applications on behalf of the Kennedy Center and National Symphony Orchestra and organized the selection process in West Virginia.

    "I think it's a great opportunity for Austin to experience music making at a high level," said Dr. Michael Stroeher, professor of trombone at Marshall and Seybert's teacher. "He's an excellent musician and a very motivated student. The Appalachian Education Initiative is an extremely worthwhile program, and we are thankful for their support. I wish more students could have similar opportunities."

    The National Symphony Orchestra usually selects one student musician from most states to attend the Summer Music Institute.  Accepted students will attend on full scholarship, which includes transportation to and from Washington, D.C., housing, food, and local transportation while attending the program.

    The program was open to students ages 15-20, by recorded audition and application.  Three music professionals from West Virginia listened to all of the auditions anonymously and selected four students for nomination. The panelists were Betty King, education manager for the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra; Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the Department of  Music at Marshall University; and Maggie Snyder, assistant professor - viola at West Virginia University.  The three panelists selected the finalists based on their overall musicality, as well as inclusion of specific musical elements in their pieces.

    "There were many very talented musicians who applied," said panelist Betty King. "However, these four students really stood out.  The National Symphony Orchestra has a good pool of candidates from West Virginia."  Students will be notified of the final selection by the end of this month.

    The mission of the Appalachian Education Initiative is to promote students' personal development, academic performance and 21st century workforce preparation by ensuring the availability of quality arts education in West Virginia public schools.

    For more information, or to inquire about the program for future years, persons may contact Melanie Skeen Gregory at the Appalachian Education Initiative by e-mail at :mmskeen@aeiarts.org or by phone at (304) 225-0101.


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    Thursday March 20, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-2038

    Graduate College's School Psychology Program earns approval from national professional organization

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Graduate College's School Psychology Program has earned approval from a national professional organization.

    The National Association of School Psychologists has approved Marshall's program through 2011.

    "It is no small feat to obtain approval from this organization," said Fred Jay Krieg, Ph.D., program director. "We have to demonstrate that our school psychologists are actually making a difference in the lives of their students. As it turns out, it's easy for us to show because our program has a lot of field-based experience components to it. Our students are out there working with mentors and students from the very start."

    Marshall's program is the only school psychology graduate program in West Virginia. Students who graduate with an educational specialist degree - approximately 15 per year - have learned the skills necessary to work in a field ranked by U.S. News and World Report as one of the country's 10 best.

    "Students enter Marshall's program with a great chance of landing solid employment," Krieg said. "School system administrators from around the country who employ our graduates often will contact us for more interns. The demand is high, and because we focus heavily on hands-on field experience, our graduates can hit the ground running and fill positions in a graying profession that is facing a shortage of qualified school psychologists."

    School psychologists have specialized training in both psychology and education.  School psychologists use their knowledge and skills in consultation with parents, educators, health-care providers and mental health professionals to ensure that every child, adolescent and young adult learns in a safe, healthy and supportive environment. 

    For more information on the Marshall School Psychology program, contact Krieg at the Marshall University South Charleston campus (304) 746-2607 or fred.krieg@marshall.edu.


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    Pulitzer Prize-winning Dr. Julia Keller keynote speaker at Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Julia Keller, a two-time Marshall University graduate and Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the Chicago Tribune, will be the keynote speaker at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation on Friday, April 4, in Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

    The convocation, which is part of Marshall's 14th annual Celebration of Academics, recognizes Marshall students participating in honors programs. It begins at 7 p.m.

    The Celebration of Academics, sponsored by the Drinko Academy, also features the annual John Deaver Drinko Symposium, which takes place at 2 p.m. Thursday, April 3 in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. The featured speaker is Dr. Wendell Dobbs, who is the 2007-2008 Drinko Fellow. The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps, started last year by Dobbs, will perform during the symposium.

    Keller, a Huntington native, will speak on "The Meaning Of Home: How Origins Shape Our Thinking." She currently is the Tribune's cultural critic. In 2005, Keller won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing.

    "I was born and raised in Huntington, and my earliest memories are of accompanying my father, the late James Keller, to Old Main on Saturdays, where he would pick up his paycheck," Keller said. "He was a professor in Marshall's mathematics department for almost two decades. Coming back to Marshall as an adult is very special to me. I'll be talking about the meaning of home - not just the place we live, but the place that lives inside of us."  

    Keller earned a B.A. and M.A. in English from Marshall, and obtained a Ph.D. in English Literature at Ohio State University.

    She began her journalism career as a reporting intern for nationally syndicated columnist Jack Anderson in Washington, D.C. Her first job was as a reporter and then editorial page editor at the Ashland (Ky.) Daily Independent. Later, she worked as television critic at the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch. She joined the Chicago Tribune in late 1998.

    During the 1997-98 academic year, Keller was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, In the fall of 2006, she served as McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. She has twice been a juror for the Pulitzer Prizes.

    Keller has written a book called "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It." It explores the cultural role of multiple-firing weaponry in the 19th Century world. The book will be published by Viking May 29.

    The Drinko Symposium gets the Celebration of Academics started on Thursday afternoon. Dobbs, a professor in Marshall's music department, will speak on "Music of Revolution and Destiny."

    Dobbs and his wife, Linda, also a professor in Marshall's music department, conceived the idea of forming the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps in 2007. As the Drinko Fellow, Wendell Dobbs developed a schedule of events at which to display the corps.

    Here are the John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps performances to date:

    • Sept. 3, 2007 - media event, Corps premiere, lawn in front of Old Main
    • Sept. 8, 2007 - pre-game show, Marshall-WVU football game at Marshall University
    • Sept. 15, 2007 - pre-game show, Marshall University
    • Sept. 17, 2007 - President's home during John Marshall Celebration Week
    • Sept. 19, 2007 - John Marshall Celebration, Drinko Academy, Experimental Theater
    • Sept. 24, 2007 - rededication of Shockoe Hill Cemetery in Richmond, Va.
    • Sept. 24, 2007 - John Marshall House and Library of Virginia
    • Oct. 6, 2007 - Mountain State Forest Festival and Band Festival, Elkins, W.Va.
    • Oct. 27, 2007 - Marshall University Homecoming parade and pre-game show
    • Nov. 3, 2007 - Marshall University Band Festival
    • Dec. 1, 2007 - Charleston Christmas Parade, Charleston, W.Va.
    • Dec. 4, 2007 - Joyous Night, West Virginia State Capitol, Charleston, W.Va.
    • Jan. 26, 2008 - Marshall FluteWorks, Jomie Jazz Center
    • Feb. 5, 2008 - GOP Convention, Charleston, and West Virginia Senate
    • Feb. 29, 2008 - Marshall University Foundation Dinner, Edgewood Country Club, Charleston, W.Va.
    • March 17, 2008 - St. Patrick's Day Parade, Columbus, Ohio

    Dobbs said the John Deaver Drinko Academy's mission to reinvigorate civic and political culture inspired the creation of the Corps.

    "Forming the Corps has been an extraordinary experience," he said. "The devotion of the students, watching the rise of leaders from within the Corps, the making of new friends at events on and off campus, and the support of colleagues at the university and in our community have been very gratifying."

    Here is the schedule for the 14th annual Celebration of Academics:

    Thursday, April 3

    2 p.m. - The Drinko Symposium, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center; speaker: Dr. Wendell Dobbs; topic: "Music of Revolution and Destiny"

    3 p.m. - Public reception, lobby of Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    Friday, April 4

    7 p.m. - The Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center; speaker: Dr. Julia Keller; topic: "The Meaning of Home: How Origins Shape our Thinking"

    8:30 p.m. - Public reception, lobby of Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center


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    Aries Spears visits with Marshall's 'Up Late' crew

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Up Late," Marshall University's student-run late-night television show, goes a little mad this weekend.

    Well-known comedian Aries Spears, who starred on Mad TV for seven seasons, talks with host Jamie LoFiego while impersonating a number of celebrities like Eddie Murphy, Snoop Dogg, Shaquille O'Neal and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Spears also has appeared in several movies, including Jerry McGuire.

    The "Up Late" gang goes festival hopping this week. LoFiego takes on the pancake-eating champ at the Kiwanis Pancake Festival in Huntington with less than appetizing results. Crew members also hit the Chocolate Festival in Ripley and talk with the town's mayor, a woman dressed as a blue M&M. Finally, crew members check in with the staff of Planet 92.7 regarding their St. Panties Day promotion.

    This week's musical guest is Harry-O Productions. Hanna Francis, a junior from Kenova, makes a repeat appearance as doorkeeper.

    The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, March 22 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    Wednesday March 19, 2008
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    Stadium's west lot to be closed next week for resurfacing

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The west parking lot at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Stadium will be closed from Sunday, March 23 through Saturday, March 29 for resurfacing.

    Jim Terry, Marshall's Director of Public Safety, said all automobiles must be removed from the lot before work begins Sunday morning. Students who had planned to leave their automobiles on the lot during next week's spring break are asked to instead park on another permit lot.

    For more information, call Carolyn O'Lynn in the Office of Public Safety at (304) 696-6684.


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    Wednesday March 19, 2008
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    5th Avenue F parking lot to close for construction of new Alumni Center, Foundation & Development Complex

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University F parking lot for employees, located on the south side of 5th Avenue across from Corbly Hall, will be closed beginning Monday, March 24 in preparation for construction of the new  Erickson Alumni Center and Marshall University Foundation & Development Complex.

    Fencing will be installed Monday around the entire lot, which extends from the Newman Center to John Marshall Drive, and from 5th Avenue to the 5-1/2 alley.

    The meters currently on the lot south of the 5th Avenue F lot will be removed to allow for employee permit parking. The meters will be relocated to the lot west of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center. Employees also will be able to park on the 3rd Avenue F lot or in the new lot at the former Weiler Steel location.


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    Therapy group for new moms experiencing depressive symptoms offered at Marshall University Psychology Clinic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Baby blues: A baby friendly therapy group for new moms experiencing depressive symptoms" is a service offered by doctoral-level psychology students working at the Marshall University Psychology Clinic.

    Meetings will take place beginning Thursday, April 3 and continue on Thursdays from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. for six weeks at the clinic on the Huntington campus.

    The therapy group is designed to help mothers that experience the "baby blues," depressing feelings that don't go away after delivery.  The group is targeted to mothers of infants from four to 16 weeks old and the mothers are encouraged to bring their babies with them. Potential group members will meet individually with a therapist prior to beginning the sessions to ensure that the therapy group is appropriate for their needs.

    Those that may consider joining the group have recently given birth and notice a loss of pleasure or interest in activities they once found enjoyable, have difficulty sitting still or getting motivated to be active or have difficulty concentrating on a task or making decisions. Potential participants also may feel sad most of the day for many days or have excessive feelings of worthlessness or guilt.

    "Postpartum depression not only affects the mother's well-being, but the new baby's well-being also. It is important for new mothers experiencing these symptoms to talk to their doctors about how they are feeling," said Dr. Patrick Ryan, a pediatrician who will be available at one of the group's sessions to address new moms' concerns. "A therapy group is a great way for new moms to gain social support and to understand their feelings in an environment of others who are experiencing similar symptoms."

    The goals of the meetings are to educate mothers about baby blues and postpartum depression, to raise awareness and to educate new mothers about common difficulties they will face. They also hope to provide new mothers with a safe environment in which to express new and foreign emotions and to provide a warm environment to break the isolation that so many new mothers feel.

    "The psychology clinic tries to meet the needs of the community with our various services. We feel that the impact of a baby on a new mother has often been something that has been neglected or minimized," said Dr. Keith Beard, Director of the Marshall University Psychology Clinic. "The hope is that this group will normalize some of the feelings that new mothers are experiencing and help them gain support and skills to deal with problems that have developed or have worsened since giving birth."

    The sessions are free for mothers wanting to join. For more information, persons may contact Sarah Setran, M.A., psychological trainee at the Marshall University Psychology Clinic, or Lisa Ryan, M.A., psychological trainee at the Marshall University Psychology Clinic, at (304) 696-2772 or by e-mail at babybluesgroup@yahoo.com.


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    Friday March 14, 2008
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    Documentary on Hechler to be shown April 5 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice," a two-hour documentary focusing on the life, career and legacy of the former West Virginia congressman and secretary of state, will have its first public showing on Saturday, April 5 on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Barbara Winters, dean of Marshall University Libraries, said the documentary will be shown at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. It is free and open to the public.

    Country music singer-writer Lionel Cartwright, composer, performer and producer of the documentary's soundtrack, will perform during the event.

    Created by filmmakers Russ Barbour and Chip Hitchcock, who began work on the project in July 2005, "Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice" is a two-part, two-hour examination of the role of political office in 20th century America.

    Winters said the program also documents the development of Hechler's views on government and his commitment to helping individuals through public service and political office. The production traces Hechler's political philosophy and subsequent actions to the progressive movement of the 1900s - and to the model President Theodore Roosevelt presented through his efforts on behalf of impoverished and disenfranchised Americans. 

    Considerable insight is provided by Hechler's former colleagues, including such notable public officeholders as U.S. Senators Tom Harkin, Bob Dole and George McGovern, as well as U.S. Congressmen John Brademas and James Symington. The documentary also features labor historians, reporters and several of Hechler's former students, staffers, constituents, friends and family.

    The production also makes use of archival photographs, motion pictures and sound recordings, including rarely viewed news film. The documentary employs excerpts from numerous addresses, including speeches by Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman and John F. Kennedy.

    "Ken Hechler's life provides a great backdrop for illustrating President Theodore Roosevelt's progressive ideals in a real and practical manner," Barbour said. "The son of devout believers in progressivism, Hechler enthusiastically embraced and put into practice the governmental principles popularized by TR and his cousin, President Franklin Roosevelt. Through the extensive use of archival images, Hechler's journey through the 20th century also presents an ideal opportunity to document significant events in 20th century America, from beginning to end, in a compelling and remarkably visual manner."

    Winters said that Marshall University's partnership role in the project included assisting the filmmakers in accessing materials located in the Ken Hechler collection at the Marshall Libraries.   The university also provided an intern to work with the filmmakers during the research and filming phases.

    Winters said Marshall University will receive all the original field tapes at the end of the project, and intends to distribute copies of the tapes containing interviews with Hechler to other archives, most notably the State of West Virginia Archives, as well as to the West Virginia Collection located at West Virginia University.

    For further information about "Ken Hechler: In Pursuit of Justice," call Winters at (304) 696-2318.


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    Contact: Jamie LoFiego, , (304) 696-2967

    Student filmmaker promotes new documentary on Marshall's 'Up Late' show

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Up Late," Marshall University's student-run late-night television show, focuses on the silver screen this weekend.

    Francesca Karle, a junior from Chesapeake, Ohio, talks with host Jamie LoFiego about her new documentary "Back to the Bottle." The film focuses on one man's lifelong struggle with alcohol addiction. This same man was homeless in Karle's first film, "On the River's Edge," which she filmed three years ago. The show also will feature music written by Karle and performed by Rick Ruggles.

    The Appalachian Film Festival's Sam St. Clair, gives a preview of the upcoming event, which runs April 17-19 at the Keith Albee in Huntington. A red carpet gala premiere for "Back to the Bottle" is planned for opening night of the festival with proceeds benefiting the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership.

    Two members of the "Up Late" crew, Lawren Hightower and Emily McKenna, decide to give unopposed candidate Matt James a run for his money in the race for student body president with comical results.

    The show will air Saturday, March 15, from 11 to 11:30 p.m. on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    SCORES competition attracts more than 2,600 students to Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 2,600 high school students from West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Saturday, March 15 to participate in the 31st annual Search Committee on Recognition of Excellent Students (SCORES) Academic Festival.

    SCORES is an academic competition that allows high school students to compete in different fields of study that are offered at Marshall. The purpose of the event is to recognize academic excellence, create relationships with area high schools, show the importance of college attendance and recruit talented high school students.

    "SCORES brings more than 2,000 prospective students to campus each year," said Jean Gilman, Marshall's director of recruitment. "It is very exciting for us to be able to hold a competition on campus and at the same time show all the prospective students the university."

    The event, which runs from 8 a.m. to about 3 p.m., is open to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors. The students compete in a variety of tests, contests and performances which are evaluated by Marshall faculty and staff. Areas of competition for SCORES include business, education, fine arts, journalism and mass communications, and science.

    Awards will be given to the top seven students in the SCORES competition, with one student winning the $1,000 Robert Wheeler Scholarship and a Marshall tuition waiver. The other six students will receive Marshall tuition waivers. First-, second- and third-place awards will be given for each division. The schools in the competition will be divided into five categories and compete for trophies.

    The SCORES awards ceremony takes place at 1 p.m. at Cam Henderson Center. For more information, contact the SCORES offices at (304) 696-2246.


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    Marshall associate professor honored by Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia as Professor of the Year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Montserrat Miller, an associate professor of history at Marshall University, was named 2007 Professor of the Year by the Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia Tuesday evening at a banquet in the Great Hall of the Cultural Center in Charleston.

    Miller, who was one of five finalists attending the banquet, received $10,000 and a trophy. The runner-up received $1,000 and the remaining three finalists received $500 each.

    The Faculty Merit Foundation of West Virginia each year honors an outstanding faculty member at a West Virginia college or university. The Professor of the Year award is presented with financial support from United Bank.

    "This is not really about me or about any single individual," Miller said. "The award celebrates higher education in West Virginia."

    Miller said West Virginia colleges and universities "are nodes in a global network that some call the Republic of Learning."

    "Through them we attract talented and committed professionals from far and wide," she said. "I'm surrounded by legions of disciplined professionals who've dedicated their lives to serving our students and our communities. They understand teaching to be a sacred trust, a privilege, and an honor. Teaching is a way of expressing hope for the future, it involves planting seeds that we may not live to see mature."

    Miller has been a member of the Marshall History Department since 1996. She has won several awards during that time, including the Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award in 2007, the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher Award in 2006, and the Pickens-Queen Teaching Award in 1999.

    She received a Ph.D. (1994) and M.A. (1990) in European Social History from Carnegie Mellon University, and an M.A. in History (1988) and a B.A. in International Affairs (1983) from Marshall.

    She is a member of several organizations, including the American Historical Association, the Society for Spanish and Portugese Historical Studies, and the European Business History Association.

    Before coming to Marshall, Miller was an assistant professor of history at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and director of the World History Instructional Design Project at Carnegie Mellon University.

    Dr. Sarah Denman, provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs at Marshall, nominated Miller for Professor of the Year. She described Miller as "an outstanding teacher, a caring mentor and advisor, and a prolific scholar."

    "Montserrat's classes are widely regarded by students as very hard and yet they are always fully enrolled," Denman said. "If you ask students why this is so, they will tell you that she is demanding but fair, inclusive, encouraging, and inspirational. They will tell you that they absorb her passion for history and learn to rise to her high expectations because she believes they can."

    For more information on the award, contact Miller at (304) 696-2723.


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    Statement of Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp on the passage of the Research Trust Fund legislation

    "On behalf of Marshall University, I thank Governor Joe Manchin for his vision and leadership, and the members of the West Virginia Senate and House of Delegates who voted to pass the Research Trust Fund Bill this session (Senate Bill 287). This legislation will have the effect of an economic stimulus package that will have a far-reaching and lasting impact across the State of West Virginia. It will create new high-paying jobs and add to the diversification of our economy.

    "I envision advances in both economic development and new job opportunities that will rival the impact of similar investments in Kentucky with their "Bucks for Brains" initiative. I can say with great confidence that the passage of this legislation along with the investment of $50 million in the WV Research Trust Fund to be matched by an equal amount of private gifts will significantly increase the economic horsepower of both Marshall University and West Virginia University. The focused growth in applied research and corresponding research-based new enterprise development will accelerate the growth of private sector jobs and increase tax revenues for our state and communities. Simply stated, this legislation is good for all West Virginians and arguably the most important piece of legislation enacted in recent memory."


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    Poet, fiction writer to read from their work at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Poet Mark DeFoe and fiction writer Richard Schmitt, both faculty members at West Virginia Wesleyan College, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Monday, March 17 in Room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Their appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department's Visiting Writers Series, now in its 19th year, and the College of Liberal Arts.

    DeFoe's eighth collection of poems, Weekend Update, has just appeared.  His work is widely anthologized and has appeared in such journals as Poetry, Yale Review, Paris Review, Christian Science Monitor, The Kenyon Review, Sewanee Review and Denver Quarterly.  He is the recipient of two Artist's Fellowships from the state of West Virginia and has been recognized by many other awards.

    Schmitt's novel, The Aerialist, appeared from Harcourt in 2001.  It was named as a Barnes and Noble Discovery Series pick and as winner of the Chautauqua South Fiction Award.  His work has appeared in such literary journals as Mississippi Review, New Stories of the South: Year's Best 1999, Gulf Coast, Flyway, Puerto del Sol and others.  He also is the recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

    For more information, contact Art Stringer in the English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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    Countdown to Commencement is March 18-19 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Countdown to Commencement 2008, a two-day event in which graduating students can complete pre-commencement responsibilities, will take place next week on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Numerous services will be available for students as they prepare for graduation at Countdown to Commencement 2008, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, March 18-19, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room.

    Countdown to Commencement 2008 is for all July 2007, August 2007, December 2007 and May 2008 graduates of Marshall University and the Marshall Community and Technical College. Students will be able to purchase academic regalia, announcements, diploma frames, class rings and other items to commemorate their graduation.

    "This event provides an opportunity for our graduates to confirm arrangements for participation in the annual commencement exercises in a one-stop-shop experience," said Marshall University Registrar Roberta Ferguson. "Various campus offices contribute to the atmosphere of celebration for our graduates.  Response to the event last year was tremendous with many of the graduates commenting on the convenience of the services provided.  We hope to make this year's event even better."

    Marshall University will celebrate its 171st commencement at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 10 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The community college commencement is at 7 p.m. Friday, May 9 at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

    The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement 2008:

    Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diploma; confirm commencement participation; receive commencement instructions; pick up honor cords and tassel (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to ask any questions related to commencement.

    Individual College Recognition Ceremonies - Information will be available for the individual college recognition events held in conjunction with commencement.

    Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their cap and gown, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings, graduation announcements and much more. They also can order personalized graduation announcements at this time.

    Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2008 rings. All rings are on sale and priced as low as $239. Delivery by graduation is guaranteed. Students also may ask about interest-free installment plans.

    Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.

    Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

    Marshall Community and Technical College - Students can receive detailed information about the Community and Technical College graduation ceremony.

    Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career path. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for EASE (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

    Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan counseling interviews. For loan counseling, students will need to bring their Student ID and the addresses and phone numbers of two references.

    Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about federal student loan consolidation programs.

    Center for African American Students' Programs - Students may enroll and prepare for the May 1, 2008, Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement. They also will be provided with academic advising for graduate school and post-graduate employment.

    Center for International Programs - Graduating study abroad students and international students will be able to purchase international flag sashes. Also, information about work, teaching and study opportunities abroad will be distributed.

    For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at (304) 696-6410.


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    Marshall University Single Reed Day to feature James Houlik and Ann Hicks

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual Single Reed Day for students of clarinet and saxophone will take place beginning at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 15. Highlighting this year's event is a concert appearance by world-renowned tenor saxophonist James Houlik.

    Houlik is considered by many to be the leading performer on his instrument in the world. "The listener will be astonished to hear the extraordinary emotional range, unexpected virtuosity, and witty remarks in this rare opportunity to attend a classical tenor saxophone concert," said Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of saxophone and director of jazz studies at Marshall. "This will be an event not soon forgotten." Houlik will be joined in this concert by his longtime musical partner, pianist Michael Baron.

    Houlik's pioneering efforts on behalf of the tenor saxophone have resulted in the composition of more than 80 new concert works for the instrument, and important performances around the world.

    From the East Room of the White House for President Clinton, to solo appearances with orchestras in London, Prague, Istanbul, Berlin, Chicago, Phoenix, and New York, to recitals in the music capitals of the world, Houlik is considered to have redefined the tenor saxophone.

    In addition to attending the concert by Houlik, participants in the day's activities also will play in large ensembles of saxophone and clarinet. They also will attend master classes by Houlik and by Ann Hicks, clarinetist, who currently is a doctoral candidate in music at The Ohio State University. Hicks, who is originally from Iowa, holds a bachelor's degree in music education from Iowa State University and a master's degree in music education and clarinet performance from Ball State University.

    Following is a complete schedule of Single Reed Day events. All will take place in the Jomie Jazz Center on the Huntington campus:

    10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Registration and saxophone/clarinet ensemble rehearsal
    1:30-3:30 p.m.: Master Classes with James Houlik and Ann Hicks
    4 p.m.: Ensemble Concert with guest artists
    8 p.m.: James Houlik recital

    Registration cost for participants is $10. The concerts are free and open to the public.

    For further information, persons may contact Dr. Ed Bingham by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu or by phone at (304) 696-3147, or Dr. Ann Bingham by e-mail at binghama@marshall.edu  or by phone at (304) 696-4113.


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    Marshall's Society of Yeager Scholars program receives gift from Foundation for the Tri-State Community, Inc.

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Board of Trustees of the Foundation for the Tri-State Community, Inc., presented Marshall University's Society of Yeager Scholars with a gift of $100,000 on Friday, Feb. 29.

    The check, presented by Foundation President Mary Witten Wiseman to Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, represents the first payment toward a six-year gift from the Foundation to the Yeager Scholars program totaling $205,000. 

    The gift was made with funds from the Ashland Inc. Donor Advised Fund of the Foundation of the Tri-State Community, Inc. The grant was unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees of the Foundation for the Tri-State at its February 2008 meeting.

    "This gift, as stipulated in our proposal, will be deposited into the Ashland Inc. Endowment for the Society of Yeager Scholars program at Marshall," said Bob Galardi, Director of Major Gifts for the Society of Yeager Scholars. "It will bring the total of the Ashland Endowment to an amount that represents more than 30 percent of our Yeager Scholars total endowment.

    "If it were not for Ashland Inc. and the kind folks at the Foundation for the Tri-State Community, Inc., there would not be a Yeager Scholars program at Marshall."

    Galardi said the gift represents the very best outcome of "people working with people to improve one of the most unique scholarships in our state and in our nation, here at Marshall University."

    For more information on the challenge grant to the Yeager Scholars, contact Galardi at (304) 696-3336.


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    Former All-American Girls Baseball League members to present keynote address at Women's Studies Student Conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Maybelle Blair, Terry Donahue and Jane Moffet, former members of The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, will present the keynote address at the annual Women's Studies Student Conference, "Women Breaking Boundaries," at Marshall University.

    The keynote address will be at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 13 in the Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge on Marshall's Huntington campus. The event is free and open to the public.

    The players will be available after the talk for autographs and pictures. They also will participate in the dedication ceremonies of the Marshall University Softball Complex on Saturday, March 15.

    The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, featured in the movie "A League of Their Own," gave more than 600 women athletes the opportunity to play professional baseball and to play it at a level never before attained. The league operated from 1943 to 1954 and represents one unique aspect of our nation's history.

    Dr. Kat Williams, director of the Women's Studies program, said the women broke down boundaries when they played professional baseball in the 1940s and 1950s and they continue to provide young women with inspiration.

    For more information, contact Williams at (304) 696-2959.


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    Fort Lee Army Band to perform at Marshall March 7

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Often dubbed "the best kept secret in professional music," the 392nd Army Band at Fort Lee, Va., will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, March 7 in the Recital Hall Auditorium of Smith Music Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The concert is free and open to the public.

    The group will perform a wide variety of musical selections, including classical pieces, big band numbers, military martial selections, and contemporary pop, country and rock-and-roll tunes.

    Under the command of Warrant Officer1 Timothy F. Wallace, the 392nd Army Band is a 40-piece ensemble of trained musicians, former music instructors, and music business professionals now serving as soldiers in the U.S. Army. 

    A "goodwill ambassador to its communities," the band also has performed in concert throughout Virginia at the Richmond International Raceway, the Richmond St. Patrick's Day parade, the Sate Fair of Virginia, Patriotism Day, the Virginia "First Thanksgiving Celebration," and other festivals and celebrations throughout the Commonwealth.

    Representing the Army, the Combined Arms Support Command, and the Training and Doctrine Command, the 392nd Army Band of Fort Lee carries a proud musical heritage dating back to Ethan Allen's "Green Mountain Boys" fife and drum corps of 1775.  The band was re-designated as the 392nd Army Service Forces Band in 1944 and was assigned to Camp Lee, Virginia in 1946.

    Today, the Fort Lee Army Band promotes the national heritage of the U.S. and supports Army community relations, troop morale, and recruiting programs through live performances such as the March 7 concert at Marshall.

    For further information on the concert, persons may contact Marshall Director of Bands Steve Barnett at (304) 696-2317 or by e-mail at barnetts@marshall.edu.


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    Marshall mascot in the running for cover of Wii packaging

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's mascot, Marco, could be a cover boy soon.

    To commemorate the first NCAA football game on the Nintendo Wii gaming system, the company is sponsoring a Mascot Challenge online voting contest.

    Fans can vote once a day for their favorite mascot. The winner will grace the cover of the NCAA Football 09 Nintendo Wii video game. Voting ends Friday, March 14.  To vote for Marco, go to http://www.easports.com/ncaa09/ and click on vote now. Select Conference USA, click on Marco and then on vote for this mascot.

    "I'm sure if Marco could speak, he'd be encouraging everyone to vote for him every day," said Andrew Lowers, a freshman from Parkersburg. "He's certainly the coolest mascot on the site. Even computerized, he rocks!"

    When you click on Marco, an information box about him pops up. It says that the name Marco developed from a mix of the university's name at the time, Marshall College. After Marshall gained university status, different names for Marco were thrown around, but not one of them stuck.


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    Annual Spring Job Fest set for March 12 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and alumni can explore new job opportunities at the annual Spring Job Fest from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, March 12 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

    Nearly 70 employers representing the corporate, government and nonprofit sectors are scheduled to attend.  

    Denise Hogsett, Director of Career Services at Marshall, said participants are encouraged to bring copies of their resumes and dress to impress interviewers at this free event. She said any business or industry that is in need of or will have a need in the future for entry-level employees is encouraged to attend.

    "Our students do have experience through internships, part-time jobs and graduate assistant programs," Hogsett said. "Marshall students have a great reputation in the workforce."

    Career Services staff members are available to support students in their preparation for this event with resume assistance, printing and mock interviewing.  If students need professional attire, they may call Career Services for assistance. The staff also will be available to work with any employer that is interested in attending the fair and making it a successful recruitment tool.

    Employers and organizations attending the job fest are expected to provide a wide range of opportunities, including jobs in banking, computer information technology, criminal justice, financial advising, health care, hospitality, insurance, recreation, retail and security.

    Employers and organizations attending this year's job fest include:

    Airgas Mid America;  Amazon.com; Bath Fitter; Brayman Construction;  BrickStreet Insurance;  Bristol Broadcasting; Bureau of the Public Debt; Cabell Huntington Hospital; Cedar Point; CGI;  Cintas Corp. 525; Cornerstone Hospital; CVS Caremark Corporation;  Dixon Hughes PLLC; DMG Securities; Federal Deposit Ins. Corp.; GEICO Genesis HealthCare;  Global Contact Services;  Ikon Office Solutions; Internal Revenue Service; Ion Media Networks, Inc.;

    Kelly Services; Kentucky Transportation Cabinet;  Kroger;  Liberty Mutual Insurance;  Life Care Centers of America;  Mainstream Services, Inc.; Manpower; Marshall University ROTC; Mercy Health Partners;  Methodist Theological School; Nationwide Insurance; Northwestern Mutual Financial;  Peace Corps;  Pepsi Bottling Group; Pikeville Medical Center;  Pressley Ridge; Prestera Center; Sears Holdings/Kmart Retail; Southern Ohio Behavioral Health;  Speedway SuperAmerica; SRBI; State Electric; Strictly Business;

    Target; The Academy-Mountain State University; Thomas Memorial Hospital; Total Quality Logistics; Tri-Data, Inc.; U.S. Army & Army Reserve; United Bank;  United Talent Staffing Services;  University Directories;  Verizon Wireless; Village on 6th Ave. Apts.;  WCHS and Fox 11; Workforce Development; WV Army National Guard; WV Legislative Post Audit Division, and  WV Public Broadcasting.

    For student or employer assistance or to register, call (304) 696-2370 or visit www.marshall.edu/career-services.


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    Margaret Randall featured presenter for Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Margaret Randall, a writer, photographer and social activist who lived for nearly a quarter century in Latin America, will be the featured presenter for the Schmidlapp Distinguished Lectureship in Women's Studies on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Randall will give a poetry reading at 1 p.m. Monday, March 10 in the third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library, then lecture on "Women and Resistance: Cuba and Nicaragua," at 7 p.m. that same day in the Memorial Student Center's Alumni Lounge.

    The lectureship, which is free to the public, is sponsored by the Charlotte R. Schmidlapp Fund, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee.  Marshall Women's Studies and the Women's Center also are supporting the event. Refreshments will be served at both the afternoon poetry reading and the evening lecture.

    Randall's stay in Latin America included approximately nine years in Mexico, 11 years in Cuba and four in Nicaragua. Among her more than 80 titles are Cuban Women Now, Cuban Women Twenty Years Later, Sandino's Daughters, Sandino's Daughters Revisited, When I Look Into The Mirror And See You: Women, Terror & Resistance, and the recently-released Stones Witness.

    As a sign of the significance of her writings, the U.S. government tried to have her deported in 1984, but failed.

    For more information on Randall's visit, contact Dr. Greta Rensenbrink at (304) 696-2955.


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    Governor unveils Marshall University-themed stock car at Capitol

    CHARLESTON - Nearly two weeks before it will possibly race on a grueling track in Bristol, Tenn., a Marshall University-themed stock car took a practice run on the Capitol grounds in Charleston today.

    Gov. Joe Manchin, who unveiled the sleek green and white Dodge Charger emblazoned with the Marshall logo and Number 75, said majority shareholders Dana and Tonya Tomes are using the car as a vehicle to shine a positive light on their alma mater and the State of West Virginia.

    "You are among the first to see - and hear - this car," Manchin said. "It's truly a nice touch that the number 75 serves as a tribute to those who perished in the Marshall plane crash of 1970."

    Manchin also introduced Brett Rowe, a Barboursville native and former ARCA Lincoln Welder Truck Series national champion and 2004 Rookie of the Year. Rowe will race the Marshall car for Herd Racing, hopefully as early as March 15 in the Sharpie Mini 300 at the Bristol Motor Speedway.

    "A lot of people know about Marshall because of the 'We Are Marshall' movie, but I think NASCAR can bring even more exposure to the university," Rowe said. "At Herd Racing, we really are Marshall. Everyone on staff has strong ties to the school as well as the Tri-State area. It is exciting to see how much exposure we can get for both as we compete nationally."

    Herd Racing LLC is a West Virginia-based NASCAR-sanctioned Nationwide Series team. The Tomes family approached university officials about using official Marshall logos on the hood of the car as well as in sponsorship materials at no cost to the school.

    Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp is excited about the unique opportunity to reach new audiences and tell Marshall's story.

    "Once people see this car and meet the amazing team involved in Herd Racing," Kopp said. "They will naturally want to learn about Marshall. It is a great partnership for us and we appreciate all of their efforts."

    Dana Tomes said Herd Racing is still working to sign more sponsors for the new team.

    "I feel confident that sponsors see the great opportunity here," Tomes said. "Not only are they  supporting Marshall University but they are also helping put West Virginia in the national spotlight in one of America's most popular sports."

    For more information on Herd Racing, go to http://www.herdracing.com


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    Festival Band Weekend attracts 300 W.Va. high school students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 300 students from 36 high schools in West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Thursday through Saturday to participate in Festival Band Weekend.

    The students, who were nominated by their band directors to participate in Festival Band Weekend, will audition on Thursday evening and then be divided into three bands of about 100 students each: the John Marshall Band (Recital Hall stage), Thundering Herd Band (Band Room) and Marco's Marauders (Jomie Jazz Center Rehearsal Room). Each of the bands will rehearse at various times Friday and Saturday in preparation for a concert performance Saturday afternoon.  

    Steve Barnett, Marshall's Director of Bands, said three "outstanding" guest conductors will be working with the groups. They include Dr. Dwayne Sagen, Director of Bands at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.; Dr. Richard Lemke, former Marshall University Director of Bands; and Tommy Thompson, former interim Marshall Director of Bands and longtime area band director.

    The students also will be attending master classes at 4 p.m. Friday. In these classes, they will receive special instruction on their musical instruments.

    The Marshall Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band will perform in concert for the Festival Band participants and directors at 8 p.m. Friday in Smith Recital Hall. The concert is free to the public.

    The students' concert, which also is free to the public, begins at 4 p.m. Saturday in Smith Recital Hall.

    For more information, contact Barnett at (304) 696-2317.


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    Women Tech Academy brings 36 8th-grade female students from Mercer County to Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-six 8th-grade female students from schools in Mercer County, W.Va., will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus on Saturday, March 1 to take part in an activity affiliated with a program called Women Tech Academy.

    Women Tech Academy was developed by Mercer County Schools, in a partnership with Bluefield State College, to encourage female students to consider technical careers, particularly engineering. The program has been in existence for four years.

    The students' visit to Marshall is one of four quarterly activities planned throughout the school year as part of the academy. The students also attend a week-long academy each summer, focusing on different fields of engineering and taking a field trip to see science and engineering in action.

    "They contacted Marshall expressing an interest in seeing our Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center and some presentations," Beth Wolfe, coordinator of STEM Outreach at Marshall, said of Mercer County Schools. "Carol McClaugherty, their director, said the response from their students was absolutely overwhelming. They are very interested, very excited about coming to Marshall."

    Here is the agenda for Saturday's visit to Marshall:

    11 a.m. - Students arrive at Harless Dining Hall (Ed Grose Room)
    11:10 a.m. - Welcome, Beth Wolfe, Coordinator STEM Outreach
    11:15 a.m. - Remarks by Dr. Sarah Denman, Provost
    11:45 a.m. - Introduction of Marshall faculty and students in attendance
    Noon - Lunch
    12:40 p.m. - Remarks by Betsy Dulin, JD, PE, Marshall faculty
    1 p.m. - Tower-building activity, Gullickson Hall
    2 p.m. - Tour of Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center
    2:40 p.m. - Presentation and campus tour, Recruitment and Welcome Center
    4 p.m. - Students depart

    In addition to encouraging the students to consider a technical career and to take higher-level math and science classes to prepare for college, the Women Tech Academy gives them the support and resources they need throughout their high school years.

    "When they come to Marshall they will hopefully learn some things, get to see the campus, have some fun and be inspired," Wolfe said.

    According to Wolfe, a team of girls from Women Tech Academy won the state competition for the West Point Bridge Design contest last year, and they will attempt to qualify for the state contest again this year.

    For more information on Saturday's event, call Wolfe at (304) 696-6007 or e-mail her at Beth.wolfe@marshall.edu.


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    Monday February 25, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University Foundation Inc. establishes scholarship in honor of Homer Hickam Sr.

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. is establishing the Homer Hickam Sr.-Red Helmet Scholarship for children and grandchildren of coal miners and mine rescue team members.

    The scholarship honors Homer Hickam Sr., a coal miner and father of New York Times best-selling author Homer Hickam Jr. Homer Hickam Sr. was instrumental in developing the first mine rescue team units in West Virginia.

    "My father knew the value of a good education," Homer Hickam Jr. said in a recent interview.  "He wasn't able to go to college but he saw to it that my brother and I had the means to go.  By creating this scholarship at Marshall University, I hope to draw attention to the higher education opportunities available to students of the coalfields."

    The scholarship will be awarded annually to a West Virginia resident who is an undergraduate student and the child or grandchild of a coal miner or coal mine rescue team member.  The award is renewable for up to four years provided satisfactory academic progress is maintained.

    Dr. Lynne Mayer, Associate Vice President for Development at Marshall, said, "This effort by Homer Hickam Jr. to honor his father is a wonderful and lasting tribute."

    Homer Hickam Jr. is best known for his award-winning classic Rocket Boys: A Memoir that was made into the film October Sky.  Red Helmet, his latest novel, is a love story set in a contemporary West Virginia coal mining town.

    Hickam, who was awarded an honorary Doctor of Literature degree last year by Marshall University, says he will help promote the scholarship during his nation-wide Red Helmet tour this month and in March.   Hickam is scheduled to be in West Virginia to promote his new novel on Friday, Feb. 29 and Saturday, March 1.  Friday's schedule includes stops at Tamarack in Beckley at 1 p.m. and Hearthside Books in Bluefield at 5 p.m.  Saturday's visits will be at Empire Books in Huntington at 1 p.m. and Taylor Books in Charleston at 6 p.m.

    "I'm pleased that we can honor my father and the work of mine rescue teams with this scholarship at Marshall," Hickam said. "Marshall is the university that services the Appalachian coalfields more than any other, and I am thrilled to help create this scholarship opportunity."

    To contribute to the scholarship, please visit www.homerhickam.com or www.marshalluniversityfoundation.com. For more information on the scholarship, contact Tracy Straub, Donor Relations Coordinator, at straub5@marshall.edu or (304) 696-6781.


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    Friday February 22, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Charleston attorney to speak during Women of Color Program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Katherine L. "Kitty" Dooley, an attorney practicing in Charleston, W.Va., will be the keynote speaker at this year's Women of Color Program at Marshall University.

    The program, which is free to the public, begins at noon Tuesday, March 4 in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. This year's theme is Women's Art and Women's Vision. Women of Color awards will be presented during the program and a reception will follow.

    Dooley, who earned her bachelor's degree in journalism from Marshall University in 1980 and is a 1990 graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law, is the principal of The Dooley Law Firm, P.L.L.C.

    She is chair of the Board of Commissioners for the Charleston-Kanawha Housing Authority. In 2006, she received the UniCare Community Service Award for her work with the Housing Authority.

    Among her other affiliations, Dooley is a member of the Mountain State Bar Association, Inc., the American Association for Justice, the West Virginia Association for Justice, the Judge John Fields American Inns of Court and the Charleston Branch of the NAACP.

    She is serving her second term as a member of the Board of Governors of the West Virginia State Bar. Dooley is a board member of the Children's Home Society of West Virginia and is a member of the West Virginia University Women's Studies Visiting Committee.

    The Women of Color Program activities are coordinated by Fran L. Jackson, Program Assistant II, Center for African American Students' Programs; Leah Tolliver, Director of the Women's Center; and Lisa Allen, Program Assistant I, Student Development.

    Vendors and displays will be set up in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center throughout the day.

    For more information, contact Fran L. Jackson at (304) 696-6705.


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    Friday February 22, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall establishes scholarship in memory of Leah Hickman

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has established the Leah Hickman Memorial Scholarship in Journalism, according to Marshall University Foundation Inc. Chief Executive Officer Dr. Ron Area.

    Leah Hickman was a Marshall University broadcast journalism major who died in December 2007.

    The scholarship will be awarded to a Marshall University freshman, sophomore or junior who is a full-time journalism student, a West Virginia resident and in good academic standing according to standards set by the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall.

    The Leah Hickman Scholarship was made possible by donations from Dress Barn Inc., the many family and friends of Leah Hickman, and Leah's friends at the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

    Hickman's mother, Sherry Russell, helped the Marshall University Foundation with the formation of the scholarship as a way to honor her daughter's memory. 

    "Leah had chosen journalism as a major because she wanted to be in a position where she could make a change, where she could influence others for good," Russell said.

    "Leah Hickman's desire to help others will live on through this scholarship that bears her name," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp.   "The recipients of this scholarship and their life works will be a testament to Leah's life and the generosity of the many who have expressed their support of Leah's family during this tragic and difficult time."

    Dr. Corley Dennison, dean of the School of Journalism, said Leah thoroughly enjoyed her shift at WMUL-FM, Marshall's student-run radio station.

    "Many of our students have been asking about an appropriate way to remember Leah," Dennison said. "We are currently working on the details of several fundraisers and the proceeds from those will be contributed to the scholarship fund named in her honor." 

    To contribute to the scholarship, visit www.marshalluniversityfoundation.com  or contact Tracy Straub, Donor Relations Coordinator, at (304) 696-6781. 

    The first award will be made during the School of Journalism's annual spring banquet.


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    Friday February 22, 2008
    Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

    Marshall president and 'Abe Lincoln' star on 'Up Late's' presidential show

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Up Late," Marshall University's student-run late-night television show, goes presidential during this weekend's show.

    Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp talks with "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego about his Quoits game and new buildings on campus, and even throws a few softballs in the studio hallway to warm up the next guest, Rachel Folden.

    Folden is an all-American catcher from Marshall selected as the first pick in the second round at the National Pro Fastpitch Senior Draft by the Chicago Bandits. She was the only Conference USA member to be selected.

    The "Up Late" crew also joins a "clone" of President Abraham Lincoln as he makes rounds on campus in honor of President's Day. The musical guest is singer/songwriter Traci Stanley of Wayne, W.Va., who performs her song, "Take You Back." Rebecca Doss, a sophomore from Barboursville, serves as doorkeeper this week.

    The show airs from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday February 21, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Mak receives Scholar Award from Midwest District of AAHPERD

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jennifer Y. Mak, associate professor and program coordinator in the Division of Exercise Science, Sport and Recreation at Marshall University, has been named the 2008 Midwest District Scholar of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD).

    The Midwest District Scholar Program provides the means through which the Midwest District of AAHPERD recognizes an individual with an outstanding record of scholarly publications and presentations and active service to health, physical education, recreation, dance, and/or sport. Only one person per year receives this honor.

    "It is a great encouragement for me to be recognized by my colleagues as a scholar," Mak said. "I will continue to work hard in developing my scholarship, teaching and professional leadership. Marshall has provided a great environment for me and I really enjoy working here. My recognition is only one example of Marshall's national prominence for excellence in the areas of high quality research, teaching and services."

    Mak came to Marshall in August 2000 after receiving her doctoral degree from Indiana University in Bloomington. Her research and teaching focuses are marketing for sport and leisure industry and leisure behavior.

    Mak has more than 35 refereed publications and more than 50 refereed or invited presentations at international, national, regional and state conferences. She has served on editorial boards for several publications, including Sport Management Education Journal and Journal of Physical Education and Recreation.

    She also has received several prestigious awards, such as the Marshall University Distinguished Artists & Scholars Award and the Mabel Lee Award from the AAHPERD.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday February 19, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall names Dr. David J. Pittenger dean of COLA

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. David J. Pittenger, Associate Provost at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga since 2004, has been named dean of Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts.

    Dr. Frances Hensley, Marshall's Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, said Pittenger will assume his duties at Marshall on July 1.

    "I see a lot of opportunity in the college and at the University, and I want to be a part of it," Pittenger said. "There is a strong commitment to students and eager faculty engaged in teaching, research and providing service for the community."

    Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, headed the search committee that selected Pittenger. He said Pittenger emerged from a field of about 50 initial applicants.

    "We felt that Dr. Pittenger had the strongest grasp of the kinds of issues that are challenging higher education right now and that he would be the one who could be the most effective leader for the College of Liberal Arts as we move into the future," Van Horn said.

    Pittenger, a native of Akron, Ohio, received a B.A. in Psychology in 1979 from The College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio; an M.S. in Psychology in 1981 from Texas A&M University; and a Ph.D. in Psychology in 1989 from the University of Georgia.

    Pittenger first went to UT-Chattanooga in 2000 as a professor and head of the Department of Psychology. He has extensive experience as a creative leader in a number of academic and administrative positions dating back to 1999, including department chair, department head, registrar and associate provost. He has educational and work experience at liberal arts colleges, regional comprehensive universities and research institutions.

    In addition to UT-Chattanooga, Pittenger has taught at Texas A&M, Blinn Junior College in Bryan, Texas, the University of Georgia and Marietta College. As an instructor, Pittenger has earned national and local awards for excellence. He has considerable experience developing departmental and general educational curricula, strategic plans and assessment and accreditation activities.

    Pittenger and his wife, Denise, are the parents of two grown children. Their daughter, Rebbecca, is working on her doctorate at the University of Kentucky and their son, Alex, is a sophomore at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

    Pittenger may be reached at david-pittenger@utc.edu or (423) 425-4778.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday February 19, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Nursing program's pass rate better than state, national averages

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Nursing Program has among the highest pass rates for the National Nursing Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses in West Virginia, according to Dr. Denise Landry, chair of the School of Nursing.

    In fact, with a 95 percent pass rate in state nursing programs with 20 or more students in 2007, Marshall ranks number one.

    By a wide margin, Marshall students have surpassed both the state and national averages.  In 2007, West Virginia students' rate of passage was 81 percent and the national average was approximately 85 percent, according to Pamela Alderman, president of the West Virginia Board of Registered Professional Nurses.

    "I am extremely proud of our graduates and our nursing program," Landry said.  "We have an exceptional group of students who make many sacrifices - money, family, time - in order to attend our program.  And we have a dedicated faculty who work to provide these students with the highest quality education possible.  Our priority has always been to ensure that our students are prepared to pass the national nursing licensure exam and to assume the demanding duties and responsibilities of the professional nurse."

    Students who complete nursing programs, either associate or baccalaureate degree programs, must take the National Council Licensure Examination to receive their licenses.

    The Marshall Nursing Program recently implemented a quality improvement plan that has helped the steady increase in the pass rate over the past few years, according to Landry.

    "We are very proud of our strong pass rate," Dr. Shortie McKinney, dean of Marshall's College of Health Professions, said.  "Our School of Nursing has support systems in place to strengthen the pass rate on the nursing exam.  As we move to increase the number of nursing students, maintaining a high pass rate is an important factor in our continued success."

    For more information, contact Landry at (304) 696-2630.

                                                                ###


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday February 18, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Construction of residence halls continues

    Construction of two new living/learning residence halls on Marshall University's Huntington campus has continued throughout the winter months.

    The two buildings, which will open in time for the start of the fall 2008 semester that begins in August, are part of a $94 million public-private project. Also under construction to the east of the residence halls is a 123,000 square-foot student recreation center, which is expected to open in February 2009.

    Links to the images provided by Capstone Development Corp., which with its partners jointly developed the project for the Student Recreation Center and new residence halls, can be found at http://www.marshall.edu/www/images/rec/.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday February 18, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

    Capitol press corps, Marshall Journalism grads ready to poke a little fun at state leaders during 'Third House'

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - For the 19th consecutive year, members of the Capitol press corps are teaming up with the Marshall University W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) to bring "The Third House" to the stage.

    The event, the school's largest annual fundraiser, will be at 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 5, at the West Virginia Cultural Center Auditorium. A catered reception will follow the show. Tickets are $25 and are available from the Governor's Press Office, the President of the Senate's Office, or the SOJMC.

    This year's production, "Live from the Archives, Library, Gift Shop and Grill," will feature WQBE's Larry McKay portraying former state Archives and History Director Fred Armstrong combing through "Third House" archives. As he does, the press corps troupe will showcase many best-of-the-best skits and musical satire from previous years. The production typically pokes a little fun at the expense of state leaders. SOJMC Dean Corley Dennison said this year's production won't disappoint. 

    "Expect to see some of your old favorites as well as clever new skits from this session," Dennison said. "Several creative people put in a lot of time to make 'Third House' a great success. We appreciate their hard work, energy and cleverness."

    "Third House" is organized by the SOJMC Alumni Association. Funds will directly benefit students.

    To order tickets from the school or for more information, contact sojmc@marshall.edu or call (304) 696-2360.


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    Friday February 15, 2008
    Contact: Jamie LoFiego, "Up Late", (304) 696-2967

    Nationally known comic Jim Short can add MU's 'Up Late' to his resume

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nationally known stand-up comic Jim Short - the Australian with the British accent - appears this weekend on "Up Late," Marshall University's student-run, late-night television show.

    Australian-born Short is based now in San Francisco and has appeared on "Late Night with Conan O'Brien," "Comedy Central's Premium Blend," "NBC's Late Friday," and "A&E's Comedy on the Road." He talks comedy with "Up Late" host Jamie LoFiego.

    Short won the 2004 San Francisco International Stand Up Competition and was deemed a "Talk of the Fest" performer at the 2004 Montreal International Just For Laughs Comedy Festival. Short is in Huntington for performances at the Funny Bone Comedy Club through the weekend.

    "Up Late's" musical guest is regionally known rapper D.O. Ceasar and doorkeeper is Ariene Wiley, a junior from Princeton, W.Va. This week the "Up Late" crew plays its game, "Ultimate Trivia Challenge," in which students across campus answer random questions. Gerry the Troll shows his softer side as cameras follow him on a Valentine's Day date.

    The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors LoFiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday February 15, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    CSX gift supports RTI, engineering program at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - CSX Corporation today presented $20,000 to Marshall University - $10,000 each to the Nick J. Rahall, II, Appalachian Transportation Institute and Marshall's newly reinstated engineering program.

    A check presentation took place in the office of MU President Stephen J. Kopp on the Huntington campus. Kopp was joined by Randy Cheetham, CSX's Regional Vice President-Public Affairs, Robert Plymale, director of the Rahall Transportation Institute, Dr. Tony Szwilski, interim dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), and Sara Mullen, director of development for CITE, in the presentation.

    "CSX's contributions to the Rahall Transportation Institute and the new engineering school at Marshall recognize our long-standing relationship with the University and the important role it plays in Huntington, where so many of our employees live and work," Cheetham said. "RTI's research continues to be a vital resource for the railroad industry, strengthening its ability to support the American economy.  And we look forward to the day when Marshall University School of Engineering graduates come to work for CSX."

    The funds will be used to support further research at the Rahall Transportation Institute and to fund a scholarship for the engineering program.

    Plymale said the support of CSX is important to RTI's success.

    "We appreciate CSX's ongoing financial and technical support for our research," Plymale said. "It is an important partnership for us."

    Szwilski said he, too, is grateful for CSX's latest gift.

    "The CSX scholarship is a significant investment in our engineering students," Szwilski said. "In addition, CSX is helping to support the engineering program's growth and success."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday February 14, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Annual Diversity Breakfast is Feb. 22 at Marshall; Director of Equity Programs is keynote speaker

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Michelle Brown Douglas, Director of Equity Programs at Marshall University since July 2007, will be the keynote speaker at Marshall's eighth annual Diversity Breakfast on Friday, Feb. 22.

    The breakfast, which is expected to attract about 300 people from the university and the community, runs from 7:30 to 8:50 a.m. in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The Diversity Breakfast is presented by Black United Students in collaboration with Multicultural Affairs, Office of Student Affairs, College of Liberal Arts, Office of Academic Affairs, Student Activities Programming Board and International Programs.

    "In today's society, more than ever, we must recognize and embrace the importance of living in a pluralistic world," said Maurice Cooley, Director of Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs, and Interim Vice President of Multicultural Affairs at MU. "Our own United States is becoming more culturally and racially diverse each day. Marshall University, as an academic institution that is widely diverse within our own boundaries, must take a leading role of promoting and teaching others about acceptance and inclusiveness of others in our daily lives. The annual Diversity Breakfast is a time in our community set aside to celebrate the importance of inclusiveness."

    Douglas, who is a native of Pompano Beach, Fla., will be introduced by Dominique Elmore, president of Marshall's Student Government Association. The breakfast also features special music from the Marshall University Student Jazz Combo and Muslim, Jewish and Christian blessings of the food.

    Douglas has earned degrees from the University of Minnesota (B.A. in History and African American Studies) and Florida State University (M.A. in History) and has been working in higher education for the past 16 years.

    Before coming to Marshall, she served as Director of Student Activities and Cultural Diversity at Ashland Community and Technical College from 2005 to 2007. She was the Assistant Director of the Office of Equity and Diversity at Buffalo State College from 2001 to 2005. Douglas has taught at Morehouse College, the University of West Georgia and Buffalo State College.

    Douglas' charge at Marshall is to promote and ensure equitable and fair treatment in every aspect of campus life, education and employment. She and her husband, Wade, have two children - 5-year-old daughter, Aria, and 3-month-old son, Quinton. They live in Milton, W.Va.

    Cost to attend the Diversity Breakfast is $11 per person, or $100 for a table of eight. Payment in advance is preferred, but not required. To pay in advance, persons may visit Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs in Room 1w25 of the Memorial Student Center. Or, call Fran Jackson at (304) 696-6705.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday February 13, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    2-Hour Delay for Wednesday, Feb. 13

    Marshall University's Huntington campus will be on a 2-hour delay (Code B) for Wednesday, Feb. 13.

    Code B means that classes and opening of offices are affected.

    For further information, visit http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/weather.html.

     

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday February 12, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    SURE program continues this summer; applications being accepted

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will continue to offer the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program not only this summer, but through 2010, thanks to a grant renewal from the West Virginia Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (WVEPSCoR) Research Challenge Fund.

    The program, first conducted at Marshall in 2005, is designed specifically to enable undergraduate researchers to work at Marshall. Each student will receive a stipend of $4,000, plus funds for travel and supplies.

    SURE supports undergraduate researchers over a 10-week period, and this year's program runs from May 19 through July 25. The SURE program is now accepting applications for summer 2008.  Application forms are available at the SURE Web site:   www.marshall.edu/SURE.

    "Anyone who is an undergraduate in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields at any institution here in West Virginia is eligible for the SURE program," said Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry and director of the SURE program at MU.

    Last summer, several Marshall University students received grants for research in the STEM fields. The students were: Charles Lowe (mathematics), Christina Newsome (chemistry), Deborah Preston (biology), Derek McKinney (environmental science), Jacob Kilgore (chemistry), Megan Neal (biology), Reema Patel (biology), Mai-lan Pham (biomedical sciences), Robert Gibson (biology), Samantha Newberry (biotechnology) and Zachary Tackett (biotechnology).

    For more information, contact Norton at (304) 696-6627 or e-mail norton@marshall.edu. More detailed summaries of SURE students' projects are available on the SURE Web site.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday February 12, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Award-winning writer to appear at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Writer Kirk Nesset will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21 in room 2W16 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Nesset is the author of Paradise Road, a collection of stories just out from the University of Pittsburgh Press and winner of the prestigious Drue Heinz Literature Prize.  Writer Ann Beattie calls Nesset's stories "endlessly surprising."

    He also is the author of two forthcoming collections of poems, as well as a non-fiction study of the works of Raymond Carver.

    Nesset's work has been widely published in literary journals and magazines, including Paris Review, Ploughshares, Fiction, Prairie Schooner, and The Southern Review. He also is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and several grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts.

    He teaches at Allegheny College in Pennsylvania.

    His appearance is sponsored by the Marshall English Department and the College of Liberal Arts.  It is free to the public.

    For more information, contact Art Springer in the English Department at (304) 696-2403.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday February 11, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Children can 'Grow With Music' this semester

    HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Children ages birth to 5 and their parents can still participate in "Grow With Music," a developmental music program that began Feb. 4 and will continue until May 21, according to Joni Pappas, director of the program, which is offered through the Speech and Hearing Clinic at Marshall University.

    Pappas says the 45-minute sessions are designed to enhance a child's cognitive, social/emotional, speech/language and physical development by using age-appropriate music activities and movement. Emphasis is made on American folk music, with which most of the parents will be familiar, and virtually all of it will be performed live.

    Classes are available for babies from birth to 18 months; toddlers from 18 to 36 months; and children from 3 to 5 years of age. Parent participation is required in the classes for the baby and toddler categories and optional for the 3-5 year category. Classes take place Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, with both daytime and early evening sessions available. A maximum of 10 children is accepted per class.

    "Music is very motivating for children of these ages," Pappas said. "We assist them in learning through play." She noted that children with special needs are welcome.

    Pappas is a board-certified neurologic music therapist specializing in early childhood intervention, special education and older adults. Her private practice has included work in numerous pre-schools, early childhood centers, special education programs, nursing homes and rehabilitative centers in Iowa, Mississippi and Indiana. She also is a music educator, having taught pre-K-12 general and choral music in Dubuque, Ia. She is currently serving as adjunct faculty for the Department of Music at Marshall.

    For information on the classes that are still available, persons may contact Pappas by e-mailing pappasj@marshall.edu, or by calling her at (304) 697-0211.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday February 11, 2008
    Contact: Mary Beth Reynolds, Interim Director of Assessment, (304) 696-2987

    Marshall asks for student feedback on national survey

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four thousand Marshall University students will be invited to participate in a national survey in which they can rate everything from the extent to which Marshall challenges them academically to the extent to which they interact with professors.

    The names of 2,000 freshmen and 2,000 seniors will be randomly selected to complete the National Survey of Student Engagement this month. They will receive notification of the online survey in the coming weeks from both the university and NSSE, according to Mary Beth Reynolds, interim director of assessment for Marshall.

    "We want to know what our students think of their curricular and co-curricular experiences, their surroundings, their activities, their professors and their Marshall experience as a whole," Reynolds said. "The results of NSSE will help us to assess our strengths and weaknesses as an institution.  What we learn will help us to enhance students' experiences at Marshall so that they are given the maximum opportunity to grow intellectually, personally and socially during their time here."

    The invitation to participate in the survey will be sent to students in an e-mail from NSSE. The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. Results will be compiled over the summer and shared with administrators and faculty before the start of the 2008-2009 academic year, Reynolds said.

    The survey will examine five benchmark areas:

    ·        Level of academic challenge

    ·        Active and collaborative learning

    ·        Student-faculty interaction

    ·        Enriching educational experiences

    ·        Supportive campus environment

    The NSSE survey is administered by Indiana University.  It gathers information from more than 1,200 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide to enhance student learning and personal development. The results provide an estimate of how undergraduates spend their time and what they gain from attending college.


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    Monday February 11, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    2- Hour Delay for Tuesday, Feb. 12

    Marshall University will be on a 2-hour delay (Code B) on Tuesday morning, Feb. 12.

    Code B means that both classes and opening of offices will be affected.

    For further information on Marshall's weather policy, visit the following link: http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/weather.html .

     


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    Friday February 8, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'The Vagina Monologues' is Feb. 15-16 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Women's Center and Women's Studies are sponsoring the annual benefit production of Eve Ensler's "The Vagina Monologues" on Friday, Feb. 15 and Saturday, Feb. 16 at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The production, presented as part of the 2008 V-Day Campaign, will take place at 8 p.m. each day in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre. "The Vagina Monologues" is part of a campaign to raise awareness about violence against women and girls.

    "The Vagina Monologues" also will help raise funds for local nonprofit organizations. The proceeds from the local event will be donated to Contact Rape Crisis Center, Branches Domestic Violence Shelter and TEAM for West Virginia Children.

    Admission is $12 for the public and $8 for Marshall students. For more information, contact Leah Tolliver, Marshall University Women's Center Coordinator, at (304) 696-3338.

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    MTV reality television personality Ashley McNeeley helps 'Up Late' learn to date

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Reality television personality and former Marshall University Thundering Herd football player Ashley McNeeley guest stars on this week's episode of "Up Late," MU's student-run late-night television show.

    McNeeley talks with host Jamie LoFiego about his recent fame, the MTV show "A Shot At Love," and his newest venture, "That's Amore," which begins airing March 5 on MTV. The cast and crew of "Up Late" also play a dating game with McNeeley with comical results. Will Sutherland, a senior from Shepherdstown, W.Va., shares his audition tape for his shot at reality television fame. Musical guest Mark Haas, a senior from Huntington, plays keyboard.

    The show will air from 11 to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9 on MyZTV and on Comcast Channel 25 throughout the weekend.

    "Up Late" grew out of the Introduction to Video Production class taught by instructors Lofiego and Eric Himes, who both work with Marshall's Instructional Television Channel 25. It is produced entirely by students and has a late-night show quality featuring interviews, skits, ridiculous stunts, guest bands and comedy.


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    Hot Shot Business Competition for Kids is Feb. 16 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - High school and middle school students are invited to compete for certificates and prizes from local sponsors and entrepreneurs while learning about starting a business during the Hot Shot Business Competition for Kids Saturday, Feb. 16 at Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Hot Shot Business, a computer simulation game created by Disney© and the Kauffman Foundation©, shows young people what it is like to start a business. The format for the competition is fast-paced and fun and provides the opportunity to learn by doing.  Winners of each session will be determined by the largest profit earned.  Participants will learn how to spot business opportunities, deal with ethical dilemmas, get organized, make decisions and become savvy money managers.  

    A workshop for parents and guardians will be offered while the students are taking part in the competition. It will provide information on local support services for entrepreneurs, how a hobby can be turned into a business, opportunities for government contracting, and continuing education opportunities.

    Speakers, funding for prize packages, and volunteer support for the event is being provided by the following state and local sponsors: A Vision Shared; Advantage Valley Entrepreneurial Support Network and Entrepreneurial League System; BB&T; Community Trust Bank; Guaranty Bank and Trust; Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce; Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce's Young Professionals Committee; Jeslyn Performing Arts Center; Marshall Community and Technical College's Small Business Development Center; Marshall University Information Technology; Marshall University's Lewis College of Business; Marshall University's Office of Recruitment; Marshall University Technology Transfer Office; Opening Soon, Inc.; West Virginia State Community and Technical College; Regional Contracting Assistance Center, Inc. of Charleston, W.Va., and Yellow Brick Road.

    Students may register for the Hot Shot Business Competition for Kids by calling Kathleen Thornton at Marshall University Community and Technical College's Small Business Development Center at (304) 399-1042. Deadline to register is 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15. Although there is no charge for the competition, a maximum of 80 participants will be accepted for each of the two sessions.

    Here is the schedule for the day:

    Morning session (middle school students)

    9:30 a.m., registration (first-floor lobby of Corbly Hall, corner of 5th Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard)
    10 a.m., competition begins (one hour); workshop for parents/guardians
    11:15 a.m., refreshments
    11:30 a.m., speaker (winner is announced)


    Afternoon session (high school students)

    Noon, registration (first-floor lobby of Corbly Hall, corner of 5th Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard)
    12:30 p.m., competition begins (one hour); workshop for parents/guardians
    1:45 p.m., refreshments
    2 p.m., speaker (winner is announced)

    Participants may practice for the competition by logging on to www.hotshotbusiness.com and creating an account.  Participants must bring their account usernames and passwords with them to the competition.

    For more information, contact Amy Anastasia, Assistant Director of Marshall University's Technology Transfer Office, at (304) 696-4365

    ###


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    Book Marks '08 exhibition brings engaging, accessible contemporary art form to Marshall University's Birke Art Gallery

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Book Marks '08, an exhibition featuring established and emerging artists in the field of contemporary book arts, opened Monday, Feb. 11 at the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    The exhibition also showcases rare and limited-edition traditional books from Marshall's Morrow Library along with a private collection. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 6-8 p.m. Monday.

    The exhibition's featured artist is Miriam Schaer from Brooklyn, N.Y. Schaer creates witty sculptural books that push the boundaries of the book, pulling viewers into their narratives with unexpected textures and forms. Schaer will present a public lecture at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14 in Smith Hall room 154 adjacent to the Birke Art Gallery. Both the lecture and the exhibition are free to the public.

    Other contemporary book artists exhibiting in Book Marks '08 are Andrea Deszo, Jim Bailey, Doug Beube, Carrie Lingscheit, Rebecca Gilbert and Maddy Rosenberg. Marshall are faculty members Peter Massing and Byron Clercx also are exhibiting book works.

    The terms "book arts" and "artist's books" are used more or less interchangeably in the contemporary visual art world. Artist's books are original or limited-edition works of art that are realized in book form. Book artists often interpret the book form loosely, and they may employ a variety of "book" formats, such as scrolls, accordion fold-outs or even individual works on paper contained in a box.

    For most people, artist's books are more unfamiliar than traditional art media like painting and sculpture, but the art form is an especially engaging and accessible one. Artist's books are often interactive, and the viewer is encouraged to touch, handle and "read" the artwork.


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    Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp to take place April 4-5 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - New York Jets quarterback Chad Pennington and former Philadelphia Eagles long snapper Mike Bartrum will share coaching duties with New England Patriots receiver Troy Brown in the 2008 Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp April 4-5 at Marshall University.

    Brown, Pennington and Bartrum coached in last year's inaugural fantasy camp, which is a fundraiser for Marshall's Child Development Academy. The 2008 camp will include time with coaches, team practices, a draft and a flag-football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

    The event is of special interest to Brown, a member of three Super Bowl champion New England teams, because of his connection to the area. He played football for the Thundering Herd in the 1991 and 1992 seasons, and still lives in Huntington with his wife, Kim, and their two sons.

    "My family has a very strong and special connection with Huntington and Marshall University," Brown said. "When Kim and I chose to raise our children in Huntington, they enrolled at the Child Development Academy at Marshall University and the academy became a major positive force in their early development."

    The cost of the camp is $1,000 and participants must be at least 23 years old. All of the money raised goes to the academy. For more information or to register for the Troy Brown Fantasy Football Camp, log on to www.troybrownfantasyfootball.com.


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    Piano recital to feature former Marshall faculty member

    Dr. Harsha Abeyaratne, who once served on the Marshall University music faculty, will return to present a recital at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10 in the Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus.

    As a solo and collaborative pianist, he has performed in halls, churches, colleges, and universities in locations as far-ranging as Chicago; New York; Jacksonville, Fla.; Ashland, Ore.; Charleston, W. Va.; Cambridge, Ohio; and Huntington, Ind. His teachers have included Mary Billimoria, Ann Schaffert Miller, and Robert Palmer.

    He has two undergraduate degrees from Lewis and Clark College and both master's and doctoral degrees from Ball State University. He joined the department of music at Muskingum College in 2003 as an assistant professor of music and currently resides in Zanesville, Ohio.

    The recital is free and open to the public. For further information, persons may call the Marshall Department of Music at (304) 696-3117.


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    Activities planned in conjunction with American Heart Month

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As part of February's American Heart Month activities, the Marshall University College of Health Professions, along with the offices of Student Health Education and Student Services, is hosting a series of activities to increase awareness of the importance of heart health.

    The events are being planned for the students, faculty and staff at Marshall as well as for the Huntington community.

    One of those activities will be a nearly mile-long Go Red Heart Health Walk around Marshall's Huntington campus on Wednesday, Feb. 27.   

    "It only takes about 30 minutes of activity each day to improve heart health," said Marilyn Fox, program manager of the College of Health Professions.  "The walk through the Marshall campus can be the first step in improving heart health.

    Several of the events will focus on healthier eating through food selection and preparation.  There will even be tips on how to maintain a heart healthy diet on a budget and when eating out.

    Marshall students can participate in tours of the Twin Towers and Harless Dining Hall on  Thursday, Feb. 21 at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.  Dietetics students will meet with them and explain how to make good heart healthy choices when eating in the cafeterias.

    As part of the Fitness Challenge, lunch seminars are scheduled for Wednesday, Feb.13, 20, and 27, in room 402 of the Drinko Library.  These lunch bag seminars are designed to provide numerous pointers on attaining and maintaining a healthier lifestyle.

    Other events open to faculty, staff and the community include:

    • Tuesday, Feb. 12, Heart Healthy Meal Preparation, 6 p.m., Corbly Hall 103.  A $10 charge will cover materials including a donation to the American Heart Association.  Space is limited so interested persons should contact Fox at (304) 696-2620 or at foxm@marshall.edu to reserve a space.
    • Wednesday, Feb. 20, Go Red Wellness Fair, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Memorial Student Center.  Everyone is invited to stop by and learn more about improving heart health.
    • Wednesday, Feb. 27, Go Red Heart Walk, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  Participants will meet at the Memorial Student Center before beginning the walk around the campus.

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    Chesapeake Energy announces scholarship support to Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Chesapeake Energy Corporation today announced the donation of $150,000 in scholarships to Marshall University. The funds will support student education in business and engineering. 

    The five-year program, which was announced at Marshall Day at the Capitol, highlights Chesapeake's commitment to creating private-public partnerships to support education. While $75,000 will go directly to Marshall University, the remaining $75,000 will be directed to a nonprofit organization, the Appalachian Leadership and Education Foundation (ALEF), for students studying civil engineering at Marshall.

    "This donation is a unique opportunity for three organizations to work together for a common goal: to create a stronger workforce with a commitment to leadership and community," Dr. Stephen J.  Kopp, president of Marshall University, said. "Chesapeake Energy's investment affirms their confidence in Marshall University and is greatly appreciated."

    Over the next five years, the $150,000 in scholarship support will fund at least three scholarships in the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE) and the Lewis College of Business annually.

    "This partnership allows Chesapeake Energy to invest in West Virginia's future," Scott Rotruck, Vice President of Corporate Development, said. "Marshall is shaping leaders, and we are pleased to help them pursue that mission."

    ALEF is a nonprofit organization funded by foundations and companies. It supports and enables young men and women from Appalachia to pursue higher education through scholarship and leadership curriculum. The program includes an emphasis toward the preparation required to be the leaders of the next decade.  The concept of operations for ALEF is to partner with established academic institutions across Appalachia to provide the technical skills necessary as the basis for credible leadership.

    "The generous support provided by Chesapeake Energy is paramount to achieving our goals and developing the next greatest generation of West Virginia leaders," Pamela Scaggs, ALEF's resource development director, said.

    Chesapeake Energy Corporation is the largest independent producer and third-largest overall producer of natural gas in the United States.  Headquartered in Oklahoma City, the company's operations are focused on exploratory and developmental drilling and corporate and property acquisitions in the Mid-Continent, Fort Worth Barnett Shale, Fayetteville Shale, Permian Basin, Delaware Basin, South Texas, Texas Gulf Coast, Ark-La-Tex and Appalachian Basin regions of the United States.

    For more information, please visit www.chk.com or www.marshall.edu.


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    Wednesday January 30, 2008
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    Fall 2007 dean's list available on Marshall Web site

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Fall 2007 semester are available on the Marshall Web site.

    To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. The names of 2,317 students on the dean's list are included on the Web site. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list.

    The dean's list is accessible at www.marshall.edu/ucomm/DeansList/deanslist.html.


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    Monday January 28, 2008
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    Dennison named Director of Development for College of Science at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Cory Dennison IV, a cum laude graduate of Marshall University with a degree in political science, has been named Director of Development for the university's College of Science.

    In conjunction with the Marshall Foundation, Dennison will lead fundraising efforts, provide counsel, and assist with public relations for the college. He will work closely with Dr. Andrew Rogerson, dean, and Lance West, Vice President for Major Gift Development, to identify key areas of need. Dennison previously served as a development officer for the foundation.

    "I look forward to working with Dean Rogerson, faculty, and alumni to build upon their success," Dennison said. "It's an exciting time of growth and opportunity for the college and the university."

    As a student, Dennison was the long snapper on Marshall's 2002 GMAC Bowl championship football team. He was the student body vice president and a two-year member of the MU Board of Governors, in which he served as the student representative. He also is a 2006 graduate of the West Virginia University College of Law. He has worked for the West Virginia Senate and with the law firm of Tyson and Tyson in Huntington. 

    "Cory's leadership at Marshall, combined with his previous experience, makes him an ideal fit for the position," West said. "He understands the important role education plays in the future of our state, our economy and our community."

    Rogerson said the college continues to see increased enrollment due to a growing need for science-related professionals. The college features award-winning instructors and the state-of-the-art Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center, which provides students with an excellent learning environment, and faculty with superior research facilities. The faculty encourages student participation in research activities, too, giving students hands-on experience they can apply after graduation.

    "As the need for individuals with specialized skills in science continues to grow, Marshall University is able to provide students the education and experience they'll need to succeed," Rogerson said. "We're committed to providing our students with a comprehensive education from which to grow, learn and develop as leaders."
     
    Dennison can be reached by calling (304) 696-2435 or via e-mail at denniso3@marshall.edu.


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    Worth, McNearney to show new artwork Feb. 2 at Java Joint

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Christopher Worth, a tutor with the Marshall University H.E.L.P. program and alumnus of the College of Fine Arts, and Clay McNearney, chair of MU's Religious Studies program, will be showing some of their new artwork on Friday, Feb. 2.

    The showing begins at 8 p.m. at the Java Joint, located at 1555 3rd Ave. (corner of 3rd Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard).

    "This event showcases new artwork for both Clay and me," Worth said. "I believe it's an example of the fine arts at Marshall University having a wider reach in the community. It's very exciting to be given this opportunity by the Java Joint."

    For more information, contact Worth at (304) 942-6959 or via e-mail at worth2@marshall.edu.


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    Marshall University joins hundreds of universities in nationwide global warming Teach-In

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Beginning Thursday, Jan. 31, Marshall University will host a series of events as part of its participation in a nationwide Teach-In to further inform the public about the facts of global warming.

    More than 1,000 colleges and universities throughout the United States have been organized through Focus the Nation (www.focusthenation.org) to host such events.  It will be the largest Teach-In in U.S. history.

    The Marshall events begin with a free showing of the Oscar-winning documentary movie "An Inconvenient Truth" at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center Alumni Lounge. Events continue the next day, Friday, Feb. 1, with a lecture on Paleoclimate by Dr. Dewey Sanderson of the MU Department of Geology beginning at 9:30 a.m. The lecture will take place in Room 376 of the Science Building.

    The lecture will be followed by four 50-minute panel discussions, all in Room 376 of the Science Building. They include:  "Lessons in Climate" (10-10:50 a.m.), "Climate and West Virginia" (11-11:50 a.m.), "Motivating Action" (1-1:50 p.m.), and "Climate and Social Justice" (2-2:50 p.m.).  Discussion panels will be composed predominantly of Marshall faculty.  A notable exception is Tony Cavalier, Chief Meteorologist at WSAZ-3, who will participate in "Climate and West Virginia."

    Sodexho Foods is sponsoring lunch, which will be provided in the Harless Dining Hall and will feature local food.  Informational booths will be set up in Morrow Library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    The Teach-In will conclude that evening with a lecture featuring keynote speaker Stephanie Timmermeyer, Cabinet Secretary with the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, at 6 p.m. in the MSC Alumni Lounge.

    All events for the Marshall University Global Warming Teach-In are free and open to the public.

    For additional information on the Marshall University Global Warming Teach-In, contact Dr. Dawn Holliday (hollidad@marshall.edu) or Dr. Frank S. Gilliam (gilliam@marshall.edu).  Gilliam also may be reached at (304) 696-3636 or by fax at (304) 696-3243, or persons may visit his Web site at http://mupfc.marshall.edu/~gilliam/.


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    Dan Trudell, Knoxville Jazz Orchestra to Headline MU Jazz Festival

    HUNTINGTON W. Va. - Dan Trudell, the man Downbeat Magazine has called "the best organ player now working in Chicago," will bring his Hammond B-3 and the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra  to Huntington at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1 in the headline concert of  Marshall University's 39th annual Jazz Festival.

    Festival events, sponsored by MU's department of music, will take place in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Tickets may be purchased at the center's box office, or by calling (304) 696-2787.

    Dr. Ed Bingham, director of jazz studies at Marshall, said the Jazz Festival has been an important part of West Virginia's artistic community since its beginning in 1970.

    "It attracts nationally recognized artists and supports the MU Jazz Studies Program in its efforts to educate students, to entertain the public and to preserve the rich heritage of jazz," Bingham said.

    Artists who have performed at Marshall and with the MU Jazz Ensemble comprise a veritable "Who's Who" among important jazz musicians, Bingham said. Included among them are Joe Farrell, Phil Wilson, Clark Terry, Gary Burton, Rich Matteson, Art Pepper, Jamey Aebersold, Maynard Ferguson and Orchestra, Stan Kenton and Orchestra, Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd, Herbie Mann, Gary Burton, Ed Soph, Dominic Spera, the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra with Buddy Morrow, the Count Basie Orchestra, Bob Thompson, Mike Vax, Chris Vadala, Bill Watrous, Eddie Daniels, Oliver Nelson, Dave Valentin, Alvin Batiste, Terry Gibbs, Denis DeBlasio, Conrad Herwig, James Dapogny, Louis Bellson, Arturo Sandoval, The Columbus Jazz Orchestra, Paquite D'Rivera and the Dizzy Gillespie All Stars and, most recently, Sherrie Maricle and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra.

    The Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, under the direction of founder Vance Thompson, is is a 17-piece big band with five saxophones, four trombones, five trumpets, piano, bass, and drums. The band is comprised of East Tennessee's top professional musicians and performs a wide range of music from America's jazz tradition. The group's performances have been described as energetic, exciting, engaging and highly entertaining. Internationally recognized artists who have appeared with the group include pianists Monty Alexander, Donald Brown, Hank Jones and Mulgrew Miller; saxophonists Seamus Blake, Don Braden, Vincent Herring, James Moody and Grey Tardy; trumpeters Bill Mobley, Marvin Stamm and Byron Stripling; trombonists Wycliffe Gordon and Paul McKee; and vocalists Deborah Brown and Annie Sellick.

    Trudell has numerous professional credits, including stints accompanying singers Joe Williams and Aretha Franklin. He has also performed with prominent jazzmen Nick Brignola, Alan Dawson, Jim Rotondi, James Clay, and Matt Wilson. He currently performs in Chicago with the Chicago Jazz Orchestra, and the Mike Allemana Organ Trio, and his group, the B3 Bombers.

    In keeping with the educational mission of the MU Jazz Festival, student ensembles from across the region will perform during the event on Feb. 1. Each group will receive feedback from members of the Knoxville Jazz Orchestra and Trudell in a concert-clinic format. 

    Here is the complete festival schedule:

    Thursday Jan. 31:

    7:30 p.m., Opening Concert  (admission $10 adults, $5 students)
    Bridgeport High School
    Cabell Midland High School
    Bluetrane: Marshall University's Faculty Jazz Ensemble
     

    Friday, Feb. 1:

    9 a.m.               Point Pleasant High School
    10 a.m.             Cabell Midland High School
    11 a.m.             Blennerhasset Junior High
    1 p.m.              Parkersburg High School
    2 p.m.              Gallia Academy High School 
    3 p.m.              Bridgeport High School
    4 p.m.              Fairmont High School
    5 p.m.              Williamstown High School

    7:30 p.m., Concert by Dan Trudell, Knoxville Jazz Orchestra, and Mark Zanter Group (admission $10 adults, $5 students)

    Saturday, Feb. 2:

    7:30 p.m., Finale Concert (admission $10 adults, $5 students)
    Thundering Herd All-Stars
    Marshall University Jazz Ensemble with faculty soloists

    For more information, persons may contact Bingham at (304) 696-3147.


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    BB&T awards $1 million gift to Marshall University College of Business

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The BB&T Charitable Foundation announced today the contribution of $1 million to establish The BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at the Lewis College of Business at Marshall University.

    BB&T West Virginia Group/State President Phyllis Arnold said a key component of the BB&T Center will be to provide students with a solid grounding in the workings of capitalism and free market forces.  Components of the Center's curriculum include but are not limited to:

    •     An upper level course focusing on the principles set forth in Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged and Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations.
    •    A Lecture series known as the BB&T Lectures with speakers advocating public policies that promote economic and political freedom.

    "There is overwhelming evidence that capitalism produces a higher economic standard of living," said Arnold.  "John Allison, our chairman and chief executive officer, passionately believes there needs to be a deeper understanding of the moral defense of capitalism and its causal relationship to economic well being."

    "We find that many students that graduate with a business degree, while understanding the technology of business, do not have a clear grasp of the moral principles underlying free markets.  It is with great pleasure that we make this contribution to enhance the educational offerings of the University and look forward to seeing the successes that result from Marshall's business students, not just in the next semester, but in the years to follow," Arnold said.

    According to Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, Cal Kent, vice president for Business and Economic Research, will serve as director of the Center. Kopp said the University is thrilled to incorporate this Center into the Lewis College of Business.

    "This College produces hundreds of graduates each year, all with the knowledge and skills to enjoy successful business careers," Kopp said.  "We are confident this Center will enhance the business acumen of our students and broaden their educational foundations of the fundamentals in free market capitalism. We greatly appreciate BB&T's contribution to Marshall, which will establish this important center."

     "This is a very exciting opportunity," Kent said. "It will better inform our students regarding the benefits of the market economy and will enable us to better prepare our graduates for the workplace."

    With $132.6 billion in assets, Winston-Salem, N.C.-based BB&T Corporation is the nation's 14th largest financial holding company. It operates nearly 1,500 financial centers in 11 states and Washington, D.C.

    For more information, please visit www.bbt.com or www.marshall.edu.


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    Tuesday January 22, 2008
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    Fifth annual Undergraduate Day at the Capitol attracts 100 students, including 18 from Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - One hundred students, including 18 from Marshall University, will participate in the fifth annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston on Thursday, Jan. 31.

    The students will represent 13 West Virginia colleges and universities at Undergraduate Research Day, which runs from 8:45 a.m. to noon in the Capitol Rotunda. Students will present their discoveries in poster format and talk to legislators about their findings. The projects are original research and the posters have been designed for a general audience.

    In addition to Marshall, other schools represented are Alderson-Broaddus College; Bethany College; Concord University; Fairmont State University; Glenville State College; Ohio Valley University; the University of Charleston; West Liberty State College; West Virginia University; West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wheeling Jesuit University and WVU Institute of Technology.

    Students will present their posters in the areas of aerospace engineering, chemistry, environmental studies, foreign language, geology, sociology/social work, psychology, chemical engineering, computer science and information technology, biology, biochemistry, engineering, electrical engineering, physics, biological science and mathematics.

    "It's an event that members of the Legislature enjoy. These students are incredibly enthusiastic about their projects and that excitement engages anyone who stops by to chat with them," said Michael Castellani, chair of Marshall's chemistry department, and co-chair of the event's organizing committee. "Likewise, the students are proud to display their projects and speak with state officials about their research. It is a special day and a special event for everyone involved."

    The following is a list of Marshall's participants, along with their home counties or cities, disciplines, research posters and advisors:

    • Jennifer Cavender, Kanawha County (Psychology) - "A Correlational Study of High-Fat and High-Sugar Foods on BMI." - Marc Lindberg, advisor
       
    • Heather Butts, Cabell County (Biology) - "Adult-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Parkinson's Disease." - Elmer Price, advisor
       
    • Adam Short, Cabell County (Biology) - "Prevalence and Significance of Acanthamoeba in Huntington Tap Water." - Andrew Rogerson, advisor
       
    • William Kelly, Wayne County, Ashley Stewart, Cabell County, and Waseem Khader, Cabell County (Biology) - "Altered Protein Expression in Microgravity." - Jagan Valluri, advisor
       
    • Brent D. Frederick, McDowell County, Jamar Grayson, Kanawha County, and Marvyn Grayson, Kanawha County (Biological Science) - "Effect of Arsenic, Aluminum and Copper on Genotoxicity and Apoptosis in Fish Cells." - Elizabeth Murray, advisor
       
    • Candice M. Dotson, Mingo County, and Rebecca L. Klug, Cabell County (Chemistry) - "Computational Study of Two Classes of Potential Nanodevices." - Rudolf Burcl, advisor
       
    • Tiffany Oxley, Cabell County (Psychology) - "Tests of an Attachment Model of Suicide." - Marc Lindberg, advisor
       
    • Daniel Velazquez, Cabell County (Physics) - Anisotropic Capillary Wave Propagation in a Ripple Tank." - Thomas Wilson, advisor
       
    • Todd Amick, Putnam County (Psychology) - "Helplessness and Hopelessness in Depression in Relation to Attachment Theory." - Marc Lindberg, advisor
       
    • Laurel Ackison, Cabell County (Biology) - "Effects of Temperature and Ammonia on the Capacity of Freshwater Mussels to Filter Water." - Jeff Kovatch, advisor
       
    • Megan Neal, Cabell County (Biology) - "Effects of Acetaminophen on Aging Cardiac Muscle and miRNA Expression." - Eric R. Blough, advisor
       
    • Zachary Tackett, Proctorville, Ohio (Biochemistry) - "Molecular Epidemiological Analysis of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Isolates in a Subpopulation of West Virginia." - Menashi Cohenford, advisor
       
    • Amelia Boslaugh, Kanawha County (Art and Design) - Program cover artist - Mary Grassell, advisor

    For more information on Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol, contact Castellani at (304) 696-6486.


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    Friday January 18, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Annual Soul Food Feast set for Sunday, Jan. 27 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Center for African-American Students' Programs at Marshall University is sponsoring the annual Soul Food Feast Sunday, Jan. 27 on the Huntington campus.

    The feast begins at 2 p.m. in the John Marshall Dining Room, which is located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center. The event offers participants a gathering in which they can socialize and experience the soulful taste of traditional African-American foods prepared by local chefs.

    "The  Center for African-American Students' Programs  looks forward each year to this awesome gathering of people from throughout our community who come together to enjoy traditional 'soul' foods and the company of one another," said Maurice Cooley, Interim Vice President for Multicultural Affairs and Director of the Center for African-American Students' Programs. "Some families return year after year to the only place in town where one can sit amongst friends to enjoy a full complement of African-American foods that have been handed down from generation to generation."  

    The menu for the event includes items such as chitterlings, fried chicken, barbeque ribs, macaroni and cheese, collard greens, candied yams, potato salad, cole slaw, cornbread and desserts.

    The event is open to the public. Tickets for the feast are $7 for adults and $4 for students. Participants may purchase tickets at the door or in advance at the center's office, which is located in room 1W25 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    For more information, persons may contact Fran Jackson, assistant with the Center for African-American Students' Programs, at (304) 696-6705.


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    Friday January 18, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Governor Manchin appoints Michael G. Sellards to Board of Governors

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Michael G. Sellards, President and Chief Executive Officer of St. Mary's Medical Center, has been appointed to Marshall University's Board of Governors by West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin III. Sellards' term runs through June 30, 2010.

    Sellards, a Huntington resident, replaces former vice chair Menis E. Ketchum, who resigned from the board on Jan. 2, citing commitments to his campaign for the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

    "Mike Sellards is a very capable executive, experienced in areas of medicine, and the St. Mary's organization that he leads is a major economic force in an area of great interest to Marshall University and the state of West Virginia," said Robert L. Shell, chair of Marshall's board. "We are privileged to have someone of his caliber serving on our board."

    Sellards, who has been in his current position at St. Mary's since 2000, was Executive Director/CEO of Pleasant Valley Hospital in Point Pleasant, W.Va., from 1982 to 2000. He is a native of Huntington.

    "Marshall University is the most important factor in the future growth and success of the Huntington area," Sellards said. "I look forward to joining the MU Board of Governors and helping continue a long tradition of excellence in higher education, research and community development."

    Sellards is affiliated with numerous professional and civic organizations. He is a delegate with American Hospital Association Regional Policy Board 3, and a member of the West Virginia Hospital Association Board of Trustees, the Premier Quality Improvement Committee, the Huntington Medical Community Foundation Board of Trustees and the Tri-State Health Partners (Physician Hospital Organization) Board of Directors.

    Sellards is chair of the United Way of the River Cities board of directors. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce Board of Trustees in Huntington, the Advantage Valley Board of Trustees, the West Virginia Business Roundtable, the West Virginia Chamber of Commerce Health Care Policy Committee, West Virginia Vision Shared and the West Virginia Council for Community and Economic Development.


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    Thursday January 17, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Herd fans invited to reception before Capital Classic

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Hundreds of Marshall University basketball fans are expected to gather in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center Wednesday, Jan. 23 for a Chesapeake Energy Capital Classic pre-game reception.

    The reception, hosted by the Marshall University Alumni Association and sponsored by Pepsi Bottling Co., BrickStreet Mutual Insurance Co., ELCO Mechanical, Mountain State Insurance, Inc., and Liberty Mutual Insurance, Inc., is from 6 to 8 p.m. and is free to the public. It coincides with a basketball doubleheader between Marshall's and West Virginia University's women's and men's basketball teams in the Charleston Civic Center Coliseum.

    The women's game starts at 5:30 p.m., with the men's game tipping off at 8 p.m. All four teams have winning records.

    "Based on the success of the men's and women's teams from both universities so far this season, and the natural rivalry of the two universities, an exciting night of basketball is guaranteed," said Tish Littlehales, Marshall's director of alumni relations. "We want to get that excitement started early at the annual pre-game reception. It's the perfect venue to get our fans revved up for both games."

    Music will be provided, along with complimentary hors d'oeuvres, a cash bar and giveaways. Marshall's cheerleaders, along with Marco and the pep band, also will perform at the reception.

    Representatives from many Marshall colleges, departments and activities will take part in the reception, setting up displays and sharing information with visitors. Among those planning displays are the College of Health Professions, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, the College of Information Technology and Engineering (CITE), the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), the Lewis College of Business, the College of Fine Arts, the Marshall Bookstore - which will be selling merchandise, STEM, the College of Education and Human Services, the College of Science, the Bridge Campaign, the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, MU Libraries, the College of Liberal Arts and Student Affairs.

    Also, one of the large "We Are Marshall" movie posters that lined the walls of the premiere at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena will be up for bid in a silent auction during the reception. The poster will be signed by Red Dawson, an assistant coach with the 1970 Marshall football team. His character was played by Matthew Fox in "We Are Marshall." Dawson plans to attend the reception.

    For more information on the reception, contact Nancy Pelphrey with the Alumni Association at (304) 696-3134. 


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    Wednesday January 16, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

    Marshall student to perform with DIVA Jazz Orchestra

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Angela Crum, a Marshall University senior majoring in trumpet performance, has been invited to perform with Sherrie Maricle and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra in a performance they will give in Hackettstown, N.J., on Saturday, Jan. 19.

    "I can't begin to tell you how much this performance means to me," Crum said. She first met Maricle, a drummer who leads the band, and the other DIVA musicians last year when they came to Huntington to perform at the MU Jazz Festival.

    Sherrie Maricle and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra are based in New York City and play contemporary, mainstream big band jazz composed and arranged by band members and other renowned writers including Tommy Newsom, Ellen Rowe, Rich Shemaria and Scott Whitfield.

    DIVA was founded by Stanley Kay, a former manager and relief drummer for the Buddy Rich Big Band. In 1990, Kay was conducting a band where Maricle was playing drums. Impressed by her skill, Kay wondered if there were other women musicians with a similar caliber of musicianship. A nationwide audition of players produced a core group of musicians who performed their first concert in March of 1993.

    "This kind of opportunity for one of our students is a real coup for our jazz studies area and the Department of Music overall," said Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, chair of the music department at Marshall. "We are very proud of Angela and our jazz program, which she will be representing."

    Crum, whose hometown is Union, W. Va., is a member of the university's chapter of Delta Omicron International Music Fraternity and several other campus groups, including the International Association for Jazz Education.

    The Jan. 19 performance will take place at Centenary College in its Whitney Chapel.

    For further information, persons may contact the Department of Music at (304) 696-3117.

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    Wednesday January 16, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall alums Debby Stoler, Glen Midkiff join Career Services staff

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two new staff members have joined Marshall University's Career Services, according to Denise Hogsett, Career Services director.

    Debby Stoler and Glen Midkiff, both Marshall graduates, are returning to their alma mater, Stoler as Assistant Director for Development and Outreach and Midkiff in the new position of Events and Publicity Coordinator for Career Services.

    Stoler has an extensive background in sales and marketing with the Hershey Company and most recently with The Herald-Dispatch in Huntington.

    "Debby will fill an important role at Marshall University as she continues to develop needed relationships with employers large and small that are looking to connect with our students for entry-level positions," Hogsett said.  "She will be developing plans of action for employers to increase on-campus presence and educate students and faculty about the company and employment opportunities."

    In addition, Stoler will work to develop meaningful internships, facilitate interest in informational/recruiting sessions, encourage attendance at job fairs, develop a speakers bureau, and work with faculty to obtain their input involving career opportunities and internship requirements, Hogsett said.

    "Being a lifelong Huntington resident and Marshall alum, I definitely 'bleed green,' " Stoler said.  "I am so pleased to be an official part of the university that has always been a part of my life.  I look forward to forming beneficial relationships with employers and faculty that will help bridge that first step from education to career for our students."

    Midkiff returns to Marshall University after beginning his career at Michigan State University and then moving on to be Assistant Director of Housing and Residence Life at the University of Louisville.  He has an undergraduate degree from Marshall and received his Master of Science Degree in Adult and Technical Education from Marshall in May 2000.

    "Glen brings with him a wealth of experience in education and training, which will assist members of the university community with event planning and other services we offer," Hogsett said.

    His major role will be to increase awareness among students of career events and opportunities as well as the coordination of events for the Career Center and evaluating the effectiveness of each event, according to Hogsett.

    "I am thrilled about coming home to my alma mater, which has made such a positive impact on my life," Midkiff said.  "I feel so fortunate to have the opportunity to contribute to Marshall because the university has invested so much in me."

            ###     


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    Wednesday January 16, 2008
    Contact: Beverly McCoy, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, (304) 691-1713

    Two Marshall doctors play key roles in developing new medical guides

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- A newly revised American Medical Association reference book used internationally for impairment evaluations contains significant contributions from two physicians of Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    Dr. Mohammed Ranavaya, a professor of occupational and environmental medicine in Marshall's Department of Family and Community Health, was one of five associate editors for the book, the AMA's "Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment, Sixth Edition." Ranavaya was the primary author of three chapters, including the instructions for using the rating system and the chapter relating to lung disease and other disorders of the pulmonary system. He oversaw the development of other sections of the book as well.

    Dr. Paulette Wehner, professor of cardiovascular services and program director of Marshall's adult cardiology training program, was the primary author of the book's chapter on heart disease and other problems of cardiovascular system.

    Released this month, the 654-page book is a detailed road map for determining how much impairment -- and ultimately the disability -- an illness or injury has caused in a person.

    Ranavaya said the workers compensation programs of about 40 U.S. states (including West Virginia, Ohio and Kentucky) are required by law to use the AMA Guides as their basis for determining long-term benefits for job-related injuries or illness. The guides are used extensively by the federal government and in some auto accident and personal injury cases, and also are widely recognized in Canada, Australia, South Africa and the European Union as a tool to measure impairment.

    The guides promote consistency and fairness, said Ranavaya, an authority on impairment and disability evaluations who has worked for more than 20 years on this and previous editions. "Without uniform standards there would be far more disputes, and decisions would have to be made on the basis of opinions, which are subject to bias," he said. "A unified standard helps prevent disputes and needless litigation while providing equitable and just adjudication of claims."

    In addition to incorporating the latest in medical knowledge, the new edition of the guides has been significantly restructured. For example, it now includes a detailed diagnosis-based evaluation grid for each organ system, with step-by-step instructions. The goal is to help assure that when different evaluators look at the same set of facts, they reach the same conclusion, Ranavaya said.

    Details about the guides can be found at https://catalog.ama-assn.org/Catalog/home.jsp


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    Monday January 14, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Adnate exhibition and artist talk will open Birke Art Gallery's spring exhibition season

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Birke Art Gallery in Marshall University's College of Fine Arts will open this spring's exhibition calendar with Adnate, a two-person exhibition of works by Drew Goerlitz and Ali Della Bitta.

    The exhibition will open on Wednesday, Jan. 16 and run through Thursday, Feb. 7. An Artist Talk (lecture/presentation by the exhibiting artists) is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 17. The presentation will take place in Smith Hall Room 154, next door to the Birke Art Gallery, and will be followed by a reception. The event is free to the public.

    The adjective adnate means "grown to a usually unlike part, especially along a margin." Sculptors Drew Goerlitz and Ali Della Bitta mix the durable, industrial media of large-scale sculpture with delicate, ephemeral materials to create sculpture and installation works that explore the ever-changing relationship between man and nature, and between the finite and the infinite.

    While these artists produce their own individual works, the reciprocal influences resulting from their relationship as a couple yield an organic formal harmony and a thoughtful conceptual dialogue.


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    Friday January 11, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Annual King Symposium is Jan. 21 and 23 in Huntington

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 15th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium is scheduled for Monday, Jan. 21 and Wednesday, Jan. 23 at various locations around Huntington as part of the annual celebration of the civil rights leader's life. 

    The symposium was established by Marshall University's Multicultural Affairs office and is partially funded by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.  This year's symposium theme is "Rising from the Dark … To the Sunlit Path of Racial Justice," a quote from King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

    The symposium begins with a Focus on Youth Program coordinated by Marshall's Student Government Association. The session begins at 2 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 21 and takes place at First Baptist Church at 801 6th Ave.

    Marshall Psychology senior Ronald Jones and SGA President Dominique Elmore are facilitating the youth program that will focus on academic achievement and the importance of a college education.  The interactive forum will target middle and high school youth.

    Following the youth program, participants in the traditional march procession will begin lining up at First Baptist Church.   The march is scheduled to begin at 4:45 p.m. and ends at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church at 1647 9th Ave. The Martin Luther King, Jr.  " I Have a Dream" speech will be delivered from the steps of the  Sixteenth Street Baptist Church by Arley Johnson,  formally ending the procession.

    This year's march will be led by Grand Marshal Dr. Ken Hechler, a former West Virginia Secretary of State and Marshall faculty member.  Huntington Mayor David Felinton and Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, President of Marshall University, also will participate in the march. All members of the community are encouraged to take part in this historical event.

    The annual Memorial Service begins at 6 p.m. at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church and features guest speaker Dr. Patricia Kusimo, Chief Executive Officer for The West Virginia Center for Professional Development.   WVCPD is a state agency which works to support West Virginia educators in their professional development as a means to improve student academic achievement in the classroom.

    Dr. Kusimo has been involved with education for more than 25 years. The Memorial Service also will feature the Huntington High School Choir and a combined community choir, Voices Supreme Gospel Choir, directed by Dale Capehart.

    Winners of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards Competition will be announced during the service.  This year's competition featured four divisions: elementary, middle school, high school and university. 

    A reception in the church's fellowship hall follows the service.

    The other symposium event is a 10 a.m. theatrical performance on Wednesday, Jan. 23 by the SaltWorks Theatre Company of Pittsburgh, in collaboration with Cabell County Schools. The performance takes place at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

    Sponsors of the events are Marshall University Multicultural Affairs, in cooperation with the Mayor of Huntington; the Cabell County Board of Education; the Cabell County Public Library; the Huntington/Cabell County NAACP; The Herald-Dispatch, the Huntington Human Relations Commission and the West Virginia Higher Education Commission.

    For more information, contact Maurice Cooley, Interim Vice President for Multicultural Affairs, at (304) 696-5430; Dr. Chris Green, co-chair of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Symposium Committee, at (304) 696-6269; or the Rev. Paul Willis, co-chair of the symposium committee, at (304) 523-1712.


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    Thursday January 10, 2008
    Contact: Bill Bissett, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

    Statement of Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp

    in response to Governor Manchin's announcement
    of $50 million endowment fund for research at Marshall, WVU

    "Governor Manchin's announcement of a critically important legislative initiative to invest in research at Marshall and West Virginia University is a decisive step forward that promises future benefits for West Virginia families. Patterned after Kentucky's highly successful 'Bucks for Brains' program, this matching fund program will make sensible investments in applied research that will help diversify our economy, stimulate new business ventures and produce new jobs.

    "Growth in tax revenues will be an important dividend of the Governor's decision. According to this plan, every private dollar supporting research at WVU and Marshall University will be matched by a dollar from the state, doubling the impact of the state's investment.

    "On behalf of the students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the Board of Governors of Marshall University, I thank Governor Manchin for his visionary leadership and support of our two state research institutions. This investment will create opportunities that will influence the future of West Virginians in every corner of the Mountain State."


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    Tuesday January 8, 2008
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 746-1989

    Marshall University Graduate College hosts open house Saturday

    SOUTH CHARLESTON - Marshall University Graduate College is opening its doors this Saturday to give busy professionals an opportunity to learn about the variety of advanced degrees conveniently offered at the South Charleston campus.

    Doors will be open from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 12, in the Administration Building on campus, 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., South Charleston.

    Depending on career goals and experience, potential students can apply to a variety of programs. Faculty and staff representing the following programs will be on hand during the open house event:

    • BUSINESS - Master of Business Administration, Executive MBA,  Master of Science in Human Resource Management and Master of Science in Health Care Administration.

    • EDUCATION - Elementary and Secondary Education, Reading, Special Education, Counseling, School Psychology, Leadership (School Administration/Leadership Specialist), Graduate Humanities Program, and Doctorate in Education.

    • INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING - Engineering, Environmental Science, Information Systems, Technology Management and Safety.

    Admission and financial aid experts also will be available to answer questions.

    To access information about the graduate college online, please go to http://www.marshall.edu/graduate.


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    Tuesday January 8, 2008
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall provost, Dr. Sarah N. Denman, to retire at the end of the current academic year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Sarah N. Denman, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall University since 1999, will retire at the end of the current academic year, President Stephen J. Kopp announced today. The academic year ends on May 10 with Marshall's 171st commencement.

    Denman is approaching 39 years in education, including 33 at Marshall. She has been with the University since 1975, when she was hired by the Marshall Community and Technical College as part of the team to establish the Community and Technical College and as coordinator of the communications program.

    "I thank Sarah for all of her efforts, not only during my time as president of Marshall University but for her 33 years with the community college and the University," Kopp said. "Her enthusiasm and commitment to our students, faculty and our community are truly remarkable and very much appreciated. As she begins this new chapter in her life, we wish her great happiness and satisfaction. I am pleased that Sarah has agreed to continue to assist Marshall University on a part-time basis. This approach will give her the flexibility to enjoy the benefits of retirement, while permitting us to engage her experience and expertise on special projects important to Marshall University."

    Denman, who has served with nine presidents while at Marshall, described her decision to retire as "bittersweet."

    "I am very happy about my decision to retire, but I am sad to leave all the people I have worked with over the years," she said. "I have enjoyed every minute with this institution. It has been an honor and a privilege to serve."

    After graduating from Ceredo-Kenova High School in 1966, Denman earned both her bachelor's (1969) and master's (1973) degrees from Marshall University and her doctorate in higher education administration from West Virginia University in 1986. She taught for six years at Ceredo-Kenova High School.

    Through the years, Denman often has noted in public speeches the importance of the students and faculty not only at Marshall, but at all institutions of higher education. She reiterated that belief today.

    "We need never to lose sight that the students and faculty are the two most important components of institutions of higher education," she said.

    Denman began her career in education in 1969 as a teacher of English and Speech at Ceredo-Kenova High School. She remained there until joining the community college. While at the community college, she served as assistant dean from 1984 to 1988, and associate dean from 1988 to 1991.

    Denman's first administrative appointment with Marshall University came in 1991 when she was named associate vice president for academic affairs. She became interim vice president for academic affairs in 1996 and vice president for academic affairs in 1997.

    Don Van Horn, dean of Marshall's College of Fine Arts, said Denman has been "the continuity and stability and certainly the humanity that makes Marshall what it is."

    "She is a terrific leader and a tremendous resource for this college and every college on campus," Van Horn said. "She is as faculty- and student-centered as any human being I've known in higher education. That's what it's all about for Sarah Denman. I'm happy for Sarah, but Marshall is losing one of the most dedicated servants it probably has ever had."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday January 7, 2008
    Contact: Barbara Winters, Dean of Libraries, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Libraries launches new Web site called 50 Years Ago Today: As Seen on WSAZ-TV News

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Libraries today launched a new Web site called 50 Years Ago Today: As Seen On WSAZ-TV News at a news conference in the Special Collections Department of Morrow Library on MU's Huntington campus.

    The Web site is accessible at www.marshall.edu/50yearsago/.

    "With the click of a mouse, 50 Years Ago Today: As Seen On WSAZ-TV News will allow viewers on the Internet to watch vintage film and video of local, state and national news that occurred 50 years ago on that exact date, as written and reported by the WSAZ-TV news staff of 50 years ago," said Barbara Winters, dean of University Libraries.

    Winters said 50 Years Ago Today: As Seen On WSAZ-TV News is a collaborative effort between WSAZ-TV and Marshall University, literally 32 years in the making.

    "WSAZ-TV gifted Marshall with its film, video and paper archival materials beginning in 1976, and we gladly continue to be the repository and custodians of these priceless film and video images to this very day," Winters said.

    Winters said Andrew D. Earles, Technical and Content Supervisor for Special Collections, originated the concept for the 50 Years Ago Today project.  Winters said Earles, who is in charge of digitizing the WSAZ news footage from fragile film and video to sturdy DVD, came up with the Web site idea the day before the 50th anniversary of the launch of Sputnik.

    "Andy mentioned to Special Collections Curator Lisle Brown that he and Media Technical Assistant Lori Thompson had WSAZ news stories from the year 1958 already digitized and 'in the can,' " Winters said. "Andy's idea of putting it on the Internet for the entire community to 'tune in' and enjoy was a winner, and when Lisle passed along Andy's concept for the Web site to me, I heartily concurred."

    Winters said Libraries Web Services Librarian Floyd Csir worked with Earles, Information Technology Video Services Producer/Director Eric Himes, Information Technology's Daniel Saez and Brian Williams of Marshall's Center for Information Technology to arrive at ideas for a Special Collections "destination Web site" that would make the community history fun and accessible to Internet users.

    Saez served as the Web site's Conceptual Designer and Project Coordinator, with Williams providing the technical know-how and creative input as the site's Programmer and Art Director.

    Seeking to give context to and complement the vintage news images that appear on the Web site, Marshall Libraries received permission from noted area author and media producer David E. Carter to showcase images from his 1999 book, "Friends We All Grew Up With: A Fifty Year History of WSAZ TV,"  published by London Books Ltd.

    The film to digital media process at Special Collections

    1. The WSAZ 16mm news film is run through a special projector that takes the light and images and converts both into digital data. The film runs in "real time," which is time consuming but necessary for quality and clarity.

    2. The digital data is then transferred onto a DVD, which has the capacity to hold two hours of film/video content. (NOTE: Two hours equals four newsreels equals between 15 and 30 clips)

    3. The information on the DVD is then fed into a computer and run through an image editing program, which breaks each clip apart and assigns each its own appropriate clip number, and converts that information to Windows Media video for eventual streaming online.

    Representation of actual news scripts

    Scripts that appear in this presentation are scripts actually written by the news department and read on air by the on-air personality for that particular story.  Once we film and video, clips are matched to their respective scripts whenever possible.

    Selected scripts are retyped in a Microsoft Word document.  Each individual script has its own file on the Marshall server, which relates to the appropriate clip.

    For more information about Marshall University Libraries Special Collections in particular, contact curator Lisle Brown at (304) 696-2344) or visit www.marshall.edu/LIBRARY/speccoll/.

    For more information about the Marshall University Libraries in general, contact Dean Barbara Winters at (304) 696-2318 or visit http://www.marshall.edu/LIBRARY/.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday January 7, 2008
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Choral Union to Begin Rehearsals

    Marshall University's Choral Union will begin weekly spring semester rehearsals Monday, Jan. 14 at 7 p.m. in preparation for concerts April 19 and 20. The group invites any interested singer to join them, according to Dr. Jeffrey Pappas, who will be replacing regular director Dr. David Castleberry during his sabbatical.

    Rehearsals continue every Monday from 7-9 p.m. in the Choral Room (Room 150) in Smith Music Hall on the Huntington campus. 

    Works to be performed on the program include Franz Joseph Haydn's "Heiligmesse," John Rutter's "Te Deum" and Aaron Copland's "Stomp Your Foot" from his opera "The Te