January 2013 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 31, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU cheerleaders to conduct cheerleading clinic for 4-10 year-olds

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University cheerleaders will conduct a one-day cheerleading clinic for children ages 4-10 Saturday, Feb. 23, in the Gullickson Hall gym on MU's Huntington campus.

Participants in the Junior Thundering Herd Cheerleading Clinic will learn cheerleading techniques from Marshall's cheerleaders and will get to perform with the MU cheerleaders in the men's basketball game with UAB that evening at Cam Henderson Center.

The camp will run from 9 a.m. to noon and the cost is $40. Participants also will receive a cheer t-shirt, a photo with Marco and admission (for the performer) to the 7 p.m. basketball game. The cutoff date for applications and payment is Monday, Feb. 11. Parents are invited to stay with their children during the clinic.

For more information, call Kelsey Waybright at 304-532-1729 or Natalie Zigmond at 304-633-3085.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 30, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine receives $500,000 from Huntington Foundation Inc.

Gift will fund geriatric research through the creation of newly endowed geriatric chair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University has received $500,000 from the Huntington Foundation Inc. to create The Huntington Foundation Inc./Frank E. Hanshaw Sr. Endowed Chair of Geriatrics. The gift was announced today by Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the school.

The gift is expected to be matched by the West Virginia Research Trust Fund, also known as Bucks for Brains, which brings the total benefit to Marshall to $1 million.

"I am very pleased the Huntington Foundation, in its quest to support health care and medical education in our community, has made this wonderful gift to our school of medicine," Shapiro said. "Research into areas like geriatrics and the aging process, which include such diseases as hypertension and diabetes, is pivotal to helping those in our state and Appalachia lead fuller and more productive lives. We are very grateful to the Huntington Foundation for its generosity and leadership in this area."

The endowed chair is named for the foundation and in memory of Frank E. Hanshaw Sr., who for years served Marshall University and the Huntington community through service in many diverse areas. He was a founder and past president of the Marshall University Foundation Inc., and also was chairman of the board of Huntington Wholesale Furniture Co.

Hanshaw served as president of several other local and national organizations, including the Marshall University Alumni Association, the Huntington Chamber of Commerce, the Tri-State Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Huntington Rotary Club and the National Wholesale Furniture Association.

In addition, Hanshaw served as one of the original trustees of the Huntington Foundation, which was created in 1984 to return to the community money generated by the sale of Huntington Hospital to Hospital Corporation of America.

His son, Frank E. Hanshaw Jr., now serves as president of the foundation which makes grants for charitable, religious, education and scientific needs.

"My father was a great proponent of Marshall University and I know he would be thrilled with the decision to build a robust research program in an area that will benefit many, many people," Hanshaw Jr. said. "Through dad's work and through the work of many others, the foundation's commitment to build a better community remains steadfast."

Dr. Joseph B. Touma, Huntington Foundation board member and chair of the Marshall University Board of Governors, said the donation is the Huntington Foundation's largest single gift since he's been involved with the organization.

"The Huntington Foundation believes in supporting higher education, especially medical education," he said. "We are dedicated to ensuring our contributions focus on areas that benefit the lives of many people, and I feel sure that the research that will occur as a result of this partnership will be paramount to future generations."

In addition to Touma and Hanshaw, Lee K. Oxley and Kermit E. McGinnis are members of the Huntington Foundation Board of Directors.

Previous gifts from the Huntington Foundation include a $1 million contribution in 1988 that created the Frank E. Hanshaw Sr. Geriatric Center. Additional gifts include funding for Marshall University research and the endowed Edith M. Miller Memorial Nursing Scholarship.

For additional information on this contribution or for more information about giving to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes at 304-696-1711.

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Photo: The late Frank E. Hanshaw Sr. has been honored with the establishment of the Huntington Foundation Inc./Frank E. Hanshaw Sr. Endowed Chair of Geriatrics at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 29, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sheyann Webb-Christburg, King's smallest freedom fighter, to speak at Marshall's Living the Legacy awards luncheon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will combine the observance of Martin Luther King Jr., Day  and Black History Month with the Living the Legacy awards luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 6, on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

The luncheon will include a recognition of the Living the Legacy Award recipients and will feature keynote speaker Sheyann Webb-Christburg,  who  became known as King's smallest freedom fighter and later  co-authored  the book Selma, Lord, Selma:  Girlhood Memories of the Civil Rights Days.

Born one of eight children in Selma, Ala., in 1956,  Webb-Christburg attended the then-segregated public schools of Dallas County.  When she was nine years old, she and her friend Rachael West, who later would co-author their book, had a fateful and chance encounter with King

The two were playing outside the Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church when they noticed a car pull up with several nicely dressed African American men inside.  Curious, they walked over to the car and were introduced to King, who, they were told, was in Selma to help African Americans  get voting rights.

As part of that effort there were nightly mass meetings held at the church which  Webb-Christburg  would sneak out of her house to attend.  She would also lead the congregation in singing freedom songs with "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around" as her favorite. She got so involved with the Selma campaign that she began skipping school in spite of warnings from her parents.  She listened to them but continued to miss classes.  Her devotion to King and his causes was deep and fervent.

After a young black man, Jimmy Lee Jackson, was killed while demonstrating for voting rights, a 54-mile march from Selma to the state capital in Montgomery to present a petition to Gov. George Wallace was planned for Sunday, March 7, 1965.  Webb-Christburg was the youngest person to attempt the march and she walked near the end of the crowd with her teacher.  Once the marchers crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were ordered to turn back and when they didn't were charged by deputies on horseback who beat them with billy clubs and threw tear gas.  As she was running back to the church she was picked up by Rev. Hosea Williams, one of the leaders of the march.  That day went down in history  forever to be  known as "Bloody Sunday."

She would later write the book about her experiences which would be turned into a movie,  "Selma, Lord, Selma," made by Walt Disney Television which premiered on ABC television on Jan. 17, 1999.  King's daughter, Yolanda, had a role in the movie as Webb-Christburg's teacher who walked beside  her in the march.

Since 2006 she's lived in Montgomery, Ala., and works for Alabama State University. Today she travels around the country telling her story about what happened on Bloody Sunday, a day she says changed her life forever.

Also at the luncheon the 2013 recipients of the Living the Legacy awards will be honored.  Receiving awards will be Dr. David Trowbridge, Outstanding Faculty Service; Stephanie Holman, Outstanding Community Service; and Charles Meyers, Outstanding Student Service.

According to Dr. Shari Clarke, Vice-President for Multicultural Affairs,  criteria for the awards include a demonstrated commitment of service and affiliations within the Marshall and/or Huntington community; inspiring others by giving freely and unselfishly of their time and talent;  demonstrating a commitment to addressing community needs; demonstrating a commitment to helping others achieve and overcome obstacles to build stronger and more diverse/tolerant and safer communities; and a commitment to effecting change in their communities through transformative action.

The observance of Martin Luther King Day was postponed from the traditional designated day of Jan. 21 because of the inauguration of President Barack Obama.

The luncheon is free but reservations need to be made by Wednesday, Jan. 30.  They can be made by contacting Clarke at 304-696-4677 or at Clarkes@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 28, 2013
Contact: Maurice R. Cooley, Director, Center for African American Students' Programs, (304) 696-7153

Black History Month activities to include trivia quiz game, soul food feast, annual Diversity Breakfast

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Observances of Black History Month on Marshall University's Huntington campus will begin with a team trivia, game-show-style event at  7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7 in the Memorial Student Center, room BE-5.

"We invite members of the Marshall community to form teams of 2 to 8 players and compete for cash prizes," said Maurice Cooley, director of  Marshall's Center for African American Students' Programs. "Teams can represent sororities, fraternities or other student organizations, in addition to groups from churches or other community organizations."

Then, the annual Soul Food Feast will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, in the John Marshall Room, located on the second floor of the Memorial Student Center. Cooley said the feast is an occasion filled with fellowship among friends, family and others from throughout the community.

"It is a joyful time to celebrate the spirit of love while enjoying  the company  and conversation with family, friends, faculty, students and others from throughout the community, enhanced by some of the most appetizing and traditional African-American dishes," Cooley said.The soulful buffet will include chitterlings, crispy fried chicken, barbeque ribs, mac and cheese, collard greens, candied yams, potato salad, beverages and an assortment of tasty desserts ($6 for students/$12 for adults). Tickets are available at the door or in advance to avoid short waiting lines.

Another annual event at Marshall, the Diversity Breakfast, will take place from 7:30 to 8:50 a.m. Friday, Feb. 15, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center.

This year's theme for the breakfast is "We Are the World." The keynote will be delivered by Marshall College of Business graduate, Joseph A. Slash, former deputy mayor of Indianapolis and currently president and chief executive officer of the Indianapolis Urban League.

Tables of eight for the breakfast are available at the community rate of $150, with single reservations available for $20 each. A discount applies to Marshall University departments, faculty/staff and students.

For additional information on any of the events, contact the MU Center for African American Students' Programs at 304-696-6705.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 25, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, 304-696-3296

MU Jazz Fest to feature Airmen of Note

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Airmen of Note, considered the premier jazz ensemble of the U.S. Air Force, will headline the 44th annual Marshall University Jazz Festival, which begins Thursday, Jan. 31, and continues through Saturday, Feb. 2.  Performances will take place at 7 p.m. each evening in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the university's Huntington campus.

"The Jazz Festival is one of the many programs put forth by the College of Fine Arts, funded in-part by the president's office of Marshall University and the Marshall University Foundation," said Dr. Sean Parsons, assistant professor of music in jazz studies at Marshall. "By bringing performers to campus as part of this festival, it is one way to share music and art with the university and community."

Admission to the concerts will be free; however, tickets are required and can be picked up the nights of the performances at the Joan C. Edwards box office.

The festival begins Thursday evening with a performance by this year's high school honor ensemble, The Patriot, from Parkersburg South High School, under the direction of Eric Staats. Afterward there will be a performance by Marshall University student combos.

Staats, the director of bands at Parkersburg South High School and a Marshall alumnus, said the jazz ensemble is one of two auditioned jazz bands at Parkersburg South.

"The band has 23 members who range in grade level from 9 through 12," Staats said. "These students are intensely motivated musicians who choose to study their craft in greater depth. They were also featured performers at the Universal Studios, Orlando, 'STARS' performance series in 2012 and were used in the theme park's marketing/publicity materials."

The Marshall University Alumni Big Band will perform Friday night, followed by Marshall University 12.0 and guest artists. Parsons said the alumni band is an ensemble that spans four decades, made up of many musicians who studied jazz at Marshall. The ensemble is being led by alumnus and Marshall music faculty member Jeff Wolfe.  

"The groups will be top notch, including our own 12.0 Jazz Ensemble and top jazz combo, Project Postbop," said Dr. Martin Saunders, associate professor of music in trumpet and jazz studies at Marshall and director of the 12.0 Jazz Ensemble. "The 12.0 performs every year as part of the jazz festival, and has performed with several notable, highly regarded guest artists."

Saturday is the closing night, with a performance by the Thundering Herd All-Star Band and the featured guests, Airmen of Note. The Thundering Herd All-Star Band is a group of select high school musicians who come together in a jazz ensemble, working over the period of a few days to perform a concert, Parsons said.  This year features students from six different high schools and will be led by Steve Roberts, director of jazz at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

"Audience members who attend on Saturday night will hear one of the premier jazz ensembles on the planet, the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note," Saunders said. "I'm excited to hear the Airmen of Note since I used to be part of the Air Force Bands program and the pianist is a good friend from that previous experience."

According to their website, the Airmen of Note was created in 1950 to carry on the tradition of Maj. Glenn Miller's Army Air Corps dance band. Today the "Note" features 18 of the most talented jazz musicians in the country and is one of the last touring big bands. As a result, it has earned an international reputation as one of the finest and most versatile big bands of its kind in the world.

Staats and Parsons also expressed their excitement about getting to work with the Airmen of Note and hearing them perform.

"When I was a teenager, I distinctly remember listening to the Airmen of Note recordings and attending concerts anytime they were within driving distance either with my father, a veteran of the USAF, or my junior high band director," Parsons said. "It's a terrific honor for me to help organize a performance by not only one of the finest jazz ensembles in the world, but also a group that had such a profound impact on my musicianship."

The festival is beneficial in many ways, Parsons said. Not only is it entertaining, but it is also serves as an educational experience for the students participating. Throughout the day prior to the evening concerts the festival will feature 11 junior high and high school ensembles from around the region.  They will perform at Joan C. Edwards, and are adjudicated and given a workshop by guest clinicians, who are renowned educators.

"It is important to have these types of events for students and educators alike," Saunders said. "This gives us jazz educators an opportunity to work with students from our region in a very concentrated way, away from the normal school-day schedule.  This also gives music teachers a chance to learn new techniques and tips from our guest artists and clinicians."

The 44th annual Marshall University Jazz Festival is in memory of trombonist Jim Groscup, a Marshall alumnus and active member of the musical community.

Questions about the festival may be directed to Parsons at 304-696-6459 by phone or parsons@marshall.edu by e-mail.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 25, 2013
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

New scholarship created for students at Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced today the creation of a $15,000 endowed scholarship by Dr. Robert A. Hess, a 1984 graduate of the school. His son, Dr. Jonathan A. Hess, is a 2012 graduate of MUSOM and currently a resident physician in family medicine at Marshall.

The scholarship, known as the Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. Hess Scholarship for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, will be awarded to a first-year medical student who is also the first in his or her immediate family to attend medical school.  The recipient will be selected by the School of Medicine Scholarship Committee, in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Affairs.

"Jannell and I are grateful to Marshall University for allowing me the opportunity to achieve my dream of becoming a physician," Hess said.  "For one of two out-of-state students accepted in 1980, Marshall's tuition was affordable compared to other schools around the country. We realize that for many, the cost of obtaining a medical degree is still a major obstacle. It is our privilege to endow this scholarship that will allow future students the chance to realize their dreams."

Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs at the School of Medicine, said gifts from graduates like Hess are greatly appreciated.

"I cannot emphasize enough the importance of gifts from our graduates," she said. "We are very grateful to the Hess family for their generous contribution to our scholarship fund."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 24, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-3296

27th Annual Student Juried Exhibition begins Jan. 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 27th Annual Student Juried Exhibition, composed of artwork created by undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Art and Design at Marshall University, will be displayed in the Birke Art Gallery on the Huntington campus starting next week. An opening reception will take place at 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 28, and award winners will be recognized at 5:30 p.m.

John Farley, a Marshall alumnus and the gallery's director, emphasized the eclectic nature of the show and stressed the benefits to students.

"As in years past, I expect a dynamic display that represents the breadth of disciplines our students are engaged in," Farley said. "Over the last 27 years, this exhibit has blossomed into a highly successful and rewarding juried contest, with a little something for everyone. For viewers, it will be a treat. For students, it is a great opportunity for their hard work to be recognized and celebrated."

The jurors for this year's competition were Benjy Davies and Kathleen Kneafsey. Davies is a professor of graphic design and printmaking and the chair of the School of Fine Arts at the University of Rio Grande in Ohio. Kneafsey is a clay artist and educator, and has served as the Huntington Museum of Art's artist in residence since 2000.

This exhibition runs through Friday, Feb. 15.

The Birke Art Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 to 8 p.m. on Mondays.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 24, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center announces 'Kids' Night Out'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will be hosting a special night out for kids from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1. This program is available to parents who would like some time to themselves to shop, see a movie, or get some things done around the house.

The children will be entertained in a fun, safe environment where they will experience climbing on the Rec Center's rock wall, swimming in the indoor pool, playing ball on the courts and having a pizza party with all their new friends.

Children ages 4-12 are welcome. The deadline to register is Thursday, Jan. 31. Parents are asked to register their children in advance, as space is limited. The cost for members is $15 ($10 for each additional sibling), and the cost for non-members is $20 ($15 for each additional sibling).

Cash or checks made out to the Campus Rec Club will be accepted.

Forms and waivers for this event can be found on www.marshallcampusrec.com. Parents are asked to return the forms to the Marshall Recreation Center welcome desk or mail them to Marshall Recreation Center, Attn.: Dan Belcher, 402 Thundering Herd Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

For more information, call Belcher, facility operations coordinator, at 304-696-4651.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 24, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to conduct spring semester test of MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 30.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

"This test is a routine test of the system, as we do at least once per semester," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

The most recent test of the system occurred Sept. 12.

The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall and delivered thru the Blackboard Connect service, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those in the active Marshall community (faculty, staff and students) who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 24, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Pharmacy receives gift from Cabell Huntington Hospital

Hoods will be used in pharmacy simulation laboratory

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has received two laminar flow hoods from Cabell Huntington Hospital, Dr. Robert B. Stanton, assistant dean in the Office of Experiential Education at the school, announced today.

Laminar flow hoods are used for the purpose of cleansing the air when sterile techniques and a sterile environment are required, particularly during the compounding process.

"Cabell Huntington Hospital graciously donated two of their laminar flow hoods for our pharmacy simulation laboratory and we are very grateful for their generosity," Stanton said. "Cabell is an important partner in our students' experiential education and we look forward to working with them on many projects in the future."

Jennifer L. Kibler, Pharm D., director of pharmacy at Cabell Huntington Hospital, says the hospital pharmacy recently underwent an extensive renovation which allowed the flow hoods to be donated to Marshall.

"We were aware that Marshall needed the flow hoods for its simulated compounding area," she said. "It just made sense to donate the items to the school. Cabell Huntington Hospital is eager to support the new school and looks forward to years of collaboration."

Marshall's School of Pharmacy opened its doors in August and will graduate its first class in 2016. It is located on the campus of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in the Spring Valley area of Huntington.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 22, 2013
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University and partners select diabetes coalitions to receive funding for community programs

More than $750,000 in training and technical assistance grants to be allocated

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -- The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), the Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation and Marshall University have selected five Appalachian diabetes coalitions to receive funding and enhanced support services through the Appalachian Diabetes Control and Translation Project (ADCTP).

Each coalition will receive an initial $40,000 grant for local efforts to prevent and control diabetes, along with training and technical assistance. The grants are renewable for up to four years, for a total of up to $160,000 for each recipient.

The selected coalitions include:

  • Northwest Georgia Healthcare Partnership (Murray County, Ga.)
  • Montgomery County Diabetes Coalition (Winona, Miss.)
  • Meigs County Creating Healthy Communities Coalition (Pomeroy, Ohio)
  • Grundy County Health Council (Altamont, Tenn.)
  • McMinn Living Well (Athens, Tenn.)

Representatives from the five selected coalitions will attend a training conference this month, then design and complete new initiatives to expand the impact of their coalition partnerships. Through this project, these groups will develop new ways to help people prevent and control diabetes , while building their communities' capacity to sustain these efforts.

In addition to the five groups that will receive the $40,000 grants and enhanced support, nine additional communities will receive technical assistance and $2,000 mini-grants to establish new diabetes coalitions in Appalachian counties. The communities are:

  • Adair County, Ky.
  • Clay County, Miss.
  • Mitchell/Yancey counties, N.C.
  • Rutherford County, N.C.
  • Carter County, Tenn.
  • Greene County, Tenn.
  • Fayette County, W.Va.
  • Logan County, W.Va.
  • Nicholas County, W.Va.

The Appalachian region faces a number of serious health problems, including high rates of type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. Since 2000, the ARC and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have partnered with Marshall University's Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health to support a network of local diabetes coalitions in the region's economically distressed communities. These coalitions organize community-based efforts to provide diabetes education and prevention services for thousands in the Appalachian region each year.

The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation's Together on Diabetes initiative joined the ADCTP effort in 2011, committing $2.6 million in new resources to the program. Together on Diabetes is a five-year, $100 million initiative launched in November 2010 to improve health outcomes of Americans living with type 2 diabetes by strengthening patient self-management education, community-based supportive services, and broad-based community mobilization. In line with the foundation's mission to promote health equity and improve health outcomes, the initiative targets adult populations disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes.

Thirty-six diabetes coalitions from across Appalachia submitted applications for the ADCTP funding. All groups that applied for funding and support will be included in the ADCTP network of more than 80 Appalachian coalitions, and will continue to benefit from training and technical assistance services provided by Marshall's ADCTP team.

For more information on diabetes prevention and control, visit the CDC's website at www.cdc.gov/diabetes.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 22, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-7153

3-D art on display at Gallery 842

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  beginning Friday, Jan. 18.

The exhibit, separately titled 60' 6" for Smith and Anthropometry for Wolhoy, opens at 6 p.m. Friday with a reception, which is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Smith, of Huntington, is an adjunct professor in the School of Art and Design and full time safety/shop technician in the Art Warehouse. Wolhoy, of Ashland, Ky., is a Marshall University alumnus and an adjunct faculty member in the School of Art and Design.

Both artists create work primarily in three dimensions, although they are not limited to specific sculptural media.

Smith investigates the fluid, shifting recollections of his childhood by presenting recognizable forms in an altered scale, combination, material or setting. "At the age of 12, a baseball crushed my skull and I suffered a catastrophic brain injury. The unifying focus of my study is the concept of memory and childhood," Smith said.

Wolhoy grew up in a family dedicated to construction and real estate development, and very quickly connected to the materials of three-dimensional design. "The pieces in this series (Anthropometry) consist of wood sculptures combined with other media, displayed in conjunction with paintings on canvas," Wolhoy said. "Both the sculptural and two-dimensional components are proportionate to, or even larger than the human figure, thus creating a physical space that the viewer can experience."

"In addition to the obvious command of materials, both artists display an impressive ability to manipulate space. Each creates dynamic work that is interactive, experiential, and challenges us to think about our physical environment," said John Farley, director of the gallery. 

60' 6" and Anthropometry will be on display until Feb. 22. Gallery 842, located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington, is free and open to the public Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon to 7 p.m.

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Photos: "Wagons Gone Wild" (above) by Michael Anthony Smith (2011, digital print, 24" x 36") and "The Prodigal" (below) by Rick Wolhoy (2011; Wood, Stainless Steel, Dry Pigment in Resin; 9'x4'x4') are among the works on display at Gallery 842 starting Jan. 18.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 22, 2013
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

Marshall receives Islamic book, film collection from National Endowment for the Humanities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is among 842 institutions nationwide and two in southern West Virginia that have been selected to receive the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities "Bridging Cultures" initiative. The announcement was made earlier this month.

The Muslim Journeys Bookshelf is a collection of books, films, and other resources that will introduce the American public to the complex history and culture of Muslims in the United States and around the world, according to NEH officials.

Marshall's participation in the program was initiated by Dr. Majed Khader, associate librarian, and Dr. David Pittenger, dean of the College of Liberal Arts.

"By participating in the Muslim Journeys project we will set the occasion for a frank and forthright discussion of the culture, literature, art, and profound beliefs of the Muslim tradition," Khader said. "More importantly, this discussion will occur in the context of a respectful discussion of other religious traditions, as we believe that a culture is best understood when placed in historical and social context."

"Marshall University wishes to be a central educational resource that will allow our students and community to learn more about Islam and other critical religions," Pittenger said. "Our receipt of this collection means that we can further this goal."

Pittenger said that the university and Cabell County Libraries intend to hold a number of public events that afford the discussion of the books and films in the collection. These events will provide opportunities to discuss the materials and messages the collection contains.

According to the NIH, libraries that have received the bookshelf materials also will be eligible for future programming grant opportunities.

Support for the development and distribution of the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf was provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York, with additional support for the arts and media components from the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

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About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 17, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Fine Arts, (304) 696-7153

3-D art to be featured at Gallery 842

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three-dimensional artists Michael Anthony Smith, academic lab manager for Marshall University's School of Art and Design, and Rick Wolhoy, sculpture studio technician, will present a  joint exhibition of their work at Gallery 842 in Huntington beginning Friday, Jan. 18.

The exhibit, separately titled 60' 6" for Smith and Anthropometry for Wolhoy, opens at 6 p.m. Friday with a reception, which is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Smith, of Huntington, is an adjunct professor in the School of Art and Design and full time safety/shop technician in the Art Warehouse. Wolhoy, of Ashland, Ky., is a Marshall University alumnus and an adjunct faculty member in the School of Art and Design.

Both artists create work primarily in three dimensions, although they are not limited to specific sculptural media.

Smith investigates the fluid, shifting recollections of his childhood by presenting recognizable forms in an altered scale, combination, material or setting. "At the age of 12, a baseball crushed my skull and I suffered a catastrophic brain injury. The unifying focus of my study is the concept of memory and childhood," Smith said.

Wolhoy grew up in a family dedicated to construction and real estate development, and very quickly connected to the materials of three-dimensional design. "The pieces in this series (Anthropometry) consist of wood sculptures combined with other media, displayed in conjunction with paintings on canvas," Wolhoy said. "Both the sculptural and two-dimensional components are proportionate to, or even larger than the human figure, thus creating a physical space that the viewer can experience."

"In addition to the obvious command of materials, both artists display an impressive ability to manipulate space. Each creates dynamic work that is interactive, experiential, and challenges us to think about our physical environment," said John Farley, director of the gallery. 

60' 6" and Anthropometry will be on display until Feb. 22. Gallery 842, located at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington, is free and open to the public Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon to 7 p.m.

---------------

Photos: "Wagons Gone Wild" (above) by Michael Anthony Smith (2011, digital print, 24" x 36") and "The Prodigal" (below) by Rick Wolhoy (2011; Wood, Stainless Steel, Dry Pigment in Resin; 9'x4'x4') are among the works on display at Gallery 842 starting Jan. 18.


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Tuesday January 15, 2013
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 746-2038

International president of Alpha Kappa Alpha to visit Huntington Jan. 26

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Local members of  Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the first Black Greek letter organization established by African American women, will welcome the organization's international president, Carolyn House Stewart, at a Founders' Day brunch Saturday, Jan. 26. Stewart will give a keynote address at the brunch, which will take place at 11 a.m. on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

"We also will be recognizing one of Alpha Kappa Alpha's founders, Lavinia Norman," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president for multicultural affairs at Marshall, who is co-chairing the event. "She was a West Virginia native and taught at Douglass High School for 40 years."

The sorority was founded at Howard University in 1908.

Brunch tickets may be purchased by contacting Clarke at 304-696-4676.


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Tuesday January 15, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

FYS students' projects featured on National Day of Listening website

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected stories from students in Professor Jennifer Sias' First-Year Seminar (FYS) classes last fall at Marshall University are featured on the StoryCorps' National Day of Listening website.

The stories resulted from the class's final project in which students were assigned to interview a person who has made an impact on their lives and produce an audio or video digital story.  All of their stories are on the class website: http://muweb.marshall.edu/wpmu/fys100-sias/.

"We used StoryCorps' Question Generator as a starting point for developing interview questions, and then students had the freedom and responsibility to develop questions tailored to their interview subjects," Sias said. "StoryCorps, This I Believe and This American Life all influenced our approach to conducting interviews and storytelling."

Throughout the FYS class, Sias and her students considered, discussed and reflected on various aspects of critical thinking, including the beliefs of others as well as their own.

"I am so proud of the work of these FYS students," Sias said. "Think about it, the work of some of these first-year students has now been 'published' or featured on a website that has a national and even international audience."

Sias said two of the Marshall students' best stories on StoryCorps' National Day of Listensing Website are interviews conducted by  students Joey Paugh and Danelle D. Wandling. They can be found at www.nationaldayoflistening.org.

For more information, contact Sias at 304-696-2522.


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Tuesday January 15, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center to host Pump and Run competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center's annual Pump and Run, a competition that features weight lifting and running, will take place at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the center on the Huntington campus.

Race director Michele Muth said Pump and Run is a great opportunity for participants to get an intense workout, train for other Pump and Run races and enjoy the competition.

Participants can take up to 15 minutes off their running time by shedding 30 seconds from their time with each bench press rep. The 5k run (3.1 miles) will be completed outside around the Marshall University campus, and will include chip timing.

The pump portion of the race, which precedes the run, will take place in the recreation center. After weighing in to determine the amount of weight to be bench pressed, racers will do up to 30 reps at a designated resistance.

Men 39 years of age and under will be responsible for lifting 100 percent of their body weight.  Men 40-49 will lift 90 percent of their body weight, and men 50 and over will lift 80 percent of their body weight.

Women 39 and under will be responsible for lifting 70 percent of their body weight.  Women 40-49 will lift 60 percent of their body weight and women 50 and over will be responsible for lifting 50 percent of their body weight.

Participants must be at least 18 years of age to compete. Scores will be determined by: 5k time minus number of reps x 30 seconds. Awards will be given to the overall top male and female contenders and to the first-place finishers in each men's and women's division.

Anyone interested in competing may sign up for Pump and Run at the Marshall Recreation Center welcome desk or by visiting  www.tristateracer.com for online registration or to print the registration form.

Participants can sign up for the Pump and Run the day of the event. The entry fee is $20. For more information or to sponsor the race, contact Muth at 304-696-2943 or e-mail her at pallante1@marshall.edu.


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Friday January 11, 2013
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

University Eye Surgeons encourage annual eye exams to help prevent glaucoma

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine ophthalmologist Dr. Michael Krasnow and his colleagues at University Eye Surgeons are encouraging area residents to make the health of their eyes a priority this month as part of a national emphasis on glaucoma awareness.

Researchers from Prevent Blindness America and other leading vision and eye health groups have declared January National Glaucoma Awareness Month in an effort to educate the public on glaucoma. Glaucoma can damage central vision if left untreated over time and the symptoms often develop very gradually.

"Through early detection and treatment, the debilitating effects of glaucoma can be reduced and managed," Krasnow said. "It's very important for everyone to have an annual eye exam to identify glaucoma and other diseases, but it's even more significant for people with certain risk factors including their age, family history, nearsightedness, use of steroids and race."

Statistics show that African Americans are significantly more likely to develop glaucoma than white Americans.

Open-angle glaucoma (OAG) is the most common form of the disease and affects more than 2.8 million people in the U.S.  and, according to the latest research, the incidence of OAG is up some 20 percent in the last 10 years.

Glaucoma can be diagnosed through the use of several eye tests which can be performed as part of an overall eye exam in an office setting.


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Wednesday January 9, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Gift for MIIR takes Marshall University to $15 million 'Bucks for Brains' goal

Allied Realty Company contributes $150,000 for research, capital campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University officials today announced that a gift from Allied Realty Company is the final private donation needed to reach the university's $15 million West Virginia Research Trust Fund fundraising goal.

Allied recently made a $150,000 donation to support the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) and the university's College of Fine Arts. The $100,000 portion of the gift designated for research at MIIR, in addition to other year-end gifts and pledges, is expected to be matched by the state's trust fund and will allow Marshall to draw down the last of the money allocated to it in the fund.

The West Virginia Legislature created the trust fund, which is also referred to as the "Bucks for Brains" program, in 2008 with an initial appropriation of $15 million for Marshall and $35 million for West Virginia University. Over the past five years, the universities have been able to tap into the fund to double private gifts that support research initiatives linked to economic development, health care and job growth. With this latest Allied contribution, Marshall has raised its maximum of $15 million in private donations, which, with the match from the trust fund, will result in a $30 million benefit to the university. The program has led to the creation of 16 new research endowments at Marshall and will increase the university's overall endowment by more than 15 percent.

"It is entirely fitting that Allied Realty Company made the donation that brings us to our goal," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "Allied was the first private donor to step forward when the trust fund program was established, and they have been supporting research at Marshall with generous donations ever since. The Polan family and their company are community leaders in every sense. We are fortunate to have their commitment to advancing local and regional economic development through research."

He continued, "On behalf of the entire Marshall community, I extend a hearty thank you to all the donors who have made it possible for us to reach this milestone. Their contributions will help ensure funding for research that will advance new discoveries and promote economic development far into the future.

"I also want to express deep gratitude to our state's leaders, including members of the state legislature and officials at the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, who had the foresight to support the 'Bucks for Brains' concept. We hope the success we have had will encourage continued support and reinvestment in this program."

Allied Realty Company President Rebecca Polan said MIIR's role of conducting commercially viable bioscience research at the university and facilitating partnerships with outside companies is vital to the future of Huntington and the entire region.

She added, "We are pleased to support organizations that serve Huntington, the state and region. Marshall University makes the Huntington community an excellent place to live, learn and work."

Lake Polan, Allied's chairman of the board and CEO, said, "By helping Marshall University expand its presence as a leading research institute, we are helping our community leverage itself into the knowledge economy."

Since 2008, Allied has donated a total of $450,000 for research at Marshall. With the match from the state's trust fund, the total benefit to the university from Allied's gifts is $900,000.

Dr. Ron Area, Marshall University Foundation CEO, said Allied and other donors like the research trust fund program because they can essentially double their gifts, while making a lasting impact through endowments.

He said, "Hats off to Allied Realty for this most recent generous gift and for serving as pioneers in the trust fund program. They have helped us show others what a wonderful incentive the trust fund is. Donors like being able to maximize their contributions and, because their gifts are doubled and endowed through this program, they know they will be helping students, faculty and the community for generations. We have gained a good deal of momentum over the past year, and have additional qualifying donations and pledges ready to match if the state allocates more money for the trust fund."

Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, added, "The proceeds from these endowments are already impacting research programs across the university from science to engineering to medicine. Thank you to the donors and the state leaders who helped establish the research trust fund. We look forward to watching these research and economic development initiatives grow and prosper over the coming years."

Allied Realty Company is the corporate hub for a full-service global logistics business with more than 2.5 million square feet of commercial, manufacturing and distribution holdings in downtown Huntington, Kenova, Nitro and Parkersburg; Paris, Ky.; and Waynesboro and Harrisonburg, Va. The $50,000 portion of Allied's recent gift designated for Marshall's College of Fine Arts will support the college's capital campaign, including renovation of the former Stone and Thomas building in downtown Huntington. The renovated facility will house Marshall's visual arts and graphic design programs.

MIIR was founded in 2008 to promote economic development and entrepreneurial activity by funding commercially viable bioscience research at Marshall and facilitating partnerships with outside companies.

At Marshall, the West Virginia Research Trust Fund is supporting research in disciplines as diverse as biotechnology, aging and dementia, engineering, chemistry and biology, transportation, obstetrics and gynecology, translational sports medicine, and occupational and environmental health. The program also has helped catalyze public and private support for a number of new research facilities at the university, including an applied engineering complex, translational genomics research institute, sports medicine translational research center, and schools of pharmacy and physical therapy.

For more information about "Bucks for Brains" at Marshall, visit www.marshall.edu/b4b. 


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Tuesday January 8, 2013
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall health providers say flu vaccine still an option to battle this year's virus

Influenza-like illnesses making widespread appearance

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.
- The annual flu season is under way and infectious disease experts, including the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's Dr. Thomas Rushton, say this year's virus is hitting early and often.

"The last 10 years or so influenza hasn't typically shown up before the new year," Rushton said. "This year there were a significant number of cases reported around Thanksgiving."

More than half of the states in the U.S. are experiencing high levels of flu-like illness, and flu activity continues to be on the rise, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's latest FluView report.  While West Virginia is reporting only moderate levels of flu-like illness, Rushton said it's still a good idea to get a vaccination because the flu season can last well into spring.

"There is still time for the flu vaccine to be effective, therefore we are recommending that people get it," Rushton said. "Normally, it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to actually kick in and the flu season has yet to reach its peak.   Everyone 6 months of age or older should get one."

Typical flu symptoms include fever, dry cough, sore throat, muscle aches and general malaise.   Rushton says anyone experiencing these type symptoms should call his or her health care provider.

About 112 million Americans had been vaccinated by the end of November, the CDC report said. Manufacturers were expecting to produce about 135 million total doses this year.

On average, about 25,000 Americans die each flu season, according to the CDC. 


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Monday January 7, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New lecture series examines the history and culture of West Virginia

Four regional scholars to present talks at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four regional scholars will present talks on the forces that shaped the commerce and identity of West Virginia in a lecture series at Marshall University sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts.

"The History and Culture of West Virginia: A Lecture Series" features one event per month from January through April. Each lecture takes place at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on MU's Huntington campus.

"Farming, railroads, river boat commerce and the Civil War have each defined this great state," said Dr. David J. Pittenger, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts. "The speakers in this series are expert in their fields and have done much to preserve our history and tell compelling stories. Each lecture will be an interesting glimpse into the past."

All four lectures are free to the public.

Here is the schedule for the lecture series, along with a brief look at each speaker:

Tuesday, Jan. 22 - Gerald W. Sutphin will speak on "Steamboats, Rivers and West Virginia." He is a native of Mullens, W.Va., and a graduate of Marshall University. After completing degrees in art and journalism, he served in the U.S. Army, and then returned to Huntington to begin work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For the next 18 years he specialized in creation and presentation of various exhibits the Corps sponsored.

During this time, he began to learn about the history of riverboats that navigated the river systems feeding the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. His accumulated expertise has allowed him to write numerous articles and book chapters on the topic. He also has overseen the creation of various exhibits at the Smithsonian and The Huntington Museum of Art. One of his most recent contributions is a chapter in the book, Full Steam Ahead: Reflections on the Impact of the First Steamboat on the Ohio River, 1811-2011, copies of which will be available for sale at the presentation.

Tuesday, Feb. 5 - John C. Allen Jr. will speak on "The Early Houses of Jefferson County." Allen is an architectural historian living in Jefferson County, W.Va. A graduate of Tulane University, he is a member of the Society of Architectural Historians and the Vernacular Architectural Forum. Allen serves on both the Jefferson County Historic Landmarks Commission and the board of the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley.

A native of Harrison County, Allen's passion is the study of West Virginia's historic architecture. Last year, West Virginia University Press released his book, Uncommon Vernacular: The Early Houses of Jefferson County 1735-1835. This title won several publishing awards including the Gold Medal for Architectural Publishing and was a finalist for the prestigious Historic Preservation Book Prize. Copies of the book will be available for sale at the presentation.

Wednesday, March 6 - Jack Dickinson will speak on "Every Bloodstained Mile: A Railroad History of Southern West Virginia." He is a West Virginia native and a 1966 graduate of Marshall University. He is the bibliographer of the Rosanna Blake Confederate Collection at Marshall. 

The author of 12 books and numerous magazine articles on the Civil War, he is the 1999 recipient of the Jefferson Davis Historical Writing Award from the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the History Writer's award from the West Virginia Department of Archives and History. Dickinson will sign copies of his book series on the history of the N&W Railroad he coauthored with his wife, Kay.

Tuesday, April 16 - B. J. Peyton will speak on "Civil War in the Kanawha Valley." He received his bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in history from West Virginia University. He has worked as a public historian at WSWP-TV, a local PBS affiliate in Beckley, and for the National Park Service in Mississippi and West Virginia. 

Peyton also served as associate director of a research institute at WVU, worked for a local historic architectural firm, and taught high school history. Peyton joined the full-time faculty at West Virginia State University in 2002, where he is currently associate professor of history and chairman of the Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences.


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Monday January 7, 2013
Contact: Leah Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine announces new academic scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four new gift endowments and amendments to an existing scholarship have been announced at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine that will assist medical students with educational costs, as well as provide educational opportunities for all students.   Four of the gifts are courtesy of medical school alumni.    The following is a listing of the newly created endowments and the previous scholarship and its amendments.

  • The Hensley Family Endowment for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is an endowed scholarship created by the Hensley family.  Dr. W. Michael and Diane Hensley and their children who are graduates of the Marshall University School of Medicine-Laurel A. (Hensley) Fedor, Class of '07, Alice A. (Hensley) Walz, Class of '11, and Brian M. Hensley, Class of '12, have chosen to support the medical school through this gift. The Hensley Family Endowment will aid and improve medical student education by providing materials for the Clinical Skills Center or by providing assistance to educational programs like the Standardized Patient Program.

  • The Dr. and Mrs. Mark F. Sheridan and Family Endowed Scholarship is an endowed scholarship for a medical student who will be selected by the scholarship committee of the School of Medicine.   Janet Sheridan is a graduate of the Marshall University School of Nursing and Dr. Mark Sheridan is a 1987 graduate of the School of Medicine.   Dr. Sheridan has served as a past president of the School of Medicine's Alumni Association and is an inaugural member of the newly formed dean's advisory board. He is an otolaryngologist in Huntington at Tri-State Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Inc.

  • The Touma Family Scholarship, created in 1997 and amended in 2012, will continue to support medical education in the form of scholarships.   The recipient or recipients of this scholarship will be member(s) of an underrepresented minority in medicine.  It is the intent of the scholarship fund to provide annual awards for a total amount not to exceed $20,000.   It is expected that as long as there are 10 or fewer recipients, each recipient will receive $2,000 annually.  The scholarship was created by Drs. Joseph and Omayma Touma.   Dr. Joe Touma is a Huntington otolaryngologist with the Touma Ear, Hearing and Balance Center and River Cities Ear, Nose & Throat.   In addition, he is chairman of the Marshall University Board of Governors and is an inaugural member of the dean's advisory board.  Dr. Omayma Touma is the retired medical director of the Cabell-Huntington Health Department.
     
  • The Drs. R. Trenor Williams and Matt W. Lambert Endowed Scholarship is made possible by the generosity of Dr. R. Trenor Williams and Dr. Matt W. Lambert, both members of the MUSOM Class of 1997. Following their residencies, Dr. Williams co-founded Clinovations Health Care Solutions, a health care consulting company, and Dr. Lambert joined his former classmate as a consultant. The scholarship will be awarded to an entering medical student from West Virginia or Virginia and includes a summer internship and stipend with the company. 
  • The fifth scholarship for medical education was created by a Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine retired faculty member and his family, who wish to remain anonymous.   This award will be given to an entering medical student from West Virginia with second priority given to a student from a bordering state. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress. 

Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said continued creation of scholarships at the medical school is essential to assist students in their education and career choice.

"Our medical school's core mission is dedicated to educating students who will become primary care doctors and serve our nation's rural populations," she said.  "By helping reduce student debt, we allow students freedom to choose specialties based on interest and not on how they are compensated." 

For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.


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Friday January 4, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall visiting professor 'consultant editor' for Oxford handbook

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert Ellison, a visiting assistant professor of English at Marshall University, recently served as a "consultant editor" on The Oxford Handbook of the British Sermon, 1689-1901.

As the book jacket states, "The period 1689-1901 was 'the golden age' of the sermon in Britain. It was the best-selling printed work and dominated the print trade until the mid-nineteenth century. Sermons were highly influential in religious and spiritual matters, but they also played important roles in elections and politics, science and ideas and campaigns for reform. Sermons touched the lives of ordinary people and formed a dominant part of their lives." The goal of the Handbook is to "demonstrate the interdisciplinary strength of the field of sermon studies and to show the centrality of sermons to religious life in this period."

Ellison's role as one of the three "consultant editors" included checking the citation format and other matters of house style for all 37 essays in the volume, for which he received the following special credit in the acknowledgements:

"Robert Ellison acted as final arbiter in matters of citations and saved us from the inconsistencies of the Harvard style of which humanities scholars remain wary."

In a blog entry for the American Society of Church History, Ellison wrote that Bill Gibson's introduction and Keith Francis' conclusion provide "a kind of manifesto on the current state and future direction of the field" of sermon studies. Gibson and Francis edited the handbook.

This collection, along with The Victorian Pulpit: Spoken and Written Sermons in Nineteenth-Century Britain (Susquehanna UP, 1998) and A New History of the Sermon (Brill, 2010), is part of Ellison's effort to bring greater attention to the sermon and encourage its study through a number of disciplinary lenses.

Ellison taught in Texas for 14 years before moving to West Virginia in the summer of 2009. His research specialty is Victorian nonfiction, especially sermons and other forms of religious speech. At Marshall he has taught a variety of courses in both the English Department and the Honors College.


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Thursday January 3, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University receives $2.5 million BrickStreet Foundation gift for research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University has received a $2.5 million gift from the BrickStreet Insurance Foundation Inc. to establish a research endowment.

The donation is expected to be matched through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, for a total benefit to Marshall of $5 million.

Proceeds from the endowment will be used to support research at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, particularly projects related to occupational and environmental health.

Greg Burton, president and chief executive officer of BrickStreet Mutual Insurance Company, presented the donation to university representatives today at the company's headquarters in Charleston.

"Through the leadership and vision of our board, BrickStreet has set up a foundation focused on giving back to the community in which we live," said Burton. "Through this partnership with Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, BrickStreet is proud to support their continued research efforts. Many of our employees are Marshall graduates, so our partnership with the university runs deep and I know this investment will be used to not only strengthen the university's research efforts in occupational and environmental health, but also to continue to fulfill its mission to improve the health and wellness of our communities.

"As one of the largest workers' compensation providers in the region, we understand that the graduates of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will be our future partners in continuing to improve occupational health across West Virginia."

Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, president of Marshall University, thanked BrickStreet for the contribution, saying, "We are very pleased and proud that BrickStreet has chosen to make this gift commitment in support of endowment-based biomedical research focused on some of the most pressing occupational and rural health problems confronting our state and region. The Marshall University School of Medicine is a leader in rural medicine and the support provided by BrickStreet will be amplified by matching support from the West Virginia Research Trust Fund. This research endowment fund offers great promise to help improve the health and wellness of our rural communities."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of Marshall's medical school, added, "I couldn't be more pleased to receive this generous gift from BrickStreet. It will most certainly benefit thousands of West Virginians. With this gift, Marshall researchers will conduct work that will span the spectrum from basic molecular research to practical, workplace-based research, finding both laboratory and clinical answers to help improve the quality of life for those in our state and region. BrickStreet has provided us with the necessary funding to get these projects under way and we can't wait to get started."

Last year, BrickStreet donated $300,000 to Marshall to support athletics, academics and research. A portion of that gift was matched by the state's trust fund.

The state legislature created the West Virginia Research Trust Fund in 2008 with an initial appropriation of $15 million for Marshall. The university can tap into this fund to double private gifts that support specific research initiatives linked to economic development, health care and job growth.

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Photo: From left, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; Greg Burton, president and CEO of BrickStreet Mutual Insurance Company; Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation; and Dr. Joseph Shapiro, dean of the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, display an oversize check for $2.5 million presented by BrickStreet Foundation to the Marshall University Foundation today at the BrickStreet office in Charleston. The donation will be used to establish a research endowment at Marshall. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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