February 2013 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 28, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Gallery 842 to feature exhibit by artist Kaz McCue beginning Friday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting sculptor and installation artist Kaz McCue will be featured in a solo exhibition at Marshall University's Gallery 842, located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington, W.Va. The exhibit opens Friday, March 1, with a public reception from 6 to 8 p.m.

McCue is known as a staunch advocate for the arts and has been recognized throughout his career for community involvement and his efforts to enhance access and participation in the arts.

"McCue brings to our campus and community a wealth of experience as a noted visual artist, educator, curator and arts administrator," said John Farley, Marshall University's gallery director. "Given the open, collaborative spirit between university and community that we aim to promote, he is a natural fit for an exhibition at Gallery 842."

McCue holds a B.F.A. in photography from the Parsons School of Design and an M.F.A. in mixed media from Long Island University/ C. W. Post Campus. He has received numerous grants and awards and has exhibited his work nationally and internationally. As a curator, McCue has put together more than 200 exhibitions and more than 100 lectures and artist presentations.

The artist has taught at numerous universities, colleges and academies and has served in several arts administration positions. He currently teaches at the Leelanau School in Glen Arbor, Mich., and recently served as artist-in-residence at the Prairie Center of the Arts in Peoria, Ill., and Blue Sky Project in Dayton, Ohio. His work is also the subject of a recent catalog titled "Bad Seed" that explores the masculine stereotype in relation to ideas of social justice that are encapsulated in his installation work.

McCue's solo exhibition will be on display until April 5. Gallery 842 is free and open to the public from noon to 7 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

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Photo: "Forget"  (installation with found objects, fake fur, panels with Xerox transfers and screen printing, video; 2004) is a work by artist Kaz McCue, whose work will be on display at Gallery 842 March 1 through April 5.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 28, 2013
Contact: Mary Clark, Office of Multicultural Affairs, 304-696-5852

Marshall to welcome leadership conference for young men March 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Office of Multicultural Affairs will cosponsor a new leadership conference for young men in grades 7 through 12 next week. It will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, in the Memorial Student Center on the university's Huntington campus.

Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president of multicultural affairs at Marshall, said the university is working with the Huntington Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to present the E.M.B.O.D.I. (Empowering Males to Build Opportunities for Developing Independence) Male Leadership Conference.

"Data suggest that a great many young males, particularly those of African American, multicultural or ethnically diverse descent, are not reaching their fullest potential," Clarke said. "This program is one way we are taking action to address the needs of these young men."

Using a half-day format, the participants will learn about topics such as self-esteem, relationships, healthy living, money management, life after high school, career exploration and leaderships. In addition, they will get a chance to meet and interact with male campus and community leaders.

The students applied for the program through their school counselors, and were notified of their selection by letter. About 75 students are expected to attend.

For further information, contact Mary Clark, program director in the office of multicultural affairs, by phone at 304-696-5852 or by e-mail at clarkm@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 28, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall to welcome noted tubist March 3

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -   Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will welcome international tuba artist Oystein Baadsvik Sunday, March 3, for a guest clinic at 5 p.m. and recital at 8 p.m. in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"Oystein Baadsvik is one of the few tuba virtuosos to have carved out a career exclusively as a soloist rather than becoming a member of an orchestra or accepting a teaching post," said Dr. George Palton, who teaches tuba at Marshall and will serve as host for the March 3 events. "His multi-faceted musical career as a soloist, chamber musician, lecturer, and recording artist has taken him all over the world. The unique virtuosity and musicality Mr. Baadsvik brings to the tuba has established him as an exemplar of the instrument."

Baadsvik studied under the celebrated tuba player Harvey Phillips, a distinguished professor emeritus in the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University, and with the legendary Arnold Jacobs, who had a 40-year career and position of principal tuba with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Baadsvik's international career began in 1991 when he was awarded two prizes at the prestigious Concours International d'Execution Musicale in Geneva.

His international engagements have included performances with orchestras such as the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra, Bergen Philharmonic, Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, the Taipei National Symphony Orchestra, Singapore Philharmonic, and the Orchestra Victoria of Melbourne. Baadsvik has performed in some of the most famous venues in the world and in 2006 made his New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall.

Baadsvik has premiered some 40 solo works for the tuba, by composers from the U.S., Russia, Sweden, Norway and Switzerland. He also has developed new tuba-playing techniques that have been used in a number of more recent works for the instrument.

Admission is free and open to the public. For further information about these events or music at Marshall University, persons may call 304-696-3117 or e-mail Palton at palton@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday February 28, 2013
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission leader to speak at MU Monday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Honorable Jon Wellinghoff, will give a presentation on Marshall University's Huntington campus Monday, March 4.

Sponsored by the College of Business, Wellinghoff's presentation, "A Day in the Life of the Grid," will be open to the public as well as the Marshall University community. He will speak at Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, at 4 p.m. A question-and-answer session will follow.

President Barack Obama named Wellinghoff chairman of FERC in 2009. Wellinghoff is an energy law attorney with 37 years experience in regulatory, consumer and commercial law. Prior to joining FERC as a commissioner in 2006, he was in private practice focusing exclusively on client matters related to renewable energy, energy efficiency and distributed generation.

He served two terms as the State of Nevada's first Consumer Advocate for Customers of Public Utilities and authored the first comprehensive state utility integrated planning statute. That statute has become a model for utility integrated planning processes across the country. He also was the primary author of the Nevada Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) Act. Nevada is one of the two states to receive an "A" rating by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Wellinghoff has written and lectured extensively on numerous subjects related to energy policy and practice including renewable project development and renewable portfolio standards; smart grid and integration of electric vehicles and consumer appliances into the grid; demand response and distributed generation; efficient energy market structures and development and licensing of hydrokinetic systems.

Chairman Wellinghoff's priorities at FERC include opening wholesale electric markets to renewable resources and providing a platform for participation of demand response and other distributed resources in wholesale electric markets, including energy efficiency and local storage systems such as those in plug-in hybrid and all electric vehicles (PHEVs and EVs).

In addition, he is focused on promoting greater efficiency in our nation's energy infrastructure through the institution of advanced technologies and system integration. As chairman, he created FERC's Office of Energy Policy and Innovation (OEPI), which is responsible for investigating and promoting new efficient technologies and practices in the energy sectors under FERC's jurisdiction.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 27, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Application process begins for Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted for the Marshall University Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver program for the summer 2013 terms, according to Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College. The program provides tuition assistance for Marshall University graduate students and Marshall University full-time faculty and staff employees.

Applicants must be currently admitted and enrolled in a graduate degree-granting or certificate program at Marshall University.  Up to three hours of waiver for graduate coursework will be awarded to qualified applicants. The waiver does not cover online courses and a student cannot hold a graduate assistantship and a tuition waiver at the same time.

The awarding of waivers is very competitive and is made on the basis of academic achievement and promise, Spindel said. Students who received a Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waiver for the spring term, 2013, are not eligible for a waiver for summer 2013.

  • Deadline for the applications is Friday, April 5. Applicants who are awarded waivers will be notified by e-mail. Waivers are posted to student accounts within 10 business days of approval and registration. Award recipients are responsible for any amount not covered by the waiver. Balances must be paid by the tuition/fee due date noted on the Bursar website at www.marshall.edu/bursar/tuition/dates.html .
  • Applicants must be registered for graduate courses for spring 2013 by Wednesday, May 1, in order to receive a waiver. Spindel said applicants are encouraged to register for classes at the same time they submit a waiver application. Waivers for students who are not registered by May 1 will be assigned to other qualified applicants.

Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student's academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver.

Completed waiver applications can be mailed, emailed, or faxed. Mail to the Graduate College, Old Main 113, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755, e-mail to graduatecollege@marshall.edu or fax to 304-696-3316.

For more information, contact the Graduate College office at 304-696-6606.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 27, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word wins state speech and debate tournament again

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Victoria Ledford, a junior from Braxton, W.Va., was the overall individual champion this past weekend as she helped Marshall University's Thundering Word win the West Virginia Intercollegiate Forensic Association's (WVIFA) state championship for the third consecutive year.

The speech and debate competition took place Feb. 22-23 on the campus of West Virginia University-Parkersburg. WVU-Parkersburg took second place, Alderson-Broaddus was third and Fairmont State was fourth.

Ledford, an honors pre-med chemistry major, placed first in Pentathlon, which is a student's best five events, with 103 points. She also was fourth in Dramatic Interpretation; second in Poetry Interpretation; first in Duo Interpretation with Christian Adams; second in Persuasion, first in Rhetorical Criticism, second in Informative and fourth in Impromptu.

Marshall team members reached the final round in 43 of the 45 individual slots they had in the competition, winning first place in every individual event, second in 10 of the events and third in eight of them. The team dominated the rest of the state in the competition.

Other Marshall students in the competition were:

  • Christian Adams, a junior honors pre-med Psychology major from Culloden, W.Va., who was second in pentathlon with 94 points. Along with his state championship in Duo with Ledford, he placed first in Prose Interpretation, fourth in Poetry, fourth in Duo with Marji McCoy, first in After-Dinner Speaking and third in Impromptu.
  • Marji McCoy, a sophomore honors pre-med chemistry major from Beckley, W.Va., who was also second in Duo with Josh Gainer. She also placed third in Persuasion and third in Prose.
  • Juliet Djietror, a sophomore pre-med biology major from Ghana, who was third in Pentathlon, scoring 74 points overall. She was the state champion in Persuasion, fourth in Dramatic Interpretation, sixth in Prose, third in Duo with Josh Gainer and fourth in Extemporaneous Speaking.
  • Matt Osteen, a sophomore honors pre-med chemistry major from Harpers Ferry, W.Va., who was fourth in pentathlon with 73 points. Osteen placed first in Extemporaneous Speaking, second in Lincoln Douglas Debate and was second-best Speaker in Debate, sixth in Programmed Oral Interpretation and second in Rhetorical Criticism.
  • Garrett Walker, a sophomore sociology major from Shady Spring, W.Va., who was sixth in pentathlon with 69 points. Garrett was first in Impromptu Speaking, fourth in Rhetorical Criticism, fourth in Informative and second in Extemporaneous Speaking.
  • Joe Garton, a junior Finance major from Huntington, W.V., who was a semifinalist in Lincoln Douglas Debate and the third-best speaker. This was Garton's first time competing.
  • Erin Jorden, a freshman history education major from Wheeling, W.Va., who was second in Prose, sixth in Dramatic Interpretation and fifth in Poetry.
  • Taryss Mandt, a freshman University College student from Arlington, Va., who was first in Informative Speaking, second in After-Dinner Speaking, second in Dramatic Interpretation, third in Poetry Interpretation and second in Programmed Oral Interpretation.
  • Josh Gainer, a junior political science major from Parkersburg, W.Va., who was second and fourth in Duo Interpretation, first in Poetry, first in Dramatic Interpretation, first in Programmed Oral Interpretation and fourth in Prose Interpretation.

Marshall next competes in the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament in March and the NFA national tournament, which will be held in April on Marshall's Huntington campus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 27, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Funding for collaborative medical research announced at Marshall University

Translational research aims to transfer discoveries from the laboratory to the bedside quickly

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine officials today announced $150,000 in funding for six research grants associated with the school's translational medicine research program.

The Marshall Health Translational Pilot Grant program, created in 2012, encourages collaborative research between basic scientists and clinical physicians in an effort to speed up the process of laboratory discovery to clinical application for patients.  The grants are funded by Marshall Health.

"We are very pleased that Marshall Health has created this grant program to stimulate research efforts," said Richard M. Niles, Ph.D., senior associate dean for Biomedical Sciences at the School of Medicine. "Moving Marshall to the next level of medical research takes vision, commitment and of course, funding.  This grant allows 12 researchers, as well as medical residents and students, the opportunity to explore very diverse areas."

Marshall Health is the faculty practice plan for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and supports the clinical, educational, research and services missions of the school.  Beth Hammers, executive director of the organization, says the pilot grant program provides one year of support at $25,000 for each grantee, with additional funding based on progress of the research.

"Medical research is essential to the development of new medical treatments and cures for patients," Hammers said.  "We are thrilled to help stimulate a robust, viable grant program which pairs basic scientists from Marshall University with School of Medicine physicians to work on projects which will lead to the betterment of our community."

The investigators and their projects are listed below:

Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, and Dr. Anthony Alberico, Department of Neuroscience - "Chemotherapy resistance and sensitivity testing in tumors of the central nervous system"

Dr. Elaine Hardman, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, and Dr. James Jensen, Department of Surgery - "Feasibility and Safety of Nutritional Supplementation with Omega-3 Fatty Acids to Reduce Prostate Specific Antigen Rise in Men with Biochemical Failure after Prostatectomy or External-Beam Radiotherapy"

Dr. Nalini Santanam, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, and Dr. Paulette Wehner, Department of Cardiology - "Perivascular Fat Relation to Hypertension Appalachian Heart Study"

Dr. Nalini Santanam, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, and Dr. Abid Yaqub, Department of Medicine, Endocrinology Section - "Impact of Technology-based Behavioral Intervention on Molecular and Clinical Parameters in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes"

Dr. Monica Valentovic, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology, and Dr. Brenda Dawley, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology - "Prenatal Exposure to Heavy Metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) Alter Umbilical Cord Blood Levels of Thyroid Hormone and Vitamin D"

Dr. Hongwei Yu, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, and Dr. Yoram Elitser, Department of Pediatrics - "Investigate the distribution of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in American children and the presence of SFB with childhood diseases"

Other current translational research under way at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine includes a partnership with the University of Kentucky (UK) as part of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Awards program, which also is aimed at speeding the time for laboratory discoveries to benefit patients.

In 2011, UK and its partners received $20 million for the program to support research at UK's Center for Clinical and Translational Science, making Marshall part of a select national biomedical research network.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 27, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Body Shots VII: Lady Gaga's Secret' to be presented at MU

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Body Shots VII: Lady Gaga's Secret will be presented at Marshall University's Francis-Booth  Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus Thursday, March 7.

The show, which starts at 7:30 p.m. and runs for about an hour, is free to the public. It will be preceded at 7 p.m. by a reception and an art show in the lobby featuring works by Marshall students and faculty.

The show's theme uses Lady Gaga's always provocative, often contentious challenges to boundaries of gender and sexuality as its jumping-off point. Now in its seventh year, Body Shots continues to be a unique collaborative effort involving Marshall students and faculty from across disciplines exploring themes relating to gender and the body.

Body Shots is a unique collaborative effort involving Marshall students and faculty from across disciplines exploring themes relating to gender and the body.  Participants are from art and  design, biology, history, political science, sociology and anthropology, theatre and dance, among others.

For more information, contact Robin Conley at conleyr@marshall.edu or 304-696-2788.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday February 26, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

City administrator to speak at Marshall's Women of Color program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Women of Color program, featuring the theme, "Building Leadership: Community to Politics," takes place at noon Wednesday, March 6, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

The keynote speaker is Brandi Jacobs-Jones, a Marshall graduate and former president of  the Student Government Association, who currently is  director of administration and finance for the City of Huntington.  Jacobs-Jones is a former recipient of the Women of Color award.
 
Women of Color awards will be presented and a luncheon buffet will follow.

The Women of Color program activities are coordinated by Fran L. Jackson, Program Assistant II with the Center for African American Students' Programs; Leah Tolliver, director of the Women's Center; Lisa Allen, administrative  assistant with Multicultural Affairs, and Kesha Glover, assistant director of residence services.

The program is free to the public. Vendors and displays will be set up in the lobby of the Memorial Student Center throughout the day.

For more information, contact Jackson at 304-696-6705.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday February 25, 2013
Contact: Mary E. Clark, Office of Multicultural Affairs, 304-696-5852

Students can explore health care fields March 14-15; deadline to apply is Feb. 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - African American undergraduate students who are considering careers in health care fields can participate in "Successful Steps to Careers in Health Care," a day-and-a-half immersion and exploration program, March 14 and 15, in the Marshall University Medical Center. Deadline to apply for the program is Thursday, Feb. 28.

During the program, students will be able to tour facilities, learn about medicine and pharmacy admission requirements and obtain information about student financial assistance. In addition, there will be a presentation with "Harvey," the simulation mannequin used in medical school instruction; tours of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health and the School of Pharmacy; and roundtables with students from both medicine and pharmacy.

Mary Clark, program director in the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Marshall, said the program is targeted at students who typically participate in the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation or the Society of Black Scholars; however, the program seeks to expose diverse, talented students to how they can make their dreams a reality when it comes to careers in health care.

"Successful Steps to Careers in Health Care" is a joint effort of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and the School of Pharmacy, with assistance from School of Medicine Office of Diversity and Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs.

For further information or to reserve a place in the program, students should contact Dr. Shelvy Campbell, director of the Marshall University JCE School of Medicine Office of Diversity, by phone at 304-691-1607 or by e-mail at campbels@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday February 25, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Symphony Orchestra to present 'Peter and the Wolf'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, will present a Family Concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The program will include Verdi's Sicilian Vespers Overture; the final movement of  the Mozart Piano Concerto in B Flat Major, K. 595; Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf and the Sea Songs Quick March by Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Soloist in the Mozart will be pianist Christianna Dixon, a high school junior who studied piano with Mila Markun, and who also plays viola in the Marshall University Symphony Orchestra. She is the winner of the 2013 Young People's Concert Competition, sponsored by the Women's Club of Huntington.

Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music at Marshall, will be the narrator for Peter and the Wolf.

The program is geared to families with children, and will take less than an hour. The same program will be presented earlier that day at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center for all the 5th graders in Cabell and Wayne counties.

The concert is free and open to the public. For more information call 304-696-6609 or e-mail Smith at smither@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 22, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Visiting ceramic artists to exhibit work at Marshall's Birke Art Gallery

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting ceramic artists Darien Johnson and Casey McDonough will present a two-person exhibition of their work titled Connection: Formation through Disconnect at Marshall University's Birke Art Gallery on the university's Huntington campus.

The joint exhibit opens on Tuesday, Feb. 26, with a reception at 5 p.m. McDonough will be working hands-on with students in the preceding days to create a site-specific ceramic installation in the gallery. At 6 p.m. he will lead an informal discussion of the work on display and his experiences as an artist and educator.

"Both Darien Johnson and Casey McDonough approach the medium of ceramics through a mixed-media lens," said Frederick Bartolovic, Marshall University's assistant professor of ceramics. "They harness two-dimensional elements in their work to supplement the three-dimensional forms or installations they create. In this way, the work of these ceramists is uniquely accessible to people interested in all different media."

Darien Johnson received his B.F.A. from Saint Cloud State University, Minnesota in 2002. He completed a year of post-bachelor's work at the Kansas City Art Institute and received an M.F.A. at Arizona State University in 2009. He is currently an assistant professor of ceramics at Buffalo State College, Buffalo, N.Y. Johnson's work has been in national exhibitions such as "Ink and Clay 34" in California, "Concordia Continental " in Minnesota and "Generously Odd: Craft Now" in Kentucky. He has also been published in 500 Ceramic Sculptures, Surface Design for Ceramics and Ceramics Monthly. Johnson's sculptures are part of public collections including the Mesa Arts Center (Mesa, Ariz.) and California State Polytechnic Collection (Pomona, Calif.).

Casey McDonough holds a B.S. in marine biology and studio art from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Fla., and an M.F.A. in ceramics from Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, R.I.). He is currently a visiting professor at the University of Central Arkansas. In addition to maintaining an active exhibition record, McDonough has given numerous lectures and workshops at academic institutions across the country, including Lehigh University (Bethlehem, Pa.) and Hunter College (New York), and was a panel presenter at the 45th Annual Conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts in Tampa, Fla., in 2011.

A closing reception for the exhibition will take place at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14. Johnson will give a lecture at 6:30 p.m. that evening in Smith Hall, room 154.

Connection: Formation through Disconnect will be on display until March 15. The Birke Art Gallery is free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, as well as Mondays from 6 to 8 p.m. All gallery events are free and open to the public.

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Photos: RGB by Darien Johnson (porcelain, mixed media; 2011), above,and If this is all that exists how can there possibly be anything else? by Casey McDonough (ceramic, mixed media; 2011) are among the works to be displayed at the Birke Art Gallery on Marshall's Huntington campus beginning Feb. 26.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday February 22, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 696-7153

More than 30 Marshall students to showcase their work next week at Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Thirty-one students from Marshall University will be among approximately 100 student researchers from across West Virginia who will present their discoveries at the 10th annual Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol in Charleston next Thursday, Feb. 28.

The event, which will take place from 9 a.m. to noon in the rotunda of the State Capitol, is intended to showcase the importance of student research by giving policymakers and the general public the opportunity to talk directly with the students who conducted the research projects, which range from cancer to bridge construction to cloud computing. The students' projects are original research and they will be sharing posters they have prepared to help illustrate their work.

"This is a fun event for our students and for the members of the state legislature," said Dr. Charles Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science and a member of the event's organizing committee. "Students work on these original research projects for as long as four years and this event provides them an opportunity to share their work with the senators and delegates."

The research projects Marshall students will be highlighting are in the disciplines of biochemistry, biology, engineering, chemistry, computer science/information technology and psychology.

Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, said, "The work these students are doing is on par with that done at the best universities in the country. This event provides a unique opportunity for members of the legislature to see an aspect of higher education normally hidden from public view, but that is one of the most important tools for developing students for entry into the workplace or postgraduate education."
The following is a list of Marshall University's participants, along with their hometown, disciplines, project titles and advisers:

  • Kristen Bobuk, Belle Vernon, Pa., engineering, "Design and Construction of a Model Steel Bridge to Meet Specifications for Competition" (Jeffrey Huffman, advisor)
  • Rebekkah Brown, Cross Lanes, biochemistry, "Resveratrol Reduces Kidney Injury induced by Hydrogen Peroxide" (Dr. Monica Valentovic, advisor)
  • Luke Brumfield, Barboursville, computer science/information technology, "Expert System for Reverse Mathematics" (Dr. Carl Mummert, advisor)
  • James Caldwell, Hurricane, computer science/information technology, "Creation of the Inventory College of Information Technology and Engineering (IN-CITE) Project for Real-Time Management of Laboratory Equipment" (Jeffrey Huffman, advisor)
  • Erin Fankhanel, Hurricane, biology, "Use of cerium oxide nanoparticles for the treatment of pulmonary and cardiac remodeling during pulmonary arterial hypertension in Sprague Dawley rats" (Dr. Eric Blough, advisor)
  • Matthew Ferguson, Barboursville, computer science/information technology, "Calculating PageRank in Cloud Computing" (Dr. Hyoil Han, advisor)
  • Heather Fry, Kenova, psychology, "Obesity Objectives" (Dr. Marc Lindberg, advisor)
  • Robert Gaum, Charleston, computer science/information technology, "Creation of the Inventory College of Information Technology and Engineering (IN-CITE) Project for Real-Time Management of Laboratory Equipment" (Jeffrey Huffman, advisor)
  • Joseph Hall, Lawrence, Ohio, computer science/information technology, "MarcOS" (Jonathan Thompson, advisor)
  • Bradley Hammond, Huntington, computer science/information technology, "Building inverted indexing in Cloud Computing" (Dr. Hyoil Han, advisor)
  • Finley Hammond, Huntington, computer science/information technology, "Marshall University Cybersecurity Research and Education System (CRES) version 3" (Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, advisor)
  • Courtney Hatten, Wayne, chemistry, "Pyrolysis Products from the Thermal Decomposition of Butyraldehyde" (Dr. Laura McCunn, advisor)
  • William Hice, Oak Hill, psychology, "Tests of resiliency models of women's criminal behavior" (Dr. Marc Lindberg, advisor)
  • Alex King, Fairmont, computer science/information technology, "LockoutII" (Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, advisor)
  • Cameron Loader, Sugar Land, Texas, computer science/information technology, "Data Mining for Diabetes Medical Data" (Dr. Hyoil Han, advisor)
  • Kyle Merritt, Lesage, engineering, "Design and Evaluation of a Canoe Constructed of Concrete" (Jeffrey Huffman, advisor)
  • Rikki Miller, Ripley, biochemistry, "Kidney Damage by Cisplatin is Protected by Resveratrol in a Human Kidney Cell Line" (Dr. Monica Valentovic, advisor)
  • James Moore, Barboursville, computer science/information technology, "Web Application for the Search Committee on Recognizing Excellent Students (SCORES)" (Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, advisor)
  • Emmanuel Pittore, Wayne, computer science/information technology, "Marshall University Cybersecurity Research and Education System (CRES) version 3" (Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, advisor)
  • Travis Rainey, Fraziers Bottom, computer science/information technology, "Grade Tracker" (Jonathan Thompson, advisor)
  • Derek Ramsey, Caldwell, biochemistry, "Resveratrol Reduces Kidney Injury induced by Hydrogen Peroxide" (Dr. Monica Valentovic, advisor)
  • Nicholas Riggleman, Evans, computer science/information technology, "Quality Control for a Non-Profit Organization" (Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, advisor)
  • Michelle Schaller, Morgantown, psychology, "Tests of resiliency models of women's criminal behavior" (Dr. Marc Lindberg, advisor)
  • Sean Sovine, Huntington, computer science/information technology, "MIDAS: Multiple-Inferencing Document Automatic Summarization" (Dr. Hyoil Han, advisor)
  • Caleb Spencer, Huntington, computer science/information technology, "Expert System for Reverse Mathematics" (Dr. Carl Mummert, advisor) and "Calculating PageRank in Cloud Computing" (Dr. Hyoil Han, advisor)
  • Anthony Stephenson, Ironton, Ohio, biochemistry, "The effect of glycerol availability on the production of triacylglycerols in Chlorella vulgaris" (Dr. Derrick Kolling, advisor)
  • Ericka Staples, Beckley, psychology, "Obesity Objectives" (Dr. Marc Lindberg, advisor)
  • Kasey Stickler, Huntington, biochemistry, "Comparison of Lipid Accumulation in Photomixotrophically and Heterotrophically Grown Chlorella vulgaris Cultures under Nitrogen and Nitrogen-Starved Conditions" (Dr. Derrick Kolling, advisor)
  • Morgan Stickler, Huntington, biochemistry, "Comparison of Lipid Accumulation in Photomixotrophically and Heterotrophically Grown Chlorella vulgaris Cultures under Nitrogen and Nitrogen-Starved Conditions" (Dr. Derrick Kolling, advisor)
  • Brian Warner, Lawrence, Ohio, chemistry, "Pyrolysis Products from the Thermal Decomposition of Pivaldehyde" (Dr. Laura McCunn, advisor)
  • Emily Wright, Beckley, chemistry, "Pyrolysis Products from the Thermal Decomposition of Pivaldehyde" (Dr. Laura McCunn, advisor)

In addition to Marshall, 14 other universities and colleges will be represented at the event, including Alderson-Broaddus College; Bluefield State College; Concord University; Fairmont State University; Glenville State College; Ohio Valley University; Shepherd University; University of Charleston; West Liberty University; West Virginia State University; West Virginia University; West Virginia Wesleyan College, Wheeling Jesuit University and WVU Institute of Technology.

For more information about Undergraduate Research Day at the Capitol, contact Somerville at 304-696-2424.


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Thursday February 21, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Rosanna Blake bibliographer to deliver lecture on railroad history of southern West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The lecture series titled "The History and Culture of West Virginia," sponsored by Marshall University's College of Liberal Arts, continues Wednesday, March 6, in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on the Huntington campus.

Jack Dickinson, bibliographer of the Rosanna Blake Confederate Collection, will deliver a lecture titled "Every Bloodstained Mile: A Railroad History of Southern West Virginia" at 7 p.m. The lecture is free to the public.

Dickinson will talk about the building of the N&W Railroad, which was built between Bluefield and Kenova and, he says, changed the face and nature of southern West Virginia. He will recount the brawls between ethnic groups, along with train wrecks, the railroad detectives, the sleek passenger trains and the growth and death of coal and railroad towns.

Dickinson is a 1966 graduate of Marshall University and  the author of 12 books and numerous magazine articles on the Civil War. In 1999, Dickinson received the Jefferson Davis Historical Writing Award from the United Daughters of the Confederacy and he received the History Writer's award from the West Virginia Department of Archives and History.

At the lecture, he will sign copies of his book series on the history of the N&W Railroad he coauthored with his wife, Kay.


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Thursday February 21, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall to host Festival Band Weekend

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Music will host its 12th annual Festival Band Weekend beginning today and concluding with three final concerts Saturday, Feb. 23, on the Huntington campus.

Steve Barnett, Marshall's director of bands, who is coordinating the event, said there was record participation this year. Sixty-six schools from Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia nominated more than 1,000 students. Approximately 400 students were selected and placed into three honor bands: the John Marshall Band, the Thundering Herd Band and the Marco's Marauders Band.

These are like 'all-star' bands for the region's top band students," Barnett said. "We have three outstanding guest conductors coming in."

Marshall music faculty members will be teaching master classes for the high school students during the festival.

Guest conductor and clinician for the weekend will be Robert W. Smith, considered one of the most popular and prolific composers of concert band and orchestral literature in the U.S. today. He is vice president of product development and an exclusive composer for the C.L. Barnhouse Company and Walking Frog Records. He also teaches in the music industry program at Troy University in Troy, Ala.

Marshall's Wind Symphony and Symphonic Band will give a Showcase Concert at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22, featuring compositions by Smith under his direction.

The concluding concerts on Saturday, each featuring one of the three honor bands, will each take place in Smith Recital Hall as follows:

  • Marco's Marauders Band at 4 p.m.
  • Thundering Herd Band at 4:45 p.m.
  • John Marshall Band at 5:15 p.m.

Smith will conduct the John Marshall Band. The Thundering Herd Band will be conducted by Mark Hardman, band director at George Washington High School in Charleston, W.Va.,  and the Marco's Marauders Band will be conducted by Doug McCullough, band director at Beavercreek High School in Dayton, Ohio.

All festival concerts are free and open to the public.


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Thursday February 21, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MEDIA ADVISORY: Marshall University's graduation list available for media use

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of students who were awarded degrees from Marshall University from July 2012 through December 2012 are listed on the university's website and may be used by the media.

 

The name, hometown and home county, along with the degree earned and honor (if applicable) are listed for graduates from West Virginia. For those from other states, the name, hometown, state, degree and honor (if applicable) are listed.

 

The graduation list is available at http://muwww-new.marshall.edu/ucomm/graduates-july-2012-december-2012.
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Tuesday February 19, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine plans summer academy for undergraduate students interested in medical school

Center for Rural Health and SOM partner to address anticipated shortage of physicians

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health, in conjunction with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (JCESOM), is offering a summer residential academy for undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine.
  
The academy is scheduled for June 3-7 at Marshall University.

"We are excited to launch this outreach program to college students," said Jennifer Plymale, director of the Byrd Center for Rural Health and associate dean for admissions at the JCESOM. "Students will be participating in a variety of hands-on activities and offered instruction on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) preparation and interviewing skills, in addition to traditional lectures."

The academy is an extension of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's pipeline program for high school students, which began in 2004. Through the pipeline program, which spans 14 counties and 31 schools, high school students are encouraged to consider medicine as a career.

The pipeline program seeks to remove barriers for young people who would like to attend medical school and possibly return to their home communities to practice.  The newly created summer academy is an exciting next step in expanding the pipeline program to the college level.

Plymale said that estimates show by 2015 the physician shortage in the United States will have expanded to 63,000 and that pipeline programs like the summer academy are effective mechanisms to help students identify and eliminate barriers associated with pursuing medical school.

"The Affordable Care Act extends health care to 30 million people and as such will require thousands more physicians," she said.  "With pipeline programs like we have in place at the high school and college levels, Marshall is able to encourage more students to consider medicine as a career to meet the future demand."

Plymale said the academy is free to students who are selected for the academy. To be eligible to apply, applicants must be West Virginia residents who are currently enrolled in a West Virginia  public or private accredited college or university.   Other requirements include:

-  Earned between 30 and 60 credit hours
-  Have a composite G.P.A. of  at least 3.00 for all courses
-  Scored a minimum of 22 on the ACT or SAT equivalent
-  Demonstrated serious interest in a medical career

The application process is open to all.  Women, minorities and those from groups that are underrepresented in medicine are especially encouraged to apply.  Additional details and applications are available at http://crh.marshall.edu/summeracademy.asp.

Deadline to apply is April 15. 


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Monday February 18, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Day at the Capitol is Wednesday, Feb. 20

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University representatives will pack the upper rotunda of the State Capitol in Charleston Wednesday, Feb. 20, in celebration of the annual Marshall Day at the Capitol. 

Marshall staff, faculty, students and alumni will be at the capitol from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., greeting visitors and interacting with legislators. Nearly 40 displays promoting a variety of programs will be set up during the event, which is being organized by the MU Alumni Association.

At this year's event, the Marshall community will celebrate meeting its goal of raising $15 million in private donations for research which, along with the match from the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, has led to the creation of 16 new research endowments at Marshall and a 15 percent increase in the university's overall endowment. In all, 170 private donors gave "Bucks for Brains" gifts ranging from less than $50 to $5 million, all in support of research at Marshall.

"We look forward to Marshall Day at the Capitol each year, and I think the legislators enjoy seeing all the Kelly green and learning what's new with our university," said Nancy Pelphrey, assistant director of alumni relations. "We are proud to let them know that we are strong and still growing, and thrilled that the university met its fund-raising goal for research, which means a total benefit to Marshall of $30 million. We're using this year's event as an opportunity to thank members of the legislature for their support of this important program."

The John Marshall Fife and Drum Corps will perform and resolutions will be read in the House and the Senate declaring Feb. 20 "Marshall University Day." Fun features of Marshall Day at the Capitol include free giveaways, including popcorn and soft drinks.

Marshall representatives planning to attend include: Regents Bachelor of Arts; College of Health Professions; College of Liberal Arts; West Virginia Autism Training Center; Financial Aid; Mid-Ohio Valley Center and Teays Valley Regional Center; Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences; College of Education; College of Information Technology and Engineering; Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing;

Luke Lee Listening, Language and Learning Lab; Marshall University School of Medicine; TRIO programs; Graduate College; School of Pharmacy; Marshall Recreation Center; Marshall University Research Corp.; ROTC, Biomedical Sciences; Graduate Humanities Program; Career Services;

Information Technology; College of Fine Arts; Graduate School of Education and Professional Development; Outreach and Continuing Studies; School of Journalism and Mass Communications; Student Resource Center; University College; College of Business; Marshall University Alumni Association; Housing and Residence Life and Multicultural Affairs/African American Students' Programs.

For more information, contact the alumni association at 304-696-2901.


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Friday February 15, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Future Investment Day at Marshall emphasizes importance of going to college

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 200 eighth-grade students from Huntington Middle School will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday, Feb. 22, to take part in Future Investment Day.

 

Charles C. Meyers Jr., a senior engineering student at Marshall and the event director, said the purpose of Future Investment Day is for the students to realize the need for college and to understand the steps necessary to prepare for college.

 

"Eighth-grade students are at a point in their lives where it becomes crucial for them to start thinking about the idea of going to college," Meyers said. "If the students go into high school with a set goal of attending college, then they are more likely to work harder in class and focus on getting good grades."

 

Future Investment Day features hands-on and interactive workshops designed to stress the importance of college. The students also will learn about student organizations, college majors and potential careers. Marshall students will share personal stories of achievement and academic success with the eighth-graders.

 

Meyers is involved in organizations on campus such as My Brother's Keeper and the Society of Black Scholars that focus on the personal growth of individuals through mentoring, workshops and campus involvement.

 

He has developed and coordinated various leadership initiatives including the Words of Reflection Writing Contest at Huntington Middle School that allows students to write about their personal struggles, achievements and aspirations.

 

"Future Investment Day will help students in the Huntington community understand that each one of them has the potential of going to college and to realize the need of investing in their own future through education," Meyers said.

 

Major sponsors of the event are:

 

Center for African American Students at Marshall University; Cabell County Schools; Future Investment Program of Huntington, W.Va.; My Brother's Keeper; Division of Academic Affairs at Marshall University; College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall University; Toyota Motor Manufacturing, West Virginia, Inc.; College of Science at Marshall University; Neighborgall Construction Company; and, Office of Recruitment at Marshall University.

 

"The Marshall University Center for African American Students is elated to support and host this unique initiative created by one of our most outstanding university students," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "We sincerely celebrate opportunities of this nature that will stimulate the growth and development of our local youth to prepare their pathway to higher education. It is also a pleasure to collaborate with Cabell County Schools towards the success of this initiative."

 

The event runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center.


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Friday February 15, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 696-7153

Marshall experts to speak at state biosciences summit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Several Marshall University representatives are among more than 20 life science experts who will share experiences and discuss strategies for successfully growing the state's bioscience industry during the upcoming West Virginia Bioscience Summit.

Sponsored by the Bioscience Association of West Virginia (BioWV), the summit will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 :30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 28, at the Marriott Town Center in Charleston. The annual event brings together members of the state's bioscience community with policy and opinion leaders, economic developers and others who are interested in learning more about how to grow and nurture the industry.

At the summit, Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, will join representatives from the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute, West Virginia State University, the University of Charleston and West Virginia University on a panel highlighting research being conducted in the state.

"The BioWV Summit is a tremendous opportunity to bring attention to the significant economic development happening via West Virginia's life sciences community," said Maher. "At the other end of the pipeline we have a great deal of exciting biotechnology work happening here at Marshall and we are pleased to have this chance to share it with our colleagues and friends from around the state and region."

Dr. Nader Abraham, vice dean for research at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, is on the program to share information about clinical trials at Marshall, and the assistant director of Marshall's Technology Transfer Office, Amy Melton, will participate in a panel discussion about commercialization opportunities and recent changes in U.S. patent law.

In addition, representatives of two Marshall spinout companies, Derek Gregg of Vandalia Research and Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio of Cordgenics, are scheduled to be on a panel of bioscience company representatives and funders who will discuss the challenges of raising capital and creating an environment for life science growth in the state. Gregg and Claudio both founded their companies on technology they developed in the university's labs.

A host of industry leaders, policy-makers and other experts also will participate in the conference, including the following:

  • Governor Earl Ray Tomblin (invited);
  • Fritz Bittenbender, Vice President, Alliance Development and State Government Relations, Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO);
  • Jeff May, Vice President, Product Strategy, Mylan North America;
  • Dr. Paul Hill, Chancellor, West Virginia Higher Education Commission;
  • Jeff Trewhitt, Senior Director of Communications and Public Affairs, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

The summit's keynote speaker will be Dr. David Scholl, who helped grow Athens, Ohio-based Diagnostic Hybrids into a $100 million biotech company. He is now a partner in a regional venture capital firm and is involved with the billion-dollar Ohio Third Frontier program.

Gregg, who serves as the chairman of BioWV, said, "A successful life science industry begins with research, which then leads to discoveries. Those discoveries provide the basis for company development and economic growth for the state. West Virginia is having success but there is much more that can be done to help grow this industry within our borders.

"The bioscience industry is creating new technologies -- pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, medical technologies, chemical processes and more -- that not only advance science but provide high-wage jobs to West Virginia residents. This conference will bring people together to highlight what is currently under way and to discuss how we can grow the industry."

In addition to BioWV, summit sponsors include BIO, PhRMA, Mylan, Pfizer, Fisher Scientific, Amgen, Steptoe & Johnson LLP, Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute, West Virginia Small Business Development Center and TechConnect West Virginia. BioWV also receives funding through a grant from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

Marshall University is a founding member of BioWV. The purpose of the association is to promote and strengthen the bioscience industry in the state by developing a cohesive community that unites biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device and research organizations.

For more information or to register for the summit, visit www.biowv.org.

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Friday February 15, 2013
Contact: Haven Campbell, Marketing & Event Graduate Assistant,Career Services, 304-696-2370

Career Services to feature etiquette expert at upcoming dinner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its bi-annual Etiquette Dinner, featuring etiquette consultant Terri Thompson, on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

The dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. in room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus. Doors open at 6 p.m. and professional dress is required.

During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, along with answers to any questions students might have.

"Terri has a wonderful way of making the students feel at ease, while maintaining a real sense of professionalism," said Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach with MU Career Services.
 
All current Marshall students are welcome to attend. However, juniors and seniors will be given preference.

Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services Center. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner. Cancellations must be made within 72 hours of the event to receive a full refund.

This spring will mark the eighth time Thompson has conducted the event. Thompson is an etiquette coach and reinvention expert who started the companies Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

For more information, contact Career Services at 304 696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu.


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Friday February 15, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

Marshall University to host 4th annual Festival of New Music starting Feb. 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 4th annual Festival of New Music will feature the music of Marshall alumna Esin Gunduz, as well as compositions by Dr. Kelly Rossum, Dr. Marc Satterwhite, Gabriel Araujo and others.

Performances will take place at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus; at noon Friday, March 1, at First Presbyterian Church, 1015 5th Ave. in Huntington; and at 8 p.m. Friday, March 1, in Smith Recital Hall.

"Those with an interest in contemporary music will experience an exciting array of new works," said Dr. Mark Zanter, professor of music at Marshall and coordinator of the festival.

Guest performers during the festival will include Lindsey Goodman, principal flutist of the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra; violinist Anyango Yarbo-Davenport; faculty chamber ensembles from Marshall and Morehead State University and the MU Contemporary Music Ensemble.

Thursday evening and Friday noon concerts feature a variety of chamber music, including works with electronic media and many U.S. premieres of works composed within the past two years, Zanter said. Three new commissioned works by Zanter, Suite, Gestures II and The Persistence of Memory, are included.

The Friday evening concert will feature a performance of Rossum's score to the John S. Robertson's 1920 film, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. "Rossum's jazz-inspired score adds an entirely new dimension to the viewer's experience of the film," Zanter said. "[His] interpretation of Jekyll's struggle with 'good and evil' adds a modern twist to the classic tale."

In addition to the concert performances, Satterwhite will give a presentation at 2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, in Drinko Library room 341 on Marshall's Huntington campus. The discussion will focus on issues concerning composition and composing concert music. Satterwhite is professor of music at the University of Louisville and coordinator of that university's Grawemeyer Award in Music Composition.

All events are free and open to the public. For further information, persons may contact Zanter by phone at 304-638-3481 or by e-mail at zanter@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday February 13, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word performs well in recent tournaments

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - " Marshall University's Thundering Word has had a very successful start in speech and debate competition this semester.

Recent performances included a sixth-place finish among 31 schools in a tournament at Butler University in Indianapolis. Three of those schools, Illinois State, Eastern Michigan and Ball State, were in the top 10 at nationals last year.

In the Gorlock Gala Tournament at Webster University in St. Louis, Marshall finished fourth among 48 schools. Boise State, Marion and Southwest Baptist University were the top three in that competition.

"We traveled to a region outside of our normal competition to better prepare ourselves for the national tournaments we will participate in this semester," Marshall Coach Danny Ray said of the tournament at Webster.

Here are the highlights from the tournament at Butler:

Finalists for Marshall were:

  • Victoria Ledford, a sophomore pre-med chemistry honors student from Braxton County, W.Va., who placed fourth in Persuasion and sixth in Rhetorical Criticism;
  • Erin Jorden, a freshman history education major from Wheeling, W.Va.,who placed sixth in Prose Interpretation;
  • Marji McCoy, a sophomore pre-med biology honors student from Beckley, W.Va., who placed fifth in Persuasion (competing in her second-ever tournament);
  • Joshua Gainer, a junior political science major from Parkersburg, W.Va., who was sixth in Poetry Interpretation;
  • Matt Osteen, a sophomore pre-med chemistry honors student from Jefferson, W.Va., who was second in Lincoln-Douglas Debate and the second-best speaker in debate at the tournament.

Ray said Marshall scored many points in the preliminary rounds of the tournament, which he described as "large and very competitive." Taryss Mandt, a freshman University College student from Arlington, Va., was seventh in Dramatic Interpretation. Only the top six make it to the final round.

At Webster University, Marshall won three events. Tournament champions were Ledford and Christian Adams, a junior pre-med psychology honors student from Culloden, W.Va., in Duo Interpretation, Mandt in Informative Speaking and Juliet Djietror, a sophomore pre-med biology major from Ghana, in Prose Interpretation.

Ledford was first in Duo Interpretation and sixth in Persuasion.

Adams was first in Duo Interpretation, sixth in After-Dinner Speaking and sixth with McCoy in Improv Duo.

Mandt was not only first in Informative Speaking but also the top novice in that category. She was top novice and third in Programmed Oral Interpretation, and received an award of excellence and top novice in Dramatic Interpretation.

Jorden was a semifinalist and an award of excellence recipient in Poetry Interpretation.

Djietror was the tournament champion and top novice speaker in Prose Interpretation. She also won an award of excellence in Persuasive Speaking and was third with Gainer in Improv Duo.

McCoy was sixth in Improv Duo and won an award of excellence in Persuasion.


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Wednesday February 13, 2013
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Krystle Davis takes new role with Marshall Foundation

MU grad is named program director of scholarships and donor relations

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Krystle Davis, event and building operations manager with the Marshall University Foundation since July 2009, has accepted the position of program director of scholarships and donor relations with the foundation.

Christine Anderson, assistant vice president for development with the foundation, said Davis starts her new job Friday, Feb. 15.

"I look forward to the personalized professionalism Krystle will bring to this very important position that serves our students and donors, along with the university and foundation family," Anderson said.

Davis, a 2007 and 2009 graduate of Marshall, has been the foundation's only building operations manager since the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, opened three years ago. She scheduled and facilitated all events and took care of day-to-day responsibilities in the building.

Although her first official day on the new job is Friday, she won't be giving up her old duties just yet.

"I will be handling all MU Foundation Hall events until someone is in place," Davis said. "I will only be one floor away if they need any assistance."

In her new job, Davis will work in the development office, setting up scholarship guidelines and collaborating with financial aid in continuing to develop the processes in place with the hopes that more and more students will be assisted by scholarships," she said.

"One opportunity I'm looking forward to is helping the students in making connections with their donors and building those lifelong relationships," Davis said.

For more information, contact Davis at 304-696-3420.


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Tuesday February 12, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Future Investment Day at Marshall emphasizes importance of going to college

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 200 eighth-grade students from Huntington Middle School will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Friday, Feb. 22, to take part in Future Investment Day.

Charles C. Meyers Jr., a senior engineering student at Marshall and the event director, said the purpose of Future Investment Day is for the students to realize the need for college and to understand the steps necessary to prepare for college.

"Eighth-grade students are at a point in their lives where it becomes crucial for them to start thinking about the idea of going to college," Meyers said. "If the students go into high school with a set goal of attending college, then they are more likely to work harder in class and focus on getting good grades."

Future Investment Day features hands-on and interactive workshops designed to stress the importance of college. The students also will learn about student organizations, college majors and potential careers. Marshall students will share personal stories of achievement and academic success with the eighth-graders.

Meyers is involved in organizations on campus such as My Brother's Keeper and the Society of Black Scholars that focus on the personal growth of individuals through mentoring, workshops and campus involvement.

He has developed and coordinated various leadership initiatives, including the Words of Reflection Writing Contest at Huntington Middle School, that allow students to write about their personal struggles, achievements and aspirations.

"Future Investment Day will help students in the Huntington community understand that each one of them has the potential of going to college and to realize the need of investing in their own future through education," Meyers said.

Major sponsors of the event are: Center for African American Students at Marshall University; Cabell County Schools; Future Investment Program of Huntington, W.Va.; My Brother's Keeper; Division of Academic Affairs at Marshall University; College of Information Technology and Engineering at Marshall University; Toyota Motor Manufacturing, West Virginia, Inc.; College of Science at Marshall University; Neighborgall Construction Company; and Office of Recruitment at Marshall University.

"The Marshall University Center for African American Students is elated to support and host this unique initiative created by one of our most outstanding university students," said Maurice Cooley, director of the center. "We sincerely celebrate opportunities of this nature that will stimulate the growth and development of our local youth to prepare their pathway to higher education. It is also a pleasure to collaborate with Cabell County Schools towards the success of this initiative."

The event runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Memorial Student Center.


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Friday February 8, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Doubt' to be presented by Marshall Theatre Alliance

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Theatre Alliance will present John Patrick Shanley's highly acclaimed drama "Doubt" Feb. 20-23 and Feb. 28-March 2 in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre located inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The play, guest directed by Cathey Crowell Sawyer, artistic director of the Greenbrier Valley Theatre, starts at 8 p.m. each day. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for Marshall faculty and staff, and $15 for seniors. Marshall students are admitted with a valid I.D.

Tickets may be purchased by calling the box office at 304-696-2787 between 1 and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

"Doubt," set in a Bronx Catholic school in 1964, examines the intersections of doubt, truth and faith. Sister Aloysius is certain that young Father Flynn has "made advances" toward the school's first and only African American student and sets out in search of the truth.


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Friday February 8, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 696-7153

Applications being accepted for minority internship program in the biomedical sciences

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Applications are now being accepted for the 2013 Summer Research Internship for Minority Students, available through the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program.

The program supports minority undergraduate students over a nine-week period. Participants conduct graduate-level research in the field of the biomedical sciences. They receive formal research training through workshops and seminars, mentoring and use of Marshal's state-of-the-art laboratory facilities. Each student will receive a stipend of $3,000, free room and board, and support for travel.

This program has been conducted at Marshall since 2009 and is funded in part by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research.

This year's program runs from May 28 through July 29. The application deadline is Feb. 15. All materials may be submitted online.

For eligibility requirements and application procedures, visit www.marshall.edu/bms/future-students/summer-research-internship. For more information, e-mail srims@marshall.edu or call 304-696-3365.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday February 6, 2013
Contact: Angela L. Holley, Director, Marshall University Heart of Appalachia Talent Search Program, 304-696-2201

Free financial aid assistance available Sunday, Feb. 10

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. a" For those planning to continue their education after high school or return to college, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, also known as the FAFSA, must be completed.

Free help in filling out and submitting the FAFSA is available during College Goal Sunday, a one-day event that will be held at 23 locations throughout the state.

College Goal Sunday workshops will take place Sunday, Feb. 10, in Corbly Hall on Marshall Universityas Huntington campus, as well as at the Marshall University Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant. Experts will be available to assist students from 1 to 4 p.m. and students can stop by anytime during those hours. Registration is not required but recommended.  Students who complete a FAFSA at the event will be entered to win an iPad and other door prizes. Refreshments will be provided.

Local financial aid professionals will be on hand to offer free one-on-one, confidential support. For complete details, including directions and a list of what to bring, visit www.cfwv.com.


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Wednesday February 6, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-7153

Guest recitals this week feature pianists Ertl, Samolesky

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will present two guest artist piano solo recitals this week.

Dr. Jacob Ertl, assistant professor of piano at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, will perform at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Dr. Jeremy Samolesky, associate professor of piano at Auburn University, will perform as part of Marshall's Sonatina Festival at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, in room 107 in Smith Music Hall. His performance will immediately follow a pre-concert talk by Dr. Henning Vauth, assistant professor of piano at Marshall, titled "The Influence of Practice on the Development of Motor Skills."

Ertl, a native of Appleton, Wis., has performed across the United States, and abroad in Europe, Israel, Canada and Mexico. A winner of numerous national and international competitions, he has debuted at Carnegie Hall's Weill Recital Hall and Merkin Concert Hall in New York City, on Chicago Radio's "Live from WFMT" series and Wisconsin Public Radio's "Live from the Elvehjem" series. He has also performed with the Milwaukee Chamber Orchestra and the Fox Valley Symphony in Appleton. He holds degrees from Oberlin College and the Eastman School of Music.

Samolesky, a native of Manitoba, Canada, has appeared in concert as a soloist and chamber pianist throughout the U.S., Canada, Italy, Austria, Hong Kong, China, Malaysia and Singapore, including a full recital at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., which was broadcast nationally on National Public Radio's "Performance Today." He holds degrees from the University of Manitoba, the University of Washington and the Eastman School of Music.

"We are very excited to be able to present these two high-caliber guest artist recitals to the Marshall community," Vauth said. "Both of them will be performed on our grand pianos in Smith Recital Hall on campus and are free and open to the public. I encourage all students, faculty and staff to take advantage of this opportunity to hear beautiful music performed by distinguished artists such as Dr. Ertl and Dr. Samolesky."

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Photos: Guest pianists Dr. Jacob Ertl (above) and Dr. Jeremy Samolesky will give recitals this week at Marshall University.


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Wednesday February 6, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

SURE program continues this summer; applications being accepted

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Marshall University is accepting applications for the 2013 Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellowship.

This program has been conducted at Marshall since 2005, and is funded through the West Virginia Research Challenge Fund, administered by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, Division of Science and Research. The SURE program is designed specifically to enable West Virginia undergraduate students with a history of research to work at Marshall. Each student will receive a stipend of $4,000, plus support for travel.

SURE supports undergraduate researchers over a 10-week period. This year's program runs from May 20 through Aug. 2. The SURE program is now accepting applications through 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 22.  Application forms are available at the SURE website: www.marshall.edu/SURE.

aAnyone who is an undergraduate in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields at Marshall University is eligible to perform research at Marshall through the SURE program,a said Dr. Michael Norton, professor of chemistry and director of the SURE program at MU.

Last summer, several Marshall University students received grants for research in the STEM fields. The students were Samantha Adkins (Psychology); Caleb Calvary (Chemistry); Arrin Carter (Chemistry); James Collins (Chemistry); Courtney Hatten (Chemistry); Abigail Hayes (Biology); Catherine Higgins (Chemistry); Deborah Moore (biology); Robert Mwangi (Integrated Science and Technology), Anthony Stephenson (Biochemistry) and Chunji Yin (Biology).

For more information, contact Norton by phoning 304-696-6627 or by e-mailing him at Norton@Marshall.edu. More detailed summaries of past SURE students' projects are available on the SURE website.


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Wednesday February 6, 2013
Contact: Dr. Laura Michele Diener, assistant professor of history, 304-696-2954

Benefit production of 'The Vagina Monologues' planned Feb. 14-16 at Marco's

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will present a three-night only benefit reading of Eve Ensler's award-wining play, "The Vagina Monologues," at 8 p.m. daily from Thursday, Feb. 14, through Saturday, Feb.  16, at Marco's in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the event. All proceeds from the benefit will go to Branches domestic violence shelter in Huntington and CONTACT rape crisis center, which also serves the Huntington area.

Hailed by The New York Times as "funny" and "poignant" and by the Daily News as "intelligent" and "courageous," The Vagina Monologues, which was first performed off-Broadway by Ensler, dives into the mystery, humor, pain, power, wisdom, outrage and excitement buried in women's experiences.

Branches Domestic Violence Shelter is a non-profit agency providing shelter to victims of domestic violence, operating in Huntington and the surrounding area.  The shelter is committed to the belief that everyone has the right to live without the fear of violence.

CONTACT of Huntington is a rape crisis center that serves Cabell, Wayne, Lincoln and Mason counties in West Virginia. The center provides advocacy for victims of sexual assault and stalking, and provides prevention education to the local community.


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Tuesday February 5, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine specialty care expanded in Mingo County

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Physicians with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will provide expanded specialty health care beginning this month at the Larry Joe Harless Community and Health Center in Gilbert, W.Va. The Marshall clinic began last year as part of a state-wide initiative to deliver health care to the most rural parts of West Virginia.
In addition to cardiology and endocrinology services already in place for area residents, Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, a nephrologist, will begin seeing patients Monday, Feb. 18, at the clinic. Nephrology is the area of medicine concerned with the study and treatment of kidney disease. Shapiro is also dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.
Dr. Melissa D. Lester, an interventional cardiologist, and Dr. Henry K. Driscoll, an endocrinologist and section chief, along with the endocrinologists in his section, have been seeing patients since last year at the clinic and will continue their monthly clinical visits, which are generally on the fourth Friday of the month. School of Medicine resident physicians also see patients at the clinic as part of their rural medicine rotations.
The Harless Health Center is a collaborative partnership that includes the West Virginia University School of Medicine, the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the town of Gilbert, and the Harless Center to provide health services to the region.
The U.S. Department of Health Resources and Service Administration awarded the center nearly $3 million in 2010 to help renovate the community center to create the health care clinic. The funding request was spearheaded by the late Sen. Robert C. Byrd.
Scheduling for the Gilbert clinic is available by calling 304-691-1000 for endocrinology and nephrology, and a physician referral is required. Dr. Lester accepts physician referrals as well as self referrals, and appointments may be made by calling 304-691-8500. A toll-free number for scheduling is also available: 855-774-7279. The phone number for the Larry Joe Harless Community and Health Center is 304-664-2500, ext. 102.
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Monday February 4, 2013
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Chamber music program to feature guitar, violin and flute Feb. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Guitarist Dr. Julio Ribeiro Alves, a member of Marshall University's music faculty, will be joined by his wife, violinist Kristen Alves, and fellow faculty member, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, in a program of chamber music at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13. The program will take place in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"It's a joy to be part of a musical community where one can share great music with such wonderful fellow musicians and an appreciative audience." Dobbs said.

Featured on the program will be works by J.S. Bach, Gaspard Kummer, Carl Blum, Ferdinando Carulli and Astor Piazzola.

Bach wrote nothing for the guitar, but this arrangement of the Sonata for Organ, BWV 525 demonstrates the versatility of the modern guitar and how well it blends with the flute and violin. Kummer was a talented town musician in Coburg, Germany. His delightful divertimento features contrasting spritely and nostalgic melodies in an expressive contrapuntal style. Blum was an actor, singer and composer in early 19th century Berlin. His musical depiction of roses comes from a three-work set of nocturnes titled Le Bouquet. A native of Naples who resided in Paris most of his career, Carulli was very important to the 19th century development of the guitar and guitar technique. His e minor trio is full of romantic verve. Argentine composer Piazzola is best known for his tangos and coined the title Libertango from the Spanish words for liberty and the tango, thus intending this work to break from the classical tango form.

Kristen Alves holds music degrees from Rice University and the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore.

The program is free and open to the public. Contact the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117 for more information or visit online at www.marshall.edu/cofa/music.

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Photo: Guitarist Dr. Julio Ribeiro Alves (left) will be joined by his wife, violinist Kristen Alves (center), and fellow faculty member, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, in a program of chamber music at 8 p.m. Wednesday,  Feb. 13 in Marshall University's Smith Music Hall.


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Monday February 4, 2013
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Community invited to compete in Marshall Rec Center indoor triathlon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center is sponsoring an event that features a little healthy competition while promoting fitness in the community.

Children and adults are invited to take part in an indoor triathlon at 9 a.m.  Saturday, March 2, at the rec center on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

"We wanted to put on a small scale triathlon in Huntington, and an indoor triathlon sounded just perfect," said Stephanie Vlahos, the event's director. "The recreation center has a great building to put on an event like this, and this time of year it is nice to get out of the weather."

Entrants can tackle the triathlon alone or sign up with a team for a chance to win a Corporate Cup. Participants will swim 300 yards, equivalent to 12 pool lengths, and then bike eight miles on a spinning bike before running two miles on a treadmill. Everyone will have five minutes to change clothes after they swim.

All of the events will be timed. Awards will be given to the top overall male and female, and the top competitors in each age group. Age groups are 16-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and 60-plus. Corporate Cups will be given to the top three teams.

Children also are encouraged to participate. Children's age groups are 8-10 and 11-15. They will swim 150 yards, equivalent to six pool lengths, bike four miles on a spinning bike and run one mile, equivalent to seven laps on the track. Children must be at least 4 feet, 2 inches tall to ride the bike.

Parents can accompany their children in the 8-10 year-old race, but not the 11-15 year-old race. Children can use floatation devices like kickboards and life vests in the pool, but fins and paddles are prohibited.

Registration is $20 in advance, $40 the morning of the race and $50 per corporate team of two or three. The first 80 people to pre-register will receive a T-shirt. To receive the desired shirt size, participants must pre-register before Feb. 19. Participants, or parents of the children taking part, must sign consent forms before the race.

Proceeds benefit NECCO, an agency that helps place troubled children with foster families, and the Sue Niestroy-Wilson Memorial Fitness Scholarship Award.

Participants may register online at tristateracer.com or visit the rec center welcome desk for registration forms.

For more information contact Michele Muth at pallante1@marshall.edu or 304-696-2943.


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Friday February 1, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

2-Hour Delay Friday, Feb. 1

MarshallUniversity will operate on a two-hour delay this morning, Friday,Feb. 1,on a Code B basis.This affects both the opening of classes and offices for all campuses and centers.

Click to view more information on closings and delays.


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Friday February 1, 2013
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-2300

Academic reorganization will streamline Marshall University's administrative structure

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning this summer, Marshall University will streamline its academic college structure in a move expected to create additional opportunities for students while also reducing administrative personnel costs.

On July 1, the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development and existing College of Education units will combine programs to become a new comprehensive College of Education. Dr. Teresa Eagle, currently dean of GSEPD, will become dean of the new College of Education.

Eagle said, "Our new College of Education will continue to be centered on student success and providing the tools our students need to become highly sought-after professionals who make a positive difference in the lives of their students. Marshall University was founded 175 years ago as an academy to train West Virginia teachers. The roots of the GSEPD are rich in a philosophy and practice of outreach across the state and the region. We are bound by our mission and our  history to build on those traditions through modern, effective instruction and administration. I'm confident we can take that to the next level through this new organizational structure." 

Dr. Robert Bookwalter, currently dean of the College of Education, will become interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts, effective June 1.

Dr. Gayle Ormiston, Marshall University provost, said the retirement of two longtime administrators is providing the opportunity to combine administrative roles and responsibilities across several programs. Dr. Rudy Pauley, associate vice president for Outreach and Continuing Studies, will retire June 1; and Dr. Donna Spindel, dean of the Graduate College, will retire Aug. 16.

Dr. David Pittenger, currently dean of the College of Liberal Arts, will assume Pauley's and Spindel's duties, which are being combined into the position of associate vice president and dean of graduate studies. Dr. Pittenger will serve in this role on an interim basis.

"These moves will eliminate two senior administrative positions without reducing student support services or affecting program curricula," Ormiston said.

Staff members in the Graduate College and College of Education will continue in their current roles. Administration of the university's physical facilities in South Charleston, Point Pleasant, Beckley and Teays Valley, for which Pauley was responsible, will be provided through existing staff at the South Charleston campus.

Beginning July 1, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications will join with the School of Music and Theatre and the School of Art and Design, which are currently within the College of Fine Arts, to form a new college, the name of which has not been announced. The Marshall Artists Series also will reside in the new college.

Donald Van Horn, currently dean of the College of Fine Arts, will become dean of this new college. Janet Dooley, currently interim dean of the School of Journalism and Mass Communications, will become director of the school and will also serve as associate dean of the new college.

Dr. David Castleberry, currently interim director of the School of Music and Theatre, will return to his previous role as associate dean on July 1. Byron Clercx will continue as director of the School of Art and Design.

Van Horn said, "I see tremendous opportunities for our students in progressive new programs ranging from advanced web design, photography, social media, digital media, graphic design and advertising. We will continue our renowned tradition of training outstanding journalism and public relations professionals, visual and performing artists and arts scholars, while capitalizing on degree programs that respond to rapidly evolving fields in digital communications.

"We are in a constantly changing era of digital communications and Marshall University is creating an entirely new model that I strongly believe will make us one of the most outstanding programs in the nation. This is a very exciting time for Marshall University with the construction of our new downtown Visual Arts Center and the creation of this new college. Fine and performing arts and communications are truly on the move here in Huntington."

Van Horn has formed a committee of journalism and arts faculty to develop policies and procedures, as well as to recommend a name for the new college.

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SUMMARY

June 1 - Dr. Rudy Pauley retires. Dr. David Pittenger assumes duties of associate vice president for outreach and dean of graduate studies. Dr. Donna Spindel remains in her role as dean of the Graduate College until her retirement Aug. 16. 

June 1 - Graduate School of Education and Professional Development and the College of Education will be combined in a new College of Education. Dr. Teresa Eagle becomes dean.

June 1 - Dr. Robert Bookwalter becomes interim dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

July 1 - School of Art and Design, School of Music and Theatre, and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications join to form an entirely new college. Don Van Horn becomes dean. The name for this new college will be selected in the coming months by a committee and transition team appointed by Van Horn.


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Friday February 1, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Children of deceased Marine veteran receive RBA degree he was pursuing at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The children of a United States Marine Corps veteran who died late last year while a student at Marshall University today received the diploma representing the degree their father was pursuing at MU.

The presentation of the degree, which was conferred posthumously, took place in the Memorial Student Center's Shawkey Room on the Huntington campus.

Owen M. Moul, a native of Phoenix, Ariz., died Nov. 23, 2012, at his home in Barboursville. He was 34 years old.

Moul's children Sydney, 14, Sierra, 8, Owen Jr., 7, and Zane, 1, attended today's event and accepted Moul's Regents Bachelor of Arts (RBA) degree from Dr. Chris White, an associate professor of Latin American history at Marshall and Director of Graduate Studies. White also was a neighbor and friend of Moul, whose children also received their father's special military recognition cord and honors cord. He was a 4.0 student at Marshall.

White said Moul was in the Marines for 12 years, which included deployment in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He was a Marine recruiter in the Huntington area from 2004 through 2008. Moul was a student in White's "American Diplomacy in the 20th Century" class last fall.

"He was my top student, the best student I've had in nine years of teaching," White said. "He was dynamite. He had everything it takes to go on and become a college professor."

In July 2011, Moul received an associate degree in applied science from Mountwest Community and Technical College. He was planning to attend graduate school with a focus on history or geography after receiving his RBA.

"It was important to Marshall University that his children receive this degree in honor of their father," said Kelly Sweetman, director of military and veterans affairs at Marshall. "It was our mission to make sure they had his diploma."

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Photo: Owen Moul's children pose with their dad's diploma they received today from Marshall University. From left to right are Owen Jr., 7, holding the diploma; Sierra, 8, Zane, 1, and Sydney, 14. Photo by Liu Yang/Marshall University.


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Two visiting poets to read from their works Feb. 18 at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will welcome two visiting poets, Ross Gay and Erika Meitner, to the Huntington campus this month in conjunction with the university's A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series, a program that invites 6 to 8 writers every year to read publicly from their bodies of work.

Poetry readings from Gay and Meitner are scheduled for 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 18, in Smith Hall 154 on the Huntington campus. A book signing will immediately follow the readings.

Gay is an assistant professor of English at Indiana University and the author of two poetry collections: Against Which (CavanKerry Press, 2006) and Bringing the Shovel Down (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011). His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Gulf Coast, Ploughshares, and Sou'wester, among many other places. Gay was born in Youngstown, Ohio, and grew up outside of Philadelphia. He also teaches at the low-residency MFA in poetry program at Drew University and is a Cave Canem fellow.

Meitner is a National Poetry Series winner and the author of Inventory at the All-Night Drugstore (Anhinga Press, 2003), Ideal Cities (HarperCollins, 2010), and Makeshift Instructions for Vigilant Girls (Anhinga Press, 2011). Meitner is a first-generation American whose maternal grandparents survived the Auschwitz, Ravensbruck and Mauthausen concentration camps. She is currently an assistant professor of English at Virginia Tech, as well as the Morgenstern Fellow in Jewish Studies at the University of Virginia.

The Marshall English Department, Center for African American Students and College of Liberal Arts, along with the Jewish Benevolent Association and B'Nai Sholom congregation in Huntington, are sponsoring the event.

"The Visiting Writers Series would like to thank the MU Center for African American Students, B'nai Sholom Congregation, and the Jewish Benevolent Association of Huntington," said Dr. Rachael Peckham from Marshall's Department of English. "Their support has given this community access to two incredible poets and thinkers in Ross Gay and Erika Meitner."

A small reception will take place before the readings from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in the third-floor Drinko Library atrium on the Huntington campus. Both the reception and the readings are free and open to the public.

For more information, call Peckham in the Department of English at 304-696-3649.


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Friday February 1, 2013
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Jazz Festival events remain on schedule.

As of late Friday afternoon, Feb. 1, all Jazz Festival events are still on schedule.

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Original news item:

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Friday, January 25, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts 304-696-3296

MU Jazz Fest to feature Airmen of Note

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Airmen of Note, considered the premier jazz ensemble of the U.S. Air Force, will headline the 44th annual Marshall University Jazz Festival, which begins Thursday, Jan. 31, and continues through Saturday, Feb. 2.  Performances will take place at 7 p.m. each evening in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the university's Huntington campus.

"The Jazz Festival is one of the many programs put forth by the College of Fine Arts, funded in-part by the president's office of Marshall University and the Marshall University Foundation," said Dr. Sean Parsons, assistant professor of music in jazz studies at Marshall. "By bringing performers to campus as part of this festival, it is one way to share music and art with the university and community."

Admission to the concerts will be free; however, tickets are required and can be picked up the nights of the performances at the Joan C. Edwards box office.

The festival begins Thursday evening with a performance by this year's high school honor ensemble, The Patriot, from Parkersburg South High School, under the direction of Eric Staats. Afterward there will be a performance by Marshall University student combos.

Staats, the director of bands at Parkersburg South High School and a Marshall alumnus, said the jazz ensemble is one of two auditioned jazz bands at Parkersburg South.

"The band has 23 members who range in grade level from 9 through 12," Staats said. "These students are intensely motivated musicians who choose to study their craft in greater depth. They were also featured performers at the Universal Studios, Orlando, 'STARS' performance series in 2012 and were used in the theme park's marketing/publicity materials."

The Marshall University Alumni Big Band will perform Friday night, followed by Marshall University 12.0 and guest artists. Parsons said the alumni band is an ensemble that spans four decades, made up of many musicians who studied jazz at Marshall. The ensemble is being led by alumnus and Marshall music faculty member Jeff Wolfe.  

"The groups will be top notch, including our own 12.0 Jazz Ensemble and top jazz combo, Project Postbop," said Dr. Martin Saunders, associate professor of music in trumpet and jazz studies at Marshall and director of the 12.0 Jazz Ensemble. "The 12.0 performs every year as part of the jazz festival, and has performed with several notable, highly regarded guest artists."

Saturday is the closing night, with a performance by the Thundering Herd All-Star Band and the featured guests, Airmen of Note. The Thundering Herd All-Star Band is a group of select high school musicians who come together in a jazz ensemble, working over the period of a few days to perform a concert, Parsons said.  This year features students from six different high schools and will be led by Steve Roberts, director of jazz at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"Audience members who attend on Saturday night will hear one of the premier jazz ensembles on the planet, the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note," Saunders said. "I'm excited to hear the Airmen of Note since I used to be part of the Air Force Bands program and the pianist is a good friend from that previous experience."

According to their website, the Airmen of Note was created in 1950 to carry on the tradition of Maj. Glenn Miller's Army Air Corps dance band. Today the "Note" features 18 of the most talented jazz musicians in the country and is one of the last touring big bands. As a result, it has earned an international reputation as one of the finest and most versatile big bands of its kind in the world.

Staats and Parsons also expressed their excitement about getting to work with the Airmen of Note and hearing them perform.

"When I was a teenager, I distinctly remember listening to the Airmen of Note recordings and attending concerts anytime they were within driving distance either with my father, a veteran of the USAF, or my junior high band director," Parsons said. "It's a terrific honor for me to help organize a performance by not only one of the finest jazz ensembles in the world, but also a group that had such a profound impact on my musicianship."

The festival is beneficial in many ways, Parsons said. Not only is it entertaining, but it is also serves as an educational experience for the students participating. Throughout the day prior to the evening concerts the festival will feature 11 junior high and high school ensembles from around the region.  They will perform at Joan C. Edwards, and are adjudicated and given a workshop by guest clinicians, who are renowned educators.

"It is important to have these types of events for students and educators alike," Saunders said. "This gives us jazz educators an opportunity to work with students from our region in a very concentrated way, away from the normal school-day schedule.  This also gives music teachers a chance to learn new techniques and tips from our guest artists and clinicians."

The 44th annual Marshall University Jazz Festival is in memory of trombonist Jim Groscup, a Marshall alumnus and active member of the musical community.

Questions about the festival may be directed to Parsons at 304-696-6459 by phone or parsons@marshall.edu by e-mail.


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