All 2013 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 19, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine students successful in military residency matches

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Four medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have matched into military residency programs at military health care facilities across the nation.
   
The 4th-year students and their match locations are as follows:

Sonja P. Dawsey
Internal Medicine
U.S. Air Force
San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium

Lindsey M. Edwards
Internal Medicine
U.S. Army
Eisenhower Army Medical Center

David R. Hourani
General Surgery
U.S. Army
Eisenhower Army Medical Center

Alexander J. Salazar
General Surgery
U.S. Navy
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

The military match is the armed services equivalent of the civilian National Residency Matching Program (NRMP), which announces its residency matches in March annually. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Photos: From left, Sonja P. Dawsey, Lindsey M. Edwards, David R. Hourani and Alexander J. Salazar have been matched into military residency programs.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 19, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center announces 'Boredom Busters'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is starting the New Year right with a new program designed to strengthen the bond between parents and their children, as well as teach kids how to stay healthy and active.

The program is called "Boredom Busters" and takes place one Saturday each month starting in January and ending in May. Alex Boyer, assistant director of youth programming at the Rec Center, came up with the concept. "We want to provide a program to help parents lure their children away from TV, video games and tablets so that they can spend quality time with them trying something new."

Mini Busters is for children in grades 3 through 5, and Junior Busters is for children grades 6 through 8. Some of the activities parents will be able to enjoy with their children include yoga, belaying and climbing the rock wall, backpacking and knot tying, camping and "Kidobics," a fitness activity. All sessions will take place inside the Rec Center, which is located on the corner of 5th Avenue and 20th Street in Huntington.

The program costs $10 for Rec Center members and $20 for non-members. All supplies for the activities will be provided.

For more information or to sign up, call Boyer at 304-696-4101 or e-mail boyer3@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 16, 2013
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Huntington campus to observe holiday hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities on Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open at various times during the holiday break, which takes place from Saturday, Dec. 21, through Wednesday, Jan. 1.

The holiday hours are listed in the online chart at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/2013/12/UniversityHolidayHours_2013.pdf


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 12, 2013
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Vision Team asks community to vote on a new vision statement for the university

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Since October, teams of Marshall University students, faculty and staff have been diligently working to develop the university's latest strategic plan. The intensive discussions were sparked following a summit that identified Marshall's key challenges as it faces dwindling state funding for public higher education.

During the Oct. 11 summit, known as the 20/20 retreat, one of the first priorities was to create a new "shared vision statement," which will help set the stage for Marshall's overall goal as a university, said President Stephen Kopp. Summit participants set a deadline of Jan. 10, 2014, to develop a draft vision statement.

"A vision statement should be both inspirational and aspirational, and serve to motivate all stakeholders," Kopp said. "It should declare the august ambitions of an organization and answer the question, 'What do we seek to become?' It should be clear, memorable, and concise as it will serve as the guide for present and future university priorities and actions."

As a result of the 20/20 retreat, an action plan was developed and participants were asked to choose two of eight action items to work on. Kopp co-chaired the 21-member Shared Vision Statement team with Dr. Tracy Christofero, professor of technology management. Those who chose working on the vision statement team as their first choice became the MUV (Marshall University Vision) team. The participants were organized into three teams. Each team included faculty, staff, senior staff, and two students enrolled in a strategic planning graduate course.

Christofero said each team was asked to identify aspirational and inspirational keywords for the university. They reviewed vision statements of businesses and other institutions of higher education to determine what they liked and disliked in a vision statement, she said.

"Our teams additionally worked on developing a cover story about what they wanted for the university. They used what they learned through these processes to develop a vision statement for the university that can be spoken in one breath," Christofero said.

In addition to the three six-person teams, Kopp, MU Foundation CEO Dr. Ron Area, and Christofero developed a statement. Now that each of the teams has prepared a statement, they are asking campus and community members as well as alumni and friends across the globe to identify from among the four statements, the one that will best serve Marshall University as its inspirational, aspirational (bold, audacious), clear, memorable, and concise vision for the future.

The proposed statements, in no particular order, are:

  • We are the most student-focused university in our region, united in realizing our students' potential through learning and service.
  • Marshall University . . . where you want to be
  • The vision of Marshall University is to inspire learning and creativity that ignites the mind, nurtures the spirit and fulfills the promise of a better future
  • Marshall University's vision: Every student succeeds
  • Anyone may vote on the four choices by visiting Marshall's strategic planning website, http://www.marshall.edu/2020/2020-vision-statement-selection/. Voting begins today and will continue through Jan. 10.

    Marshall's existing vision statement is:

    "Marshall University, an exemplar of excellence in teaching and learning, will continue to place its highest priority on providing outstanding undergraduate and graduate education, resulting in national recognition in academics and in scholarly, artistic, and creative achievement. Marshall's students will graduate well prepared for the responsibilities of life within a culturally diverse and globally interdependent society. Marshall will address the changing needs of the state and region and will return to the community and state an outstanding value for the resources invested in the university."

    Once a new statement is selected, it will be brought before the Marshall University Board of Governors for official adoption in 2014.

    In addition to the MU Vision Team, the strategic planning retreat created seven other "action teams" that are addressing topics ranging from the university budget and service quality to academic offerings and communications. More information about the process is available at http://www.marshall.edu/2020/.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday December 12, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall grad to deliver gifts to students at Huntington Middle School

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A recent Marshall University graduate will give students from Huntington Middle School "A Gift to Remember in December" Friday afternoon.

    Charles Meyers, a spring 2013 graduate, and volunteers will be delivering hand-crafted desk caddy gifts to all of the students at Huntington Middle School. About 650 students will receive the gifts between 12:30 and 3 p.m. in the library. The school is located at 925 Third St. in Huntington.

    Myers graduated with an engineering degree (Bachelor of Science in Engineering with Civil Emphasis).

    "I was trying to find a hobby to start since I would have more free time away from the classroom," Meyers said. "I decided to go back to my past hobby of woodworking. I thought I would make some furniture or start on another large project. However, one day towards the end of August an idea popped into my head of making small hand-crafted gifts for all of the students at Huntington Middle School."

    He had done a few initiatives at that school before with Future Investment Day and the Words of Reflection Writing Contest, so he thought it would be nice to give each student a gift.

    "My main purpose for giving the students gifts was for them to realize the importance of giving," Meyers said. "I have learned over the years that each one of us has our own personal 'gift' to share with individuals that could benefit from it. This initiative is a way for me to do something that I love to do, in order to possibly brighten a student's day."

    The desk caddy pieces were cut from 4-foot x 8-foot sheets of wood. The cut pieces were then separated into approximately 700 kits, and each kit piece was sanded so they would be able to be glued together accurately. Each piece was then stained, the kits were then glued together, and each desk caddy was then re-sanded and re-stained prior to delivery. Volunteers stained and glued the desk caddies.

    "(The project) also allows me to show my commitment not just to Huntington Middle School, but to the Huntington community as a whole," Meyers said. "I want to help this city become great and I believe it starts with the youth."

    His organization, "Future Investment Program," is responsible for this initiative. Meyers said his two assistants, Hayley Cornwell, a senior criminal justice and psychology major at Marshall, and Chelsey Cosby, a senior elementary education major at Marshall, have helped him throughout the planning process of the project. The Center for African American Students at Marshall is the sponsor for this initiative. Antioch Missionary Baptist Church of Huntington, Black United Students and My Brother's Keeper were an integral part of the volunteering aspect of the initiative as well, Meyers said.

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    Photos: (Above) Approximately 650 desk caddies are ready for distribution to students at Huntington Middle School Friday, Dec. 13. (Below) Volunteers work on assembling the desk caddies, which will be presented to students at Huntington Middle School.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday December 11, 2013
    Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

    Marshall University Board approves 10-year Master Plan

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors today unanimously approved its 10-year campus master plan, which provides a roadmap for future development and investment in Marshall properties.

    Marshall President Dr. Stephen Kopp said he was pleased with the recommendations, which he called fiscally responsible. "The emphasis of the plan is on flexible and adaptive reinvestment - reinvesting, improving, and where needed, expanding current facilities and infrastructure to better serve our students and campus community," Kopp said.

    Mary Jukuri, principal with SmithGroup JJR, the consulting firm hired by Marshall to prepare the plan, summarized the extensive report, which took more than a year of collaboration with Marshall officials and community members to complete. Board members received a preliminary report in April.

    "The purpose of our plan goes beyond the state's requirement for all public universities to have a 10-year master plan," Jukuri said. "A campus master plan is about creating a flexible framework for future development and reinvestment in existing properties. This is a very comprehensive master plan that covers all Marshall campuses."

    Jukuri said SmithGroup considered current construction under way, the financial resources available to Marshall today and evaluated enrollment projections for the next 10 years and beyond. The plan focuses on improving existing infrastructure and upgrades in technology, student housing and student life, as well as enhancements to pedestrian transportation, open space and signage. The plan proposes renovation of about 1.1 million gross square feet of existing facilities, out of a total of 4.25 million gross square feet in the university's building inventory.

    While the 2013 Campus Master Plan is an entirely new report, it does build on results from the 2003 plan, as well as the 2008 update of that plan. The 2013 plan includes input from an extensive outreach program that included town hall meetings and an interactive website open to the public. The plan may be viewed online at www.marshall.edu/mplan.

    In other business today:

    • Dr. Karen Kirtley, senior vice president for administration, gave an update on construction projects. She said the Indoor Practice Facility is 29 percent complete; the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex is 53 percent complete; the Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington is 61 percent complete, and the addition of an elevator at the Joseph M. Gillette Welcome Center is 61 percent complete.

    • Mary Ellen Heuton, Marshall's Chief Financial Officer, said 2013 state legislation has allowed MU to increase its investment authority from $30 million to $60 million. She said for now, funding will be divided into long-term, mid-term and short-term investments, which will allow Marshall to easily access the reserve money should it be needed as the university faces a more challenging state economy.

    • John Sutherland, Executive Director of the Big Green athletic booster organization, explained the reseating and reparking program that is currently under way in athletics. Sutherland said it has been 22 years since a reseating program was put in place (when Marshall moved out of Fairfield Stadium and into Joan C. Edwards Stadium), and that it should be done every 5-7 years.

    • And, the board congratulated Athletic Director Mike Hamrick on a successful legislative audit and the December 27th Military Bowl in which the Thundering Herd will play Maryland.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday December 10, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

    COHP faculty introduce benefits of exercise testing to Marshall cardiology fellows to help improve regional health care

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va - Dr. Terry Shepherd of the Marshall University College of Health Professions held a clinical demonstration that showed the capabilities of cardio pulmonary exercise tests (CPETs) for 12 fellows from Marshall Cardiology last week in the Cam Henderson Center.

    Shepherd, a faculty member since 1987 and an exercise physiologist in the college, said the equipment used in the demonstration can determine whether someone has an exercise intolerance and if this intolerance is caused by the pulmonary system or the cardiovascular system.

    "Many times doctors can't figure out why patients say they are unable to do certain physical things they were capable of doing last year and nothing is showing up on basic medical tests," Shepherd said. " The idea is to test them while they are actually exercising. I specialize in using exercise as a modality to discern what illness may be occurring in a patient."

    Valued at more than $35,000, the Cardio Pulmonary Exercise System: TrueOne2400 Metabolic Measurement System is the equipment that measures an individual's VO2 levels, or oxygen consumption, while exercising.

    "Oxygen consumption is dependent upon three things: how well your lungs are working, how well your heart is working and how well your muscle tissue is working," Shepherd said. "If any of those systems aren't working properly, then your VO2 will be low. If your lungs, heart and muscles are very fit, then your VO2 levels will be high and it would appear all your systems are working the very best they can. This testing shows VO2 as the best measurement of fitness."

    Dr. Ellen Thompson, program director for Marshall Cardiology, said this equipment provides solutions to various cardiovascular issues and would be an invaluable asset to any cardiology team.

    "I wanted our fellows to understand what this sort of testing provides as it's not something they are exposed to very often," Thompson said. "I don't think they knew what kind of information you can get from the CPETs and now that they do, they all want to come back and have the test conducted on themselves."

    Dr. Faisal Hayat attended the demonstration in hopes of learning how exercise testing could help him practice medicine with more accuracy. Hayat, originally from Pakistan, came to West Virginia in 2005 and joined Marshall Cardiology in 2011.

    "I think the patient population we are seeing has multiple diseases - heart conditions, diabetes, obesity, etc.," Hayat said. "When a patient tells me something is wrong, we can perform similar tests like this in order to better determine what is causing these illnesses and work toward helping them."

    The Cardio Pulmonary Exercise System: TrueOne2400 Metabolic Measurement System, housed in the basement of the Cam Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus, was purchased in 2009 and has since been used for CPET testing in the college.

    To learn more about this equipment and its capabilities, please contact Shepherd at shephert@marshall.edu. To learn more about Marshall Cardiology, please contact Thompson at ethompson@marshall.edu.

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    Photos: (Above) Dr. Terry Shepherd provided an educational session prior to the demonstration to help the fellows of Marshall Cardiology understand the benefits of exercise testing. (Center) Caleb Hill, 23, of Boone County, W.Va., is a graduate assistant in the department of exercise science. Hill served as the "guinea pig" for the clinical demonstration in which 12 fellows from Marshall Cardiology learned how CPETs can help save the lives of patients with various metabolic, cardiovascular and pulmonary problems.(Below) Dr. Faisal Hayat sits with Dr. Fikadu Tekleyes and Dr. David Francke and listens to Dr. Terry Shepherd's explanation of the CPETs. Hayat joined the Marshall Cardiology program in 2011 and believes what he learned during last week's demonstration will help him practice medicine with more understanding and accuracy.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday December 9, 2013
    Contact: Sam Kincaid, Marshall University Theatre, 304-696-6395

    Marshall University Theatre, Lunar Stratagem to present 'Can You Forgive Her?' this weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Theatre and the Lunar Stratagem, the international touring theater company based in Huntington, will premiere Lunar Stratagem's newest work , "Can You Forgive Her?" in performances Thursday, Dec. 12, through Saturday, Dec. 14. All three performances will take place at 7:30 p.m. at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    For tickets and more information, please call the Marshall Theatre box office at (304) 696-ARTS (2787) or visit www.marshall.edu/somt/theatre/marshall-university-theatre-alliance/the-joan-c-edwards-performing-arts-center/.

    Written by postman-turned-novelist Anthony Trollope (1815-82), "Can You Forgive Her?" is actually three interconnected stories. Alice (played by Marshall Theater faculty member Nicole Perrone) is engaged to the sterling John Grey (Shawn Parr), but to the horror of her family and society, she ends the engagement to resume an affair with her former lover, the cad and ne'er-do-well George (also played by Parr). Lady Glencora (Vanessa Sawson) is already married to Lord Palliser (Andi Dma), a brilliant but passionless Member of Parliament, but her heart still belongs to the doomed Burgo Fitzgerald (Hurricane native and recent Marshall graduate Nathan Mohebbi). The eccentric widow Aunt Greenow (Samantha Rosentrater) claims to be in mourning for her husband, yet she encourages the courtship of Mr. Cheesacre, a fat Norfolk farmer with leathern manners (also played by Dma).

    "I was interested in this classic Victorian story as an example of how an individual sometimes gets lost trying to make everyone else happy," says adaptor-director and Lunar Stratagem Artistic Director Matthew Earnest. "It takes courage to put on the brakes and do things in your own time, when everyone would rather you just do what you're told."
    Trollope's story, written from 1864 to 1865, is sometimes elegantly lyrical, sometimes crude, and always gossipy fun. As a postman in Victorian London, he most likely knew more of people's private business than they realized, and out of these complex connections and salacious details he created the massive 2-volume novel, "Can You Forgive Her?", as well as his great and celebrated Parliamentary novels, sometimes referred to as The Barchester Series. Earnest's modern take on the story combined with his very contemporary stagecraft slyly asks us to examine how much of our lives are still structured on these old models, and especially, why romantic love and marriage, fundamental elements of our world, have always caused us so much consternation and so much joy.

    In addition to the giddiness of courtship and the heartbreak of a marriage falling apart, "Can You Forgive Her?" contains something that has become a signature of works by The Lunar Stratagem - dancing. "Some directors are actors; some are painters," says Earnest. "I'm just a frustrated choreographer. I love to try to communicate ideas and relationships with as few words as possible, and if I can, with none." "Can You Forgive Her?" could actually be classified as a contemporary dance-theater work, as the movement sequences, both literal and abstract, are as essential to the storytelling as Trollope's hilarious, elegant text.

    The production design, juxtaposing the trappings of pristine Victoriana with our own post-industrial America, is by William Bezek. The sound design is by Anthony Narciso.
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Sunday December 8, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Music concerts cancelled for Sunday, Dec. 8

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.--All recitals and concerts presented by the School of Music and Theatre today, Sunday, Dec. 8, are canceled. These include senior recitals by Linda Campbell at 2 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Center and Josh Blair at 3 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall. Additionally, a concert presented by the MU Choral Union, scheduled for 5 p.m., in Smith Recital Hall, is canceled.

    Announcements about rescheduled recitals and concerts will be forthcoming.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday December 6, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Fan celebration planned before Marshall-WVU basketball game

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Friends and fans of Marshall University are invited to attend the 2013 Capital Classic Fan Celebration before the Thundering Herd's annual men's basketball showdown with West Virginia University Saturday, Dec. 14, at the Charleston Civic Center.

    The reception, which annually draws a large crowd of Herd followers, runs from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the South Hall of the civic center. It precedes the game between Marshall and WVU, which tips off at 7:30 p.m. Music, food, fun and festivities are guaranteed to all who attend the reception, said Nancy Pelphrey, assistant director of alumni affairs. The MU Alumni Association is sponsoring the event.

    "The reception before the Marshall-WVU game is one of the best events of the year," Pelphrey said. "It is always packed with folks wearing their Kelly green. It's a spirited affair that we all look forward to attending before the big game with the Mountaineers."

    Representatives from several campus organizations will take part in the reception, setting up displays and sharing information with visitors. Marco, the Marshall pep band and the MU cheerleaders will stop by to entertain those attending the reception. Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin and the First Lady, Joanne Jaeger Tomblin, are expected to attend as well.

    A women's game between the two schools will be played at 1 p.m. at the civic center.

    Marshall is 4-4 on the season after losing at Vanderbilt Thursday night, 69-67. The Herd plays at Penn State Saturday afternoon.

    For more information on the reception, call Pelphrey at 304-696-3134.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday December 6, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    School of Medicine researchers publish findings on health care issues for the elderly during prolonged power outages

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Shirley M. Neitch, a professor of geriatrics in the department of internal medicine at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and a team of Marshall University researchers recently published an article on the effects of prolonged power outages on the health care of elderly patients who are bedridden.
      
    The article also includes information about two underutilized resources available across much of the nation and a tip sheet for health care providers and caregivers.
     
    The study, published last month in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Geriatrics, highlighted two cases following the 2012 derecho an intense, widespread, and fast-moving windstorm which left millions of people without electricity for days across much of the mid-Atlantic United States.

    "Our article described two cases where patients who were bedridden developed complicated and irreversible pressure sores after being without power for several days," Neitch said. "The first case patient previously had intermittent but minor problems with skin breakdown, and the second case patient had no previous skin issues.  We speculate that the adverse environmental conditions resulting from the power outage were primarily responsible for these patients' pressure sores.

    High humidity and excess sweating led to an increase in moisture on their skin. It was likely difficult for their caregivers to keep them clean and dry in the absence of electricity for light, air conditioning, and heated water."

    Both patients cited in the case studies eventually died and it is believed the pressure sores contributed to their deaths.

    Neitch and her team of researchers say their case studies underscore the need for continuous power service for all bedridden patients, particularly if they are on mattresses that require electrical power. She says it is important to note that most power companies do offer high-priority restoration status, but documentation must be completed with the assistance of health care providers.

    "We know that it's impossible for power companies to guarantee continuous service or early restoration to all who need it," Neitch added. "Therefore, it's imperative for the medical community and other community agencies to be aware of all services available to at-risk populations when these weather emergencies occur."

    The article references two national initiatives that may help:  the 211 Call Center System and the Vulnerable Needs Registry system.  It should be noted the Vulnerable Needs Registry is not as readily available nationwide as the 211 Call Center System.
      
    Neitch says physicians know well that patients in emergencies will likely call 911, and they likewise need to know that patients in need of assistance should be informed about 211 for help in locating the services they need.  Local health department agencies can be contacted to determine if the 211 system is available.

    Additionally, the research team , with the help of Clinical Geriatrics and HMP Communications, developed a Patient Tip Sheet for health care providers and caregivers for elderly patients to provide important information for weather and emergency preparedness.
     
    Dr. Christine Gilkerson, assistant professor in the department of internal medicine, and Angela Brammell, a physician assistant in the department of internal medicine, were part of the research team.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday December 6, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Winners announced in President's 2013 Holiday Design Contest

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, believe that MU students have incredible talents that need to be seen and appreciated by friends, alumni and their fellow students.

    A few years ago, the Kopps determined that one way to show off those talents would be to sponsor a holiday card design contest each year. So, the Kopps began sponsoring a contest in 2007. On Monday, Dec. 2, they announced the winners of this year's eighth annual contest.

    "This is an opportunity for us to recognize the creative talents of our students," Stephen Kopp said. "The competitions bring out the best in our students, and each year the submissions are reflections of the incredible talent we have here."

    Seven men and one woman received congratulations from and posed for pictures with the Kopps Monday in the president's office. The eight winners are Bradley Leonard of Huntington, Tyler Vance of Lewisburg, W.Va., Kyle Mullins of Ripley, W.Va., John Fowler of Teays Valley, W.Va., Shane Craig of Knoxville, Tenn., Jill Smallwood of Summersville, W.Va.; David Pelts of Bluefield, W.Va., and John Dingess of Huntington.

    Leonard was first in the digital card competition, Fowler won the holiday printed card division and Pelts and Dingess tied for first place in the commemorative plate division. The plates are given to about 80 of the university's major donors while the cards are mailed to about 750 people.

    The first-place digital card may be viewed by going to http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/web/DigitalHolidayCard_2013.swf. Vance was second in the digital card competition and Mullins was third.

    Photos of the winning plate and the winning printed card are shown above. Craig was second in the printed card division and Smallwood placed third in both the printed card division and the plate division.

    "I've talked to some of our donors and they truly enjoy seeing the new plates every year," Kopp said. "Many of them have them on display in their homes. Our donors and alumni truly enjoy the fact that the students did the work and it's a product of their creative imaginations."

    Kopp said picking the winners is not easy.

    "But, it's also very enjoyable," he said. "We have a group that sits down and goes through all the submissions and arrives at a series of recommendations. Sometimes we ask for some slight modifications to fine tune what we are going to be sending out in terms of the designs."

    Leonard and Fowler each received $700 for their first-place entries, while Pelts and Dingess received $700 apiece for their first-place tie. Second-place winners received $350 and those finishing in third place received $150.

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    Photos: (Above) The winning printed card design for 2013. (Center) The winning plate design for 2013. (Below) From left, standing behind President Stephen J. Kopp and his wife, Jane, are David Pelts, Kyle Mullins, Shane Craig, Jill Smallwood, John Fowler, Bradley Leonard, Tyler Vance and John Dingess, winners of the 2013 Holiday Card Design Contest. Photos by Mallory Jarrell/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday December 5, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Winter commencement 2013 to honor more than 1,200 MU graduates

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will honor graduates from July and August 2013 and students who are tentatively scheduled to graduate this month at the annual Winter Commencement Sunday, Dec. 15, at Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus. The ceremony begins at 2 p.m.

    Among the 1,209 students who received or are about to receive degrees are 763 undergraduates and 433 with graduate degrees. More than 400 students have indicated they plan to participate in the ceremony. They will receive congratulations from President Stephen J. Kopp and be presented with a scroll by their academic dean. 

    Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 193 students will graduate with honors. Twelve will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 58 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 107 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

    Three students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and 13 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

    Based on tentative grade point averages, five students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect 4.0 GPAs. They are Sarah Michelle Barber of St. Albans, W.Va.; Emily L. Ginther of South Charleston, W.Va.; Matthew Morgan Sandy of Vienna, W.Va.; Morgan Shay Smith of Huntington and Sara Elizabeth Vinson of Amelia, Ohio.

    Marshall began conducting a winter graduation ceremony in 2008 with a convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The speaker was Dr. Montserrat Miller, a professor of history. Winter commencement began in 2009 and the tradition of having an MU professor deliver the keynote address continued.

    Previous commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, in 2009; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, professor of mathematics, in 2010; Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, in 2011, and Dan Hollis, associate professor of journalism and mass communications, in 2012.

    This year's speaker is Dr. Kateryna Schray, an English professor and the Marshall University Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award Recipient for 2012-2013.

    Schray has been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of English.

    Schray previously received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 200 and the Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

    Schray earned her Ph.D. in Medieval Literature from the University of North Carolina in 1997. She received her bachelor's degree from La Salle University and her master's from Georgetown University. She is coordinator of the Graduate Certificate in Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Marshall.

    DVDs available
    Marshall University will produce a DVD of the winter commencement ceremony that can be purchased for $20. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Orders also will be accepted Dec. 15 at Henderson Center. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

    Parking
    Free parking for commencement will be available in the garage across 3rd Avenue from Cam Henderson Center, or on any university parking lot. The garage and the Joan C. Edwards Stadium West Lot provide the most convenient parking.

    Military Service Recognition
    Marshall University will recognize graduates with military service by issuing a special red, white and blue cord to be worn at commencement. Military cords must be picked up in the registrar's office by 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13. Cords are to be kept by graduates.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday December 4, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Kateryna Schray to deliver winter commencement speech at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kateryna Schray, an English professor and the Marshall University Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award Recipient for 2012-2013, is the keynote speaker at the university's 2013 Winter Commencement, which takes place Sunday, Dec. 15, at the Cam Henderson Center on MU's Huntington campus.

    The ceremony will be the fifth annual winter commencement for Marshall.  The university began conducting a winter graduation ceremony in 2008 with a convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The speaker was Dr. Montserrat Miller, a professor of history. Winter commencement began in 2009 and the tradition of having an MU professor deliver the keynote address continued.

    Previous commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, in 2009; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, professor of mathematics, in 2010; Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, in 2011; and Dan Hollis, an associate professor of journalism, in 2012.

    Commencement begins at 2 p.m. and is for students who graduated in July or August 2013, or are tentatively scheduled to graduate this month.

    Schray has been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of English.

    "I am truly humbled and fully aware of what a great privilege it is to share this important day with the graduates," Schray said. "I attend every graduation that I can because it really is a big deal, it represents so much achievement, effort, sacrifice ...  every graduation I applaud every single graduate as his or her name is called, every single one, no matter how many there are."

    Schray said she plans to speak about the three big unknowns that loom on the horizon for the graduates.

    "After the euphoria of graduation settles a bit, it is normal for graduates to be faced with the daunting NOW WHAT?" she said. "For most of the graduates, three big unknowns loom on the horizon: What  will I be doing? With whom will I be sharing my life? Where will I be living?  -- of course everyone has to find their own answers to these deeply intimate questions, but my goal is to try to offer some guidance, lay out some basic principles so that our students enter the world as prepared as they can be."

    She said she likes the idea of a faculty member speaking at winter commencement.

    "I had the privilege of being the keynote speaker at the Freshman Convocation just this past August, during the Week of Welcome, and I actually spoke at the August 2009 Freshman Convocation which means -- if my math is right -- that there is a very good chance that some of the graduating students and I have already shared an important milestone together, which makes this especially exciting for me," Schray said. "One of the best things about Marshall is the investment that faculty make in their students."

    Schray previously received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001and the Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

    Schray said she takes three guiding principles with her into the classroom: 1, learning is a joy; 2, come as you are, and 3, an education really does make a difference.

    "I have taught writing in an industry setting, in a homeless shelter, in a convent, and in an impoverished country," Schray said. "In all those settings my students were taking an active step towards improving their lives in a way that nothing else could. I want my students to leave my class with a quiver full of lightning bolts and the confidence to launch them."

    Schray earned her Ph.D. in Medieval Literature from the University of North Carolina in 1997. She received her bachelor's degree from La Salle University and her master's from Georgetown University. She is coordinator of the Graduate Certificate in Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Marshall.


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    Chants of 'We Are...Marshall' planned nationwide as Herd battles Rice in Conference USA title game

    Former MU BOG chairman says team will 'hear us in their hearts'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thundering Herd football fans across the world, most of whom are convinced that Marshall University's Conference USA championship game with Rice this Saturday should be played in Huntington, will be shouting the "We Are...Marshall" chant at specific times during the game.
     
    Since the game will be played in Houston, Marshall fans who cannot make the trip will be there in spirit doing their best to demonstrate support for the Thundering Herd. They will be chanting in unison, "We Are ... Marshall," from their homes and alumni clubs where game-watching parties will be widespread.
     
    The chants will start at noon with the opening kickoff and continue every time Marshall scores.
     
    "Our football team loves and responds to its fans! Unfortunately, we are not playing at home but if every Herd fan exactly at certain times were yelling, 'We Are ... Marshall,' all over the world and the team knew it, I believe they would hear us in their hearts," said Verna Gibson, former chairman of the Marshall Board of Governors.
     
    Many fans will be going outside of their homes and into their neighborhoods to chant "We Are ... Marshall" when the Herd scores. There will be no mistaking when MU scores. "Let's let the Herd hear and feel our worldwide support," Gibson said.
     
    The game will be televised on ESPN 2 at Noon EST.


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    Communication Disorders graduate students take home second place in ASHA Knowledge Bowl

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of six graduate students from the Marshall University College of Health Professions received second place in the Knowledge Bowl held at the American Speech-Hearing-Language Association's (ASHA) annual convention Nov. 14-16 in Chicago, Ill.

    Emily Barney, Katie Ward, Emma Searls, Amanda Moon, Natasha Scott and Kristen O'Neill are second-year graduate students from the college's Department of Communication Disorders. These students were selected to represent Region 3 in the competition, which included West Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, Alabama and Florida. Craig Coleman, assistant professor within the department, said the Knowledge Bowl is a "Jeopardy"-style game, which allows students to answer questions based on knowledge in various areas of the field.

    "We had to apply to be selected and there are many big schools within the region," Coleman said. "The achievement in the Knowledge Bowl demonstrates the strength of our program. In addition, all of the presentations with student involvement show the commitment of our faculty and students working hard to bridge research and clinical practice."

    Coleman said Marshall University was one of the most represented in terms of student involvement at this year's convention.

    "I received an e-mail after the convention from our region coordinator saying how impressed she was with our students and hoped we would participate again in the future," Coleman said. "I also received an e-mail from the National Stuttering Association stating many of our students came by their exhibit booth and talked with them about stuttering. They were so impressed with our students and will be putting a picture and story in their national publication."

    Coleman said the students will be featured in the National Stuttering Association's next publication.

    Searls, who is 23 and is from DeWitt, Mich., said their team competed against nine other regions. Searls said she believes it is important to participate in events such as these in order to stay current in the field of communication disorders.

    "Our field is evolving with new strategies to make us competent students and clinicians," Searls said. "Attending these conferences allows us to practice what we've learned in the classroom and implement this knowledge in the real world. It is important we stay updated in order to give our patients the best quality of care."

    The 2014 ASHA Convention will be held Nov. 20-22 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To learn more about this organization, visit www.asha.org online. To learn more about the Department of Communication Disorders and its involvement with ASHA, please contact the department's chair, Dr. Karen McNealy, at mcnealy@marshall.edu.

    -----------------------

    Photo: Graduate students Emma McCullough, Frances Elvins and Emma Searls stand with Professor Craig Coleman during the 2013 ASHA Convention. This group served as a research team studying tele-therapy and the effects on a 19-year-old who stutters. There were a total of 37 students from Marshall University who presented research at the convention this year.


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    Monday December 2, 2013
    Contact: Margie Phillips, Marshall Sustainability Department, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University recognized for food donation and waste diversion efforts

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is among 26 colleges and universities in the Mid-Atlantic Region that have joined the Environmental Protection Agency's Food Recovery Challenge to date. According to a list provided by the EPA, West Virginia University is the only other participant in West Virginia.
     
    The Food Recovery Challenge encourages colleges, universities and other organizations to donate and divert as much of their excess food as possible. Organizations that join EPA's challenge find that they not only save money, but they also feed the needy and help protect the environment at the same time.
     
    "The food donations to hunger-relief organizations made by colleges and other institutions can help the one in six Americans who don't know where their next meal is coming from," said EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. "In addition to feeding the hungry, the food donations go a long way to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lowering disposal costs for their campuses. The Food Recovery Challenge is truly a win-win situation."
     
    Food waste generated by local institutions, hospitals, colleges, universities and restaurants is often actually safe, wholesome food that could feed millions of Americans, according to both the U.S. Department of Agriculture and EPA. EPA is working with institutions and hunger-relief organizations to increase food donations. Composting food waste also leads to important environmental outcomes. Composted food waste creates a valuable soil product that can be used to enhance the quality of soils.
     
    For more information on EPA's Food Recovery Challenge, visit www.epa.gov/foodrecoverychallenge online.
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    Monday December 2, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 696-7153

    Brownfields Assistance Center expands surface-mined land reuse and redevelopment activities

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials at the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University today announced an expansion of their partnership with the West Virginia Division of Energy's Office of Coalfield Community Development to explore the reuse and redevelopment potential of land that has been surface-mined.
     
    Over the past several years, the two organizations have worked together to demonstrate and evaluate renewable energy applications on former surface-mined properties. Projects have included assessments of wind, solar and biomass energy, as well as hydropower.
     
    Today's announcement includes two initiatives that will further those efforts and adds a new project to study redevelopment opportunities.
     
    According to center director George Carico, the Division of Energy and the Appalachian Regional Commission are providing $355,000 in funding for the three new projects, which will be completed over the next two years.
     
    "Our efforts in recent years with the West Virginia Division of Energy have produced multiple renewable energy demonstration and research projects, and we've gained valuable knowledge about a number of surface-mined lands available for redevelopment," said Carico. "We continue to play a primary role in reuse and redevelopment of West Virginia's surface mine lands for progressive and innovative new purposes, and welcome the opportunity to expand our efforts in bringing new life to these properties after mining activities have been completed."
     
    Carico said that for the first project they will use state-of-the-art Sonic Detection and Ranging (SODAR) equipment to continue wind measurement studies designed to help identify promising wind energy sites. Carico said six sites were evaluated in a previous phase and this new funding will allow them to add three or four additional sites to the study.
     
    Through the second initiative, the Brownfields Assistance Center will administer a grant program to support renewable energy projects on surface-mined land. Competitive grants of up to $40,000 each will be awarded to projects with the potential to yield renewable energy from biomass, wind or solar sources. Examples of fundable projects include demonstration plantings of biomass energy crops like switchgrass, a small wind or solar system for classroom instructional purposes, and solar- or wind-powered generation as a backup energy source for an industrial park built on a reclaimed mine site. Each grant will require a 50 percent match and will have a 12-month timeframe for completion. The Appalachian Regional Commission will make the final determination on project funding. A Request for Proposals is available at www.wvbrownfields.org.

    The third project announced today will involve a study of various options for redeveloping surface mine sites to meet local or regional economic development needs. The options to be evaluated include commercial or industrial applications, specialty housing, and agricultural or recreational use.

    The West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University is a program of the university's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS).

    For more information, contact Carico at carico@marshall.edu or 304-696-5456.


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    Local foundation provides tuition assistance for class on history of Charleston

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Tuition assistance is available for Marshall University graduate students who wish to enroll in a spring 2014 seminar about the Glenwood Estate in Charleston.

    The graduate seminar, "Glenwood and the History of Charleston," is a joint program of the Historic Glenwood Foundation and Marshall University's graduate humanities program. Attending graduate students will receive three hours of graduate credit, for which tuition assistance is available from the foundation.

    Classes in the seminar will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning Jan. 13 and continuing until May 6. Students will gather on site at Glenwood, the iconic 1850s estate that stands in the hills of Charleston's West Side. They will be working with Dr. Billy Joe Peyton, associate professor of history at West Virginia State University, who also teaches in Marshall's graduate humanities program.

    The seminar also is available to members of the public who wish to participate for one hour of graduate credit. A public participant must have an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university. Qualifying public participants will not be expected to do as much coursework or attend all the classes required of the graduate students who wish to receive 3 hours of credit.

    Students will get "up close and personal" with the past as they use elements of the historic Glenwood collection to examine the 150-year development of Charleston from a small 19th-century village into a modern 21st-century capital city.

    The Glenwood Estate, a complex intersection of North and South, has been the focus of the Graduate Humanities Program's Glenwood Project, which marked its 7th year with presentations on site at Glenwood in June and at the new Mary C. Snow West Side Elementary School in October.

    Marshall's graduate humanities program offers a broad range of courses each semester, including the study of art and society as well as historical, cultural and literary studies. Other humanities program classes to be offered during the 2014 spring semester include "Appalachian Literature: Exploring the Soul of a Region" and "Women, Men, and Cultural Change."

    More information may be found on the graduate humanities website at www.marshall.edu/graduatehumanities or by calling the program office at 304-746-2022.


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    Visiting pianist Arunesh Nadgir to perform romantic piano music Dec. 2

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pianist Dr. Arunesh Nadgir will give  a guest artist recital at 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2, in the Jomie Jazz Forum on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The program includes virtuoso piano music from the Romantic era by Frederic Chopin, Franz Liszt and Alexander Scriabin.

    "I am looking forward to an evening of wonderful Romantic piano music," said Dr. Henning Vauth, assistant professor of piano at Marshall. "Arunesh Nadgir is praised for his passionate, sensitive and thoughtful musical style. It will be nice to enjoy an hour of relaxing music during the busy Christmas season."

    Nadgir, who has concertized as soloist and chamber musician in the United States (Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall), South America, Europe and Asia, holds degrees from the Juilliard School, the Eastman School of Music, and the New England Conservatory of Music. He currently serves as assistant professor of piano at Middle Tennessee State University and as president of the Middle Tennessee Music Teachers Association.

    For more information, contact Vauth in the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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    Monday November 25, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

    MU public health professor hosts study abroad program in Tanzania

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney, public health program director in the Marshall College of Health Professions, said she will take a group of students to Tanzania this summer for a unique study abroad opportunity.

    "This is the only study abroad program related to public health care and nursing," Sawhney said. "We will offer students an opportunity to explore aspects of our world that they may never have a chance to do so otherwise."

    Sawhney said students can receive undergraduate or graduate credit for coursework in public and global health, nursing and Swahili.

    "The sky is the limit here at Marshall to have a well-guided study abroad trip with faculty from different disciplines who are able to provide an enriched experience," Sawhney said. "Internships and service-learning opportunities are also available through this program."

    Kayla Boggs, a 21-year-old senior cell and molecular biology major from Big Bend, W.Va., traveled to Tanzania last summer and said she expects her experiences from the public health course to benefit her future career in health care.

    "A study abroad experience is worthwhile no matter where one chooses to study," Boggs said. "For me, it was all about gaining a greater understanding of the hardships Tanzanians face every day, finding a greater respect for myself in overcoming the stereotypes many have about Africa and making a difference in the lives of the people I met."

    While in Tanzania for five weeks, Boggs said she snorkeled in the Indian Ocean and explored the native wildlife through her adventures on a safari.

    "I loved every minute of the safari and snorkeling in the Indian Ocean, but my favorite thing would have to have been meeting and forming relationships with so many unique and wonderful individuals," Boggs said. "The Tanzanians I had the pleasure of meeting were incredibly welcoming and I still keep in touch with a few of them on Facebook."

    The Tanzania study abroad trip will take place June 12 - July 16, 2014. Cost of the trip is $3,975 plus airfare and the $250 application fee. Individuals interested in signing up before Jan. 20 can save $100. The final application deadline for the trip is Feb. 15. To learn more, please contact Dr. Monika Sawhney by phone at 304-696-2602 or by e-mail at sawhney@marshall.edu.

    --------------

    Photo: Marshall student Kayla Boggs, 21, of Big Bend, W.Va., stands with a group of native Tanzanians last summer during her study abroad trip to Africa. While in Tanzania, Boggs said she was in an ideal setting to gain valuable academic and cultural experiences which helped her achieve a broad understanding of our world.


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    Friday November 22, 2013
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    Dr. Chong W. Kim Endowed Scholarship honors two-time dean at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Dr. Chong W. Kim Endowed Scholarship, a fund named in honor of the former two-time dean of Marshall University's College of Business, has been established by the Marshall University Foundation Inc.

    Kim, who retired last year after 35 years at Marshall, was honored Thursday evening in a ceremony at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

    Dr. Haiyang Chen, current dean of the College of business, said the college also plans to start a distinguished speaker series in honor of Kim that will feature successful alumni of the College of Business.

    "We're here to honor Dr. Kim for his generosity and support of our students for more than three decades," Chen said.

    Kim, a native of Korea who lived most of his youth in Seoul, South Korea, served at Marshall from 1977 to 2012. He not only taught, but served as the division head of the Management, Marketing and MIS (Management Information Systems) Division for 22 years. He was dean of the College of Business from 2003 to 2005 and from 2008 to 2012.

    Kim thanked those in attendance for their help during his 3 decades of service to Marshall.

    "One of the best decisions I ever made was when Bob Alexander (former dean of the College of Business) offered me a job and I accepted it," Kim told the audience, of which Alexander was a member. "Even though it has had its ups and downs and been stressful (at times), I had a very good career at Marshall, and Marshall was very good to me. I want to help future Marshall students by establishing this scholarship as a small token of my appreciation to Marshall.

    "Establishment of this scholarship was very much possible due to the great help from College of Business Advisory Board members and all my friends whom I will cherish in my memory for the rest of my life."

    Kim majored in English at Yonsei University, graduating in 1966 before serving as a Korean Army officer from 1966 to 1968. He then received his M.B.A. degree from Miami (Ohio) University in 1971, and his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University, majoring in Organizational Behavior in Business in 1976.

    He was a professor at Rider College in 1976 and 1977 before joining Marshall. Kim was elected into the Marshall College of Business Hall of Fame last year.

    Kim is a Taekwondo (TKD) 9th degree black belt who taught TKD at each stop of his educational and professional career. He opened his private TKD School in Huntington, where he remains today.

    The recipient of the Kim scholarship will be a full-time undergraduate student in the College of Business who is in good academic standing with a 2.5 or higher GPA. First priority will be given to minority students who are majoring in management. Second priority will be given to minority students majoring in any business field, and third priority will be given to students who are majoring in management.

    The award will be renewable for up to four years (eight semesters) if the recipient maintains good academic standing of a 2.5 GPA or higher.

    ----------------

    Photo: From left, Dr. Haiyang Chen, dean of Marshall's College of Business; Dr. Chong Kim, former dean of the College of Business for whom the Dr. Chong W. Kim Endowed Scholarship is named; Norman Mosrie, president of the Advisory Board of the College of Business at Marshall; and Lance West, vice president for development at Marshall, pose with a copy of the guidelines for the Kim scholarship. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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    Friday November 22, 2013
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    Thundering Word continues to perform well in Porch Swing Invitational

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's speech and debate team has had its best competitive semester since its reformation in 2009.

    Last weekend, the Thundering Word traveled to Carson Newman University in Jefferson City, Tenn., to participate in the Tennessee Porch Swing Invitational and placed third behind Western Kentucky University and the University of Alabama, two of the top teams in the nation.

    "We actually held our own with them, which is something we haven't been able to do in the past," Coach Danny Ray said. "Ten members of the Thundering Word traveled to Tennessee and every one of them made it to at least one final round. This doesn't happen very often."

    Marshall's individual results were:

    • Christian Adams, a senior honors pre-med psychology major from Ona, W.Va., was second in Pentathlon (five or more events) making him the second-best speaker at the tournament. He also placed fourth in After-Dinner Speaking, fifth in Duo Interpretation with Josh Gainer, sixth in Prose Interpretation, and he was a semifinalist in Impromptu Speaking.
    • Victoria Ledford, a junior honors pre-med communication studies major from Erwin, Tenn., was second in Persuasive Speaking, second  in Duo Interpretation with DeVan Sample, and fifth in Informative Speaking.
    • Logan Spence, a freshman game design major from Davie, Fla., placed fifth and was the Top Novice in Poetry Interpretation and placed sixth and was Top Novice in Informative Speaking.
    • Alyssa Hager, a freshman broadcasting major from West Hamlin, W.Va., took fifth place in Top Novice Prose Interpretation and Top Novice Persuasive Speaking.
    • DeVan Sample, an honors English & Japanese major from Martinsburg, W.Va., took second place in Duo Interpretation with Victoria Ledford.
    • Taryss Mandt, a sophomore geology major from Arlington, Va., was fourth in Prose Interpretation.
    • Josh Gainer, a senior political science major from Parkersburg, W.Va., finished in fifth place Duo Interpretation with Christian Adams.
    • Matt Osteen, a junior honors communication studies major from Shenandoah Junction, W.Va., was fifth in Rhetorical Criticism.
    • Juliet Djietror, a junior biomedical sciences major from Mt. Pleasant, Mich., was sixth in Dramatic Interpretation.
    • Garrett Walker, a junior Spanish major from Shady Spring, W.Va., was sixth in After-Dinner Speaking.

    Ray said this was the fifth tournament in which Marshall has placed in the top three in the tournament, including first place at Central Missouri, second at the University of Kentucky and second at the Chief Justice, which Marshall hosted.

    The following Marshall students are qualified for the NFA national tournament in April.

    • Christian Adams - Prose, Poetry and Duo interpretation, After-Dinner and Impromptu Speaking
    • Juliet Djietror - Persuasive Speaking and Prose Interpretation
    • Josh Gainer - Prose, Poetry, Dramatic and Duo Interpretation
    • Victoria Ledford - Persuasive, Informative, Impromptu Speaking, Rhetorical Criticism and Duo
      Interpretation
    • Taryss Mandt - Informative Speaking, Prose and Poetry Interpretation
    • Matt Osteen - Lincoln Douglas Debate and Rhetorical Criticism
    • DeVan Sample - Poetry, Dramatic and Duo Interpretation
    • Garrett Walker - Extemporaneous and After-Dinner Speaking, Rhetorical Criticism
    • Joe Garton - Lincoln Douglas Debate
    • Alyssa Hager - Prose and Duo Interpretation and Persuasive Speaking
    • Logan Spence - Poetry, Dramatic and Duo Interpretation and Informative Speaking
    • Spencer Stephens - Lincoln Douglas Debate and Extemporaneous and Impromptu Speaking

    Ray said the Thundering Word will be joined by additional students in the spring, which will make the team even more competitive.


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    Thursday November 21, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    School of Medicine dean part of international team investigating renal-artery stenting

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and a team of researchers around the world had their findings published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, the premier journal for publishing clinical studies.

    The multi-center study included 947 patients with renal-artery stenosis and either high blood pressure or chronic kidney disease, who were then randomized to receive either medical therapy and stenting or medical therapy alone.   The study outcomes indicated there was no significant benefit to the population that received the stenting procedure.

    Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL), was the largest study examining renal-artery stenting which became popular in the 1990s after some small studies suggested there were benefits to the procedure.    Statistics show about 100 million Americans have hypertension and between 1 and 5 percent will develop atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis.

    "Hardening of the arteries to the kidneys is a significant public health issue," Shapiro, who is a longtime kidney disease researcher, said.  "This study was designed to determine whether stenting, with its substantial cost and potential risk, is a viable treatment option for patients with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis.  Our research indicated that it is not the best option for most patients, ergo, contemporary medical treatment should be our go-to treatment."

    Approximately 40,000 patients per year undergo a renal-artery stent in the United States.  If the results of the CORAL trial are embraced, there will be substantial financial savings in the care of these patients.

    Shapiro served as the enrollment chairman for the study.


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    Thursday November 21, 2013
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    Marshall University honored for creating tobacco-free campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University was honored recently for its efforts in creating a tobacco-free campus. A brief ceremony took place Monday, Nov. 18, in the Shawkey Room inside the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp received an award from Dr. Harry K. Tweel, medical director of the  Cabell-Huntington Health Department. The award was made on behalf of the Cabell County Coalition for a Tobacco-Free Environment, which is based out of the health department.

    Amy Saunders, director of student health education programs at Marshall, said several groups including the Student Government Association, the Classified Staff Council, the Faculty Senate and the Board of Governors helped work on this policy.

    "The policy is one of the first steps in changing the culture on campus regarding tobacco use," Saunders said. "Now we must begin to work on enforcing the policy and helping those that are addicted to nicotine."

    Marshall has been tobacco free since July 2013.

    The coalition meets the fourth Monday of every month at noon at the Cabell-Huntington Health Department. Community members are welcome and encouraged to attend. Light refreshments are served. For more information about this event or to attend the Cabell County Coalition for a Tobacco-Free Environment meetings, please contact Teresa Mills, regional tobacco prevention coordinator at the Cabell-Huntington Health Department, at 304-523-6483, EXT 283.

    ---------------

    Photo: Second from left, Dr. Harry K. Tweel, medical director of the Cabell-County Health Department, presents a plaque to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp in recognition of the University developing a tobacco-free campus. Also pictured are, left, Dr. Robert Stanton, assistant dean of experiential learning with the MU School of Pharmacy, and, right, Dr. Joseph Shapiro, dean of the Marshall Medical School. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Tuesday November 19, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

    Blake Collection at Marshall receives Civil War-era items

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. and Mrs. John O'Brien, from the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, have given a group of items and books to the Rosanna Blake Collection, part of Marshall University's Special Collection department housed in the Morrow Library.

    "These donations are significant and will help maintain the standing of the Blake Collection as one of the outstanding Confederate and southern collections outside of the National Archives," said Jack Dickinson, curator of the Blake collection.


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    Monday November 18, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    School of Medicine professor serves as editor for medical school curriculum e-book

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Aaron M. McGuffin, associate professor in the department of pediatrics at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and a team of 48 students from 11 medical schools have created a medical curriculum e-book that was released this month online.

    "Universal Notes for Medical Students 2013" is available on the Inkling store.

    "We are very proud of Dr. McGuffin and his team for developing this new tool which combines old-school note-taking with 21st century technology," said Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall School of Medicine. "Their efforts are commendable and will provide medical students across the country with another avenue for success."

    McGuffin and colleagues initiated the project earlier this year.

    "This first edition contains the majority of drugs, bugs and diseases that were determined to be important for medical students to know," McGuffin said. "There is still a great deal of pertinent basic science information to add, but we are steadily filling those gaps."

    The book's initial concept was created by McGuffin and student editors Becca Hayes, Marshall University School of Medicine; John Corker, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine; Jessica Deslauriers, University of South Florida; Laura Halpin, University of Toledo; and David Savage, University of Texas at Houston. The concept team, which included others from Marshall's School of Medicine, worked to establish a website, www.myuniversalnotes.com, to recruit medical students to write topics for the e-book.

    The medical students submitted material on hundreds of topics to create the primary content of the e-book, which was then reviewed by the student editors and a physician panel to ensure accuracy and consistency of the material.

    The e-book is organized into 21 easy-to-navigate chapters, primarily by systems.

    "We used the existing national board outlines to help organize the material since they are the most complete documents currently available that describe what medical students should know," Hayes said.

    Deslauriers agreed, saying, "Universal Notes will change medical education by empowering students to customize their study materials while building upon accurate and relevant topics that address the core competencies of being a doctor."

    The e-book is the first in a series of projects by Universal NotesTM aimed at revolutionizing the way medical students are educated around the world.


    Direct Link to This Release


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday November 18, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Recreation Center and First-Year Residence Halls partner to bring Christmas joy to Tri-State

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center and the Marshall University First-Year Residence Halls have partnered this holiday season to help local agencies and children in the Huntington community.

    Rec the Halls with Holiday Hopes can be compared to an "Angel Tree," full of Christmas wishes made by children from local agencies such as Golden Girl, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Ronald McDonald House, A.D. Lewis Community Center, the June Montgomery Harless Children's Home and NECCO, said Michele Muth, assistant director of the Rec Center.

    The wishes are hung on a tree in the lobby of the Marshall Recreation Center, as well as in the First-Year Residence Halls. Students and members of the community alike are encouraged to take a tag from the tree, purchase the gift listed on the wish, and bring the gift back with the tag that was attached to the tree. Stop by the Rec or one of the First Year-Residence Halls to make a child's wish come true! 

    A wrapping party will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13, to wrap the gifts for the agencies.  Donations of wrapping paper and other supplies are needed and greatly appreciated. Volunteers can stop by between classes or after the work day any amount of time can help. Volunteers will be rewarded with snacks and drinks while enjoying each other's company in a festive atmosphere.

    For more information call Muth at 304-696-2943 or e-mail pallante1@marshall.edu.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday November 15, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 696-7153

    Morgan recognized for expertise in education technology, named inaugural Blackboard MVP

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brian M. Morgan, chairman and associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science and Technology at Marshall University, has been named one of 17 inaugural Blackboard MVPs by education technology company Blackboard Inc.

    Blackboard offers platforms and services to help educational, professional, corporate and government organizations extend teaching and learning online, facilitate campus commerce and security, and communicate more effectively. Its new MVP program recognizes users who stand out as experts in the company's technologies, share their expertise, demonstrate leadership in the education technology community, and actively provide feedback to Blackboard. While MVPs will be peer-nominated in the future, this first class was selected by Blackboard.

    "I am very proud to be a part of this prestigious new program," said Morgan. "E-learning and learning management systems have been a passion of mine for the past 16 years. Being a Blackboard MVP, sharing knowledge and best practices about Blackboard and distance learning in general, is truly an honor."

    Jay Bhatt, Blackboard chief executive officer, said, "We are proud to recognize Blackboard MVPs for reaching beyond the borders of their institutions and organizations to share their knowledge of and best practices with our products. This program is incredibly powerful, as it provides a platform not only for users to collaborate and learn from each other, but also for our company leaders to hear directly from the people who use our solutions in the field, every day. Blackboard MVPs are truly helping improve the learning experience and address important challenges in education."

    Morgan said the program will give him access to exclusive professional development opportunities and he will be invited to private product briefings and roadmap sessions with company executives. He added that MVPs will continue to share their expertise by moderating the Ask the Doctors Client Q&A forum and through their own personal blogs, Blackboard blogs, social media, virtual office hours and other avenues.

    Morgan holds a bachelor's degree in computer science and a master's degree in technology management, both from Marshall. His special interests include e-learning and web application development.

    For more information, visit www.blackboard.com/mvp or contact Morgan at brian.morgan@marshall.edu or 304-634-6736.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday November 15, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

    Marshall's United Way campaign extended until Nov. 20

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The deadline for Marshall University's United Way campaign has been extended until Wednesday, Nov. 20. 

    United Way of the River Cities' goal is to change 30,000 lives in the region.  To do so, the organization needs to raise $1.2 million.

    For more than 20 years, the Marshall University community has supported United Way of the River Cities in a variety of ways.  Faculty and staff contribute financially and serve on grants-review committees, as well as on the organization's four coalitions.  Students participate in forums on current issues, have provided useful tools through service learning projects and internships and provide staff support to United Way as work-study placements. 

    "As one of the leaders in our community, Marshall University has been a very important part of United Way's work," said Laura Gilliam, executive director of the organization. "Thousands of people in our region have received help because of the university's support.  We count on faculty, staff and students every year to make our fundraising campaign successful. Without their support, our community wouldn't be the same."
               
    Students interested in making a donation may go to www.unitedwayrivercities.org/give. Faculty and staff can return their completed investor pledge forms to the Marshall Recreation Center for a free day pass; to an individual's departmental office; or to Dean Michael Prewitt via campus mail at Prichard Hall 224 or by faxing 304-696-6739. Pledge forms can be downloaded at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/web/UnitedWayMarshallPledgeForm_2013.pdf.

    To learn more about United Way of the River Cities, visit http://www.unitedwayrivercities.org.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday November 15, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    School of Pharmacy receives diversity grant from Walgreens

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy announced today it received a $10,000 grant from Walgreens Corporation for diversity and inclusion efforts at the school.

    The grant, to be disseminated as scholarships and funding for pipeline programs and other cultural initiatives, is part of Walgreens' national effort to support increasing diversity among professional student programs.

    Chris Creamer, R.Ph., and Deborah Harris, Pharm D., both with Walgreens, presented the check to School of Pharmacy representatives including H. Glenn Anderson, Pharm D., Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

    "We are so pleased to have received this funding from Walgreens for the second year," Anderson said. "Our school is actively engaged in finding ways to educate our students on understanding the health care needs of every population we serve."

    As part of this grant, Walgreens requires the school to report on how the annual funds were used to support diversity initiatives throughout the year. Since 2008, the company has donated more than $1 million annually to support diversity initiatives at schools and colleges of pharmacy nationwide.

    Two Marshall School of Pharmacy students, James Frazier and Priscilla Adjei-Baffour, were awarded scholarships as part of Walgreens gift last year.

    ------------

    Photo: H. Glenn Anderson, Marshall University School of Pharmacy Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, accepts a check from Deborah Harris, Walgreens Corporation. Also pictured from left: Terri Moran, assistant dean of student affairs, Shelvy Campbell, director of diversity, Chris Creamer with Walgreens, Anderson, Harris, Kim Broedel-Zaugg, professor and chair, department of pharmacy practice, Robert Stanton, assistant dean of experiential learning, and Craig Kimble, director of experiential learning.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday November 15, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Recreation Center to hold Black Light Boulder Bash

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Marshall Recreation Center Outdoor Pursuits program will conduct its first-ever Black Light Boulder Bash from 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4.

    The windows in the rock climbing facilities at the MRC will be blacked out, black lights will be lit and bouldering paths will be marked with neon colored tape that will glow under the lights and guide climbers.  

    "The event is intended to create awareness and exposure for the Marshall Recreation Center's indoor rock climbing wall, as well as to provide existing users a fun event to be involved in," said Chad Steen, Outdoor Pursuits coordinator. "It will offer new climbers the chance to try their hand at bouldering, while providing a new perspective to traditional bouldering."

    This non-competitive event will only feature bouldering, and the paths will vary in difficulty.  MRC staff will be on hand to spot during Black Light Boulder Bash.  Top-rope climbing with a belay will not be available during this event.
     
    Admission for the event will be $15 for members of the Rec Center, and $20 for non-members.  Advanced registration will be held until 5 p.m.  Sunday, Nov. 24 and will guarantee a free event t-shirt.  Participants also may register or purchase a t-shirt for an additional $10 the night of the event. T-shirts ordered the night of the event will be available for pick-up the following week.    Snacks will be provided after climbing.  Black Light Boulder Bash is sponsored by MPE Entertainment and TapeBrothers.com.

    Normal operation of the Outdoor Pursuits facilities will be postponed during Black Light Boulder Bash.

    For more information contact Steen at 304-696-4653 or steenc@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday November 14, 2013
    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program and student organization to host crime scene investigation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University forensic science graduate students and faculty will present a crime scene investigation workshop for students from Fairview High School of Ashland, Ky., and Notre Dame High School of Portsmouth, Ohio, from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at the crime scene house.

    About 35 high school science students are expected to attend the "CSI Huntington" workshop. They will participate in lectures, demonstrations and hands-on experiments in the areas of ballistics and firearms identification, latent print development, handwriting analysis, blood pattern analysis, outdoor crime scene investigations and digital forensics. 

    The workshop will be presented by Master's United Forensic Identification Association (MUFIA), a student organization comprised of forensic science graduate students in the nationally recognized two-year program. Proceeds from the workshop will go towards travel expenses for graduate students to attend the national meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences next February 17-22 in Seattle, Wash., or other forensic science conferences. Funds also may support travel for internship or job interviews. Thirty forensic science graduate students will be assisting with the workshop.

    "CSI Huntington" workshops have been conducted previously as a summer camp for middle school students and as a series of evening sessions for adults and high school students.

    Dr. Pam Staton, associate professor of forensic science in the graduate program, is the faculty advisor for the "CSI Huntington" workshops. Teachers who are interested in scheduling a "CSI Huntington" workshop for area middle and high school students should contact Staton for more information at 304-691-8962. Workshops also are available to other groups upon request.

    The house is located at 1524 5th Ave. in Huntington.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday November 14, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students and faculty inducted into national honor society

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ten fourth-year medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were inducted today into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) in a ceremony at the Byrd Clinical Center Auditorium.

    The society, established in 2002, is an association of individuals and medical school chapters whose members are selected as exemplars of empathy, compassion, altruism, integrity and service in working with patients, their families and others in the field of medicine.  

    The students were nominated for the organization by their peers and include the following individuals:

    • Zubair A. Ansari
    • Don A. Bertolotti
    • Caroline "Carly" L. Brady
    • W. Dennis Carr
    • Lora B. Fetty
    • Rebecca "Becca" M. Hayes
    • Joshua F. Hendrix
    • Sammy Hodroge
    • Corey A. Keeton
    • Douglas C. vonAllman

    Additionally, four medical residents and four faculty members were inducted into the society.   The residents are:

    • Amy M. Bair, M.D., Department of Surgery
    • Kimberly R. Becher, M.D., Department of Family and Community Health
    • Susan M. Lopata, M.D., Department of Pediatrics
    • Lauren M. Thompson, M.D., Department of Pediatrics


    Faculty inductees included:

    • Sean Loudin, M.D., Department of Pediatrics
    • Adrienne M. Mays, M.D., Department of Family and Community Health
    • Charles C. McCormick, M.D., Department of Family and Community Health
    • Kathleen M. O'Hanlon, M.D., Department of Family and Community Health

     

    Marshall's chapter of GHHS was established in 2012.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday November 13, 2013
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Journalism and mass communications majors at Mountwest CTC can parlay their associate degrees into bachelor's degrees from MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has entered into an agreement that allows journalism majors who have successfully earned associate degrees from Mountwest Community and Technical College to seamlessly transfer those credits to Marshall in pursuit of a bachelor's degree, according to Donald Van Horn, dean of MU's College of Arts and Media.

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Mountwest President Keith J. Cotroneo today signed a 2+2 Articulation Agreement to benefit students in the fields of advertising, public relations, online journalism as well as radio/television production and management. The signing took place in Studio A in the Communications Building on Marshall's Huntington campus. Afterward, Marshall students led a tour of the journalism and mass communications facilities including Studio A, The Parthenon newsroom, the WMUL radio studio and Out Loud, a creative agency space designed for advertising and public relations majors.

    Van Horn said faculty and staff in the College of Arts and Media as well as the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications are excited about the opportunity to provide these degree options to students from Mountwest.

    "The agreement aligns programs at the two institutions and provides opportunities for students to further their studies, which is important as we prepare them for the global workplace," Van Horn said.

    According to the official agreement, the deans of both programs will continually monitor the curriculum at both institutions to ensure consistency and program quality. Students who earn an associate degree at Mountwest will earn a bachelor's degree from Marshall by fulfilling their final two years of coursework on the Huntington campus. Once at Marshall, transfer students are a part of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism that is housed within the College of Arts and Media.

    Cotroneo said this is a great opportunity for Mountwest students who have worked hard to earn their associate degree in journalism.

    "Mountwest is pleased to offer this opportunity for our journalism students to pursue a bachelor's degree close to home," Cotroneo said. "Our newest partnership with Marshall University makes it easy for Mountwest graduates to continue working toward their career goals."

    Janet Dooley, an associate dean in the College of Arts and Media and director of the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, said the agreement is a benefit to both institutions. Marshall gets high-performing students from Mountwest and those students get to earn a four-year degree from a nationally accredited program.

    "After reviewing Mountwest's curriculum requirements, it seems like such a logical progression to continue in journalism and mass communications to earn a bachelor's degree," Dooley said. "We're looking forward to the first cohort of students from Mountwest."

    Linda Vinson, associate professor of communication at Mountwest, said it's been a privilege to collaborate with Marshall's faculty to create this opportunity for a seamless transfer from Mountwest to Marshall.

    "Both Mountwest and Marshall University share a common goal to help students achieve their career aspirations of working in the exciting world of mass media," Vinson said.

    ---------------------

    Photos: (Above) Marshall University graduate student Hanna Francis talks about the Marshall broadcasting program to students from MCTC as Marshall president Stephen J. Kopp and Mountwest President Keith J. Cotroneo look on. The presidents signed a 2+2 Articulation Agreement today in Studio A on Marshall's Huntington campus that will benefit students studying journalism and mass communications. (Below) Two Mountwest Community and Technical College students get a feel for broadcasting behind the MU Report desk in Studio A.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday November 12, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Fundraiser benefitting McCaskey Scholarship brings in $3,000

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An art fundraiser benefitting the Ambrose E. McCaskey, Jr. Memorial Scholarship for Engineering took place on Sunday, Nov. 10, at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

    The artwork of the late Anne McCaskey Koppehele was on display and sold for the benefit of the scholarship in memory of her father.

    Koppehele, a Marshall graduate, passed away last year. Her friends and family gathered for a memorial service in Foundation Hall, surrounded by 67 pieces of her artwork.

    "Anne lived her life in three colors," said Michael Markiewicz, a personal friend of Koppehele, "life, love and laughter." Markiewicz spoke about Koppehele's generous character and her ability to find the good in everyone.

    Even a year after her death, her generosity is still present, Markiewicz said, as her artwork contributes to the Ambrose E. McCaskey, Jr. Memorial Scholarship.

    McCaskey was hired at Marshall in 1936 as head of the new engineering program. Eight of his pieces were on display Sunday as well.

    Through the sale of several art pieces and donations, Sunday's event raised almost $3,000, with additional donations expected to come in over the coming weeks.

    If you would like to make a donation, or learn more about the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., please call 304-696-6264.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday November 12, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall to conduct GIS Day activities Nov. 20 on Huntington campus

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the third consecutive year, Marshall University will conduct GIS Day activities on the Huntington campus. GIS Day, Wednesday, Nov. 20, provides an international forum for users of geographic information systems (GIS) technology to demonstrate real-world applications that are making a difference in our society.

    Dr. Jamie Leonard, who works in the geography department at Marshall, said GIS is a computer technology for presentation and analysis of all types of science and social data referenced to the earth's surface. GIS uses an infinite variety of mapped data, aerial photographs, digital elevation models, satellite imagery, and more to solve problems and answer questions.

    Among academic fields, geography (both as an earth science and a social science), environmental sciences, geology, history, archaeology, engineering, planning, political science, criminal justice, natural resources management, and demographics are but a sampling of GIS users. In fact, it has been estimated that about 80 percent of all data have a spatial component, opening limitless potential uses for GIS (http://www.gis.com), Leonard said.

    The public is invited to view undergraduate, graduate, and faculty GIS posters in the Memorial Student Center room BE5 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.  From about 9 a.m. until about 11 a.m., high school students will be participating in GIS activities in a Corbly Hall computer lab.  At 11 a. m. in BE5, keynote speaker Dr. Jeremy Wimpey of Applied Trails Research will talk about his use of GIS in the real world.

    Following lunch from noon to 1 p.m., high school students will participate in a GPS (global positioning system) activity on campus. All activities will end by 2 p.m.

    Anyone with questions about GIS Day at MU may call  Leonard at 304-696-4626 or contact him by e-mail at leonard@marshall.edu. Or, contact Dr. Min Kook Kim at 304-696-3748 or by e-mail at Kimm@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday November 12, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs, 304-696-4677

    Observance of Native American Heritage Month highlighted by luncheon Nov. 19

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's observance of Native American Heritage Month will be highlighted by a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19, on Marshall's Huntington campus in room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center.
     
    The luncheon will be free to all who make reservations by Thursday, Nov. 14, said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of multicultural affairs at Marshall. The guest speaker will be Cork Bomberry, who is a member of the Bear Clan on the Tuscarora Reservation in New York. The program also will include Native American dance demonstrations.
     
    Luncheon reservations may be made by calling 304-696-4677 or e-mailing Clarke at clarkes@marshall.edu


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday November 11, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Rachael Peckham, Associate Professor of English, 304-696-3649

    Award-winning authors to read from their works Nov. 19 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Julia Watts, author of a dozen novels, including the Lambda Literary Award-winning young-adult Novel Finding H.F., and Lila Quintero Weaver, who was named a finalist for the Small Press Expo 2012 Ignatz Award for Promising New Talent, will be the featured guests in the next A. E. Stringer Visiting Writer Series at Marshall University.

    The readings are scheduled at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 19, in Smith Hall 154 on the Huntington campus. The A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series received support for this event from The College of Liberal Arts, the Honors College, the Center for African-American Students and Sexuality Studies.

    Watts' latest young adult novel, Secret City, is set in Oak Ridge, Tenn., during the Manhattan Project. Watts has received grants from the Kentucky Foundation for Women, and her fiction has appeared in a variety of publications, including The American Voice, Brain/Child, The Journal of Kentucky Studies and Now and Then.

    She holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Spalding University and an M.A. in English from the University of Louisville. A native of southeastern Kentucky, she serves as a mentor in Murray State University's low-residency M.F.A. program and teaches at South College in Knoxville, Tenn.

    A Meet and Greet reception in honor of Watts, hosted by Sexuality Studies, will take place from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the Drinko Atrium, also Tuesday, Nov. 19. Light refreshments will be served.

    Weaver was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1955. At age five, she immigrated to the U.S. with her family and spent her school years in a small Alabama town where she absorbed the material that makes up her illustrated memoir titled Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White. A graduate of the University of Alabama, Weaver was named a finalist for the 2012 Cybils Award in the Graphic Novels category.

    The Children's Literature & Reading Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association awarded Darkroom: A Memoir in Black and White with a Notable Books for a Global Society designation.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday November 11, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Cyber Safety Summit returns to Marshall University Tuesday, Dec. 3

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host its second annual, free cyber safety summit beginning at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3, according to John Sammons, assistant professor of Integrated Science and Technology and director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

    The summit will be held in the St. Mary's Medical Center for Education from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is targeted toward adults, college students and younger students ages 12-14.

    During the sessions participants can learn how to prevent cyber bullying, keep themselves and their families safe online, handle the dangers of social media, keep their information and computers safe and identify scams. In addition, they can find out how and why criminals target them and more.

    The event is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Science & Technology, the FBI, St. Mary's Medical Center and the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence.

    To reserve a seat, e-mail sammons17@gapps.marshall.edu by Tuesday, Nov. 26.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday November 7, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

    Marshall professor's research to be published for her work with text messaging as innovative teaching tool

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kay Swartzwelder of the Marshall University College of Health Professions has had her manuscript, "Examining the Effect of Texting on Students' Perception of Learning," accepted for publication in Nursing Education Perspectives.

    Swartzwelder, an assistant professor in the college's School of Nursing, said the purpose of her research was to examine the effects of utilizing text messaging as an instructional tool in an online learning environment.

    "Each student learns differently and the techniques used in the past won't be effective forever - we have to change how we are teaching our students in order to reach them," Swartzwelder said. "With my research, I learned students felt more engaged in the course and enjoyed learning much more when using text messaging."

    Dr. Nancy Elkins, also an assistant professor in the School of Nursing, said she was influenced by Swartzwelder's research findings and decided to use text messaging in her own classroom with Poll Everywhere, which is a free student response system. Instructors can prepare a list of questions for assessment purposes and students can text or use the Web to answer.

    "This generation uses their phones every day and takes them everywhere they go," Elkins said. "I'm very open to using new technology to reach every student and when I heard about Professor Swartzwelder's research, it seemed like a great idea to stimulate interaction and group participation."

    Swartzwelder and Elkins are not the only two professors in the Marshall School of Nursing using texts to teach. Dr. Jeanne Widener, associate professor in the school, said she chose to utilize text messaging in her medical-surgical nursing course because she believes the standard lecture is not keeping the attention of students in the classroom.

    "I've found that several students slept through all or part of the class, even though it was only 60 minutes of lecture beyond the announcements and discussion of assignments," Widener said. "I strongly believe that texting in the classroom is a good option for the current students. The fact it is free has made it easy for me to use it guilt free. Informally, the students have stated they seem to feel the interaction and immediate feedback does make them think more and several distant-site students have thanked me for using this approach because they can now participate in classroom activities."

    Swartzwelder said she is thrilled to be published in Nursing Education Perspectives and hopes her research generates awareness about the changing educational environment.

    "As educators, we always need to explore new ways to help students become excited about lifelong learning," Swartzwelder said. "In the future, I hope to expand my research and explore specifics about the different needs and ways to engage Appalachian students in our region."

    According to its website, Nursing Education Perspectivess, the research journal of the National League for Nursing, is a peer-reviewed, bimonthly journal. It provides a forum for the exchange of information regarding teaching and learning, curricula, technology, the recruitment and retention of students and other issues important to nursing education.  To learn more about Swartzwelder's research, please contact her at swartzw1@marshall.edu.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday November 7, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU students to host turkey bowling to raise money for River Valley Child Development Services

    Students have the opportunity to bowl using frozen turkeys

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Public Relations Club is hosting a fundraiser on Buskirk Field on the Huntington campus from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.  20.

    This is the first of many fundraisers planned to help raise money for River Valley Child Development Services (RVCDS). Half the proceeds will go to RVCDS and the rest will go toward the club's Trivia Night fundraiser in March, which benefits RVCDS as well.

    WMUL-FM, the Marshall University college radio station, will provide the entertainment and Adam Rogers will serve as master of ceremonies for the turkey bowling event.

    Laura Hatfield, media relations team member, said this is a good way for students to contribute to the community while relieving stress. "We chose turkey bowling because it's right around Thanksgiving and it's new and exciting," Hatfield said. "It's also a good way to blow off steam or relax before finals week."

    For more information, call Hatfield, the event coordinator, at 304-696-6624.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday November 7, 2013
    Contact: Angela Holley, Director, Heart of Appalachia Talent Search Program, 304-696-2201

    Marshall University organizations sponsor collection drive for Barboursville veterans home

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The Heart of Appalachia Talent Search Program, ROTC  and the  Military and Veterans Affairs office at Marshall University are working together to collect donations for residents of the West Virginia Veterans Home in Barboursville. 

    Items will be collected on the Huntington campus from Friday, Nov. 8 through Friday, Dec. 6. Donation boxes are located in the Memorial Student Center, Smith Hall, Corbly Hall and the Marshall Recreation Center.

    The following items are requested for donation:

    Shampoo
    Deodorant      
    Toothpaste                 
    Toothbrush  
    Shaving Lotion/Gel    
    Soap/Body Wash
    Socks                          
    Board Games

    Additional information about this project can be found on the Marshall website at www.marshall.edu/trio/talent-search/hats-program/news.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday November 6, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Huntington attorney John Proctor to speak at Nov. 14 memorial service

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington attorney John Proctor, whose parents were among the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash, will be the featured speaker in this year's annual memorial service honoring all who died in the tragedy.

    The service, conducted by Marshall's Student Government Association, starts at noon Thursday, Nov. 14, at the Memorial Student Center plaza on the Huntington campus. The public is invited to attend.

    The crash on Saturday, Nov. 14, 1970, occurred at about 7:47 p.m. when a DC-9 jetliner, returning Marshall home from its football game at East Carolina University in Greenville, N.C., clipped some treetops just short of Tri-State Airport and went down. Victims included Marshall football players, coaches, staff and supporters, along with the crew of five.

    Proctor, who was 5 years old when the plane crashed, was the youngest of five sons and daughters of H.D. "Pete" Proctor and his wife, Courtney Josephine Proctor, both of whom died in the crash. The other surviving children were John's sister Courtney, who was 6; his sister Patricia, who was 8; his brother, Jim, who was 17, and his sister Kim, who was 19.

    "I don't remember a whole lot about it," Proctor said of the crash. "Not until I was about eight years old when other kids talked about it did I even realize it. The first distinctive memories I have are from the third grade on. The brain is a wonderful thing. I'm not sure if I was too young or what."

    Proctor said he is uncertain what he will talk about in his speech on Nov. 14.

    "I'm really not sure, honestly," Proctor said.

    He said he is thankful to have grown up under the guidance of many people.

    "In a way, I'm blessed," Proctor said. "I was raised by my family and my friends, and my parents' friends and people who loved them."

    H.D. "Pete" Proctor graduated from Marshall University and received his medical degree from the Emory School of Medicine in Atlanta, Ga. A Navy veteran of World War II, he was one of the team's physicians. He was 43 years old when he died.

    E. J. Hassan, president of Marshall's student body, spoke of the importance of the ceremony 43 years after the crash.

    "The Memorial Ceremony is the pinnacle of our university in terms of honoring our history as well as remembering the lives that were taken from our university community in 1970," Hassan said. "It is an absolute honor for me personally to help in the planning of this ceremony, and it is my hope that we can bring as many students as possible so that not only can they take part in remembrance, but so that we can educate them on the rich history that makes Marshall University the community and family that it is today."

    In addition to Proctor and Hassan, other speakers invited to take part in the memorial service include Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Marshall Athletic Director Mike Hamrick.

    The service will conclude with the placing of the memorial wreath at the Memorial Fountain. The fountain will be silenced after the laying of the wreath, and remain silent until next spring.

    For those who can't attend, the service will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu/it/livestream. The Marshall football team will be watching from Tulsa, Okla., where it will play the University of Tulsa at 7:30 p.m. later that day.

    At 6:30 p.m., the SGA will conduct the first Memorial Service Site Visit. Anyone interested in boarding a bus that will take them to the crash site near Tri-State Airport may do so at that time.


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    Wednesday November 6, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    School of Medicine grads gather for 30th reunion at school's alumni weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine celebrates this weekend with its annual alumni homecoming weekend.

    Classes being honored at this weekend's events include the class of 1983, which is marking its 30th reunion, and the class of 1988, which celebrates its 25th.   In addition, the classes of 1993, 1998, 2003 and 2008 are marking anniversaries.

    Dr. R. Mark Hatfield, class of 1983, has been named the 2013 Distinguished Alumnus by the School of Medicine Alumni Association and will be recognized during the annual homecoming banquet Friday night at the Memorial Student Center, Room BE5.

    He will serve as the guest speaker for the 17th annual Albert Esposito, M.D. Memorial Lecture, which is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Saturday at the Harless Auditorium, Marshall University Medical Center.  Hatfield's presentation, "Doc, They Stuck This Medicine In My Eye: Intravitreal Injections for Retinal Diseases 2013," is open to the public.

    Saturday's events also include a  "There's No Place Like Home . . ." tailgate located between the MU Recreation Center and the Sorrell Building on 20th Street across from the West Lot of the Edwards Football Stadium.  The tailgate begins at 10 a.m. and is followed by the Marshall versus University of Alabama-Birmingham (UAB) football game, which kicks off at noon.

    The weekend's events coincide with the 27th Annual Jos I. Ricard, M.D. Family Medicine & Sports Medicine Conference, where physicians may receive continuing medical education credits.

    More information is available from the School of Medicine at 304-691-1711.


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    Jazz Ensemble to salute U.S. veterans Monday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Music and Theatre will present "A Salute to Veterans!" by the Jazz Ensemble I at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The concert will highlight great veterans of our nation's past and present, said Dr. Martin Saunders, director of jazz studies at Marshall, who is the director of the group. Selections will include popular tunes by the great jazz bandleaders and jazz icons from the 1940s through the 1960s, including Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Sarah Vaughan, Frank Sinatra and others.

    Admission is free and open to the public. For further information, call the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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    Tuesday November 5, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Director of Communications, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

    Dr. Zijian Xie named director of Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Zijian Xie, whose laboratory is internationally recognized for its groundbreaking work to understand the behavior of cellular pathways and their relationship to cancer, renal disease and cardiac failure, has been named the director of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research.

    Photo of Dr. Zijian Xie

    Xie comes to Marshall from the faculty of the University of Toledo's College of Medicine, where he was a professor of physiology, pharmacology and medicine, and served as the co-director of the M.D./Ph.D. program. He was chosen to lead MIIR through a national search.

    "I am thrilled Dr. Xie has agreed to take on this vitally important leadership role at MIIR," said Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp. "He is a brilliant scientist with a track record of patented discoveries and successful research collaborations with clinical scientists, including those at our own Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. He has demonstrated the rare ability to bring together interdisciplinary teams and resources to address compelling research questions, while blending them with his considerable interpersonal skills to produce high-level results. These attributes make him the ideal person to take our institute to the next level."

    MIIR was established five years ago as Marshall University's key vehicle to advancing regional economic development through entrepreneurship and commercialization of scientific discoveries. Scientists at the institute are developing a focused program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries.

    In addition to conducting his own active research program at MIIR, Xie will be responsible for adding to the team of interdisciplinary researchers who comprise the core of the institute and for fostering collaborations with other scientists at Marshall.

    "I was attracted to Marshall by MIIR's business orientation," said Xie. "I've been doing research for a long time and President Kopp's vision for the institute is compelling:  How do we really promote research from our labs and translate it into something tangible that will help people down the road? By all working together, I think we can build this institute and integrate research programs at Marshall into a much larger enterprise that will help improve human health, promote international exchange and stimulate economic development in the region."

    A molecular biologist/pharmacologist, Xie has focused his research for nearly 30 years on an enzyme commonly referred to as the "sodium-potassium pump" because it controls the levels of potassium and sodium entering and exiting cells. This pumping process is vital to transporting essential nutrients like glucose and amino acids into cells and maintaining the electrical charge within cells, which is particularly important in controlling normal functions in nerves and muscles, as well as in the kidney and heart.

    Xie's research shows that in addition to its critical pumping function, which was discovered by scientists in the 1950s, this "pump" plays a second, distinct role by directing a variety of cellular processes in the heart, kidneys and other tissues. Through their studies to learn more about the molecular mechanisms by which this cellular signaling occurs, Xie and his colleagues are working to develop new treatments for cancer, heart and kidney disease.

    Xie holds international patents and patent applications on seven medical inventions resulting from his research. He has served as principal investigator, project leader or co-investigator on National Institutes of Health-funded projects totaling more than $10 million, and has established active international collaborations with total funding of more than $1 million. He has been involved with the creation of two spin-off companies from his research.

    Marshall's Vice President for Research Dr. John M. Maher has been serving as MIIR's interim director since the institute's founding director Dr. Eric Kmiec left in August 2011. Maher said he is pleased at Xie's selection.

    "Dr. Xie will be a wonderful addition to the Marshall research community," said Maher. "He embraces the entrepreneurial focus of MIIR. He brings to the institute significant external funding for his own research and understands the institute's commercial and economic development goals.

    "In addition, his existing research partnerships with scientists at our medical school and elsewhere are testament to his commitment to conducting collaborative translational research, where laboratory discoveries are quickly moved to clinical trials and then to treatments for patients."

    Maher added that there is a nice synergy between Xie's work and the research already in progress at MIIR.

    "The research group at MIIR has been exploring the biomedical applications of nanofiber scaffolds. Their work has implications in the development of techniques to treat conditions like heart attacks, and for tendon repair and skin grafts, so there is a natural fit there, too," he said. "I look forward to watching the institute grow and prosper under his leadership."

    Research in Xie's laboratory is currently supported through funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Youbo Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 articles published in scientific journals, has authored a number of book chapters and has been invited to give numerous presentations as part of national and international conferences, symposia, seminars and visiting professorships. He serves as a regular member of NIH study sections and has chaired and co-organized several international symposia.

    Xie earned a bachelor's degree from the Nanjing College of Pharmacy in Nanjing, China, in 1982. He went on to complete a master's degree in toxicology at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in Beijing in 1984 and a doctorate in pharmacology at the Medical College of Ohio (now University of Toledo) in 1990. He was a post-doctoral fellow at the Medical College of Ohio from 1990-91 and joined the institution's faculty in 1991 as an instructor of pharmacology and therapeutics. He advanced steadily, becoming a research assistant professor in 1992, an assistant professor in 1996 and an associate professor in 2000. He was named full professor with tenure in 2005.

    While at Toledo, he mentored dozens of graduate and post-doctoral students and assistant professors. More than 10 of his trainees have established independent laboratories in the U.S. and abroad.

    Xie, who begins his new duties at MIIR this week, will have a joint appointment with Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

     

    About MIIR

    Since its founding in 2008, MIIR has grown to include three researchers in addition to the new director, Dr. Zijian Xie.

    Scientific activity at the institute has resulted in grants from federal, commercial and private sources, and four patents/patent applications/invention disclosures. Collaborations with private industry have resulted in sponsored projects with global pharmaceutical company Pfizer and major diagnostics company IDT. In addition, MIIR scientists are collaborating with other researchers at Marshall, including those working in the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems and at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    The business plan for MIIR calls for the institute to be a self-sustaining enterprise supported by grants and a $36 million endowment created from public and private sources. An economic impact study by Marshall's Center for Business and Economic Research estimated that once the endowment is fully funded, MIIR will create thousands of new jobs and generate millions of dollars in tax revenues over 20 years.

    The endowment, which currently stands at $6 million, has been funded through both private donations and matching state funds made possible by the "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund. Fundraising efforts to increase the endowment are ongoing.

    At its current level, the MIIR endowment provides continuing support for two endowed scientists, one of whom Dr. Jingwei Xie (no relation) has been working at the institute since January 2011. Dr. Zijian Xie is the second endowed scientist.

    For more information about MIIR, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.


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    Monday November 4, 2013
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    Marshall Chamber Choir to perform Sunday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Chamber Choir, under the direction of Dr. David Castleberry, will present a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10,  in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Admission is free and open to the public.

    The centerpiece of Sunday's program is Benjamin Britten's "Hymn to Saint Cecilia," Castleberry said. Britten was born on St. Cecilia's Day (Nov. 22) and Cecilia is the patron saint of music.

    "This year the music world celebrates Benjamin Britten's 100th anniversary year," Castleberry said. "We are pleased to honor the composer's memory with a presentation of one of his finest works. This ten-minute piece was very special to Britten and is a jewel among his many fine creations." 

    The concert also features works by Hans Leo Hassler, Claudio Monteverdi, Felix Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann and Samuel Barber.

    The Chamber Choir is a select, thirty-four-voice choir, drawn from students across the university. The choir has distinguished itself through performance tours and recordings, including a concert tour a year ago to France that included performance at Paris's famed Cathedral of Notre Dame.

    Smith Recital Hall is located at the corner of Hal Greer Boulevard and Third Avenue.


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    Marshall to welcome Bulgarian guest artist for piano recital Nov. 6

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bulgarian pianist Dr. Daniela Mineva will present a guest artist recital at Marshall University Wednesday, Nov. 6. The performance will take place at 8 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Forum on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Mineva is an associate professor of piano at Humboldt State University in California. Hailed by critics as a "vibrant and expressive performer who could steal the show in every concert" (New York Times) and an "energetic and lively pianist who displays power and delicacy in nuanced sensitivity along with virtuoso technique" (The Baltimore Sun), Mineva's unique approach to standard repertory, combined with the performance and dedication of works by living composers has taken her career across Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

    "It is a tremendous pleasure for us to host Dr. Mineva," said Dr. Henning Vauth, assistant professor of piano at Marshall. "She is a strong advocate for contemporary music and the second half of her program is entirely devoted to works by composers active in the late 20th and early 21st century. Her jovial and personable character, combined with flawless pianistic technique and intense musical expression, allows her to present new music in an exciting, adventurous way that is enjoyable for musicians and non-musicians alike. The intimate and modern atmosphere of the Jomie Forum, where the audience sits in armchairs close to the artist, promises an exciting and special avant-garde experience."

    Vauth added that there also will be some classical highlights on the program. He will be performing two Hungarian dances by Brahms for piano four hands with Mineva.

    The program is free and open to the public. For further information, contact the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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    Friday November 1, 2013
    Contact: Dr. David Trowbridge, Associate Professor of History, (304) 696-7153

    Author of 'Right to Ride' to speak at Marshall Nov. 12

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Blair L. M. Kelley, an associate professor of history at North Carolina State University, will discuss her award-winning book, Right to Ride, on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The event will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12, in room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center.

    "Dr. Kelley is a fantastic speaker and her work should interest many in our community," said Dr. David Trowbridge, associate professor of history and director of African and African American studies at Marshall.

    Right to Ride is about early civil rights activism and boycotts of segregated streetcars during the early 1900s. Between 1900 and 1907, citizens of 25 Southern cities protested segregation on streetcars. The book received the 2010 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Award from the Association of Black Women Historians.

    Kelley's scholarly work focuses on the history of African American resistance to segregation, and she teaches courses on African American history, civil rights, oral history and the history of New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. She earned her B.A. from the University of Virginia and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University.

    Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing by the author.


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    Marshall School of Pharmacy professor publishes pediatric research

    Additional published research include studies on pharmacy education and practices

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Chris Gillette, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, administration and research with the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, is a member of several research teams that recently published papers on pediatric asthma management.

    Gillette's research was published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, Clinical Pediatrics,  Journal of Asthma and Pediatric Pulmonology, all  peer-reviewed journals.

    His study published in the International Journal of Pharmacy Practice looked at how often children and parents of children with asthma who report problems with asthma medications asked about those medications during a routine medical visit. 

    "We found that about one in three parents who reported a problem with their child's medications asked questions and one in 10 children asked questions during their doctor's visit," Gillette said. "The conclusion of the paper is that pharmacists should encourage parents and children to report problems they may be having in using their medications."

    The study published in Clinical Pediatrics focused on the frequency with which providers discussed written asthma action plans with children and their caregivers.  The study in the Journal of Asthma reviewed how often medical providers discussed peak flow meter use with children and their caregivers, and the research in Pediatric Pulmonology looked at how often medical providers discussed the side effects of asthma medications with children and their caregivers.
     
    The collaborative projects involved researchers from the University of North Carolina's medical and pharmacy schools as well as San Diego State University, Husson University and Indiana University, among others. Additional recent research publications by School of Pharmacy faculty members include:

    • Dr. H. Glenn Anderson, Jr.,  associate dean for academic and curricular affairs, "A Standardized Patient Counseling Rubric for a Pharmaceutical Care and Communications Course," American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.
    • Dr. Hasan Koc, assistant professor and director of pharmacometrics and pharmacoanalysis,  along with Dr. Emine C. Koc, assistant professor of biochemistry and microbiology, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine,  authored a chapter in the book, "Translation in Mitochondria and Other Organelles."
    • Dr. Angel Kimble, clinical assistant professor, department of pharmacy practice, administration and research, "Pharmacist interventions throughout care transitions: a review of current practices," International Current Pharmaceutical Journal.

    The Marshall University School of Pharmacy admitted its first class of students in 2012.


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    'Textbook War' journalist to present a new radio documentary about culture war battles over Texas curriculum

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Trey Kay, producer of "The Great Textbook War," a radio report about the 1974 Kanawha Textbook Controversy, will return to Marshall University's Huntington campus to present his new radio documentary about the culture war battles over public school curriculum content in Texas.

    A special advance listening session of "Long Game: Texas' Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom" for the Marshall community will take place at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, in the John Deaver Drinko Library, room 402. The presentation of the documentary will be followed by a panel discussion that will include Kay and Dr. Kathy Seelinger, professor of education at Marshall. The presentation is open to the public and admission is free, although seating may be limited.

    "Long Game" will be broadcast on West Virginia Public Radio at 9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7.

    "The story of the Kanawha textbook controversy was an example of where the nation was in the early'70s regarding culture wars and education," Kay said. "Texas is a great example of where those battles are today. For more than a half a century, citizens of the Lone Star State have had intense, emotional battles over what children should and should not be taught in public school classrooms."

    The hour-long "Long Game" begins with a focus on the recent controversy over an online set of lesson plans widely used in Texas schools. "Tea Party" parents believed these lessons to be pro-Communist, anti-Christian and pro-Islam. Earlier this year, they successfully pushed to remove the lessons from Texas schools.  The piece moves on to discuss how an unlikely conservative, religious couple created an organization powerful enough to force textbook publishers to alter books.  The documentary closes by examining the battle over what science textbooks should teach about evolution in public school classrooms. 
     
    "The Great Textbook War" was honored with Peabody, Murrow and DuPont awards. Kay also has contributed numerous reports to national programs, including This American Life, Marketplace, Morning Edition, American RadioWorks, Studio 360 and Frontline.  In 2005, he shared a Peabody for his contribution to Studio 360's "American Icons: Moby Dick" program. 

    "Long Game" was made possible by the Spencer Fellowship for Education Reporting at Columbia University's School of Journalism, with additional funding provided by the Fund for Investigative Journalism, Marist College, the CRC Foundation and Friends of West Virginia Public Broadcasting. 

     


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    International Festival is Nov. 9 at Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 50th Annual Marshall University International Festival is scheduled from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Admission to the festival is free and the event is open to the public. Food tickets will be available for purchase, allowing guests to sample a variety of dishes from all around the world.

    For the second year, the festival will take place at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, to accommodate the event's need for additional space. It was previously on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    "Last year, we had more than 4,000 people visit the festival, and it was one of the most exciting and well-attended international events in our region," said Dr. Tammy Johnson, executive director of admissions and international student services. "We are looking forward to an even bigger crowd this year."

    By moving the festival to the larger location, organizers were also able to invite area restaurants to join in the celebration. This year, the festival will feature 11 different food vendors. Each restaurant will offer tastings of signature menu items for guests to purchase.

    In addition to the international foods, the festival will also feature music and dance from around the world, along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures provided by Marshall University international students and the Tri-State international community.

    "The International Festival is a perfect fit with Marshall's efforts to increase international enrollment and involvement on campus," Johnson said. "The festival provides a tremendous opportunity for our students, faculty and staff to interact with the Huntington community at large. It's a wonderful event for everyone who attends."

    The students are the heart of the festival from hosting booths representing their home countries to entertaining the crowd with cultural music and dance, said Jyotsna Patel, who is with the Marshall University Center for International Programs.

    "Our students really enjoy and look forward to participating in the festival each year," Johnson said. "They enjoy telling others about their home countries and their cultures. A lot of time and work is put into preparing for the event."

    Dr. Clark Egnor, director of international programs with the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, said the festival "demonstrates that Marshall University and the Huntington Tri-State community are welcoming to people from around the world.

    "As we strive to prepare our citizens to live, work and compete in the global economy, Marshall's International Festival serves as a great example for other universities and communities across West Virginia to follow," Egnor said.

    Participating restaurants at the festival include: Julian's Market, Chateau D'Italia, Towers Market Place at Marshall University, Jug and Kilt, The Original Hibachi Japanese Steakhouse, Cedar Market, La Famiglia, El Rachito, Nawab Indian Cuisine, River & Rail Bakery and New China Garden Buffet.

    Food tickets will be available for purchase at the festival or in advance at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center on Friday, Nov. 8, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. For further details about Marshall University's annual International Festival, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu, or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

    -------------------------

    Photos: Scenes from the 2012 International Festival at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington, W.Va. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Marshall School of Medicine receives high marks for its strong clinical conflict-of-interest policies

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. A national study by the Institute of Medicine as a Profession (IMAP) on clinical conflict-of-interest (COI) policies shows the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has some of the strongest policies among American medical schools.

    The analysis was published in the October issue of Academic Medicine and reviewed clinical COI policies that seek to limit ties to industry including managing gifts and meals from pharmaceutical and device manufacturers, along with physicians' consulting and speaking engagements for company-sponsored events.

    According to the report, Marshall has a policy strength average score of 2.4 on a scale of 0 to 3, placing it in the 94th percentile.

    "Having these policies in place is important to maintain strong ethical practices and conflict-free relationships," said Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine. "We continue to work toward an environment that elevates transparency and openness."

    Overall, the 2011 study showed schools have made great progress in developing policies to limit industry influence as compared to a 2008 study, although no school met all standards as defined by IMAP.


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    Wednesday October 30, 2013
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    Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown is the featured Amicus Curiae speaker at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Louis Michael Seidman, the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, will be the featured Amicus Curiae Series speaker at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 5, at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson alumni Center, on the Huntington campus.

    Seidman describes his talk, On Constitutional Disobedience, as follows:

    "More than two centuries after its ratification, most Americans are still infatuated with their Constitution.  And yet, despite years of hagiography for the founders and worship of the text that they produced, atheists and agnostics have survived.  Throughout our history, many of our most revered political figures have expressed doubts about the Constitution.   Constitutional skepticism has been at the heart of some of our most important political battles, and it has preoccupied some of our leading political thinkers.  It is as American as apple pie."

    Seidman's talk is based on his book of the same title, On Constitutional Disobedience, which was released this year by Oxford University Press.

    The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy is sponsored by Marshall's Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, and supported by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.
                                        
    "Professor Seidman is a tremendously distinguished constitutional scholar," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy. "He is a graduate of Harvard Law School.  Among other accomplishments, he clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, observing the workings of the Supreme Court from the inside while assisting one of the greatest civil rights lawyers in history.  Professor Seidman has taught at Georgetown - one of the country's finest law schools - for almost 40 years.  His most recent book, On Constitutional Disobedience, has received widespread attention for its controversial ideas; it is also very thought-provoking.  We are honored that Professor Seidman has agreed to participate in the lecture series and look forward to welcoming him to Marshall."

    In addition to On Constitutional Disobedience, Seidman is the author of Silence and Freedom; Equal Protection of the Law; and Our Unsettled Constitution: A New Defense of Constitutionalism and Judicial Review, and the co-author of five textbooks on Constitutional law.

    Each lecture in the Amicus Curiae series is approved for one hour of West Virginia Continuing Legal Education credit.


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    Wednesday October 30, 2013
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    Marshall University to host series of forums focused on higher education funding in West Virginia

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp has announced a series of forums designed for faculty, students and members of the community to discuss an anticipated second round of budget cuts to state higher education funding. Forums will be held next week on three of the university's campuses.

    The forums, which are sponsored by the Office of the President and the Marshall University Faculty Senate, will be moderated by Beth Vorhees, news director for West Virginia Public Broadcasting. Each forum begins at 6 p.m. and will run as follows:

    • Monday, Nov. 4, at the Marshall University Mid-Ohio Valley Center, Point Pleasant;
    • Tuesday, Nov. 5, at the Marshall University John Deaver Drinko Library, Third Floor Atrium, Huntington; and,
    • Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Marshall University South Charleston Campus Library, South Charleston.

    Legislators and representatives from the governor's office as well as members of the Higher Education Policy Commission have been invited to attend. The forums are all open to the public.

    This year, higher education institutions in West Virginia underwent a 7.5 percent cut to their state budget appropriations and have been asked to submit budgets reflecting cuts of another 7.5 percent for next year. The forums have been designed to give the public an opportunity to learn about budget cuts and their impact as well as to ask questions.

    President Kopp said that the responsibility of funding public higher education is being shifted increasingly to students and their families.

    "Our students and their families are the ones who experience the direct financial impact," Kopp said. "But we also need to evaluate the long-term effects of cuts to public higher education funding in terms of their implications for future state economic development. Additional cuts portend lasting implications for our state and region."

    Dr. Marybeth Beller is a political science faculty member and chairwoman of the Faculty Senate Legislative Affairs Committee. She said when cuts are made to state funding for higher education, tuition often increases while services decline and programs are eliminated entirely.

    "It felt critical to work on this early with President Kopp to make sure everyone understands the vast impact including causing the state's economic development to suffer that additional cuts would have on higher education," Beller said. "We're not asking for more funding, but we definitely don't want to be cut again."

    Beller cited statistics from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, The Value of Public Higher Education, in which Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce stated that by 2018, the State of West Virginia needs to produce an additional 20,000 college degrees just to sustain its current economy. The report notes that although this figure seems intimidating, this goal can be accomplished by increasing degree completion rates of students already enrolled in the in the two- and four-year systems as well as through enrollment increases.

    The article also stated that by 2020, 51 percent of West Virginia jobs will require an associate degree or higher. Currently, only 27 percent of West Virginians fall in that category.


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    Tuesday October 29, 2013
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    Marshall University recognized as a Phi Kappa Phi Chapter of Merit

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines recently recognized the Marshall University chapter of Phi Kappa Phi as a Chapter of Merit. The award is given to chapters that excel in recognizing and promoting academic excellence in all fields of higher education and engaging the community of scholars in service to others.

    The Chapter of Merit distinction is a part of the society's Chapter Recognition Program, which acknowledged 69 chapters with recognition this year, including 50 as Chapters of Merit.

    "Phi Kappa Phi is proud of all its chapters, but we are pleased to offer special recognition to those who have achieved the status of Chapter of Merit and Chapter of Excellence," said Society Executive Director Dr. Mary Todd. "The efforts of chapter officers to promote academic excellence on their campuses demonstrate their strong commitment to the mission of Phi Kappa Phi and to their students." By receiving the Chapter of Merit distinction, the Marshall University chapter is recognized as a thriving organization that meets regularly, holds annual initiations and applies frequently for Phi Kappa Phi's select awards, grants and fellowships.

    "I am pleased that the Marshall University chapter was honored as a Chapter of Merit," said Chapter President Dr. Todd L. Green. "It means a lot to us as we are a young chapter, having been established in 2010. We are fortunate to have such high quality student and faculty members."

    Chapters achieving the Chapter of Merit distinction receive:
    -  a commendation letter from the society sent to chapter officers and campus administration
    -  special recognition on the society's website and publications
    -  a specially designed logo for use in chapter communications
    -  recognition advertisements in local media and educational journals
    -  a $100 award

    Founded in 1897 at the University of Maine, Phi Kappa Phi is the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines. The society has chapters at more than 300 select colleges and universities in North America and the Philippines.

    For more information on Phi Kappa Phi, please call 800-804-9880 or visit www.PhiKappaPhi.org.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday October 28, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall alumna named 2013 Outstanding Woman in Technology at 'Spirit of Innovation' awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two-time Marshall University graduate Dr. Stephanie A. Skolik was recognized as one of West Virginia's top innovators last week at the TechConnectWV "Spirit of Innovation" awards banquet.

    An ophthalmologist and president and CEO of the Huntington Retina Center, Skolik was honored with the 2013 Outstanding Woman in Technology award for her retinopathy research and invention of devices to assist with eye surgery. She is the founder of the American Retina Research Foundation and heads up Eyedea Inc., an ophthalmic invention company.

    Approximately 20 years ago, she observed that patients with long-term diabetes and co-existing arthritis seemed far less likely than their non-arthritic counterparts to develop diabetic retinopathy, the most common diabetic eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. The disease is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina.

    Skolik hypothesized that the inflammatory joint proteins were providing a sort of innate protection. The search for the identity of this protective factor is the focus of her research. If the protective factor can be identified, it may be a critical link to understanding diabetes itself and could eventually lead to a "diabetes vaccine."

    Dr. Jan I. Fox, Marshall's senior vice president for information technology and chief information officer, said she has known Skolik since high school, when they were debate partners.

    "Stephanie Skolik epitomizes entrepreneurship. When I think of innovation, technology and a strong female leader, it is her name that comes to mind," said Fox. "When she needed something for her work that was not available, she would just create a new device for ophthalmic surgery. Most people could only dream of holding a single patent, but she holds multiple patents for ophthalmic medical devices.

    "Above all, she has used her intellect and skills to improve the lives of West Virginians. Eleven years ago she established the non-profit American Retina Research Foundation, which is based in Huntington, to provide financial support for diabetic retinopathy research. Her heart is as large as her talent."

    Skolik earned a bachelor's degree from Marshall in 1981 and graduated from the university's school of medicine in 1985. She was a finalist in the U.S. Olympic Trials in basketball in 1980 and a Rhodes Scholarship finalist in 1981.

    In addition to being an assistant professor at Marshall's medical school from 1994 to 1999, she has been a clinical instructor and fellow at the Yale University School of Medicine. From 1998 to 2002, she was a guest researcher at the highly acclaimed National Eye Institute in Bethesda, Md.

    TechConnectWV is a non-profit coalition committed to the advancement of the high-tech economy in West Virginia. The awards banquet was held Tuesday in Morgantown.

    Anne Barth, TechConnect's executive director, said, "The 'Spirit of Innovation' program is an opportunity to spotlight success stories throughout the state, and recognize the people and organizations that support innovation-based economic development. By showcasing these creative efforts and the people behind them, we hope to inspire others who may have an entrepreneurial spirit. The 33 nominations received for this inaugural awards program demonstrate that in West Virginia, the innovation economy is not just a concept it's a reality."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday October 28, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Fraught fantasies' conversation with authors takes place Nov. 4 at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Women's Studies Program will be a hosting a conversation with authors Kallypso Masters and Ann Mayburn and Marshall Assistant Professor of English Jill Treftz. The discussion, titled "Fraught Fantasies: Feminism, Erotic Literature, and BDSM," will focus on women as writers and consumers of erotic literature and the controversies surrounding recent bestselling books such as Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James.

    Masters, a bestselling author in the U.S., writes emotional and realistic novels including the captivating Rescue Me series. She has been writing full-time since May 2011. Masters at Arms was her debut novel (published in August 2011), followed by Nobody's Angel, Nobody's Hero and Nobody's Perfect.
    Mayburn is an award-winning author of more than 30 erotica and romance novels including the Prides of the Moon series and Wild Lilly.  She is influenced by mythology and fairy tales and has written historical, paranormal and contemporary romance novels.

    Treftz holds a Ph.D. from Penn State. She teaches and writes about nineteenth-century British literature, fantasy and romance fiction. She is interested in representations of female desire in literature. 

    The conversation will be moderated by Leah Tolliver, the coordinator of the Women's Center at Marshall.

    "Fraught Fantasies" will take place at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 4, in Drinko Library 402.  A reception and book signing with the authors will follow at 8 p.m. in the third-floor Drinko Atrium. Books by Masters and Mayburn will be available for purchase.  

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Please contact Laura Michele Diener at 304-696-2954 or Leah Tolliver at 304-696-3112 with questions.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 25, 2013
    Contact: Lalena Price, Communications Coordinator, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall students have top number of proposals in statewide business plan competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - If the numbers of students participating in a statewide business plan competition are indicative of an entrepreneurial spirit at Marshall University, professors here say their students are "thundering loud" with it.
     
    Marshall University students have submitted the most entries in this year's West Virginia Statewide Collegiate Business Plan Competition, which is sponsored by the BrickStreet Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at West Virginia University. Out of a record 235 entries from 11 state universities and colleges, 107 are the work of Marshall students.
     
    The annual competition showcases the desire to start West Virginia businesses and gives college students the opportunity to win $10,000 worth of goods and services toward transforming their business idea into reality. The second round of the competition will be hosted by Marshall University on the Huntington campus Nov. 22.
     
    Elizabeth Reusch, assistant professor of strategy and entrepreneurship in Marshall's College of Business, is impressed with the enthusiasm of the students who submitted their ideas.
     
    "Given the size of Marshall University, 107 is an impressive number," Reusch said. "I think everybody should be wowed by the fact that so many of our students are willing to take a chance on their ideas. Entering a fledgling idea into a competition like this takes a lot of guts.
     
    "In West Virginia, approximately 97 percent of our economy is based around thriving small businesses. If we want to help ensure the future success of West Virginia, we need to encourage our students to think like entrepreneurs. I am superbly proud of our students."
     
    She said two years ago, Marshall had five plans in the competition. Last year, 70 students took the plunge, with two plans making it to the semi-final round.
     
    Even if no Marshall students make it into Round 2 for the semi-finals, Reusch said the fact that so many took a chance on their ideas is admirable. "We know most successful entrepreneurs fail spectacularly with their first few ideas. I'd like to see our students get that out of the way, learn that sometimes great ideas aren't profitable and that business plans are beneficial to helping determine what ideas will and won't work."
     
    The complete list of institutions and number of submissions includes: Bluefield State College, 4; Concord University, 4; Fairmont State University, 3; Glenville State College, 1; Marshall University, 107; Shepherd University, 11; University of Charleston, 2; West Liberty University, 5; West Virginia State University, 3; West Virginia University, 94; and WVU at Parkersburg, 1.
     
    There are three rounds in the business plan competition. Round 1 requires a 3-page summary of a business idea, which will be scored by a panel of judges using a scoring rubric. Up to 10 teams in each category will be selected to advance to Round 2, which will be hosted by Marshall. This semi-final round consists of three levels - a feasibility study, a two-minute elevator pitch, and a series of interviews. The top five teams in each category emerging from the semi-finals will advance to the final round, which will be held at WVU.
     
    In the final round, teams will be given comprehensive instruction and support in developing a complete business plan, a business coach/mentor, and a stipend of $1,000 to cover costs associated with developing their business. Each finalist team submits a 20-page business plan to a panel of judges and then makes an oral presentation to a panel. One team per category will be awarded a $10,000 prize in April. Categories include: Hospitality and Tourism, Lifestyle and Innovation and a new STEM-related business category that covers engineering, technology, energy and health care.
     
    For more information about the annual statewide collegiate business plan competition, please visit http://www.be.wvu.edu/bpc.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday October 24, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Countdown to Commencement is Nov. 5-6 at Marshall University

    Graduates can take care of pre-commencement responsibilities in central location

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct its semi-annual Countdown to Commencement Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 5 and 6,  in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

    The purpose of Countdown to Commencement is to assist those participating in this year's winter commencement, set for 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15, at Cam Henderson Center, in preparation for the event. It is designed to assist graduates in communicating with campus administrative offices in a central location.

    "Countdown to Commencement is very well attended, both by the spring graduates and the winter graduates," MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said. "With everything in a central location, it saves them a lot of running as they take care of pre-commencement responsibilities. We encourage everyone who plans to take part in the December ceremony to stop by the Don Morris Room on November 5th or 6th."

    Countdown to Commencement is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. It is for July, August and tentative December 2013 graduates.

    The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement:

    Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diploma; confirm commencement participation; obtain commencement instructions; receive recognition cords for military service or ROTC; pick up honor cords and tassels (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to ask any questions related to commencement.

    Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their caps and gowns, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings and much more.

    Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2013 rings. Ring packages start at $238.90. Packages include a custom ring, wooden display box and a 10-year extended warranty. Also, students can order graduation announcements.

    GradImages - Cap and Gown portraits will be taken. There is no sitting fee, no obligation to purchase and free proofs will be available within 24 hours of the sitting.

    Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

    Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

    Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career paths. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for JOBTRAX (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

    Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan exit counseling materials.

    Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about upcoming financial aid workshops in which they may learn about default prevention, debt management, loan repayment, loan consolidation and loan forgiveness/cancellation programs. They also will have the opportunity to complete their loan exit counseling.

    Campus ID Office - Issues regarding students' HigherOne accounts or Points accounts may be resolved.

    Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.

    For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday October 24, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University School of Pharmacy students participate in national drug diversion project

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Nearly two dozen Marshall University School of Pharmacy students will join other community groups around the Tri-state area for Saturday's 7th National Take-Back Initiative, an effort to safely dispose of prescription medications.
    School of Pharmacy organizer and second-year student Lindsey McKinney of McLean, Va., says the event is important because it increases awareness about proper drug disposal.

    "As a school, we are bridging gaps between health care, law officers, and the public," she said.  "If the public knows that drug take-back, drop-off locations are available, we as a community may be able to decrease the probability that prescription drugs end up in the wrong hands for illicit or unsafe use."

    Saturday's event has multiple locations around the region.   Marshall pharmacy students will be stationed at the following locations from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.:

    o          Huntington Police Department, Douglass Center, 1448 10th Ave.
    o          Cabell County Sheriff's Department, CVS,  5179 U.S. 60 E.
    o          Milton Police, Milton Pre-K School, 1302 U.S. 60, Milton
    o          Kenova Police, Kenova  Fire Department,  1600 Pine St., Kenova
    o          Wayne Police, Wayne Police Department, 10328 Rt. 152, Wayne

    The national campaign aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.  The U.S. Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Agency sponsor the event on the federal level. Locally, the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership and law enforcement agencies are leading the project.

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    Media note: 2nd-year student Lindsey McKinney will be available for interviews at the Milton location.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday October 23, 2013
    Contact: Crystal Stewart, Program Manager, Information Technology / MUOnLine, 304-696-2970

    Marshall awarded 2014 Military Friendly Schools Designation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been named to Victory Media's Military Friendly Schools list for 2014, according to Crystal Stewart, program manager for information technology/MUOnLine at the university.

    The list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America's military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

    "Inclusion on the 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools shows Marshall University's commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students," said Sean Collins, vice president at Victory Media and a nine-year Navy veteran. "The need for education is growing and our mission is to provide the military community with transparent, world-class resources to assist in their search for schools."

    The Military Friendly Schools media and website, found at www.militaryfriendlyschools.com, feature the list, interactive tools and search functionality to help military students find the best school to suit their unique needs and preferences. The 1,868 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year's list exhibit leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience. These schools have world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility and other services to those who served.

    "Potential military students are encouraged to virtually attend the upcoming Military Friendly Schools Virtual College Fair, Wednesday, Nov. 20," Stewart said. "The fair will provide an opportunity for service members, spouses and veterans to engage with Marshall while searching for a school and is especially efficient for introducing service members deployed overseas or those still in uniform to our education programs."

    Those who would like to attend the virtual college fair may register at www.militaryfriendly.com/events, Stewart said.

    Now in its fifth year, the 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools was compiled through extensive research and a data-driven survey of more than 10,000 schools nationwide approved for VA tuition funding. The survey results composing the 2014 list were independently tested by Ernst & Young LLP based upon the weightings and methodology established by Victory Media. Each year schools taking the survey are held to a higher standard than the previous year via improved methodology, criteria and weightings developed with the assistance of an Academic Advisory Board (AAB) consisting of educators from schools across the country.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday October 23, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Communications, 304-746-2038

    Solo exhibit features paintings by visiting artist Morgan Craig

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Philadelphia-based painter Morgan Craig will be featured in a solo exhibition at Marshall University's Gallery 842. A public reception for the artist will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, with a brief lecture at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.
     
    Craig creates large-scale paintings of dilapidated and abandoned interior spaces, often portraying the ruins of urban dwellings, factories, asylums and penitentiaries. He has found inspiration for his work in locations ranging from defunct factories in Detroit to forbidden nuclear zones in Russia to restricted industrial islands in Australia. The artist describes these structures as "both repositories and vehicles for memory that profoundly influence culture and identity." Craig's paintings address the demise of the American Dream, as well as the human component of these vacant spaces the imprint of the men and women who spent the vast majority of their lives working within these now-spent buildings.

    "We're very excited to welcome an artist of Craig's caliber to our community," said Marshall University gallery director John Farley. "Many of the architectural settings depicted look all too familiar - equal parts beauty and poignancy. As downtown Huntington seeks to rebuild, rebrand and reinvent itself, Craig's paintings provide an important vehicle for discourse."

    Craig received an M.F.A. in painting from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and a B.F.A. in painting with teacher certification from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University, also in Philadelphia. He has been featured in periodicals including New American Paintings, American Art Collector Magazine and Direct Art Magazine. Craig has shown at SOFA Chicago; the Goggleworks Center for the Arts in Reading, Pa.; the Arlington Arts Center in Arlington, Va.; the Current Gallery in Baltimore; and the Lawrence Asher Gallery in Los Angeles, among others.
     
    The exhibition at Marshall University will be on display until Dec. 6. Located at 842 4th Ave in Huntington, Gallery 842 is free and open to the public from noon to  7 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

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    Image: "The Heartbeat of America" (2011) is an oil painting on linen, 72" x 54" by artist Morgan Craig, whose work will be on display at Gallery 842 until Dec. 6.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 22, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Army veteran takes over as director of military and veterans affairs at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tommy Reynolds, a Marshall University graduate and United States Army veteran, is the new director of military and veterans affairs at MU.

    Reynolds, 28, replaces Kelly Sweetman, who resigned this summer. He assumed his duties Sept. 16.

    More than 500 military veterans are enrolled at Marshall this semester. Reynolds said he wants to help them transition from military life to higher education life, "to help them navigate (the website) and do the same things I had to do." He has redone the military and veterans affairs website and is creating a brochure.

    "Just finding the veterans on campus is difficult," he said. "My main goal is to make military veterans feel at home at Marshall. I want them to be a part of the college experience and feel at home."

    Reynolds is a native of Point Pleasant, W.Va., and a 2003 graduate of Point Pleasant High School. He joined the Army right after high school and served five years, including a 15-month tour of Iraq as an infantry paratrooper with the 82nd airborne division.

    After being discharged from the Army, Reynolds went to work at a steel mill in New Haven, W.Va. While there, he decided to enroll at Marshall, where he earned a social work degree.

    "I wanted to be a social worker to help veterans," he said.

    While a student at Marshall, Reynolds worked in the military and veterans affairs office under Sweetman. Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs, said Marshall is fortunate that it didn't have to look far to find Sweetman's replacement, although an extensive search was conducted.

    "I'm very proud of Tommy," Hensley said. "He's a combat veteran, and he earned his degree through the very program that we support, the modern GI Bill. He is very energetic and extremely committed to providing support for our veterans."

    For the past few years, Reynolds has been involved in raising money for the Wounded Warriors Project in Delaware, Ohio. His wife, Linsey, is from Fairmont, W.Va., and they have a 22-month-old son, Jaxx Reynolds.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 22, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

    Marshall COHP/St. Mary's School of Respiratory Care celebrate Respiratory Care Week

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College of Health Professions and the St. Mary's School of Respiratory Care are celebrating Respiratory Care Week Oct. 20 - 26.

    This annual event recognizes the respiratory care profession and promotes awareness of lung health issues, according to Christopher Trotter, assistant professor at the Marshall/St. Mary's cooperative School of Respiratory Care.

    "Respiratory care professionals from around the world come together in their communities to celebrate, motivate, educate, inspire and learn more about our field," Trotter said. "We do this by hosting activities to honor and reward respiratory therapists for their contributions."

    This year, the School of Respiratory Care is hosting a picnic and wiffleball tournament for all respiratory care students and staff. The picnic will begin at noon, Wednesday, Oct. 23, at Coonskin Park in the Gorman Shelter in Charleston, W.Va., with the wiffleball tournament and other activities to follow.

    "Through these fun activities, students can create a positive and enjoyable connection to their field," Trotter said. "It also allows students the opportunity to network and build relationships with potential employers."

    "We are very proud of the accomplishments of our respiratory care staff and students," said Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions. "With initiatives such as these, our students will become actively involved in their field and hopefully take roles in related organizations such as the West Virginia Society for Respiratory Care or the American Association for Respiratory Care."

    To find out more information about these events or to learn more about St. Mary's School of Respiratory Care, please contact Trotter at Christopher.trotter@st-marys.org or visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday October 21, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    New instructor for Extra Mile 5k class teaches first session today

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is welcoming a new instructor for the Extra Mile 5k class this semester. Julia Galloway, a Huntington native and member of the Marshall University cross country team, begins teaching the first session today (Monday, Oct. 21), and continues until Nov. 11. The class costs $23 for Rec Center members and $29 for non-members.
     
    The class will be moved indoors during inclement weather to avoid obstacles in training.  More course dates are to follow. Prospective participants can register at the Membership Services Desk in the MRC or through the Rec Center's online portal at www.marshallcampusrec.com.
     
    The Extra Mile 5k class prepares beginners and avid runners alike to take a step further with group training that improves speed and endurance. "I want to teach this class to improve fitness for everyone and I hope to see a wide range of ages from teenagers to seniors," Galloway said. "The class is for first-time runners and those who just want to shave time off their personal best."
     
    For more information on the Marshall Recreation Center or to register for the course please visit http://www.marshallcampusrec.com/ or call 304-696-4732.
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday October 21, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall to conduct annual Volunteer Fair Oct. 23

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct its annual Volunteer Fair Wednesday, Oct. 23, in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus.

    The office of community engagement invites everyone to participate in the fair, which runs from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Parking is available in the 6th Avenue parking garage.

    "This will be an opportunity to recruit student volunteers as well as promote the services of your organization," said Elizabeth Sheets, director of the office of community engagement. "It's the chance for agencies to come on campus and get the students involved. We have students who are looking to volunteer. It's a chance for them to meet with the agencies and see what their needs are."

    So far, 18 agencies have signed up to participate in the volunteer fair. More are welcome, Sheets said.

    "We'd be glad to have them," she said.

    Persons may call Sheets at 304-696-2285 or e-mail her at appell1@marshall.edu for more information.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 18, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall School of Medicine biomedical science students to co-host conference in Charleston

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Biomedical science students from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, in collaboration with students from West Virginia University, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University, will host the second annual Appalachian Regional Cell Conference (ARCC) in Charleston next week.

    The conference is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at Charleston Area Medical Center, and is funded by a grant from the American Society for Cell Biology.

    "The ARCC is unique because it is a student-driven research conference," said M. Allison Wolf, one of the conference organizers and a doctoral student at Marshall.  "This is a wonderful opportunity for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the field of cell biology to network and share resources. It also provides a platform to showcase the emerging center of student research in Appalachia."

    In addition to Wolf, Marshall doctoral students Johannes Fahrmann and Miranda Carper were members of the conference's organizing committee.

    The conference will feature keynote speaker, Dr. John J. Kopchick, Distinguished Professor and Goll-Ohio Eminent Scholar, Edison Biotechnology Institute & Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ohio University.   

    Registration is available at http://tinyurl.com/ARCC2013.

    For more information contact Wolf at 304-696-3576.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday October 17, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Career Services to feature etiquette expert at upcoming dinner

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will hold its bi-annual Etiquette Dinner, featuring etiquette consultant Terri Thompson, on Wednesday, Oct. 23.

    During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, along with answers to any questions students might have.

    "Terri has a wonderful way of making the students feel at ease, while maintaining a real sense of professionalism," said Debby Stoler, Assistant Director for Development and Outreach with MU Career Services. 

    All current Marshall students are welcome to attend. However, juniors and seniors will be given preference. The dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. in room BE5, located in the basement of the Memorial Student Center.  Doors open at 6 p.m. Professional dress is required.

    Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services' Center. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner. Cancellations must be made within 72 hours of the event to receive a full refund.

    This fall will mark the ninth time Thompson has conducted the event. Thompson is an etiquette coach and reinvention expert who started the companies Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

    For more information, contact Career Services at 304-696-2370 or visit career-services@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday October 17, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    National science and medicine policy advisor visits Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Phyllis Frosst, senior policy fellow at the Personalized Medicine Coalition in Washington, D.C., and former senior advisor for the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, will visit Marshall University at noon on Friday to talk with students about career options in the biomedical science field.

    The talk is in Room 102 at the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on the Huntington campus.

    Dr. Richard M. Niles, senior associate dean for biomedical sciences at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, says Frosst's visit is part of a new immersion program for doctoral biomedical students aimed at introducing them to graduate school academics, expanding career opportunities and team building skills.

    "We implemented our new program, Transforming Interdisciplinary Graduate Education (TIGRE), over the summer with a Biomedical Boot Camp where students learned many of the skills necessary to succeed," he said.   "One component of TIGRE includes exposing our students to the variety of opportunities available in the biomedical field."

    Niles says the TIGRE program also will offer doctoral students the opportunity for an internship in the growing biomedical field.

    "When I started my career, most jobs for researchers were in laboratories or academics," he said.  "Now the field includes positions in industry, technical and science writing, biotechnology patent law and science and medicine policy.  Dr. Frosst will focus on what's happening at the federal level and allow students a glimpse into a biomedical sciences job that isn't in a lab."

    Frosst is with the Personalized Medicine Coalition in Washington, D.C., which represents a broad spectrum of academic, industrial, patient, provider and payer organizations that work on personalized medicine concepts and products that ultimately benefit patients.

    Prior to her current position, she was a senior advisor for Policy, Communications and Strategic Alliances at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and head of Policy and Program Analysis at the National Human Genome Institute, both at the National Institutes of Health.  Frosst holds bachelor's and master's degrees with honors from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and a doctorate in Cell and Molecular Structure and Chemistry from The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif. 

    Niles says Friday's talk is geared toward biomedical science graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, but all students are welcome to attend.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday October 16, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall places second in Individual Events Sweepstakes at UK

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word Speech and Debate Team placed second in Individual Events Sweepstakes this past weekend at the Bluegrass Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Ky.

    Fourteen teams competed, including Bowling Green State University, which finished first, and Carson-Newman University, which was third. Some of the other teams in the tournament were Ohio University, Texas Christian University, the University of Kentucky and Alderson Broaddus University.

    "This is the best team finish we have had this season and we only had one-half of the team competing," said Marshall Coach Danny Ray.

    The team received second place in Individual Events Team Sweepstakes and third place in Combined Debate and Individual Events Team Sweepstakes. Additionally, all of Marshall's traveling team members received individual awards.

    Alyssa Hager, a freshman broadcasting major from West Hamlin, W.Va., was first and top novice in Radio Broadcasting, first and top novice in Prose Interpretation, fourth in Persuasive Speaking, and took fifth place and top novice in Duo Interpretation with Logan Spence.

    Victoria Ledford, a junior pre-med, honors, communication studies major from Erwin, Tenn., was second in Persuasive Speaking, third in Duo Interpretation with DeVan Sample, and fourth in Communication Analysis.

    Logan Spence, a freshman game design major from Davie, Fla., was third and top novice in Informative Speaking, and fifth and top novice in Duo Interpretation with Alyssa Hager.

    Garrett Walker, a junior pre-med and Spanish major from Shady Spring, W.Va., was fifth in Communication Analysis and fifth in Extemporaneous Speaking.

    DeVan Sample, a junior honors English/Japanese major from Martinsburg, W.Va., took third place in Duo Interpretation with Victoria Ledford and was fifth in Dramatic Interpretation.

    Spencer Stephens, a junior political science major from Wayne, W.Va., placed sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking. This was Stephens' first competition in forensics.

    Joe Garton, a junior finance major from Huntington, placed third in Radio Broadcasting.

    The Thundering Word travels to the University of Central Missouri this weekend and will host the fifth-annual Chief Justice Speech and Debate Tournament on October 25-26. This event will be open to the public.


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    Founder of ChannelNet, Paula Tompkins, to speak at her alma mater Oct. 31

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Paula Tompkins, a Marshall University alumna and CEO/founder of the marketing and sales firm ChannelNet, will speak on the Huntington campus Thursday, Oct. 31. Her presentation, which will take place at 5 p.m. at Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, is titled "Energy, Empowerment and Enterprise."

    "This will be an interesting and enlightening presentation about the incredible success of an alumna from Marshall," said Dr. Ronald G. Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc. "Paula will be very entertaining, for sure."

    ChannelNet, founded in 1985, specializes in multichannel marketing and sales solutions based on Internet technology. The company's client list includes automobile companies such as Ford, GM and Toyota; technology companies such as IBM and Intel; retailers such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Macy's; and other consumer retailers such as Coca Cola, La-Z-Boy and Benjamin Moore Paints.

    The event is free and open to the public, but reservations are required by Saturday, Oct. 19, by calling 304-696-3321 or e-mailing vance50@marshall.edu. Dress is business and light refreshments will be served.

    Tompkins, who was a business major at Marshall, is an acknowledged pioneer in using technology to facilitate multichannel sales and service. In the past 25 years, she has helped a multitude of the world's leading companies use technology to sell their products and build customer relationships. She began her career working in sales and marketing at 3M, General Electric, and several technology start-ups. Among other achievements, she was instrumental in the design and marketing of early personal computers, including the Actrix and Grid, the first true portable computers. She also invented Skytray, an interactive electronic advertising medium targeted to airline passengers, for Altus Corporation.

    Her early foray into interactive selling fueled her belief that the personal computer was a persuasive communication platform for selling and buying. Since founding ChannelNet (formerly The SoftAd Group) in 1985, she has led the company to create multichannel marketplace solutions based on the best available technologies from early iterations of multimedia, through CD-ROM and client/server technology, and on to the Internet.

    As an expert in using technology to improve sales and service processes, Tompkins is a much sought-after resource for journalists and authors, and as a conference panelist and keynote speaker. She has appeared on television in Tom Peters' "Thriving on Chaos" and PBS' "The Nightly Business Report," as well as on National Public Radio's "Money Talks."

    She has lectured at Columbia University's School of Business, the University of California at Berkeley's Haas School of Business, and Stanford University.


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    Marshall University School of Medicine announces new scholarships

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five new academic scholarships have been announced at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine which will assist medical students with educational costs.    The following is a listing of the newly created scholarships:

    • The Peggy (Margaret) Theis Scholarship is a scholarship fund established by the family of Peggy Theis, a long-time employee of the School of Medicine who died in 2013.  In creating the scholarship, her family noted Peggy's compassion and interest in others which was exhibited through her daily service to students, faculty and staff.  Once fully endowed, the scholarship will be awarded to a female, first-year medical student who is the first physician in her family and has a financial need as per standards set by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.
    • The Thomas and Dora Cyrus Memorial Scholarship is an expendable scholarship created by Dr. Pamela A. Cyrus, SOM Class of 1989.    Dr. Cyrus established the scholarship in honor of her parents.  It will assist a first-year medical student and is renewable.
    • The Kowalski Family Scholarship is an endowed fund established by Dr. David C. Kowalski, Class of 1987, Dr. Joseph M. Kowalski, Class of 1984, Dr. Paul V. Kowalski, Class of 1984, Dr. Bruce J. Kowalski, Class of 1991, and their mother, Kathleen Reedy.   In creating the scholarship, the family requested the recipient be a first-year medical student who has a strong academic record and a common sense grasp of and use of academic and clinical material.  The award is renewable for three years pending normal academic progress.
    • The Dr. Franklin D. Shuler Expendable Scholarship is a scholarship fund established by Cynthia Howe Murray and Thomas J. Murray in honor of Dr. Shuler for outstanding medical care.   The recipient of this one-time award will be a 4th -year medical student who has demonstrated an interest in orthopaedics.   The award will be given for five years.
    • The Dr. Mark and Monica Hatfield "Adopt a Medical Student" is a fund endowed by Dr. R. Mark Hatfield, Class of '83, and Mrs. Monica Hatfield, both loyal supporters of the School of Medicine. The recipient of the award will be a medical student selected by the School of Medicine's Scholarship Committee in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

    Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs, said creation of the scholarships, particularly the Adopt a Medical Student concept, is absolutely essential to assist students in defraying the cost of a medical education and also helps students reduce their medical school debt.

    "We are so pleased at the School of Medicine to develop scholarships and scholarship programs that assist our students with the cost of their education," she said.   "Along with the usual endowed and expendable scholarships, we have added another program, 'Adopt a Medical Student,' thanks to the generous contributions of the Hatfields. This program allows the donor to support a medical student for four years while also endowing a scholarship."

    For more information on making scholarship gifts to the School of Medicine, contact Holmes at 304-691-1711.


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    Janna Levin, professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College of Columbia University, to deliver da Vinci Lecture

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Janna Levin, a professor of physics and astronomy at Barnard College of Columbia University, is the 2013 da Vinci lecturer at Marshall University.

    Levin speaks at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, in room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Her lecture on "The Third Culture" is free to the public.

    Levin was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2012. Her scientific research concerns the early universe, chaos and black holes. Her second book - the novel A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines - won the PEN/Bingham Fellowship for Writers that "honors an exceptionally talented fiction writer whose debut work ... represents distinguished literary achievement ..." It was also a runner-up for the PEN/Hemingway award for "a distinguished book of first fiction."

    She is the author of the popular science book, How the Universe Got its Spots: Diary of a Finite Time in a Finite Space.

    In her talk about a growing movement deemed "The Third Culture," Levin discusses the crossover between the arts and the sciences, sharing stunning examples - such as a Brooklyn collective of artists, designers, roboticists, engineers and biologists - of a new intellectual culture being born.

    Levin holds a B.A. in physics and astronomy from Barnard College with a concentration in Philosophy, and a Ph.D. in physics from MIT. She did research at the Center for Particle Astrophysics at the University of California-Berkeley before moving to the United Kingdom to work at Cambridge University in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

    Just before returning to New York, Levin was the first scientist-in-residence at the Ruskin School of Fine Art and Drawing at Oxford University with an award from the National Endowment for Science, Technology, and Arts. She has written for many artists and appeared on several radio and television programs.


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    Next event in Visiting Writers Series to feature Marshall professor

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - John Van Kirk, fiction writer and professor of English at Marshall University, will be featured at the next reading in the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series on the university's Huntington campus.

    The reading will take place at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, in Smith Hall, room 154, with a book-signing immediately following.

    Van Kirk will read from his debut novel, Song for Chance, which has been called by Publishers Weekly "a passionate, elegiac tale about the excesses of sex, drugs, and rock and roll over a tortured musician's lifetime."

    Van Kirk joined the U.S. Navy in January of 1980. He graduated from flight school as a naval aviator and served for three years in the Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron 7, based in Jacksonville, Fla. In 1989, Van Kirk joined the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Maryland, where he studied with Joyce Kornblatt, Howard Norman and Stanley Plumly. After two years of sailing and traveling internationally, he joined the Marshall faculty, where he has balanced a dual career as a writer and teacher since 1993. The recipient of an O. Henry Award and the Fiction Prize at The Iowa Review, Van Kirk's work has appeared widely in The New York Times Magazine, The Hudson Review, West Branch, Kestrel, The Sonora Review and Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, among several other journals and anthologies.

    The Visiting Writers Series receives support from the College of Liberal Arts and the Honors College at Marshall University.


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    Fruth Pharmacy provides Marshall University with scholarship support gifts

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University announced today it has received two separate gifts for student scholarships totaling $24,000 from West Virginia-based Fruth Pharmacy. 

    Dr. Kevin Yingling, R.Ph, M.D., dean of the School of Pharmacy, said the relationship with Fruth Pharmacy is of significant importance to the emerging school and developing of team-based health care in our region.  

    "We are so grateful for the support of Lynne Fruth and the entire Fruth Pharmacy family," Yingling said.  "As a West Virginia-based pharmacy, they understand that pharmacy education is essential to ensuring better health outcomes for those in our state and region.  The Fruth team has become a very valuable part of our family at Marshall."

    In addition to the $11,000 gift to the School of Pharmacy, the company also presented the university with a generous $13,000 gift for the Fruth Pharmacy Scholarship. Established in 1995, this scholarship is awarded to qualifying employees, or relatives of active employees of Fruth Pharmacy who are enrolled full- or part-time at Marshall University.

    "The scholarship support Fruth Pharmacy provides has grown increasingly important to our students as the cost of higher education continues to rise. Fruth Pharmacy understands the importance of educational access and we are grateful for their partnership with us," said Christine Anderson, associate vice president of development at Marshall University.

    -------------------

    Photo:  Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, left, accepts a gift from Lynne Fruth, president and chairman of the board, Fruth Pharmacy, Inc., and Tim Weber, director of pharmacy administration and procurement, Fruth Pharmacy, Inc.


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    Marshall Recreation Center to host 'Haunted Rec'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Marshall Recreation Center will have its annual "Haunted Rec" from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22.

    Haunted Rec is free to the public and offers an array of Halloween-themed events for kids of all ages.  There will be a haunted house, a ghoulish obstacle course, and an "Eat This, Not That" challenge complete with prizes.

    All kids are encouraged to wear their costumes and to bring swimming suits. A screening of the movie "Hotel Transylvania" will take place in the pool at 7 p.m.

    Parents wanting to join in on the Halloween fun can take a class that teaches the dance performed in Michael Jackson's "Thriller" while their kids enjoy the movie screening. The cost of the class is $8 and all proceeds will go to Erin Hickok, a personal trainer at the Rec Center, who will be running in the New York Marathon on Nov. 3

    Hickok will be running for Team Healthier Generation, a national program working to prevent childhood obesity.  The funds will not only make it possible for Hickok to run in the marathon, but to raise money for the Healthier Generation Alliance as well.

    For more information on the Marshall University Recreation Center, visit http://www.marshallcampusrec.com/, or for more information about Team Healthier Generation, visit http://www.healthiergeneration.org.


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    First Marshall Preview Day set for Monday, Oct. 14

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct the first of four Preview Days planned during the current academic year Monday, Oct. 14.

    Students who already have been admitted as freshmen next fall are invited to attend Preview Day.

    "They literally get a preview on what it's like to be a Marshall student," said Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruitment. "And, they will get in-depth information on what they need to do next to get enrolled for the fall."

    Wolfe said the students will actually sit in on a class to find out what that is going to be like.

    Parents are invited to attend, as well, because "they are an important part of this process," Wolfe said. A session is planned for the parents while the students are sitting in on the class. About 30-35 students are expected to attend the first Preview Day, but the numbers are expected to rise at later Preview Days, Wolfe said.

    "It's actually a nice way to start easing into it," she said. "We are excited about kicking things off Monday."

    Future Preview Days are scheduled Dec. 2, Jan. 27 and March 31.

    The schedule for Monday's Preview Day is:

    • 8 a.m.. - check-in and welcome breakfast in Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room
    • 9 a.m. to noon - rotations of parent program in BE5 with students observing classes, session with their college, and workshop on next steps for enrollment
    • Noon - lunch
    • 1 p.m. - financial aid session on net price calculator
    • 2 p.m. - student services/activities panel
    • 3 p.m. - living/learning community tour

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    Marshall University hosts blood drive on South Charleston campus

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is hosting a blood drive for the American Red Cross on its South Charleston campus from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16. Donors have the option of giving blood or making a double-red cell donation during the drive.

    No appointment is necessary, but donors can call 1-800-REDCROSS or visit redcrossblood.org and enter mugrad to make an appointment.

    All blood types are needed, but Red Cross officials have issued special alerts requesting both O-negative and O-positive blood.

    The South Charleston campus is located at 100 Angus E. Peyton Dr., just off of the Kanawha Turnpike. Parking is free and convenient.

    For more information, contact Joyce Harrah at 304-746-2030 or jsharrah@marshall.edu.


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    Contact: Dr. Majed Khader, University Libraries, (304) 696-7153

    'Created Equal' film screenings, reception to take place Oct. 14-16

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first two films in the "Created Equal" program will be shown on Marshall University's Huntington campus beginning Monday, Oct. 14.

    Marshall University is one of 473 institutions across the country awarded a set of four powerful documentary films ("The Abolitionists," "Slavery by Another Name," "Freedom Riders" and "The Loving Story") as part of the "Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle" grant, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities that uses the power of documentary films to spark public conversations about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America.

    On Monday, Oct. 14, the Emmy-nominated PBS mini-series, "The Abolitionists," will be shown in the Drinko Library Auditorium, Room DL 402, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

    On Tuesday, Oct. 15, the powerful PBS documentary, "Slavery By Another Name," will be shown in the Drinko Library Auditorium, Room DL 402, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

    Both screenings are free and open to the public, and the community is encouraged to attend.

    On Wednesday, Oct. 16, Dr. David J. Trowbridge, director of the African and African American Studies program at Marshall and Burnis Morris, Carter G. Woodson Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications, will lead a facilitated discussion with special guest Sylvia Ridgeway, the president of the West Virginia Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, in the Drinko Library Auditorium, Room DL 402, from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m.

    Ridgeway, a lifelong Huntington resident and Marshall alumna, was honored by The Huntington Herald-Dipatch as the Citizen of the Year for 2012 for her work as the driving force behind the NAACP in West Virginia.

    The facilitated discussion will be immediately followed by a public reception with beverages and light refreshments provided by the MU Libraries in the Drinko Library Atrium, giving students, faculty, staff and the community an opportunity to interact and have informal chats about the importance of civil rights in the U.S.

    The Marshall University Libraries will offer additional Created Equal programming to celebrate African American History Month in February, including public film screenings of "Freedom Riders" and "The Loving Story."


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    NSF grant to integrate robotics technology into middle school courses in Mingo County and Pennsylvania

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An innovative program that introduces robotic technology into non-technical middle school classes will be used by rural West Virginia and suburban Pittsburgh schools in a federally funded research project to identify and nurture students with an affinity for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

    All 6th-, 7th- and 8th-grade students in Mingo County Schools and all 7th- and 8th-grade students at Springdale Junior-Senior High School in Allegheny Valley, PA - a total of 900 children annually - will use robotic kits developed at Carnegie Mellon University. They will use the kits to complete at least one project or assignment each year in required courses such as health, earth science and language arts.

    The three-year Creative Robotics project, supported by a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant, seeks to increase the number and diversity of students in the STEM education pipeline.

    "We're particularly interested in finding students who may not realize they have STEM-related talents or interests, or who otherwise have slipped through the cracks," said Dr. Illah Nourbakhsh, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) professor of robotics and the project's principal investigator. "Integrating robotics technology into classes such as art or health will give every student multiple opportunities to discover their STEM potential. At the same time, robotics can help make those courses more compelling, which helps all students."

    In addition to CMU and the Mingo County and Allegheny Valley school districts, the project includes faculty and staff members in the colleges of education at Marshall and West Liberty Universities in West Virginia including the June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development. 

    The CREATE Lab in the CMU Robotics Institute set the stage for this new project in 2006 when it launched a program called Robot Diaries, which later became known as Arts & Bots. The idea was to foster interest in technology at the middle school level, particularly among girls. Rather than focusing on building robots, Arts & Bots used robotic kits to enable students and teachers to turn almost any arts and crafts project into a robot, or something akin to a kinetic sculpture.

    The kit, called Hummingbird, consists of a customized control board along with a variety of lights, sensors and motors that can be connected to the controller without soldering. Students program their creations with an easy-to-learn, drag-and-drop environment that requires no prior experience with programming.

    The CREATE Lab and the June Harless Center at Marshall train teachers on how to use the kits in their classes. Approximately 1,100 students and about 200 educators in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio, as well as Brazil and the United Kingdom, have participated in Arts & Bots thus far.

    In most cases, however, participation has been limited to a course or two, or just a handful of teachers in each school. With the new Creative Robotics project, Arts & Bots will be introduced into required core courses that all students take.

    Andrew Leviski, principal at Springdale High and a co-principal invesigator with Nourbakhsh, said one of his teachers, Sue Mellon, introduced Arts & Bots to the school's language arts course several years ago, with encouraging results. In poetry lessons, for example, students have created what he described as "dioramas on steroids."

    Students have used Hummingbird for such projects as a replica of Star Wars' R2D2, a "coin monster" for an ancient coin exhibit, and models of the human arm and its musculature for a high school anatomy class. Hummingbird is sold through a CMU spinoff company, BirdBrain Technologies.

    "It's been a wonderful opportunity for our students," Leviski said, noting it helped identify several Springdale students with STEM abilities that teachers hadn't previously recognized. Now, Arts & Bots will expand to include the school's 7th-grade health classes and 8th-grade arts and science courses. "It will involve all of our kids, not just some of our best and brightest," he added.

    Faculty members at West Liberty and Marshall Universities as well as June Harless Center staff will work with CMU researchers to develop curriculum and bolster teacher training. Dr. Harold Blanco, associate professor of education and instructional technology at Marshall and co-principal investigator, also emphasized the importance of integrating Arts & Bots into pre-service teacher candidate training.

    "My goal is to give them the tools needed to not only integrate technology in the classroom but to show them how technology can be multidisciplinary," Blanco said. "I want my students to graduate already knowing the tools and having skills to implement technology in the classroom."

    Jennifer Cross, a project coordinator with Emily Hamner in the CREATE Lab, said teachers will undergo training this fall, with the goal of introducing the Arts & Bots units into their classes next spring. Feedback from the teachers also will play an important role in refining the project. "It's not just a one-way street," she said.

    The Arts & Bots program was created with the support of the Heinz Endowments, the National Science Foundation and the Benedum Foundation. Marshall University's June Harless Center and West Liberty University are part of a CREATE Lab Satellite Network, which also includes West Virginia University and Carlow University in Pittsburgh. The network, with support and direction from the Benedum Foundation, provides outreach in each community for the lab's technology projects.


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    Presentation on Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Lily's Place services to be given Oct. 18 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Dr. Sean Loudin, medical director at Lily's Place, and Mary Calhoun Brown, secretary and treasurer with the Lily's Place board of directors, will give a presentation titled "Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and Lily's Place" Friday, Oct. 18, at Marshall University.

    The presentation will provide information related to services offered by Lily's Place, a pediatric addiction recovery center, and the ever-growing problem of neonatal addiction. It will take place at noon in room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    The event is hosted by Marshall University Student Health Education Programs, The Women's Center, Women's Studies and the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership.

    Refreshments will be provided. Attendees are asked to bring a package of diapers, size newborn or 1.

    Call 304-696-4103 for more information.


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    Tuesday October 8, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall School of Pharmacy announces activities for awareness month

    Governor and mayor issue proclamations declaring October Pharmacists Month

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University School of Pharmacy is marking American Pharmacists Month with several student-initiated activities including a poster contest in Cabell County Schools.

    The "Above the Influence" Poster Contest, which is sponsored in partnership with the Cabell County Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership (CCSAPP),   is open to all 5th-grade, middle-school and high-school students in Cabell County.  Winners will be announced at 6:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 14 at the School of Pharmacy.

    "Through previous volunteer work with CCSAPP, I have seen the value of the work that they do with students. I wanted to find a way for MUSOP students to have that same impact on area youth, " said Brittany Williams, a second-year student at the School of Pharmacy and Student Executive Council treasurer. "Given that October is American Pharmacists Month and National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, I thought this was a great way to involve MU School of Pharmacy students in these efforts."

    The month-long observance is intended to bring attention to the vital contributions pharmacists make to health care through improved medication use and advanced patient care. Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and Huntington Mayor Steve Williams are both issuing proclamations for the state and the city recognizing pharmacists for their important role in health care in West Virginia and the nation.

    Additional pharmacy awareness activities at Marshall during October include the following:

    • Pharmacy Student Luncheon with special guest Huntington Mayor Steve Williams, 11 a.m.- 1 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 10, Don Morris Room, Memorial Student Center. The event also features Brian Gallagher, R.Ph., JD, director of special projects for Marshall Health, who will speak on "What is Going on in Washington and Why Should I Care?" Students will gather for a group picture at 1 p.m. at the Memorial Fountain.
    • Poster Contest Award Ceremony
      6:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 14, lower level of the Coon Education Building, Marshall University School of Pharmacy   
    • Operation Immunization Awareness (Poster Education)
      Noon-6 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 15 at the Memorial Student Center
      4 p.m.-7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 17 at CVS Pharmacy located at 8th Avenue and 20th Street
    • National Take-Back Initiative
      10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 26, at various locations in Cabell and Wayne counties. Pharmacy students will participate in the national drug diversion project where unused medications may be turned in for safe disposal. Here is a partial list of locations in the area:
                  Huntington Police Department, Douglass Center, 1448 10th Avenue
                  West Virginia State Police, Headquarters, 3339 U.S. Route 60 East
                  Cabell County Sheriff's Department, CVS,  5179 U.S. Route 60 East
                  Milton Police, Milton Pre-K School, 1302 U.S. Route 60, Milton
                  Kenova Police, Kenova  Fire Department.,  1600 Pine Street, Kenova
                  Wayne Police, Wayne Police Department, 10328 Route 152, Wayne

    MUSOP students are also participating in several internal events during the month including intramural sports activities and a formal dance.


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    Awea Duo, guest pianist to appear at Marshall Oct. 21

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Awea Duo, consisting of Mas Sugihara, saxophone, and Jennifer Brimson Cooper, flute, will give a recital on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, Oct. 21.  The performance will take place at 8 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall and also will include pianist Eunbyol Ko.

    Until recently the three musicians were colleagues at Morehead State University in Morehead, Ky., but Sugihara is now on the faculty at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. However, the Awea Duo continues to perform, having made more than 20 appearances including recitals at the Flute Society of Kentucky Festival, the Florida Flute Association convention, the National Flute Association convention, the North American Saxophone Alliance Region 7 conference, as well as at Santa Catarina State University and Goias Federal University in Brazil.
     
    "It is our goal to expand available literature for this instrumentation while having a great time working and performing together," Cooper said.

    "This is a program not to be missed," said Dr. Wendell Dobbs, professor of music at Marshall. "Here's an opportunity to hear great artists performing new, cutting-edge repertoire."

    The program will include works from Brazil, France, Germany, Serbia, Russia and China, as well as the United States. It is free and open to the public. Call the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information.

    -----------

    (Photos) The Awea Duo (above) and Eunbyol Ko will perform at Marshall University Monday, Oct. 21.


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    INTO Marshall Center to celebrate grand opening Thursday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - INTO Marshall will celebrate its grand opening at 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at the INTO Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    INTO  officials will host tours of the facility as well as a reception following a ribbon cutting. INTO Marshall is located at East Hall, former home of the Marshall Community and Technical
    College.

    "This isn't just the opening of a new building," said Eric Fry, the INTO center director. "It is a transformative event placing Marshall University firmly on the world stage.  Marshall graduates from West Virginia, the United States and across the globe will have the benefit of a degree from a university that is known far and wide and soon, our American and international students will have a global stage from which to share West Virginia's beautiful quality of life and business-friendly atmosphere."

    INTO is a private company that forms innovative joint venture partnerships with leading universities to expand opportunities for higher education, ensuring student success and transforming lives. Students benefit from university-designed programs, university-led teaching, and supportive university environments while enjoying full access to university campus facilities, resources and services.

    Since 2006, the company has successfully launched partnerships with 17 universities in the United Kingdom, United States and Asia.

    The INTO Center was renovated this summer at a cost of $2.3 million. Approximately 165 students make up the first INTO Marshall class.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 4, 2013
    Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

    Marshall's bond rating of 'AA-' affirmed by Fitch Ratings


    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than $86 million in Marshall University revenue bonds have had their 'AA-' ratings affirmed by Fitch Ratings, university officials announced today.
     
    In the affirmation document, Fitch said that the rating reflects "historically stable student enrollment and demand for auxiliary facilities." It also said that it expects Marshall to manage effectively through any cuts in state operating appropriations.
     
    "This is yet another indication that Marshall has been fiscally responsible and managed its money well," said Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp. "We thank the members of our Board of Governors, both past and present, for their direction and expertise."  The support of the university's faculty and staff is also important, he said, in keeping the university on solid ground.
     
    The affirmation specifically made reference to $51.9 million in university revenue bonds, series 2011; and $34.8 million in university refunding revenue bonds, series 2010.
     
    Fitch Ratings is part of the Fitch Group, a global organization specializing in financial information services, with operations in more than 30 countries. It is located online at www.fitchratings.com.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 4, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Application process under way for graduate tuition waivers at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted for the Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the spring 2014 semester, according to Dr. David J. Pittenger, interim dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for a limited number of graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

    Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

    The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Pittenger said. Students are eligible for one award in three consecutive semesters (i.e., a student who received an award in fall 2013 is not eligible for another award until fall 2014; a student who receives an award in spring 2014 is not eligible for another award until Spring 2015; a student who receives an award in summer 2014 is not eligible for another award until summer 2015). In addition, beginning with the fall 2013 scholarship waiver period, students are limited to a maximum of four awards. Past awards do not apply.

    Deadline for the applications is Friday, Nov. 8. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar.

    Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for spring 2014 by Friday, Nov. 22, in order to receive a waiver. Pittenger said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Nov. 22 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

    Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online via a link from www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver. Completed waiver applications may be mailed, e-mailed, faxed or submitted in person.

    For complete information please see: www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver or contact the Graduate College office at 6-6606.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday October 4, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine gets nod of approval from LCME

    Probation lifted; school moves forward under approved plan

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va.--The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), the nationally recognized accrediting authority for medical education programs leading to the M.D. degree in United States and Canada, has removed probationary status for the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, University President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

    "This milestone has not been easily achieved and has involved a systemic culture change within the medical school," Kopp said. "Dean Joseph Shapiro addressed the issues with precision and tenacity and has created a vision for an even better medical school.  I sincerely thank our faculty, staff, students, Governor Tomblin, Senator Plymale, our legislators and everyone involved throughout the Medical School and our Marshall University community for their incredible hard work."

    A LCME site team visited the school in June for a limited survey with administrators, faculty and students and then reported its findings to the entire LCME Board of Directors.   The Board voted to lift the probation at its meeting this past week and Dean Shapiro was notified during a telephone call Friday morning.

    "We will have more details when we receive the formal letter from the LCME, but I did not want to wait to share this fantastic news with our friends and the folks who have worked so diligently to make this happen," Shapiro said.  "With our accreditation status now solid, we can move forward. I want to thank everyone for their incredible efforts and am encouraged that our future is bright."
    Shapiro emphasized that the review process gathered information from all constituencies.   

    "We've worked to create a culture of innovation and creativity in response to the LCME's review," he said. "Our students, residents, faculty and staff have been encouraged to provide input and their ideas have helped us shape what we think is an excellent model for medical education."

    Kopp commended the Board of Governors for its support of the university's plan to address the LCME concerns. He extended special thanks to Dr. Robert Nerhood, who served a crucial leadership role as interim dean of the School of Medicine, laying the foundation for Dr. Shapiro and the resultant success.

    He said Marshall and the medical school will remain vigilant and continue to set the bar for improvement higher. "Accreditation compliance work is ongoing and an incumbent responsibility of all concerned."

    The School of Medicine was placed on probation in June 2011 after the LCME cited nine standards in noncompliance, one standard in compliance with a need for monitoring and three standards in transition.  The entire time the school remained fully accredited.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday October 3, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Director of Multi-Robot Systems Lab at Rice featured speaker at Yeager Scholars Symposium

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. James McLurkin, director of the Multi-Robot Systems Lab at Rice University, will be the featured speaker Tuesday, Oct. 8, at the annual Society of Yeager Scholars Symposium at Marshall University.

    The event begins at 7 p.m. and takes place in room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. It is free to the public.

    McLurkin's lecture is titled "Man and Machine: Exploring the Future of Humanity and Robotics." He will speak on swarm robotics. Measuring 4.5 inches, McLurkin's swarm robots are programmed to emulate the behavior of bees, with capabilities to cluster, disperse, follow and orbit. Equipped with bump sensors, a self-charger, a radio modem and an audio system, they are autonomous yet travel in a fleet. When one robot makes a discovery, it signals the group to execute the task together.

    The swarm robots were originally built under a team McLurkin managed at iRobot in Massachusetts.

    McLurkin received his S.B. in Electrical Engineering from MIT, his M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and his S.M. and Ph.D. in computer science from MIT. McLurkin began his postdoctoral appointment at the University of Washington in 2008; he is using probabilistic models for algorithm development. His words of advice to aspiring inventors: "Empowerment and go."

    A question-and-answer session and a reception will follow the lecture, which is sponsored by the Marshall Honors College, the Pace Family and Wells Fargo Insurance.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 1, 2013
    Contact: School of Music and Theatre,, Marshall University, 304-696-3117

    Marshall to present 'The Magic Flute' Oct. 19 and 20

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will present a fully staged production of Mozart's The Magic Flute, sung in English, at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20. Both performances will take place at the  Jean Carlo Stephenson Auditorium in Huntington City Hall.

    The Marshall Symphony Orchestra, directed by Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, joins the MU Opera Theatre, under the direction of Linda Dobbs, in Mozart's musical fantasy that has become the world's most frequently performed opera. Scene and lighting design by are by Lang Reynolds, professor of theatre at Marshall.

    "The Magic Flute has something for every member of the audience," Dobbs said. "Children will delight in Papageno's antics and the bewitching spells of the magic flute, while adults may ponder the symbolism of the Enlightenment and the Masonic imagery provided by Mozart and his librettist, Emanuel Schikenader. Everyone will marvel at the Queen of the Night and go home humming. We have a wonderful cast and orchestra and we are thrilled to share this much-loved opera with our Huntington audiences."

    The Magic Flute is both whimsical and profound, Dobbs added. It is a beguiling tale of the star-crossed lovers, Tamino and Pamina, and a loveable but lonely bird-catcher as the three search for love and struggle to attain wisdom. During their journey, they must overcome hatred, temptation, and dangerous trials but, aided by a magic flute and benevolent guidance, they are all proven worthy. The tale is woven together by the extraordinarily tuneful and enchanting music of Mozart. The Magic Flute is a perfect opera for the entire family, she said.

    General admission tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children under 12 and groups. Marshall students are admitted free with current IDs. Tickets are available at the door or by calling the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.

    ----------------

    Photo: Laura Campbell (left) and Robert Nunez preview their roles in Marshall University's production of Mozart's Magic Flute, which will take place Oct. 19-20. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 1, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2616

    Marshall graduate student chosen as PROGENY research finalist

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University student has been chosen as a finalist for the American Speech-Language Hearing Association's (ASHA) 6th annual PROGENY research program Nov. 13-17 in Chicago, Ill.

    Sara Henson, 22, of Harts, W.Va., is a first-year graduate assistant in the Marshall University Department of Communication Disorders. Henson conducted her research on the social, political and cultural considerations of individuals with disabilities in Appalachia. She will share this research in a poster presentation during the annual ASHA conference in November.

    "PROGENY stands for PROmoting the future GENeration of researchers," said Dr. Karen McComas, assistant director for the Center for Teaching and Learning. "That is exactly what we do at Marshall - we have created CoRP, our Community of Research Practice, to encourage our students to engage in research projects which allow them to pursue an academic-research career."

    Henson said she started her research project "just to explore my own curiosities about my field and discover other research ideas."

    "The primary aim for the study was to develop an understanding of the lives of people with disabilities and how the Appalachian culture affects their experiences," Henson said. "When I started the research project, it wasn't to get an award or to be a presenter at ASHA."

    Henson is one of four students chosen from Marshall to attend this year's ASHA conference, McComas said. Graduate students in the Department of Communication Disorders, Megan Foster, Hillary Johnson and Jordan Lewis, will join Henson at the conference to present their own research projects.

    McComas, who also serves as a professor of communication disorders, said the department's Community of Research Practice group is the main way these students learn about research and the opportunities offered through the PROGENY program.

    McComas said developing research skills enhances a student's clinical capabilities and prepares them to be evidence-based practitioners. Since the Community of Research Practice group began in 2008, Marshall has had six students represented in the PROGENY program in the past five years.

    "No matter the size of your school or department, it is possible to have a distinct and important impact on a whole discipline," McComas said. "We are very proud of our involvement with this organization because it highlights the work done by our students who do it because they love it, not because they have to."

    The Community of Research Practice sessions are held at 9 a.m. every Friday in Smith Hall 113 on the Huntington campus.  Students can learn more about these sessions by visiting www.marshall.edu/corp online. To find out more about ASHA, visit www.asha.org, or to learn about PROGENY, visit  www.asha.org/Research/PROGENY/ online. 


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 1, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2616

    Marshall offers new sonography program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students now have the chance to learn a medical technique used every day in hospitals around the word.

    With the collaboration between the Marshall College of Health Professions and the St. Mary's School of Medical Imaging, a bachelor of science degree in medical imaging with an emphasis in diagnostic medical sonography will be offered to students who have completed their sophomore year in medical imaging.

    Sonography, a painless medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce visual images of organs, tissues and blood flow inside the body, is considered interchangeable with "ultrasound" due to the use of these sound waves to create an image.

    Dr. Rita Fisher, director of the St. Mary's School of Medical Imaging, said Marshall's program will be the only accredited bachelor's degree program in the state that offers its students the choice to specialize in abdominal, vascular or echo sonography.

    "We wanted to be able to offer all three modalities so our students can choose what truly interests them," Fisher said. "This field is advancing because the equipment is relatively inexpensive and patients don't have to worry about radiation exposure. In the next year, we hope to add another instructor to develop coursework with breast sonography."

    Nancy MacClellan, clinical coordinator of the sonography program, said growth is expected to continue for this profession and graduates should expect to find jobs immediately after completing the program.

    "Our graduates will have opportunities for employment in hospital ultrasound departments, clinics and physicians' private offices to name a few," MacClellan said. "St. Mary's Medical Center is the reason why we even considered offering this degree because they are desperately in need of sonographers, so it's a win-win for everyone. We do a lot of clinical rotations through the hospital and the sonographers there go above and beyond to make sure our students gain great experiences and become experts in their field."

    Chelsea Belcher, 20, of Peytona, W.Va., is a junior in the medical imaging program and plans to study cardiovascular sonography. Belcher will be asked to sit for her first board exam this year to ensure she will be ready for the specialty exams that will qualify her for employment upon graduation.

    "Many sonographers are losing their jobs because they aren't passing their boards. In this program, we are made to pass the physics boards before we even graduate," Belcher said. "It makes such a difference to have people in our corner who want us to succeed. You don't just get that anywhere."

    The St. Mary's medical imaging program accepts 24 students a year and eight of those students will be chosen for the sonography track. For more information on enrolling in the program, contact Fisher at rita.fisher@st-marys.org or MacClellan at nancy.macclellan@st-marys.org.

    ------------------

    Photo: Since August 2013, the sonography program has been offered to selected students in the St. Mary's School of Medical Imaging. The program will graduate its first class in 2015. Pictured left to right are Grace Carter, Chelsea Belcher, Jasmine Smith, Kristen Blankenship, Crystal Bryant, Erica Browning and Tabby Price.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday October 1, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Graduate College Fair will feature programs, services Oct. 16

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Graduate College will sponsor a Graduate College Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the Memorial Student Center lobby on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Representatives from a number of Marshall units will be available to talk with students about their graduate programs and services. Expected to be present are representatives of the Graduate College, the College of Business, the College of Information Technology and Engineering, the College of Health Professions, Journalism, Adult and Technical Education, Technology Management, English, Physical Therapy, Biomedical Sciences, Forensic Science, Graduate Admissions, Financial Aid, Career Services, Veterans Affairs, Public Health, History, Nursing, Criminal Justice, Physical and Applied Sciences, Humanities, Political Science, School of Pharmacy, Sociology and Anthropology and the Chancellor's Scholars program. All will be available to talk with students about their respective programs.

    Students who complete an information card will be eligible for door prizes, which include two $20 gift cards from the Marshall University bookstore and Marshall t-shirts from the Graduate College.

    The Graduate College Fair is free and open to everyone, according to fair organizers.

    For further information, contact the Graduate College at 304-696-6606.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday September 30, 2013
    Contact: Haven Campbell, PR & Event Graduate Assistant, Career Services, 304-696-2370

    More than 90 employers expected to attend this fall's Career Expo

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its annual Fall Career Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

    The expo is open to all Marshall students, faculty, staff and alumni.  Recruiters will be sharing information on part-time, full-time and internship positions.

    More than 90 employers are expected to have recruiters at the event, representing the areas of customer service, IT/computer science, health care, media sales, engineering, insurance/financial services, corrections, retail management and many others. A continually updated list of employers planning to attend the Career Expo is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/events/careerexpo.html.

    Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to dress professionally and come prepared with multiple copies of their resumes. Hogsett said even if students are not looking for a job, attending the expo presents an excellent networking opportunity.

    This fall's Career Expo is expected to be one of the largest in recent years. Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach, said, "We are excited about the number of companies attending the Expo this fall.  We should have over 90 tables occupied, the most we have had for the last couple of years.  New and growing businesses are providing good employment opportunities for our students and alumni."

    Leading up to the event, the "Resume Doctor," Senior Career Counselor Mirek Bialk of Career Services, will be reviewing resumes for students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 1-2 in the Memorial Student Center lobby.

    Career Services also will hold an open house from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7, for resume review, tips on networking, and free printing of business cards and copies of students' resumes. No appointment is necessary.  Students may also call Career Services for an appointment to create or review their resumes with a career counselor.

    For more information about the event, contact Stoler at 304-696-6679 or stolerd@marshall.edu or the Career Services front desk at 304-696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday September 30, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Arts & Bots' coming to RCBI in October

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington-area middle school students will have an opportunity to design, build and program their own robots at "Arts & Bots," an after-school camp hosted at the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI) in October.

    The camp, co-sponsored by Marshall University's June Harless Center and RCBI, will be conducted at the RCBI Huntington Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center, 1050 Fourth Ave.  The camp will begin Oct. 1 and continue each Monday and Tuesday through Oct. 21.

    "Arts & Bots" integrates technology, literature and history through the use of familiar art supplies, circuit boards, lights, motors and sensors while promoting technological literacy and informal learning. The registration fee for the six-session camp is $160. For more information or to sign up, contact Carrie-Meghan Quick at 304-481-0544 or e-mail quickblanco@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday September 27, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Despite tough competition, Thundering Word performs well in first event of year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Thundering Word, Marshall University's Speech and Debate team, competed successfully last weekend at its first tournament of the year.

    Several top teams in the nation competed at the Forensic Fiesta at Western Kentucky University, including Western Kentucky,  Illinois State, Miami (Ohio), Gustavus-Adolphus College, William Carey University, Southwest Baptist University, the University of Alabama, Mississippi and the University of Kentucky.

    Marshall finished third in combined speech and debate sweepstakes for the weekend tournaments.

    MU placed fourth in Debate Sweepstakes and fifth in Individual Events Sweepstakes during the second half of the swing tournament on Sunday, placing behind Alabama, William Carey, Illinois State and Western Kentucky.

    "This was a great first outing for the Thundering Word," said Coach Danny Ray. "We normally don't run into this caliber of competition this early in the season. Our results were better this year at this tournament than they have ever been. Our future is very exciting."

    Next up for the Word are Miami (Ohio) on Sept. 28 and Illinois State on Oct. 5.

    Here are the individual results from last weekend:

    • Victoria Ledford, Junior, honors Pre-med Communication Studies major from Erwin, Tenn., placed fifth in Individual Sweepstakes, second in Persuasive Speaking and fifth in Rhetorical Criticism.
    • Matt Osteen, Junior, honors Communication Studies and Political Science major from Jefferson, W.Va., was the ninth-best speaker in Lincoln Douglas Debate and a Quarter Finalist. He also placed sixth in Rhetorical Criticism.
    • Devan Sample, Junior, honors English major from Martinsburg, W.Va., placed second in Poetry Interpretation.
    • Logan Spence, Freshman, Game Design major from Davie, Fla., was the top novice and sixth in Informative Speaking.

    Team results also included preliminary-round points from the entire team. Those contributing were:

    • Juliet Djietror, Junior, Biomedical Sciences, Pre-med major from Mt. Pleasant, Mich., competed in Prose, Dramatic Interpretation and Persuasive Speaking.
    • Taryss Mandt, Sophomore, Geology major from Alexandria, Va., competed in Prose, Poetry and Informative Speaking.
    • Kai Stewart, Senior, Social Work major from Parkersburg, W.Va., competed in Lincoln Douglas Debate and Impromptu Speaking.
    • Garrett Walker, Junior, Spanish, Pre-med major from Shady Spring, W.Va., competed in After Dinner Speaking, Rhetorical Criticism, Impromptu and Extemporaneous Speaking.
    • Joe Garton, Junior, Finance major from Huntington, competed in Lincoln Douglas Debate and Extemporaneous Speaking.
    • Alyssa Hager, Freshman, Broadcasting major from West Hamlin, W.Va., competed in Persuasion and Prose.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday September 27, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Second 'We Are ... Family Unity Walk Celebration' is Oct. 1 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's second annual "We Are ... Family Unity Walk Celebration," an event created in 2012 to give all Marshall students, faculty and staff an opportunity to celebrate their unity and the fact that they are all members of the same "family," will take place at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 1, on the Huntington campus.

    More than 1,100 students, representing 44 university student organizations, athletic teams, resident halls, fraternities, sororities and others, took part in last year's first event, and even a much greater number of students and "teams" are expected this year. But, there are some changes in the logistics of the event.

    Rather than a celebratory walk just a short distance to the Memorial Student Center plaza, this year's walk, with an anticipated attendance of more than 1,500 students and alumni, begins at the Marshall Recreation Center at 6 p.m. "The Unity Walk" will be enhanced by group banners, cheers, chants and music.

    Upon arrival at the plaza, festive music will continue, followed by group introductions, and short motivational remarks by President Stephen J. Kopp and women's basketball Coach Matthew Daniel. The event will conclude with a We Are the World Choral number and announcement of the 2013 homecoming court, another change from recent years. Free food and music at the plaza await those who participate in the Unity Walk.

    "Last year we celebrated as a family for the first time in this manner," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students and creator of this event that is now slated as an annual affair. "This year, we have raised our excitement level throughout campus as we look forward to celebrating once again. We are Marshall and we are one. We invite all Marshall University students, staff, faculty and alumni, along with the Marshall community, to come and enjoy this most festive walk with us as we again demonstrate our loyalty, unity, inclusiveness and oneness."

    All students, organizations, resident teams, athletic teams, fraternities and sororities are invited to take part. The Unity Walk is sponsored by the Student Resource Center, Student Affairs, Greek Affairs, MU Athletics, Housing and Residence Life, INTO, Alumni Affairs, and the Center for African American Students.

    Participants also are invited to take part in a Unity Walk Banner Contest. To be considered, participants must march with their banners, which will be judged based on:

    • Creativity: relationship to the homecoming theme (Mardi Gras Marshall Style)
    • School spirit
    • Organizational branding (What does your banner say about your group?)

    Prizes will be awarded to the residence halls and organizations scoring the highest in the judging. Anyone with questions may contact Amy Lorenz at lorenza@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday September 27, 2013
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Former Miss Marshall and husband to serve as parade grand marshals

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - On a chilly autumn  day in 1966,  Ben Hale stood at midfield in Fairfield Stadium attempting to plant a kiss on his dream girl, who had just been crowned  "Miss Marshall"  before a huge homecoming crowd.  But, "she pulled away, saying I would mess up her make-up," Hale, who was her escort onto the field, recently reminisced.
           
    The kiss on the field may have gone awry, but luckily their relationship didn't, because today the couple are Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hale - she's the former Jan Jenkins - and they have been married for 46 years with two daughters and three grandsons.  And on Saturday, Oct. 5, they're returning to Huntington to serve as grand marshals of the 2013 Marshall University homecoming parade.
     
    The parade begins at 10 a.m. in downtown Huntington on 4th Avenue in front of the Cabell County Courthouse. It continues east to 12th Street where it turns right, then travels one block over to 5th Avenue. It then turns left on 5th and continues to Joan C. Edwards Stadium at 20th Street.

    Marshall plays its homecoming football game at the stadium at 2 p.m., taking on the University of Texas at San Antonio.
     
    The couple is thrilled to serve as grand marshals, because, according to Ben Hale, "We had the time of our lives at Marshall." The Huntington natives met in the ninth grade when Jan Hale, who attended West Junior High School, was invited to dances at Cammack Junior High, which Ben Hale attended.

    Growing up in Huntington, Ben Hale, now a senior partner at Smith and Hale LLC in Columbus, Ohio, spent a freshman semester at another college before joining Jan at Marshall, where she was an art education major.  He quickly became the quintessential "Big Man on Campus," excelling academically, athletically and socially.  He graduated at the top of his class with a B.B.A. in Management, ran track, played football and was an active participant in Greek life as a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity.
     
    Jan Hale recalls her days at Marshall as a happy whirl of activities.  "I hardly had time to study, I was having so much fun," she said with a laugh.  "Since I was a 'townie,' so many of my friends were at Marshall as well.  We still keep in touch, go to the beach together and have reunions."

    Both Hales are always eager to get back to their Huntington roots.  Ben Hale makes a concerted effort to stay connected to many former high school and Marshall classmates who remain close friends.
     
    "We're looking forward to reuniting with old friends and family members during the upcoming homecoming festivities," Jan Hale says.

    Jan Hale was a popular figure on campus as well, taking part in numerous activities.   Before she was elected "Miss Marshall," the PKAs named her their "Dream Girl."  Ben Hale and his fraternity brothers built the float on which Miss Marshall 1966 and her court rode, which was bannered with the slogan, "PKA's Dream Girl." The only thing that marred that perfect day for the Hales was Marshall's 35-15 loss to the University of Louisville.

    The couple married in August 1967, shortly after they graduated, and headed for Columbus, Ohio, where Ben Hale had been accepted into The Ohio State University Law School.  He joined Smith and Hale right after graduation in 1970 and has remained with the firm since that time.  Jan Hale taught art in area schools for several years.  Today the couple lives in New Albany, Ohio, close to their daughters and grandsons.

    To date the homecoming parade has approximately 50 units signed up, but there will be more coming, according to Jordan Wooldridge, chief of staff for the Marshall University Student Government Association and one of the parade organizers.  Along with marching bands, Marshall fraternities, sororities and other organizations, local businesses and groups such as Little Victories, there will be appearances by Huntington Mayor Steve Williams, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and the current Miss West Virginia, Miranda Harrison, a Marshall student.
     
    "We are still accepting applications for anyone who wants to be in the parade," Wooldridge said. "We want to have as many groups as possible participate, so we're encouraging groups to apply."

    Applications can be found online at www.marshall.edu/sga.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday September 26, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2616

    College of Health Professions dean elected new board member of respiratory group

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the Marshall University College of Health Professions, has been elected to serve as a board member for the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care, which is sponsored by the American College of Chest Physicians.

    Prewitt has served as a site visitor for the commission for more than 20 years. He will be the first non-physician representative from the organization to serve on the board, according to Tom Smalling, executive director of the commission.

    "Becoming a member of the board will allow me to learn more about the accreditation process after the site visit has been conducted," Prewitt said. "This can only strengthen the goals and objectives we have for our departments within the College of Health Professions and for the university as a whole."

    Smalling said that as a non-physician, Prewitt will provide a "unique insight."

    "(He) has the appropriate credentials and demonstrates a strong involvement in respiratory care," Smalling said.

    Darcy Marciniuk, president of the American College of Chest Physicians, said Prewitt has been a member of the organization since 2000 and an elected fellow since 2001. With his extensive experience in the industry, Marciniuk said, Prewitt was a natural choice for the position.

    "Prewitt has an impressive background in respiratory care, from his involvement as director for the respiratory care program at University of Missouri-Columbia for over 20 years to his continued participation in our organization," Marciniuk said. "Being the first non-physician representative to sit on the board for the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care,  he will bring something new to the table."

    As a long-time member of the American College of Chest Physicians, Prewitt will provide input based on the perspectives and experiences he's gained during his 13 years with the organization. Prewitt said he will travel to Bedford, Texas in November for the first board meeting to officially begin his four-year term.

    Since 2000, Prewitt has been a member of the Allied Health and Respiratory Care American College of Chest Physicians NetWorks and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Allied Health NetWork section. As a commission board member, he will be eligible for two consecutive four-year terms.

    For more information on the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care, visit www.coarc.com online. For more information on the American College of Chest Physicians, visit www.chestnut.org.


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    Thursday September 26, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Spin-a-thon at Marshall to raise money for charity

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Erin Hickok, a personal trainer with the Marshall Recreation Center, is hosting a Spin-a-thon to raise money for her charity, Team Healthier Generation.

    "Spin for a healthier generation" is Thursday, Oct. 10, and includes two spinning sessions - the first one at 7 p.m., and the second one at 8 p.m., both at the recreation center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Members and non-members are invited to participate in one or both of the sessions.

    Hickok is training to run in the New York Marathon, which takes place Nov. 3.  In conjunction with training for the marathon, Erin is also running to raise $3,500 for Team Healthier Generation.  Team Healthier Generation is a charity aimed at ending childhood obesity.

    For Hickok, the purpose of her training is not so much about running the New York Marathon as it is helping the Huntington community and her home state end an issue that is much larger than just one marathon.  While Team Healthier Generation is helping her accomplish her personal goal of running a marathon, it also is helping her accomplish her ultimate goal, which is to help end childhood obesity nationwide.

    All proceeds go directly to her  charity.  To participate, register at the Welcome Desk of the Marshall Recreation Center.  The cost is $15 per person to participate, and any additional donations will also be accepted at that time.

    Hickok can only receive cash and checks made payable to "Alliance for a Healthier Generation."  There will be prizes as well as free bottled water for all who participate.  No donation is too big or too small - every dollar counts.

    For more information, contact Hickok at hickok@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday September 26, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Big Pink Volleyball' tournament to benefit Path to the Cure

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Big Pink Volleyball," a tournament featuring a bright pink volleyball measuring four feet in diameter, will be played Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus.

    The event will benefit St. Mary's Path to the Cure, a foundation that is operated locally and raises money to prevent and treat breast cancer.

    The tournament is similar to one played at Western Illinois University, which has raised nearly $100,000 and sparked breast cancer events at more than 15 colleges and universities across the United States.

    Participants must form a group with at least four players and register prior to the tournament at the Recreation Center Welcome Desk, or at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena during the Path to the Cure race packet pick-up on Saturday, Sept.  28.

    There also will be an opportunity to sign up on race day at the Rec Center tent. The cost to participate is $5 and must be paid by cash or check made payable to the Campus Rec Club. T-shirts also will be available for purchase for an additional $10 for short sleeves and $13 for long sleeves.

    Four different categories of teams will compete. They are Student Clubs/Organizations, Residence Halls, Business-Corporate, and Independent. The last day for teams to sign up is Monday, Oct. 14.

    "Marshall Rec Center is putting on this event to help bring awareness to breast cancer through a positive and active volleyball tournament," said Dan Belcher, event coordinator for the tournament. "The challenge of playing with such a large ball will also add to the fun!"

    A captain's meeting is planned for Thursday, Oct. 17,  at either 5 p.m. or 8 p.m. Attendance is mandatory for all team captains and the tournament schedule, including game times, will be given out at the meeting.

    All proceeds raised will be given to Path to the Cure during halftime of Marshall's home football game against UAB on Nov. 9 . There are several sponsorship opportunities available including T-shirts and signage at the event. For more information, contact Michele Muth at pallante1@marshall.edu or 304-696-2943 or Belcher at belcherd@marshall.edu by Friday Oct. 11.


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    Thursday September 26, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Et Cetera to host grad school Q&A panel Thursday

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Et Cetera, a student-produced literary magazine at Marshall University, is hosting a graduate school Q&A panel at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, in Corbly Hall room 306 on the Huntington campus.

    A panel of faculty members will discuss topics relating to applying for graduate school in English fields such as creative writing, literature, composition and rhetoric.  A question and answer period will follow.

    The panel's aim is to address any concerns that students who are planning to enroll in graduate studies might have, according to Michelle Hogmire, editor-in-chief of Et Cetera. Refreshments will be served following the meeting.


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    Wednesday September 25, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Winners announced in annual O'Hanlon essay contest

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Laurel Peace, a sophomore education major from Proctorville, Ohio, took first place in the 5th annual Dan O'Hanlon Essay Competition at Marshall University.

    Peace received $1,500 and runner-up Adam Shaver, a senior pre-med biology major from Huntington, received $750. The winners were announced in a brief ceremony Monday in the Memorial Student Center's John Marshall Room on the Huntington campus.

    The Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition, first conducted in 2009, was created with a $50,000 anonymous donation. Its purpose is to encourage Marshall University undergraduate students to study the historical and contemporary significance of the Constitution of the United States of America and the effect the Marshall court had in establishing the importance of the Supreme Court.

    O'Hanlon served as professor and chair of the Marshall University Criminal Justice Department and dedicated his life to the legal system and helping people in the region. Marshall, for whom Marshall University was named, was the third Chief Justice of the United States, serving from Feb. 4, 1801, to his death in 1835. Under his leadership, the Supreme Court became a powerful branch of government that complements the legislative and executive branches.

    Peace said she was surprised when informed that she had won.

    "I thought there would be a lot of pre-law and political science students entering the contest," she said. "And I thought that they would have the advantage." But once she read the material, she became not only interested in the question, but passionate about it. Peace said she hopes to one day be a 6th-grade teacher.

    Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, said Shaver is a great leader in Marshall's Honors College.

    "He is very engaging and thoughtful and it came through in his essay," she said.

    This year's Dan O'Hanlon essay question focused on the work of Louis Michael Seidman, Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown University Law Center and a former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.  In his recent book, On Constitutional Disobedience, Seidman argues that we should reconsider whether the U.S. Constitution should be the supreme law of the land or whether we should consider it merely one source of values that influences us in deciding what laws and policies are best for our society.  Students were asked to read his book, and other materials offering different perspectives, and opine on his arguments.

    "This question might be considered a bit surprising here at Marshall University, where we spend much of September celebrating both John Marshall's and the Constitution's birthdays and even have a Center for Constitutional Democracy," Proctor said.  "It is useful, however, for all of us to have our conventional assumptions challenged and to revisit whether our ideas can be improved upon.  The students' essays were a great opportunity for them to think `out of the box' and they rose to the challenge."

    The students - and the rest of the community - will have the opportunity to meet Professor Seidman Nov. 5 when he will be the featured presenter in the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series sponsored by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, with funding from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

    ----------------

    Photo: Laurel Peace, right, won the Dan O'Hanlon Essay Contest and Adam Shaver, left, finished second. Photo by Amanda Williams/Marshall University.


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    Wednesday September 25, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine to host traveling art exhibit

    'Opening Doors' celebrates contributions of African-American academic surgeons


    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning this week and continuing until Nov. 2, the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will host the traveling art exhibit, "Opening Doors: Contemporary African American Academic Surgeons," in the lobby of the Marshall University Medical Center on the campus of Cabell Huntington Hospital. 

    The exhibit tells the stories of four pioneering African American surgeons and educators who  exemplified excellence in their fields and believed in the importance of mentoring younger physicians and surgeons.  Other academic surgeons from around the country also are featured in the exhibit.

    "We are so pleased to offer this free exhibit to our community," said Dr. Shelvy Campbell, assistant dean for diversity at the SOM.  "I encourage visitors to our medical campus to take a moment and enjoy the remarkable stories brought to life on these panels."

    The Opening Doors exhibit has been traveling to medical schools and academic medical centers since 2007. It was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine and the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, Baltimore, Md.


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    Tuesday September 24, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Homecoming car bash set for Wednesday, Oct. 2, at Buskirk Field

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's student radio station, will be demolishing its 12th vehicle from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, on Buskirk Field on Marshall's Huntington campus as part of homecoming activities.

    The car to be bashed is a Ford Thunderbird donated by Kelly's Radiator Service. The Thunderbird will be painted orange, white and blue, the colors of the University of Texas at San Antonio, Marshall's homecoming opponent. The car will be smashed by Marshall students, faculty and community members.

    "It's a great opportunity for everyone, not just students, to get some stress out and show some Marshall pride," Promotions Director Amanda Reesman said. "It a homecoming tradition we are proud and excited to keep going."

    Participants will pay $1 to bash the car for two minutes. WMUL-FM will provide the gloves, sledgehammers and goggles.

    "Homecoming is an exciting time but it also falls right before midterms," Reesman said. "The car bash will provide a way to show your Marshall pride and to take out some of the stress of worrying about midterms."

    The dollar admission will provide participants with two minutes of full access to the Thunderbird.

    For more information, contact Reesman at reesman@marshall.edu or at 724-272-1132.


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    Monday September 23, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall cardiologist named American Heart Association fellow

    HUNTINGTON, W.VA. Paulette S. Wehner, M.D., FAHA, senior associate dean for graduate medical education and a professor in the department of cardiovascular service in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, was named a fellow of the American Heart Association at its September meeting in New Orleans.

    The fellowship distinction is conferred for outstanding and sustained scientific contributions in cardiovascular diseases and stroke; and volunteer leadership and service to the American Heart Association.

    Wehner, a Kingwood, W.Va., native, is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and earned her medical degree at Marshall, where she also did her residency and fellowship training.

    In congratulating Wehner, Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, said her contributions to the School of Medicine and the health care of the community are exceptional.

    "Dr. Wehner is first and foremost an outstanding clinician," he said. "She cares deeply about her patients and works expertly to give them high quality cardiovascular care. Secondly, she is a dedicated and gifted professor preparing our students, residents and cardiology fellows for their careers in medicine."

    Wehner, an active researcher involved in several projects, is the principal site investigator at St. Mary's Medical Center for Yale University's research study of older persons who are admitted to the hospital with heart attacks.

    She also is one of two West Virginia physicians honored in the Local Legends project of the National Library of Medicine in 2005. A member of the Marshall faculty since 1995, she has repeatedly been honored by medical students through awards such as "Outstanding Attending of the Year" and "Outstanding Program Director."

    She is a member of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha, as well as a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, which she is currently serving as governor in West Virginia. She also is a fellow in the American College of Physicians and the American College of Chest Physicians. Wehner is currently the president of the School of Medicine's Alumni Association.


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    Monday September 23, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall faculty members to present 'American Originals' for trombone Sept. 29

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University music faculty members Dr. Michael Stroeher, trombone, and Dr. Henning Vauth, piano, will give a concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 29, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The program, titled "American Originals," will feature compositions by Henry Cowell, Samuel Barber, David Amram and Alec Wilder.

    "We're exploring a wide range of American styles, ranging from the Colonial era to modern jazz," Stroeher said. "Samuel Barber is one of America's most well-known composers, primarily due to his 'Adagio for Strings,' which was used in several films, including Platoon. David Amram wrote film scores for classic films such as Splendor in the Grass and The Manchurian Candidate, and Alec Wilder composed popular songs for Frank Sinatra, among many others."

    Vauth is in his second year at Marshall after having taught at Auburn University. He holds degrees from the Hochschule fr Musik in Hannover, Germany, and the Eastman School of Music. He has won several competitions in Europe, and performs throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia.

    Stroeher, who is professor of trombone at Marshall, also performs as principal trombonist in the Huntington Symphony and bass trombonist in the Landau Eugene Murphy big band. He has previously performed with the St. Louis Symphony, the South Carolina Philharmonic, the Temptations, Frank Sinatra Jr. and in a number of other shows. He holds degrees from the University of North Texas and the New England Conservatory of Music.

    The concert is free and open to the public. For further information, contact the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.

    ---------------

    Photo: Marshall University music faculty members Dr. Michael Stroeher, trombone, and Dr. Henning Vauth, piano, rehearse in preparation for their 'American Originals' program Sunday, Sept. 29.


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    Monday September 23, 2013
    Contact: Nancy Pelphrey, Assistant Director, Alumni Affairs, 304-696-3134

    University gets ready to celebrate homecoming with a Mardi Gras theme

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mardi Gras, Marshall University style, will be observed with music, picnics, parades, floats, a football game and a host of other activities as the university celebrates homecoming week Sept. 30-Oct. 6.

    A highlight of the week is the matchup of the Thundering Herd football team with first-time opponent, the University of Texas San Antonio Roadrunners, at 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 5 at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. 

    "We'll have a full slate of diverse activities for students, staff, alumni and Marshall supporters," said Nancy Pelphrey, assistant director of alumni affairs. "The university continues to grow year by year, so those alumni who haven't been back to campus for a while are in for a real treat. There will be something for everyone this year and we're looking for a great turnout."

    The grand marshals of the homecoming parade are Benjamin "Benny" Hale Jr. and Jan Jenkins Hale, who were crowned "Mr. and Miss Marshall" at halftime during the 1966 homecoming football game.  Now married and living in Columbus, Ohio, the couple will lead the parade, which begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct.5, in downtown Huntington. 

    Homecoming is sponsored in part by Bridgeport Equipment and Tools.

    "We're thankful to have such tremendous support from our local business partners,"  Matt Hayes, executive director of alumni affairs, said.  "It's a win-win scenario in that the business gains additional exposure and recognition while we meet the needs of our guests at these events. Businesses that wish to become involved may contact Nancy Pelphrey at 304-696-3134 for more information."

    Here is a breakdown of homecoming week events and activities:

    Monday, Sept. 30

    • Office decorating contest.  Offices are asked to decorate using the homecoming theme with prizes to be awarded on Friday, Oct. 4, at the Picnic on the Plaza.

    Thursday, Oct. 3

    • 10 a.m. - Office decoration judging begins

    Friday, Oct. 4: Green and White Day

    • 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - Free picnic on the Memorial Student Center Plaza with music, prizes, games and lunch. This is the first official alumni event of homecoming weekend.  Co-sponsored by the Alumni Association and the Office of Development.
    • Noon to 3:30 p.m. - Family check-in for Parents and Family Weekend, Office of Student Affairs in Memorial Student Center
    • 3 to 6 p.m. - Black Alumni Association registration, Pullman Plaza, second floor
    • 6 to 8 p.m. - Champagne reception in the lobby of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
    • 7 p.m. - Volleyball, MU vs. Tulane, Cam Henderson Center
    • 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. - Welcome back champagne reception/silent auction, Erickson Alumni Center, sponsored by the Black Alumni Association with funds from the auction to go to the Janis Winkfield Scholarship 
    • 8 p.m. - MU Theatre presentation in the Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center
    • 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.  - Laid-back Friday after-party sponsored by the Black Alumni Association, Inc.

    Saturday, Oct. 5

    • 9 a.m. - 18th Annual 5K Alum Run. The course starts on Veterans Boulevard near Pullman Square.  The entry fee is $20 for early registration and $25 for late registration.   Contact Joe DeLapa at joedelapa@gmail.com.
    • 8:30 a.m. - Breakfast with the President, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center. Breakfast will begin after a brief greeting and comments by President Stephen J. Kopp.
    • 9 a.m. - Black Alumni Association business meeting/registration, Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center
    • 10 a.m. - Homecoming parade, starting in downtown Huntington and ending at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.
    • 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Tailgate blast on the field next to the Harless Dining Hall
    • Reveal of the new Marco costume will take place pre-game, just before kick-off
    • 2 p.m. - Kickoff for the Marshall vs. University of Texas San Antonio game, Joan C. Edwards Stadium
    • 8 p.m. - NPHC Step Show, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center
    • 9 p.m. -  Rhoyal Affair Black Alumni dance/silent auction, Pullman Plaza Grande Ballroom; music by Hybrid Soul Project.  Sponsored by Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. 

    Sunday, Oct. 6

    • 9 a.m. - Prayer Breakfast, Kentucky Room, Pullman Plaza; speaker, Bishop Frederick M. Brown with music by Rodney Boyden

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    Friday September 20, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    RCBI locations across the state to celebrate National Manufacturing Day Oct. 4 with open houses

    Huntington event to also feature symposium and luncheon

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing invites the community to join its celebration of National Manufacturing Day Friday, Oct. 4.

    The institute will be hosting demonstrations and tours from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at its Advanced Manufacturing Technology Centers in Huntington (1050 Fourth Ave.), South Charleston (100 Angus E. Peyton Dr.) and Bridgeport (2400 E. Benedum Industrial Dr.). The events are free and open to the public.

    "Manufacturing Day is for everyone," said Charlotte Weber, director and CEO of RCBI. "The day's activities will highlight the importance of manufacturing to the nation's economy with special attention focused on today's advanced manufacturing, including additive manufacturing with 3-D printers. RCBI is proud to play a role in the nationwide resurgence of manufacturing.

    "We hope to attract a large crowd at each of our statewide Advanced Manufacturing Technology Centers as we celebrate manufacturers, entrepreneurs and innovators in West Virginia."

    According to Weber, events at the Huntington location also will include a Manufacturing Institute Industry Partners Symposium. The symposium will begin at 11:30 a.m. with remarks by U.S. Rep. Nick Rahall, followed by networking opportunities and a luncheon.

    She added, "The symposium will strategically connect RCBI's entrepreneurial manufacturing clients with academic and government experts and other industry partners to discuss current opportunities in manufacturing, identify opportunities for collaboration and learn about current research activities."

    Reservations for those who plan to attend the symposium and luncheon in Huntington are due by 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27. No reservations are necessary for the demonstrations and tours at any of the locations.

    To register or receive more information, call (800) 469-RCBI (7224) or visit www.rcbi.org/mfgday2013.

    Directions to each of the locations are available on the website.


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    Friday September 20, 2013
    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Marshall DNA analyst presents property crimes research at International Association for Identification conference

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Season E. Seferyn, M.S.F.S, a parentage DNA analyst at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, presented findings from a property crimes project at a conference sponsored by the International Association for Identification earlier this month.
     
    The Marshall University Forensic Science Center provided DNA analysis on evidence from 1,227 property crimes cases for the Miami-Dade Police Department Crime Laboratory from February 2007 through July 2009 as part of a collaborative effort coordinated by the National Institute of Justice. The project involved the identification of criminals by generating DNA profiles and entry of the profiles into CODIS, the COmbined DNA Index System. Information continues to be gathered on hits generated in CODIS to identify single perpetrators with multiple crimes and to identify serial events.
     
    The presentation, titled "A Crime Scene Snapshot: A Look into Property Crime Cases from Miami, Fla.," addressed findings from DNA test results of evidentiary items recovered from crime scenes. The information presented at the conference is expected to assist crime scene investigators with collection of evidence that may yield the best results from DNA testing, thus identifying the perpetrator. Items were classified into categories including house, clothing, vehicle, tools and weapons. Evidence containing oral samples, blood and "touch" samples yielded DNA profiles from perpetrators.
     
    The IAI held its 98th Annual International Educational Conference Aug. 4-10, in Providence, R.I. The annual conference attracts more than 1,000 participants and features workshops and presentations given by leading experts in forensic identification and related fields.
     
    This project was supported by award numbers 2005-MU-BX-K020, 2008-DN-BX-K219, and 2009-IJ-CX-K111 awarded by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice.
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    Friday September 20, 2013
    Contact: Patricia Proctor, Director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, (304) 696-7153

    Lecture by James Simon begins Amicus Curiae lecture series Oct. 8

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -James F. Simon, a noted author and commentator on the United States Supreme Court, will give the first lecture in Marshall University's Amicus Curiae lecture series. Simon will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8, in Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

    "We are thrilled to have James Simon as a speaker in the lecture series," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy at Marshall. "He is a wonderful writer with great insight into the history and the politics of the Supreme Court, and he is going to talk about a fascinating time in our political and judicial history."

    Simon will speak on the subject of his most recent book, FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, The Supreme Court and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal, the third in a trilogy on clashes between American presidents and chief justices at critical times in American history.  He also will compare Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes to Chief Justice John Roberts (and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Barack Obama) focusing particularly on the court's Affordable Health Care Act decision. 

    Simon, who is dean emeritus and Martin Professor of Law emeritus of New York Law School, has written eight books on American history, law and politics. FDR and Chief Justice Hughes  (Simon & Schuster, 2012) has been widely praised, with Jeffrey Toobin - the country's preeminent commentator on the Supreme Court - calling it "an elegant dual biography of the incomparable FDR and a formidable Chief Justice" and Bob Woodward describing it as "a spectacular book, brilliantly conceived and executed."  Jean Edward Smith, former member of the Marshall University political science faculty and himself the author of the highly acclaimed and award-winning FDR, calls Simon's book a "marvelously written, meticulously researched study" of the relationship between FDR and Chief Justice Hughes.

    Simon was a commentator in the PBS series The Supreme Court and has been a legal affairs correspondent and contributing editor for Time magazine.  He has lectured frequently in the United States and abroad. His other books include Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney:  Slavery, Secession, and the President's War Powers; What Kind of Nation: Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, and the Epic Struggle to Create a United States (which was named a New York Times Notable Book); Independent Journey: The Life of William O. Douglas; The Antagonists:  Felix Frankfurter, Hugo Black and Civil Liberties in Modern America, and The Center Holds:  The Power Struggle Inside the Rehnquist Court.  

    The next lecture in the series will feature Louis Michael Seidman, professor of constitutional law at the Georgetown University Law Center and author of the book On Constitutional Disobedience. That event will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, also at Foundation Hall.

     


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    Thursday September 19, 2013
    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Marshall University Forensic Science Center staff and students receive glimpse into the future of rapid DNA analysis

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Forensic Science graduate students and DNA analysts saw first-hand their DNA profiles being generated in under 90 minutes using rapid DNA analysis, an emerging biometrics technology that may revolutionize how certain crimes are solved.
     
    Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, said the demonstration of the biometric technology was an unusual opportunity.  "Rapid DNA analysis technology drastically reduces DNA analysis time, and we got to see a glimpse into the future of serving justice," he said.
     
    Representatives from GE Healthcare Life Sciences demonstrated the DNAscanTM Rapid DNA AnalysisTM System in the Marshall University Forensic Science Center DNA training laboratory last week. The instrument is a fully automated rapid STR (short tandem repeat) system with integrated data analysis and Expert System software for forensic testing and research.
     
    West Virginia State Police Crime Laboratory representatives and officers from the Huntington Police Department also were on hand to see the state-of-the-art system in action and learn how the technology may affect crime investigations in the future.
     
    GE Healthcare Life Sciences representative Len Goren said the equipment's applications may benefit law enforcement, forensic crime laboratories, military and intelligence agencies, and border control efforts. In the future, it may aid with the identification of victims of mass disasters and also aid in tracing people during missing persons investigations, he added.
     
    The automated system processes samples on a fully integrated "lab-on-a-chip," a disposable cartridge that performs all stages of DNA analysis. Goren said the system provides a called STR profile from five individual single-source DNA swabs in less than 85 min.
     
    Fenger said the demonstration provided important information for the DNA analysts working forensic cases as well as faculty and students in the academic program.
     
    "Rapid DNA analysis is a hot topic in the field of forensic science, and it is critical that our staff be apprised of scientific developments and technologies in the area of DNA analysis," he said. "Our students also benefitted from the demonstration because they got to see firsthand how the future of solving crimes may be evolving, and our instructors can integrate the most current scientific information into our curriculum."
     
    According to the FBI's website, rapid DNA describes the fully automated (hands-free) process of developing a CODIS Core STR profile from a reference sample buccal swab.  The "swab in - profile out" process consists of automated extraction, amplification, separation, detection and allele calling without human intervention.

    -----------

    Photos: (Above) The photo illustrates how law enforcement agencies would use the GE Healthcare Life Sciences DNAscanTM Rapid DNA AnalysisTM System to process DNA profiles at the time suspects are processed in police agency booking stations. (Below) The BioChipSet Cassette, a disposable cartridge that performs all stages of DNA analysis, is inserted into the DNAscanTM Rapid DNA AnalysisTM System. Photos courtesy of GE Healthcare Life Sciences.
     


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    Thursday September 19, 2013
    Contact: Elizabeth Appell Sheets, Office of Community Engagement, 304-696-2285

    Students plan baby shower to benefit pediatric addiction recovery center and ask Marshall community to donate specific items

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students are planning a baby shower to benefit Lily's Place, a new nonprofit pediatric addiction recovery center in Huntington scheduled to open its doors later this month.

    Organizers are asking students, faculty, staff and members of the community to bring specific items to the Memorial Student Center lobby, Thursday, Sept. 26, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Participants dropping off their donations can expect a festive baby shower atmosphere complete with cake, punch and all the trimmings, according to Elizabeth Appell Sheets, director of Marshall's Office of Community Engagement.

    Lily's Place is in need of the following items: baby laundry detergent, baby powder with cornstarch, baby bath gel, baby lotion, wipes, newborn diapers, size one diapers, cloth diapers, pacifiers, latex and nonlatex gloves and file folders. The items should not be wrapped.

    "We are asking everyone in the Marshall University community to donate at least one item from the list for Lily's Place," Sheets said. "The items are not expensive at all, so it should not be a burden for students. We just want Lily's Place organizers to know that we support them and their efforts to provide special care to innocent infants suffering from prenatal drug exposure."

    The event is sponsored by Gamma Beta Phi, an academic honor and service organization for students with GPAs of 3.0 or higher; Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed community service fraternity; as well as the Office of Community Engagement. The baby shower is in conjunction with Governor Tomblin's Day to Serve, an annual effort to strengthen communities through volunteer service.

    "We chose Lily's Place because several students already have been heavily involved with helping the nonprofit get set up," Sheets said. "It's due to open its doors to babies in need on Sept. 29 and we want to do all we can to help."

    The mission of Lily's Place is to provide immediate, short-term medical care to infants suffering from prenatal drug exposure and to provide education and support services to the families of substance-abused babies.
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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday September 16, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall University School of Pharmacy sponsors International Symposium on Safe Medicine

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University School of Pharmacy, along with several other conference partners, is sponsoring the 2013 International Symposium on Safe Medicine (ISSM) beginning tomorrow in Charleston. The conference, which has historically been held in the state of Maine, brings together pharmacists, physicians, toxicologists, educators and others for sessions on prescription drug use, abuse, return and disposal.

    Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy and a speaker for the event, said the escalation of prescription drug abuse across the United States makes it imperative for health care professionals to collaborate with others in the field.

    "There are many facets of the prescription drug abuse issue that need to be addressed," Yingling said. "This symposium exposes health care professionals to educational topics like best practices in medication prescribing, creating public policies about drug diversion, the roles of pharmacists in medication therapy management and even environmental issues impacted by the unsafe disposal of medications."

    Dr. John V. Schloss is professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Science at the Marshall School of Pharmacy and is one of the organizers of past ISSM conferences in Maine.

    "Prior to joining the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, I was heavily involved with the conference planning in Portland," Schloss said. "There are many parallels between Maine and West Virginia that contribute to their common problem in prescription drug abuse. This symposium has facilitated cross-disciplinary approaches to solving the drug abuse problems, not just in West Virginia, but across various states."

    The conference also features speakers from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the MU Forensic Science Center and the College of Health Professions. Additional speakers are from the Pew Prescription Project, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and various companies and universities.

    The symposium is being held in conjunction with West Virginia's Integrated Behavioral Health Conference.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday September 11, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

    Marshall School of Medicine researchers to present findings at American Heart Association meeting

    Eight abstracts accepted for scientific session on high blood pressure

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Researchers from Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, in collaboration with international partners in China and Italy and colleagues in the United States, will present their findings at the 2013 American Heart Association's High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions later this week in New Orleans.

    "We are very pleased that all eight of our research abstracts were accepted for presentation at this world-class conference," said Nader G. Abraham, Ph.D., Dr. H.C., FAHA, vice dean for research at the School of Medicine. "Marshall is truly expanding its medical research footprint and is being recognized at the international level."

    In making the announcement, Abraham said research from Marshall scientists and clinicians includes findings on heart disease, obesity, fatty liver, and hypertension. 

    "Much of our research here at Marshall is focused on the issues that plague our population in West Virginia and really the entire Appalachian region," Abraham said. "For instance, the project that the dean, Joseph Shapiro, and I have been working on with researchers from Beijing and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science in North Carolina has found that there are small, special fatty acids that can improve heart attack mediated damage to prevent further damage, which may eventually lead to developments in new therapies and prevention."

    Click to view PDF of the eight abstracts.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday September 11, 2013
    Contact: Maurice Cooley, Director, Center for African American Students, 304-696-5430

    Four scholarships to honor victims of Birmingham church bombing, 50 years later

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An anonymous donor has given $2,000 to set up four $500 scholarships at Marshall University in memory of four young girls who were killed in a racially motivated church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963.

    Raquel Whitmore, Rebecca Britton, Donavia Beltran and Jasmine Felder, who are current Marshall University students, will receive the scholarships at a presentation and remembrance of the bombing at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12, in the Drinko Library Atrium on the Huntington campus.

    The African American 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was nearly destroyed by a bomb placed there on Sunday, Sept. 15, 1963. The blast killed the four girls, who ranged from ages 11 to 14, and injured 23 others as they attended Sunday school classes. The church had been a rallying point for civil rights activities during the spring of that year and was a meeting place for civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.

    "During the past summer a local donor, who wants to remain anonymous, contacted the MU Foundation office and offered to set up these gifts," said Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students.  "She had just finished reading Carolyn Maull McKinstry's book, While the World Watched, about those events and she was so moved that she was inspired to offer these gifts."

    The donor's requests were simple, Cooley said.  In addition to anonymity, she requested that the recipients be current African American female students at Marshall, that the awards be given before the anniversary date of the bombing and that each scholarship bear the name of one of the bombing victims: Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Wesley, Carole Robertson and Denise McNair. In addition, the donor has purchased four copies of McKinstry's book, which will be presented to the scholarship recipients during the event.

    Cooley will give opening remarks, give a presentation about the events that are being commemorated, and offer a short reading on that era and the church bombings.  He will be assisted by Krystle Davis, program director of scholarship and donor relations at the foundation, who has also been instrumental in planning this event.

    Cooley says he has not yet had an opportunity to speak to the donor but says he is sincerely impressed by the "heartfelt kindness and the sensitivity that this one person experienced and acted on to positively impact the lives of others. In offering this gift she told a staff member that it is the recipients who are important and not the person who is giving it." 

    The public is welcome to attend the Sept. 12 presentation, Cooley said.  For additional information, contact Marshall's Center for African American Students at 304-696-6705. 


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday September 10, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2013

    Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18.

    Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

    "This test is part of our plan to test the system at least once per semester," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

    The most recent test of the system occurred Jan. 30.

    The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall and delivered thru the Blackboard Connect service, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those in the active Marshall community (faculty, staff and students) who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday September 10, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Guest saxophonist to visit Marshall Sept. 12

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's jazz studies program will welcome guest artist Dr. Gordon Towell Thursday, Sept. 12. He will be on the Huntington campus working with students during the day and performing at 8 p.m. in the Jomie Jazz Forum with members of the Marshall music faculty.

    Towell, a saxophonist, is a jazz faculty member at Morehouse State University in Kentucky and a member of Landau Eugene Murphy's band.

    "Gordon is a superb saxophonist and jazz educator," said Dr. Martin Saunders, professor of trumpet and director of jazz studies at Marshall. "He is versed in many different styles, and he will demonstrate that on Thursday night.  Having been on the Landau band with him for a couple of years now, I can tell you that he Gordon is the consummate musician and gentleman, and I'm excited for our students to learn from his expertise."

    The performance at 8 p.m. Thursday is free and open to the public. Performing with Towell will be the jazz faculty rhythm section, which includes Jay Flippin, piano; Jeffrey Thomasson, guitar; Steve Heffner, bass; and Steve Hall,  drums.

    Call the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday September 10, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Integrated Behavioral Health Conference available to Marshall University students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Health Professions will play a key role as a partner for the inaugural West Virginia Integrated Behavioral Health Conference Tuesday, Sept. 17, through Thursday, Sept. 19, at the Charleston Civic Center in Charleston, W.Va. Marshall students will receive a discounted rate to enroll in the conference. 

    Dr. William Pewen, assistant professor of public health and family medicine at Marshall, said the meeting will bring together professionals from diverse fields, including physicians, social workers, pharmacists, nurses, law enforcement officers, legal advocates and others. Participants will have the opportunity both to enhance their own skills and learn how to better collaborate with other professionals.

    "This is the first time so many disciplines have been brought together to confront our region's behavioral health needs," Pewen said. "From substance abuse to child welfare to disabilities - this meeting could mark a sea change in improving public health in West Virginia and throughout the Appalachian region."

    The conference will feature internationally and locally recognized presenters who will examine the state of integrated health care. Among these is Dr. Daniel Carlat, who serves as director of the Prescription Project in Washington, D.C., and is responsible for the oversight of the Pew Charitable Trusts' initiatives on medical conflicts of interest.

    "Dr. Carlat brings a key perspective to our concurrent meeting of the International Symposium on Safe Medicine as an expert in how conflicts of interest influence the use of prescription drugs," Pewen said. "The chance to attend a meeting of this sort should be a compelling opportunity for health professionals and concerned members of the public."

    Dr. John Schloss, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Research at Marshall's School of Pharmacy, was also involved as an organizer for the safe medicine component of the conference.  

    Students can register for $35 per day with lunch included.  Registration for non-students is $249. For more information on attending this conference, visit http://dhhr.regsvc.com/ibhconf online.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday September 9, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Music faculty members, guest alumnus to perform trio recital Sept. 23

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pianist John Ingram, violinist Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith and flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs will present a full program of music from the 20th century at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Featured on the program will be works by Martinu, Ibert and Rota.

    Smith and Dobbs are members of the Marshall music faculty. For Ingram, this is a return to Marshall. Dobbs said that in the 1980s, Ingram pursued a graduate degree at Marshall studying piano with Kenneth Marchant. He then became a doctoral candidate in the piano performance program at the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music. His career led him in another direction, though, and he's been a grant writer, mostly for nonprofits, for many years. In recent times he's felt the attraction of music once again.

    The program will begin with Bohuslav Martinu's Madrigal Sonata. The native Czech composer, who also spent time in Paris and the United States, composed in the neo-classical style as developed by Igor Stravinsky. Stravinsky was also an influence on the compositional style of Nino Rota, whose trio will end the program. Rota is best remembered as the Italian prodigy who came to America and composed music for 150 movies including ones by Fellini ("8 1/2"), Zeffirelli ("Romeo and Juliet"), and Coppola ("The Godfather"). Between the Martinu and Rota works will be Jacques Ibert's Two Interludes. Like Rota, Ibert was active in writing music for movies, though, also like Rota, his compositional output was extraordinarily diverse and defied categorization.

    The program is free and open to the public. Call Marshall's School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday September 9, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Rachael Peckham, Associate Professor of English, 304-696-3649

    Visiting Writers Series to begin Thursday, Sept. 19, with two poets

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will welcome two visiting poets,Will Schutt and Marcus Wicker, in the first program of the university's A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series of the 2013-2014 academic year. They will read from their works beginning at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19, at Gallery 842, which is located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington.
     
    Schutt is the 2012 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize and author of the collection Westerly. A graduate of Oberlin College and Hollins University, he is the recipient of fellowships from the James Merrill House and the Stadler Center for Poetry. His poems and translations have appeared or are forthcoming in Agni, FIELD, The New Republic, The Southern Review and elsewhere.
     
    Wicker is the 2012 winner of the National Poetry Series and author of Maybe the Saddest Thing. A native of Ann Arbor, Mich., he was the recipient of a 2011 Ruth Lilly Fellowship. He also has held fellowships from Cave Canem, the Fine Arts Work Center and Indiana University, where he received his Master of Fine Arts degree. Wicker's work has appeared in Poetry, Beloit, Third Coast and Ninth Letter, among other journals. He is assistant professor of English at the University of Southern Indiana and the poetry editor of Southern Indiana Review.
     
    A casual "Coffee and Conversation" hour with the poets also will take place Sept. 19, from 4 to 5 p.m. in the 3rd-floor atrium of the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus.
     
    Both events are free and open to the public. They are sponsored by the Center for African American Students, the English department and the College of Liberal Arts at Marshall.
     

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday September 6, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Gallery 842 to open juried exhibition Friday, Sept. 6

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Gallery 842 will host its 3rd annual juried exhibition, which will open at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, with light refreshments and art from the Huntington community and beyond.

    Approximately 25 artists and 40 works are represented in the show, including students in Marshall University's art department as well as other entries from across the region, said John Farley, director of Marshall University galleries.

    "In this particular juried exhibit, the competition was open to artists working in any medium, addressing any theme, student or professional," Farley explained. "It will be a diverse cross-section of contemporary art that reflects the Huntington and Marshall University art communities, as well as artists practicing throughout the region."

    Farley noted that juried competitions are a great way for artists to gauge the quality and development of their work against that of their peers.

    "As an artist, it's a chance to see what others are making, where you fit in - or not, network, gain exposure, polish your presentation skills, learn from others and think about what you are making in a broader context," Farley said. "This specific competition can be of particular benefit to students, in the sense that they are pitting themselves and their work against artists who may have far more experience, education and so on. It is a worthwhile challenge, and an opportunity to grow, learn and hone their craft."

    Katherine Cox juried this year's competition. Cox holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Master of Arts in Teaching from Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Fla. Her drawings have been exhibited in galleries throughout the mid-Atlantic region, including recent solo and invitational shows at the Muse Gallery in Columbus, Ohio, and the Art Store in Charleston, W.Va. Cox is currently the director of education at the Huntington Museum of Art.

    Admission to Gallery 842 is free and open to the public from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesdays through. The 3rd Annual Juried Exhibition runs through Friday, Oct. 18.


    Direct Link to This Release


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday September 6, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    'Band Day' tomorrow features Marching Thunder, 11 high school bands

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Marching Thunder will play host to 11 high school bands for a mass halftime show at Marshall's home football game against Gardner-Webb University Saturday, Sept. 7.

    "This show will honor our veterans and military personnel, as well as pay tribute to the victims and families of the 9-11 tragedy," said Steve Barnett, director of bands at Marshall.

    The Marching Thunder will begin by performing the opening selection of their current halftime show. The high school bands will then march onto the field and join them in the "Armed Forces Medley" and several other selections. The show will conclude with the massed bands' performance of "Sons of Marshall."

    The high school bands participating, along with the names of their directors, are as follows:

    Fairland High School Band, Keith Carper
    Oak Hill High School Band, Timothy M. Mullens
    Summers County High School Band, James Messenger
    East High School Band, Elizabeth Gowdy
    Liberty High School Band, Thomas Day
    Symmes Valley High School Band, Matt Jarvis
    Fayetteville High School Band, Stephanie Sumner
    Tug Valley High School Band, Deanna Holderby
    Greenbrier East High School Band, Jim Allder
    South Gallia High School Band, Cassandra Thompson-Chapman
    Wayne High School Band, Brian Dunfee

    The football game starts at 6:30 p.m. For further information on band day, contact Marshall's School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday September 5, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    WMUL student broadcasters named national finalist

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Student broadcasters from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, were named a national finalist in the 2012 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) National Mark of Excellence Contest in the radio category of Best All-Around Newscast.

    The award was presented at the SPJ National Convention and Excellence in Journalism 2013 Conference Saturday, Aug. 24, at the Anaheim Marriott in Anaheim, Calif.

    Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of Radio-Television Production and Management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, said that the students competed with other broadcasting students who won regional first-place awards for best all-around radio newscast, from colleges and universities across the nation representing SPJ's 12 regions. 
     
    "Our radio students have established a tradition at WMUL-FM of being able to successfully compete at the national level with other student journalists," Bailey said.  "This national finalist award is further evidence of the quality of the work performed by our talented broadcasting students at WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications, and the College of Arts and Media."


    The national finalist award-winning entry in the Best All-Around Newscast 4-year college/university category from Marshall is:

    Best All-Around Newscast

    The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast and made available online Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. The students who participated are Adam Rogers, producer, a senior from Charleston; Leannda Carey, co-anchor, a recent MAJ graduate from Wellsburg; Marcus Constantino, co-anchor, a senior from Bramwell; Joshua Rose, weather,  a senior from Olney, Md.; and Nathan Barham, sports, a recent MAJ graduate from Youngsville, N.C.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday September 5, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions,

    Communication Disorders to host reaccreditation visit

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) will conduct a reaccreditation site visit for Marshall's M.S. program in Communication Disorders later this month.

    A four-member team, chaired by Dr. Theresa Bartolotta of Seton Hall University, will be on campus Sept. 19-20 to meet with students, key administrators and all members of the academic and clinical faculty.

    The CAA is seeking public comment as part of its review of the graduate education programs in audiology or speech-language pathology. A public meeting will take place from 4:30 to 5 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 19, in Smith Hall 134. Individuals with an interest in the Department of Communication Disorders or the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center are especially encouraged to attend the public meeting.

    A copy of the standards of accreditation and information on the CAA's policy on public comment may be obtained by contacting the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) accreditation office at 800-498-2071, ASHA's Web site at http://www.asha.org/Academic/accreditation/PublicCommentList/ or ASHA at 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Md. 20850.

    For further information, contact Department Chair Dr. Karen McNealy at 304-696-3634 or e-mail mcnealy@marshall.edu.



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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday September 4, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

    Constitution Week features quoits, Simon Perry book signing, visit from early Freedom Rider

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Simon Perry, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Marshall University, will sign copies of his book, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson: By Their Deeds You Shall Know Them, Tuesday, Sept. 17, on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Perry, the John Deaver Drinko Fellow for the academic year 1994-1995, will sign his books beginning at 7 p.m. in the third-floor atrium of the Drinko Library.

    The event is part of Marshall's annual celebration of Constitution Week, which features activities - such as the popular quoits competition - throughout much of September. September 17 is Constitution Day.

    "The Drinko Academy is pleased to publish Simon Perry's recent book," said Dr. Alan Gould, director of the Drinko Academy. "It's been a personal pleasure for me to be Simon's colleague and friend for nearly 40 years and he, although now retired, rightfully deserves his unofficial title of dean of the faculty."

    Perry's role as a faculty member at Marshall from 1962 through 2010 made his 47-year tenure as a faculty member the longest in the history of the institution.  He earned a reputation as an outstanding educator and received numerous prestigious awards during his illustrious career, including Marshall's Distinguished Faculty Award.   Two separate governors presented him with the Distinguished West Virginian Award.  In a poll recently conducted by MU's Office of Alumni Affairs, Perry was named the Outstanding Teacher at Marshall University.

    The Dr. Simon D. Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy was created by the College of Liberal Arts to honor him along with John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, for whom the university is named.  The purpose of the center is to promote the study of government, the constitution, and the work of John Marshall and the Supreme Court.  It is an interdisciplinary academic program that promotes the teaching and original research regarding the formation and evolution of the U.S. Constitution and examines its importance in contemporary legal, political and civil and cultural matters.

    Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson:  By Their Deeds You Shall Know Them can be purchased for $24.95 plus $6 for shipping and handling  through The Drinko Academy.

    Quoits/John Marshall Birthday Cake

    One of the highlights of Constitution Week in recent years at Marshall has been the quoits competition on the west end of Buskirk Field. Teams of faculty, staff, students, fraternities and sororities can sign up now to play in the tournament that begins on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and continues through Friday, Sept. 13.

    To sign up, participants need to stop by the quoits pits between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9, e-mail Kristen Pack at milhoan4@marshall.edu, or call her at 304-696-3183. The deadline for team registration is 5 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9.

    The President's Invitational Quoits Media Challenge is at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24. It will be preceded by the cutting of John Marshall's birthday cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza at 11 a.m. by President Stephen J. Kopp.

    Quoits, a game in which rings of iron are pitched at stakes much like horseshoes, was the favorite game of John Marshall. 

    Also planned during Constitution Week:

    • 4:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23 - Announcement of the winner of the Judge Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition in the student center's John Marshall Room.
    • 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 - The Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre features Early Freedom Rider Ms. Joan C. Browning. Her address is titled "Oh the Places That Freedom Riding Take Me."

      Browning, who lives on a hillside in the Irish Corner District of Greenbrier County, writes and lectures at colleges and universities on her personal experiences as a white woman in the civil rights movement.

      On the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Rides, she was feted all across the country, including as a guest of Congress at the premiere of the documentary about the Freedom Rides, as a guest on the Oprah Winfrey Show, and at a meeting requested by President Barack Obama. She has been a  guest lecturer at more than 75 colleges and universities.

      In addition to speaking at the Byrd forum, Browning will speak at 7 p.m. Thursday, also in the Francis-Booth Theatre. That address is titled, "The Constitution and Civil Rights."
    • 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8 - Amicus Curiae Lecture. The guest speaker will be James E. Simon, dean emeritus of New York Law School. His address will take place at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday September 4, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Oct. 3 gala to celebrate West Virginia's coal mining people and communities

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - On Thursday, Oct. 3, miners, industry leaders, community members and others will gather at Tamarack in Beckley for a gala reception, dinner and awards ceremony to celebrate the past, present and future of West Virginia's coal mining enterprise.

    According to organizers, the purpose of the annual "Miners' Celebration" is to recognize all those who play a role in the state's mining industry.

    "The West Virginia mining industry is very important to us, for example, as a destination for jobs for many graduates from our safety technology program," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "The industry depends upon thousands of individuals in a number of different roles and every person whether they work as a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders, educators and mining families.

    "The mining industry owes its success to every one of them. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."

    Szwilski said one of the highlights of the gala will be the "Because of You" awards presented to several individuals for their significant contributions to West Virginia's coal-mining community. This year's honorees include:

    • James H. "Buck" Harless of Gilbert, whose success in the coal and timber industries and commitment to the people of southern West Virginia have inspired him to become one of the state's leading philanthropists (Community Investment Award);
    • Geneva Steele of Paynesville, who helped lead the effort to build the McDowell County Miners' Memorial in Bradshaw and has worked with the local historical society to preserve the area's coal mining heritage (Community Involvement Award);
    • Jim Dean of Morgantown, who heads West Virginia University's mining and industrial extension program and served as acting director of the state's Office of Miners' Health, Safety and Training following the Sago and Aracoma mine disasters (Safety Professional Award);
    • Jennie Henthorn of St. Albans, who is the owner of Henthorn Environmental Services and a recognized authority on state and federal water quality standards and environmental permitting (Environmental Professional Award);
    • Roger Owensby of Bluefield, who is the director of the mining engineering technology program at Bluefield State College and a certified mine foreman-fireboss (Educator of the Year Award); and
    • Katharine Fredriksen of Pittsburgh, who is the senior vice president of environmental strategy and regulatory affairs for CONSOL Energy Inc. (Women in Mining Award).

    Internationally recognized musician and songwriter John Ellison, who grew up in the mining community of Landgraff in McDowell County, will be on hand at the event to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award. A member of the 1960s group the Soul Brothers Six, Ellison is best known for writing the song "Some Kind of Wonderful" one of the most-recorded songs in history. He is dedicating his award to the memory of his father, who worked in the mines in McDowell County.

    "Rocket Boys" author Homer Hickam, the recipient of last year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" award, will present a new award, the "Homer Hickam Collier Award," to a working coal miner who epitomizes the spirit, dedication and skills of the mining profession. The 2013 recipient, Scott Lancianese of Mount Hope, is a third-generation West Virginia miner who has worked in the industry for 36 years, including the last 16 as a superintendent for Alpha Natural Resources.

    Szwilski added that representatives of the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area also will be on hand to present the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.
     
    The free reception will begin at 5 p.m. in the Tamarack atrium. Entertainment will be provided by singer-songwriter Reagan Boggs, who wrote "Thank You - Miner's Song" as a tribute to the men and women who work in the mines. A native of the mining community Pound, Va., Boggs is currently playing shows with Nashville-based group The Coal Men.

    Dinner and the awards ceremony, which require a ticket, will begin at 6 p.m. in the ballroom. Tickets are $50/person. To purchase tickets or inquire about sponsorship opportunities, call 304-696-4029.

    For more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/mcc.
     
    The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

    Sponsors include Brickstreet Insurance, Marshall University, State Electric Supply Company and the West Virginia Division of Energy.
     


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    Tuesday September 3, 2013
    Contact: Karen Kirtley, Senior Vice President of Administration,, 304-696-3328

    Final draft of master plan to be reviewed at open house Monday, Sept. 9

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A final draft version of Marshall University's master plan for all campuses will be reviewed by the community at an open house Monday, Sept. 9.

    The event will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. in room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. All members of the university and Huntington communities are invited to attend, said Dr. Karen Kirtley, Marshall's senior vice president of administration.

    "This will be a final opportunity to see the plan before it is presented to our Board of Governors," Kirtley said.

    The Campus Master Plan will be presented to the Marshall University Board of Governors Oct. 30 and subsequently the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Further information on the planning process can be found on the Marshall University website at www.marshall.edu/mplan.


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    Tuesday September 3, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University graduate student receives McManus Fellowship

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Amber Epling, a political science graduate student at Marshall University, recently received the McManus Fellowship, the West Virginia Legislature's most prestigious internship.

    The McManus Fellowship is available to second-year graduate students concentrating in public administration.

    As the 2014 McManus Fellow, Epling will conduct research for the House Committee on the Judiciary.

    "My primary role will be in the spring when the Legislature is in session," Epling said. "It'll be a lot of sitting in on committee meetings, taking notes, doing research for proposed legislation and presenting bills."

    Epling, who is from Gallipolis, Ohio, earned her undergraduate degree in 2004 from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio.

    The fellowship is named for Lew McManus, who served in the West Virginia House of Delegates from 1966 to 1976, including three terms as speaker.


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    Tuesday September 3, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Woodwind quintet to feature modern, period instruments

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three Marshall University music faculty members will be joined by two guest instrumentalists for a program at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18, that the performers are calling "Music from the Age of Invention." The concert will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The performers include Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flute, Dr. Stephen Lawson, horn, and Kay Lawson, bassoon, who all teach at Marshall. The guest performers are Curtis Foster, oboe, and Dr. Richard Spece, clarinet. The group has chosen to call themselves the Maelzel Metronome Woodwind Quintet, referring to the Age of Invention in the early 19th century, when inventions such as Maelzel's time-keeping contraption and musical and technical innovations marked the artistic landscape in Europe.

    Though woodwind quintet music has been well represented on Marshall's Huntington campus in the past, Dobbs said, this particular program will be different since all involved will perform not only on modern instruments, but also on historical reproductions of instruments that existed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The instruments vary considerably from their modern counterparts. They naturally sound differently and they require a whole new technique when playing.

    This repertoire of music for five wind instruments began life in late 18th- and early 19th-century Paris when numerous multi-movement works featuring the five winds of the classical era orchestra - flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn - were composed by Anton Reicha, Franz Danzi and others. (Though the horn is not a woodwind instrument, the convenient name "woodwind quintet" has described the combination for many generations.) The program on Sept. 18 will feature works by Reicha and Danzi, as well as a third by Giuseppe Maria Cambini.

    Dobbs noted that "historically informed" performances on period instruments, as these historical reproductions are called, are gaining more attention on many college campuses and on the classical music scene in many major American cities. "In essence, we hear the same sounds as the composers and musicians from the era and this informs our decisions on numerous aspects of the music and indeed permits us and our audience to understand the music in ways that may be obscured by the louder, more homogenized sounds of modern instruments," he said.

    The two guest artists are very involved in performance on period instruments. Foster lives in Seattle, Wash., and has performed with many of the important historical music groups in the United States, including the Baroque orchestras of Seattle, St. Louis, Baltimore and Madison. He is a graduate of Indiana University's Early Music Institute, where he studied with Washington McClain. Spece teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Campus and performs regularly with a host of groups including Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Portland Baroque Orchestra, Ama Deus Ensemble, California Bach Society, Magnificat, Classical Consort, Concert Spirituel and Opera Lafayette. He is also a founding member of Circa 1800 Chamber Winds.

    The two guests are sponsored by contributions from the Marshall University John Deaver Drinko Academy and First Presbyterian Church in Huntington.

    A slightly abbreviated repeat performance will occur at First Presbyterian Church, part of the MUsic Alive! Series, at noon Friday, Sept. 20. The church is located at 1015 5th Ave.

    Both programs are free and open to the public. Call the Marshall University School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information.

    -------------

    Photos: Guest artists Curtis Foster (above)and Dr. Richard Spece will appear with Marshall University music faculty members Sept. 18.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday August 30, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall University School of Pharmacy begins academic year with new faculty and staff

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has added seven new faculty members and four staff employees as it implements second-year curriculum and the expansion of research and outreach programs.
        
    In making the announcement, Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the school, said, "As our school continues to grow and we reach our full student capacity in 2016, our personnel infrastructure must expand as well.   I am excited to welcome this new cadre of educators and business professionals to our pharmacy family."

    The new faculty are listed by department:

    Department of Pharmaceutical Science and Research

    Jinsong Hao, Ph.D., assistant professor, is a specialist in the area of drug formulation and delivery, with experience in drug delivery to the inner ear and eye.  She was formerly with the University of Cincinnati.

    Tim Long, Ph.D., assistant professor, is a medicinal chemist with a research focus in infectious disease.   Long most recently served at the University of Georgia.

    Inder Sehgal, Ph.D., professor, is a pharmacologist whose research focus has been in the areas of cancer and the toxicology of herbal products.  Over the past 15 years, Sehgal has conducted research and taught in the pharmacy program at North Dakota State University and the School of Veterinary Medicine at Louisiana State University.

    Department of Pharmacy Practice, Administration, and Research

    Elaine Cruse, Pharm.D., clinical assistant professor, has a shared position with Valley Health, where she practices medication therapy management in the area of diabetes.   Cruse is a certified diabetes educator.

    Brian Gallagher, R. Ph., J. D., Director of Pharmacy Services for Marshall Health and assistant professor, has served as a legal expert for the American Pharmacists' Association and is coordinating special projects for Marshall Health.

    Angel Kimble, Pharm. D., BCPS, clinical assistant professor, has a shared position with Fruth Pharmacy, where she practices medication therapy management.   She has practiced with King's Daughters and Holzer medical centers and taught at the University of Charleston.

    Leesa Prunty, Pharm.D., clinical assistant professor, has a shared position with Cabell Huntington Hospital, where she practices in the area of pediatrics.  Prunty completed a residency at St. Mary's Medical Center.

    Department of Experiential Learning

    Craig Kimble, M.H.A., M.B.A., Pharm.D., Director of Experiential Learning and assistant professor, most recently served as the Director of Pharmacy and Clinical Services for Fruth Corporation.  He begins his duties with Marshall University School of Pharmacy in September.

    Also joining the School of Pharmacy are the following staff members:  Shane Lawrence, IT support specialist, Sr.; Kalina Grimm, B.A., administrative secretary, Sr.; Gail Rice, administrative associate; Jennifer Kennedy, M.A., director of student affairs and assessment, and Mellissa Clay, A.A., administrative secretary, Sr.

    The Marshall University School of Pharmacy was granted candidate status by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education in 2013.  Candidate status is awarded to a Doctor of Pharmacy program that is currently recognized by ACPE with pre-candidate status and has students enrolled, but has not yet had a graduating class.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday August 30, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-3655

    Marshall University students given chance to learn from former health reform policy adviser

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - With the implementation of health reform just weeks away, Marshall University students will have a rare opportunity to gain knowledge and insight on a subject that will impact both their physical and economic health for years to come as a faculty member who served as a key player in Washington health policy leads them through an examination of health reform.

    As a former senior health policy adviser for U.S. Sen. Olympia J. Snowe (R ME), Dr. William Pewen helped construct the Senate Finance Committee's health reform legislation, which formed the foundation of the Affordable Care Act.

    "The act's greatest impact is coming this fall as health coverage will become more accessible and affordable to millions of Americans," Pewen said. "That is a landmark achievement, yet the political process certainly failed to produce a broad national consensus on health reform, and we continue to face a multitude of critical health system problems.  While affordable access to coverage has been expanded, improving the quality and cost of health care is likely to be far more difficult."

    Pewen, now an assistant professor of public health in Marshall's College of Health Professions, plans to examine some of the key issues of health reform in a new course, "Topics in Health Policy," offered this fall for both undergraduate and graduate students.

    "Given the complexity of health itself and how we obtain care, it's no surprise that so many Americans find our health care system incomprehensible," said Pewen, who also serves on the faculty of the Department of Family and Community Health at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  He noted that students will gain an understanding of the challenges policymakers face in attempting to forge agreement among disparate groups - from patients and health care providers to employers, economists, legal experts and the health sector industry itself.

    "Since the issue is truly a matter of life and death, and health expenditures now comprise nearly one of every five dollars in domestic spending, it's a central concern for all of us," Pewen said.

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said the course cuts across multiple disciplines and is designed not only to provide students with a working knowledge of the issues of health reform, but also provide each student with experience in crafting a policy proposal on a health issue of interest.

    "The issues of health reform remain key concerns to health care providers and thus involve economists, policy makers, patient advocates and, of course, those in clinical care and public health," Prewitt said. "We feel extremely lucky to have someone like Professor Pewen on staff to provide real-world perspectives for our students and staff at Marshall."

    The course, "Topics in Health Policy," will be taught from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays in Prichard Hall on the Huntington campus and will be available for undergraduate and graduate credit. For more information on this course, contact Pewen at pewen@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday August 30, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Recreation Center announces 'Kids' Night Out'

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is hosting a special night out for kids from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6. This program is available to parents who would like some time to themselves to shop, see a movie, or get some things done around the house.

    The children will be entertained in a fun, safe environment where they will experience climbing on the Rec Center's rock wall, swimming in the indoor pool, playing ball on the courts and having a pizza party with all their new friends.

    Children ages 4-12 are welcome and the deadline to register is Thursday, Sept. 5. Parents are asked to please register their children in advance, as space is limited. The cost for members is $15 ($10 for each additional sibling), and the cost for non-members is $20 ($15 for each additional sibling). Cash, credit cards or checks made out to the Campus Rec Club will be accepted.

    Kids' Night Out also will be occurring on the following dates throughout the rest of 2013: Oct. 11, Nov. 1 and Dec. 6. Sign-up deadlines are the day the before the events.
     
    Forms and waivers for this event can be found on www.marshallcampusrec.com. Parents are asked to return the forms to the Marshall Recreation Center Welcome Desk or mail them to: Marshall Recreation Center, Attn: Dan Belcher, 402 Thundering Herd Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

    For more information, call Belcher, facility operations coordinator, at 304-696-4651.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday August 29, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall School of Medicine associate dean to serve with national medical organization

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Darshana Shah, associate dean of faculty affairs and professional development with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been selected as chair of the professional development and program subcommittee of the American Association of Medical Colleges' Group on Faculty Affairs (GFA) committee.

    The appointment follows her election as an at-large representative to the GFA's Steering Committee earlier this year. The mission of the GFA is to build and sustain faculty vitality in medical schools and teaching hospitals.

    "Dr. Shah's commitment to guiding faculty members in their professional development and career pathways is absolutely terrific and I cannot think of a person more fitting to serve in this position," said Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.   "She is one of those individuals who always sees the glass half-full and is determined to find solutions in the complex world of medical education. We certainly are proud of her achievements, both here and on the national level."

    Shah will serve a three-year term on the committee and says she is eager to begin her new role.

    "Developing programs to assist and nurture faculty is an essential component of any medical school," Shah said. "I am thrilled to participate as a JCESOM faculty member in designing added-value programs at the national level."

    Shah is the first from Marshall to be elected to an AAMC steering committee.

    In addition to her role as associate dean, Shah is a professor of pathology and is an active leader within numerous other professional and educational groups.  Currently, she serves as president of the Group for Research in Pathology Education, a national organization whose purpose is to promote and facilitate excellence in pathology education.

    Shah has received several teaching awards and is the faculty advisor to the JCESOM's chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society, an international group dedicated to compassionate medical care.

    Shah graduated from the University of Maryland with a master's degree in microbiology and earned her doctorate in biomedical sciences at West Virginia University before completing postdoctoral research work at the JCESOM.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday August 28, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions,

    MU Board of Governors approves Master of Public Health program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The Marshall University Board of Governors, meeting Tuesday, Aug. 27, on the Huntington campus, voted to approve the Master of Public Health (MPH) program offered through the College of Health Professions.

    President Stephen J. Kopp said the master's degree in public health is a logical addition that complements Marshall's professional doctoral schools in health care, including medicine, pharmacy and physical therapy. He said he believes it builds on the university's reputation for serving the region's rural communities.

    "The interdisciplinary approach is very important to our shared goal of improving rural health outcomes," Kopp said.

    Dr. William Pewen, program director, said the program will help position students to be at the forefront of change, as our state faces among the most serious health challenges in the nation.

    "While there are many programs in public health, few offer the sort of synergies that we will see at Marshall," Pewen said. "Interdisciplinary, collaborative practice is a key to improving health in our nation, and with our diverse health professions programs and institutions - and the opportunity for students to begin making practical contributions in a region facing critical health challenges - Marshall provides exceptional opportunity for public health students."

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of Marshall's College of Health Professions, said the MPH program will be among the most affordable, ensuring that many graduates can build careers in West Virginia and the Appalachian region.

    "The Marshall MPH program will meet a critically important need for public health professionals in the region which will strengthen existing partnerships with local, state and national agencies necessary to engage in public health practice," Prewitt said. "Our graduates will achieve competency in several areas including communication, cultural competence, community-based participatory research, global health, policy and law and public health ethics."

    Dr. Harry Tweel, physician director of the Cabell Huntington Health Department, is a strong advocate for public health education at the university level.

    "This is a program that has been needed in our state for a long time and the changing landscape of health care has solidified the need to move in this direction," Tweel said. "Every day we work to protect the public. In order to continue to improve the services of public health, we will need trained leaders for the future. I certainly encourage the students of Marshall University to reap the benefits of this opportunity."

    For more information about the MPH program, contact Pewen at pewen@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday August 28, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall gallery director to exhibit work in Ironton

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Works of art by John Farley, director of galleries at Marshall University, will be on exhibit at Ohio University Southern in Ironton, Ohio, beginning Thursday.

    Farley, who directs both the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall's Huntington campus and Gallery 842 in downtown Huntington, will be showcasing work he has done over the years, as well as some of his more recent creations.

    "Although largely composed of previous drawings, stylistically and thematically unified, I have chosen to also include two new examples of portraiture," Farley said. "This show represents a shift from the introspective drawings of the last few years to a developing body of portrait drawings that is more accessible to a viewer, rewarding for me as an artist, and meaningful to those I care for, which is really what it's all about."
     
    Farley is also a Marshall graduate, having received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2007 with an emphasis in painting.

    "Given our close proximity to OU Southern, I hope that this is only one of many upcoming efforts at 'cross-pollination,' " Farley said. "Networking is always crucial. I'm not the first artist with MU ties to display work there, and I hope to feature more artists from southern Ohio at Marshall."

    Farley said there is no general theme for the exhibition but the show is dedicated to his grandmother.

    The exhibition's opening reception is from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29. The exhibition will run until Thursday, Sept. 26, and will take place at the art gallery, room D11, in the Dingus Technology Center, 1804 Liberty Ave. in Ironton.


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    Tuesday August 27, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Changes on campus include demolition of Hodges Hall, ban on tobacco; construction projects well under way

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The start of the fall semester at Marshall University is always a time of change on the Huntington campus. Yesterday, the first day of classes, was no exception as thousands of students quickly discovered.

    The most eye-catching change this fall is in the center of campus where green space, along with new lights, trees and sidewalks, has replaced Hodges Hall, which was demolished this summer. The location where Hodges Hall, a former men's dormitory, stood for 76 years is now open, presenting a splendid view of both ends of campus from that area.

    Hodges Hall had become too expensive to maintain and was not air conditioned, and students had not lived there since 2007.

    Marshall's men and women now play their home soccer matches at the new Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex on 5th Avenue, where Veterans Memorial Field House once stood. Athletic Director Mike Hamrick said the Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex is one of the best soccer venues in the country.

    The facility was officially dedicated and the field named in honor of the Jeff Hoops Family as Marshall's women's team played the first regular-season game there last Friday, defeating Campbell University, 3-0.

    Marshall officially became a tobacco-free university June 11 when the tobacco ban was approved.  Signs have been placed throughout campus, reminding students, staff, faculty and visitors of the tobacco ban, which went into effect July 1.

    If part of Joan C. Edwards Stadium looks larger this fall to Herd fans, it's probably because four sky suites have been added to the top of the press box. Also, getting from the concourse to the press box or sky suites will be easier and quicker, thanks to repairs made on the two existing elevators and the addition of a third elevator. Marshall plays at home at 7 p.m. Saturday, taking on Miami (Ohio).

    Of course, and most importantly, an estimated 2,500-3,000 new students - freshmen and transfers - will be enrolled in classes this fall. That number includes a new group of international students, representing the first class of the new INTO Marshall Program. 

    Marshall has partnered with INTO, a private company that forms joint partnerships with leading universities around the world to expand opportunities for higher education. Its offices on Marshall's campus are in the former Marshall Community and Technical College building, which was renovated this year at a cost of $2.3 million.

    Also this summer, work continued or has begun on:

    • construction of the $50 million Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, located on Third Avenue between the Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories and the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center. The project is expected to be completed in spring 2015.
    • a $13 million renovation of the former Stone & Thomas building in downtown Huntington to create a state-of-the-art educational space for Marshall's visual arts program. The center will house studios and classrooms, plus ground-floor retail and gallery space. The expected completion date is June 1, 2014.
    • construction of an Indoor Practice Facility, Sports Medicine Translational Research Center, Hall of Fame Atrium and Student-Athlete Academic Center next to the Joan C. Edwards Stadium.
    • renovation projects in the Gullickson Hall wellness center, Old Main rooms 213 and 310, Harris Hall room 448 and Smith Hall.

    In Smith Hall, the College of Arts and Media established a Student Success Center near the Birke Art Gallery on the first floor. Tammy Reynolds, director of the center, said it is a place where students in the College of Arts and Media can go specifically for advice regarding their major.
     
    About 10 smart classroom upgrades consisting of new furniture, new white boards, painting, cleaning and repairing ceilings took place. Sidewalks and lights were replaced on 3rd Avenue, and new flowers were planted around campus.
     
    Total cost of these renovations and upgrades was about $435,000.
     
    Jim Terry, director of public safety at MU, said no changes have been made in parking since last year on the Huntington campus. He did, however, emphasize that the year-old 6th Avenue garage, with its 412 spaces, is a convenient place for students to park. The cost is 50 cents an hour. This will be its first full year in operation.
     
    Academically this summer, Marshall streamlined its academic college structure. The changes, which began July 1, included:

    • the W. Page Pitt School  of Journalism and Mass Communications joining with the School of Music and Theatre and the School of Art and Design to form the new College of Arts and Media;
    • the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development and the College of Education combining programs to become a new comprehensive College of Education and Professional Development.

    ------------------

    Photos: (Above) The Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex is expected to open in spring 2015. (Middle) The Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex is the new home of Thundering Herd men's and women's soccer. (Below) The demolition of Hodges Hall opened up the center of Marshall's Huntington campus. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 27, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Marshall faculty members Dobbs, Vauth to present recital Monday, Sept. 9

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pianist Dr. Henning Vauth and flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, both music faculty members at Marshall University, will present a full program of music from Germany and Austria at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9. The program, featuring works by Kreutzer, Reinecke and Schubert, will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Vauth came to the music faculty at Marshall University two years ago. Since that time, Dobbs said, he has made an indelible stamp on cultural life in Huntington, having performed dozens of programs including a solo appearance with the Huntington Symphony Orchestra.

    "We are indeed lucky to have attracted a pianist of such formidable technique and wonderful musical insight," Dobbs said. "I'm delighted to have this opportunity to perform such extraordinary repertoire with him."

    Dobbs is beginning his 29th year at Marshall and performs regularly as principal flute of the Huntington Symphony Orchestra and the Ohio Valley Symphony.

    Vauth and Dobbs will begin the program with a virtuoso sonata by Conradin Kreutzer, a German 19th century composer and pianist. Kreutzer's Sonata is a showpiece, full of virtuoso cadenzas and delightful melodies. The duo will continue with Karl Reinecke's "Undine" Sonata, a programmatic work that musically describes Friedrich de la Motte Fouque's 1811 story of a mermaid who becomes human in order to marry with a man and obtain an immortal soul.

    The second half of the program is devoted to Franz Schubert's Arpeggione Sonata. This tuneful and well-composed sonata is a favorite among cellists, since the arpeggione was a bowed, but fretted instrument about the size of the cello that enjoyed a brief vogue in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Dobbs tailors this version for flute after a 1970s interpretation by Jean-Pierre Rampal.

    The program is free and open to the public. Call the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information.

    ---------------

    Photos: Dr. Henning Vauth (above) and Dr. Wendell Dobbs will give a recital Monday, Sept. 9.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday August 26, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall's respiratory care program is one of two accredited bachelor's programs in West Virginia

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) on the rise, not only in West Virginia but nationwide, the field of respiratory care is needed more than ever.

    Chris Trotter, associate professor of respiratory therapy at Marshall University, said respiratory therapists are and will continue to be in high demand due to the many respiratory hazards in this region.

    "We live in an area dependent on the special metals and coal industries," Trotter said. "As great as this is for our economy, it is equally detrimental to the respiratory health of our residents. We understand the urgency of this problem, which is why Marshall University was one of the first to step up and do something about it."

    According to the United Health Foundation, 25 percent of the population over 18 smoke on a regular basis in West Virginia. Smoking is considered the most prominent risk factor for COPD, which has been the fourth-leading cause of death in the U.S. since 1991, and the third-leading cause of death in West Virginia for eight of the nine years from 2000 through 2008, as noted by the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources.

    With COPD on the rise, licensed respiratory therapists are wanted to evaluate, educate and treat patients with all types of breathing disorders.

    Since 2005, the St. Mary's/Marshall University cooperative school has offered a Bachelor of Science degree in respiratory care. Currently, it is one of two nationally accredited programs in West Virginia, joining Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, W.Va.

    Keith Terry, associate professor of respiratory therapy at Marshall, said unlike the traditional four years required for most undergraduate programs, the respiratory therapy program takes just three years to complete.

    "Our program provides a comprehensive, faced-paced environment which allows for a better understanding of our profession," Terry said. "Our advanced coursework engages our students, fostering the foundation of knowledge necessary to result in better patient outcomes."

    Housed in the St. Mary's Center for Education on 29th Street in Huntington, the respiratory care classrooms have state-of-the-art equipment complete with an on-site library and a new high fidelity simulation lab.

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the Marshall College of Health Professions, said the partnership between the college and St. Mary's provides a unique opportunity for those interested in pursuing careers in the health professions.

    "Our graduates are able to seek employment in multiple health care settings," Prewitt said. "An increasing number of respiratory therapists are now working in skilled nursing centers, physicians' offices, home health agencies, specialty care hospitals and medical equipment supply companies."

    The St. Mary's/Marshall University cooperative respiratory care program accepts 20 new students each year.  For more information on enrollment, contact Christopher.trotter@st-marys.org or call 304-399-4969 or 304-399- 4970.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday August 26, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Biology professor receives federal grant to study rattlesnake habitat at Parris Island

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jayme Waldron often can be found crawling through dense brush in search of the largest venomous snake in North America - the eastern diamondback rattlesnake.

    An assistant professor of biology at Marshall University, she has spent much of her career tracking the snakes to learn more about how and where they live, and how far they roam.

    Waldron's newest research project will take her to the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in Beaufort County, S.C., where she will be leading a study to examine the effects of common military land use practices on the snakes. The research is being funded through an $87,800 grant from the U.S. Department of the Army.

    According to Waldron, the eastern diamondback is found in the southeastern part of the U.S., along the coasts of North Carolina down through Florida and along the Gulf Coast, including on several U.S. Department of Defense installations. Due to declining numbers and widespread loss of habit, the species is currently under review for possible protection under the Endangered Species Act.

    Waldron said that ultimately the military's goal is to make sure their habitat management practices both ensure the success of their training operations and address the conservation of at-risk species.

    She said Parris Island provides an ideal setting for the study, given a history of eastern diamondback rattlesnake research at the facility and recent changes to the habitat.

    "Recently, they've implemented new land management activities at Parris Island, including prescribed forest thinning and fire, to improve their training operation," she said. "These activities have significantly modified the habitat structure, and potentially changed the amount of suitable diamondback habitat."

    She added that Parris Island also is located in a coastal area that has faced rapid development pressure from an expanding human population, including in popular vacation and retirement destinations like Hilton Head Island.

    "Increased human-wildlife conflicts are expected as species redistribute in response to shifting climatic changes and habitat loss," she said. "These effects are particularly important for DOD training installations along the southeastern coast, where projected changes in sea-level will interact with current coastal erosion and severe storms to accelerate the rate and magnitude of coastal habitat loss," she said.

    For the study, she and her team, including Dr. Shane Welch, research assistant professor, and graduate student Brad O'Hanlon, will conduct mark-recapture surveys and use radio telemetry to monitor free-ranging diamondbacks over a period of two years. They also will be monitoring the vegetation associated with the new land use treatments.

    Waldron said the results will be applicable to the region's other military installations that may employ similar land use practices, including Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, N.C., Eglin Air Force Base in northwest Florida and Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center near Hattiesburg, Miss.

    She said, "At the end of the study, we will be providing the Department of Defense with an objective, preliminary assessment of the snakes' response to the new land management practices in the training areas, as well as regionally applicable home range maps and habit use models for use by natural resource managers.

    "These natural resources managers play a critical role in maintaining long-term access to training facilities, particularly when imperiled species like the diamondback occur within training areas. Studies like ours can provide them with a degree of confidence needed to employ adaptive policies for species conservation. It's fulfilling to think that our results will be used to decrease the likelihood that diamondback imperilment will conflict with military training activities."

    ----------------

    Photos: (Above) Dr. Jayme Waldron takes notes while out in the field in pursuit of rattlesnakes. (Below) Dr. Jayme Waldron gets a close-up look at a rattlesnake as it crosses a road. She has spent much of her career tracking the eastern diamondback rattlesnakes to learn more about how and where they live, and how far they roam.


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    Monday August 26, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall University faculty member named West Virginia Public Relations Educator of the Year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) West Virginia chapter named a Marshall University (MU) faculty member and Tri-State area native the West Virginia Public Relations Educator of the Year.

    Terry L. Hapney, Jr., Ph.D., associate professor of public relations in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications (SOJMC) at MU, received the honor and award at PRSA-W.Va.'s recent Crystal Awards Gala, held in Charleston, W.Va.

    Hapney, an alumnus of MU's SOJMC, said the award was appreciated.
    "I thank PRSA and those who nominated me for this honor," Hapney said. " I am very humbled by this. The greatest thing I get out of it is the knowledge that my work to prepare future generations of public relations practitioners is where it needs to be in terms of quality."

    PRSA-W.Va. is the premier professional organization for public relations practitioners and scholars in the state of West Virginia. It provides peer-based support, encourages professional growth through participation in the chapter's meetings and sponsored programs, and promotes the highest standards of professional work ethic in the field of public relations, according to the organization's website.

    Hapney, who graduated from the University of Dayton (UD) in December with his Ph.D., was also recently published in a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal - Education Law Journal. His research focused on student newspapers in the United States and the adversarial relationship between student journalists at public universities and university administrators. He presented his research on a panel at the regional Society of Professional Journalists conference held at UD this past spring.

    In addition to his Ph.D., Hapney holds a master's degree in journalism from MU and a bachelor's degree in communication from the University of Kentucky. He will complete a second master's degree from Kent State University in December.
    Chelsie Patrick, 2013 graduate of the MU public relations academic program and one of Hapney's former students, said she supported Hapney's nomination for the award because she found that he is one of few professors who is truly passionate about his work and demonstrates enthusiasm when teaching students - regardless if he is teaching a class of freshmen or seniors.

    "Dr. Hapney goes above and beyond the call of duty to ensure the success of each student with whom he interacts," she said. "He has set up an effective array of challenges for students so they will be successful public relations practitioners once they graduate from Marshall University."

    Katie Wise, an alumna of the MU public relations program, said Hapney is not only knowledgeable and well versed in the field of public relations, but he is also kind, patient, and dedicated.

    "Under Dr. Hapney's relentless guidance, I have developed a true sense of what the public relations field entails and have personally sharpened my skills under all journalistic facets," she said. "He is extremely influential and dedicated to his professional duties and will continue to inspire and cultivate students to their highest potential."

    Janet Dooley, director of the SOJMC at MU, said it is gratifying to gain this kind of recognition from professionals in the public relations field, as it is a good indicator of the quality of the academic program.

    She said Hapney has generated renewed enthusiasm in the public relations major since joining the MU faculty in 2008, has produced award-winning student work at the state and regional levels, has heightened the visibility of the program within the community, and has responded to industry changes by establishing new courses and creating online sections.

    "We are very humbled and appreciative of Dr. Hapney's award as the state's public relations educator of the year," she said.

    For more information regarding the public relations and other academic programs in the SOJMC at MU, visit www.marshall.edu/sojmc.


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    Monday August 26, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    MU Choral Union accepting new members

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Choral Union is looking for interested singers for the 2013-2014 season.

    This fall, the choir will be performing Anton Bruckner's Mass No. 2 in E Minor for eight-part choir, which will feature an instrumental ensemble of oboes, clarinets, bassoons, trumpets, horns and trombones.

    The group will be under the direction of Robert Wray, associate professor of music at Marshall.

    "The Mass in E Minor is a work of inspiration and incredible artistry," Wray said. "Composer Anton Bruckner combined wonderfully his unique approach to harmony and counterpoint with many of the traditions and sounds of the older sacred music he cherished."

    Rehearsals will begin on Monday evening, Sept. 9, and take place each Monday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. in Smith Music Hall, Room 150. Music will be available for purchase at rehearsal. Music reading skills are a plus, but not necessary, and any singing level is accepted, Wray said.

    For further information, please contact Wray by phone at 304-696-2399 or by e-mail at wrayr@marshall.edu.


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    Friday August 23, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall School of Medicine cardiology fellow wins inaugural national award

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Christopher Adams, M.D., a cardiology fellow with the department of cardiology, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, recently received the James Willerson Clinical Award Competition for Residents and Fellows from the International Academy of Cardiovascular Sciences (IACS). The award was established to promote, encourage and recognize young talents in cardiovascular science, medicine and surgery.

    The award is named in honor of James T. Willerson, M.D., president and medical director of the Texas Heart Institute in Houston and current president of IACS.

    Adams was recognized for his research, "Perivascular Fat Relation to Hypertension: WV-Appalachian Heart Study," which he has been conducting for several years with faculty members Paulette Wehner, M.D., a professor of cardiology and senior associate dean for graduate medical education, and Nalini Santanam, Ph.D., M.P.H., a professor in the department of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology.

    "Dr. Santanam and I are very fortunate to collaborate with Dr. Adams," Wehner said. "The award is particularly important because Dr. Adams started the Appalachian Heart project as a medical student and has continued the work through his sixth year of post-graduate training."

    Wehner continued, "The work was partially funded through a translational research grant awarded by Marshall Health to promote research within our institution. According to a recent Gallup Healthcare poll, the residents of the Huntington-Ashland Metropolitan area are twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack as the national average. We are hopeful that our research may help identify why we are having such a higher incidence of heart attacks in our area."

    Adams presented the findings at the Cardiovascular Forum for Promoting Centers of Excellence and Young Investigators meeting earlier this month in Louisville, Ky. He was one of five international applicants invited to participate.

    Adams is a graduate of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Marshall as well. His future plans include an interventional and structural heart disease fellowship next year at the University of Kentucky.


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    Friday August 23, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Lajterman scramble moved to Twin Silos, tees off Sept. 6

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The seventh annual Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Golf Scramble, held in New Jersey the past six years, will take place this year at Twin Silos Golf Course in Lavalette, W.Va.

    The event tees off at noon Friday, Sept. 6, with dinner and an awards ceremony at 5:30 p.m. Cost to play is $100 per person or $400 per team.

    The tournament is played in honor of Lajterman, a former place kicker/punter on the Marshall University football team who died along with 74 others in the 1970 Marshall plane crash. Lajterman was just 19 years old when he died.

    The Lajterman family decided to move the tournament to the Huntington area this year. Proceeds, which are processed through the Marcelo Lajterman Memorial Scholarship Fund, benefit both athletic and academic endowments to Marshall University. Checks should be made payable to the fund.

    The top four or five teams will be awarded prizes, and there will be a closest to the pin contest.

    For more information, call Ted Wilson at 304-523-9779, or Mike Stapleton at 304-634-5274. Or, visit www.marcelo23.com.


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    Thursday August 22, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall offers master's degree in public administration this fall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's new master's degree in public administration (MPA) is available to students beginning in the fall semester, which starts Monday, Aug. 26.

    Dr. Marybeth Beller, MPA director, said this is an interdisciplinary program offering students concentrations in nonprofit management, urban governance and general administration policy.

    "The College of Business and the departments of political science, geography, leadership studies, sociology and psychology are combining their expertise to offer students in the Tri-State region a flexible program, with courses taught in Huntington, South Charleston and online," Beller said.

    Both daytime and evening courses will be available to students.  Anyone interested in learning more about the program may contact Beller at 304-696-2763 or beller@marshall.edu.


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    Thursday August 22, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Best. Decision. Ever.' commercial spots may be viewed on YouTube

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Proud Marshall University alumni and current MU students talk about why they are so happy to have chosen Marshall to further their education in new commercial spots that will air this fall.

    The 30- and 60-second commercials, featuring the theme "Best. Decision. Ever.," debut during the telecast of Marshall's season-opening football game with Miami (Ohio) Saturday, Aug. 31, at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. They also will be shown on the video board at the game.

    Marshall friends, fans and alumni wanting to get an early look at the spots may do so by visiting www.youtube.com/herdvideo.

    Featured in the commercial are current students Kristeena Ray and brothers Blake and Eric Frohnapfel, along with alums Taylor Childers (2008), Gary Cremeans (1999) and Sean Hornbuckle (2010).

    The spots were created by Marshall University Communications and Bulldog Creative Services, an advertising and design agency in Huntington.


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    Thursday August 22, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Solo exhibit features drawings of Amanda Burnham

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting artist Amanda Burnham will be featured in a solo exhibition beginning next week at the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    The exhibit opens Monday, Aug. 26, and will feature a site-specific installation of drawings, created on site in the days before. A public reception for the artist will take place Monday evening from 5 to 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.

    "I make drawings as a way of exploring cities, an exercise that began when I moved to Baltimore years ago," Burnham said. "More recently, I've been developing a series of installations . . .  this new trajectory allows me to experiment with the forms that interest me on a large scale  . . .  These 'wall drawings' afford me . . .  the chance to more aggressively make use of space, to dramatize the page with atmospheric lighting and to envelop/implicate the viewer."

    Burnham earned her B.F.A. in painting and printmaking from Harvard University, and her M.F.A. in visual and environmental studies from Yale University. She is currently an assistant professor and foundations coordinator at Towson University in Towson, Md. Burnham has exhibited her work in venues nationally and internationally, with recent installations at Volta 7 in Basel, Switzerland, and in solo exhibitions at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, at Benrimon Contemporary in New York City, and at the Dorsch Gallery in Miami, Fla.

    The exhibition at Marshall will be on display until Oct. 11. The Birke Art Gallery is free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 6 to 8 p.m. Mondays.

    -----------------

    Photo: Hood (2011) by Amanda Burnham, a drawing installation of paint, paper and tape at Hamiltonian Gallery in Washington, D.C. An exhibition of Burnham's work will take place at Marshall University beginning Monday, Aug. 26.


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    Thursday August 22, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Herd supporters encouraged to participate in Green Fridays

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans like to show their support and pride for the Thundering Herd in many different ways. One of those ways could result in prizes for some lucky fans if they simply wear green Marshall gear every Friday throughout the football season.

    The university kicks off Green Fridays on Aug. 30 by participating in the ninth annual National College Colors Day. Fans across the nation are encouraged to wear their college colors and support their favorite university.

    College Colors Day, organized by the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), coincides with "back to school" and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics. By participating in College Colors Day, Marshall is continuing a tradition of encouraging fans to wear their Marshall gear on this special day.

    The Green Fridays promotion continues throughout the season. Marshall University employees, students and fans everywhere are encouraged to participate in Green Fridays to show their pride throughout the season.

    In addition, employees of local businesses, schools and organizations may take part in a contest in which they wear their Marshall gear and have a chance to win prizes from the university. Participants must register with Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Marketing and Branding Coordinator, to be eligible to win. Registration is available at www.marshall.edu/greenfridays.

    Participants need to submit their location and the number of participating employees. A winner will be chosen every Friday before a home football game.

    Fans also have the opportunity to win prizes this year with the Fan of the Week contest. Herd fans may submit a photo of themselves in their Marshall gear through the contest page at www.facebook.com/marshallu to be eligible.

    A Fan of the Week will also be chosen every Friday before a home football game throughout football season. Winners will be notified by e-mail and will receive a $50 gift card to the Marshall University bookstore. They also will be entered in the grand prize drawing for a $150 gift card to the bookstore.

    For more information, contact Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 20, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine resident elected to national post

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Kimberly R. Becher, M.D., a family medicine resident in the Department of Family and Community Health at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, was recently elected to serve as the National Congress of Family Medicine Residents representative to the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).
     
    Becher was elected to the national post by her peers at the AAFP'S National Conference of Family Residents and Medical Students last month. She will serve as the sole resident member on the AAFP's board of directors representing more than 3,000 family medicine residents nationwide.

    "Dr. Becher is the quintessential family doctor. She is engaged with her patients, cares about her community and is always looking for ways to improve medicine," said Dr. John Walden, chair of the Department of Family and Community Health. "I cannot speak highly enough of her dedication to improve the health care outcomes of West Virginians and others in the Appalachian region. She is an outstanding ambassador for our school and our state. "

    Becher, who grew up in West Virginia and graduated from the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in 2011, is in her third and final year of residency and serves as one of the department's chief residents. Highly interested in health policy and reform advocacy, Becher also serves as one of Marshall's Paul Ambrose Health Policy Fellows.
     
    Following residency, Becher plans on working in Clay County for Community Care of West Virginia.


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    Tuesday August 20, 2013
    Contact: Kayla Dodd, RecFest coordinator, 304-696-2943

    More than 100 vendors expected at 5th annual RecFest

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - With more than 100 vendors, "a ton of giveaways" and live music, the 5th annual RecFest set for this Saturday, Aug. 24, at the Marshall Recreation Center on the Huntington campus could be the best one yet, according to Rec Center officials.

    RecFest is from noon to 3 p.m., and the first 500 to enter the free event will receive a free Marshall water bottle. Live music will be performed by the band Violet Hill throughout the afternoon.

    Students are invited to learn about Marshall University student organizations and groups, and businesses and churches from around Huntington, during RecFest.

    "It's a great chance for students to become familiar with local Huntington businesses and it's a great opportunity for them to socialize and have fun," said RecFest Coordinator Kayla Dodd. "There are a ton of giveaways this year, too, so participants should walk away with some pretty nice stuff."

    Week of Welcome starts Wednesday, Aug. 21, at Marshall University. Fall classes begin Monday, Aug. 26.

    Some of the organizations represented at RecFest include fraternities, sororities, restaurants, banks, retailers and religious organizations.

    "We are really excited about the wide variety of vendors that are joining us this year. It's going to be the best RecFest we've seen thus far," said Michele Muth, assistant director of the center.

    Some of the first-time vendors include West Virginia Skydivers, La Famiglia, Cold Stone Creamery and Brown Dog Yoga. The presenting sponsors include the Color Run and Chase Bank, as well as Huntington Physical Therapy, HIT Center, Med Express, Verizon and the Campus Activity Board.

    Some items the vendors will be giving away include an Xbox, iPad 2, bicycle, computer, gift cards, shoes, gift baskets, coupons and food. Fitness demos by some of the vendors are planned, so participants are encouraged to wear workout clothes. Also, the climbing wall at the Rec Center will also be available to try out.

    Participants may share their RecFest photos and posts by using the hashtag "#RecFest" on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Vine.


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    Monday August 19, 2013
    Contact: Dan Belcher, Facility Operations Coordinator, 304-696-4651

    Marshall Rec Center partners with Multicultural Affairs to bring 'First Night Block Party' to students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center and Multicultural Affairs will host the "First Night Block Party" from 9 p.m. to midnight Wednesday, Aug. 21, as part of Week of Welcome for incoming students. Live music by Tyler Gage aka DJ TGage will be featured.

    The block party will include games such as World Class Musical Chairs on the Multipurpose Field and a three-point shooting contest inside the Rec Center. The three-point contest will take place at 9:15 p.m., 10:15 p.m., and 11:15 p.m.

    The winners of these games will receive prizes and giveaways such as gift cards from Sun Tan City, Marshall University rain ponchos, a gift basket from the Pottery Place, and Marshall T-shirts and bags courtesy of Graphic Solutions. A free demo of the group fitness Hip Hop Class will take place at 9:30 p.m.

    Area pizza restaurants will participate in a Pizza Challenge from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Those invited include Daniello's, Domino's, Gino's, Pizza Hut, Slyce, Papa John's and DP Dough. These restaurants will bring samples of their pizza for people to try, and participants can vote on their favorites. At 11 p.m. the best pizza on campus will be announced. The event is free to the public.

    For more information, contact Dan Belcher at 304-696-4651 or belcherd@marshall.edu.


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    Monday August 19, 2013
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

    Charleston Camera Club members' exhibit to be on display in library at South Charleston campus

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - An open-themed exhibit featuring the work of 12 members of the Charleston Camera Club will be on display beginning Friday, Aug. 23, in the library on the Marshall University South Charleston campus.
     
    An opening reception is scheduled from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday in the library.
     
    The goal of the exhibit is to showcase the work of local photographers who might not ordinarily get the opportunity to show their work, according to Lisa Hechesky,  a library associate on the South Charleston campus and one of the exhibitors.    The exhibit will run through mid-December, she said.
     
    The Charleston Camera Club is the state's longest running photography club, with a diverse  membership of varying experience and photographic interests.  Among the wide selection of photos featured are  nature and architectural photographs in addition to images from throughout West Virginia.  Camera Club members who will be represented range from a member who joined the club in the 1960s to a 15-year-old Capital High School student.
     
    Photographers exhibiting are Cheryl Barnett, Jeremy Chapman, Bill Evans, Ron Gaskins, Amanda Haddox, Lisa Hechesky, Penny Johnson, Al Peery, Neci Pickens, Ernie Powell, Bill Woodrum and Andrew Yianne. 
     
    The exhibit can be viewed during the library's hours, which are Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, l0 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Free parking is available on site.  Both the reception and the exhibit are free and open to the public.
     

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    Friday August 16, 2013
    Contact: Kristen McElhone, , 212-522-4305

    Marshall University named a contender for 'The South's Best Tailgate' by Southern Living; Readers will determine the winner

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Marshall University is among 15 schools selected as contenders for "The South's Best Tailgate" by Southern Living. The contenders in the second-annual competition are featured in the September issue, hitting newsstands Aug. 23. Fans will ultimately determine the school that hosts "The South's Best Tailgate."

    "In the South, pre-game celebrations matter as much as what happens on the field," said Southern Living Editor-in-Chief Lindsay Bierman. "We're asking readers to decide which school best honors our great tradition of Southern hospitality with the most stylish and spirited spread."

    Readers will vote until Sept. 30 to determine the 2013 winner. Fans are encouraged to rally around their favorite Southern team and vote daily on southernliving.com/tailgate or via smartphone by scanning the corresponding image in the September issue with the Digimarc Discover app.

    One vote per person per day is counted toward the final tally, and votes cast on Saturday count twice. Voters are entered daily for a chance to win $2,500 toward an ultimate tailgate. Southern Living will crown the winner of "The South's Best Tailgate" at a home game this fall. 

    The schools vying for "The South's Best Tailgate" include Marshall University, Appalachian State University, Clemson University, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, Oklahoma State University, Texas A&M University, University of Alabama, University of Georgia, University of Mississippi, University of Tennessee, University of Texas, Vanderbilt University, Virginia Tech and West Virginia University.

    Southern Living chose the universities based on the following criteria:

    -  Most spirited
    -  Traditionalists
    -  Powerhouses
    -  Style Setters


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    Thursday August 15, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Golf scramble honoring Johnathan Goddard set for Aug. 30

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2013 Johnathan Goddard Memorial Golf Scramble, played in honor of the former Marshall University football standout, will take place Friday, Aug. 30, at Twin Silos Golf Course in Lavalette, W.Va.

    Goddard was an all-American defensive end for Marshall in the early 2000's. He died in a motorcycle accident in 2008. Proceeds from the golf tournament go to the Johnathan Goddard Endowment Scholarship which is given to a chosen student-athlete with a learning disability.

    The scramble tees off at 1 p.m. Cost to enter is $75 per person or $300 for a team.

    The tournament features closest-to-the-pin prizes, longest-drive prizes, a raffle, an auction, and a chance to win a car. Dinner is at 6 p.m.

    Anyone with questions, suggestions or donations, or who is interested in sponsorship or wants to claim a team's spot in the scramble, can e-mail tournament officials at herd50scramble@gmail.com or call Tamera at 443-865-7281. Participants must pre-register by e-mail or at http://jgmemorialgolf.whindo.com.

    Pre-payments will also be accepted by mail. The address is Johnathan Goddard Endowment Scholarship (JGES), 617 W. 10th Ave., Huntington, W.Va. 25701.


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    Wednesday August 14, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL faculty manager selected for state's Broadcasting Hall of Fame

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Charles G. "Chuck" Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University and faculty manager of WMUL-FM, has been selected for the West Virginia Broadcasting Hall of Fame.

    The hall of fame recognizes individuals associated with broadcasting throughout the state who have excelled in the field of broadcasting.

    "I am humbled, honored, and at the same time happy, for my induction reflects the importance of college radio stations," Bailey said. "My thanks go to all of our past and present students and engineering support staff at WMUL-FM who have defined greatness over the past 28 years at Marshall University."

    Bailey and eight others who make up the Class of 2013 will be inducted Saturday, Oct. 12, in a ceremony at the Museum of Radio and Technology in Huntington. The addition of these nine brings the total number in the hall of fame to 176. The initial 61 members were inducted on Sept. 16, 2006.

    Bailey has been at the helm of WMUL-FM as faculty manager since 1985. During the past 28 years, WMUL's student broadcasters have received 1,335 awards. Bailey has received the Lifetime Achievement Award (2007) from the West Virginia AP Broadcasters Association and the John Marshall Award for Extraordinary Service to West Virginia Higher Education (2000).


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday August 13, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall student participates in fellowship at Masonic Medical Research Laboratory

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University student Lyndsey Brown, a senior majoring in forensic chemistry, completed her second summer in a fellowship at the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory (MMRL), an internationally recognized cardiac research institute in Utica, N.Y.,  this year.

    "Participating in the summer fellowship program at the MMRL has been an incredible experience that I will never forget," Brown said. "It was amazing to have the opportunity to be involved with some of the groundbreaking research being conducted there. The knowledge I gained will not only be beneficial as I complete my studies at Marshall but as I go on to graduate school and my career."

    Brown said she worked in the Molecular Genetics department both years with Yuesheng Wu as her mentor. Her task was screening patients with Brugada Syndrome (a cardiac arrhythmia) to identify any variations in the genes that she was assigned.

    The process begins with a patient's blood being sent to the lab (after informed consent is obtained by his or her doctor) where the DNA is then extracted. Brown's work involved amplifying the DNA, performing a series of reactions to prepare the sample for sequencing, sequencing the DNA in a machine that uses a laser to activate a fluorescent tag added to the DNA sample and analyzing the sequences to look for variations.

    "When we discover a variation, we look it up on different databases, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, to determine the frequency of the variation," Brown said "I found three mutations this summer in the gene I worked with. Performing expression studies and functional studies with these mutations may provide insight into the gene's potential link(s) to cardiac tissue as well as Brugada Syndrome

    --------------

    Photos: (Above) Marshall University student Lyndsey Brown participated in a summer fellowship at the Masonic Medical Research Laboratory in Utica, N.Y. (Below) Brown (right), receives a certificate from Dr. Charles Antzelevitch, director of the lab. Photos courtesy of Marshall University.


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    Tuesday August 13, 2013
    Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Coordinator of Marketing and Branding, (304) 696-7153

    Thundering Herd fans encouraged to support Marshall in spirit competition

    160 colleges, universities vying to be crowned winners of College Colors Day Spirit Cup

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is asking for the support of its fans as it seeks to win the national Spirit Cup award and $10,000 toward its general scholarship fund in the second annual College Colors Day spirit competition.

    By visiting www.facebook.com/collegecolorsday, Thundering Herd fans can register to vote for Marshall as the school with the most college spirit and loyal fan base. After placing a vote, fans will have the opportunity to win prizes and discounts through an instant-win game, view and submit photos to the College Colors Day fan photo gallery, and download a custom Facebook cover photo promoting Marshall for College Colors Day.

    The Facebook-based rivalry competition, which includes more than 160 participating colleges and universities and is an element of this year's 2013 College Colors Day celebration, kicked off yesterday and runs through 11:59 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29.  Fans can vote once each day and can check who is winning the competition nationally and within each conference. The winner will be announced on College Colors Day Friday, Aug. 30.

    College Colors Day is an annual celebration dedicated to promoting the traditions and spirit that embody the college experience by encouraging fans across America to wear their favorite college or university apparel throughout the day on Aug. 30.

    The national spirit competition is presented by The Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), a division of IMG College, and NCAA Football.

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    About The Collegiate Licensing Company

    CLC is a division of global sports and entertainment company IMG. Founded in 1981, CLC is the oldest and largest collegiate trademark licensing agency in the U.S. and currently represents nearly 200 colleges, universities, bowl games, athletic conferences, The Heisman Trophy and the NCAA. The mission of CLC is to be the guiding force in collegiate trademark licensing and one of the top sports licensing firms in the country. CLC is dedicated to being a center of excellence in providing licensing services of the highest quality to its member institutions, licensees, retailers and consumers. Headquartered in Atlanta (Ga.), CLC is a full-service licensing representative, which employs a staff of more than 80 licensing professionals who provide full-service capabilities in brand protection, brand management, and brand development. For more information on CLC, visit: www.clc.com or www.imgworld.com.


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    Tuesday August 13, 2013
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Tickets still available for Paint the Capital City Green

    CHARLESTON, W.Va.- Ticket sales close Friday evening for Marshall University's 16th annual Paint the Capital City Green pep rally Thursday, Aug. 22, at Embassy Suites in Charleston.

    Ticket holders will be entered into a drawing to win free game tickets and hotel accommodations for the Thundering Herd's game with Florida Atlantic University Saturday, Oct. 12, in Boca Raton, Fla. To order tickets or sponsor a table, contact the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138 or paintthecapital@marshall.edu. Individual tickets are $50 and won't be sold at the door.

    Festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7:30 p.m.

    Thundering Herd fans will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp as well as all senior players on this year's team as they speak about the future of Marshall University football.

    Fans also will enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder.

    The event, presented by Friends of Coal and supported in part by Huntington Bank, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association and event proceeds benefit those two organizations.


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    Monday August 12, 2013
    Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

    Herd fans make it clear they want 'Old Marco'; Winner resembles previous Marco, collects 76 percent of the vote

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thundering Herd fans have made clear their choice on a new mascot costume: They want the new Marco to look a lot like, well, an old one.

    Over the past two weeks, fans and friends of the university have been voting on Facebook social media to determine whether Marco will keep his current design or be given a new or updated look. His current costume, after five years of extensive wear, travel, cleaning and repair, is worn out and needs to be replaced.

    Marshall decided to let the fans determine which of three options they preferred. They overwhelmingly selected option No. 3, or the more complete makeover with a friendlier face and fur-covered legs. It is also referred to as the classic Marco because of its similarity to the previous Marco from the late-1980s and 1990s.

    "It's obvious from the number of votes and the interest in this contest that Marco means a lot to our fans," said Matt Turner, chief of staff. "We want to thank the more than 3,000 people who voted online, as well as those who called us and emailed and shared the contest through social media. They're saying loud and clear that 'we want our old Marco back.' "

    The winning Marco costume received 76 percent of the votes with 2,424 of the 3,187 votes cast. A partial makeover of the current Marco was second with 448 votes (14 percent) and the current Marco was third with 315 votes (10 percent).
     
    The new Marco is expected to make his first public appearance Saturday, Oct. 5, during Marshall's homecoming football game with UTSA. Game time at Joan C. Edwards Stadium is 2 p.m.
     


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    Friday August 9, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Scholarship established in honor of former Air Force test pilot

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sara E. Brumbaugh of Kenova, W.Va., a Marshall University Yeager Scholar, is the first recipient of the Col. Aaron C-Dot George Scholarship, established by the Marshall University Foundation in memory of the former United States Air Force test pilot.

    Brumbaugh is a graduate of Spring Valley High School and is pursuing her education in biomedical science and mathematics.

    George was an adventurous person who knew and respected (Ret.) Brig. Gen. Chuck Yeager, the first pilot to break the sound barrier and a Lincoln County, W.Va., native. As a fighter test pilot, George helped push the boundaries of manned flight to improve the performance and safety of U.S. fighter pilots.

    "The Honors College is very grateful for the financial support that this scholarship will provide a Yeager Scholar," said Dr. Ronald J. Bieniek, dean of the Honors College. "It is a wonderful way of honoring the legacy of Colonel George and contributions to aviation development at the edge of possibility."

    The scholarship will cover the benefits available to Yeager Scholars, which include tuition, fees, room and board, books, foreign travel and supplies.

    A George Scholarship recipient will be a full-time, undergraduate student who has been named a Yeager Scholar. The Yeager Scholars are selected through a rigorous screening process. The dean of the Honors College and the Society of Yeager Scholars board of directors will be charged with selecting the students and renewing the award, in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.


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    Friday August 9, 2013
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    Week of Welcome to be fun, informative, relaxing for Marshall freshmen

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is working hard to make sure its new freshmen are comfortable in their new surroundings when fall classes begin Monday, Aug. 26.

    The best way to make them comfortable, officials believe, is to treat them to some fun, informative, relaxing activities during the annual Week of Welcome (WOW).

    "It's all about making the transition to university life smoother for first-year students," said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, MU's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. "Week of Welcome is just that - a welcome to all freshmen. It is important that they feel comfortable with the university before classes begin. And it is equally important for first-year students to be introduced to the expectations faculty will have of them when they begin classes on Monday, August 26th."

    From Wednesday, Aug. 21, through Saturday, Aug. 24, about 1,700 freshmen will take part in numerous fun activities, such as watching an outdoor movie on campus, scaling the climbing wall in the Marshall Recreation Center, posing for a group picture, enjoying an ice cream social, tossing Frisbees, attending a comic show or building a Marco-themed bear.

    The freshmen will actually begin their first class at Marshall during Week of Welcome. UNI 100, Freshman First Class is an introduction to academic structures and expectations of college life. Those who successfully complete the course earn one hour of elective credit.

    The course is made up of two parts: (1) attending large group sessions and small class sessions during Week of Welcome, and (2) attending eight additional 50-minute class sessions, once per week in the first eight weeks of the semester.

    "Week of Welcome and UNI 100 provide an opportunity for students to arrive early to campus, meet new classmates, and make new friends," said Sherri Stepp, director of University College. "They will meet President (Stephen) Kopp at Convocation, meet their academic dean at their college session, and begin learning the things they need to know to help them be successful students both academically and socially."

    Back-to-back events in the afternoon and early evening Wednesday highlight the first day of Week of Welcome. The President's Convocation, in recent years conducted in the morning, has been moved to a 5 p.m. start in the Henderson Center arena. This year, for the first time, MU officials decided to invite parents to the convocation as well.

    The convocation will be followed immediately by the family picnic, which is open to all freshmen and their families and will take place on the student center plaza from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

    Commuter students and students living on campus will need to check in for WOW on Wednesday, Aug. 21, in the recreation center. For any commuter students who cannot check in on Wednesday, there will be a short registration time on Thursday morning before the Freshman First Class session in the Henderson Center arena.

    The complete WOW schedule is available at www.marshall.edu/wow. A new Student Success app will be introduced to students as well.   The app is designed to work on iOS  and Android-based devices.  It provides students with online access to the WOW schedule, individual student class schedules, and an interactive GPS-based map of the Huntington campus.  More information about the app can be found at www.marshall.edu/success.

    Here is a brief look at some of the fun and informational events scheduled during Marshall's Week of Welcome:

     

    Wednesday, Aug. 21

    4 p.m. - Students are invited to visit the practice field and watch the Marching Thunder perform while learning the Marshall songs and cheers they will hear at athletic events.

    5 to 5:45 p.m. - President's Convocation, Cam Henderson Center

    6 to 7:30 p.m. - Family picnic, Memorial Student Center plaza

    8:30 p.m. - Screen on the Green. A movie will be shown outside on the big screen on the first-year North and South residence halls lawn.

    9 p.m. to midnight - "First Nite" block party, Marshall Recreation Center

    Thursday, Aug. 22

    8:30 to 9:15 a.m. -Freshman First Class, Cam Henderson Center arena

    9:15 to 9:45 a.m. - Class photo, Henderson Center arena

    3 to 4 p.m. - Ice cream social and Build-A-Bear, Memorial Student Center

    4 to 6 p.m. - Throwback Thursday games with Disciples on Campus, North South Field

    3 to 5 p.m. - Freshman Footprints, get to know who makes up MU, Memorial Student Center lobby

    5 to 7 p.m. - Revolution cookout, Christian Center lawn

    5 to 9 p.m. - Carnival extravaganza, features live entertainment, games and food, Memorial Student Center, Recreation Center and amphitheater

    9 p.m. - Cosmic Frisbee, Buskirk Field

    9 p.m. - Hypnotist, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

    Friday, Aug. 23

    3 to 8 p.m. - Students are invited to play video games in the Video Game Lounge, Prichard Hall 200

    5 p.m. - The Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex opens with a 5 p.m. Marshall alumni game for the men, followed by a 7:30 p.m. game featuring the Marshall women against Campbell University. Tickets for full-time students are free with a valid MU ID.

    8 p.m. - Comedy Caravan Comedy Show, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

    Saturday, Aug. 24

    Noon to 3 p.m. - RecFest, Marshall Recreation Center

    3 to 6 p.m. - Marshall football season kickoff party; students are invited to attend a scrimmage at Joan C. Edwards Stadium

    7 to 9 p.m. - Coffeehouse/open mic, Harless Media Room, live entertainment and coffee 

    RecFest allows Marshall University and the community to greet the students back to the Huntington campus for another year. The event presents a great opportunity for businesses and Marshall University departments and organizations to introduce and familiarize their names and services to the students, faculty and staff.

    The success of previous years was a result of more than 100 exhibitors and more than 2,000 participants who took part in the numerous activities and demonstrations throughout the Marshall Recreation Center. Those attending can eat free food and sign up to win prizes.

    On Sunday, Aug. 25, students can prepare for classes by participating in a walk-through of their classes with a representative from Housing and Residence Life. They need to bring their schedules to the Memorial Student Center plaza between 2 and 4 p.m.

    For more information about WOW, contact the Student Resource Center on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center by calling 304-696-5810.

     


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    Friday August 9, 2013
    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Marshall University Forensic Science spring graduate wins scholarship from the Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Sciences

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - David Eckre, a spring graduate of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program, received a $1,000 scholarship award from the Mid-Atlantic Association of Forensic Sciences at its annual meeting in May.

    At the meeting, Eckre presented the results of his research on synthetic cannabinoids during an internship with the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL) in Atlanta, Ga., last summer.  His presentation was titled "Thermal Degradation of Cyclopropyl Synthetic Cannabinoids."  Co-authors on the research paper were Dr. J. Graham Rankin, a forensic chemistry professor in the Forensic Science Graduate Program, and Dr. John Krsenansky, former professor and director of Medicinal Chemistry with Marshall's School of Pharmacy.

    The USACIL Drug Chemistry Laboratory processes suspected drug samples confiscated from military personnel including cannabinomimics, the new legal term for synthetic cannabinoids. 

    Cannabinomimics are synthetic compounds which have many of the effects of the active ingredients in marijuana when smoked.  These compounds are added to inert plant material and sold through head shops and convenience stores as "herbal incense" under brand names such as "Spice" and "K2."

    Eckre's internship involved work on an unidentified component of drug samples which included bongs (smoking devices) and other smoking materials which seemed to contain two components. One of the components already had been identified by USACIL.  Eckre's research identified the unknown component and proved it was a product of decomposition that occurs when the identified compound is heated. 

    In addition to the scholarship,  MAAFS awarded Eckre free registration and hotel accommodations at the meeting in Roanoke, Va. 

    Eckre graduated May 11 with a Master of Science degree in Forensic Science.

    MAAFS awarded scholarships to three recipients. They were from Marshall, Virginia Commonwealth University and George Washington University. 

    Rankin and Dr. Lauren Waugh, an assistant professor of Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program, presented research related to emerging drug issues at the conference.  Rankin presented a workshop titled "Legal Issues and Analytical Challenges with Emerging Drug 'Analogs.' "   Waugh's presentation was titled "A Wide Range of Circumstances Observed in MDPV-Related Deaths."  MDPV is a common controlled substance found in so-called "bath salts" products which have been very prominent in the news media lately.

    Rankin served as Chair of the Criminalistics Section of MAAFS and moderated the Criminalistics Sessions.

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    Photo: David Eckre, a spring graduate of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program, receives a $1,000 scholarship award and plaque from Dr. Tracie Cruz, president of MAAFS, at its annual meeting held this year in Roanoke, Va.


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    Wednesday August 7, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University to participate in initiative marking history of civil rights in U.S.

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been selected to participate in Created Equal: America's Civil Rights Struggle, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities, said Dr. Majed Khader, director of the Morrow Library at the university.

    The initiative includes a series of four documentary films, including new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in the U.S., as well as programmatic and support materials developed by NEH in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

    The films include The Abolitionists, Slavery by Another Name, Freedom Riders and The Loving Story and include dramatic scenes of events in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 

    Marshall is one of 473 institutions across the country that has been awarded a set of the films. Khader said a schedule of showings will be announced in the near future.

    "These films chronicle the long and sometimes violent effort to achieve the rights enumerated in the Declaration of Independence life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all Americans," Khader said.  "We are pleased to receive a grant from NEH to provide programming around these films. This is especially meaningful to the community of Huntington as the hometown of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who devoted his career to African American history."

    Each of the films was produced with NEH support, and each tells stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.

    The Created Equal film set is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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    About the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
    Founded in 1994, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit organization that promotes excellence in the teaching and learning of American history. Programs include publications, teacher seminars, a national Affiliate School Program, traveling exhibitions, and online materials for teachers, students, and the general public. www.gilderlehrman.org.

    About the National Endowment for the Humanities
    Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities. NEH grants enrich classroom learning, create and preserve knowledge, and bring ideas to life through public television, radio, museum exhibitions, and programs in libraries and other community places. www.neh.gov.

     


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    Wednesday August 7, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall names Tracy Smith Director of Environmental Health and Safety

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tracy Smith, a health and safety specialist at Marshall University for the past six years, has been named Director of Environmental Health and Safety at MU, Dr. Karen Kirtley, senior vice president for administration, announced today.

    Smith assumed his position this summer.

    "Tracy has done an excellent job as a health and safety specialist," Kirtley said. "He has extensive training in that field. We are very pleased that a person with Tracy's talents was already on board at Marshall, which made the decision to move him into the director's position an easy one."

    Smith has worked on Marshall's Huntington campus since 2007. He spent the previous 13 years at the medical school as a safety officer.

    "It's a great opportunity, I'm very excited to be in this position," Smith said. "We have made a lot of progress over the past few years in environmental health and safety here on campus. I'm looking forward to continuing that success."

    Smith has a B.A. in management and accounting and an M.S. in safety and health from Marshall. He began his career as extra help at the medical school and later interned there as part of his master's degree requirements.

    Smith, who lives in Barboursville, and his family are fans of Marshall football and basketball. His mother, Judy Olson, is a longtime employee in the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall, and his stepfather, Dr. Lee Olson, has taught in Adult and Technical Education at MU since 1971.


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    Tuesday August 6, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-2038

    Grant to MIIR will support commercialization of technology to repair skin injuries

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Chemical Alliance Zone's Chemicals and Materials (CAM) Commercialization Fund has awarded $20,000 to a Marshall University scientist to help bring to market a technology he has developed for repairing skin injuries.

    The award to Dr. Jingwei Xie of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) will help Xie's research team produce device prototypes and samples, market to potential customers and conduct patent analysis.
     
    Dr. Kevin DiGregorio, executive director of the Chemical Alliance Zone, said, "We are pleased to present these funds to Dr. Xie and hope this award will play at least a small part in the commercialization success of this exciting technology. In addition to the purposes for which the funds will be directly used, this grant can act as seed money to attract attention and potential investors to his work."
     
    Research in Xie's lab involves using one of science's fastest growing fields to develop products that can be used to improve treatment of burns and other skin wounds. He and his colleagues at MIIR, including postdoctoral fellows Dr. Bing Ma and Dr. Jiang Jiang, are using nanotechnology to create scaffolds made of tiny fibers, invisible to the human eye, to be used as skin grafts.
     
    According to Xie, their devices also can be used to deliver medications topically for chemotherapy, anti-infection or pain relief purposes.
     
    He added, "The treatment of large-area, full-thickness burns still constitutes a major surgical repair challenge. The current clinical 'gold standard' for burn wound treatment and repair is to use patients' own skin as skin grafts to close the wounded area. This method can have a number of drawbacks, including the limited supply of available donor sites on a badly burned patient, heavy scarring and poor functional recovery.
     
    "Our product shows great promise for addressing all these shortcomings and improving the healing of these types of wounds."
     
    DiGregorio said the CAM Commercialization Fund assists researchers, entrepreneurs, startup companies and small-to-medium firms with the commercialization of technology and products related to the chemicals and materials sectors in West Virginia. Funds are provided through a grant to TechConnect West Virginia from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. The Chemical Alliance Zone administers the program with the assistance of an advisory group made up of representatives from the INNOVA Commercialization Group, Mountaineer Capital, the West Virginia Angel Network and the West Virginia Jobs Investment Trust.
     
    Xie said the grant is special because it is intended specifically for commercialization activities.
     
    "This is exciting for us because we can use these funds to get our product closer to the market and potential customers," he added. "There are many grant programs out there to support research itself, but there is not as much funding available for these purposes. Having an actual product to show people will be invaluable as we continue toward our goal of starting up a company and commercializing our products."
     
    Anne Barth, executive director of TechConnect West Virginia, said, "Through a generous grant from the Benedum Foundation, we were able to provide funding to create the CAM Commercialization Fund to assist West Virginia entrepreneurs. The research under way by Dr. Xie, with its potential as a new product headed for market, is exactly the kind of activity the fund is intended to support."
     
    Xie joined MIIR in January 2011. With more than 10 years research experience in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nanotechnology and micro-/nanofabrication, he has developed a number of projects related to biomedical applications, including neural tissue engineering, tendon-to-bone insertion site repair and drug delivery. He and the other scientists at MIIR are developing a focused program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries. In keeping with the institute's goal to be self-sustaining, Xie is funded entirely through external sources. He is the co-inventor on five patents and has co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed journal articles.
     
    In addition to the project on skin wounds, Xie's team is working to improve surgical repair of rotator cuff injuries by constructing a biomedical device that will better mimic an uninjured tendon-to-bone attachment and ultimately result in improved healing.
     
    For more information about Xie's research or MIIR, which was created in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.
     
    For more information about the CAM Commercialization Fund, contact DiGregorio at (304) 437-4295.


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    Monday August 5, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Seven appointed to Marshall University Board of Governors; three members reappointed, four are newcomers to board

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin has appointed seven people, including three who are being reappointed, to serve on Marshall University's Board of Governors, he announced Friday.

    The newest appointees are James Bailes of Huntington, Tim Dagostine of Charleston, Christie Kinsey of Lavalette and Phil Cline of Huntington. Bailes, Dagostine and Kinsey were appointed to three-year terms and Cline was appointed for four years.
     
    Current board chair Joseph Touma of Huntington, along with Dale Lowther of Parkersburg and Edward Howard III of Scottsdale, Ariz., were reappointed by Tomblin. Touma's term is for three years, while the terms of Lowther and Howard are for four years.

    "I'm pleased these men and women have accepted this opportunity to serve on the board of governors," Tomblin said. "Together, their knowledge, skills and expertise will help guide (Marshall University) and help ensure a brighter future for our young people."
     
    All of the appointees will be sworn in at the board's next meeting, scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 27, in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on the Huntington campus.

    Leaving the board are Verna Gibson, John Hess, Letitia Neese Chafin and Michael Farrell.

    "I extend our sincere appreciation to Verna, John, Tish and Mike for their outstanding service to the board," Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said. "They have devoted considerable time and energy to serving on the board during this historic time at Marshall University, and they have been instrumental in the progress made here throughout recent years. At the same time, I am looking forward to working with the four new members. I believe Governor Tomblin has made four first-rate appointments."

    Bailes is an attorney with Bailes, Craig and Yon, PLLC, in Huntington. He succeeds Chafin, who could not be reappointed. "I am pleased at the appointment," Bailes said. "It's a significant responsibility. I don't have an agenda, but I am very excited about the progress Marshall has made and I want to do my part to see it continue."

    Dagostine is a division manager with Champion Industries in Huntington. He succeeds Gibson, who could not be reappointed. "I'm honored to have been appointed to the board," Dagostine said. "I just want to try to make the right decisions and help move Marshall University forward. Hopefully we can continue the progress we've made the past few years."

    Kinsey is a financial adviser with Northwestern Mutual in Huntington. She succeeds Hess, who could not be reappointed. "I'm thrilled," Kinsey said of being chosen to serve on the board. "When asked if I would accept if asked, I jumped at the chance. It's a privilege. Marshall is very important to the community."

    Cline is a retired businessman and a consultant living in Huntington. He succeeds Farrell, who could not be reappointed. "I'm thankful to the governor for his having asked me to join. And I look forward to serving," Cline said.


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    Friday August 2, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, 304-696-7153

    MEDIA ADVISORY: Dean's list available on Marshall website

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Spring 2013 semester are available on the Marshall website for use by the media.

    To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. Marshall has 2,490 students included on the website. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list.

    Many students and their parents have requested that Marshall make the dean's list available to publications that cover their hometowns.

    Each student's name, hometown, county (for West Virginia) and state are included on the dean's list, which is accessible online at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/deans-list-for-spring-2013/.


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    Wednesday July 31, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    'Legendary' music educator recognized by scholarship at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has announced a significant endowment to provide scholarships for music education students at Marshall University.

    The Janice Chandler Gold Scholarship was established through a gift from Dr. Stephen M. Wilks ('68) and Robin Chandler Wilks ('71), with additional contributions from friends and former students of Janice Chandler Gold. Gold is being recognized for her years of service to the musical life of the Huntington community, including her years of teaching music to students in Cabell County; training of teachers as mentors and student teaching supervisors; and as the director/conductor of numerous vocal ensembles and choral groups in the Huntington area. The annual award will be given to a full-time student majoring in music education who is in good academic standing.

    "Our daughter Kelly ('01) had a five-year, three-quarter tuition scholarship for her cello performance degree from Marshall and it was most appreciated," said Robin Wilks, who received a music education degree from Marshall. "We have always been grateful for and proud of the top-flight music education available at Marshall."

    "I had a small scholarship my last year at Marshall, thanks to Dr. Tom Scott, and also for medical school at Emory," Stephen Wilks said. "Both of our families are full of educators parents, brothers and sisters. A good educational foundation is a 'springboard' for opportunity. It is a privilege to be part of this process."

    Nearly 200 singers from several states, all of whom were in Gold's a cappella choirs at Huntington East High School between the fall of 1958 and the spring of 1983, will present a free concert titled "Here We Come!" under Gold's direction at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at Huntington High School's main auditorium. As part of the event, Gold will be presented with a certificate to commemorate the scholarship.

    Debby Stoler, a former student of Gold's and assistant director of development and outreach in career services at Marshall, is organizing the event.

    "Janice Chandler Gold is an amazing lady and a bundle of energetic talent," Stoler said. "She has brought music to our community and enriched our lives in numerous ways over the last 50-plus years. I feel so privileged to work with her and our hardworking committee to make this reunion happen. A scholarship assures that her legacy of devoted teaching of music continues long into the future."

    Melanie Griffis, senior director of development at Marshall, and also a former student of Gold's, said that the scholarship is important for many reasons.

    "For a student studying music education, this scholarship is important on several levels," Griffis said. "It recognizes that student's achievements as a musician and future teacher. I can't think of a better example for an aspiring music teacher than Janice Chandler Gold. She is legendary in the Cabell County and surrounding school systems for the quality of her musicianship and teaching, but also for the teachers in our region whom she has trained. On a personal level, I was one of her students at Huntington East High School. I've experienced her in action and to have this scholarship to give to future teachers who will know her by example and can aspire to exemplify her career is a really exciting prospect for the future of music education at Marshall."

    Griffis noted that the Wilks understand the need for financial support during college.

    "This particular scholarship is designed to relieve much of the financial burden for the recipient, but still requires a personal financial responsibility," she said. "Motivated by the Marshall experience of their own daughter, Kelly Wilks Maxwell, the Wilks believe it is important that the students take some ownership in the cost of their education."

    "Kelly was given a scholarship at Marshall that paid for about 75 percent of her education," Stephen Wilks said. "She worked to provide the remainder. We believe that the combination of help from her scholarship and her personal investment made her education that much more important to her."

    -------------

    Photo: Janice Chandler Gold, shown at left with her daughter, Robin Chandler Wilks, has been recognized for her work in the Huntington musical community with a scholarship for music education at Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday July 30, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Speech and Hearing Center holds 'Tiny Talkers' program for children with speech disorders

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four-year-old Cooper Frasher was diagnosed with apraxia of speech when he came to the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center two years ago. Cooper's mother, Terri Frasher, said this speech disorder caused her son to have language delays, which kept him from learning to speak, spell and even read.

    "As a mother, I am his biggest advocate," Frasher said. "I knew I needed to help him and when a speech therapist at Cooper's school suggested the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center, I didn't hesitate to come."

    In order to help children like Cooper, the program "Tiny Talkers Book Club" was created to facilitate speech therapy through the use of books. Jen Baker, speech language pathologist in the center, said one of the main points of the program is to focus on emergent literacy.

    "Kids with speech and language delays are at risk for having challenges with literacy," Baker said. "We saw a great need for a program like this, which would help strengthen a child's language skills in a group setting to decrease the chances of literacy problems in the future."

    Since coming to the Speech and Hearing Center, Frasher said she has seen dramatic improvements in her son's language development.

    "This time last year Cooper spoke approximately five words," Frasher said. "By the end of the summer, he was up to 80 words and using complete sentences."

    Baker said the program holds parent seminars once a month to provide strategies for families to continue teaching their children at home.

    "We want to build a solid foundation for our clients," Baker said. "While working with these children, we are also able to provide great training opportunities for our graduate students in Marshall's College of Health Professions."

    This summer's final session of the "Tiny Talkers Book Club" will take place from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, in the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center, located on the Huntington campus in Smith Hall. For more information about the program and future sessions, contact Baker at jen.baker@marshall.edu.


    Photos: (Above) Cooper, age 4, and Ellora, age 6, have participated in the Tiny Talkers Book Club all summer. These sessions have provided interactive learning exercises for children ages 3-6 who suffer from various speech disorders. (Below) Graduate students Catherine Counts (left) and Sarah Trill (right), work with children during the "Tiny Talkers Book Club" program.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 29, 2013
    Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University School of Pharmacy announces creation of new academic scholarship; Charleston pharmacist lends support

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, announced today creation of a new endowed scholarship fund, the Paula Campbell Butterfield Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy.

    The scholarship is named in honor of Paula Campbell Butterfield, a pharmacist and longtime owner of Trivillian's Pharmacy, an iconic independently owned pharmacy in Charleston.   Butterfield, who completed her pharmacy degree at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, has owned and operated Trivillian's for more than 30 years.

    In announcing the scholarship, Yingling praised Butterfield for her years of mentoring young women and men in the field of pharmacy.

    "Ms. Butterfield's generosity is obvious, not only in her willingness to create a scholarship for our students, but in her every-day commitment to mentoring young pharmacists in the field," Yingling said. "Additionally, she is the epitome of what a community pharmacist should be - a valued member of the health care team dedicated to educating her patients about their medications and how to use them safely."

    The Paula Campbell Butterfield Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy will be awarded to a recipient who is a full-time student at the school and a resident of West Virginia.   First preference will be for a female student who lives in Kanawha County or an adjacent county (Jackson, Roane, Clay, Nicholas, Fayette, Raleigh, Boone, Lincoln or Putnam).  The recipient must  have and maintain a 3.0 GPA.

    The award is renewable.

    For specific information on the scholarship, contact the Marshall University Office of Financial Aid at 304-696-3162.

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    Photo: Dr. Kevin Yingling, left, today announced creation of a new endowed scholarship fund that honors Paula Campbell Butterfield, right, a pharmacist and longtime owner of Trivillian's Pharmacy in Charleston.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 26, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall University coordinating regional forum on geohazards' impact on transportation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Engineers, geologists and transportation planners from across the region will meet at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., Tuesday, July 30, through Thursday, Aug. 1, for the nationally recognized Appalachian States Coalition for Geohazards in Transportation's 13th annual technical forum, "Geohazards Impacting Transportation in the Appalachian Region."

    Coordinated by Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), this year's forum is hosted by the Virginia Department of Transportation.  It is a joint endeavor with the Interstate Group on Abandoned Underground Mines (ITGAUM) that deals with abandoned mines' impact on transportation infrastructure.

    Members of the Appalachian coalition meet annually to share information about research developments and projects related to rock falls and landslides along highways, seismic activity, and hazard-prone areas impacting transportation infrastructure in the region.  Risk assessment and emergency response also will be covered.

    Coalition members represent the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Corporation, the Federal Highway Administration and the departments of transportation and state geological surveys in  Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.  ITGAUM is comprised of members from 19 states, one turnpike authority, the Canadian federal government and one Canadian province.

    Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director and chairman of the coalition, said, "It is an exciting prospect to work with federal, state and private entities to share best practices on the prevention and remediation of geological problems that affect transportation throughout the Appalachian region and nationally."

    Presenters from Marshall include Dr. William Niemann from the College of Science, Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering,  and Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, also with the College of Information Technology and Engineering.

    This year's event includes a pre-conference field trip and workshop which will be of interest to geologists, geotechnical engineers, environmental scientists, planners and others interested in geohazards.

    For more information, contact Szwilski at szwilski@marshall.edu or 304-696-5457.  Also see www.marshall.edu/cegas/.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 25, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    MIIR scientist awarded $293,000 NIH grant

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jingwei Xie, a senior scientist at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), has been awarded a $293,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead a project to develop a technique that may improve surgical repair of rotator cuff injuries.

    The project will combine the expertise of two research groups at Marshall University. Xie, who is an expert in bone growth and development, and his team at MIIR will be working with Dr. Franklin D. Shuler, associate professor and vice chair of research in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    According to Xie, rotator cuff injuries are among the most common conditions affecting the shoulder and can occur from falls or repetitive motions like throwing a baseball. Rotator cuff repair is also one of the most common orthopedic surgeries, with approximately 300,000 procedures performed annually in the United States alone.

    He explains that rotator cuff surgery done with current methods has a failure rate that ranges from 20-90 percent, due in large part to the manner in which the tendons are reattached to the bone. For this project, his team will combine principles of engineering and biomedicine to construct a new type of biological device that will better mimic an uninjured tendon-to-bone attachment, and ultimately result in improved healing.

    "We are pleased to be able to take advantage of this opportunity to combine expertise from two research groups at Marshall," Xie adds. "My background in tissue engineering and Dr. Shuler's extensive experience in clinical treatment of rotator cuff injury will allow us to do work that may very well improve the health and quality of life for individuals afflicted with these injuries. This research could also have a significant impact on the treatment of other, similar injuries of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces."

    The grant is from NIH's National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

    Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research and the interim director of MIIR, extended his congratulations to Xie, saying, "This grant is quite an accomplishment for Dr. Xie and MIIR. His research in this area is showing great promise to improve human health and to produce patentable technologies. A collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to translational research is the foundation of the success of this program and the participation of MIIR, the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at the School of Pharmacy, and the School of Medicine was key to securing this funding."

    Xie has more than 10 years research experience in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nanotechnology and micro-/nanofabrication, and has developed a number of projects related to biomedical applications, including neural tissue engineering, tendon-to-bone insertion site repair and drug delivery. He joined MIIR in January 2011. He and the other scientists at the institute are developing a focused program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries. In keeping with the institute's goal to be self-sustaining, Xie is funded entirely through external sources. He is the co-inventor on five patents and has co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed journal articles.

    For more information about MIIR, which was created in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 25, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-7691-1713

    School of Pharmacy students receive Walgreens diversity awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two rising second-year Marshall University School of Pharmacy students have been awarded scholarships for their efforts to embrace diversity and promote inclusion initiatives on campus.

    James Frazier, from Louisville, Ky., was named recipient of the 2012-2013 Marshall University School of Pharmacy Walgreens Diversity and Inclusion Excellence Award for his strong commitment to raise diversity and inclusion awareness on the pharmacy campus. 

    Also, Frazier and classmate Priscilla Adjei-Baffour of New York, N.Y., were awarded the Walgreens Student Diversity Award. The distinctions include a financial award.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

    Dr. Shelvy M. Campbell, assistant dean for diversity at the School of Pharmacy, said both students are exemplary in their commitment to diversity on campus.

    "James and Priscilla have been important partners in our mission to create an environment at the School of Pharmacy that is welcoming and nurturing to all students, particularly those from underrepresented minority groups in pharmacy," Campbell said.  "These two students are true leaders and we are honored they have chosen Marshall for their pharmacy education."

    Walgreens awarded the School of Pharmacy the scholarship money last fall.
     
    According to the company, its gift strategy is three-fold: to increase the availability of education assistance for underrepresented students enrolled in pharmacy programs; to support the development of pipeline and recruitment programs targeting minority students; and to support awareness initiatives and programs that focus on building a diverse, supportive and inclusive culture.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 24, 2013
    Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, (304) 696-7153

    Herd fans to choose Marco costume from among three concepts

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's beloved mascot is getting a new costume, and for the first time the responsibility of choosing his new look is in the hands of Thundering Herd fans and friends.
     
    Beginning today through Facebook social media, Herd fans have the opportunity to determine whether Marco will keep his current design or be given a new or updated look. His current costume, after five years of extensive wear, travel, cleaning and repair, has been stretched as far as it can, so it's time to replace it, said Matt Turner, Marshall's chief of staff.

    "There's no doubt that Marco means a lot to our fans and alumni so we want their help to choose his appearance," Turner said. "He is as iconic as Old Main and his public appearances extend well beyond the field, so we think it's important to hear from them."

    All Marshall fans, alumni, students and staff are encouraged to cast their votes via Facebook.
     
    Matt Hayes, Marshall's executive director of alumni relations, said, "This is a great concept, a wonderful way to involve alumni and friends of Marshall who care deeply about how the mascot embodies and represents the face of the university. I'm sure the Herd nation will not be shy and will make their voices heard."
     
    A costume maker has provided three concepts from which the voters can choose from now through midnight Saturday, Aug. 10. They are:
     
    Option 1:  Current Marco.
     
    Option 2:  A partial makeover of current Marco. This "hybrid" version of current Marco includes returning to the hoof feet and fur-covered legs of the previous mascot costume.
     
    Option 3: A more complete makeover. This new design more closely resembles the previous Marco with a friendlier face and bison goatee.
     
    Aaron Goebbel, associate director of athletics for external affairs, said, "Marco represents our fans and they are the ones he is most involved with. It's magical when Marco shows up at an event and he always wants to look his best. And we think it will be a lot of fun having the voting done on social media."
     
    Voting has begun on Marshall's Facebook site - https://www.facebook.com/marshallu - and participants can vote only once. The Marco costume that receives the most votes will be announced on Facebook on Monday, Aug. 12.

    Once the design is finalized, Turner said he expects the new costume to be completed in time for Marshall's homecoming game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium Saturday, Oct. 5, against UTSA. Game time is 2 p.m.
     
    As a reward for helping select one of the three concepts, someone will win tickets and a tailgate package for four to the first Thundering Herd football game of the season, scheduled at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at home against Miami (Ohio). They also will receive Marshall hooded sweatshirts.

    Artist renderings of the three choices, and photos of the old Marco and the current Marco, can be found at http://muphotos.marshall.edu/NewsPhotos-4/Marcos-New-Look-2013.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 24, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Autism Training Center director at MU named Professional of the Year

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center (WVATC) at Marshall University, was recently named the Dr. Cathy Pratt Autism Professional of the Year at the 44th annual Autism Society of America Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.

    Becker-Cottrill has served as executive director of the WVATC for the past 23 years. Among her accomplishments in this position was the development and implementation of a comprehensive service delivery program for families and their children with autism spectrum disorders.

    "It was truly an honor to receive this recognition from the Autism Society and it has been a great honor to serve as the director of the WVATC," Becker-Cottrill said. "There are few statewide programs in the nation that provide direct services and supports specifically targeted for families of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) of all ages."

    Becker-Cottrill is the founder and co-developer of the College Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome, sponsored by the West Virginia Autism Training Center and housed at Marshall University. She served as the principal investigator for the surveillance of autism grant with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She also is a co-author of the book "Autism: A Primer for Educators."

    Becker-Cottrill will be retiring from her position as the executive director on July 31. A retirement reception will be held at Foundation Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, July 26. The public is invited to attend.

    Becker-Cottrill says she plans to focus on autism research activities in the upcoming year. "We have also done a lot of collaborative work with the West Virginia Department of Education, Office of Special Programs in the past few years which has opened up training and coaching opportunities for educators of students with ASDs," she said. "Marshall University has been a tremendous supporter of our work and I am deeply grateful. I believe we have come a long way in the provision of evidence-based services for people with ASDs and I know there is a long way to go."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday July 23, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Biomedical sciences student selected for Chancellor's Scholar Program

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University biomedical sciences graduate student Kristeena L. Ray has been selected for the university's Chancellor's Scholar Program, an initiative to help ensure the academic success of underrepresented minority doctoral students.
     
    The program will provide Ray with a stipend of $10,000 per semester. In addition, she will receive mentoring and research opportunities through the university, networking opportunities through the Southern Regional Education Board doctoral scholars program, and financial support for her dissertation and thesis work.
     
    A native of Glen Allen, Va., Ray received her bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University in 2009. She worked as a research assistant at Duke and as a process development engineer at Talecris Biotherapeutics in Clayton, N.C. She has been a graduate student at Marshall since 2011.
     
    "Kristeena is a truly outstanding graduate student and we are thrilled to present her with our first award from the new Chancellor's Scholar Program," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president for multicultural affairs. "The ideal candidate, she is dedicated, well-rounded and committed to her research."

    Ray said, "Being part of this program is such a gift and an honor. The stipend lightens the burden of locating funding and allows me to really focus on my research. I am also excited to take advantage of the additional benefits, including networking opportunities and membership in key organizations in my field."
               
    Ray works in the lab of Dr. Nalini Santanam, a professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. Her research is focused on endometriosis and the pain caused by the disease, which is characterized by cells normally present in the uterus migrating outside the organ and attaching to other places in the pelvis. At least one in seven women suffers from the condition.
     
    Specifically, Ray is investigating the epigenetics of pain in endometriosis the changes caused to DNA and genes by environment and lifestyle.
     
    She said, "We're looking at epigenetic markers in patients with endometriosis. We believe that our continuing research in this area will help us better understand what leads to endometriosis in some women and find alternate treatment options for its symptoms.
     
    "Long-term, I am interested in the research and development behind drugs and therapies, such as one that may benefit women with endometriosis."
     
    In April, she presented her research at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which was held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology conference in Boston.
     
    Ray serves as president of the Graduate Student Organization, is a member of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and volunteers with the March of Dimes and the Tri-State Literacy Council.
     
    The Chancellor's Scholar Program at Marshall is funded through the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 22, 2013
    Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program ranks number one in the nation on national assessment test scores

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program once again is ranked number one in the country for its students receiving the highest overall scores on the Forensic Science Assessment Test, a qualifying test offered each year by the American Board of Criminalistics.

    In addition, a Marshall student received the highest test score from among 179 students from 15 other forensic science programs that participated in the test.

    Of the top 25 highest test scores ranked, 11 were students from the Marshall Forensic Science Graduate Program.

    Dr. Pamela Staton, program coordinator, said the test scores are evidence of the high quality education the program provides.

    "The quality of an academic program can be measured by a program's achievement of national accreditation and how well its students perform on national board examinations," she said. "The Forensic Science Graduate Program at Marshall University has achieved both of these honorable distinctions. This translates to high quality forensic science services to law enforcement, the legal profession, and the public as graduates of this program become forensic scientists in the field."

    Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the forensic science graduate program, said the test is useful for assessing the program's strengths and demonstrating to prospective students and the general public its ability to meet national standards.

    "The results demonstrate not only the quality of the program and its students, but the dedication of its full-time faculty and the many adjunct faculty members," Fenger said. "The program greatly benefits from the input of law enforcement and criminal justice system professionals here locally and across the state."

    Marshall's program is accredited by the Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

    The students who participated in this examination, which was administered in Spring 2013, are now graduates of Marshall's nationally recognized Forensic Science Program. They demonstrated their knowledge in disciplines including forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent prints, questioned documents, fire debris and firearms/tool marks.

    The test is offered to students in their last semester of an academic forensic science program. While seeking their first jobs, recent college graduates may use their test results to demonstrate their knowledge across a broad range of forensic science disciplines.

    The American Board of Criminalistics offers a wide array of testing and certification services that focus on the forensic sciences.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 22, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

    Researchers awarded $750,000 NASA grant to study muscle and bone loss associated with space travel

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Miaozong Wu of the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy has been awarded a $750,000 grant from NASA to lead a team of researchers investigating the muscle and bone loss associated with space travel.

    Wu's three-year project was one of only 14 funded nationally through NASA's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). According to Dr. Majid Jaridi, chairman of the NASA West Virginia EPSCoR Committee, which coordinates the grant proposal process in West Virginia, researchers in 29 states were eligible to compete.

    "Marshall University has had a track record of success in winning these grants. The program is quite competitive and this latest award is a great achievement for the team," Jaridi added. "I look forward to working with them to get the project started."

    Wu said, "The loss of muscle and bone observed with space travel is an important and vexing problem, and NASA has put a high priority on identifying risk factors and treatments. It was really exciting news to get this award. We have a great team ready to get to work."

    Wu's team of collaborators for the project includes:  Dr. Eric Blough and Dr. Nicole Winston, also of the School of Pharmacy; Dr. Henry Driscoll and Dr. Omolola Olajide of the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine; and Dr. John Leidy of the Huntington VA Medical Center. Other contributors include colleagues at West Virginia State University, University of Louisville, University of Delaware, Universities Space Research Association and NASA's Johnson Space Center.

    Wu explained that the researchers will have three primary objectives: to study the effects of space travel on the body's muscles and bones, to identify possible causes and to develop potential treatments.

    "The lack of gravity and the exposure to increased radiation in space are believed to be related to musculoskeletal loss, but very few studies have been done," he said. "Our findings will have direct applicability not only to NASA personnel traveling in space, but also to anyone who is experiencing muscle and bone loss, including aging patients and those suffering from cancer, AIDS and diabetes."

    Wu added that the project will involve undergraduate and graduate student researchers, and endocrinology physician fellows from the Department of Internal Medicine's Endocrinology Fellowship Program.

    "An important component of this particular NASA program is to train students for science and other high-tech careers," he said. "We will be giving them hands-on opportunities to do significant research associated with this study."

    Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, congratulated Wu and his colleagues for the award, saying, "This project will further the team's partnerships, significantly increase the state's research and development capabilities, and support both our educational mission and economic development in the region. It's really a win-win."

    --------------------


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday July 19, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

    Marshall University gives Scouts a look at virtual technology, 3-D printing

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Scouts attending this week's 2013 National Scout Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Reserve are getting the opportunity to explore state-of-the-art virtual technology and 3-D printing, thanks to Marshall University's engineering and advanced manufacturing programs.

    Hundreds of Scouts each hour are visiting the Jamboree exhibits sponsored by the university's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

    CEGAS Director Dr. Tony Szwilski says his group is demonstrating their latest research and development efforts, including an interactive, multi-user virtual program designed to support mine emergency response training.

    The program simulates an underground coal mine and uses a video game engine a platform familiar to Jamboree participants. The format allows users to practice their communications and decision-making skills in dangerous and stressful environments.

    "Although this exhibit is just a small-scale version of the Visualization Lab we have on our Huntington campus, the Scouts are fascinated by the 3-D stereo display technology and the virtual environments we have created," said Szwilski. "This has proven to be a wonderful way to share what we are doing and showcase our programs to future students. It's been a great experience all the way around."

    RCBI is giving the Scouts an opportunity to experience first-hand one of the world's most exciting technologies 3-D printing, which turns digital designs into actual objects. The technology is beginning to be used in the aerospace and automotive industries, health care, architecture, engineering and countless other fields.

    Charlotte Weber, the institute's director and CEO, said her group is glad to be part of the Jamboree and to share the technology with Scouts, who are using RCBI's printer to produce copies of a fleur-de-lis, the stylized flower used in the Boy Scout symbol.

    Weber added, "3-D printing isn't the wave of the future, it's happening here and now. Over the last few years, our labs have given dozens of manufacturers and entrepreneurs access to our 3-D printers for everything from rapid prototyping to full-scale production. Now we're thrilled to be able to offer Jamboree participants a hands-on introduction to this truly revolutionary technology."

    She said she hopes exposure to the possibilities presented by 3-D printing will spur some of the Scouts to become interested in Marshall University, high-tech manufacturing and entrepreneurship.

    The Marshall exhibits will continue through the end of the Jamboree on July 24.

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    Photos: (Above) Scouts try their hand at navigating the virtual coal mine developed by the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences for use in mine emergency response training. (Middle) Jamboree participants proudly display a fleur-de-lis produced at a 3-D printing exhibit sponsored by the Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. (Below) Scouts from all over the country and around the world have visited Marshall University's exhibits this week as part of the 2013 National Scout Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Reserve in the New River Gorge.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 17, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    'Tech Up' program helps nontraditional students with technology concerns

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - When Karen Riffle returned to Marshall University in 2012 as a nontraditional student after 30 years away from the college environment, she quickly discovered a big technology gap between herself and traditional students.

    She could have used the new "Tech Up" program being offered at Marshall.

    "Tech Up," which debuts next month, has one purpose to help nontraditional students succeed at Marshall by being technologically up to speed by the time they take their first course.

    Riffle, a Mineral Wells native, said she expected to face what she called the daunting task of "catching up" with traditional students where technology was concerned. And she did.

    What surprised her most, however, was the learning style of the current traditional students and the extent to which they rely on technology. Because of the requirements of one class, she said she found it necessary to become immediately familiar with MUOnline, which uses systems from Blackboard, a global technology company.

    Riffle was fortunate because the class proved to be a great help in overcoming the initial obstacles she faced. However, she believes there are many nontraditional students today facing the same challenges with technology. Many of them simply have never had a need to use technology. Many of them are overwhelmed and frustrated.

    In a letter last February to Steve Hensley, Marshall's dean of student affairs, Riffle shared her experience and suggested a program be developed to help nontraditional students who are not tech savvy. That's the goal of "Tech Up."

    Hensley said, "We have found that many of our students, particularly those students who have been out of school for a few years, are not as tech savvy as they would like to be. This new program will help these students discover the essential technology students use at Marshall."

    Riffle added, "In developing a program to assist nontraditional students in acclimating to Marshall, Marshall will receive the reward of greater retention and enrollment rates among the nontraditional student body."

    In her letter to Hensley, Riffle said not a day passes that she does not use Blackboard for one or more of the following purposes:

    • access PowerPoint presentations for use in class and for study purposes;
    • submit homework assignments;
    • take online exams;
    • check for updated grades;
    • participate on a discussion board;
    • review a syllabus; and/or,
    • check for class announcements and notifications.

    The university's IT (Information Technology) personnel will conduct the "Tech Up" sessions, which are scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22, and from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, in Drinko Library rooms 138 and 349. To reserve a space, students may call the Office of Student Affairs at 304-696-6422 or e-mail studentaffairs@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday July 15, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Gala event to celebrate state's coal mining community; Singer-songwriter John Ellison among those to be honored

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Miners, community members and others connected with the state's coal mining industry will gather at Tamarack in Beckley on Thursday, Oct. 3, for the 2013 Miners' Celebration a gala reception and dinner to celebrate the past, present and future of West Virginia's coal mining enterprise.

    According to organizers, the purpose of the annual event is to recognize those who play a role in the success of the state's mining enterprise. The community focus of this year's event is McDowell County and its coal mining heritage.

    "Many of our graduates find employment in West Virginia's mining industry, which depends upon thousands of individuals in a number of different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every person who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders, educators and mining families.

    "The mining industry owes its success to every one of them. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved and to spotlight McDowell County's long history in mining. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."

    Internationally recognized musician and songwriter John Ellison, who grew up in the mining community of Landgraff in McDowell County, will be on hand at the event to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award. A member of the 1960s group the Soul Brothers Six, Ellison is best known for writing the song "Some Kind of Wonderful" one of the most-recorded songs in history. He is dedicating his award to the memory of his father, who worked in the mines in McDowell County.
     
    "Rocket Boys" author Homer Hickam, who received last year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" award, will present a new award, the "Homer Hickam Collier Award," to a working coal miner who epitomizes the spirit, dedication and skills of the mining profession.
     
    Conference organizers also will present "Because of You" awards to individuals for their significant contributions to West Virginia's coalfields heritage in the following categories:  Community Investment, Community Involvement, Women in Mining, Safety Professional, Equipment/Technology Innovation, Environmental Professional, Management Professional, Engineering Professional and Educator of the Year.
     
    The Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.
     
    The free reception will begin at 5 p.m. in the Tamarack atrium. Dinner and the awards ceremony, which require a ticket, will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the ballroom.
     
    Tickets for the dinner and awards ceremony are $50/person. To purchase tickets, call 304-696-4029.
     
    For more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/mcc.
     
    The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

    Sponsors include Brickstreet Insurance, Marshall University, State Electric Supply Company and the West Virginia Division of Energy.


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    Friday July 12, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    112 ninth-grade students from southern West Virginia to participate in HSTA Summer Institute at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The annual Health Science & Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute conducted by Marshall University will take place July 14-19 on MU's Huntington campus.

    This is the 20th year of summer institutes for HSTA, which was started in 1994 with 45 students from two counties. It now averages around 800 students from 26 counties throughout the state enrolled in the program each year. This is Marshall's ninth year sponsoring a summer institute.

    Officials anticipate 112 ninth-graders from southern West Virginia taking part in this year's institute, which kicks off with a dinner at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 14, in room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center.

    Guest speakers at the dinner include Ann Chester, director of the HSTA program in West Virginia, and Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science. Two former HSTA students will also speak, and cake and ice cream will be served as part of the 20-year anniversary celebration.

    "We are going to expose rising ninth-graders to the activities and things that not only science has to offer, but Marshall University has to offer," said David Cartwright, director of the event. "Hopefully, the 'Fun With Science' institute will help convince many of these students to choose science as a career."

    The institute is designed to give hands-on research and lab experience through Marshall's College of Science and high school teachers. It is a highly innovative and successful initiative designed to encourage high school students to pursue college degrees in the health sciences.

    The "Fun With Science" summer institute is structured to enroll a high percentage of African American youth to offset the disparity of African Americans as professionals in related fields of study.

    Students from Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will be involved in the institute again this year. Jo Ann Raines with Graduate Medical Education (GME) said medical students will help teach a suturing workshop from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday and a heartbeat workshop from 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesday. Both workshops will take place in Morrow Library.

    The students will practice suturing using simulated skin and pigs feet in the suturing workshop. In the heartbeat workshop, they will listen to heart sounds from actual patients and observe simulated laparoscopic surgery.

    A "speed-dating" session, in which the students have access to different medical specialists, is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday in Memorial Student Center room BE5.

    In addition to attending classes, labs and workshops, the students also will take part in several recreational activities, such as bowling, dancing, Zumba, attending a movie, playing kickball and visiting the Marshall Recreation Center.


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    Friday July 12, 2013
    Contact: Clark Egnor, Marshall University Center for International Programs, 304-696-6265

    Restaurants invited to participate in 50th anniversary International Festival this fall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - International restaurants from throughout the Tri-State Area are invited to participate in Marshall University's 50th anniversary International Festival, scheduled from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at the SMG-managed Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Restaurants can still apply for a spot in the festival by submitting an application this summer. Participants will receive a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales and promotion of their restaurant. The deadline to apply is Friday, Aug. 9, and space is limited. The application form can be downloaded from the Marshall University Center for International Programs website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

    For the second year, the festival will take place at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, to accommodate the event's need for more space. As the largest entertainment venue in the Tri-State, Big Sandy Superstore Arena hosts concerts, family shows, trade shows, and regional and state athletic competitions.

    "We were very happy with the attendance last year," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs. "But we anticipate many more people will attend this year with the observance of the anniversary."

    Admission to the festival is free and the event is open to the public.
    In addition to the international foods prepared by restaurants, the International Festival will also feature music and dance from around the world along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures provided by Marshall University international students and the Tri-State international community, in partnership with Cabell County Schools and Mountwest Community and Technical College.

    "The international festival events are the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to enjoy the international diversity and global opportunities found on the Marshall campus and in the surrounding community," Egnor said. Currently, Marshall enrolls more than 400 international students from 60 countries. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp has set a goal for Marshall to double the number of international students in the next several years.

    Each restaurant will offer tastings of its signature menu items. Egnor said that by purchasing food tickets, guests can sample a variety of foods from all over the world at very affordable prices.  "Festivalgoers," he said, "will have an opportunity to easily explore new restaurants and sample different international dishes they would not ordinarily try. You won't walk away hungry."

    For further details about Marshall University's annual International Festival, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu, or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

    --------------
     
    Photos: Scenes from the 2012 International Festival at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington, W.Va. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 11, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Marshall faculty member and former Olympic trainer will travel to Brazil to present biomechanics research

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Suzanne Konz of the Marshall University College of Health Professions will travel to Natal, Brazil this summer to present research at the 2013 International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) conference, which takes place once every two years.

    Konz, an assistant professor of biomechanics in the School of Kinesiology, said she will share her research among the biggest players in the biomechanical field. She will give an oral presentation on her work titled, "Changes in Windmill Pitch Over Time."

    "This is one of those conferences, as a biomechanist, that seems more challenging because I'll be presenting in front of scholars from all around the world," Konz said. "It's exciting to think I could potentially expose someone else to a different perspective of biomechanics research."

    Cristina Arikawa, a member of the ISB organizing committee, said only 40 percent of the 858 submitted abstracts were chosen for an oral presentation.

    "Konz was chosen to give an oral presentation due to the quality of her research and the fit of her research into the (sports biomechanics) theme of the session," Arikawa said. She said 53 countries will be represented at this year's conference.

    A 2002 Winter Olympic Games athletic trainer, Konz now serves as a member of the USA Track & Field sport science biomechanics group specializing in throwing events, specifically the hammer throw.

    Konz said she will continue to develop relationships with other professionals in this global forum and showcase the amazing work being done at Marshall University.

    "I believe this opportunity puts Marshall on the map in terms of research capabilities in the field of sports science," Konz said. "From a university standpoint, we want students to see what we do and help provide them with similar opportunities to meet the scholars they read about in their textbooks. This makes our department more personal."

    Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of kinesiology and associate dean of the college, said Konz's work continues to impress him.

    "Dr. Konz is an undeniable asset to the College of Health Professions and the School of Kinesiology," McIlvain said. "I look forward to her future research endeavors which can only highlight the breadth of possibilities available here at Marshall."

    The conference takes place from Aug. 4 to 9, and Konz will give her oral presentation from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 7. For more information about this year's conference, visit http://www.isbbrazil.com.


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    Thursday July 11, 2013
    Contact: Karen Kirtley, Senior Vice President of Administration, 304-696-3328

    Preliminary master plan to be unveiled at open house July 18

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A revised version of Marshall University's master plan for the Huntington and South Charleston campuses will be reviewed by the community at an open house. The event will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18, in room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    All members of the university and Huntington communities are invited to attend, said Dr. Karen Kirtley, Marshall's senior vice president of administration.

    "We have heard the suggestions of the communities and incorporated them into the plan," Kirtley said. "We're looking forward to refining the plan even further based on input received at the open house."

    The Campus Master Plan will be presented to both the Marshall University Board of Governors and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Further information on the planning process can be found on the Marshall University website at www.marshall.edu/mplan.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 11, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Kinesiology, Orthopaedic Surgery join King's Daughters to offer continuing education at no cost to participants

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Kinesiology and the School of Medicine's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery will join with King's Daughters Sports Medicine to host the fourth annual continuing education conference for athletic trainers Saturday, July 13.

    Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of kinesiology and associate dean for the College of Health Professions, said the conference will provide eight hours of high-caliber continuing education to athletic trainers at no cost.

    "As for any other allied health profession, the Board of Certification requires continuing education for certification of athletic trainers," McIlvain said. "A conference offering eight hours of continuing education would generally cost between $200 and $450. We are providing it for free."

    McIlvain said this is his fourth year coordinating the conference alongside Marshall Orthopaedic surgeons Dr. Charles Giangarra and Dr. John Jasko.

    "This had not been offered in the Tri-state previously so we decided this would be a great service to our community's athletic trainers," McIlvain said. "It allows clinical athletic trainers, athletic trainers in secondary and higher education and physicians to provide better medical services to athletes and health-conscious individuals of all ages."

    This year's conference will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Marshall University Physicians & Surgeons Medical Campus located beside Cabell Huntington Hospital. For more information, call McIlvain at 304-696-2930 or 606-615-2842 or e-mail mcilvain2@marshall.edu to register.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday July 11, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU Foundation surpasses goal in 630 by 6/30 challenge campaign

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Office of Development surpassed an ambitious fundraising goal in June, helping the MU Foundation finish the fiscal year on a strong note.

    A one-month campaign, called "MU Challenge 630 by 6/30," raised more than $78,000 - including two endowed scholarship gifts totaling $32,000, according to Griffin Talbott, director of annual giving.

    The goal was for 630 donors to make contributions during the month of June. Overall, 648 donors gave to the campaign.

    Dr. Greg Crews and Dr. Dallas Nibert, who have a family dentistry practice in Huntington, agreed to contribute $10,000 when the goal of 630 donors was met.

    "The MU Challenge 630 by 6/30 was a huge success," Talbott said. "Thanks to Drs. Greg Crews and Dallas Nibert. They were the first to offer a challenge gift."

    Talbott was thrilled with the success of the challenge campaign. He praised Marshall alumni, friends and family for their contributions. Christine Anderson, assistant vice president with the MU Foundation, said she also is grateful to all who contributed.

    "We are grateful to Drs. Greg Crews and Dallas Nibert for serving as examples in our first-ever challenge campaign," she said. "Our success is made possible by the partnerships we have with our friends and alumni and they are certainly a testament to that."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday July 9, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    WMUL finishes strong in WVAP broadcast awards, ends year with 92; overall total since 1985 is 1,335

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, continued a longtime tradition of excellence by winning 92 awards during the 2012-2013 academic year.

    WMUL students surpassed 90 awards for the fourth consecutive year. Twenty-five of the 92 awards were for first place, 37 for second place, three for third place and 27 for honorable mention. Since 1985, WMUL student broadcasters have won 1,335 awards, according to Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall, and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

    WMUL finished the year strong with three firsts and 10 seconds in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2012 broadcast journalism awards ceremony June 8 at the Charleston Civic Center.

    "Overall, this commendable effort helps to build upon another successful year by the volunteer-student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications from state, regional and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations," Bailey said.

    Here is a look at the WMUL winners in the WVAP awards:

    Radio Broadcast Journalist of the Year: Laura Hatfield, a graduate student from Chapmanville.

    Best Anchor or Anchor Team: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with news anchor Laura Hatfield, broadcast Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.

    Best Host: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Rogers, a senior from Charleston, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

    The second-place winners were:

    Outstanding News Operation: The Newscenter 88 team. News director for the Spring semester 2012 and the Fall semester 2012 was Laura Hatfield.

    Best Regularly Scheduled Newscast: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, Nov. 6, 2012. Participants included Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, a recent graduate from Wellsburg; Whitney Adkins, a senior from Milton; and Amanda Reesman, a sophomore from Sarver, Pa.

    Best Continuing Coverage: "Election 2012," a multitude of packages and sound bites produced by Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne, a recent graduate from Winfield; written by hosts Laura Hatfield and Leannda Carey, along with reports by Marcus Constantino, a senior from Bramwell; Braxton Crisp, a sophomore from Huntington; Ashleigh Hill, a recent graduate from Princeton; Alex James, a freshman from Matthews, Va.; Andrew Harrison, a sophomore from Toms River, N. J.; Jessica Patterson, a junior from Hartford, Jessica Starkey, a sophomore from Kearneysville, and Will Vance, a senior from Charleston. The packages were broadcast and made available online during the "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" from Oct. 29, 2012 to Nov. 6, 2012, Election Night Coverage Special.

    Best Anchor or Anchor Team: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" with news anchor Leannda Carey, broadcast Feb. 24, 2012.

    Outstanding Sports Operation: The FM 88 sports team. Sports director for the spring semester 2012 and fall semester 2012 was Adam Rogers.

    Best Sportscaster: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by James Collier, a senior from Worthington, Ky., broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

    Best Regularly Scheduled Sportscast: "The Conference USA Report: Week 12 Talking Animals," broadcast Nov. 16, 2012. The students who participated were: Will Vance, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jarrod Clay, a senior from Barboursville, Joshua Rose, a junior from Olney, Md., and Jimmy Sanders, a senior from Stroudsburg, Pa.

    Best Sports Talk Show: "Sportsview: Women's Basketball," with host James Collier, broadcast and made available online Oct. 31, 2012.

    Best Host: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by James Collier, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

    Best Website: WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2012 webmaster for WMUL-FM Online was Jeremy Johnson, a recent graduate from Smithburg, Md.


    Here is a look at other awards competition and WMUL's results during the spring:

    AVA Awards

    Students from WMUL received five Platinum Awards, seven Gold Awards and two Honorable Mention Awards in the International AVA Awards 2012 competition. The winners were named in a letter dated Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, from Arlington, Texas. This marks WMUL-FM's second time competing in this particular contest.

    The AVA Awards contest is an international competition that recognizes outstanding creative professionals involved in the concept, direction, design and production of media that is part of the evolution of digital communication.

    The Platinum Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

    Radio Sports Program: "Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday, Oct. 19, 2011. The students who participated were Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne.

    Radio Special Programming: "The Patrick and Alex Radio Special," written and produced by Patrick Webb, a recent graduate from Huntington; Alex Constantino, a recent graduate from Parkersburg; A. Jay Meadows, a senior from Madison; Brittany Barnes, a recent graduate from Hurricane, Tyler Kes, a senior from Burnsville, Minn., and Aaron Payne. The radio special aired Friday, April 27, 2012.

    Sports Package: "The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the pre-game show for Marshall football at Ohio University Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011.

    Promo: "WMUL Knockout," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, April 23, 2012, to the present time, written and produced by Will Vance.

    News Package: "Zapp Comes to Huntington" by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Nov. 2, 2012.


    The Gold Award winning entries were in the following categories:

    Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report: Halloween Spooktacular 2: The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012. The students who participated were Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Huntington; Adam Rogers, Jared Clay, Hunter Morrison, a sophomore from Huntington; Alec Hildebeidel, a freshman from Bel Air, Md.; Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

    Sports Package/Podcast: "Coach Geth," by Aaron Payne, was broadcast during "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, and also made available online the same day.

    Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The students who participated in "The Racer's Edge" were Kyle Gibson, a junior from Bluefield; Joshua Rose, Marcus Constantino and Ashley Killingsworth, a senior from Horseheads, N.Y.

    News Package: "Marching Thunder" by Jessica Patterson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Sept. 14, 2012.

    Sport Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall versus the University of Memphis women's college basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center Feb. 16, 2012. The students calling the game were Aaron Payne, Adam Rogers, Bennet Siffrin, a senior from New Martinsville, and Peter Wilson, a senior from Charleston.

    News Package: "On A Higher Note: Louise Fraser," by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Monday, Nov. 26, 2012.

    Promo: "WMUL Halloween," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, written and produced by Jessica Patterson.

    The Honorable Mention Award-winning entries were in the following categories:

    Sports Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus West Virginia University football game played in Morgantown Saturday, Sept. 3, 2012. Calling the game were Adam Rogers, Aaron Payne, Leannda Carey and Scott Hall, a graduate from Stevens City, Va.

    Overall Website: WMUL's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul.marshall.edu/wmul.
    The 2012 Web Master for WMUL-FM Online was Jeremy Johnson, a recent graduate from Smithburg, Md.

    NBS/AERho Awards

    WMUL students received two grand prize awards and 16 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 22nd Annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 50th Annual Audio/Video Production awards competition .

    The ceremony took place March 23, 2013, at the Hilton Crystal City at Washington Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va.

    Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) chapters.

    WMUL's grand prize award winning entries in production were:

    Audio Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012. The students who participated in "The Racer's Edge" were Kyle Gibson, Joshua Rose, Marcus Constantino and Ashley Killingsworth.

    Audio Comedy Program: "The Patrick and Alex Radio Special," written and produced by Patrick Webb, Alex Constantino, A. Jay Meadows, Brittany Barnes, Tyler Kes and Aaron Payne. The radio special aired Friday, April 27, 2012.

    The honorable mention awards in production went to:

    Audio News Package: "Pi Day" by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, March 14, 2012.

    Audio Feature Package: "Marching Thunder" by Jessica Patterson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Sept. 14, 2012.

    Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report: Halloween Spooktacular 2: The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012. The students who participated are Scott Hall, Adam Rogers, Jarrod Clay, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

    Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report: Week 5 Undercover," broadcast Friday, Sept. 28, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose, Andrew Harrison, Jimmy Sanders and Will Vance.

    Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report: Week 8 Future," broadcast Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jimmy Sanders, Will Vance, Joshua Rose, Hunter Morrison and Sam Craigo, a senior from Huntington.

    Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report: Week 12 Talking Animals," broadcast Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. The students who participated were Will Vance, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jarrod Clay, Joshua Rose and Jimmy Sanders.

    Audio Sports Package: "Marshall Soccer's Home Away from Home" by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012.

    Audio Sports Package: "JUCOs Beef Up the Herd" by Kyle Gibson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012.

    Audio Sports Segment: "The Youth of Marshall Softball," by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov.7, 2012.

    Audio Sports Segment: "Shuler Runs It Up," by Adam Rogers, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012.

    Audio Sports Segment: "Tom Jackson," by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 21, 2012.

    Audio Sports Program: "Sportsview: Women's Basketball," with host James Collier, broadcast and made available online Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012.

    Audio Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. The students who participated were Kyle Gibson, Joshua Rose, Marcus Constantino and Ashley Killingsworth.

    Audio Comedy Program: "The Patrick and Alex Show: The Hun-gar Games," written and produced by Patrick Webb; Alex Constantino; A. Jay Meadows; Brittany Barnes; Tyler Kes, Aaron Payne and Kyle Hobstetter, a recent graduate from Portsmouth, Ohio. The radio comedy program aired Friday, March 20, 2012.

    Audio Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note: Zapp," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 19, 2012.

    Audio Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note: Louise Fraser," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 26, 2012.

    Mark of Excellence Awards

    WMUL students won four first-place awards, three seconds and three thirds in the 2012 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Mark of Excellence Contest for Region Four in the four radio categories. The awards were presented at the Region Four SPJ Convention Saturday, April 6, 2013, at the University of Dayton.

    The first-place award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

    Best All-Around Newscast: The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast and made available online Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers; Leannda Carey; Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham, a recent graduate from Youngsville, N.C.

    Radio News Reporting: "Mayor Kim Wolfe Incumbent Election 2012," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the Newscenter 88's election-night programming and made available online Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.

    Radio Feature: "African Dance," written and produced by Jimmy Sanders, was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, April 20, 2012.

    Radio Sports Reporting: "Eddie Sullivan Returns" written and produced by Adam Rogers, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Show before the Marshall versus Western Carolina college football game from Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012.

    The second-place winning entries were in the following categories:

    Radio News Reporting: "Natural Gas," written and produced by Nathan Barham, was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, April 20, 2012.

    Radio Feature: "West Virginia Bridge Day," written and produced by Marcus Constantino, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Oct. 22, 2012.

    Radio Sports Reporting: "Nothing to Lose at UAB," written and produced by Jimmy Sanders, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012.

    The third-place award-winning entries were in the following categories.

    Radio News Reporting: "Coal Activists," written and produced by Whitney Adkins, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, March 28, 2012.

    Radio Feature: "Hit Like a Girl," written and produced by Kayla Marcum, a junior from Fort Gay, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Thursday, March 15, 2012.

    Radio Sports Reporting: "Ed Geth," written and produced by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012.


    BEA Awards

    WMUL students received one third-place award and one honorable mention award during the Eleventh Annual Broadcast Education Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony Monday, April 8, 2013. The event took place at the. Las Vegas Hotel and Convention Center.

    The third-place award-winning entry in audio was:

    Newscast: "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. Participants were Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham.

    The honorable mention award-winning entry in audio was:

    Sports Play-by-Play: The Marshall versus Houston college football game at the Joan C. Edwards Stadium, broadcast Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012. Calling the game were Aaron Payne, Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, James Collier and Sam Craigo.

    Communicator Awards

    Students from WMUL received one Award of Excellence and four Awards of Distinction in the 19th Annual Communicator Awards 2013 Audio Competition. The winners were named Monday, June 3, in New York, N.Y.

    The Communicator Awards come from the International Academy of Visual Arts that recognizes outstanding work in the communications field. The 2013 contest had more than 6,000 entries from radio stations, ad agencies, interactive agencies, production firms, in-house creative professionals, graphic designers, design firms, public relations firms, corporate communications departments and government entities.

    The Award of Excellence winning entry by WMUL-FM is in the following category:

    Sports Program: "Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne.

    The Award of Distinction winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

    Sports Package: "Ed Geth," written and produced by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012.

    Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report: Halloween Spooktacular 2: The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012. The students who participated were Scott Hall, Adam Rogers, Jarrod Clay, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

    Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report: Week 8 Future," broadcast Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jimmy Sanders, Will Vance, Joshua Rose, Hunter Morrison and Sam Craigo.

    Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note: Zapp," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 19, 2012.

    Hermes Awards

    WMUL students received one Platinum Award and four Gold Awards in The Hermes Creative Awards 2013 Competition. The winners were named in a letter dated Monday, June 17, from Arlington, Texas

    The Platinum Award-winning entry was in the Radio Promotional Announcement category:

    Promo:"WMUL Knockout," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, April 23, 2012, to the present time, written and produced by Will Vance.

    "This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best promotional announcements in the country," Bailey said. "I am proud and grateful for the honor this Hermes Creative Platinum Award bestows on WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University."

    The Gold Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the Radio Newscast, Radio News Reporting Podcast, Radio Sports Reporting Podcast and Radio Sports Play-By-Play categories.

    Newscast: The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast and made available online Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. The students who participated in were Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham.

    Radio News Reporting: "Anti-Valentine's Day Party," by Marcus Constantino, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013.

    Radio Sports Reporting: "The Youth of Marshall Softball," by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012.

    Sports Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus East Carolina University women's college basketball game played at the Cam Henderson Center Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The students calling the game were Adam Rogers, James Collier, Nick McKendree, a senior from Gallipolis Ferry, and Joshua Rose.

    ---------------

    Photo: Adam Rogers, left, a senior from Charleston, and Laura Hatfield, a graduate student from Chapmanville, show off their first-place awards after the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's awards ceremony June 8 in Charleston.


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    Monday July 8, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall announces upgraded student e-mail system

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An upgraded student e-mail system at Marshall University will result in more available services and an easier, single sign-on system for student accounts, beginning July 15.

    The system, powered by Microsoft Office 365 (previously known as Live@edu), will be available for all Marshall students. The upgrade will not impact MU faculty and staff using the university-hosted Outlook/Exchange e-mail.

    Marshall has been part of the Live Mail program with Microsoft since 2010. Microsoft has since discontinued the Live Mail service and replaced it with Office 365. Some of the features of Office 365 are improved e-mail and calendaring, web conferencing, instant messaging, file storage and sharing and team web sites. Not all of the new services will be available immediately but will be in the near future.

    "Office 365 is a big upgrade for students that will give them online tools much like the Microsoft Outlook services used by companies around the world," said Jody Perry, executive director of Technology Services with Marshall University Information Technology. "It's more than just better email - it includes calendar and task management features that will help them keep up with their busy schedules and coursework."

    Perry said students using mobile devices to connect to their e-mail will need to update their credentials and log in with their MUNet username and password to access their e-mail. If they don't do this, they will not automatically receive e-mail on their phones. Students who do not know their MUNet credentials may visit www.marshall.edu/munetlookup to get their usernames and reset their passwords. Their e-mail address will remain the same.

    The upgraded Office 365 system will be easily accessible through the updated Marshall University Portal, myMU (www.marshall.edu/myMU).

    More information about Office 365 is available at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/academic/. Students also may contact the IT service desk at itservicedesk@marshall.edu, or call 304-696-3200.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday July 3, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Medical students at Marshall University publish inaugural edition of creative works

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Aenigma Medicorum," a literary and art review recently published by medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, features poetry, photography, musical selections and short essays about life as seen through the eyes of medical students and physicians.

    The idea germinated with the student members of the school's Multicultural Affairs Committee which seeks to advance institutional diversity initiatives.
     
    The book's executive editor, Matthew Q. Christiansen, M.D., a 2013 graduate of the JCESOM and  first-year resident in the Department of Family Medicine, says the publication is an attempt to strengthen the medical school community by reaffirming commitment to the human experience and clinical excellence.
     
    "The name 'Aenigma Medicorum' translates roughly to 'the puzzle of doctors' and is a reference to the intangible aspects of medicine that are so important to a successful medical practice," Christiansen said.  "It is an acknowledgment that, although we may be very good at treating disease, we are still learning and perfecting our practice.  Each patient teaches us and makes us a better clinician."

    Submissions are made in the fall, reviewed by a student advisory board and selected for publication after assistance from faculty advisers.  Submissions for the 2014 edition may be e-mailed to aenigmamedicorum@gmail.com.

    Printed copies of the current edition are available through the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs, 3rd floor, Marshall University Medical Center.  It may be viewed digitally at http://musom.marshall.edu/students/AenigmaMedicorum/.


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    Wednesday July 3, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine volunteer faculty member awarded teaching honor

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mathew Weimer, M.D., a family physician in Milton who completed a family medicine residency at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (JCESOM), is among a select group of physicians honored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation for his commitment to education in the field of family medicine.

    Weimer was selected to receive a 2013 Pfizer Teacher Development Award based on his scholastic achievement, leadership qualities and dedication to family medicine.   He was nominated by colleagues in the Marshall Department of Family Medicine where he is currently a part-time instructor.

    "Medical students benefit in their interaction with Dr. Weimer from the comprehensive care he delivers to his patients in the context of a practice enhancing its patient centeredness and as an attending physician with outstanding patient care skills," said Dr. Mitch Shaver, residency program director for family medicine. "Dr. Weimer's dedication to patient care as a resident physician was validated  by superlative patient evaluations that reflected the ease at which he develops rapport and the high level of advocacy he displays for patients."

    Weimer earned his medical degree from the Medical College of Ohio (now the University of Toledo College of Medicine) and completed a residency in family medicine at JCESOM in 2008. He serves as a volunteer clinical faculty member with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    "I view teaching as an essential responsibility for physicians," Weimer said.  "I also enjoy working with budding health professionals; they bring a fresh perspective to my practice and raise important questions as I make decisions about care.  I hope to expose my students to the many joys and challenges of family medicine, at the core of which is the unique relationship that a physician is privileged to share with patients."

    This is the third consecutive year a Marshall University Family Medicine residency graduate has received the prestigious award.   In 2012, Dr. Jason Hudak was given the award and in 2011, Dr. Scott Davis was recognized.


    ----------

    About the Pfizer Teacher Development Awards

    The Pfizer Teacher Development Awards Program recognizes outstanding, community-based family physicians who combine clinical practice with part-time teaching of family medicine. Each nomination is reviewed and scored by a panel appointed by the AAFP Foundation. The award provides funding for each recipient to attend an activity of choice to further their professional development and teaching skills. This program is supported by a grant from Pfizer Inc. For more information, including eligibility criteria, please visit www.aafpfoundation.org/ptda.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday July 2, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University School of Pharmacy passes second step in national accreditation process

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has earned "candidate" accreditation status from the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), the national accrediting body for schools of pharmacy in the United States, according to the school's dean, Dr. Kevin W. Yingling.
     
    Candidate accreditation status is the second step of a three-step process that culminates with  graduation of the first class and adherence to all ACPE accreditation standards.   The new status is based on a site visit made to the school in April.

    In its decision to grant candidate status to Marshall's Doctor of Pharmacy program, the ACPE's Board of Directors reported, "action was taken upon the determination that planning for the Doctor of Pharmacy program has adequately taken into account ACPE standards and guidelines, and that reasonable assurances exist for moving to the next step in the accreditation process, namely that of Full accreditation status. The Candidate accreditation term granted for the Doctor of Pharmacy program extends until June 30, 2015, which represents the customary two-year cycle for programs granted Candidate accreditation status. A focused on-site evaluation for purposes of considering the continuation of the Doctor of Pharmacy program Candidate accreditation status and its transition to Full accreditation status shall be scheduled during the 2014-2015 academic year."

    "I am so very pleased to announce that Marshall has passed this very pivotal point in the accreditation process," Yingling said. "The ACPE was very complimentary of our faculty and staff for their outstanding efforts to build a dynamic, forward-thinking school of pharmacy which will educate the next generation of pharmacists and help meet the growing health care needs of our state and region."

    Yingling went on to say that receiving candidate status is the result of months of building robust experiential and clinical platforms, as well as developing operational policies and procedures for faculty, staff and students.

    Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the School of Pharmacy's progress under Yingling's guidance is a testament to his outstanding leadership abilities.

    "Dr. Yingling has assembled a dedicated, highly-qualified group of individuals who, working together as a team, are molding what will become one of the premier pharmacy schools in the country," Kopp said. "Our commitment to the success of Marshall University and our students is unwavering; our vision to create an outstanding academic program designed for the 21st century is clear."

    The Marshall University Board of Governors voted unanimously in December 2009 to approve the awarding of the Doctor of Pharmacy degree.   The first class was admitted in August 2012.

    ACPE accredits Doctor of Pharmacy programs offered by colleges and schools of Pharmacy in the United States and selected non-U.S. sites. It is located at 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503, 312/644-3575; FAX 312/664-4652, website www.acpe-accredit.org.


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    Tuesday July 2, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

    Works of artist Craig Hill to be featured in exhibition at Gallery 842

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting artist Craig Hill will be featured in a solo exhibition beginning this weekend at Marshall University's Gallery 842 at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington.

    The exhibit opens Friday evening, July 5, with a public reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and will feature both paintings and drawings. Light refreshments will be served.

    "We're excited to welcome an artist of Mr. Hill's reputation to campus," said Marshall University gallery director John Farley. "His paintings are equal parts playful and thoughtful, with content that is both accessible and challenging. The familiar imagery derived from popular culture - superheroes, toys and ray guns - found in Hill's paintings offers viewers deceptively simple points of entry for the discussion of much more complex ideas."

    Hill earned his B.F.A. in drawing from the Atlanta College of Art and his M.F.A. in painting and printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design. He teaches drawing, painting and printmaking at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. His work appropriates imagery and techniques from pop culture and modernist works of art, and addresses issues of masculinity and male rites of passage.

    Hill has exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions across the country at such venues as the Danna Center Gallery at Loyola University in New Orleans, La., the Shremshock Gallery in Westerville, Ohio, and the L2 Gallery in Washington, D.C.

    The exhibition will be on display until Aug. 23. Gallery 842 is free and open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 7 p.m.


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    Friday June 28, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall scholarships memorialize educator John E. Huxley

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The John E. Huxley memorial scholarships for physical therapy and special education have been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., according to Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the foundation.

    These endowed and renewable awards will go to full-time Marshall University students who are residents of West Virginia, in good academic standing (2.5 GPA or higher) and are majoring in Physical Therapy and Special Education, respectively. The award recipients will be chosen by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

    The awards were established to memorialize John E. Huxley, who spent his life as an educator, teaching in Kanawha and Boone counties and at Charleston Catholic High School. He also worked for the West Virginia State Department of Education in the Office of Special Education. Most recently, Huxley was the Director of Distance Education at the Marshall University Graduate School of Education and Professional Development.

    These scholarships will be available for the 2013-2014 academic year.

    Anyone wanting to contribute to the John E. Huxley Memorial Scholarship for Physical Therapy or the John E. Huxley Memorial Scholarship for Special Education may do so by sending a check payable to: The Marshall University Foundation, Inc., 519 John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25703 and listing the specific scholarship on the memo line.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 28, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall School of Physical Therapy receives Hedrick Grant for Teaching Innovation

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Penny Kroll and Dr. Rania Karim of the Marshall University School of Physical Therapy have received the Hedrick Program Grant for Teaching Innovation for the 2013-14 academic year.

    Kroll is director of the School of Physical Therapy and Karim is an assistant professor with the school.

    The Hedrick Grant is given annually from the Faculty Development Office in the Center for Teaching and Learning at Marshall. The grant funds an award of up to $5,000 for a project that supports innovations in teaching at the program level.

    "As clinicians we realize the importance of working together across disciplines," Kroll said. "We have joined with the College of Health Profession's Department of Communication Disorders and School of Nursing as well as the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and School of Pharmacy to continue our inter-professional education (IPE) initiative."

    Approximately 320 students were brought together this past spring for three, three-hour seminars. They participated in activities designed to encourage inter-professional education, which occurs when "students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective learning."

    With the aid of the Hedrick Grant, Karim said students can build on these experiences and continue their interactions with different professionals to learn about improving patient care.

    "If we can get our students exposed to this collaborative environment of working with individuals of different disciplines, we create meaningful interactions that improve student outcomes," Karim said. "Growing up in this educational environment will allow them to be more prepared for real-world situations. That's our ultimate goal."

    Both Kroll and Karim agree the need for inter-professional education is greater than ever due to miscommunication among health care workers, which can result in many costly medical errors. Pam Holland, director of clinical education in the Department of Communication Disorders, said the changing landscape of health care is one reason why inter-professional education is so important.

    "Students we are educating now will be working in a changing environment," Holland said. "It is essential, now more than ever, to have a solid understanding of how other professionals can contribute to the care of a patient and see others' knowledge and skills as equally important."

    Holland, one of the faculty organizers for the inter-professional education sessions, said she was not surprised to hear about the School of Physical Therapy's grant award.

    "This is a great example of innovation that benefits both faculty and students as well as the community for years to come through the quality of health care received," Holland said. "The fact that the IPE initiative is a collaborative endeavor across several disciplines further supports the recognition provided through the grant."

    ----------

    Photo: Students from the College of Health Profession's Department of Communication Disorders, School of Physical Therapy and School of Nursing joined with the Joan C. Edwards Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy last spring for the first ever inter-professional education (IPE) seminar at the St. Mary's Center for Education. These seminars will continue into fall 2013 with the help of the Hedrick Grant.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 27, 2013
    Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Advance only tickets on sale now for Marshall University's 16th annual Paint the Capital City Green rally

    CHARLESTON, W.Va.- Tickets are on sale for the 16th annual Paint the Capital City Green celebration coming to Charleston Embassy Suites on Thursday, Aug. 22.

    Thundering Herd fans will hear from Doc Holliday, Marshall University's head football coach, athletic director Mike Hamrick and President Stephen J. Kopp, as well as key members of this year's team as they talk about the future of Marshall University football.

    Fans will also enjoy a pep rally atmosphere that includes a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder.

    Festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. and the formal program begins at 7:30 p.m.

    Advance only tickets are $50 and must be purchased by close of business on Friday, Aug. 16, to be entered into a drawing for the opportunity to win admission and hotel accommodations for two to Marshall's game at Florida Atlantic University Oct. 12 in Boca Raton.

    For ticket information, call the Big Green Scholarship Foundation at 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu.

    The event, presented by Friends of Coal, is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for Thundering Herd alumni, fans and friends. Paint the Capital City Green is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association. Event proceeds benefit the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.

    For more information, contact Lalena Price, M.B.A |Marshall University Communications, 304-746-1989 | pricel@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 27, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Marshall University selected to help implement energy and power curriculum for high school students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has been selected by the Southern Regional Education Board to help implement an energy and power program of study for high school students in West Virginia and other states.

    As part of SREB's Advanced Career program, faculty members from Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering are working with the West Virginia Department of Education to launch a sequence of four courses intended to increase the number of students who leave high school prepared for further study, advanced training and careers in energy and power.

    Engineering professor Dr. Richard Begley, who is directing the project at Marshall, said the field of energy and power was selected for the project because of its importance to West Virginia's economy. The project is one of several similar initiatives SREB is developing in partnership with its member states.

    "The Advanced Career program focuses on high-wage, skilled fields important to the participating state's economy," Begley added. "The goal is to deliver courses that start students down the path toward a recognized industry certificate, a community/technical college certificate, or an associate or bachelor's degree in that field."

    According to Begley, the new courses were designed by teams from universities and high schools in partnership with industry experts. The curriculum incorporates a hands-on approach with experiments that use energy and power measurement instruments, data software and computer simulations. Participating students will learn to apply mathematical and scientific concepts, and will use technology and engineering to solve real-world problems found in the energy and power industry.

    SREB Senior Vice President Gene Bottoms said, "This is what modern career-tech education looks like. Because the aim is to graduate more students with more options, the program is available to any and all mainstream students. It flips the switch for those students who aren't sparked by traditional teaching styles and gives them a new way to learn. It's a path we must take to not only graduate more students, but to prepare them for what comes after high school."

    Begley said Marshall's primary role in the project will be training high school teachers to deliver the curriculum. Sessions to train selected West Virginia teachers will be held this summer. The trained teachers will pilot the new courses during the upcoming school year and next summer will help train teachers from other states.

    Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, said the cooperative project is testament to the quality of the university's engineering faculty.

    "The fact that our college was selected by SREB to help implement this program in West Virginia speaks volumes about our faculty, their skills and their dedication to helping students learn at all levels," he said. "Work force development is at the heart of everything we do and this new curriculum will play a vital role in preparing high school students to continue their educations and contribute to our state's economic future."

    West Virginia Superintendent of Schools James B. Phares said, "We welcome the opportunity to be part of this partnership with Marshall University and the SREB. This project promises to increase the level of engagement, motivation and effort for many students, while meeting a growing work force need in West Virginia, where energy and power play an important role in our economy. We look forward to sharing our work with other states in the Advanced Career consortium in the future."

    Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall, congratulated Begley and Zatar, saying, "We are pleased to be part of this important cooperative program with SREB and the West Virginia Department of Education. Thank you to Dr. Begley and Dean Zatar for their leadership. The hands-on approach of the Advanced Career program is perfectly suited to the style of teaching and learning we embrace here at Marshall."

    The Atlanta-based Southern Regional Education Board is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving public education in its 16 member states. Visit www.sreb.org.

    For more information about the Advanced Career program at Marshall, contact Begley at 304-696-3438 or begley@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 27, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, 304-696-7153

    Tobacco ban takes effect Monday, July 1, at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning Monday, July 1, the use of all tobacco products will be prohibited on any property owned or controlled by Marshall University.

    The tobacco policy was passed unanimously by Marshall's Board of Governors June 11, and takes effect Monday. It applies to faculty, staff, students, contractors, vendors and visitors. No advertising, sale or free sampling of tobacco products will be allowed on any Marshall campus.

    Amy Saunders, director of Marshall's student health programs, said Marshall is making the move to improve the health of its students, faculty and staff. She said more than 800 colleges and universities across the nation have done the same.

    "I hope everyone will be respectful of our policy and help us to make our campus healthier and safer for everybody," Saunders said. "It's a policy and, like any policy, we expect everybody to follow it. It's change, and it's change for the better."

    The policy includes an exception for events that attract a large number of off-campus visitors. Such events may be exempted on a case-by-case basis with the approval of the Vice President for Administration, provided that all smoking be restricted to designated outdoor smoking areas.

    Tobacco waste containers will be removed beginning Monday, and signs reminding faculty, staff and students of the tobacco ban will be placed around campus soon. Saunders said her organization will be setting up programs to help students, faculty and staff with cessation efforts.

    Saunders said she has received numerous calls since the policy was passed June 11.

    "A lot of people are happy about the tobacco policy," she said. "We do expect people to comply."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday June 26, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Traditional change of command ceremony conducted by Marines at MU

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The U.S. Marine Corps conducted a traditional change of command ceremony today on the plaza of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Maj. Lauren Edwards, a native of Smiths Grove, Ky., and a recent graduate of Marshall with a Master of Arts degree in leadership studies, relinquished command of Recruiting Station Charleston to Maj. Gabriel Diana of Columbus.

    Edwards spent three years as commanding officer at Recruiting Station Charleston, which is located in Ona. She next is headed to the Naval Command and Staff College in Newport, R.I.

    Diana served with 1st Battalion 9th Marines as the Commanding Officer Headquarters and Service Support Company and the Battalion Operations Officer from September 2009 to June 2012. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1996.

    Today's ceremony was attended by families of each Marine, along with an assembled company of command, honored guests and other dignitaries.

    ------------

    Photos: (Above) Maj. Gabriel Diana, left, and Maj. Lauren Edwards stand together during today's change of command ceremony at Marshall University. (Below) Maj. Gabriel Diana, left, holds the U.S. Marine Corps flag after receiving it from Maj. Lauren Edwards, right, in today's change of command ceremony at Marshall University. Edwards relinquished command of Recruiting Station Charleston to Diana in the ceremony. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 24, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Assistant professor's presentation detailing her research expected to boost world-wide collaboration for MU community

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney, an assistant professor with the Marshall University College of Health Professions, will give a presentation on her research of health care economics, titled "The performance of India's health care system: Evidence from a stochastic frontier analysis."

    Sawhney will give her presentation at the ninth International Health Economics Association (iHEA) World Congress from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday, July 8, in Sydney, Australia.

    "I am very excited to see what other researchers have been working on in the area of health economics," Sawhney said. "This opens many doors for the Marshall community to be able to collaborate with scholars around the world on future research initiatives."
               
    "My research involves the basic principle of efficiency," Sawhney said. "We have so many economic challenges all over the world. In order to be efficient, we have to implement the best health care practices. One of the ways to do this is to make efficient use of available resources."

    Sawhney is director of the Public Health program at Marshall. She said this is a very timely topic for not only developing countries such as India, but for nations across the globe as well as states within the U.S., especially West Virginia.

    "Many national and local governments - both in the developing and developed world - are faced with the possibility of a decline in resources for health and other social sectors," Sawhney said. "This conference will provide an opportunity to be exposed to cutting-edge research that can help policymakers implement strategies that encourage high levels of efficiency."

    Tom Getzen, iHEA executive director, said more than 1,000 researchers representing more than 60 countries will attend the event.

    "This is a large forum where like-minded people can present their ideas and connect with one another on a global front," Getzen said. "This is a great way for researchers to get feedback on their methodology and meet others interested in the field of health economics. Those attending this conference have presented work that meets an international standard."

    Sawhney said she is thrilled to be given an opportunity to share her knowledge with others in her field.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 24, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Researcher lands NIH grant to study mechanisms of human reproduction

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Guo-Zhang Zhu, an associate professor of biology at Marshall University, has received a two-year, $148,800 grant from the National Institutes of Health for his work to study the processes of human reproduction.

    Research in Zhu's lab focuses on understanding the molecular basis of fertilization and early embryonic development.

    He says that in addition to helping scientists understand the mechanisms of cell differentiation and development, the study funded through NIH's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development may offer insights into the causes of infertility in men and lead to new strategies for assisted reproduction and male contraception.

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development sponsors research on human development; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation.

    Zhu previously was awarded a three-year NIH grant worth $212,792.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 21, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Newly enacted pharmacy legislation allows for health care advances

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials with the Marshall University School of Pharmacy say legislation adopted  by the 2013 West Virginia Legislature and signed into law by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin paves the way for new educational opportunities and also modernizes pharmacy practice in the state.
       
    Brian A. Gallagher, director of pharmacy services at the school, said the legislation expands collaborative practice between pharmacists and physicians and replaces outdated policy from the 1990s.

    "The changes provide the opportunity for pharmacists to be more active members of the health care team by managing medications for patients in conjunction with the patient's physician," he said.  "Allowing cooperation among health care professionals in the community setting improves the quality of care and provides increased access while decreasing overall costs."

    Gallagher says under the new law pharmacists will be able to partner with physicians to provide specific patient care functions under certain conditions and limitations.

    Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, applauded the efforts of lawmakers for revamping the decades-old pharmacy act which, he says, now allows for enhanced  patient care outcomes through medication therapy management by pharmacists and for broader experiential opportunities for pharmacy students.

    "The modernization of the pharmacy practice act moves West Virginia forward in pharmacy education and ultimately means better and more accessible health care for patients," Yingling said.  "I commend the West Virginia Legislature, in particular Delegate Don C. Perdue and Senator Ron D. Stollings, and Governor Earl Ray Tomblin for their dedication to shepherding this much-needed initiative into law."

    The Larry W. Border Pharmacy Practice Act is named in memory of longtime delegate and pharmacist Larry W. Border, who passed away in 2011.   Perdue, of Wayne County, a sponsor of the legislation and also a pharmacist, said the new legislation is the culmination of years of work by those in the academic, clinical and community areas.

    "This particular legislation had been in process for three years," Perdue said. "The assistance of Dean  Yingling, the folks at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy and pharmacy professionals across the state were critical in getting a version passed that was appealing to both professionals and the public."

    Stollings agreed, saying, "The work of Dr. Yingling and others at Marshall certainly helped facilitate the passage of this much-needed update to the Pharmacy Practice Act.  Health care of the future is all about teamwork and the new law provides a framework for that collaboration to occur."

    The new law takes effect July 1.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 21, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Hensley receives Distinguished Service Award from organization of student personnel administrators


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 20, 2013
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Recent MU grad headed back to Turkey to study the language

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A recent Marshall University graduate has been awarded a U.S.  Department of State Critical Language Scholarship for the second consecutive year. The scholarship will allow her to spend two months this summer in Turkey studying the Turkish language.

    Mary Harper of South Charleston, W.Va., who received a B.A. degree in International Affairs from Marshall last month, left today (June 20) for Bursa, a city in northwestern Turkey, where she will engage  in intensive language institutes.

    Harper is returning to Turkey after spending several weeks there last year studying in Ankara, Turkey's capital city.

    The Critical Language Scholarship program is part of a government effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and mastering critical foreign languages.

    Harper, the daughter of Rich and Peggy Harper, also of South Charleston, was one of approximately 600 undergraduate and graduate students nationally who received a C.L.S. Scholarship to study abroad.

    This trip actually marks Harper's third visit to Turkey.  She credits her interest in the Turkish language to a friendship she developed with an international student with whom she was paired in Marshall's Learning English for Academic Purposes (LEAP) program. The friendship led to an invitation to visit her friend's home in Turkey where Harper said she developed a strong interest in the Turkish culture and its language.

    Harper will be pursuing a master's degree in English as a Second Language this fall at West Virginia University.  She hopes to return to Turkey as a teacher working primarily with refugees.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday June 18, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    University announces hydroelectric demonstration and education project at Morris Creek Watershed

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences and the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University have announced the installation of a hydro generator to be used as a demonstration and education project in the Morris Creek Watershed near Montgomery.

    Installed in conjunction with the Morris Creek Watershed Association, the hydro generator is using acid mine drainage discharge as its water source. It is the latest in a series of projects the university is conducting in partnership with the West Virginia Division of Energy's Office of Coalfield Community Development to demonstrate renewable energy applications on former surface-mined properties.

    The Morris Creek Watershed is located in an extensively mined area of Kanawha and Fayette counties. According to George Carico, director of the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center, mining has not occurred in the watershed since the late 1980s but acid mine drainage discharges are present.

    He says water from a discharge has been diverted to provide the water source for the generator. After the water passes through the generator, it is directed back into the main stream for treatment before entering Morris Creek.

    Power generated from the 1.3 kilowatt system is being used to charge the Morris Creek Watershed Association's stream monitoring equipment and meeting facility. The association is monitoring the generator's performance and will be offering informational tours of the system as part of its ongoing educational program.

    Carico worked with the West Virginia Division of Energy to find a suitable site to demonstrate this type of renewable energy. He says that while the project provides renewable energy to the watershed association, it also has a great deal of educational value.

    "We're seeing an increasing interest in various types of renewable energy all around the state," he adds. "Electricity generated from hydropower is definitely not new, but using mine water discharge as a power source is.

    "This system, though quite small in terms of electrical generation capacity, will help people better understand this particular type of renewable energy. With the Morris Creek Watershed Association providing educational outreach programs, members of the local community and students and teachers, as well as other watershed groups, will get to see close up how hydropower in the right setting can provide a reliable power supply."

    A total of $14,000 in federal and local funding was provided for the project, including $7,000 from the Appalachian Regional Commission and $7,000 in cash and in-kind funding from the Morris Creek Watershed Association. The association's match included engineering expertise and support from the West Virginia University Institute of Technology and Bridgemont Community and Technical College.

    For more information about the project, contact Carico at 304-696-5456 or carico@marshall.edu. To schedule a site tour, contact Mike King of the Morris Creek Watershed Association at 304-442-4185 or mikewvoa@suddenlink.net.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday June 14, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Application process begins for Fall Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the fall 2013 semester, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for a limited number of Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

    Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses.

    The awarding of waivers is competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Beginning with the fall semester of 2013, students are eligible for one award in three consecutive semesters (i.e., a student who receives an award in fall 2013 is not eligible for another award until fall 2014; a student who receives an award in spring 2014 is not eligible for another award until Spring 2015; a student who receives an award in summer 2014 is not eligible for another award until summer 2015). In addition, beginning with the fall 2013 scholarship waiver period, students are limited to a maximum of four awards. (Past awards do not apply.)

    Deadline for the applications is Friday, July 26. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar.

    Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for fall 2013 by Friday, Aug. 9, in order to receive a waiver. Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by Aug. 9 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

    Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at http://www.marshall.edu/graduate/forms/tuitionwaiverapplication.pdf. Completed waiver applications may be mailed, emailed, faxed or submitted in person.

    For complete information please see: www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver/ or contact the Graduate College office at 304-696-6606.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 13, 2013
    Contact: Christine Anderson, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Ohio Valley Bank establishes scholarship for students served by Point Pleasant center

    POINT PLEASANT, W.Va. - Full-time students at Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center (MOVC) will benefit from a new scholarship fund established by the Ohio Valley Bank.

    "As a locally based business, Ohio Valley Bank is a longtime partner of the Mid-Ohio Valley Center as it works toward academic excellence," said Homer Preece, director of the center. "We are pleased to get this scholarship program under way."

    The scholarship agreement was announced yesterday at the bank's Point Pleasant location by Mario Liberatore, president of Ohio Valley Bank Point Pleasant and a longtime member of the MOVC Board of Advisors; Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; and Dr. Ronald G. Area, chief executive officer of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., which will administer the fund. "

    "I am very happy to be a part of a community bank like Ohio Valley Bank, who takes great pride in helping the youth in our area," Liberatore said. "This scholarship is an example of many ways that we help Mason County and all the other communities that we serve."

    Plans call for each recipient of the scholarship to be a full-time sophomore, junior or senior at MOVC, with a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Priority will be given to students in Mason County first, then Gallia and Meigs counties in Ohio. The award will be renewable for up to four years if the recipient remains in good academic standing with a 2.5 grade point average. Recipients will be selected by the director of the center, with assistance from the Board of Advisors and Marshall's Office of Student Financial Assistance. The first scholarship is expected to be awarded during the 2014-2015 academic year.


    ----

    Photo: Mario Liberatore, president, Ohio Valley Bank Point Pleasant, presents a copy of the guidelines for a scholarship fund for students of Marshall University's Mid-Ohio Valley Center, to Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. From left: Jeffrey E. Smith, chairman, Ohio Valley Bank; Tom Wiseman, president and CEO, Ohio Valley Bank; Kopp; Liberatore; Christine Anderson, assistant vice president for development, Marshall University Foundation; Dr. Ronald Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation; and Homer Preece, director of Marshall's Mid-Ohio Valley Center. Photo by Tyler Kes.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday June 12, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    First session of orientation set for June 18 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first of three New Student Orientation sessions at Marshall University this summer will take place June 18-21 on the Huntington campus. Orientation also is planned July 9-12 and Aug 1-2.

    Students who have been admitted for fall 2013 and have paid their $100 enrollment deposit are eligible to register for a New Student Orientation session. The sessions are designed to get students started on the path to success as Marshall students.

    "It's really their first day as Marshall University students, their first day on campus," said Beth Wolfe, director of recruitment at Marshall. "The most valuable part is the time they spend with their advisers to go over their schedules, and really the whole four-year plan."

    A program specifically designed for parents also is available, Wolfe said.

    "Whether it's their first child or their fifth child going to college, they will receive some valuable information on how to support their son or daughter and help him or her to be successful," she said.

    Here are the dates for orientation:

    June 18 - (Honors College students only)
    June 19, 20, 21 (registration for all three days is closed)
    July 9, 10, 11, 12 (registration for July 9 is closed.
    Aug. 1,2

    Wolfe said each orientation session is a busy, half-day program that includes many activities. A maximum of 225 students may attend each session, with an estimated 180-200 attending the Honors College session. At orientation, students can:

    • register for fall classes and discuss their schedule with an adviserlearn about campus housing or the resources available to commuter students
    • get their pictures taken for their student I.D.'s
    • learn about campus IT resources
    • take a tour of campus
    • attend a financial aid workshop

    Call the orientation office at 304-696-2354 for more information or visit http://muwww-new.marshall.edu/recruitment/orientation.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday June 11, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    MU board approves tobacco ban, 2013-2014 operating budget

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors today approved a policy banning tobacco products on campus and approved the university's proposed budget for operating expenses for Fiscal Year 2013-2014 today in a meeting on the Huntington campus.

    The tobacco policy applies to any and all indoor and outdoor locations. However, events that attract a large number of off-campus visitors to Marshall's campus may be exempted on a case-by-case basis, provided that all smoking be restricted to designated outdoor smoking areas.

    The tobacco policy goes into effect Monday, July 1.

    "We are so happy that our campus is making this move to improve the health of our students, faculty and staff," said Amy Saunders, director of Marshall's student health programs. "We are joining more than 800 colleges and universities across the nation that have taken this stance against tobacco use."

    Saunders said her organization will soon be setting up programs to help students, faculty and staff with cessation efforts.

    Also in today's meeting, the Board of Governors unanimously approved the university's proposed budget for operating expenses of $196,434,905 for Fiscal Year 2013-2014.  Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp praised the recently-formed budget working group, consisting of faculty, deans, staff and student representatives, for its role in preparing the balanced budget. The group will continue with additional constituent representatives.

    "We worked very diligently together in solving the problem that was presented to us as a result of reductions in state appropriations and increased projections of expenditures," President Kopp said. "We started out with a $6.8 million deficit and tailored that down to a balanced budget with about a $43,000 projected surplus.

    "We did it through a great deal of give and take and sharing of information. It's a reflection of what happens when folks can work together and do work together."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday June 11, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Cancer researcher presents technology developed to help personalize chemotherapy

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University biomedical sciences researcher Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio traveled to a national medical meeting in Chicago earlier this month to present a technology he and his colleagues think will help physicians personalize chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

    Claudio's presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology focused on ChemoID, a system he has developed with Marshall biology professor Dr. Jagan Valluri to measure the sensitivity of patients' tumors to chemotherapy drugs.

    "Oncologists every day face many challenges in determining the best course of therapy for an individual cancer patient," says Claudio. "The basic problem is that patients with similar diagnoses don't always respond to the same chemotherapy. This technology we have developed could help physicians select the appropriate chemotherapy for an individual patient giving them an edge in the fight against cancer."

    He says ChemoID is the first chemosensitivity test for both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells.

    According to Claudio, cancer stem-like cells are a small, resilient subset of cells found in tumors. Current anticancer therapies are imperfect because they target the tumor without treating the root of the cancer the small subpopulation of these tumor-initiating cancer stem cells thought to be responsible for recurrences. The result is that the tumor often shrinks but soon grows back. In addition, the stem-like cells appear to be preferentially resistant to both standard chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

    He says more evaluation of the technology is needed, but a clinical trial on a small number of patients found ChemoID 100 percent accurate in predicting which drug is more effective in treating patients affected by brain cancer if the cancer stem-like cells are evaluated.

    The upshot for a cancer patient, he says, is that ChemoID may make possible personalized treatment by predicting the most effective drug combination to successfully target that specific patient's cancer increasing the chance the drugs will work and perhaps reducing side effects by helping the patient avoid unnecessary drugs.

    Claudio acknowledged the contributions of Dr. Anthony Alberico, chairman of the Department of Neuroscience at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, for providing the clinical samples, as well as his co-investigators at the school of medicine, McKown Translational Genomics Research Institute and Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 10, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

    Marshall music alumnus McCoy to participate in Longwood Gardens International Organ Competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- Yuri McCoy, a Huntington native and Marshall University music alumnus, has been invited to participate in the Longwood Gardens International Organ Competition beginning Tuesday, June 18, and continuing through Saturday, June 22.

    The competition features Longwood's 10,010-pipe Aeolian organ, a panel of distinguished judges and live performances by young organists from countries such as South Korea, Bulgaria, France, Russia and New Zealand.  The winner receives a prize of $40,000.

    Longwood Gardens is the former weekend home of Pierre S. du Pont, founder of  E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company.

    McCoy received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree magna cum laude from Marshall in 2008. While living in Huntington, he held several organ posts in and around the city, most recently at St. John's Episcopal Church, and played violin with both the Huntington Symphony and the Marshall University Orchestra. He received his Master of Music degree in the fall of 2010 from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, and is now studying at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University in Texas.

    While an undergraduate, he attended the Cortona Contemporary Music Festival (now soundSCAPE) in Cortona, Italy. He studied with Thomas Rosenkranz and Nathanael May during the week-long festival. At Marshall, he was the winner of the Concert of Soloists Competition, the West Virginia Music Teachers Association's Mountain State Collegiate Piano Competition and the Belle and Lynum Jackson Competion. While pursuing his master's degree, he was the only pianist from the University of Hawai'i selected to perform in a master class given by the legendary pianist Leon Fleisher in 2008.

    McCoy's fifth-grade grade music teacher in Huntington, Harriet Tucker, said she is thrilled that he has been chosen for this competition. "He is very, very talented," Tucker said. "I think Patricia Green taught him in third grade, and saw it even before me, that he was very talented. He worked with me through high school, and by the time he was a junior, he gave a recital by himself."

    Further information on the competition is available online at www.longwoodgardens.org/OrganCompetition.html.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 10, 2013
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

    Project makes Glenwood Estate more publicly accessible

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Graduate Humanities Program is hosting another installment of the Glenwood Project, a three-part initiative now in its final phase that seeks to make the Glenwood Estate on Charleston's West Side more publicly accessible through archaeological and historical analysis.

    The stately Georgian-style mansion sits on the corner of Orchard Street and Park Avenue, just a short distance from Stonewall Jackson Middle School. It is a rich repository of the history of Charleston and the Kanawha Valley as well as of the estate's early owners, whose names would become familiar to Charlestonians through the streets that today bear their names.

    On June 30, the public can get a glimpse into the colorful past of the estate, learn about its rich history and share his or her memories through Glenwood Memories/Histories, a presentation of the Glenwood Project which will take place at the pre-Civil War estate. The program is free and open to the public and will include:

    -  1 p.m. - The Glenwood Project, Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, program director of the Graduate Humanities Program;

    -  1:15 p.m. - Oral Histories of Glenwood, Dr. Elizabeth Campbell, faculty member in the Marshall University Graduate School of Education and Professional Development;

    -  1:30 p.m. - Historic Glenwood: Window on the West Side, Dr. Billy Joe Peyton of West Virginia State University and the MU Graduate Humanities Program;

    -  2:15 p.m. - Landscape Archeology, Glenwood and the Road to Urbanization, Dr. Robert Maslowski of the Marshall University Graduate Humanities Program;

    -  3 p.m. - Sharing Memories of Glenwood

    Glenwood was built in 1852 by James Laidley on a vast 366-acre tract that stretched from the current Delaware Avenue, Somerset Drive and the Chandler Branch Drive of Edgewood Hills to the Kanawha River.

    Laidley, the founder of the Charleston newspaper, The Western Register, was forced by financial reverses to sell the home in 1857 to George W. Summers.

    Portions of the estate were sold off as it was passed down through generations until 1978 when the final owner, Summers' great-granddaughter, Lucy Quarrier, deeded it to the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies, which later became part of Marshall University.

    Glenwood is now owned and maintained by the Historic Glenwood Foundation, which formerly was the Marshall University Graduate College Foundation.

    "It provides a unique history into the complex history of Charleston, the Kanawha Valley and West Virginia," Lassiter said. "Much of the estate's history is contained in the documents and materials at Glenwood."

    An objective of the Glenwood Project is to facilitate public engagement in a variety of ways, including an archival database, public workshops and seminars such as this one, development of the Marshall University Graduate Humanities curriculum, and other activities.

    The Glenwood Project is funded through a partnership with the West Virginia Humanities Council, Council of West Virginia Archaeology, Kanawha Valley Historical and Preservation Society, Historic Glenwood Foundation, Marshall University Graduate School of Education and Professional Development and Marshall University College of Liberal Arts.

    For additional information, call 304-746-1923 or e-mail lassiter@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday June 6, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Nomination deadline extended to June 28 for Miners' Celebration 'Because of You' awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The deadline to submit nominations for "Because of You" awards to honor people who have made significant contributions to West Virginia's coal mining enterprise and the state's mining heritage has been extended to June 28.
     
    Awards in nearly a dozen categories will be presented at a gala dinner and awards ceremony planned as part of this year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration to be held Oct. 3 at Tamarack in Beckley.
     
    According to event organizers, representatives of the state's mining industry and community leaders will gather at the event to recognize miners, engineers, safety and environmental professionals and community members.
     
    "Many of our engineering graduates find employment in West Virginia's mining industry, which depends upon thousands of individuals in a number of different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every person who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders, educators and mining families.
     
    "It is because of every one of them that the mining industry is successful. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."
     
    According to Szwilski, "Because of You" awards will be presented in the following categories:  Equipment Innovation, Safety Professional, Women in Mining, Community Investment, Environmental Professional, Engineering Professional, Community Involvement, Management Professional and Educator of the Year. In addition, the Homer Hickam Collier Award and Spirit of the Coalfields Award will be presented.
     
    Representatives of the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will be on hand to present several of that organization's top awards, including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.
     
    The "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration gala dinner and awards ceremony is a ticketed event and will begin at 6 p.m. Szwilski added that the program also will feature exhibits and presentations focusing on a variety of aspects of the mining industry, beginning at 1 p.m.
     
    To nominate someone for the "Because of You" awards or for more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit http://muwww-new.marshall.edu/cegas/events/mcc/ or contact Teresa Buckland at 304-696-3568 or buckland@marshall.edu.
     
    For more information about the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area awards, call 304-465-3720 or e-mail info@coalheritage.org.
     
    The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 3, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

    Jazz-MU-Tazz music camp starts June 10; closing performance is June 15

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will host its 15th Jazz-MU-Tazz festival, a jazz camp for high school students, June 10 to 15 on the Huntington campus. The camp will culminate with a concert performance at 5 p.m. Saturday, June 15, at Pullman Square.

    Students who attend Jazz-MU-Tazz participate in rehearsals, discussion forums and jam sessions. Throughout the week, they perform in big bands and combos while learning about jazz improvisation, history and theory.

    This year, Jazz-MU-Tazz participants will work with, in addition to Marshall music faculty, guest artist Dr. Sim Flora, a jazz trombone player and professor emeritus of music theory and jazz studies at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Ark. Flora's unique and varied career has included public school teaching in southern Illinois, freelance trombone work on the West Coast and in the St. Louis area, and a seven-year tenure as musical director at Six Flags Over St. Louis. He has served on the faculty of Clark Terry's All-American Jazz Camps and various university summer jazz camps. He currently is on staff with the prestigious Alessi Seminar for trombonists.

    "The concert at Pullman Square provides a terrific, informal venue for these aspiring musicians to showcase their talents," said Dr. Ed Bingham, professor of music and director of jazz studies at Marshall. "Music making, especially jazz, is a creative activity that is heightened by communication between musicians and their audience. The entertainment provided by these aspiring jazz musicians will be enjoyable to the audience and will help encourage these young musicians to further their creative abilities."

    A native of southern Illinois, Flora earned his Ph.D. in music education at the University of Oklahoma, his Master of Music Education at Ouachita Baptist University and a Bachelor of Music from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Ill. He has presented master classes and directed all-state and regional honor bands throughout the United States. He has appeared as a guest artist with many university and community bands and trombone choirs, with The United States Air Force Band and has twice been featured soloist at the Eastern Trombone Workshop. He continues to maintain a busy performance schedule and will perform with the Murray State University trombone choir at the International Trombone Festival later this month.

    Flora has instrumental arrangements published by Southern Music, choral anthems published by the G. Lorenz Company and children's songs published by LifeWay Christian Resources. He is an artist for the Michael Rath Trombone Company and plays custom-built Rath trombones.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday June 3, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions,, 304-696-2624

    St. Mary's Center for Education to host health professions academy for local high school students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - St. Mary's Medical Center will host a health professions academy this week for high school students interested in learning more about careers in health care.

    Dr. Shelia Kyle, director of the School of Nursing for the St. Mary's Center for Education, said this is a great opportunity for high school sophomores and juniors to explore possible jobs in several health care disciplines.

    "Students will get a behind-the-scenes look into the versatile world of health care," Kyle said. "As they move through different areas of the Center for Education they will be shadowing medical imaging faculty, RNs and respiratory therapists to observe their responsibilities."

    During the three-day academy, selected students will join health care professionals as they demonstrate care for simulated patients at St. Mary's Center for Education. Experienced faculty will help students begin to plan for health care careers as they learn about the education necessary for becoming health care professionals.

    "We offer activities which include sessions for learning basic health care skills, first aid and CPR certification training," Kyle said. "At the end we also give the students a stethoscope and T-shirt to take home."

    In addition to these activities, Kyle said students will be given the chance to experience a mock trauma with local EMS in attendance.

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the Marshall University College of Health Professions, said the partnership between St. Mary's and Marshall University offers future students an advantage to identify the wealth of career possibilities available in the college.

    "Many high school students may not be aware of the vast amount of opportunities available through our cooperative programs at St. Mary's Center for Education," Prewitt said. "We are very proud of our partnership with St. Mary's and look forward to collaborating more with them in the future."

    The academy will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 to 6 at the St. Mary's Center for Education, 2825 5th Ave., Huntington. Students in the 10th and 11th grades were required to have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0, a counselor recommendation and parental consent to participate.

    For more information on the health professions academy, please call 304-526-1415 or visit http://www.st-marys.org/education_training/center_for_education.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Friday May 31, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall hosting students from eight institutions for biomedical research internships

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twelve undergraduate students from eight institutions are spending their summer doing biomedical research in Marshall University's laboratories. The students are participating in nine-week programs sponsored by the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE) and the university's Summer Research Internship for Minority Students (SRIMS) program.

    Dr. Elsa I. Mangiarua, a professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, directs the WV-INBRE summer program. She said both programs give participants the opportunity to do meaningful research and much more.

    "Over the summer, these students will gain valuable, hands-on experience doing graduate-level research in the labs of some of Marshall's finest scientists," she said. "We also teach them how to share their findings at a scientific meeting and to network, all of which helps them build academic competitiveness for graduate school."

    Diana R. Maue, who coordinates the SRIMS program, agreed, adding, "It's exciting that we are able to provide these in-depth, mentored research opportunities for very talented undergraduates, and it's equally important that these programs promote awareness of graduate degree programs and careers in biomedical research. We are helping to develop a pipeline for training tomorrow's scientists."While at Marshall, the interns are working in state-of-the-art facilities on research projects related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes, neuroscience, toxicology and environmental health, infectious diseases and bioinformatics. The students will present their research results at a symposium on July 29 at the university's Memorial Student Center
    .
    In addition to the formal research training they each receive from their Marshall faculty mentors, the interns are taking part in workshops and seminars about a variety of topics related to research and graduate education. Students in the two programs attend many of the same seminars and interact socially through a bowling outing, ice cream socials and other special events intended to help them get to know one another outside of the laboratory environment.

    Students participating in the WV-INBRE summer program include:

    • Jaya Ale, University of Charleston (Dr. Eric Blough, mentor)
    • Joshua Easterling, University of Charleston (Dr. Elaine Hardman, mentor)
    • Bishnu Kafley, Berea College (Dr. Travis Salisbury and Dr. Jim Denvir, mentors)
    • Rebecca Martin, Davis and Elkins College (Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, mentor)
    • Hajer Mazagri, University of Charleston (Dr. Richard Egleton, mentor)
    • Noah Mitchell, Bluefield State College (Dr. Nalini Santanam, mentor)
    • Rishi Reddy, West Virginia State University (Dr. Larry Grover, mentor)
    • Anthony Schnelle, Wheeling Jesuit University (Dr. Monica Valentovic, mentor)
    • Linh Vu, University of Charleston (Dr. Gary Rankin, mentor)

    The WV-INBRE program also sponsors summer fellowships for instructors. This year's fellowship recipients are science teacher Olivia Boskovic of Huntington High School and Dr. Sobha Goraguntula, an assistant professor of chemistry at Alderson-Broaddus College. Boskovic is working in the lab of Dr. Emine Koc. Goraguntula's mentor is Dr. Travis Salisbury.

    WV-INBRE is funded through a $16 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Marshall in partnership with researchers at West Virginia University received the award to help build expertise in biomedical research.

    Students in this year's SRIMS program are:

    • Annesha King, University of the Virgin Islands (Dr. Emine Koc, mentor)
    •  Ashlea Hendrikson, Oakwood University (Dr. Hongwei Yu, mentor)
    • Emmanuel Rosas, University of Texas at Brownsville (Dr. Richard Egleton, mentor)

    Support for the SRIMS program comes from the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission's Division of Science and Research.

    Each student receives a stipend. Depending on the program in which they are participating, they may also receive room and board, lab fees, and reimbursement for travel to and from Marshall.

    For more information about the WV-INBRE program, visit www.wv-inbre.org or contact Mangiarua at mangiaru@marshall.edu or 304-696-6211. For more information about the SRIMS program, visit www.marshall.edu/bms/future-students/summer-research-internship or contact Maue at maue1@marshall.edu or 304-696-3365.

    -----------------------

    Photos: (Above) Ashlea Hendrikson, shown at left with her mentor Dr. Hongwei Yu, is one of 12 undergraduate students spending this summer as a biomedical research intern at Marshall University. A student at Oakwood University in Huntsville, Ala., Hendrikson is participating in Marshall's Summer Research Internship for Minority Students (SRIMS) program. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University. (Below) Emmanuel "Manny" Rosas, left, and Hajer Mazagri are working this summer as biomedical research interns in the lab of Dr. Richard Egleton at Marshall University. Their internships were made possible through the university's Summer Research Internship for Minority Students (SRIMS) program and the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence. Rosas attends the University of Texas at Brownsville. Mazagri is enrolled at the University of Charleston. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Friday May 31, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall engineering seniors achieve perfect passing rate in Fundamentals of Engineering exam

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Seniors in Marshall University's Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree program, a total of 23, have all passed the Fundamentals of Engineering examination (FE) administered by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying in April.

    "This is an impressive result," said Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering. "I am proud to say that I personally have not heard of another school of Marshall's size and situation reporting such an achievement. Congratulations to the B.S.E. Class of 2013 on their success."

    "Passing the FE is a huge accomplishment for anyone; it takes a ton of studying and preparing for weeks up to months and even a little meditation during the last few days before the exam," said Kristen Bobuk, a senior who will graduate in December. She is a double major in engineering and music. "But to have 100 percent of the senior class pass the exam goes beyond that. It's a true testament to the hard work and dedication we've put in for the past four years, and shows that the teachers went above and beyond to make sure not only did we learn the material the first time around, but also that we retained it for years before taking this test. It's a true job well done!"

    Those who have passed the Fundamentals of Engineering exam are known as Engineer Interns and are eligible to sit for the Professional Engineer exam in West Virginia after four years of work experience following graduation.


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    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine physician authors book on medical poetry

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Aaron M. McGuffin, senior associate dean for medical education at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has published a new poetry book titled Common Illness that showcases creative writings from his experiences as a physician.
     
    McGuffin, who is board certified in internal medicine and pediatrics, credits his mother, an English teacher, for stoking his passion for creative writing.

    "My mom inspired me to write and express my feelings in a way that isn't always synonymous with the medical profession," McGuffin said. "Writing provides a release for me and in some ways has helped me become a better doctor by improving my observation skills and developing a heightened sense of empathy."

    He said he hopes his poetry provides insight into physicians' perspectives on providing patient care and will allow the reader to laugh and cry through related personal experiences.
     
    In addition to Common Illness, McGuffin has authored several poems that have been published in medical journals.  Common Illness is available on Amazon and Kindle beginning in June. 

    McGuffin is a Huntington native who graduated from the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in 1999.  He also completed a residency in Internal Medicine/Pediatrics at Marshall.

     


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    Thursday May 30, 2013
    Contact: Griffin Talbott, Director of Annual Giving, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall Foundation to kick off 30-day donor challenge

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Development will kick off "MU Challenge: 630 by 6/30" beginning Saturday, June 1, and continuing through Thursday, June 30.

    "We want 630 donors to the annual fund by June 30 in order to have a strong closing for our fiscal year," said Griffin Talbott, director of annual giving at Marshall. "It's an ambitious goal, but Marshall has the most generous alumni, friends and family. Any gift, no matter what amount, will help us reach it."

    In addition, Dr. Greg Crews and Dr. Dallas Nibert, who have a family dentistry practice in Huntington, have agreed to contribute $10,000 to the annual fund when the goal of 630 donors is reached, Talbott said. Nibert is a 2003 Marshall alumnus with a B.S. in biological sciences.

    "Marshall alumni in particular should watch their e-mails for the announcement of this campaign," said Christine Anderson, associate vice president for development at Marshall. "We encourage anyone to take part and be counted, whether they've attended Marshall or not."

    Talbot said that in addition to e-mails to alumni, the campaign will include Web (www.marshall.edu/muchallenge) and social media presences.


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    'New roadmap of world history' provided in book written by Marshall associate professor Dr. Christopher M. White

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Christopher M. White, an associate professor of Latin American history and director of graduate studies in the history department at Marshall University, has written a book that provides the reader with a new roadmap of world history, according to one reviewer.

    A Global History of the Developing World is a 288-page book that will be released in both paperback and hardback Sept. 18 by Routledge.  The book has 12 chapters and is organized into four thematic units, each containing one chapter on Asia, Latin America and Africa.

    According to the book description on the Routledge website, these units cover different commonly-experienced phenomena among the peoples of the developing world: imperialism, nationalism, globalization and development. 

    The first three are chronological, while the last surveys and analyzes the scholarly debates over the causes of development and underdevelopment. Through these chapters White presents a wide-ranging study of the major themes in studies of the developing world, including slavery, imperialism, religion, free and fair trade, democratization and economic development.

    "The book provides a comprehensive history of the developing world based on the author's profound knowledge of economic and social history over the last six centuries," said Katsushi Imai, a well-known economic development specialist from the University of Manchester in the UK. "The reader is not only provided with a new roadmap of World History but also with an alternative way of understanding key contemporary issues, such as global poverty or inequality. This book is highly recommended for students and their teachers in both social science and history."

    According to the book description, A Global History of the Developing World centralizes the struggle for self-determination in an attempt to understand how the current nation-states have been formed and what their future may hold. Although concentrating on the modern era, its scope is broad: it covers geography, ancient and modern history, economics, politics and recent events.

    White said it took about two years to actually write the book, but many years of research based on travel to mostly Latin America, including places such as Peru, Mexico, Cuba and Central America.

    "But  also based on teaching a class for the past seven years at Marshall," he said. "I have taken lots of notes down through the years and added to my lectures and kind of built the class up into the foundation of what the book became."

    The book includes detailed profiles of key figures as well as maps and illustrations.

    At Marshall, White teaches courses on Latin America, the developing world and U.S. foreign relations. He also is the author of Creating a Third World: Mexico, Cuba, and the United States during the Castro Era  (New Mexico, 2007), as well as  The History of El Salvador (Greenwood, 2008).


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    School of Medicine expands clinical research operations with appointment of new personnel

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine officials today announced the appointment of Dr. Todd H. Davies as the new director of research development and translation for the Marshall Clinical Research Center. He also has a faculty appointment as research clinical associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine.

    Davies, who previously served as the chief executive officer for ADS Biotechnologies in Toledo, Ohio, is responsible for developing and maintaining a plan for long-term, sustained research growth, including building a framework for accelerating the clinical trial process; developing administrative policies and procedures; working with the university's Technology Transfer Office to develop patenting and licensing strategies for the School of Medicine; and verifying compliance with state and federal guidelines.

    "We are thrilled to have Dr. Davies here at Marshall as we expand our footprint in the biomedical research arena," said Dr. Todd W. Gress, assistant dean, clinical research.  "He is first and foremost a scientist who understands the processes of research, but more importantly in this position, he understands the business development aspect of taking research from the bench to the bedside.  His business acumen is stellar and we couldn't be more pleased to have him on our team. "

    Davies' experience ranges from serving the city of Toledo in the department of development to identifying new bioscience technologies for commercial market value through his work as business development manager for Rocket Ventures in Toledo.

    "I am excited to be part of the research renaissance happening here at Marshall," Davies said.  "Every investigator has to balance maintaining the research process with their regular duties.  I am here to help develop and organize the resources to make that possible.  The people here have been wonderful and I anticipate a great working relationship."

    Davies earned his bachelor's degree in biology from Wesley College in Dover, Del., and then completed his Ph.D. in medical science from the University of Toledo in 2003.  He also served in the United States Air Force.

    Assisting Davies in the Marshall Clinical Research Center is Patricia "Trish" H. Sacconi, a 20-plus year employee of the School of Medicine and Marshall Health. Sacconi serves as administrator for the center. She previously held several administrative positions with Marshall, including department administrator for University Eye Surgeons.

    Sacconi will graduate from Marshall University in December with a Regents Bachelor of Arts degree. She also holds several educational and medical certificates.


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    Thursday May 30, 2013
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    Marshall Recreation Center PEIA Weight Management clients to learn about healthy eating at dinner in June

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center and Huntington's Kitchen are hosting a dinner for PEIA Weight Management Program participants from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 18, at Huntington's Kitchen, which is located at 911 Third Ave. in Huntington.

    The focus is on portion control and healthy cooking options. Dietician Daniel Jarvis and Mo Khan, an exercise physiologist from the Rec Center, are organizing the event.

    There currently are 48 active participants in the Rec's PEIA weight management group. The dinner allows clients to receive a cooking lesson as well as meet others in the same program to share tips and discuss challenges they face when making healthy food choices.  Participants in the program also complete workouts with personal trainers, meet one on one with a dietitian and complete fitness assessments as part of the program provided by the insurance company.

    The dinner costs $4 per person and covers food, staff and supplies. The menu includes chipotle pork, corn and potato ragout, sugar snap peas and a vanilla bean custard temptation.

    "This is a great hands-on learning opportunity for our program participants and we are excited to be offering it," Khan said.

    For more information about the PEIA Weight Management Program at the Marshall Recreation Center, contact wyatt6@marshall.edu or khan13@marshall.edu, or call 304-696-3653 or 304-696-4REC.

     


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    Wednesday May 29, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall School of Medicine announces new academic scholarships

    Clinical departments contribute to aid medical students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Five new academic endowments that will assist medical students with educational costs have been announced at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

    The five gifts are all courtesy of clinical departments in the School of Medicine.  The following is a listing of the newly created endowments.

    • The Marshall Family Medicine Scholarship is an endowed scholarship created by the Department of Family Medicine, under the leadership of chair Dr. John B. Walden.  The scholarship will assist a future physician who exhibits financial need and aspires to a career in family medicine.  The recipient of the award will be a fourth-year medical student.
    • The Mahmood Heydarian, M.D. Scholarship is an endowed fund that was created by the Department of Pediatrics, under the leadership of chair Dr. Joseph E. Evans, School of Medicine Class of 1982. The scholarship is named in honor of Dr. Mahmood Heydarian, who served the department as a pediatric cardiologist and professor of pediatrics for more than 30 years, and will retire in June 2013.  The recipient will be a first-year medical student.
    • The Marshall Obstetrics and Gynecology Fourth-Year Medical Student Scholarship is an expendable scholarship created by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology's faculty and staff, under the leadership of Dr. David C. Jude, School of Medicine Class of 1988.  The recipient of the $7500 award will be a fourth-year medical student who has achieved the highest score on the National Board of Medical Examiners obstetrics and gynecology subject examination and exhibits financial need. Should the individual with the highest score not have a financial need, the scholarship will go to the student with the second-highest score who has financial need. An expendable scholarship is one that does not accrue interest and can only be awarded based upon the available balance.
    • The Marshall Surgery Scholarship is from an endowed fund created by the Department of Surgery faculty and staff, under the leadership of chair Dr. David A. Denning.   The recipient of this one-time award will be a third- or fourth-year student and have financial need.   Applications for this particular scholarship are available by contacting the assistant director of financial aid for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.
    • The Ernest M. Walker, M.D., Memorial Scholarship is an endowed fund established in memory of Dr. Ernest M. "Ernie" Walker Jr., former professor and chair of the Department of Pathology. The recipient(s) of this one-time award will be third- or fourth- year students pursuing pathology residency training and exhibiting financial need as determined by the Office of Student Financial Assistance. The recipient must also be in good academic standing.

    For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.

     


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    Tuesday May 28, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Japanese photo exhibition featured at Gallery 842, beginning today

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Japanese World Heritage Photo Exhibition, featuring the work of renowned Japanese photographer Kazuyoshi Miyoshi, will be on display today through June 15 at Gallery 842 in Huntington.

    An opening reception will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. today at Gallery 842. Japanese food and snacks will be served, and the event is free to the public. The exhibition is funded by the Japan Foundation.

    It is organized by the Japanese Program in the Department of Modern Languages in the College of Liberal Arts, the School of Art & Design in the College of Fine Arts and the Japan Outreach Coordinator, all at Marshall University.

    Miyoshi has focused in recent years on taking photographs of various scenic locations in Japan, including his hometown of Yoshinogawa, as well as Mt. Fuji and Yakushima Island. His work now is part of the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film's permanent collection in New York.

    Azusa Hanah Yamada, Japan Outreach Initiative program coordinator at Marshall, said the exhibition promotes international and multicultural awareness and is recommended for school trips for students K-12.

    Gallery 842, located at 842 Fourth Ave., is open from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information on the exhibition, call Yamada at 304-638-8225.


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    Friday May 24, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Marshall dietetics program one of two accredited in West Virginia

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Didactic Program in Dietetics received continuing accreditation May 3 from the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics.

    The didactic program has been offered at the undergraduate level since 1923 and currently has more than 60 students enrolled. Jana Hovland, director of the program at Marshall, said Marshall's program and West Virginia University's are the two accredited dietetics programs in West Virginia.

    "With an increase in obesity rates across the region, dietitians are needed to work to prevent and manage the impact chronic disease has on our state," Hovland said. "We are the food and nutrition experts in today's society."

    Accreditation also was continued for the non-degree Dietetic Internship, which enrolls 10 full-time interns annually. Dr. Kelli Williams, chair of the Department of Dietetics, said Marshall has had an accredited supervised practice program since 1993.

    "In order to become a registered dietitian you must go through an accredited undergraduate program and then complete the Dietetic Internship to sit for the national exam," Williams said. "Most of our graduates stay within the Tri-state area, which is great because it allows them to serve the needs of the rural population in a localized and affordable setting."

    According to its website, the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics is responsible for setting the national standards for what dietetics students are taught as well as evaluating, recognizing and publishing a list of education programs that meet these standards.

    The Marshall Didactic Program in Dietetics and the Dietetic Internship will participate in an on-site visit in 2017 to continue to meet accreditation standards.


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    Friday May 24, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall University announces next class of Yeager Scholars

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six students, including four from West Virginia, have been chosen as the Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholars Class of 2017. They will begin their studies this fall.

    The program is named for U.S. Air Force Brigadier General (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Lincoln County, W.Va. In October 1947, Yeager captured the world's attention by becoming the first supersonic pilot by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 experimental aircraft in California. The mission of the Society of Yeager Scholars is to seek out and attract to Marshall University a diverse and talented group of students with outstanding leadership potential.

    After receiving the scholarship, the students must maintain a rigorous course load, as well as a 3.5 GPA, and are expected to participate in campus and community activities. They will also have the opportunity to study literature, political science or history abroad at the University of Oxford in England as well as study in a country of the scholar's chosen foreign language.

    Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim dean of the Honors College, said she looks forward to working with the incoming class.

    "It's a long selection process for each Yeager class," she said. "Every year we have applications from across America and it is a difficult choice for our readers and interviewers. Each new Yeager scholar brings his or her own talents and interests to Marshall."
     
    The following students were chosen as the Yeager Scholars Class of 2017:

    • Sara E. Brumbaugh of Kenova, W.Va. She is a graduate of Spring Valley High School and is interested in biomedical science and mathematics.


     

    • David Ben Jones of Huntington. He graduated from Huntington High School and intends to pursue a degree in mathematics.



     

    • Chandler M. Milam from Dunbar, W.Va. He graduated from South Charleston High School. At Marshall he intends to study biochemistry.




    • Mary Kate Miller of Berea, Ky. She is a recent graduate of Madison Central High School. At Marshall she will study forensic chemistry.




    • Abigail A. Pullen of Ashburn, Va. She graduated from Broad Run High School and is interested in studying humanities in the College of Liberal Arts.




    • Amanda Schwartz from Winfield, W.Va. She is a graduate of Winfield High School and aims to be an English major at Marshall.







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    Friday May 24, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    West Virginia is celebrating its 150th birthday!

    Be sure to visit the 150th Birthday celebration website at www.wv150.com. as well as on Twitter and Facebook.


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    Thursday May 23, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Faculty and students awarded 13 grants from NASA consortium

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University faculty members and students have been awarded 13 grants totaling $107,000 for aerospace-related research and educational programs.

    The grants from the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium support projects of scientific interest to NASA. The projects funded at Marshall range from a study to explore how obesity affects bone health to a grassroots outreach program showcasing 3-D printing technology.

    The awards fall into five categories. Faculty members and students who received grants are listed below, along with the titles of their projects and the amount of each award.

    Research Seed Grants to support faculty efforts to start research activities, conduct pilot experiments or demonstrate new concepts:

    • Dr. Nalini Santanam, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, "Omega 3 diet and microgravity regulates microRNA in adipocytes," $10,000
    • Dr. Nicole Winston, School of Pharmacy, "Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on X-ray irradiated human keratinocytes," $10,000
    • Dr. Miaozong Wu, School of Pharmacy, "Obesity-induced alteration of bone structure and function: molecular mechanisms and DMSO intervention," $10,000

    NASA Graduate Research Fellowship Program for graduate students working on a thesis or dissertation:

    • Benjamin Owen, biomedical sciences program (Dr. Lawrence Grover, mentor), "Role of Kv7 channels in controlling neuronal excitability," $12,000
    • Lyndsay Rankin, biological sciences program (Dr. Anne Axel, mentor), "Using remote sensing to measure the ecological integrity of non-intact tropical dry forests of southern Madagascar," $12,000
    • Rounak Nande, biomedical sciences program (Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, mentor), "Ultrasound mediated gene delivery in immune-competent mice," $12,000
    • M. Allison Wolf, biomedical sciences program (Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, mentor), "Investigation of benzyl isothiocyanates regulation of metastatic processes in HNSCC cell lines," $12,000

    NASA Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program to provide support for undergraduate students involved in a research project under the supervision of a faculty mentor:

    • Zachary Hunter, chemistry and applied mathematics major (Dr. Scott Day, mentor), "Probe Density and Capture Efficiency Dependence on Dendrimer Size," $5,000
    • Melissa Massie, biology major (Dr. Nalini Santanam, mentor), "Effect of omega 3 fat diet on obesity in antioxidant mice," $5,000
    • Brianna Mayfield, biotechnology major (Dr. Elizabeth Murray, mentor), "Cell Culture Bioassay Development for Prymnesium parvum Toxins," $4,000
    • Jenna Vance, exercise science major (Dr. Maria Serrat, mentor), "Unilateral Heating: A Novel Model to Induce Differential Extremity Growth in Mice," $5,000

    College Course Development Program for projects to develop new and innovative science and engineering courses:

    • Dr. Venkat Gudivada, College of Information Technology and Engineering, "Exploring the World with Computing," $5,000

    Extension and Public Outreach Program for projects to involve the public in the excitement of scientific discovery, emphasize the importance of science and engineering education, and bring the vision for space exploration to the grassroots level:

    • Tom Minnich, Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing, "3-D Printing Roadshow for NASA Outreach," $5,000

    The NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium includes 12 West Virginia colleges and universities and five corporate and scientific partners under the sponsorship of NASA. Members of the consortium are dedicated to enhancing the state's competitiveness in aerospace research, education and industrial activities.

    ---------------

    Photo:  Dr. Miaozong Wu of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy received one of 14 grants recently awarded to the university's faculty members and students for aerospace-related research and educational programs. Wu and his co-investigators Dr. Henry Driscoll and Dr. Eric Blough will use the $10,000 award from the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium to explore how obesity and metabolic syndrome affect bone health. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    Thursday May 23, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marine Corps officers are first African Americans to earn M.A.degrees in leadership studies at Marshall while on active duty

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Three active duty U.S. Marine Corps officers made history this spring when they graduated from Marshall University.

    Capt. John Tucker (right), Capt. Joseph Common (left) and Chief Warrant Officer Lamar Dupree became the first African American Marine Corps officers to graduate from Marshall with their Master of Arts degrees in leadership studies.

    Marshall is partnering with the United States Marine Corps College of Distance Education and Training (CDET) in Quantico, Va., to provide active duty Marine Corps officers the opportunity to earn the degree.

    Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and John Hemleben, Dean of Academics with the CDET, signed a memorandum of understanding regarding the arrangement in October 2011.

    "Seeing Marine Corps officers such as Capt. Tucker, Capt. Common and Chief Warrant Officer Dupree graduate with their master's degrees is inspiring to not only our young African American students but also young African American service members," said Kelly Sweetman-Nekvinda, director of military and veterans affairs at Marshall. "These men are accomplished in their careers and now as academics. They are excellent role models. Marshall is extremely proud to be a part of their journeys."

    Sweetman-Nekvinda said Marshall currently has about 100 Marines taking part in the partnership with the College of Distance Education and Training in Quantico.

    Tucker and Common attended Marshall's Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement earlier this month at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.  The celebration is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events in which Marshall's African and African American students can participate. Dupree was unable to attend.

    Tucker, a 37-year-old native of Halifax, Va., has been in the Marine Corps nearly 20 years. He is stationed in Combat Logistics Regiment 25, and was deployed to Iraq once for eight months in 2008.

    "I'm pretty ecstatic about it. It's really neat to be the first of anything," Tucker said of earning the leadership studies master's degree.

    He refers to a book titled "7 Habits of Highly Effective People," by Steven Covey;  Habit #2, "Begin With the End in Mind" as a guide that can increase a person's opportunity for success by setting goals through  a mental creation followed by a physical creation, just as a building follows a blueprint.

    "Knowing myself and seeking self improvement" is a Marine Corps leadership principle that has guided him to success throughout his military career. "Empower your life through making your circumstances," he said.

    "I'm living my dream," Tucker said. He plans next to either become a college professor or join the nonprofit business world after his retirement from the Marine Corps. He is married with two children.

    Common is from Joliet, Ill., and has been in the Marines seven years, though affiliated with the Marines for 10 years. He, like Tucker, was in Iraq for eight months in 2008. He said it is highly important to him to diversify his life and broaden his experiences.

    "Don't be afraid to think outside the box," he said. "Come up with different ideas; become a well-rounded person. Don't be afraid to make mistakes; it's how you recover that matters. Recognize your failures and turn them into success. It's important for people of different backgrounds to come together."

    Common is married with one child. He is stationed in Camp Pendleton, Calif., and celebrates his 30th birthday May 24.

    Dupree, 40, is from Brooklyn, N.Y., and has been in the Marines for 18 years. He has been deployed to Iraq twice and to Afghanistan once. He is currently stationed in the Marine Corps Air Station in Cherry Point, N.C. He is married with four children.

    "I want to be an example and inspiration to my family and Marines," Dupree said. "I want them all to know that you should always make goals for yourself and aspire to reach them."

    -----------

    Photo: Capt. Joseph Common, left, and Capt. John Tucker are two of the first three African American Marines Corps officers to graduate from Marshall University with their Master of Arts degrees in leadership studies. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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    Thursday May 23, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Visiting expert on autism to speak at Marshall May 30

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Suchowierska, assistant professor at the Warsaw School of Social Sciences and Humanities in Poland, will speak at 3 p.m. Thursday, May 30, in room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

    Suchowierska, who earned her Ph.D. from the University of Kansas, is also the director of the Step-by-Step Treatment Center for preschoolers with autism in Warsaw. She will speak on the topic "Perceiving Autism as Organized Patterns of Characteristic Behaviors."

    Dr. Joseph W. Wyatt, professor of psychology at Marshall, said that the behavioral treatment Suchoweirska will talk about is applied behavior analysis. Under the West Virginia autism insurance law, providers must be certified in this method.

    "It is a pleasure to welcome Dr. Suchowierska back to the Marshall University campus," said Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University. "She has vast experience in the field of behavior analysis and critical practical experience from her work with preschoolers with autism in Poland. I would encourage everyone who has an interest in autism spectrum disorders to attend."

    Suchowierska and Wyatt also work together in the consortium among Marshall, the Warsaw school and the University of Debrecen in Hungary that offers a transatlantic dual degree program in psychology. Wyatt is the academic adviser and coordinator for Marshall's part of the project and Suchowierska serves in a similar capacity in Poland.

    Wyatt said that to date, 29 Marshall University students have studied in Poland for a semester and 23 continued their studies abroad in Hungary. Twenty-one of those students have received dual degrees in psychology from Marshall and the University of Debrecen. A similar number of European students have come to Marshall to pursue their studies.

    Suchowierska's lecture is being presented by the West Virginia Autism Training Center at Marshall University, the Marshall psychology department, the U.S. Department of Education and the European Commission. It is free and open to the public and no pre-registration is required.


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    Wednesday May 22, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall Health appoints new director of pharmacy services

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brian A. Gallagher, R.Ph., J.D., is the new director of pharmacy services with Marshall Health for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. He has a joint faculty appointment in both schools.

    Gallagher, a West Virginia native, most recently served as senior vice president of government affairs for the American Pharmacists Association in Washington, D.C.

    "Brian will be an incredible asset to Marshall University's health sciences programs," said Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy. "His vast experience in government affairs, health care academics and pharmacy administration will aid Marshall as we move our programs forward."

    School of Medicine Dean Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro said Gallagher's knowledge of the medical and pharmacy industries allows Marshall to expand in new areas.

    "As Marshall begins to build on a collaborative system within its health sciences programs, individuals with diverse skills will be required to help design and create our initiatives," Shapiro said. "Brian Gallagher has the expertise we need and we are thrilled to have him as part of our team."

    In addition to his position with American Pharmacists Association, Gallagher has held a wide variety of posts, including vice president for regulatory compliance for Rite Aid, vice president of risk management and governance for NDCHealth, general counsel for TechRx, director of pharmacy regulatory affairs for the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and general counsel for WVU Hospitals.

    Gallagher served for eight years in the West Virginia House of Delegates, where he was chairman of both the Banking and Insurance and Legislative Rule Making Review Committees. He authored a wide variety of statutes, including the Pharmacy Practice Act.

    "Brian's responsibilities with Marshall Health will evolve as our health care system continues to change under the Affordable Care Act,"  said Beth Hammers, executive director of Marshall Health. "His background in the legislature, law and pharmacy gives him a unique perspective that is highly beneficial to our organization."

    "I am delighted to join the Marshall Health team and to be a part of the exciting initiatives they have in the works to improve the health of my fellow West Virginians," Gallagher said. "I am really happy to be back home in the Mountain State."

    Gallagher graduated from West Virginia University in 1981 with a B.S. in pharmacy and received his law degree from Wake Forest University in 1984. He is admitted to the West Virginia, Georgia and Pennsylvania bars and is licensed to practice pharmacy in West Virginia.

    Gallagher began his duties with Marshall Health March 29.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday May 22, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

    BB&T continues support for capitalism center at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today received the sixth installment in a series of gifts from BB&T supporting the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at the university's College of Business.

    David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, presented the latest check for $100,000 to Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp and Dr. Ronald Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation.

    "We are grateful to BB&T for their ongoing support," Kopp said.

    Marshall's Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism sponsors a lecture series and upper-division course in capitalism for business students, among other activities.

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    Photo: David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, third from left, presents a check for $100,000 to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp in support of the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at MU's College of Business. Also representing BB&T, from the left, are John Berry and Spencer Murphy, and from the right are Lance West and Dr. Ronald Area of the Marshall University Foundation. The presentation took place today in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on MU's Huntington campus. Photo by Tyler Kes/Marshall University


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 16, 2013
    Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

    Marshall University Professional Education Unit Receives Accreditation

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Professional Education Unit has received continuing accreditation for both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

    "This is truly something to celebrate," said Dr. Teresa Eagle, dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development. "This accreditation decision means that we are achieving the goals we have set for ourselves. I thank Dr. Ron Childress, who chaired the accreditation team, and the rest of the professional education faculty and staff for their untiring efforts on behalf of students and teachers."

    Dr. Robert Bookwalter, dean of the College of Education, echoed Eagle's comments.

    "We are proud to have earned continuing accreditation from NCATE for our teacher preparation programs," he said. "Meeting the new, more rigorous standards confirms that Marshall University is preparing great teachers for the public schools and is committed to excellence and continuous improvement in our degree programs.  I am grateful for the contributions of our faculty and staff, as well as our partner schools and local school districts, to our successful accreditation report."

    The Professional Education Unit at Marshall includes the College of Education, based primarily on the Huntington campus, and the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development, which is headquartered on the South Charleston campus. Together, the faculty of the two units graduate approximately 300 preservice and inservice educators per year.

    "This was truly a team effort and a significant achievement for Marshall's  Professional Education Unit," Childress said. He is professor of elementary/secondary education and leadership studies in the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development. "Clearly, this would not have happened without the commitment and contributions from faculty, staff, students and all of our external stakeholders. We should be well positioned as we look forward to our next accreditation visit in 2018."

    Founded in 1954, NCATE is recognized by the U. S. Department of Education as a specialized accrediting body for schools, colleges, and departments of education. NCATE and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) have consolidated and are now transitioning into the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).

    More information about Marshall's education programs may be found online at www.marshall.edu/coe and www.marshall.edu/gsepd.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 16, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall graduate student will present research at Mid-Atlantic Athletic Trainers' Association Symposium

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University graduate student will travel to South Carolina this weekend to present her research at the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Trainers' Association Symposium in Greenville, S.C.

    Brandi L. Anders, 23, of Tuckasegee, N.C., conducted a case study on complications with post-surgical athletes caused from materials used during or after surgery. Her research, titled "Skin Condition Secondary to Elbow Dislocation in a Collegiate Diver," details a case of dermatitis, which was caused by a bad reaction to a specific brand of tape after an elbow dislocation surgery. Anders said she found there is a small allergic reaction incidence rate associated with this brand of tape.

    "The incidence rate is approximately three percent of the population," Anders said. "Since the athlete was a diver, she was in contact with pool water, which contains harsh chemicals used to kill potential pathogens and neutralize contaminants, among these chlorine and bromine. The repeated exposure to the chemicals may have absorbed into her skin and contributed to the reaction with [the tape]."     

    Anders is a graduate assistant athletic trainer for the Marshall men's and women's cross country and swimming and diving teams. Since the fall of 2012, she has worked closely with these athletes to help them achieve full competitive potential.                                

    "Since becoming a certified athletic trainer, I have found the best feeling is when the athlete returns to play," Anders said. "You see your hard work, time and effort being rewarded."

    Dr. Suzanne Konz, assistant professor of biomechanics in the College of Health Professions, said Anders is as devoted to her education as she is to her athletes.

    "I know she feels it is important to be active within the profession," Konz said. "This tells us that the graduate students are not only dedicated to the sports they are assigned to as athletic trainers, but that academics are still important."

    Konz, a graduate advisor within the School of Kinesiology, said Anders presented research several times at the undergraduate level and knows the value of informing those in the profession about complications athletes could face and how to treat them successfully.

    "Brandi's research will allow others from the Mid-Atlantic region to see what our students are doing," Konz said. "This will also let undergraduate students know that Marshall University is a possibility to further their education at the master's level."


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 13, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Graduate health informatics program at Marshall is one of three accredited in U.S.

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Marshall University's Master of Science in Health Informatics (MSHI) degree program was awarded national accreditation April 19  from the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management.

    It is one of three nationally accredited programs in the United States, joining the University of Illinois at Chicago and Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Ore. It is also the only accredited, graduate-level program in health informatics within the state of West Virginia.

    Bruce Felder, manager of human resources at Cabell Huntington Hospital, said the MSHI program at Marshall is shedding light on how technology and one's ability to become self-sufficient can spill over into the gigantic, multi-faceted industry of health care.

    "In today's age, we can buy, sell, exchange money, goods and services without leaving home," Felder said. "In the future, visiting your doctor, making appointments and viewing your medical records will be common practice, all from a mobile device. MSHI students will be the infrastructure, bridge and crossroad between technology and health care information."

    Dr. Girmay Berhie, program director for the Department of Health Informatics at Marshall, said the accreditation process took more than two years to complete and would not have been possible without the unique collaboration among faculty in the College of Health Professions, the College of Business and the College of Information Technology and Engineering.

    "We have such a supportive relationship among these three colleges here at Marshall," Berhie said. "It's a unique model we've used to develop a program of this nature, which combines the skills and resources from each department. The program would not be possible without this partnership."

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said receiving accreditation sets the MSHI program among the elite programs for health informatics in the country.

    "The standards of our program exceed what is required by the national accrediting agency," Prewitt said. "We are a premier destination for health professions programs in the tri-state. Our graduates will be very marketable in the health informatics community."

    The MSHI program received 10-year accreditation and will participate in a designated on-site visit in one year in order to continue to meet accreditation requirements.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 13, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Michael Norton, Professor of Chemistry, 304-281-8523

    SURE program selects 13 undergraduates for research fellowships

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirteen undergraduate students have been selected to receive the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellowship at Marshall University for 2013.

    SURE is aimed at undergraduates who are interested in performing research, according to Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry and director of the program. Norton said SURE will fund thirteen research projects that have been selected for support by the SURE proposal evaluation committee.

    "We want students to know how strongly Marshall supports undergraduate research," Norton said. "This is the time when these young minds start utilizing their research skills in preparation for graduate school."

    The program has been conducted at Marshall since 2005, and is funded through the West Virginia Research Challenge Fund, administered by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research.  

    Students will receive stipends totaling $4,000 each for their research for a period of ten weeks uninterrupted by classes during the summer. The SURE program, now in its ninth year, will begin Monday, May 20, and end Aug. 2. The awardees and their hometowns, majors, projects, and research mentors are listed below:

    • Tanner Bakhshi; Ironton, Ohio: Molecular Biology; A Foundation for DNA Structures; Dr. Michael Norton
    • Heath Blankenship; Huntington; Biology; Epigenetic Role of MLL2 in Spermatogenesis; Dr. Guo-Zhang  Zhu
    • Hannah Bott; St. Albans, W.Va.; Chemistry; Probing a Complex Dissociation Energy Surface with Experimental and Theoretical Methods; Dr. William Price
    • Amber Campbell; Woodstock, Va.; Biology; Effects of phthalates on stem cells; Dr. Nadja Spitzer
    •  Arrin Carter; Biology; Wytheville, Va.; Biological Engineering of a Neural Migratory Stream; Dr. Elmer Price
    • Sumaiya Chaudhry; Huntington; Biochemistry; Detecting Forces in a Reference Frame; Dr. Sasha Zill
    • Erin Fankhanel; Huntington; Biology; Nano-therapy for sepsis induced lung injury; Dr. Eric Blough
    • Lindsey Harper; Belington, W.Va.; Psychology; Birth Practices Meta-Analysis; Dr. Paige Muellerleile
    • Nguyet Le; International student from Vietnam; Chemistry; Combinatorial Approach to Studying Metal; Dr. Timothy Corrigan
    • Brianna Mayfield; Weirton, W.Va.; Biotechnology; Cell Culture Bioassay Development for Prymnesium parvum Toxins; Dr. Elizabeth Murray
    • Cody Stover; Point Pleasant, W.Va.; Chemistry; Bioavailability of Capsaicin in Small Cell Lung Cancer; Dr. Piyali Dasgupta
    • Brian Warner; Ironton, Ohio; Chemistry; Thermal Decomposition of Propionaldehyde; Dr. Laura McCunn
    • Christian Warner; Ironton, Ohio; Chemistry; Synthesis and Characterization of DNA/Dendron; Dr. Scott Day

    The SURE program also has a Web page with more information including last year's awardees and their projects. Visit www.marshall.edu/SURE.

    Norton can be contacted by e-mail at Norton@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 13, 2013
    Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

    Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine picks up national award for family medicine

    Marshall only medical school in state chosen for recognition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has received a Family Medicine "Top Ten" award from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) for being one of the nation's top schools in the percentage of graduates entering family medicine residencies.

    Based on a three-year average ending in October 2012, AAFP reports 18.5 percent of Marshall medical school graduates have chosen family medicine residencies. The average places the school as number five in the country and the only medical school in West Virginia in the Top Ten.  

    "Educating primary care doctors remains our top priority," said Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine. "As the Affordable Care Act is implemented across the country, many more primary care doctors will be needed to provide care for the millions of patients entering the health care system. I am pleased our School of Medicine is doing its part to educate doctors on the front lines of medicine in this country."

    Dr. John Walden, chair of the Department of Family Medicine, says Marshall's contribution to growing the nation's ranks of primary care physicians and more specifically, family medicine doctors, shows the school is doing its part to address the shortage of primary care physicians in the country.

    "As of 2012, our Department of Family Medicine has placed residency graduates in 31 different communities throughout West Virginia," Walden said.  "Not only are we encouraging our medical students to choose family medicine as is evidenced by this award, we are then training family medicine residents who choose to stay in West Virginia and meet the health care needs of our state."

    Since 1992, Marshall has been honored 19 times by the AAFP for its high percentage of medical students choosing family medicine residencies.
    Dr. W. Mitchel Shaver, residency director for Marshall's Department of Family Medicine, accepted the award during a ceremony May 3 at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in Baltimore.

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    Photo: Dr. W. Mitchel Shaver (left) accepts an award for the number of graduates who enter family practice residencies from Jeff Cain, M.D., president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Photo credit: American Academy of Family Physicians.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 9, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Shutdown week at Marshall Recreation Center is May 13-17

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Recreation Center will be closed Monday, May 13, through Friday, May 17, in observance of its fifth annual shutdown week.  The facility will reopen Saturday, May 18. 
               
    Members of the recreation center staff will be busy during shutdown week. They will have various tasks such as wiping down fitness and exercise equipment (cardio machines, jump ropes, physio balls, yoga mats and dumbbells).  There also will be some painting, window washing, resurfacing of the fitness studio floors, remodeling of the second-floor fitness desk, carpet repair and replacement, lighting fixture repairs, cleaning of the rock wall holds, and much more.

    Staff members also will be de-scuffing the racquetball court walls and buffing the gym court floors. The locker room/restroom areas will be cleaned and disinfected. Staff will also be repairing the locker locks and replacing batteries.

    Keith Hernstrom, assistant director of facilities and operations, expects each of the staff members to work as a team to systematically knock out the duties assigned to them.

    No part of the facility goes untouched during shutdown week, and each year there are areas that get a little more special attention than others. Rec center staff can assure that a great deal will be accomplished throughout the week.

    The Rec would like to thank all members and guests for their patience and understanding during this short time. They look forward to reopening their doors..

    For more information contact Michele Muth, assistant director of marketing and membership, at pallante1@marshall.edu, or call 304-696-2943.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Thursday May 9, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

    Physical therapy students reflect on first year after receiving white coats

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty-seven students emerged as future physical therapists when slipping into their white coats during the first-ever Marshall University School of Physical Therapy White Coat Ceremony last Friday.

    Dr. Tamara Gravano, assistant professor and director of clinical education for the school, said the White Coat Ceremony marks a student's transition from student to clinical intern, as he or she strives forward to earn a doctoral degree in physical therapy.

    "It is a rite of passage, which represents a milestone on the journey toward a career in healthcare professions, and this class has certainly earned it," Gravano said. "The next two years will be even more challenging as they are expected to expand and apply this knowledge and make clinical decisions of their own - and stand behind them."

    Zachary Fisher, 23, of Huntington, said he is more than ready for the academic challenges he will face during the next two years of clinical rotation.

    "This is really exciting because we've done so much work hoping to reach our goal of becoming physical therapists," Fisher said. "With this white coat, it's like they're saying 'Welcome to the world of physical therapy'."

    Fisher compared his first year at the school of physical therapy to climbing a mountain.

    "We learn something new every day, growing into better professionals each step of the way," Fisher said. "It's kind of like reaching the top of a mountain. I can't believe we really did it."

    The White Coat Ceremony was initiated on Aug. 20, 1993, at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and has since been adopted by many professional and medical schools, both nationally and internationally.

    Joe Trout, 28, of Marion, Va., said as an older student in the program, receiving his white coat fulfilled a long-awaited life dream.

    "To know we have one year under our belts and two more to go just goes to show how determination and hard work can really pay off," Trout said. "I went into this profession to improve the quality of life for individuals and get them back to independence so they can enjoy life to the fullest. I can't wait to get started this fall."

    Both Fisher and Trout agreed it is the great professors in the School of Physical Therapy that made everything possible.

    "Dr. Penny Kroll came to Marshall and got this physical therapy program started," Fisher said. "We appreciate the experience she has brought to the table and feel so privileged to have her here."

    In August 2010, Kroll was hired to develop the new doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program at Marshall, which achieved candidacy for accreditation and admitted its inaugural DPT degree class in May 2012.

    "Our long-term goals for the program are to gain full accreditation in May 2015," Kroll said. "There is no doubt in my mind this will happen. We will continue to admit 40 competitive students each year and graduate highly qualified therapists to serve the rehabilitation needs of the community."

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    Photos: (Above) Ashton Weiss smiles as she receives her white coat from the chair of the School of Physical Therapy, Dr. Penny Kroll, during last Friday's White Coat Ceremony. (Below) Twenty-seven students received their white coats on May 3, 2013, marking their transformation from student to clinical intern. These students will be the first class to graduate from the Marshall University School of Physical Therapy in May 2015. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday May 8, 2013
    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Marshall professor will travel to Greece for her work with the Global Burden of Disease

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney of the Marshall University College of Health Professions will travel to Greece to attend the "Global Burden of Disease" workshop held May 7-17.  According to their website, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation organized this technical workshop to train interested researchers and policymakers in the data, methods, findings and implications of Global Burden of Disease Study of 2010.

    Sawhney, program director for the Marshall public health program, has an extensive background in the coordination and implementation of programs that strengthen the public health sector around the world.

    "I've worked with the World Health Organization and Center for Disease Control to coordinate and manage the polio and measles immunization campaign in Ethiopia," Sawhney said. "With the Clinton Global Initiative University, I was able to collaborate with a nonprofit organization to start the diarrhea management center in India."

    The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study, the most comprehensive effort to date, measures epidemiological levels and trends worldwide. For more than two decades, it has measured the impact of hundreds of diseases, injuries and risk factors in 187 countries around the world. Given her knowledge and experience working with the GBD in several foreign countries, Dr. Sawhney hopes to make her research applicable in the state of West Virginia in regard to childhood obesity and diabetes.

    "Since setting up the new public health program at Marshall, I am very aware of West Virginia's rate of chronic disease," Sawhney said. "This opportunity to travel and share information with scholars from across the world allows me to learn more about controlling our burden of disease."

    Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said Sawhney's trip to Greece will give an opportunity for the Marshall academic community to exchange research and ideas with other disciplines.

    "I am excited Dr. Sawhney has been selected to attend this global burden of disease workshop, which is designed to provide the most comprehensive information on population health," Prewitt said. "This will create a strong foundation for strategic decision making, collaboration, and, ultimately, better health outcomes for people of West Virginia."

    Throughout the course of her career, Dr. Sawhney has attended more than 20 conferences and given presentations about the public health sector in countries across the world such as Austria, China, Kenya and more. The "Global Burden of Disease" workshop will take place at the Elysium Resort in Rhodes, Greece. For more information on the workshop, please visit http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd/training.

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    Photo: Working in Ethiopia with the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control, Dr. Monika Sawhney coordinated and managed the measles immunization campaign, which helped the ministry strengthen their health system by focusing on design and implementation of training programs for their staff.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday May 8, 2013
    Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University Communications,, (304) 696-7153

    Commencement information available on new Marshall website

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students and their families looking for information on this year's 176th commencement ceremonies are encouraged to visit the new Marshall University commencement website at www.marshall.edu/commencement.

    Commencement ceremonies will take place Saturday, May 11, at 9 a.m. for undergraduate candidates and 2 p.m. for graduate and doctoral candidates, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    The website includes information about parking and seating, and instructions for the graduates. Commencement speaker information and the order form for a DVD of the ceremony also are available. There also is a link for live streaming of the ceremony for those who are not able to attend.

    In honor of commencement, Marshall students and alumni are also encouraged to share their favorite Marshall memory.  They can use #mugrad13 on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to share their memories or send a congratulatory message to the class of 2013.

    For more information about commencement and the website, contact Mallory Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Wednesday May 8, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Service Awards Luncheon honors staff members for years of service

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 29th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 15 in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.  In addition to the service awards, the Employee of the Year will be named at this time.

    The following is the list of university staff members who will receive awards:

    For 10 years of service:  Shyla Abraham, Christopher Albright, Amber Bentley, John Bowen, Frank "Butch" Brodtrick, Terry Campbell, Elizabeth Coffey, Maurice Cooley, Catherine Donchatz, Kathy Hale, Lisa Henry, George Hewitt, Tammy Johnson, Sybil Lockard, John Maxwell, Beverly McKinney*, Timothy McSweeney, Sarah Murray, Jeffrey O'Malley, Jyotsna Patel, Teresa Runyon, Larry Smith, Javey Vance and Monique Williams

    For 15 years of service:  Beatrice Banford, Jon Cutler, Billy Howard, Virginia Nelson, Linda Newman, Linda Owens, Bonnie Prisk, Stephen Robinson, Mary Smith, Regena Terry, and Penny Watkins.

    For 20 years of service:  Carol Bailey, Michael Clay, Virgil Crockett, Andrew Earles, Michael Farley, Jack Ferrell, Billy Johnson, Michael Justice, David Lambert, Ronald May, Lonny Muncy, Cheri Musgrave, Rebecca Pack, Margie Phillips, Jo Raines, Dorothy Rinehardt, Janice Runyon, Susan Tams, Deandre Turner, Sandra Varney, Lisa Williamson and Selah Wilson.

    For 25 years of service:  Jeanne Adkins, Michael Adkins, Doris Atkinson, Janice Colegrove, Joyce Harrah, Virginia Holderby, Damon Holley, Edwin Holley, Verlin Hughes, Yetta Meadows, Sherry Osburn, Nancy Pelphrey, Tara Runyon, Carol Stinson, James Terry, Nina Thompson, Cora Westmoreland and Cathy Zhea.

    For 30 years of service: David Bailey, Cassandra Chappelle, Roberta Ferguson, Frances Mooney, Trula Stanley, Patsy Stephenson, Mark Ward and Connie Zirkle.

    For 35 years of service: Vickie Crager, Tony Crislip, Arlene Ferguson, Lester Merle Fleming*, Karen Greybill, Kent Hayes, Estil Hurn, Jeffrey Long, Lynne Mayer, Arnold Miller, Deborah Watson and Charles Young.

    For 40 years of service:  Sue Bell, Stephen Hensley, Randy Price, Joseph Vance and Joe Wortham.

    For 45 years of service:  Deborah Hicks.

    Retirees to date: Eleanore Beckett, Bernice Davidson, Paul Dempsey, Peggy Egnatoff, David Fenney, Lester Merle Fleming*, Sue Ellen Hollandsworth, Nancy Holley, Terry Kates, William Lewis, Mary Anna Love, Lynne Mayer, Karen Midkiff, Rudy Pauley, Charles Racer, Judy Ross, Barbara Simpkins, Donna Spindel, Gary Stone  and Charles Young.

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    *Awarded posthumously.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Tuesday May 7, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Spindel to give address at graduate student commencement ceremony

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Donna J. Spindel, dean of Marshall University's Graduate College, will give the commencement address at the graduate student ceremony at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 11, at Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Spindel has been a member of the faculty at Marshall for 37 years, beginning as an assistant professor of history in 1976, then moving up to associate professor in 1981 and to full professor in 1987. In addition to teaching, she has been active in the administration of the university, including service as the director of the honors program, associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts, director of the online instruction program, chair of the department of history, interim chair of the department of English and interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts prior to becoming dean of the graduate college in 2009.

    A specialist in early American history, Spindel wrote Crime and Society in North Carolina, published by the Louisiana State University Press in 1989. In addition to that book, she has published a number of articles in journals such as the North Carolina Historical Review, Journal of Southern History, Journal of American Studies, American Journal of Legal History and West Virginia History.

    Originally from New York City, Spindel received her bachelor's degree with distinction from Mount Holyoke College and master's and doctoral degrees from Duke University.

    With the activities of May 11, Marshall University continues the practice of dividing the undergraduate and graduate commencement ceremonies. The undergraduate ceremony will take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 11, also at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 6, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    5k running class kickoff event scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, May 9, at Marshall Recreation Center

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Crossing the finish line of a 5k race is all about taking the first step, and the Marshall Recreation Center is making that step easier with a 5-week training class.

    Experts will work with people at their own pace to prepare them for their first 5k or even shave time off their current personal best. The Rec will be holding a kickoff event prior to the beginning of the class and invites those interested to attend May 9.  It will be an informative time to learn more about the upcoming 5k class and the proper techniques of running.

    The kickoff event will start at 7 p.m. Guest speakers will give nutrition and fitness tips, as well as advice on the right shoes to wear while running, stretching exercises and ways to lower participants' 5k times. The event will take place in Studio A on the second floor. There will be light refreshments and time to speak with the instructor of the class. There also will be a time to learn proper stretches to do before and after running, so those attending are asked to wear workout clothes.

    As an initiative to get more people active and to give them the experience of running their first 5k or improving an existing 5k time, Tristateracer is covering the cost of the 5k class and the 5k for up to 50 participants who qualify.

    "We want to help motivate people to take the first step by offering to pay for this class; all they have to do is finish the class and their first 5k," said Pat Riley of Tristateracer.

    Those who have never participated in the West Virginia 5k Championship or who have never run a 5k before will qualify to have their registration fee for the 5k class at the recreation center and the cost of the WV 5k Championship reimbursed.  They will initially pay either the $29 member fee or the $35 non-member fee for the class up front and also cover the $20 cost of the 5k. Upon completion of the WV 5k Championship, they will be fully reimbursed.

    Two sessions of the class will start this month. They will begin on May 21 and May 23. The classes will last for five weeks up until the West Virginia 5k Championship at 8 a.m. Saturday, June 22.

    Everyone is welcome to participate in the Extra Mile 5k class, no matter how much running experience they have. Anyone with questions may contact Michele Muth at pallante1@marshall.edu or at 304-696-2943.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday May 6, 2013
    Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

    Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine marks annual commencement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Seventy-five medical students will receive their Doctor of Medicine degrees Friday, May 10, in the Investiture Ceremony of Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.
     
    The event is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.  Admission is by invitation. 

    Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, Ph.D., who is among the speakers, will confer the students' degrees.

    This year's Investiture speaker is Gloria A.  Wilder, M.D., MPH, a nationally-recognized pediatrician, public speaker and expert on poverty and social justice.   She has served as chair of Mobile Health Programs for the Children's Health Project of D.C. at Georgetown University and the Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C.   Additionally, Wilder is president and chief executive officer of CORE HEALTH, a health care access solutions company dedicated to assisting underserved communities.

    Wilder has received numerous awards for her work including the National Caring Award, given for exceptional generosity and commitment to service, and the Physician Humanitarian of the Year Award by George Washington University.

    The ceremony, which is being streamed live at www.marshall.edu/it/livestream, will also include recognition of graduates of Marshall's Biomedical Sciences program and the announcement of the School of Medicine Alumni Association's Honorary Alumnus for 2013.

    In addition to this ceremony, there will be a senior awards ceremony at 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 7, in the Harless Auditorium of the MU Medical Center.

    -------

    Photo: Dr. Gloria A. Wilder, a nationally recognized pediatrician, public speaker and expert on poverty and social justice, will speak at the investiture ceremony for Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Friday, May 10.


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    MU Speech and Hearing Center offers free screenings to celebrate Better Speech and Hearing Month

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center will offer free speech, language and hearing screenings on Wednesday, May 15, to celebrate Better Speech and Hearing Month.

    Since 1927, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has celebrated Better Hearing and Speech Month each May to raise public awareness of speech and language disorders that affect 14 million Americans.

    Pam Holland, director of clinical education in the Marshall department of communication disorders, said speech and language disorders can take many forms and can limit academic achievement, social adjustment and career advancement.

    "Fortunately, most people with speech and language problems can be helped and even if the problem cannot be eliminated, we can teach people strategies to help them cope," Holland said. "People may not fully regain their capacity to speak and understand, but a speech-language pathologist can help them live more independently."

    Holland said many people do not realize speech-language pathologists are the professionals who treat all types of speech, language and related disorders such as feeding and swallowing. Speech-language pathologists work in schools, private practice, hospitals, clinics and other health and education settings.

    "These individuals hold at least a master's degree and are certified by the ASHA," Holland said. "In West Virginia, they also are licensed by the state."

    The Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center will be offering several free services in May.  Anyone interested in participating in one of the screenings or events may contact the speech and hearing center at 304-696-3641.

    Wednesday, May 15
    By appointment only - Call 304-696-3641
    Speech, language and hearing screenings for Marshall faculty members, staff and their families as well as the families in the Tri-state will be offered.
    Contacts: Pam Holland, Karen McNealy

    Tuesday, May 21
    6:30-7:30 p.m.
    Seminar for parents and coaches related to concussion prevention and treatment will be
    offered.
    Contacts: Bev Miller, Nicole Campbell

    Tuesday, May 28
    1- 3:30 p.m.
    A seminar on bullying prevention and intervention in Communication Sciences and Disorders for parents and professionals will be offered.
    Contacts: Craig Coleman, Emma Searls

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association is the national professional, scientific and credentialing association for more than 145,000 audiologists, speech-language pathologists and speech, language and hearing scientists. To learn more about this organization, please visit www.asha.org.


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    Thundering Word places 10th in Division 1, 22nd in nation in NFA tournament

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word, competing as the smallest entry in the largest division, received a team sweepstakes award for the first time in 28 years in the National Forensic Association (NFA) National Tournament conducted last weekend on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Marshall finished 10th in the President's Division 1 and 22nd overall out of 83 teams. To compete in Division 1, a school had to enter 27-40 slots. Marshall entered 27, making it the smallest entry in the largest division.

    "For us to finish 10th in Division 1 and 22nd in the nation, I'm very, very proud and we're very pleased," said Marshall Coach Danny Ray.

    Bradley University finished first overall, followed by Western Kentucky University and the University of Texas at Austin.

    Ray said Marshall received positive reviews as host of the tournament.

    "People said it was the best nationals they've ever attended," Ray said. "They were asking when we would be willing to host again. It went very, very smoothly and they loved our campus."

    Students competing for Marshall were:

    • Matt Osteen, a sophomore pre-med chemistry major from Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
    • Joshua Gainer, a junior political science major from Parkersburg, W.Va.
    • Christian Adams, a junior pre-med psychology Honors student from Culloden, W.Va.
    • Victoria Ledford, a sophomore pre-med chemistry Honors student from Burnsville, W.Va.
    • Marji McCoy, a sophomore pre-med chemistry major from Beckley, W.Va.
    • Juliet Djietror, a sophomore biomedical science major from Ghana
    • Garrett Walker, a sophomore Spanish major from Shady Spring, W.Va.
    • Erin Jorden, a freshman history education major from Wheeling, W.Va.
    • Taryss Mandt, a freshman University College student from Arlington, Va.

    The team will return intact for the 2013-2014 season.

    "Our hopes are high for future success," Ray said.


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    Faculty members land $400,000 in grants to support professional development for teachers

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Faculty members in Marshall University's Graduate School of Education and Professional Development have received five grants totaling $409,447 to support professional development for teachers.

    The grants were received through the Improving Teacher Quality State Grants Program (Title II). The initiative is part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which emphasizes teacher quality as a factor in improving student achievement. The Title II program focuses on preparing, training and recruiting high-quality teachers and principals and requires states to develop plans to ensure all teachers teaching core academic subjects are highly qualified.

    The projects funded at Marshall include:

    • Using the Next Generation CSOs to improve the Achievement for Secondary Students in Clay County - $94,490 (Dr. Yvonne Skoretz, assistant professor)
      This project is the second of a two-part summer institute with follow-up activities. Participants will be introduced to new instructional strategies designed to reinforce and extend content knowledge and strategies learned in the first session to increase college success and career readiness for high school graduates.
    • Writing in the Common Core:  Capacity, Commitment, Collaboration - $61,400 (Dr. Barbara O'Byrne, professor and literacy education program director)
      This project targets high school and middle school English and social studies teachers in Kanawha County. The intensive, research-based professional development will prepare participants to develop, deliver and evaluate writing instruction to support state standards.
    • Improving Mathematics Instruction in the Standards-Based Classroom (Grades K-2) in Cooperation with Mingo County Public Schools - $87,356 (Dr. Lisa Heaton, professor and elementary and secondary education program director)
      This project is designed to provide professional development in mathematics for 30 Mingo County elementary educators. Program activities will reinforce the use of standards-based instruction and assessment to support the new math standards, and provide books and materials to support content learning and skills development.
    • Standards-Based Learning in the Science Classroom (Grades 3-6) in Cooperation with Mingo County Schools - $87,356 (Dr. Lisa Heaton, professor and elementary and secondary education program director)
      This project will provide professional development in science for 30 elementary teachers.  The focus on standards-based instruction will use inquiry and problem-based learning through hands-on experiences to demonstrate the integration and application of scientific literacy in everyday life.
    • Using Next Generation CSOs to improve Middle and High School Students' Achievement in Roane County - $78,845 (Dr. Elizabeth Campbell, assistant professor)
      This project will provide professional development for 25 Roane County teachers in English, language arts and mathematics. Participants will use Next Generation CSOs strategies and skills to help with the implementation of the new state standards geared towards increasing college success and career readiness for high school graduates.

    The grant funds are administered through the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.


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    Marshall faculty member to present her research on windmill pitch mechanics

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Suzanne Konz of the Marshall University College of Health Professions will give an oral presentation detailing her research on the mechanics of the windmill pitch in softball at the 60th annual American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) conference Friday, May 31.

    Konz, an athletic trainer for the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympic Games, said she conducted her study on roughly 30 athletes in game settings by filming their pitches and then analyzing the mechanical changes of each throw over the course of a game situation.

    "We found a definite difference in angles, whether it's within an athlete's hips, knees or elbows," Konz said. "From a strength and conditioning perspective, we realized the overhead throwing position really affects the release. If strength and flexibility issues exist, we know the athlete will benefit from strengthening and flexibility at the overhead positon to increase their release velocity."

    Konz, an assistant professor of biomechanics within the Marshall School of Kinesiology, said the reality of sports for any collegiate athlete is dealing with the daily wear and tear on the body.

    "We ultimately hope to help an athlete's post-collegiate quality of life by bringing in a better standard of strength conditioning, preventive components or larger pitching staffs to the team," Konz said. "This research will allow pitching coaches to know what to look for in an athlete's mechanics that may indicate fatigue."

    Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of kinesiology and associate dean for the college, said Konz is a great asset to the school and her skills in biomechanical analysis are needed by athletes at every level.

    "Dr. Konz is one of few women to be sought out by the NFL, as well as USA track and field and collegiate athletics, for her expertise," McIlvain said. "She has been the cornerstone of the new biomechanics major in the School of Kinesiology and we look forward to many more accomplishments."

    According to the ACSM website, attendees from more than 70 disciplines come together from around the world to share new clinical techniques, scientific advancements and cutting-edge research in sports medicine, exercise science, physical activity and public health.  Dan Henkel, senior director of communication and advocacy for ACSM, said thousands of abstracts are submitted from all over the world by scientists, clinicians and others hoping to present their research at the ACSM annual meeting.

    "The number tends to increase each year; more than 3,200 abstracts were submitted in 2012," Henkel said.  "The program committee reviews them all and selects those deemed to be of particular merit or interest. This should indicate something of the selectivity and high standards reflected in the presentations chosen for the meeting."

    Konz said she was pleased to be given an opportunity to present her research and speak to audiences with very different backgrounds.

    "I'll be presenting to a large, diverse group of professionals who will hopefully begin to think about things from a different perspective," Konz said. "At the end of the conference, I want an exercise psychologist, an MD, or an athletic trainer to be able to take my message, see the value and use it in their professional lives."

    The conference will take place in Indianapolis from May 28 to June 1. For more information, visit www.acsmannualmeeting.org.


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    More than 1,500 to graduate from Marshall May 11

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University Saturday, May 11, in a pair of commencement ceremonies at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

    Marshall will conduct two commencements for the second consecutive year. The 9 a.m. ceremony is for undergraduates, and a 2 p.m. ceremony the same day is for graduate students.

    MU Registrar Roberta Ferguson said the decision to split commencement into two events last year was a popular one and both ceremonies went smoothly.

    "We received excellent feedback from last year and the overwhelming opinion was good," Ferguson said. "Two shorter ceremonies rather than one very long one makes it easier on the graduates and their families and friends. With this format we can still honor each graduate individually without taking too long."

    Among the 1,507 students receiving degrees are 986 undergraduates, 439  graduate students and 72 from the School of Medicine. The commencement ceremony is for tentative May 2013 graduates only. Ferguson said she expects about 650 undergraduates and 175 graduate students to take part in their respective ceremonies.

    Ferguson said 516 students will graduate with honors. One hundred fifty-nine will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 139 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 208 cum laude (3.3 to  3.59). Ten students receiving associate degrees will graduate with honors.

    Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

    During the morning ceremony, Marshall will recognize its graduating honor students. Based on tentative grade point averages, 16 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect GPAs.

    Those 16 students are:

    • Megan Renee Bryant of Huntington, BSN in Nursing
    • Lesley S. Cruickshank of Charleston, BA in International Affairs and Spanish
    • Anthony R. Deskins of Huntington, BBA in Economics and Finance
    • Julia Rose Freitag of Huntington,  BBA in Marketing
    • Mary Louise Harper of South Charleston, BA in International Affairs
    • Catherine Brooke Higgins of Montgomery, West Virginia, BS in Chemistry
    • Amanda M. Honeycutt of Chapmanville, West Virginia, BS in Biological Science
    • Laura J. Keffer of South Point, Ohio, BA in History
    • Sarah Alice Lively of Beckley, BS in Biological Science
    • Richard Isaac McKown III of Ravenswood, West Virginia, BS in Cellular/Molecular Biology
    • Matthew Ryan Mundell of Huntington, BS in Computer and Information Technology
    • Joan Anna-Margaret Perrine of Poca, West Virginia, BSN in Nursing
    • Aaron Nicholas Preece of Huntington, BA in History
    • Shaina Danielle Taylor of Petersburg, West Virginia, BA in English and Science
    • Matthew David Thompson of Point Pleasant, West Virginia, BS in Biochemistry
    • Yasmine Zeid of Huntington, BS in Biochemistry.

    James C. Smith, president and CEO of Thomson Reuters and a 1981 MU graduate, will deliver the keynote speech in the morning ceremony. Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Marshall Graduate College, will speak in the afternoon ceremony.

    Here is a list of upcoming commencement-related events:

    May 2

    5 p.m., Donning of the Kente, Celebration of Achievement, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    May 3

    1 p.m., White Coat Ceremony and Presentation Day, School of Physical Therapy

    1 p.m., End-of-the -year BBQ, Center for African American Students, Memorial Student Center plaza

    4 p.m., College Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome (CPSAS) graduation reception, Old Main 315

    4:30 p.m., Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony, sponsored by Student Affairs, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

    7 p.m., Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

    May 5

    1 p.m., WMUL end-of-the-year picnic, Marco's, followed by annual softball game between WMUL and The Parthenon at 4 p.m., Dot Hicks Field

    May 8

    7 p.m., Fraternity and sorority life graduation celebration, Memorial Student Center plaza

    May 9

    6 p.m., Mid-Ohio Valley Center nursing recognition ceremony for BSN graduates, at MOVC campus

    6 p.m., College of Education ceremony for master's and bachelor's degree recipients, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

    7 p.m., Graduate School of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, Emmanuel Baptist Church

    May 10

    11 a.m., LEAP Intensive English Program graduation ceremony, Memorial Student Center, Shawkey Dining Room

    1 p.m., Forsensic Science Center open house, 1401 Forensic Science Dr.

    2 p.m., Political Science hooding ceremony, Shawkey Dining Room

    4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department recognition ceremony, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

    4:30 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall, Heiner's Study Room

    5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

    6 p.m., W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications spring banquet, Marshall University Foundation Hall

    7 p.m., School of Medicine Investiture, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center

    7 p.m., College of Health Professions nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

    7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, Highlawn Baptist Church

    May 11

    9 a.m., Marshall University's 176th commencement ceremony for undergraduates, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    Immediately following morning commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

    Immediately following morning commencement, College of Fine Arts post-graduation brunch, The Palms

    2 p.m., Marshall University's commencement for graduate students, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

    4 p.m., Forensic Science graduation reception, Memorial Student Center, BE 5

    4:30 p.m., College of Science hooding ceremony, Smith Hall 154

    Commencement notes

    • Each commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web. The link will be available on the MU website at  www.marshall.edu/it/livestream.
    • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremonies for purchase at $20 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). In addition, orders will be accepted at the arena May 11. The MU Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.
    •  Marshall will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the 6th Avenue Parking Facility, the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium or across from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. for the 9 a.m. ceremony and at noon for the 2 p.m. ceremony. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.
    • Legacy Photographics will take photographs of the graduates, then send proof information to graduates using e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.

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    Nominations being accepted through June 1 for 'Spirit of the Coalfields' Miners' Celebration awards

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nominations are being accepted for "Because of You" awards to honor people who have made significant contributions to West Virginia's coal mining enterprise and the state's mining heritage.

    Awards in nearly a dozen categories will be presented at a gala dinner and awards ceremony planned as part of this year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration to be held Oct. 3 at Tamarack in Beckley.

    According to event organizers, representatives of the state's mining industry and community leaders will gather at the event to recognize miners, engineers, safety and environmental professionals and community members. Nominations for the awards are being accepted through June 1.

    "Many of our engineering graduates find employment in West Virginia's mining industry, which depends upon thousands of individuals in a number of different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every person who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders and mining families.

    "It is because of every one of them that the mining industry is successful. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."

    According to Szwilski, "Because of You" awards will be presented in the following categories:  Equipment/Technology Innovation, Safety Champion, Women in Mining, Community Investment, Environmental Champion, Engineering, Community Involvement and Educator of the Year. In addition, the Homer Hickam Collier and Spirit of the Coalfields awards will be presented.
    Representatives of the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will be on hand to present several of that organization's top awards, including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.

    The "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration gala dinner and awards ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. Szwilski added that the program also will feature exhibits and presentations focusing on a variety of aspects of the mining industry, beginning at 11 a.m.

    To nominate someone for the "Because of You" awards or for more information about the Miners' Celebration, contact Teresa Buckland at 304-696-3568 or buckland@marshall.edu.

    For more information about the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area awards, call 304-465-3720 or e-mail info@coalheritage.org.

    The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.


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    Statement from Dr. Joseph B. Touma, Chair, Marshall University Board of Governors

    May 1, 2013

    To the Marshall University Community:

    "On behalf of the vast majority of the Marshall University Board of Governors, I wish to express the board's overwhelming support for President Stephen J. Kopp.

    "Dr. Kopp has succeeded in achieving the goals set by the Board of Governors for Marshall University and he has exceeded the board's performance expectations in numerous areas. The board also believes that he is the right person to keep our great university moving in the right direction.

    "An atmosphere that fosters constructive dialogue will help us find solutions to the challenges we face, particularly those identified in recent days. We expect better communication and collegiality from all constituent groups and consider this an opportunity to establish common ground on which we can address the financial and other obstacles that lie ahead.
     
    "Our shared goal is to do what is best for our students. We can only achieve this by working together openly in a renewed and genuine spirit of cooperation."
     
    Sincerely,
     
     
    Dr. Joseph B. Touma
    Chairman


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    Statement from the President

    May 1, 2013

    "I am pleased to have the overwhelming support of the Board of Governors and trust that, working together with faculty, staff and students, we will continue down our proven path of success.

    "During the past few weeks, I have received an outpouring of affirmations and expressions of support from across the entire university community and our extended family of Marshall Sons and Daughters. It has been very gratifying and encouraging and I personally thank those who have taken the time to express themselves.

    "I respect the views of the faculty who have shared their opinion in this fashion; however, the budget challenges we set out to address remain and I do not see additional public funding on the horizon. We have much work to do in the coming days and months to ensure Marshall continues its progress with even more limited public resources.

    "I am extremely proud to lead this great institution and I want everyone to know that, while we have tremendous challenges ahead, they present an opportunity to find even more ways for us to work together."

    Stephen J. Kopp, Ph.D.
    President


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    Distinguished MU alumnus to speak at Honors Convocation; nearly 160 students to be recognized for academic achievement

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Matthew M. Powers, a former Yeager Scholar at Marshall University, will be the featured speaker Friday, May 3, at the annual Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation.

    The convocation, part of Marshall's 19th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus and is free to the public. Nearly 160 students will be recognized for academic achievement by their colleges and departments. The convocation will be followed by a public reception.

    The event is named for the late Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, who was a longstanding supporter of academic programs at Marshall.

    Powers' visit continues a tradition of having an alumna/alumnus return to speak to the students. He graduated with honors from Marshall in May 2000 with a degree in economics.

    Powers graduated from Fairland High School before attending Marshall. Currently, he is working towards an LLM in International Law at The Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School with the U.S. Army in Charlottesville, Va.

    Powers completed his initial Marine Corps training in 2002. He was deployed to Iraq in 2004 and 2005. The Marine Corps then allowed him to attend the University of Minnesota School of Law, from where he earned his Juris Doctor degree in May 2008.

    Beginning in October 2008, Powers began serving as a prosecutor and was then deployed for a third time to Afghanistan as an Operational Law Attorney.

    He resumed his role as a prosecutor after returning from Afghanistan in April 2010 and soon became a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Marine Corps in the eastern district of North Carolina.

    Powers' personal decorations include the Navy-Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Gold Star, the Navy-Marine Corps Achievement Medal with Gold Star and the Presidential Unit Citation.


     


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    Marshall's School of Physical Therapy to hold first White Coat Ceremony

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Physical Therapy will conduct its first White Coat Ceremony and Presentation Day beginning at 1 p.m. Friday, May 3, at the school's location in the St. Mary's Center for Education at 2847 5th Ave.

    "Our students have just completed their first year in the program, and will be completing their first clinical internships this summer and early fall," said Dr. Penny Kroll, professor of physical therapy and chair of the school. "This is the perfect time to give them their white coats as they move from work done primarily in the classroom to clinical rotations."

    The keynote address will be given by Dr. Tamara Gravano, director of clinical education for the school.

    In addition to the brief ceremony, the students will be presenting information about patient cases on which they have worked during the past academic year. Cases to be covered include ankle fractures and sprains, hip arthroplasty, rotator cuff repair and connective tissue disfunction, among others.

    The school's facility also will be open for tours after the presentations, Kroll said.

    For further information, persons may contact Kroll by e-mail at kroll@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-5614.


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    School of Medicine increases space for research and economic development

    Partnership with Huntington Area Development Council to facilitate expansion

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is expanding its research and development operations by acquiring laboratory and office space in the university's Forensic Science Center Annex from the Huntington Area Development Council.

    Today's announcement by Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, reflects an agreement among the Huntington Area Development Council, the Marshall University Research Corporation and the medical school that will give the school the space it needs to grow its biomedical research program.

    "I am thrilled we will soon expand our biomedical research operations into space at the Forensic Science Center Annex," Shapiro said. "Through our partnership with HADCO and the Marshall University Research Corporation, the School of Medicine will now be able to move forward with research projects guided by our new vice dean for research, Dr. Nader Abraham.  Moreover, I'm certain expansion of our research capabilities will eventually lead to additional opportunities and ultimately to better health care for our patients."

    The School of Medicine's new space is in an area of the annex designated for research and biotechnology startup companies when the facility was built. HADCO, using $1 million in federal funding, partnered with Marshall University to build the annex with a goal of creating an environment for "new economy" jobs. Through the agreement announced today, the School of Medicine will sublease from HADCO 2,100 square feet for its new laboratories and offices.

    Researchers in the new labs will be investigating the causes of kidney disease and hypertension as well as conducting clinical trials on medications to improve heart function and decrease body weight.    

    "This is exactly what HADCO envisioned several years ago," said Stephen J. Golder, chairman of HADCO's executive committee.  "HADCO will continue to encourage research throughout Marshall University and the School of Medicine that can result in the creation of 'new economy' jobs in our region."

    Golder went on to say the partnership is a great example of how public and private entities can work to foster economic development in the region.

    Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, added, "We are excited by this rapid response to demand for new research space at the School of Medicine to accommodate new grant-funded researchers. With our partner HADCO, we look forward to the innovation and technology-based economic development that will follow this new research activity. This is another significant step in making Huntington a leading regional center for translational research."

    The research space is expected to be ready for occupancy this fall. It is located at the corner of 14th Street and Charleston Avenue in Huntington.


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    Math professor contributes to new study on pandemic flu

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Pandemic flu continues to threaten public health, especially in the wake of the recent emergence of an H7N9 low pathogenic avian influenza strain in humans.

    A recent study published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal PLoS ONE provides new information for public health officials about mitigating the spread of infection from emerging flu viruses. The report brings new insight into the H1NI pandemic of 2009 and may help officials prepare for future pandemics.

    Marshall University mathematics professor Dr. Anna Mummert participated in the study, which was led by researchers at Mississippi State University. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Universidad Miguel Hernndez in Spain also collaborated on the study.

    During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, along with the last three flu pandemics of 1918, 1957 and 1968, the United States experienced multiple peaks, or waves, of infection. Normal seasonal flu outbreaks have only one peak of infection the number of cases starts very low, increases to a maximum, then decreases to a very low level, and remains at a low level until the next flu season. In this study, the team developed models to explain possible causes of the multiple peaks in pandemic flu, which are largely unknown.

    "With the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, we experienced multiple waves of infection," said Dr. Henry Wan, associate professor at Mississippi State. "The first wave began in March 2009 and peaked in late June and early July. Then there were fewer cases in August and then a second, larger wave hit in late October and early November. But China only experienced a single wave of infection. So we created infection models and analyzed the outcomes."

    The models showed that border control had some small effects on outbreaks.

    Mummert said, "In 2009, China instituted strict border controls at the onset of the outbreak. We developed models explaining the occurrence of the multiple peaks and tested border control strategies to determine if a strict border control in the United States could reduce the total number of infections."

    Four of the models indicated that stricter border control is related to fewer waves of infection.

    "What was really remarkable was that all of the models showed that strong border control would not have decreased the total number of infections," said Dr. Howie Weiss, professor in Georgia Tech's College of Sciences.

    The effects of vaccinations were studied in the models, and the authors concluded that the actual H1N1 vaccination distribution schedule played only a small role in curtailing the outbreak. While it has been thought that the timing of school vaccinations played a large role in producing the second wave of infections, the models did not show a strong link, but indicated that an earlier vaccination schedule could have helped.

    The research team plans further collaboration in understanding influenza viruses and their spread.

    "We are fortunate to have each other's expertise in mathematical modeling and infectious diseases," Wan said. "Our goal is to provide timely information to health organizations and others who work on infectious disease prevention."

    The full study can be read here.

    ----------------

    Based on a news release written by Karen Templeton, Mississippi State University.

    ----------------

    Photo: Dr. Anna Mummert, assistant professor of mathematics at Marshall University, participated in a study of pandemic flu infection patterns.


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    Yeager Scholars program receives matched gift

    From left, Lance West, Joe Gillette and Ron Area, all with the Marshall Foundation; Ruth Lemmon, president of the West Virginia Automobile and Truck Dealers Association; Barbara Atkins of Moses Honda Volkswagen; and Donnie Potter, Kelly Schmitt and Mike Funk, all with Ally Auto, take part in a check presentation Wednesday at Moses Honda Volkswagen in Huntington. Atkins was recently named West Virginia's 2013 Time Dealer of the Year nominee and received $1,000 from Ally to be donated to a charity of Atkins' choice. She chose the Yeager Scholars program at Marshall University to receive the $1,000, plus a $1,000 match from Moses Honda Volkswagen for a total donation of $2,000 to the Yeager program. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.
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    Contact: Mary Thomasson, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

    Inaugural 5K Race 'FoRUNsics' to benefit Marshall University Forensic Science Honor Society graduate students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The inaugural running of the 5K race "FoRUNsics" is scheduled  to begin at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 4, at Pullman Square with proceeds supporting a scholarship for Marshall University forensic science graduate students.

    MU students in the Forensic Science Graduate Program recently established the university's chapter of Delta Delta Epsilon, a forensic science honor society. Proceeds from the event will help establish a scholarship fund to benefit forensic science graduate students in the honor society. Membership includes forensic science graduate students and professionals.

    The race will begin at Pullman Square, continue down 3rd Avenue, turn left at 7th Street, turn left at 5th Avenue, up 5th Avenue, turn left at 20th Street (between the Marshall Recreation Center and Joan C. Edwards Stadium), turn left at 3rd Avenue and finish at Pullman Square.

    Participants may register for the event at Tristateracer.com for $20, or register on the day of the event for the same rate. Participants who register by April 29 are guaranteed a t-shirt. Race day registration and check-in begin at 7 a.m. at the Pullman Square stage.

    A moment of silence will be observed just prior to the race in memory of those directly affected by the Boston Marathon bombings. Commemorative ribbons will be distributed to race participants, volunteers and spectators.

    Winners will be crowned in the following age group categories: 12 and under, 13-17, 18-24, 25-39, 40-54, 55-69, and 70 and over. The overall top three male and top three female runners will receive medals. Additionally, the top male and top female from each age group will receive medals.

    Katie Jacque, a collegiate member of Delta Delta Epsilon, said the chapter is conducting the event to promote forensic science in the community as well as to raise funds for the scholarship.  At Pullman Square, booths will be set up to take "mug shot" photographs and to complete child identification kits. A kit will include a 10-print card, an area for physical description of the child, a bag for a DNA sample and safety tips.  There will also be crime-scene-themed decorations and t-shirts, police-badge-style awards and a dollar raffle. 

    Marshall University forensic science graduate students in the Delta Delta Epsilon honor society are coordinating the event with the assistance of Forensic Science Graduate Program faculty and Forensic Science Center staff. The Marshall University Police Department, Huntington Police Department and Cabell County Emergency Medical Services will provide assistance.

    Donations for the scholarship fund may be sent to the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, Attention: Delta Delta Epsilon, 1401 Forensic Science Dr., Huntington, WV 25701.  More information about the race and the forensic science honor society also may be found at www.marshall.edu/dde.

     

     


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    Marshall students work with local children to lead Global Youth Service Day for revitalization of playground

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will join together with local youth to revitalize the playground at Marcum Terrace in honor of Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) April 26-28.

    Twenty-five students from the departments of communication disorders and criminal justice, along with residents at St. John's House Learning and Development Center, will help clean the playground on Friday, April 26, and paint it on Saturday, April 27.

    Now in its 25th year, GYSD encourages youth-led service projects, which positively affect the young people in each community, said Pam Holland, director of clinical education in the College of Health Professions' Department of Communication Disorders.

    "We want to increase the awareness that anyone, at any age, can give back to their community," Holland said. "We particularly want to inspire the children at Marcum Terrace this weekend."

    Held each year in April, Global Youth Service Day is a time when millions of young people come together for celebrations and community service projects, often designed to address and raise awareness around tough community issues. With GYSD projects in all 50 states, more than 100 countries and six continents, GYSD is the largest service event in the world.  GYSD is a campaign of Youth Service America (YSA), an international leader in the youth service movement.

    "Congratulations and thanks to the young people of Marshall University for their work to improve their community," said Steven A. Culbertson, president of YSA and the founder and chief convener of GYSD. "On Global Youth Service Day, the world stands in awe as we see what's possible when kids take the lead as change-makers."

    GYSD caps National Volunteer Week in the United States, and coincides with other major international events, such as Earth Day. Spanning three days - April 26, 27, 28 - GYSD recognizes the invaluable contributions that young people make 365 days a year.

    Local youth who would like to get involved in this Global Youth Service Day event may contact Pam Holland at 304-696-2985. Donations are also being accepted. Learn more and browse GYSD activities around the world on the GYSD Map at www.GYSD.org. Connect on Facebook at www.facebook.com/globalyouthserviceday and on Twitter @YouthService and #GYSD.


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    Marshall University Graduate College announces thesis grant recipients

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nine Marshall University graduate students will receive Summer Thesis Research Grant Awards this year, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the graduate college.

    Each award provides $500 to cover the cost of expenses associated with thesis research. Award recipients were chosen on the basis of the quality and significance of the thesis research, the likelihood that the research will eventuate in a completed thesis and justification of the need for support. Funding for these awards is provided by the Marshall University Research Corporation and the Marshall University Graduate College Advisory Board.

    Here are the students' names, research topics, departments, and faculty advisers:

    • Ashtin M. Adkins, Correlates of Criminal Behaviors of Female Prisoners in West Virginia
      Psychology, Dr. Marc Lindberg, adviser
    • Jake Billmeyer, Effects of Excess Nitrogen on Rubus (Raspberry) in a Central Appalachian Hardwood Forest
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Frank S. Gilliam, adviser
    • Alexandria Brannick, Temporal Variations in Mandibular Dimensions of Canis dirus (dire wolf) at Rancho La Brea
      Biological Sciences, Dr. F. Robin O'Keefe, adviser
    • Derek Breakfield, Measuring Testosterone Migration Through the Egg Membranes Using an ELISA and Testosterone's Effects on Several Parameters of American Toad Eggs and Tadpoles
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Jayme Waldron, adviser
    • Elise Edwards, The Effect of Liming on Riparian Vegetation and two Plethodontid salamanders: Pseudotrition r. ruber and Gyrinophilis porphyriticus
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Jayme Waldron, adviser
    • Kelli Herrick, Evaluating the Effectiveness of Sampling Techniques for the Eastern Hellbender
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Jayme Waldron, adviser
    • Maxwell D. Hyman, University Newspapers of the Sixties
      Journalism and Mass Communications, Dr. Robert Rabe, adviser
    • Lyndsay Rankin, Assessment of Ecological Integrity of Grazed Tropical Dry Forests in Madagascar
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Anne Axel, adviser
    • Carol B. Starkey, Subthreshold Toxic Effects of Atrazine and Three of its Degradates on Behavior and Learning in Procambarus clarkia
      Biological Sciences, Dr. Brian L. Antonsen, adviser

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    Marshall students take third at district advertising competition

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of seven Marshall University advertising students once again demonstrated the strength of their program, taking third place in the 5th District competition at this year's National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC), an event sponsored by the American Advertising Federation.

    The competition took place Saturday, April 13, at the Dayton Grand Hotel in Dayton, Ohio.

    Tyler Rice, a senior from Huntington, won Best Presenter, marking the second consecutive year a Marshall student has won that award.

    Allyson Goodman, associate professor of advertising at Marshall, said the presenters prepared for the competition for a year, with the culmination of their efforts taking place in her JMC 425 course, Advertising Campaigns.

    "Their task was to develop an ad campaign for Glidden's Brilliance Collection, which is a brand of home improvement paints sold exclusively at Wal-Mart," Goodman said.   "This spring they developed a creative concept, produced a book to sell their pitch to Glidden, and prepared the presentation."

    The students who developed the project and attended the event were: Jessica Kesner, a senior from Petersburg, W.Va.; Briana Webb, a junior from Huntington; Jaimie Holmquist, a senior from Coral Springs, Fla.; Schuylar Reggi, a senior from Hurricane, W.Va.; Victoria Giuffrida, a junior from Huntington, and Rice. Blaire Lawrence, a senior from Mechanicsville, Va., worked on the project but was unable to attend the competition.


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    Local elementary children to benefit from J.T. Rembert Memorial Run/Walk

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The J.T. Rembert Memorial Run/Walk will take place at 5:30 p.m. Friday, May 10, at Ritter Park. Rembert was a linebacker for Marshall University from 2001 to 2004 who passed away July 9, 2012, from a pulmonary embolism.

    Proceeds from the run/walk will go to the J.T. Rembert Memorial Enrichment Program and be used to assist local elementary school children in attending local camps and extracurricular activities.

    The 3.2-mile event starts and ends at the Ritter Park Pavilion.

    Cost to participate is $25 in advance and $32 on race day for adults, and $11 in advance and $15 on race day for children. Participants can sign up and donations can be made at www.tristateracer.com in advance. Registration by May 3 guarantees him or her a t-shirt. Shirt availability will be limited on race day.

    Also, registrations or donations can be mailed to: J.T. Rembert Memorial Fund, 617 10th Ave., West Huntington, W.Va. 25701. More information is available by e-mailing 3.2for32@gmail.com.

    Rembert started the Johnathan Goddard Endowment Scholarship for his former Marshall teammate who passed away in a motorcycle accident a few years ago.


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    Stage managers implement digital technology at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  This semester the Theatre program in Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre has begun implementing a different way for stage managers to take notes using iPad technology.
    Nicole Perrone, assistant professor of theatre, said the digital prompt book enables the stage managers to do everything one needs to do in an electronic format, as opposed to paper.

    "In this way, they can amend the files more quickly and share the files more easily," Perrone said. "Also, the iPad has several unique features that would not be available in a paper prompt book. For example, instead of attempting to notate all the movement in a dance, the stage manager can make a video of the dance and embed that video right into the script. It's really amazing."

    The new technology is being used for this week's production of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," which runs through a matinee Sunday, April 28.

    Perrone said she first became aware of the digital prompt book when she met several transfer students from Florida School of the Arts, who have been using the digital prompt book for years.

    "Florida School of the Arts is a two-year program and we're fortunate to have many of those students transfer into our theatre program at Marshall to complete their B.F.A. degrees," Perrone said. "The interest in digital prompt book technology transferred here with them."

    Chelsey Moore, a sophomore theatre performance major, said she first used digital prompt booking as the stage manager of this year's production of "Doubt."

    "I like it because there's less paper to keep up with," Moore said. "It was really helpful, especially the picture taking. The cast doesn't even know; they don't have to stop or anything. Stage management can be stressful regardless, but this is a tool that helps make it less stressful."

    Ashley Monet, a senior theatre performance major, said the prompt book is still new to everyone, but it is easier and faster for a stage manager to use. She said the apps work together to help make prompt booking happen. 

    "We do all of our blocking on our iPad, which makes it easier to keep everything in one place. It's cleaner; it's quick; we have more functions like taking pictures of everyone when they're on stage instead of trying to write down every single person. We have a cast of 18 with two understudies, so that's a big cast," Monet said. "The iPad is such a wonderful tool for a stage manager, so we are making that transition with the rest of the theatre industry."

    Moore said that even though the digital prompt book eliminates the constant use for paper, it is still good to have a backup.

    "It's very important to also have a paper copy," Moore said. "That's why we e-mail it. We can print this out if we need to in the event that the iPad would fail."
    Not only as the director of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," but also as a faculty member, Perrone said she's happy to be using the digital prompt book for this show as well as in upcoming productions.

    "I'm very excited to support these students in developing this unique skill," Perrone said. "It's really bringing our program into the 21st century, while providing our students with a marketable skill that will put them ahead of the pack when seeking jobs after graduation."

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    Photo: Marshall University theatre students (from left) Dakota Croy, Chelsey Moore and Monet Saffore are using digital technology, including an iPad, to perform stage management tasks.


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    Football game, fountain ceremony, awards banquet among the features of Alumni Weekend at Marshall

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Former, current and future Marshall University students, along with friends of the university, are expected to visit  MU's  Huntington campus Friday and Saturday, April 26-27, to celebrate Alumni Weekend 2013.

    Several events are planned during the two days, including the annual Green and White football game and the 76th annual Alumni Awards Banquet, both on Saturday.

    Here is a brief look at the public events this weekend:

    Friday
    6 p.m. - Marshall University Theatre production of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum." The event includes dinner, coffee with the director and the play. Friday's dinner  is sold out, but seats remain for the play, which begins at 8 p.m.

    Saturday
    11 a.m. - the annual ceremony to turn the Memorial Fountain on the student center plaza back on after it was silenced Nov. 14 of last year. Former Young Thundering Herd football player Bill Forbes will be the keynote speaker.

    Forbes was recruited by Coach Jack Lengyel and played linebacker for Marshall from 1973 to 1976. He was an all-state player at Magnolia High School in New Martinsville, W.Va. Forbes now gives motivational speeches throughout the country. His wife, the former Victoria Seabolt, also is a Marshall graduate. They live in Largo, Fla.

    11:30 a.m. - annual Class Luncheon, honoring the 50th (1963) reunion class and the Grand Class (those who graduated before 1963). Cost to attend is $20 per person.

    2 p.m. - the annual Green and White football game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The West, Annex and Softball parking lots open at 9 a.m. Parking is $20 per spot on the day of the game and tickets to the game are $10 for adults and $5 for children 17 and under.

    The stadium's Gate A ticket office will open at 10 a.m. for the Choose Your Seat program. Not all seats will be available for sale until after the renewal deadline on May 10. Customer service representatives will be available to answer all questions regarding season tickets. Open seats will NOT be marked.

    Gates will open for all Green and White game fans at 12:30 p.m. Seating will be on the west side only and all fans, including MU students, must enter through Gates A, B and C. Seating is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Students who do not have a ticket prior to the game must be prepared to present a valid MU ID at the gates.

    7 p.m. - the 7th annual Alumni Awards Banquet honoring distinguished alumni and friends. Cost to attend is $75 per person or $140 per couple. The event will take place in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room. Twenty people and one alumni club will be honored.

    Saturday is also the final Green and White Day of the academic year. Beth Wolfe, Marshall's director of recruiting, said about 300 students will meet with faculty and staff from the colleges in which they are interested. "It's a great opportunity for those students who are considering coming to Marshall to check us out," Wolfe said.

    For more information about Alumni Weekend, call 304-696-2901.


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    Contact: Megan Archer, Assistant to the Dean, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

    Marshall professor will travel to Spain to present her research on sport horses

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Abbey Dondanville of the Marshall University College of Health Professions (COHP) will travel to Barcelona, Spain this summer to present her research on the jumping biomechanics of sport horses.  For the past 30 years, Dondanville has been an avid horse rider who experienced firsthand the power behind a horse's jump.

    "In 2008, we started seeing a huge spike in rider and horse deaths from what is called a rotational fall," Dondanville said. "The horses were hitting the obstacles with their legs, which caused them to pivot, fall and ultimately crush the rider. I, too, have had a rotational fall but luckily, only suffered a mild concussion."

    Dondanville decided to begin her research immediately by studying the angles of flight within a horse's jump path.  She hoped to find the cause behind the rotational falls and determine a course of action to lessen the growing occurrence of rider deaths. What Dondanville found out changed the way she will ride a horse forever.

    "We are always taught for safety to have our horse jump close to the fence," Dondanville said. "Unfortunately this is instilled too much and we aren't taught to consider speed as this is happening. By training riders to maintain the right speed and the trajectory of a horse's jump point, we can save many lives."

    Dondanville, an associate professor of athletic training through the COHP's School of Kinesiology, said her research on the biomechanics of a horse's jump was more than an area of interest. It was a labor of love.

    "My desire when doing any kind of research is making it applicable," Dondanville said. "I have such a passion for this sport, which makes it all the more meaningful that my research may provide a quick solution for a common problem."

    Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of the School of Kinesiology and associate dean for the COHP, said this will be Dondanville's third international conference, but her second oral presentation on this topic.

    "Dr. Dondanville's interests in equestrian injury prevention complement what other faculty are doing in injury prevention in other sporting venues," McIlvain said. "We are excited for her to present at an international sport science conference as it is an opportunity to showcase the breadth of faculty research and interest at Marshall. We congratulate her on her accomplishments thus far and look forward to many more."

    In addition to her extensive research initiatives, Dondanville volunteers with the Ohio University Southern (OUS) Equestrian and Therapeutic Riding program as a clinician and member of its  advisory board. With help from the VA Department of Rehabilitation, she hopes to begin a line of research exploring postural control improvements following therapeutic riding sessions at OUS.

    Dondanville will present her research in Barcelona at the European College of Sport Sciences conference June 25-29. More than 5,000 researchers will attend with more than 2,900 abstracts and 88 concurrent sessions.

    ------------------------

    Photo: Dr. Abbey Dondanville  has been riding horses for more than 30 years. Based on the data collected from her recent research, she hopes to prevent many amateur riders from experiencing a fatal fall in the future.


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    New advisory board created at School of Medicine

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, today announced the creation of a new advisory board which will provide recommendations to the dean's office on matters of strategic development, community interests and fundraising efforts, ultimately advancing the school's educational mission.

    "In order for our School of Medicine to continue its growth in a healthy and successful trajectory, it's essential we reach out to our many constituencies, listen to their counsel and respond," Shapiro said.   "I applaud the efforts of our development and alumni director, Linda Holmes, for putting together a group of dynamic individuals who will certainly help us move forward."

    The newly formed board will be led by chair Tamela J. White , a former nurse and hospital administrator who has a master's degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University.  She is also a member and founding attorney with Farrell, White and Legg, a legal firm in Huntington.

    Dr. Mark F. Sheridan, a 1987 graduate of the SOM, former SOM Alumni Association president and a local physician in private practice, has been selected by the board as chair-elect.

    The following people were named to the inaugural dean's advisory board:

    2-year term

    • Mrs. Sharon N. Ambrose, retired nurse and retired senior vice-president and chief operating officer, St. Mary's Medical Center; former president of the St. Mary's Foundation
    • Mr. Steven L. Shattls, executive director and chief executive officer, Valley Health Systems
    • Dr. Omayma T. Touma, retired pediatrician and former director of the Cabell County Health Department
    •  Mrs. Joan M. Weisberg, businesswoman and officer of record for the Arthur and Joan Weisberg Family Foundation, Inc.

    3-year term

    • Dr. Shari J. Clarke, vice president for multicultural affairs, Marshall University
    • Mrs. Monica J.W. Hatfield, MU graduate who attended the SOM before opting for a career as a math teacher; previous chair and board member of the MU Foundation, Inc.
    • Dr. Mark F. Sheridan, (chair-elect), MUSOM Class of 1987, local physician, former SOM Alumni Association president and current board member
    • Dr. Charles E. Turner,  local physician and founding member of the Huntington Internal Medicine Group

    4-year term

    • Dr. Joseph P. Assaley, MUSOM Class of 1988, local physician, former SOM Alumni Association president and current board member
    • Dr. Maurice A. Mufson, professor emeritus and first chair of the SOM's Internal Medicine Department
    • Dr. Dev R. Rellan, local physician with Huntington Internal Medicine Group
    • Ms. Tamela J. White (chair), former nurse and hospital administrator, member and a founding attorney of Farrell, White and Legg

    Ex-Officio Members

    • Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro - dean, School of Medicine
    • Dr. Paulette S. Wehner - president, SOM Alumni Association
    • Ms. Linda S. Holmes - director, Development

    The board had its first organizational meeting this month and is expected to meet bi-annually.

    ---------------------

    Photo: Front row - Linda Holmes, director, development and alumni affairs; Dr. Joseph Shapiro, dean; Tammy White, chair. Back row - Monica Hatfield; Dr. Shari Clarke; Dr. Paulette Wehner, president, SOM Alumni Association; Dr. Maurice Mufson; Dr. Joseph Assaley; Steven Shattls; Dr. Dev Rellan; Dr. Charles  "Skip" Turner. Not in the picture are Sharon Ambrose, Dr. Mark Sheridan, chair-elect, Dr. Omayma Touma and Joan Weisberg. Photo by Leah C. Payne, Marshall University.


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    Awards of distinction to be presented during spring general faculty meeting

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 30, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

    The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Eldon Larsen.

    Six people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and five will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

    To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

    • Dr. Robert Sawrey, History, College of Liberal Arts
    • Professor A.E. "Art" Stringer, English, College of Liberal Arts
    • Dr. Lawrence Schmitz, professor, Chemistry, College of Science
    • Dr. Donna Spindel, dean, Graduate College
    • Dr. Joyce Meikamp, professor, special education, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development
    • Dr. Bob Rubenstein, professor, counseling, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development

    Three individuals and one team of two people will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. Team recipients receive $2,000 to be divided among team members. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

    • Dr. Monica Valentovic, Pharmacology, senior recipient for Sciences & Technology
    • Dr. Gwenyth Hood, English, senior recipient for Arts, Social Sciences, Humanities, Education & Business
    • Dr. Paul Constantino, Biological Sciences, junior recipient in all fields.
    • Dr. Venkat Gudivada, Computer Science, and Dr. Anthony Szwilski, Applied Science & Technology, team award recipient in all fields

    Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Adviser of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisers. They are:

    • Dr. Stephen Cooper, professor, Communication Studies
    • Dr. Lisa Heaton, professor, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development

    Marshall also is recognizing 19 retiring faculty who have a combined years of service. They are:

    • Dr. Mitchell L. Berk, professor, Anatomy & Pathology, School of Medicine, 31 years of service
    • Dr. Woodrow Berry, associate professor, Business Law, College of Business, 26 years of service
    • Dr. Michael Burton, professor, Counseling, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development, 38 years of service
    • Dr. Richard A. Coulon Jr., professor, Neuroscience, School of Medicine, 4 years of service
    • Dr. Kenneth E. Guyer, associate professor, Biochemistry & Microbiology, School of Medicine, 37 years of service
    • Dr. Heather Hagerman, professor, Counseling, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development, 28 years of service
    • Dr. Mary Harris-John, professor, Leadership Studies, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development, 9 years of service
    • Dr. Mahmood Heydarian, Pediatrics, professor, School of Medicine, 30 years of service
    • Dr. Shirley Lumpkin, professor, English, College of Liberal Arts, 30 years of service
    • Dr. Rudy Pauley, professor, Associate Vice President, Outreach & Continuing Studies, 15 years of service
    • Dr. Thomas K. Pauley, professor, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 47 years of service
    • Dr. J. Graham Rankin, professor, Forensic Science, School of Medicine, 19 years of service
    • Dr. Thomas K. Savory, assistant professor, Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 31 years of service
    • Dr. Robert Sawrey, professor, History, College of Liberal Arts, 33 years of service
    • Dr. Waseem Shora, professor, Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, 17 years of service
    • Dr. Donna Spindel, professor and dean, History, College of Liberal Arts and Dean, Graduate College, 37 years of service
    • Professor Arthur E. Stringer, English, College of Liberal Arts, 25 years of service
    • Dr. Ruu-Tong Wang, assistant professor, Anatomy & Pathology, School of Medicine, 31 years of service
    • Dr. Ronald Wolf, professor, Special Education, Graduate School of Education & Professional Development, 24 years of service


    Other faculty to be honored at the meeting, as announced last week, are:

    • Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award: Dr. Kateryna Schray, professor, English
    • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. David Hatfield, associate professor, English
    • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Allison E. Carey, assistant professor, English; Dr. Laura Michele Diener, assistant professor, history; and Daniel Kaufmann, assistant professor, photography

    A reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will take place in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center after the meeting.


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    Tuesday April 23, 2013
    Contact: Lalena Price, Marshall University Communications, 304-746-1989

    Marshall looking to fill role of Marco; auditions set for April 28

    HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - Marshall University officials are seeking to fill one of the institution's most important positions - the role of Marco, the school's beloved mascot.

    The position of head bison is an important one, according to Nancy Pelphrey, assistant director of Alumni Relations.

    "Marco is the fun face of the university," she said. "As a mascot bison, he has an important role as one of our top ambassadors. He supports athletics, of course, but is also so very important to many other aspects of Marshall. He appeals to kids of all ages, visitors, students and alumni."

    Marco has been around Marshall in some form for 59 years. Jack and Vause Carlsen, who were editors for the 1954 Chief Justice yearbook, developed and introduced the idea of Marco, according to Marshall archives.

    "We were looking for a way to personalize the yearbook," Jack Carlsen said. "And I had this idea that if we could create a character on the Thundering Herd, then we could have that character wander through the yearbook.

    "That's how it started and then it just seemed logical to call him Marco because it was Marshall College, so he was our version of Marco Polo wandering through the yearbook and visiting different groups."

    Marco appeared 21 times in the 1954 yearbook and was illustrated by an artist in the publishing department. He was featured smoking a pipe while reading, singing hymns, playing football and sweating anxiously while knocking on a dean's door.

    The first Marco costume debuted in 1965. Since then, many people have played the role of Marco including Alan Young, who was one of the all-time favorites for Herd fans. He performed from 1986 through 1991 and even won a national mascot championship. Michael J. Farrell, a current member of the MU Board of Governors, played the role in the late 1960s.

    Auditions for the role of Marco are set for Sunday, April 28, at 1 p.m. in the basement of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. Students - undergraduate or graduate - interested in being Marco should go to marshall.edu/bemarco for more information and to apply.


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    Monday April 22, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Alumni Awards Banquet honors 20 people, one club

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Twenty people and one club will be honored at the Marshall University Alumni Association's 76th annual Alumni Awards Banquet Saturday, April 27, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall University's Huntington campus.
     
    The awards banquet highlights Marshall's 2013 Alumni Weekend, which takes place this Friday and Saturday, April 26-27. Honoring distinguished alumni, friends and students, the banquet starts at 7 p.m. Cost to attend the banquet is $75 per person or $140 per couple.
     
    Here is a complete list of the distinguished alumni award winners for 2013, who will be honored at the banquet:
     
    National Awards

    Distinguished Alumnus Award
     
    Dr. David Wiley is an associate professor of Instructional Psychology and Technology at Brigham Young University. Originally from Barboursville, he received his undergraduate degree in vocal performance from Marshall University in 1997. He earned his doctoral degree in Instructional Psychology and Technology at BYU in 2000. Wiley has been described as one of America's most innovative thinkers on the future of learning. He was Chief Openness Officer of Flat World Knowledge, founder of the Open High School of Utah, associate professor of Instructional Technology, and founder and director of the Center for Open and Sustainable Learning at Utah State University. According to Adam Frankel, executive director of the National Center for Research in Advanced Information and Digital Technologies, Wiley is " ... one of America's most innovative thinkers on the future of learning. His cutting-edge work is helping America find ways of cutting costs while delivering a world-class education to all our students. Harnessing the promise of technology to drive better results is David's trademark."
     
    Dr. Jan. Fox, Marshall's senior vice president for information technology/CIO, said Wiley is considered to be the creator of the first Massive Open Online Course. "His career is dedicated to increasing access to educational opportunity for everyone around the world," Fox said. Wiley has received the National Science Foundation's CAREER award and Fast Company rated him No. 78 in a list of the top 100 creative people for 2009. He also was named a Peery Social Entrepreneurship Fellow in the BYU Marriott School of Business in 2012.
     
    Alumnus Community Achievement Award
     
    Lt. Col. Kenneth L. Hale is the State Equal Employment Manager for the West Virginia National Guard in Charleston. He is directly responsible for the Equal Employment and Equal Opportunity programs for all Army National Guard units spread across 28 counties in the state along with the two Air National Guard Wings. A graduate of Stonewall Jackson High School in Charleston, he later earned credits at Marshall University, and graduated with a Regents Bachelor of Arts from West Virginia State University in Business in 1984. He is the father of seven and grandfather of 14, is active in the community and is involved with youth through mentoring and coaching. He has been recognized for his many unpaid hours of community service with the Air Force Outstanding Volunteer Service Ribbon, and the local branch Roy L. Wilkins Meritorious Service Award. He has 28 years of service as a Little League football coach and serves on many committees throughout the area. Hale has made significant contributions to the community through his membership with Omega Psi Phi fraternity, which was incorporated in 1974 through the Nu beta chapter at Marshall.
     
    Distinguished Service Award
     
    James P. (Jim) Summers has been director of development at Zeta Beta Tau Foundation since June 2012. The ZBT Foundation is a nonprofit corporation exclusively committed to educational and charitable purposes that assist the brothers of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. Summers has 35 years of corporate sales, business development and national account management experience. He graduated from Marshall University in 1970 and the previous fall had served as Marshall's mascot, Marco. He moved to Atlanta 35 years ago and immediately became one of the founding members of the Marshall University Atlanta Club.

    John Gilmore, president of the Atlanta club, said Summers is a huge Marshall supporter. "I have never known anyone that embodies what it means to be a Son of Marshall more than Jim," Gilmore said. Joe Gillette, chair of the Marshall Foundation board of directors, noted Summers is the "go-to guy for anything related to Marshall. I have witnessed his tireless work to promote Marshall on an individual level as well as local in the Atlanta area and nationally," Gillette said. Summers travels near and far, east coast to west, to watch as many Thundering Herd athletic events as possible.
     
    Awards of Distinction
     
    College of Education - Margaret "Susie" Pace
     
    Margaret Pace earned a B.A. in Special Education/Elementary Education from Marshall in 1965. She taught special education in Mercer County, served as principal of Park High School for 10 years, earned two master's degrees, earned 11 professional certifications and spent the last 10 years of her career as Director of Special Education in Mercer County. All the while, Pace and her family have been strong supporters of Marshall University.
     
    College of Fine Arts - Michael K. Paxton
     
    Michael K. Paxton is a sixth-generation West Virginian and Chicago-based artist with more than 35 years of dedicated work. He graduated from Marshall in 1975 with a B.A. in Art. Most recently he was awarded a fellowship by the Jentel Artist Residency Program in Wyoming for the summer of 2013 and an Illinois Arts Council Professional Development Grant, also for 2013.
     
    College of Information Technology and Engineering - Paul A. Mattox Jr.
     
    Paul Mattox is Commissioner of Highways and Secretary of Transportation with the West Virginia Department of Education. He earned his Master of Science degree from Marshall University. Mattox has extensive experience in designing and managing public works projects for highways, bridges, water, wastewater systems and site development. During his tenure as secretary, he has overseen the administration of more than $3 billion in construction projects across he state.
     
    College of Liberal Arts - Charlie and Norma Carroll
     
    Charlie and Norma Carroll are Marshall University sweethearts and great friends of the College of Liberal Arts. Charlie graduated in 1950 with a degree in business administration and Norma graduated in 1951 with a degree in business management. In 1975, Charlie established Carroll Insurance, which quickly became a large and highly successful operation. Both Charlie and Norma have been extremely supportive of Marshall, most recently turning their attention to the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.
     
    Graduate School of Education and Professional Development - Dr. Dixie Billheimer
     
    Dr. Dixie Billheimer is the chief executive officer of the West Virginia Center for Professional Development. A veteran educator with more than 30 years of experience, she has dedicated her professional life to enhancing educator preparedness and student achievement in West Virginia. She holds a Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction with an emphasis in Instructional Technology, as well as an Education Specialist degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a minor in Instructional Technology from Marshall.
     
    School of Medicine - Sen. Ron Stollings, M.D.
     
    Sen. Ron Stollings, M.D., is a member of the Marshall University School of Medicine's Class of 1982, and he represents the 7th senatorial district in the West Virginia State Senate. He is a professor of medicine for the West Virginia University School of Medicine and serves as field faculty for the Rural Health Education Partnership. In August, at the West Virginia Primary Care Association's 27th annual conference in Charleston, Stollings received the inaugural Distinguished Community Health Champion award.
     
    W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications - Todd Marcum
     
    Todd Marcum, a native of Wayne, W.Va., is president of Access Advertising & Public Relations in Roanoke, Va. He is a 1983 graduate of Marshall University. Marcum, co-founder of the company, contributes concepts and strategies to Access clients. In addition to Access clients, Marcum advises many local nonprofit groups in advertising and marketing. He is a founding member and officer of the Southwest Virginia Business Development Association and serves on the board of the Roanoke Valley YMCA. Marcum was inducted into the John Marshall Society for his dedication to the university. "Todd and Access Media have assisted the MU Foundation for the past five years in producing and designing the annual reports with fabulous results," said Kristi Arrowood, director of Foundation Development and Strategic Programs. The Foundation has won two CASE awards for the 2006-2007 and 2009-10 annual reports and many of the reports have won Addy awards in West Virginia and Virginia. 
     
    College of Science - Dr. Gary Ellis

    Dr. Gary Ellis, a native of Proctorville, Ohio, received his bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1976 and master's degree in chemistry in 1977, both from Marshall University. His entire professional career has been spent in the pigments industry, beginning in 1987 with BASF-Wyandotte in Huntington and continuing there when ownership of the facility was transferred to Flint Group Pigments in 2006. Ellis rose to the facility's top technical position, its Site Technical and Quality Control manager. He currently collaborates with Marshall faculty on projects relating to the development and processing of pigments at Flint Group.
     
    College of Business - Phyllis Arnold
     
    Phyllis Arnold is retired state president of BB&T West Virginia and Regional President of BB&T West Virginia Central Region. A native of Parkersburg, W.Va., she received an M.B.A. from Marshall University. She served four years as Commissioner of Banking in West Virginia, and in 1991, she became president and CEO of One Valley Bank. She was elected to One Valley Bancorp's board of directors in 1993 and in 1994 she was elected executive vice president of One Valley Bancorp, later becoming chief operating officer. Arnold is a member of the Marshall University Business Hall of Fame and currently serves as vice chair on MU's board of governors.

    College of Health Professions - Martha "Marty" Blenko
     
    Marty Blenko is director of Rehabilitation Services at Cabell Huntington Hospital. She is a Huntington native, and graduated from Marshall with a master's in Speech Pathology and Audiology in 1978. Her professional career began at the Geiger Easter Seals Speech and Hearing Clinic in Ashland, Ky. She eventually became a speech pathologist for Cabell County Schools and later began working in the medical field of speech pathology at Cabell Huntington Hospital. She is an active alumna of Marshall and maintains active membership in the West Virginia Speech-Language-Hearing Association (WVSHA).
     
    Young Alumni Award - Jacob G. Hill
     
    Jacob G. Hill is a December 2011 graduate of Marshall University. He is district manager with City Ice and Fuel Company in Point Pleasant, where he has worked for nearly six years. He has been the district manager for five stores throughout West Virginia for the past five years. Committed to his community, he took over the Point Pleasant Sternwheel Regatta as chairman when he was just 20 years old. He has served on the executive committee of the Mason, Gallia and Meigs Big Green Scholarship Foundation chapter.
     
    Dr. Carolyn B. Hunter Distinguished Faculty Service Award - Charles W. Clements, M.D.
     
    Charles W. Clements, M.D., is a professor in the Department of Family and Community Health. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and served tours of duty in several locations around the world before retiring from the Army in 1993 to attend the Marshall University School of Medicine. Today, Clements' service to the community and to the university are significant. He reaches out to provide medical care and emotional comfort to the homeless each month. And, he founded and directs the nation's first Family Medicine Residency Track in Wilderness Medicine.  
     
    Cam Henderson Award - Zachary Hunter
     
    Zachary Hunter excelled in the classroom while playing soccer for the Thundering Herd. While maintaining a 3.74 GPA, the senior earned numerous academic honors, including a spot on the 2012 Conference USA all-academic team, and the 2010-2011 commissioner's honor roll. He is a chemistry and applied mathematics double major in the College of Science. Hunter is a proud fourth-generation Marshall student. His great grandparents, grandparents, two aunts and father all attended Marshall.
     
    Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship - Ariel Meeks and Scott David Nibert
     
    Ariel Meeks, a Hurricane, W.Va., native, is a member of the Marshall cheerleading squad, majoring in Communication Disorders. She has been active in the community, participating in Clean Putnam County (Hurricane City Park), helping to facilitate playground equipment, and visiting hospitals and assisted living homes. She also has been a lifeguard at Waves of Fun in Hurricane.
     
    Scott David Nibert is a music education major at Marshall, where he plays in the marching band and the pep band, is in the Marshall University Chorus and the Marshall University Orchestra, and is a member of Fairness West Virginia and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. He is from Point Pleasant, W.Va.
     
    Nate Ruffin Scholarship - Taylor Davis
     
    Taylor Davis, a native of Pittsburgh, is a junior studying Communication Disorders with a minor in psychology. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, and is the current chapter president of the Eta Zeta chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha. Davis takes pride in serving her sorority and the community. A member of the dean's list, she plans to attend graduate school after completing her undergraduate studies.
     
    Club of the Year - Atlanta, Ga.
     
    This is the third time the Atlanta, Ga., club has been named Club of the Year since it was founded in 1995. The club's president is John Gilmore and he will be accepting the award on the club's behalf. Matt Hayes, executive director of Marshall's Alumni Association, said clubs located around the country help alumni stay connected to MU.


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    Monday April 22, 2013
    Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

    Researchers receive second patent for railroad track inspection system

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Marshall University professors have received a second patent for an invention they say will make inspection of railroad tracks safer, more accurate and less expensive than current methods.

    Engineering professors Dr. Richard Begley and Dr. Tony Szwilski recently were notified that their Canadian patent application has been approved. It is the first Canadian patent awarded for an invention developed at Marshall. They were awarded a U.S. patent last year.

    Their system, which uses a combination of GPS devices, cameras and ground penetrating radar to measure track wear and other problems, has taken more than 10 years to develop.

    Currently, they say, track inspectors have to rely largely on a limited number of multi-million dollar inspection machines that are only available to inspect the tracks a few times a year. These inspections are used in combination with bi-weekly visual observations, which must be obtained by foot in some cases.

    Begley said, "Track inspection the way it's done today is a highly specialized skill. It is labor intensive and very physically demanding. It can also be quite dangerous."

    The researchers say the invention is intended to complement the visual inspections and should help inspectors identify problems faster.

    Their device uses basic "off-the-shelf" components wired together and mounted on a mobile platform that fits snugly on the rail. The platform is attached to a sports utility vehicle or rail bike adapted to run on the tracks.

    Although the components are readily available, the inventors are quick to point out that the GPS system in their device is a specialized type, not the typical navigation system found on mobile phones or in passenger vehicles.

    "Otherwise, we used readily available equipment to build the system," Begley added. "That makes it a relatively affordable option, so we're pretty excited about the possibilities."

    Begley and Szwilski used federal and state funding to produce a prototype of the device, which they used for field testing in cooperation with the railroad industry. Although the system was designed specifically to monitor railroad tracks from the vehicle to which it is attached, the inventors say there may also be applications for the technology to be mounted directly onto railcars and other platforms.

    Szwilski said, "We're encouraged because this technological innovation has been industry 'pulled' by three major railroad companies keenly interested in applying this technology to address their specific needs. We think there's a market."

    He and Begley are now working with Marshall's Technology Transfer Office to identify companies that might be interested in commercializing the technology.

    The researchers say the entire invention process from the concept to receiving the patent was enlightening in many ways, especially after legal expertise was consulted with the assistance of the Technology Transfer Office and the Marshall University Research Corporation. The attorneys provided advice throughout the patent process.

    Szwilski said, "We have been very grateful for the guidance and technical support Marshall has provided us. That was a vital element in our being able to successfully patent our device."

    Begley agreed, saying he has enjoyed the journey.

    "It's been fulfilling to me because we've been able to expand Marshall's intellectual property global footprint through the Canadian patent," he said. "The Marshall University Research Corporation is a critical piece of the university's research infrastructure and, with the new Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, we'll have our research corporation and our engineering faculty researchers under one roof, helping to produce more success stories like this. The new facility will also help us recruit full-time graduate engineering students to work with our faculty from institutions here and from other countries, as well."

    Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering, said, "The real beauty of this system lies in its ability to detect track deficiencies and direct the maintenance crews to the best use of their time and limited budgets. This work by Dr. Begley and Dr. Szwilski speaks well for the kind of faculty talent and expertise we possess here in our college and at Marshall overall."

    ----------------

    Photos

    (Above) Marshall University researchers Richard Begley, left, and Tony Szwilski have developed a device they say will make inspection of railroad tracks safer, more accurate and less expensive than current methods. They were awarded a U.S. patent last year for the device and recently were notified that their application for a Canadian patent has been approved. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

    (Below) The railroad track inspection system Begley and Szwilski invented uses a combination of GPS devices, cameras and ground penetrating radar to measure track wear and other problems, and is mounted on a mobile platform attached to a sports utility vehicle or rail bike that has been adapted to run on the tracks. Photo courtesy of Marshall University.


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    Monday April 22, 2013
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    2013 Maier Award winners announced at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 2013 winners of the Maier Awards, sponsored annually by the Maier Foundation Inc., and hosted by Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, were announced Friday, April 19, during a ceremony in the MU Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    Outstanding high school students and Marshall students in both Latin and writing competitions were recognized during the awards ceremony. Dr. Jane Hill, chair of MU's Department of English, and Professor Art Stringer presented the awards.

    The Maier Latin Cup Awards were established in 1979 by William J. Maier Jr., father of former Maier Foundation President Ed Maier, to repay in some way the special attention his high school Latin teacher at Huntington High School showed him.

    A high school graduate at the age of 16, William Maier received an award then given by West Virginia University which named him the top Latin student in the state. He credited the extra devotion to Latin and Latin students by his teacher as having helped him secure a scholarship to Harvard College.

    The Maier Latin Cup Awards celebrate publicly the best high school Latin students in West Virginia. They are administered by Marshall's Department of Classics .

    Also, Marshall's Department of Classics sponsors the Maier Latin Scholarship, which is underwritten by the Maier Foundation. This $2,000 scholarship is intended to support the work of a student presently pursuing a Latin major at Marshall and who is enrolled in advanced Latin classes.

    The William J. Maier writing awards were established in 1972 by William J. Maier Jr., in honor of his father. These awards, for excellence in writing, are presented annually to students enrolled in English classes at Marshall.

    Here are the winners of this year's Latin and writing awards. For the college students, the degrees indicated are the ones they are pursuing or recently earned.

    Maier Latin Sight-Translation Contest
    Latin I
    First place: Mike Reed, The Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Sella
    Second place: Chris Austin, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Ginny Cook
    Third place: Noah Taylor, Hedgesville. Teacher: Margaret Horioka

    Latin II
    First place: Alex Martin, George Washington. Teacher: Ruth Diller
    Second place: Collin Kelly, The Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Sella
    Third place: Keaton Snodgrass, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Ginny Cook

    Latin III
    First place: Alec Reed, The Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Sella
    Second place: Patrick Hart, Charleston Catholic. Teacher: Ginny Cook
    Third place: Bethany Taylor, Huntington High. Teacher: Amy McElroy

    Latin IV
    First place: Taylor Cunningham, The Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Sella
    Second place: Sami Harris, Charleston Catholic. Teacher Ginny Cook

    Maier Latin Cup Awards Competition
    Winner: Colin Kelly, The Linsly School. Teacher: Nicoletta Sella
    Runner-up: Steven Johnson, Brooke. Teacher: Ede Ashworth

    Basic Composition Non-Research
    First place: Landscape - Stephen Phelps, B.S. Biological Science, Fort Gay, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Mazakis
    Second place: Life Worth Living - Alexander Srodes, B.A. History, Marlinton, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Mazakis
    Third place: Accidents Happen - Shannon Abbott, B.A. Criminal Justice, Ona, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor K. Martin

    Basic Composition Research
    First place: A Review on the Progress of Modern and Traditional Treatment Therapies of HIV/AIDS - Juliet Djietror, Pre-Science, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor K. Prejean
    Second place: Distrust Toward Medicine in the African-American Community - Nathan Wood, Education, Milton, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Mazakis
    Third place: Is Processed Food Out to Get You? -Haley Stewart, Undecided, South Point, Ohio. Faculty mentor: Professor T. Bomsta

    Upper Division Non-Fiction Prose
    First place: Affecting the Disaffected: 'The Stranger' and the English Discipline - Shaina D.W. Taylor, B.A. Political Science, Petersburg, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill
    Second place: Vision, Madness and Self Realization: A Theory of Poetry - Stacy R. Sexton, B.A. English, Mount Gay, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill
    Third place: The God It Calls Among Us: The Troubles, 'Astral Weeks' and the Purpose of Rhythm - Brian M. Brady, B.A. English, Scottown, Ohio. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill

    Graduate Non-Fiction Prose
    First place: Ethics of the Domestic: Ethical Criticism and Postmodernism in Beattie's Novels - Whitney Naylor-Smith, M.A. English, Hurricane, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill
    Second place: A History Elsewhere: Holocaust Recall and World War II Video Games - Mitchell C. Lilly, M.A. English, Beckley, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor R. Peckham
    Third place: Metafiction as a Tool of Inquiry in Ann Beattie's Novels - Rajia Hassib, M.A. English, Charleston, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill

    Graduate and Undergraduate Poetry
    First place: Learning to Stand - Daniel Lassell, M.A. English, Eminence, Ky. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer
    Second place: Everything is Broken - James K.E. Brooks, B.A. English, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer
    Third place: Woman Crossing Buskirk - Delaney McLemore, B.A. English, Huntington, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Stringer

    Graduate and Undergraduate Creative Non-Fiction
    First place: Flowerbeds - Whitney Naylor-Smith, M.A. English, Hurricane, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor R. Peckham
    Second place: True Fiction: The Mothman of Point Pleasant - P. Jackson Armstrong, B.A. English, Kenova, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor K. Prejean
    Third place: Silent Partners - Michelle Hogmire, B.A. English, Gerrardstown, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor R. Peckham

    Graduate and Undergraduate Fiction
    First place: After a Funeral, Before a Test - David Robinson, M.A. English, Scott Depot, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Viola
    Second place: Stealth - Michelle Hogmire, B.A. English, Gerrardstown, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Van Kirk
    Third place: Endangered Species - Robin Harbrecht, B.A. English, Point Pleasant, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J.E. Smith

    Multimedia
    First place: Hunter - Brittany Frederickson, B.F.A. Visual Art, Scott Depot, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor K. Martin
    Second place: Shakespeare's Sister Resurrected (and Corrected): A Manifesto of a Plebian (and Female) English Major - Michelle L. Croy, B.A. Secondary Education, New Haven, W.Va. Faculty mentor: Professor J. Hill
    Third place: Elbows on the Ceiling: Emily Updegrove, M.A. Secondary Education, Catlettsburg, Ky. Faculty mentor: Professor A. Carey

    ---------------------------

    Photo: Whitney Naylor-Smith of Hurricane, W.Va., took first place in two categories at the 2013 Maier Awards. Here she is congratulated by Professor Art Stringer after receiving one of the awards as Dr. Jane Hill looks on. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.



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    Monday April 22, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice President for Multicultural Affairs, 304-696-4676

    Marshall to kick off Cultural Immersion Workshop Series April 30

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University community members, particularly staff members, are being encouraged to attend the kickoff of a new Cultural Immersion Workshop Series at a luncheon that will take place from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 30. It will be located in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

    Featured on this initial program are the Kahurangi Maori Dance Theatre and Workshop of New Zealand.

    Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of multicultural affairs at Marshall, said that the workshop series, to continue this summer, will focus on providing culturally specific information on various countries, using both local and national speakers with expertise on a specific country. In addition, a workshop on general understanding of culture will be offered.

    "We aim to provide awareness, education and understanding of international cultures," Clarke said. "We are looking forward to welcoming more students from other countries, and we want to make sure the university community is ready."
    Clarke said that future sessions will focus on African countries, China, Japan, Korea, Viet Nam, Saudi Arabia, eastern Europe and Turkey.
    Although there is no charge for the April 30 luncheon, reservations are needed and may be made by calling the Office of Multicultural Affairs at 304-696-4677 or by e-mailing Clarke at clarkes@marshall.edu.

    In addition to the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the workshop series is being sponsored by Marshall's offices of Academic Affairs and Human Resources, the Center for International Programs and the Marshall University Research Corporation.


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    Friday April 19, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Marshall senior to exhibit poster at Posters on the Hill event in D.C.

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University senior Courtney Hatten of Wayne is being recognized this spring for her physical chemistry research at the annual Posters on the Hill event Wednesday, April 24, in Washington, D.C.  She was the only student chosen from West Virginia.

    Hatten, whose faculty advisor is Dr. Laura McCunn, will exhibit a poster on The Thermal Decomposition of Butyraldehyde, which examines how the molecule butyraldehyde breaks down at high temperatures through a process called matrix-isolation Fourier Transform-Infrared (MI-FTIR). This is important because compounds like butyraldehyde are exposed to high temperatures in the production of biofuels. Her research is one of 60 projects chosen from more than 700 applications.

    The Council on Undergraduate Research sponsors the April event, which spotlights undergraduate research in an effort to encourage more students to pursue research opportunities.
     
    "I am very excited to share my research with our nation's leaders and to promote research as a valuable component of undergraduate education," Hatten said.  "As an undergraduate researcher, I have had the opportunity to think critically about real problems, conduct experiments to solve these problems and communicate my findings to the public."

    "Courtney has worked countless hours in the laboratory, and mastered an instrument that would typically be operated by Ph.D. students. I am thrilled that she has been given the opportunity to participate in Posters on the Hill and I look forward to seeing her future achievements," McCunn said.

    Hatten is a chemistry major at Marshall.


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    Friday April 19, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Stan Maynard, Executive Director, June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research, 304-696-2945

    June Harless Center to induct three into Hall of Fame

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development Hall of Fame will gain three new members  Thursday, May 2, during the 10th annual Harless Hall of Fame Dinner and ceremony at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center.

    A showcase of the Harless Center's work begins at 5 p.m., followed by a reception and dinner at 6 p.m.

    The ceremony is a time to show appreciation and give recognition to those people who have been identified as outstanding contributors to West Virginia's educational system with special focus on the rural areas of the state, said Dr. Stan Maynard, executive director of the center.

    Inductees into the Hall of Fame typically include one teacher, one administrator and one business/educational partner or organization that has provided exemplary leadership to ensure the success of the education of all students in West Virginia.  This year's hall of fame inductees include:

    • Gov. Gaston Caperton, former president of the College Board and a former two-term governor of West Virginia;
    • Illah Nourbakhsh, Professor of Robotics, director of the Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) Lab and head of the Robotics Masters Program in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University; and,
    • A. Michael and Henriella Perry, key leaders in West Virginia business, education and health communities and co-founders of the Heritage Farm Museum and Village. 

    The showcase and the presentation of the Hallie Harless Distinguished Teacher Award will also be part of the night's events. This year's awardee is Joni Shortidge, a Special Education teacher from Guyan Valley Middle School in Lincoln County.

    In addition, William A. Smith, superintendent of  Cabell County Schools, Gerry Sawrey, Assistant Superintendent of Cabell County Schools, and John Ruddick, General Manager of Verizon, will be recognized for their unwavering support of West Virginia educational initiatives.

    The mission of the June Harless Center is to provide leadership in educational initiatives for West Virginia educators and students, providing educators and families of rural West Virginia with a support system that addresses educational problems, sustains school improvement and provides positive growth in all educational factors.  The June Harless Center currently has ongoing projects with many counties in the state providing support and professional development.


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    Friday April 19, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Civil Rights Movement topic for Woodson Foundation speaker

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Joan C. Browning, a freelance writer and lecturer living in Lewisburg, W.Va., will speak on the  Civil Rights Movement  and then discuss "the most fascinating person to call Greenbrier County home" at the 21st annual Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation, Inc., fundraising banquet Saturday, April 27.

    The banquet begins at 6 p.m. in Room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Proceeds will help fund a scholarship endowment to support outstanding Marshall University students, as well as the purchase of materials on black culture and history.

    Browning participated in the Paine College Steering Committee demonstrations in Augusta, Ga., in April 1961, and with the Atlanta Student Movement sit-ins in Atlanta in 1961-63, and was one of nine Albany Freedom Riders on the last freedom ride.

    She writes about her experiences in the 1960s freedom movement, and about African American history. She has been a guest lecturer at more than 75 colleges and universities, presented scholarly papers at a dozen historical conferences, and team-taught, with Dr. David Trowbridge, two classes in civil rights movement history at Marshall University.

    Browning is special assistant to the Honorable Andrea J. Pendleton, the first woman elected mayor of the town of Rainelle, W.Va.

    The person Browning calls the most fascinating in Greenbrier County is Ada Beatrice Queen Victoria Louise Virginia Smith-Duconge. Known as "Bricktop," Smith-Duconge entertained royalty and literary greats in Paris in the jazz era and then in Mexico City and Rome. She is being inducted into the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame this year.

    Music for the banquet will be provided by Charles Johnson. Tickets for the event are available for a donation of $30. Corporate tables also are available. To purchase tickets or for more information, contact Newatha Myers, foundation president, at 740-894-5772; Loretta Hagler, banquet chairwoman, at 304-525-5651; or Rebecca Glass, banquet chairwoman, at 304-633-0996.

    The Carter G. Woodson Memorial Foundation is named in honor of Carter G. Woodson, who was a graduate of Douglass  High School in Huntington and went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. Woodson, who is widely known as the "father of African American history," founded the Association for the study of Negro Life and History in 1915. He also started the influential "Journal of Negro History" in 1916.


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    Thursday April 18, 2013
    Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Dr. Kateryna Schray selected as Outstanding Faculty Award winner

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kateryna Schray, a professor of English at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2012-2013.
     
    Schray will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.
     
    Marshall's Center for Teaching and Learning announced the Hedrick Award and two others honoring four faculty members. They are:

    • Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. David Hatfield, associate professor, English
    • Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Allison E. Carey, assistant professor, English; Dr. Laura Michele Diener, assistant professor, history; and Daniel Kaufmann, assistant professor, photography

    Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:
     
    Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award
     
    This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.

    Dr. Kateryna Schray has been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of English.

    "Dr. Schray is, quite simply, an exemplary teacher," said John Van Kirk, also an English professor at Marshall. "Dr. Schray is one of those rare people who can shine brilliantly both in the classroom and on the page, an innovative and truly inspiring teacher and a scholar of the first rank."

    Schray describes her teaching philosophy as "embarrassingly simple: provide students with a supportive learning environment, identify and build on their strengths, and make each person an active participant in his/her own education, all the while remembering that learning is inherently joyful."

    Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the department of English, said she has "never had a colleague who more vividly and completely embodies the ideals of our profession."

    "Dr. Schray's reputation as a teacher is, quite literally, national in scope," Hill said. Hill said that for the past two years, Schray has been among the top five teachers in America, according to ratemyprofessor.com, and the highest-rated English professor in the country.

    "From the moment she started work on Marshall's campus, she has established a record of outstanding scholarship, teaching and service, and maintained the excellence in all these areas consistently over all the years she has been here - an extraordinary achievement," said English Professor Shirley Lumpkin.

    Schray previously received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001and the Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

    Schray said she takes three guiding principles with her into the classroom: 1, Learning is a joy; 2, Come as you are; 3, An education really does make a difference.

    "I have taught writing in an industry setting, in a homeless shelter, in a convent, and in an impoverished country," Schray said. "In all those settings my students were taking an active step towards improving their lives in a way that nothing else could. I want my students to leave my class with a quiver full of lightning bolts and the confidence to launch them."

    Schray earned her Ph.D. in Medieval Literature from the University of North Carolina in 1997. She received her bachelor's degree from La Salle University and her master's from Georgetown University.

    Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award

    This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all full-time faculty members who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

    Dr. David Hatfield served as chair of Marshall's English department for eight years before returning to the classroom in 2008. It was a challenge going back to full-time teaching, but according to Hill, Hatfield met that challenge and more.

    "Dr. Hatfield models a trust in the learning that is possible for Marshall students," Hill said. He has developed "a pedagogy of meeting students where they are and working with them to move toward the skills, knowledge, and interests that we want them to have.

    "That he has maintained such a high level of student satisfaction during his transition from a primarily administrative role as chair for eight years to a full-time teaching role is even more impressive."

    Hatfield believes the most effective aspect of his teaching is that he helps students interrogate and develop their own habits of mind.

    "I have to be in charge of the discussion, but the times I'm at my best in that role is when I'm invisible in that role, because I believe that students, given the right tools and opportunities and environment, also can teach themselves - and that's the kind of learning I have found most valuable and that sticks with the students," Hatfield said.

    English Professor Dr. John K. Young, Hatfield's colleague since the fall of 2000, said Hatfield played a vital role in reconfiguring the English undergraduate curriculum by revising the senior capstone course.

    According to Young, Hatfield ceded the "structural authority ordinarily inhabited by professors in order to enable students to invest in their own educations." Hatfield's students "engaged in a genuine problem-solving endeavor, enabling them to generate more authentic artifacts of their learning," Young said.

    Whitney Douglas, a former faculty member at Marshall who worked with Hatfield, said his students tend to think of his courses "not as a required class, but as a vibrant intellectual space."

    "That clearly speaks to the kind of learning environment he creates for students, and the possibilities he opens up for their intellectual engagement," Douglas said.

    Hatfield earned his Ph.D. in English from Louisiana State University in 1993. He received his bachelor's degree from Marshall in 1981 and his master's from Marshall in 1983.

    Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award
     
    Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.

    Dr. Allison E. Carey came to Marshall in 2010 from a part-time position at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte and a full-time instructor position at Cannon Upper School, a private school in Concord, N.C.

    "Her excellence in making the transition to Marshall as teacher, scholar and colleague has been seamless," Hill said.

    Carey earned her bachelor's degree and her Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee, and her master's from the University of Florida. She says three aspects of her teaching are most effective in helping students to achieve the learning outcomes: practice, support and praise.

    The students practice various skills they are learning; they are supported through extensive feedback, which is not always academic, from Carey; and, she praises her students as frequently as possible.

    "Students thrive on praise - as do we all - and I think that helps them grow as students," Carey said.

    Lumpkin highly recommended Carey for the Pickens-Queen Award.

    "I think she is a model of the reflective attitude, the efficient, high energy, productive, well-organized classroom teacher, and the engaged scholar of teaching the Pickens-Queen was designed to honor," Lumpkin said.

    Dr. Laura Michele Diener joined the Marshall faculty in 2008 and, as history Professor Montserrat Miller said, "we have never been the same since."

    "Her love of history is tremendously infectious and from what I have observed from visiting her classroom and from occupying an office across the hall from hers, no student is immune.

    Dr. Daniel Holbrook, associate professor and chair of the history department, said Diener's classes generally involve projects that go beyond reading, researching and writing. They frequently, he said, involve "hands-on" experiences with material artifacts.

    "Thus, for example, in her class on the history of textiles, students get to actually work with fibers, carding, spinning and weaving them to produce fabric," Holbrook said.

    Diener stresses the importance of writing in her classes.

    The most important concept students can learn in my class is that their strongest asset is their writing," she said. "It doesn't matter if they are writing essays, research papers, creative prose, or poetry - their words are valuable."

    Diener earned her bachelor's degree in Medieval and Renaissance Studies in 2000 from Vassar College, her master's in history in 2003 from The Ohio State University, and her Ph.D. in 2008 from Ohio State.

    Daniel Kaufmann was hired in the School of Art and Design in 2009 from a pool of well over 100 candidates. He has fit in well with the art faculty and fits the dynamics of the school, especially by integrating current technologies into the courses he teaches and by developing the facilities that are provided to the students, according to Professor Peter Massing.

    "He has exceeded the expectations that new members in our department continue to present," Massing said.

    Kauffman teaches photography in the School of Art and Design, but also teaches broad-ranged skills and concepts that can be translated to any number of career choices.

    "The skills I would like students to gain from my courses are self-advocacy, technical problem solving and critical thinking," Kaufmann said.  It is important, he said, to build a strong sense of community in the classroom.

    "Having a sense of community in the classroom creates a dynamic learning environment in which peer interaction and discourse helps to drive the content of the class," he said.

    Kaufmann received a bachelor of science degree in biology in 1997 and a bachelor of arts degree in studio art in 2003, both from Florida State University, and a master of fine arts in studio art in  2008 from the University of New Mexico.

    "Kaufmann effectively transfers his creative energy, enthusiasm and expertise to students," said Byron Clercx, director of School of Art and Design. "He is acutely aware of their desire for independence and their concurrent need for technical, conceptual and (at times) emotional guidance."


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    Thursday April 18, 2013
    Contact: Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, Professor of Biological Sciences, 304-696-4867

    Sigma Xi Research Day to take place May 3 at Marshall University

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's chapter of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, will host its annual research day on Marshall's Huntington campus from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, May 3. 

    Sigma Xi and Marshall University have been conducting this event for 23 years as a way of recognizing the outstanding students at Marshall University, said Dr. Marcia Harrison-Pitaniello, president of the local Sigma Xi chapter and professor of biological sciences at Marshall. The Marshall University Sigma Xi Research Day showcases undergraduate and graduate students, presenting the results of their original projects to members of the Marshall campus community in poster (9 a.m.- noon) and oral presentation (12:15-1:30 p.m.) formats. The projects represent scientific fields such as biology, biomedical sciences, chemistry, computer science, geology, mathematics, physics and psychology. 

    Much research shows that these kinds of faculty-student collaborative research projects have a significant, positive impact on the retention, grade point averages and post-graduation success of undergraduate students, Harrison-Pitaniello said.  They are among the most effective methods of teaching the critical thinking skills so sought after by employers in this increasingly technological era. 

    Sigma Xi was founded in 1886 to honor excellence in scientific investigation and encourage a sense of companionship and cooperation among researchers in all fields of science and engineering. Today, Sigma Xi is an international, multidisciplinary research society whose programs and activities promote the health of the scientific enterprise and honor scientific achievement. There are nearly 60,000 Sigma Xi members in more than 100 countries around the world. Sigma Xi chapters, more than 500 in all, can be found at colleges and universities, industrial research centers and government laboratories. The society endeavors to encourage support of original work across the spectrum of science and technology and to promote an appreciation within society at large for the role research has played in human progress.

    The Department of Chemistry will also host a lunch that day after the poster session, at which its faculty, students and representatives of local companies dine together and network. 

    For more information about Sigma Xi, visit www.sigmaxi.org online.  For information about the Marshall University chapter, write to harrison@marshall.edu by e-mail or visit www.marshall.edu/sigmaxi online.


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    Wednesday April 17, 2013
    Contact: Maurice Cooley, Director, Center for African American Students' Programs, 304-696-5430

    Marshall students to participate in Donning of Kente Thursday, May 2

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Center for African American Students' Programs is making plans for the annual Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement. The event will take place at 5 p.m. Thursday, May 2, at the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse on Marshall's Huntington campus.

    The celebration and cap-and-gown ceremony will begin with a processional that will include graduating students, university deans, faculty and Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp.

    The keynote speaker will be William A. Smith, superintendent of schools in Cabell County, who is an alumnus of Marshall.

    "We take pride once again to bring to our campus and community the richness of this centuries-old and unusual ceremony," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "The Kente ceremonial tradition, with its roots in West Africa, recognizes an individual for his/her extraordinary accomplishments and brings to us the spirit of this event."

    The ceremony takes place each spring for African and African American students who graduated from Marshall University during the winter and those slated for graduation in May or during the coming summer school term. Cooley emphasized that all Marshall and Huntington community members are welcome to attend.

    The Kente cloth, which resembles a stole and is worn with the academic regalia, is a symbol of accomplishment that has its roots in a long tradition of weaving in West African countries. Marshall instituted the tradition of presenting Kente cloths to graduating African American students several years ago, and approximately 50 students are expected to participate along with university deans, faculty and staff.

    Cooley said the Donning of Kente Celebration of Achievement is one of the most prestigious and culturally significant events in which Marshall's African and African American students can participate.

    The following woven cloths will be awarded during the Donning of Kente celebration: Owia Repue for associate degrees; Babadua for bachelor's degrees; Kyemfere for master's degrees; and Akyem Shield for post-master's degrees.

    African music will be provided by the Marshall University African Dance and Drum ensemble, directed by James Hall. A reception will follow for all participants and those in attendance.


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    Wednesday April 17, 2013
    Contact: Danny Ray, Thundering Word coach, 304-696-5293

    Marshall to welcome speech and debate competition this weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Huntington campus will be the host of the national championship tournament for the National Forensic Association starting Thursday, April 18, and continuing through Monday, April 22. 

    Approximately 100 colleges and universities will be represented at this speech and debate event, said Danny Ray, coach of Marshall's speech and debate team, the Thundering Word.

    "We appreciate the support of the Marshall and Huntington communities during this important event," Ray said.

    A list of events for the tournament may be found online at muwww-new.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/2013/04/2013NFATentativeSchedule.pdf.


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    Wednesday April 17, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

    Marshall students are finalists in international competition this weekend

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall music students Brianna Williams, euphonium, and Tyler Davis, tuba, have been selected as finalists in the Artist Division of the Northeast Regional Tuba-Euphonium Conference solo competition. They will perform at Ithaca College, Ithaca, N.Y., Saturday, April 20.

    Williams is a graduate student in her first year of work toward the master's degree in music performance. She earned her bachelor's degree in music education from Marshall and studies with Dr. Michael Stroeher. Williams has previously won the Marshall University Concerto Competition and the Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition. She also was a finalist at the Southeastern Regional Tuba-Euphonium competition in 2011.

    Davis is a junior music education student who studies tuba with Dr. George Palton. He recently won both the Belle and Lynum Jackson Competition and the Marshall University Concerto Competition.

    "This is a big deal," Stroeher, who is professor of trombone and euphonium at Marshall, said. "There are contestants in this competition from the top schools like Julliard, Eastman, Curtis, North Texas and from as far away as Austria and Switzerland. The fact that our students are performing at that level is pretty extraordinary."

    Williams credits the Marshall music program for her success.

    "It's an exciting opportunity to perform at a conference of this magnitude and compete against euphonium players from high caliber music schools," Williams said. "It's also a testament to our music faculty that two of the twelve finalists are Marshall students. I look forward to representing Marshall and showing the tuba-euphonium world what our music department is capable of accomplishing."


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    Wednesday April 17, 2013
    Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

    Art auction to support Florence trip for Fine Arts students

    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Florence Study Abroad program will host an art auction at Black Sheep Burritos and Brews in Huntington beginning at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 23.

    The works of art available for purchase range from small to big-ticket items and are mainly the creations of talented faculty artists at Marshall, said Jaye Ike, special projects coordinator for the College of Fine Arts. Auction attendees will also be able to bid on other items and services donated by the community.

    Featured art is displayed for public view on the 6th floor of Smith Hall this week.
    Proceeds from the auction will be used to create a cultural fund for the May 2013 Florence Study Abroad program. Marshall students traveling to Florence will explore the historic city while taking interdisciplinary courses in photography and writing. The auction proceeds will provide funding for multiple day trips, during which students will gain firsthand cultural experience by visiting areas in Italy outside of Florence, such as Siena and Assisi.

    Community members and local businesses interested in donating big-ticket items for auction, such as gift certificates, may contact Dr. Rachael Peckham at peckham@marshall.edu or Daniel Kaufmann at kaufmann@marshall.edu for more information.

    "I think the COFA Florence trip provides students with an invaluable experience that will deeply enrich their lives," said Kaufmann, who teaches photography at Marshall.  "The money raised by the art auction will supplement the cultural fund of the trip creating more opportunities for students to absorb the rich and unique culture of the region.  Last year's auction was extremely successful, raising over $3000 that funded a private trip to Siena and an authentic, unforgettable Italian culinary experience."


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    Tuesday April 16, 2013
    Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

    Summer program for children starts June 17; registration now under way

    SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Registration is now under way to enroll students from kindergarten to grade 12 in Marshall University's month-long Summer K-12 program at Stonewall Jackson Middle School in Charleston. The program will take place from June 17 through July 18.

    The program is designed to provide children under 18 with activity-based learning experiences in writing, reading and math, according to Dr. Joyce Meikamp, director of Clinical and Field Based Experiences at Marshall's South Charleston campus.

    The program utilizes supervised graduate students in clinical experiences leading to certification or licensure in special education, school counseling, school psychology, and added this year, English as a Second Language (ESL), Meikamp said.

    With the theme "Country Roads," students will have the opportunity to become actively involved with hands-on activities.  Counseling and assessment services are also available.  The program runs from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, with breakfast and lunch provided for those under 18.   Participants will be scheduled for an orientation session from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. on either Wednesday, June 12, or Thursday, June 13.

    The cost for each child is $100.  Some limi