July 2013 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 31, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

'Legendary' music educator recognized by scholarship at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has announced a significant endowment to provide scholarships for music education students at Marshall University.

The Janice Chandler Gold Scholarship was established through a gift from Dr. Stephen M. Wilks ('68) and Robin Chandler Wilks ('71), with additional contributions from friends and former students of Janice Chandler Gold. Gold is being recognized for her years of service to the musical life of the Huntington community, including her years of teaching music to students in Cabell County; training of teachers as mentors and student teaching supervisors; and as the director/conductor of numerous vocal ensembles and choral groups in the Huntington area. The annual award will be given to a full-time student majoring in music education who is in good academic standing.

"Our daughter Kelly ('01) had a five-year, three-quarter tuition scholarship for her cello performance degree from Marshall and it was most appreciated," said Robin Wilks, who received a music education degree from Marshall. "We have always been grateful for and proud of the top-flight music education available at Marshall."

"I had a small scholarship my last year at Marshall, thanks to Dr. Tom Scott, and also for medical school at Emory," Stephen Wilks said. "Both of our families are full of educators parents, brothers and sisters. A good educational foundation is a 'springboard' for opportunity. It is a privilege to be part of this process."

Nearly 200 singers from several states, all of whom were in Gold's a cappella choirs at Huntington East High School between the fall of 1958 and the spring of 1983, will present a free concert titled "Here We Come!" under Gold's direction at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 3, at Huntington High School's main auditorium. As part of the event, Gold will be presented with a certificate to commemorate the scholarship.

Debby Stoler, a former student of Gold's and assistant director of development and outreach in career services at Marshall, is organizing the event.

"Janice Chandler Gold is an amazing lady and a bundle of energetic talent," Stoler said. "She has brought music to our community and enriched our lives in numerous ways over the last 50-plus years. I feel so privileged to work with her and our hardworking committee to make this reunion happen. A scholarship assures that her legacy of devoted teaching of music continues long into the future."

Melanie Griffis, senior director of development at Marshall, and also a former student of Gold's, said that the scholarship is important for many reasons.

"For a student studying music education, this scholarship is important on several levels," Griffis said. "It recognizes that student's achievements as a musician and future teacher. I can't think of a better example for an aspiring music teacher than Janice Chandler Gold. She is legendary in the Cabell County and surrounding school systems for the quality of her musicianship and teaching, but also for the teachers in our region whom she has trained. On a personal level, I was one of her students at Huntington East High School. I've experienced her in action and to have this scholarship to give to future teachers who will know her by example and can aspire to exemplify her career is a really exciting prospect for the future of music education at Marshall."

Griffis noted that the Wilks understand the need for financial support during college.

"This particular scholarship is designed to relieve much of the financial burden for the recipient, but still requires a personal financial responsibility," she said. "Motivated by the Marshall experience of their own daughter, Kelly Wilks Maxwell, the Wilks believe it is important that the students take some ownership in the cost of their education."

"Kelly was given a scholarship at Marshall that paid for about 75 percent of her education," Stephen Wilks said. "She worked to provide the remainder. We believe that the combination of help from her scholarship and her personal investment made her education that much more important to her."

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Photo: Janice Chandler Gold, shown at left with her daughter, Robin Chandler Wilks, has been recognized for her work in the Huntington musical community with a scholarship for music education at Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 30, 2013
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Speech and Hearing Center holds 'Tiny Talkers' program for children with speech disorders

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four-year-old Cooper Frasher was diagnosed with apraxia of speech when he came to the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center two years ago. Cooper's mother, Terri Frasher, said this speech disorder caused her son to have language delays, which kept him from learning to speak, spell and even read.

"As a mother, I am his biggest advocate," Frasher said. "I knew I needed to help him and when a speech therapist at Cooper's school suggested the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center, I didn't hesitate to come."

In order to help children like Cooper, the program "Tiny Talkers Book Club" was created to facilitate speech therapy through the use of books. Jen Baker, speech language pathologist in the center, said one of the main points of the program is to focus on emergent literacy.

"Kids with speech and language delays are at risk for having challenges with literacy," Baker said. "We saw a great need for a program like this, which would help strengthen a child's language skills in a group setting to decrease the chances of literacy problems in the future."

Since coming to the Speech and Hearing Center, Frasher said she has seen dramatic improvements in her son's language development.

"This time last year Cooper spoke approximately five words," Frasher said. "By the end of the summer, he was up to 80 words and using complete sentences."

Baker said the program holds parent seminars once a month to provide strategies for families to continue teaching their children at home.

"We want to build a solid foundation for our clients," Baker said. "While working with these children, we are also able to provide great training opportunities for our graduate students in Marshall's College of Health Professions."

This summer's final session of the "Tiny Talkers Book Club" will take place from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 1, in the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center, located on the Huntington campus in Smith Hall. For more information about the program and future sessions, contact Baker at jen.baker@marshall.edu.


Photos: (Above) Cooper, age 4, and Ellora, age 6, have participated in the Tiny Talkers Book Club all summer. These sessions have provided interactive learning exercises for children ages 3-6 who suffer from various speech disorders. (Below) Graduate students Catherine Counts (left) and Sarah Trill (right), work with children during the "Tiny Talkers Book Club" program.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 29, 2013
Contact: Leah Clark Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University School of Pharmacy announces creation of new academic scholarship; Charleston pharmacist lends support

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, announced today creation of a new endowed scholarship fund, the Paula Campbell Butterfield Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy.

The scholarship is named in honor of Paula Campbell Butterfield, a pharmacist and longtime owner of Trivillian's Pharmacy, an iconic independently owned pharmacy in Charleston.   Butterfield, who completed her pharmacy degree at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, has owned and operated Trivillian's for more than 30 years.

In announcing the scholarship, Yingling praised Butterfield for her years of mentoring young women and men in the field of pharmacy.

"Ms. Butterfield's generosity is obvious, not only in her willingness to create a scholarship for our students, but in her every-day commitment to mentoring young pharmacists in the field," Yingling said. "Additionally, she is the epitome of what a community pharmacist should be - a valued member of the health care team dedicated to educating her patients about their medications and how to use them safely."

The Paula Campbell Butterfield Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy will be awarded to a recipient who is a full-time student at the school and a resident of West Virginia.   First preference will be for a female student who lives in Kanawha County or an adjacent county (Jackson, Roane, Clay, Nicholas, Fayette, Raleigh, Boone, Lincoln or Putnam).  The recipient must  have and maintain a 3.0 GPA.

The award is renewable.

For specific information on the scholarship, contact the Marshall University Office of Financial Aid at 304-696-3162.

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Photo: Dr. Kevin Yingling, left, today announced creation of a new endowed scholarship fund that honors Paula Campbell Butterfield, right, a pharmacist and longtime owner of Trivillian's Pharmacy in Charleston.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 26, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University coordinating regional forum on geohazards' impact on transportation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Engineers, geologists and transportation planners from across the region will meet at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., Tuesday, July 30, through Thursday, Aug. 1, for the nationally recognized Appalachian States Coalition for Geohazards in Transportation's 13th annual technical forum, "Geohazards Impacting Transportation in the Appalachian Region."

Coordinated by Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS), this year's forum is hosted by the Virginia Department of Transportation.  It is a joint endeavor with the Interstate Group on Abandoned Underground Mines (ITGAUM) that deals with abandoned mines' impact on transportation infrastructure.

Members of the Appalachian coalition meet annually to share information about research developments and projects related to rock falls and landslides along highways, seismic activity, and hazard-prone areas impacting transportation infrastructure in the region.  Risk assessment and emergency response also will be covered.

Coalition members represent the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern Corporation, the Federal Highway Administration and the departments of transportation and state geological surveys in  Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.  ITGAUM is comprised of members from 19 states, one turnpike authority, the Canadian federal government and one Canadian province.

Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director and chairman of the coalition, said, "It is an exciting prospect to work with federal, state and private entities to share best practices on the prevention and remediation of geological problems that affect transportation throughout the Appalachian region and nationally."

Presenters from Marshall include Dr. William Niemann from the College of Science, Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of the College of Information Technology and Engineering,  and Dr. Paulus Wahjudi, also with the College of Information Technology and Engineering.

This year's event includes a pre-conference field trip and workshop which will be of interest to geologists, geotechnical engineers, environmental scientists, planners and others interested in geohazards.

For more information, contact Szwilski at szwilski@marshall.edu or 304-696-5457.  Also see www.marshall.edu/cegas/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 25, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

MIIR scientist awarded $293,000 NIH grant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jingwei Xie, a senior scientist at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR), has been awarded a $293,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to lead a project to develop a technique that may improve surgical repair of rotator cuff injuries.

The project will combine the expertise of two research groups at Marshall University. Xie, who is an expert in bone growth and development, and his team at MIIR will be working with Dr. Franklin D. Shuler, associate professor and vice chair of research in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

According to Xie, rotator cuff injuries are among the most common conditions affecting the shoulder and can occur from falls or repetitive motions like throwing a baseball. Rotator cuff repair is also one of the most common orthopedic surgeries, with approximately 300,000 procedures performed annually in the United States alone.

He explains that rotator cuff surgery done with current methods has a failure rate that ranges from 20-90 percent, due in large part to the manner in which the tendons are reattached to the bone. For this project, his team will combine principles of engineering and biomedicine to construct a new type of biological device that will better mimic an uninjured tendon-to-bone attachment, and ultimately result in improved healing.

"We are pleased to be able to take advantage of this opportunity to combine expertise from two research groups at Marshall," Xie adds. "My background in tissue engineering and Dr. Shuler's extensive experience in clinical treatment of rotator cuff injury will allow us to do work that may very well improve the health and quality of life for individuals afflicted with these injuries. This research could also have a significant impact on the treatment of other, similar injuries of soft tissue-to-bone interfaces."

The grant is from NIH's National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

Dr. John M. Maher, Marshall's vice president for research and the interim director of MIIR, extended his congratulations to Xie, saying, "This grant is quite an accomplishment for Dr. Xie and MIIR. His research in this area is showing great promise to improve human health and to produce patentable technologies. A collaborative, multidisciplinary approach to translational research is the foundation of the success of this program and the participation of MIIR, the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at the School of Pharmacy, and the School of Medicine was key to securing this funding."

Xie has more than 10 years research experience in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nanotechnology and micro-/nanofabrication, and has developed a number of projects related to biomedical applications, including neural tissue engineering, tendon-to-bone insertion site repair and drug delivery. He joined MIIR in January 2011. He and the other scientists at the institute are developing a focused program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries. In keeping with the institute's goal to be self-sustaining, Xie is funded entirely through external sources. He is the co-inventor on five patents and has co-authored more than 40 peer-reviewed journal articles.

For more information about MIIR, which was created in 2008 through the state's "Bucks for Brains" West Virginia Research Trust Fund, visit www.marshall.edu/miir.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 25, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-7691-1713

School of Pharmacy students receive Walgreens diversity awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two rising second-year Marshall University School of Pharmacy students have been awarded scholarships for their efforts to embrace diversity and promote inclusion initiatives on campus.

James Frazier, from Louisville, Ky., was named recipient of the 2012-2013 Marshall University School of Pharmacy Walgreens Diversity and Inclusion Excellence Award for his strong commitment to raise diversity and inclusion awareness on the pharmacy campus. 

Also, Frazier and classmate Priscilla Adjei-Baffour of New York, N.Y., were awarded the Walgreens Student Diversity Award. The distinctions include a financial award.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Dr. Shelvy M. Campbell, assistant dean for diversity at the School of Pharmacy, said both students are exemplary in their commitment to diversity on campus.

"James and Priscilla have been important partners in our mission to create an environment at the School of Pharmacy that is welcoming and nurturing to all students, particularly those from underrepresented minority groups in pharmacy," Campbell said.  "These two students are true leaders and we are honored they have chosen Marshall for their pharmacy education."

Walgreens awarded the School of Pharmacy the scholarship money last fall.
 
According to the company, its gift strategy is three-fold: to increase the availability of education assistance for underrepresented students enrolled in pharmacy programs; to support the development of pipeline and recruitment programs targeting minority students; and to support awareness initiatives and programs that focus on building a diverse, supportive and inclusive culture.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 24, 2013
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, (304) 696-7153

Herd fans to choose Marco costume from among three concepts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's beloved mascot is getting a new costume, and for the first time the responsibility of choosing his new look is in the hands of Thundering Herd fans and friends.
 
Beginning today through Facebook social media, Herd fans have the opportunity to determine whether Marco will keep his current design or be given a new or updated look. His current costume, after five years of extensive wear, travel, cleaning and repair, has been stretched as far as it can, so it's time to replace it, said Matt Turner, Marshall's chief of staff.

"There's no doubt that Marco means a lot to our fans and alumni so we want their help to choose his appearance," Turner said. "He is as iconic as Old Main and his public appearances extend well beyond the field, so we think it's important to hear from them."

All Marshall fans, alumni, students and staff are encouraged to cast their votes via Facebook.
 
Matt Hayes, Marshall's executive director of alumni relations, said, "This is a great concept, a wonderful way to involve alumni and friends of Marshall who care deeply about how the mascot embodies and represents the face of the university. I'm sure the Herd nation will not be shy and will make their voices heard."
 
A costume maker has provided three concepts from which the voters can choose from now through midnight Saturday, Aug. 10. They are:
 
Option 1:  Current Marco.
 
Option 2:  A partial makeover of current Marco. This "hybrid" version of current Marco includes returning to the hoof feet and fur-covered legs of the previous mascot costume.
 
Option 3: A more complete makeover. This new design more closely resembles the previous Marco with a friendlier face and bison goatee.
 
Aaron Goebbel, associate director of athletics for external affairs, said, "Marco represents our fans and they are the ones he is most involved with. It's magical when Marco shows up at an event and he always wants to look his best. And we think it will be a lot of fun having the voting done on social media."
 
Voting has begun on Marshall's Facebook site - https://www.facebook.com/marshallu - and participants can vote only once. The Marco costume that receives the most votes will be announced on Facebook on Monday, Aug. 12.

Once the design is finalized, Turner said he expects the new costume to be completed in time for Marshall's homecoming game at Joan C. Edwards Stadium Saturday, Oct. 5, against UTSA. Game time is 2 p.m.
 
As a reward for helping select one of the three concepts, someone will win tickets and a tailgate package for four to the first Thundering Herd football game of the season, scheduled at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at home against Miami (Ohio). They also will receive Marshall hooded sweatshirts.

Artist renderings of the three choices, and photos of the old Marco and the current Marco, can be found at http://muphotos.marshall.edu/NewsPhotos-4/Marcos-New-Look-2013.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 24, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Autism Training Center director at MU named Professional of the Year

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Barbara Becker-Cottrill, executive director of the West Virginia Autism Training Center (WVATC) at Marshall University, was recently named the Dr. Cathy Pratt Autism Professional of the Year at the 44th annual Autism Society of America Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Becker-Cottrill has served as executive director of the WVATC for the past 23 years. Among her accomplishments in this position was the development and implementation of a comprehensive service delivery program for families and their children with autism spectrum disorders.

"It was truly an honor to receive this recognition from the Autism Society and it has been a great honor to serve as the director of the WVATC," Becker-Cottrill said. "There are few statewide programs in the nation that provide direct services and supports specifically targeted for families of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) of all ages."

Becker-Cottrill is the founder and co-developer of the College Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome, sponsored by the West Virginia Autism Training Center and housed at Marshall University. She served as the principal investigator for the surveillance of autism grant with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She also is a co-author of the book "Autism:  A Primer for Educators." 

Becker-Cottrill will be retiring from her position as the executive director on July 31. A retirement reception will be held at Foundation Hall on the Huntington campus of Marshall University from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, July 26.  The public is invited to attend. 

Becker-Cottrill says she plans to focus on autism research activities in the upcoming year. "We have also done a lot of collaborative work with the West Virginia Department of Education, Office of Special Programs in the past few years which has opened up training and coaching opportunities for educators of students with ASDs," she said. "Marshall University has been a tremendous supporter of our work and I am deeply grateful.  I believe we have come a long way in the provision of evidence-based services for people with ASDs and I know there is a long way to go."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 23, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Biomedical sciences student selected for Chancellor's Scholar Program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University biomedical sciences graduate student Kristeena L. Ray has been selected for the university's Chancellor's Scholar Program, an initiative to help ensure the academic success of underrepresented minority doctoral students.
 
The program will provide Ray with a stipend of $10,000 per semester. In addition, she will receive mentoring and research opportunities through the university, networking opportunities through the Southern Regional Education Board doctoral scholars program, and financial support for her dissertation and thesis work.
 
A native of Glen Allen, Va., Ray received her bachelor's degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University in 2009. She worked as a research assistant at Duke and as a process development engineer at Talecris Biotherapeutics in Clayton, N.C. She has been a graduate student at Marshall since 2011.
 
"Kristeena is a truly outstanding graduate student and we are thrilled to present her with our first award from the new Chancellor's Scholar Program," said Dr. Shari Clarke, vice president for multicultural affairs. "The ideal candidate, she is dedicated, well-rounded and committed to her research."

Ray said, "Being part of this program is such a gift and an honor. The stipend lightens the burden of locating funding and allows me to really focus on my research. I am also excited to take advantage of the additional benefits, including networking opportunities and membership in key organizations in my field."
           
Ray works in the lab of Dr. Nalini Santanam, a professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. Her research is focused on endometriosis and the pain caused by the disease, which is characterized by cells normally present in the uterus migrating outside the organ and attaching to other places in the pelvis. At least one in seven women suffers from the condition.
 
Specifically, Ray is investigating the epigenetics of pain in endometriosis the changes caused to DNA and genes by environment and lifestyle.
 
She said, "We're looking at epigenetic markers in patients with endometriosis. We believe that our continuing research in this area will help us better understand what leads to endometriosis in some women and find alternate treatment options for its symptoms.
 
"Long-term, I am interested in the research and development behind drugs and therapies, such as one that may benefit women with endometriosis."
 
In April, she presented her research at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which was held in conjunction with the Experimental Biology conference in Boston.
 
Ray serves as president of the Graduate Student Organization, is a member of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and volunteers with the March of Dimes and the Tri-State Literacy Council.
 
The Chancellor's Scholar Program at Marshall is funded through the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 22, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

Researchers awarded $750,000 NASA grant to study muscle and bone loss associated with space travel

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Miaozong Wu of the Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy has been awarded a $750,000 grant from NASA to lead a team of researchers investigating the muscle and bone loss associated with space travel.

Wu's three-year project was one of only 14 funded nationally through NASA's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). According to Dr. Majid Jaridi, chairman of the NASA West Virginia EPSCoR Committee, which coordinates the grant proposal process in West Virginia, researchers in 29 states were eligible to compete.

"Marshall University has had a track record of success in winning these grants. The program is quite competitive and this latest award is a great achievement for the team," Jaridi added. "I look forward to working with them to get the project started."

Wu said, "The loss of muscle and bone observed with space travel is an important and vexing problem, and NASA has put a high priority on identifying risk factors and treatments. It was really exciting news to get this award. We have a great team ready to get to work."

Wu's team of collaborators for the project includes:  Dr. Eric Blough and Dr. Nicole Winston, also of the School of Pharmacy; Dr. Henry Driscoll and Dr. Omolola Olajide of the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine; and Dr. John Leidy of the Huntington VA Medical Center. Other contributors include colleagues at West Virginia State University, University of Louisville, University of Delaware, Universities Space Research Association and NASA's Johnson Space Center.

Wu explained that the researchers will have three primary objectives: to study the effects of space travel on the body's muscles and bones, to identify possible causes and to develop potential treatments.

"The lack of gravity and the exposure to increased radiation in space are believed to be related to musculoskeletal loss, but very few studies have been done," he said. "Our findings will have direct applicability not only to NASA personnel traveling in space, but also to anyone who is experiencing muscle and bone loss, including aging patients and those suffering from cancer, AIDS and diabetes."

Wu added that the project will involve undergraduate and graduate student researchers, and endocrinology physician fellows from the Department of Internal Medicine's Endocrinology Fellowship Program.

"An important component of this particular NASA program is to train students for science and other high-tech careers," he said. "We will be giving them hands-on opportunities to do significant research associated with this study."

Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, congratulated Wu and his colleagues for the award, saying, "This project will further the team's partnerships, significantly increase the state's research and development capabilities, and support both our educational mission and economic development in the region. It's really a win-win."

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 22, 2013
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program ranks number one in the nation on national assessment test scores

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program once again is ranked number one in the country for its students receiving the highest overall scores on the Forensic Science Assessment Test, a qualifying test offered each year by the American Board of Criminalistics.

In addition, a Marshall student received the highest test score from among 179 students from 15 other forensic science programs that participated in the test.

Of the top 25 highest test scores ranked, 11 were students from the Marshall Forensic Science Graduate Program.

Dr. Pamela Staton, program coordinator, said the test scores are evidence of the high quality education the program provides.

"The quality of an academic program can be measured by a program's achievement of national accreditation and how well its students perform on national board examinations," she said. "The Forensic Science Graduate Program at Marshall University has achieved both of these honorable distinctions. This translates to high quality forensic science services to law enforcement, the legal profession, and the public as graduates of this program become forensic scientists in the field."

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the forensic science graduate program, said the test is useful for assessing the program's strengths and demonstrating to prospective students and the general public its ability to meet national standards.

"The results demonstrate not only the quality of the program and its students, but the dedication of its full-time faculty and the many adjunct faculty members," Fenger said. "The program greatly benefits from the input of law enforcement and criminal justice system professionals here locally and across the state."

Marshall's program is accredited by the Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

The students who participated in this examination, which was administered in Spring 2013, are now graduates of Marshall's nationally recognized Forensic Science Program. They demonstrated their knowledge in disciplines including forensic biology, controlled substances, trace analysis, toxicology, latent prints, questioned documents, fire debris and firearms/tool marks.

The test is offered to students in their last semester of an academic forensic science program. While seeking their first jobs, recent college graduates may use their test results to demonstrate their knowledge across a broad range of forensic science disciplines.

The American Board of Criminalistics offers a wide array of testing and certification services that focus on the forensic sciences.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 19, 2013
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, (304) 746-1964

Marshall University gives Scouts a look at virtual technology, 3-D printing

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Scouts attending this week's 2013 National Scout Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Reserve are getting the opportunity to explore state-of-the-art virtual technology and 3-D printing, thanks to Marshall University's engineering and advanced manufacturing programs.

Hundreds of Scouts each hour are visiting the Jamboree exhibits sponsored by the university's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences and the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing.

CEGAS Director Dr. Tony Szwilski says his group is demonstrating their latest research and development efforts, including an interactive, multi-user virtual program designed to support mine emergency response training.

The program simulates an underground coal mine and uses a video game engine a platform familiar to Jamboree participants. The format allows users to practice their communications and decision-making skills in dangerous and stressful environments.

"Although this exhibit is just a small-scale version of the Visualization Lab we have on our Huntington campus, the Scouts are fascinated by the 3-D stereo display technology and the virtual environments we have created," said Szwilski. "This has proven to be a wonderful way to share what we are doing and showcase our programs to future students. It's been a great experience all the way around."

RCBI is giving the Scouts an opportunity to experience first-hand one of the world's most exciting technologies 3-D printing, which turns digital designs into actual objects. The technology is beginning to be used in the aerospace and automotive industries, health care, architecture, engineering and countless other fields.

Charlotte Weber, the institute's director and CEO, said her group is glad to be part of the Jamboree and to share the technology with Scouts, who are using RCBI's printer to produce copies of a fleur-de-lis, the stylized flower used in the Boy Scout symbol.

Weber added, "3-D printing isn't the wave of the future, it's happening here and now. Over the last few years, our labs have given dozens of manufacturers and entrepreneurs access to our 3-D printers for everything from rapid prototyping to full-scale production. Now we're thrilled to be able to offer Jamboree participants a hands-on introduction to this truly revolutionary technology."

She said she hopes exposure to the possibilities presented by 3-D printing will spur some of the Scouts to become interested in Marshall University, high-tech manufacturing and entrepreneurship.

The Marshall exhibits will continue through the end of the Jamboree on July 24.

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Photos: (Above) Scouts try their hand at navigating the virtual coal mine developed by the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences for use in mine emergency response training. (Middle) Jamboree participants proudly display a fleur-de-lis produced at a 3-D printing exhibit sponsored by the Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing. (Below) Scouts from all over the country and around the world have visited Marshall University's exhibits this week as part of the 2013 National Scout Jamboree at the Summit Bechtel Reserve in the New River Gorge.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 17, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Tech Up' program helps nontraditional students with technology concerns

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - When Karen Riffle returned to Marshall University in 2012 as a nontraditional student after 30 years away from the college environment, she quickly discovered a big technology gap between herself and traditional students.

She could have used the new "Tech Up" program being offered at Marshall.

"Tech Up," which debuts next month, has one purpose to help nontraditional students succeed at Marshall by being technologically up to speed by the time they take their first course.

Riffle, a Mineral Wells native, said she expected to face what she called the daunting task of "catching up" with traditional students where technology was concerned. And she did.

What surprised her most, however, was the learning style of the current traditional students and the extent to which they rely on technology. Because of the requirements of one class, she said she found it necessary to become immediately familiar with MUOnline, which uses systems from Blackboard, a global technology company.

Riffle was fortunate because the class proved to be a great help in overcoming the initial obstacles she faced. However, she believes there are many nontraditional students today facing the same challenges with technology. Many of them simply have never had a need to use technology. Many of them are overwhelmed and frustrated.

In a letter last February to Steve Hensley, Marshall's dean of student affairs, Riffle shared her experience and suggested a program be developed to help nontraditional students who are not tech savvy. That's the goal of "Tech Up."

Hensley said, "We have found that many of our students, particularly those students who have been out of school for a few years, are not as tech savvy as they would like to be. This new program will help these students discover the essential technology students use at Marshall."

Riffle added, "In developing a program to assist nontraditional students in acclimating to Marshall, Marshall will receive the reward of greater retention and enrollment rates among the nontraditional student body."

In her letter to Hensley, Riffle said not a day passes that she does not use Blackboard for one or more of the following purposes:

  • access PowerPoint presentations for use in class and for study purposes;
  • submit homework assignments;
  • take online exams;
  • check for updated grades;
  • participate on a discussion board;
  • review a syllabus; and/or,
  • check for class announcements and notifications.

The university's IT (Information Technology) personnel will conduct the "Tech Up" sessions, which are scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 22, and from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, in Drinko Library rooms 138 and 349. To reserve a space, students may call the Office of Student Affairs at 304-696-6422 or e-mail studentaffairs@marshall.edu.


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Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Gala event to celebrate state's coal mining community; Singer-songwriter John Ellison among those to be honored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Miners, community members and others connected with the state's coal mining industry will gather at Tamarack in Beckley on Thursday, Oct. 3, for the 2013 Miners' Celebration a gala reception and dinner to celebrate the past, present and future of West Virginia's coal mining enterprise.

According to organizers, the purpose of the annual event is to recognize those who play a role in the success of the state's mining enterprise. The community focus of this year's event is McDowell County and its coal mining heritage.

"Many of our graduates find employment in West Virginia's mining industry, which depends upon thousands of individuals in a number of different roles," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every person who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders, educators and mining families.

"The mining industry owes its success to every one of them. This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved and to spotlight McDowell County's long history in mining. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."

Internationally recognized musician and songwriter John Ellison, who grew up in the mining community of Landgraff in McDowell County, will be on hand at the event to accept a special "Spirit of the Coalfields" award. A member of the 1960s group the Soul Brothers Six, Ellison is best known for writing the song "Some Kind of Wonderful" one of the most-recorded songs in history. He is dedicating his award to the memory of his father, who worked in the mines in McDowell County.
 
"Rocket Boys" author Homer Hickam, who received last year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" award, will present a new award, the "Homer Hickam Collier Award," to a working coal miner who epitomizes the spirit, dedication and skills of the mining profession.
 
Conference organizers also will present "Because of You" awards to individuals for their significant contributions to West Virginia's coalfields heritage in the following categories:  Community Investment, Community Involvement, Women in Mining, Safety Professional, Equipment/Technology Innovation, Environmental Professional, Management Professional, Engineering Professional and Educator of the Year.
 
The Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.
 
The free reception will begin at 5 p.m. in the Tamarack atrium. Dinner and the awards ceremony, which require a ticket, will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the ballroom.
 
Tickets for the dinner and awards ceremony are $50/person. To purchase tickets, call 304-696-4029.
 
For more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/mcc.
 
The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.

Sponsors include Brickstreet Insurance, Marshall University, State Electric Supply Company and the West Virginia Division of Energy.


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Friday July 12, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

112 ninth-grade students from southern West Virginia to participate in HSTA Summer Institute at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The annual Health Science & Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute conducted by Marshall University will take place July 14-19 on MU's Huntington campus.

This is the 20th year of summer institutes for HSTA, which was started in 1994 with 45 students from two counties. It now averages around 800 students from 26 counties throughout the state enrolled in the program each year. This is Marshall's ninth year sponsoring a summer institute.

Officials anticipate 112 ninth-graders from southern West Virginia taking part in this year's institute, which kicks off with a dinner at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 14, in room BE5 on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center.

Guest speakers at the dinner include Ann Chester, director of the HSTA program in West Virginia, and Dr. Chuck Somerville, dean of Marshall's College of Science. Two former HSTA students will also speak, and cake and ice cream will be served as part of the 20-year anniversary celebration.

"We are going to expose rising ninth-graders to the activities and things that not only science has to offer, but Marshall University has to offer," said David Cartwright, director of the event. "Hopefully, the 'Fun With Science' institute will help convince many of these students to choose science as a career."

The institute is designed to give hands-on research and lab experience through Marshall's College of Science and high school teachers. It is a highly innovative and successful initiative designed to encourage high school students to pursue college degrees in the health sciences.

The "Fun With Science" summer institute is structured to enroll a high percentage of African American youth to offset the disparity of African Americans as professionals in related fields of study.

Students from Marshall's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will be involved in the institute again this year. Jo Ann Raines with Graduate Medical Education (GME) said medical students will help teach a suturing workshop from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday and a heartbeat workshop from 1 to 5 p.m. Wednesday. Both workshops will take place in Morrow Library.

The students will practice suturing using simulated skin and pigs feet in the suturing workshop. In the heartbeat workshop, they will listen to heart sounds from actual patients and observe simulated laparoscopic surgery.

A "speed-dating" session, in which the students have access to different medical specialists, is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday in Memorial Student Center room BE5.

In addition to attending classes, labs and workshops, the students also will take part in several recreational activities, such as bowling, dancing, Zumba®, attending a movie, playing kickball and visiting the Marshall Recreation Center.


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Friday July 12, 2013
Contact: Clark Egnor, Marshall University Center for International Programs, 304-696-6265

Restaurants invited to participate in 50th anniversary International Festival this fall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - International restaurants from throughout the Tri-State Area are invited to participate in Marshall University's 50th anniversary International Festival, scheduled from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, at the SMG-managed Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

Restaurants can still apply for a spot in the festival by submitting an application this summer. Participants will receive a portion of the proceeds from ticket sales and promotion of their restaurant. The deadline to apply is Friday, Aug. 9, and space is limited. The application form can be downloaded from the Marshall University Center for International Programs website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

For the second year, the festival will take place at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, to accommodate the event's need for more space. As the largest entertainment venue in the Tri-State, Big Sandy Superstore Arena hosts concerts, family shows, trade shows, and regional and state athletic competitions.

"We were very happy with the attendance last year," said Dr. Clark Egnor, executive director of Marshall's Center for International Programs. "But we anticipate many more people will attend this year with the observance of the anniversary."

Admission to the festival is free and the event is open to the public.
In addition to the international foods prepared by restaurants, the International Festival will also feature music and dance from around the world along with displays representing more than 60 countries and cultures provided by Marshall University international students and the Tri-State international community, in partnership with Cabell County Schools and Mountwest Community and Technical College.

"The international festival events are the perfect opportunity for students, faculty, staff and members of the community to enjoy the international diversity and global opportunities found on the Marshall campus and in the surrounding community," Egnor said. Currently, Marshall enrolls more than 400 international students from 60 countries. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp has set a goal for Marshall to double the number of international students in the next several years.

Each restaurant will offer tastings of its signature menu items. Egnor said that by purchasing food tickets, guests can sample a variety of foods from all over the world at very affordable prices.  "Festivalgoers," he said, "will have an opportunity to easily explore new restaurants and sample different international dishes they would not ordinarily try. You won't walk away hungry."

For further details about Marshall University's annual International Festival, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu, or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.

--------------
 
Photos: Scenes from the 2012 International Festival at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in Huntington, W.Va. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Thursday July 11, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Foundation surpasses goal in 630 by 6/30 challenge campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Office of Development surpassed an ambitious fundraising goal in June, helping the MU Foundation finish the fiscal year on a strong note.

A one-month campaign, called "MU Challenge 630 by 6/30," raised more than $78,000 - including two endowed scholarship gifts totaling $32,000, according to Griffin Talbott, director of annual giving.

The goal was for 630 donors to make contributions during the month of June. Overall, 648 donors gave to the campaign.

Dr. Greg Crews and Dr. Dallas Nibert, who have a family dentistry practice in Huntington, agreed to contribute $10,000 when the goal of 630 donors was met.

"The MU Challenge 630 by 6/30 was a huge success," Talbott said. "Thanks to Drs. Greg Crews and Dallas Nibert. They were the first to offer a challenge gift."

Talbott was thrilled with the success of the challenge campaign. He praised Marshall alumni, friends and family for their contributions. Christine Anderson, assistant vice president with the MU Foundation, said she also is grateful to all who contributed.

"We are grateful to Drs. Greg Crews and Dallas Nibert for serving as examples in our first-ever challenge campaign," she said. "Our success is made possible by the partnerships we have with our friends and alumni and they are certainly a testament to that."


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Thursday July 11, 2013
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

Marshall faculty member and former Olympic trainer will travel to Brazil to present biomechanics research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Dr. Suzanne Konz of the Marshall University College of Health Professions will travel to Natal, Brazil this summer to present research at the 2013 International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) conference, which takes place once every two years.

Konz, an assistant professor of biomechanics in the School of Kinesiology, said she will share her research among the biggest players in the biomechanical field. She will give an oral presentation on her work titled, "Changes in Windmill Pitch Over Time."

"This is one of those conferences, as a biomechanist, that seems more challenging because I'll be presenting in front of scholars from all around the world," Konz said. "It's exciting to think I could potentially expose someone else to a different perspective of biomechanics research."

Cristina Arikawa, a member of the ISB organizing committee, said only 40 percent of the 858 submitted abstracts were chosen for an oral presentation.

"Konz was chosen to give an oral presentation due to the quality of her research and the fit of her research into the (sports biomechanics) theme of the session," Arikawa said. She said 53 countries will be represented at this year's conference.

A 2002 Winter Olympic Games athletic trainer, Konz now serves as a member of the USA Track & Field sport science biomechanics group specializing in throwing events, specifically the hammer throw.

Konz said she will continue to develop relationships with other professionals in this global forum and showcase the amazing work being done at Marshall University.

"I believe this opportunity puts Marshall on the map in terms of research capabilities in the field of sports science," Konz said. "From a university standpoint, we want students to see what we do and help provide them with similar opportunities to meet the scholars they read about in their textbooks. This makes our department more personal."

Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of kinesiology and associate dean of the college, said Konz's work continues to impress him.

"Dr. Konz is an undeniable asset to the College of Health Professions and the School of Kinesiology," McIlvain said. "I look forward to her future research endeavors which can only highlight the breadth of possibilities available here at Marshall."

The conference takes place from Aug. 4 to 9, and Konz will give her oral presentation from 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 7.  For more information about this year's conference, visit http://www.isbbrazil.com.


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Thursday July 11, 2013
Contact: Karen Kirtley, Senior Vice President of Administration, 304-696-3328

Preliminary master plan to be unveiled at open house July 18

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A revised version of Marshall University's master plan for the Huntington and South Charleston campuses will be reviewed by the community at an open house. The event will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 18, in room 2W22 of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

All members of the university and Huntington communities are invited to attend, said Dr. Karen Kirtley, Marshall's senior vice president of administration.

"We have heard the suggestions of the communities and incorporated them into the plan," Kirtley said. "We're looking forward to refining the plan even further based on input received at the open house."

The Campus Master Plan will be presented to both the Marshall University Board of Governors and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Further information on the planning process can be found on the Marshall University website at www.marshall.edu/mplan.


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Kinesiology, Orthopaedic Surgery join King's Daughters to offer continuing education at no cost to participants

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Kinesiology and the School of Medicine's Department of Orthopaedic Surgery will join with King's Daughters Sports Medicine to host the fourth annual continuing education conference for athletic trainers Saturday, July 13.

Dr. Gary McIlvain, chair of kinesiology and associate dean for the College of Health Professions, said the conference will provide eight hours of high-caliber continuing education to athletic trainers at no cost.

"As for any other allied health profession, the Board of Certification requires continuing education for certification of athletic trainers," McIlvain said. "A conference offering eight hours of continuing education would generally cost between $200 and $450. We are providing it for free."

McIlvain said this is his fourth year coordinating the conference alongside Marshall Orthopaedic surgeons Dr. Charles Giangarra and Dr. John Jasko.

"This had not been offered in the Tri-state previously so we decided this would be a great service to our community's athletic trainers," McIlvain said. "It allows clinical athletic trainers, athletic trainers in secondary and higher education and physicians to provide better medical services to athletes and health-conscious individuals of all ages."

This year's conference will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Marshall University Physicians & Surgeons Medical Campus located beside Cabell Huntington Hospital. For more information, call McIlvain at 304-696-2930 or 606-615-2842 or e-mail mcilvain2@marshall.edu to register.


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Tuesday July 9, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

WMUL finishes strong in WVAP broadcast awards, ends year with 92; overall total since 1985 is 1,335

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Students from WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, continued a longtime tradition of excellence by winning 92 awards during the 2012-2013 academic year.

WMUL students surpassed 90 awards for the fourth consecutive year. Twenty-five of the 92 awards were for first place, 37 for second place, three for third place and 27 for honorable mention. Since 1985, WMUL student broadcasters have won 1,335 awards, according to Dr. Chuck G. Bailey, professor of radio-television production and management in the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall, and faculty manager of WMUL-FM.

WMUL finished the year strong with three firsts and 10 seconds in the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's 2012 broadcast journalism awards ceremony June 8 at the Charleston Civic Center.

"Overall, this commendable effort helps to build upon another successful  year by the volunteer-student staff of WMUL-FM in garnering recognition for Marshall University and the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications from state, regional and national broadcasting organizations that evaluate the work done at campus radio stations," Bailey said.

Here is a look at the WMUL winners in the WVAP awards:

Radio Broadcast Journalist of the Year: Laura Hatfield, a graduate student from Chapmanville.

Best Anchor or Anchor Team: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," with news anchor Laura Hatfield, broadcast Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.

Best Host: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by Adam Rogers, a senior from Charleston, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

The second-place winners were:

Outstanding News Operation: The Newscenter 88 team. News director for the Spring semester 2012 and the Fall semester 2012 was Laura Hatfield.

Best Regularly Scheduled Newscast: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday, Nov. 6, 2012. Participants included Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, a recent graduate from Wellsburg; Whitney Adkins, a senior from Milton; and Amanda Reesman, a sophomore from Sarver, Pa.

Best Continuing Coverage: "Election 2012," a multitude of packages and sound bites produced by Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne,  a recent graduate from Winfield; written by hosts Laura Hatfield and Leannda Carey, along with reports by Marcus Constantino, a senior from Bramwell; Braxton Crisp, a sophomore from Huntington; Ashleigh Hill, a recent graduate from Princeton; Alex James, a freshman from Matthews, Va.; Andrew Harrison, a sophomore from Toms River, N. J.;  Jessica Patterson, a junior from Hartford, Jessica Starkey, a sophomore from Kearneysville, and Will Vance, a senior from Charleston. The packages were broadcast and made available online during the "5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" from Oct. 29, 2012 to Nov. 6, 2012, Election Night Coverage Special.   

Best Anchor or Anchor Team: "The 5 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" with news anchor Leannda Carey, broadcast Feb. 24, 2012.

Outstanding Sports Operation: The FM 88 sports team.  Sports director for the spring semester 2012 and fall semester 2012 was Adam Rogers.

Best Sportscaster: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by James Collier,  a senior from Worthington, Ky., broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

Best Regularly Scheduled Sportscast: "The Conference USA Report:  Week 12 Talking Animals," broadcast  Nov. 16, 2012. The students who participated were: Will Vance, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jarrod Clay, a senior from Barboursville, Joshua Rose, a junior from Olney, Md., and Jimmy Sanders, a senior from Stroudsburg, Pa.

Best Sports Talk Show: "Sportsview:  Women's Basketball," with host James Collier, broadcast and made available online Oct. 31, 2012.

Best Host: "A Compilation of Work," written and reported by James Collier, broadcast for the FM 88 sports team throughout 2012.

Best Website: WMUL-FM's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul. The 2012 webmaster for WMUL-FM Online was Jeremy Johnson, a recent graduate from Smithburg, Md.


Here is a look at other awards competition and WMUL's results during the spring:

AVA Awards

Students from WMUL received five Platinum Awards, seven Gold Awards and two Honorable Mention Awards in the International AVA Awards 2012 competition.  The winners were named in a letter dated Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, from Arlington, Texas.   This marks WMUL-FM's second time competing in this particular contest. 

The AVA Awards contest is an international competition that recognizes outstanding creative professionals involved in the concept, direction, design and production of media that is part of the evolution of digital communication.

The Platinum Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

Radio Sports Program: "Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday, Oct. 19, 2011. The students who participated were Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne.

Radio Special Programming: "The Patrick and Alex Radio Special," written and produced by Patrick Webb, a recent graduate from Huntington; Alex Constantino, a recent graduate from Parkersburg; A. Jay Meadows, a senior from Madison; Brittany Barnes, a recent graduate from Hurricane, Tyler Kes, a senior from Burnsville, Minn., and Aaron Payne.  The radio special aired Friday, April 27, 2012.

Sports Package:  "The Cato-Shuler Connection," written and produced by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the pre-game show for Marshall football at Ohio University Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011.

Promo: "WMUL Knockout," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, April 23, 2012, to the present time, written and produced by Will Vance.

News Package:  "Zapp Comes to Huntington" by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Nov. 2, 2012.


The Gold Award winning entries were in the following categories:

Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Halloween Spooktacular 2:  The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012.  The students who participated were Scott Hall, a recent graduate from Huntington;  Adam Rogers, Jared Clay, Hunter Morrison, a sophomore from Huntington; Alec Hildebeidel, a freshman from Bel Air, Md.; Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

Sports Package/Podcast: "Coach Geth," by Aaron Payne, was broadcast during "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, and also made available online the same day.

Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday, April 25, 2012. The students who participated in "The Racer's Edge" were Kyle Gibson, a junior from Bluefield; Joshua Rose, Marcus  Constantino and Ashley  Killingsworth, a senior from Horseheads, N.Y.

News Package: "Marching Thunder" by Jessica Patterson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Sept. 14, 2012.

Sport Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall versus the University of Memphis women's college basketball game played at Cam Henderson Center  Feb. 16, 2012.  The students calling the game were Aaron Payne,  Adam Rogers, Bennet Siffrin, a senior from New Martinsville, and Peter Wilson, a senior from Charleston.

News Package: "On A Higher Note: Louise Fraser," by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Monday, Nov. 26, 2012.

Promo: "WMUL Halloween," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, written and produced by Jessica Patterson.

The Honorable Mention Award-winning entries were in the following categories:

Sports Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus West Virginia University football game played in Morgantown Saturday, Sept. 3, 2012. Calling the game were Adam Rogers, Aaron Payne, Leannda Carey and Scott Hall, a graduate from Stevens City, Va.

Overall Website: WMUL's website is www.marshall.edu/wmul.marshall.edu/wmul.                             
The 2012 Web Master for WMUL-FM Online was Jeremy Johnson, a recent graduate from Smithburg, Md. 

 

NBS/AERho Awards

WMUL students received two grand prize awards and 16 honorable mention awards during the National Broadcasting Society/Alpha Epsilon Rho (NBS/AERho) 22nd Annual National Student Audio/Video Scriptwriting and 50th Annual Audio/Video Production awards competition .

The ceremony took place March 23, 2013, at the Hilton Crystal City at Washington Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va.

Alpha Epsilon Rho is the national honorary society composed of members selected from National Broadcasting Society (NBS) chapters.

WMUL's grand prize award winning entries in production were:

Audio Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012. The students who participated in "The Racer's Edge" were Kyle Gibson, Joshua Rose, Marcus Constantino and Ashley Killingsworth.

Audio Comedy Program: "The Patrick and Alex Radio Special," written and produced by Patrick Webb, Alex Constantino,  A. Jay Meadows, Brittany Barnes, Tyler Kes and Aaron Payne. The radio special aired Friday, April 27, 2012.

The honorable mention awards in production went to:

Audio News Package: "Pi Day" by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, March 14, 2012.

Audio Feature Package: "Marching Thunder" by Jessica Patterson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Sept. 14, 2012.

Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Halloween Spooktacular 2: The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012.  The students   who participated are Scott Hall, Adam Rogers, Jarrod Clay, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Week 5 Undercover," broadcast Friday, Sept. 28, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose, Andrew Harrison, Jimmy Sanders and Will Vance.

Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Week 8 Future," broadcast Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jimmy Sanders, Will Vance, Joshua Rose, Hunter Morrison and Sam Craigo, a senior from Huntington.

Audio Magazine Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Week 12 Talking Animals," broadcast Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. The students who participated were Will Vance, Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jarrod Clay, Joshua Rose and Jimmy Sanders.

Audio Sports Package: "Marshall Soccer's Home Away from Home" by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012.

Audio Sports Package: "JUCOs Beef Up the Herd" by Kyle Gibson, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012.

Audio Sports Segment: "The Youth of Marshall Softball," by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov.7, 2012.

Audio Sports Segment: "Shuler Runs It Up," by Adam Rogers, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012.

Audio Sports Segment: "Tom Jackson," by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Friday, Sept. 21, 2012.

Audio Sports Program:  "Sportsview:  Women's Basketball," with host James Collier, broadcast and made available online Wednesday,  Oct. 31, 2012.

Audio Sports Program: "The Racer's Edge," broadcast and made available online Wednesday,  Nov. 7, 2012. The students who participated were Kyle Gibson, Joshua Rose, Marcus Constantino and Ashley Killingsworth.

Audio Comedy Program: "The Patrick and Alex Show:  The Hun-gar Games," written and produced by Patrick Webb; Alex Constantino; A. Jay Meadows; Brittany Barnes; Tyler Kes, Aaron Payne and Kyle Hobstetter, a recent graduate from Portsmouth, Ohio. The radio comedy program aired Friday, March 20, 2012.

Audio Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note:  Zapp," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 19, 2012.

Audio Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note:  Louise Fraser," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 26, 2012.

 

Mark of Excellence Awards

WMUL students won four first-place awards, three seconds and three thirds in the 2012 Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Mark of Excellence Contest for  Region Four in the four radio categories. The awards were presented at the Region Four SPJ Convention Saturday, April 6, 2013, at the University of Dayton.

The first-place award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories:

Best All-Around Newscast: The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast and made available online Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers; Leannda Carey; Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham, a recent graduate from Youngsville, N.C.

Radio News Reporting:  "Mayor Kim Wolfe Incumbent Election 2012," written and produced   by Leannda Carey, was broadcast during the Newscenter 88's election-night programming and made available online Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.

Radio Feature: "African Dance," written and produced by Jimmy Sanders, was broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition  of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, April 20, 2012.

Radio Sports Reporting: "Eddie Sullivan Returns" written and produced by Adam Rogers, broadcast during the WMUL-FM Pregame Show before the Marshall versus Western Carolina college football game from Joan C. Edwards Stadium in Huntington Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012.

The second-place winning entries were in the following categories:

Radio News Reporting: "Natural Gas," written and produced by Nathan Barham, was broadcast during the  "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88"  and made available online  Friday, April 20, 2012.

Radio Feature: "West Virginia Bridge Day," written and produced by Marcus Constantino, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Friday, Oct. 22, 2012.

Radio Sports Reporting: "Nothing to Lose at UAB," written and produced by Jimmy Sanders, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012.

The third-place award-winning entries were in the following categories.

Radio News Reporting:  "Coal Activists," written and produced by Whitney Adkins, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, March 28, 2012.

Radio Feature: "Hit Like a Girl," written and produced by Kayla Marcum, a junior from Fort Gay, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88"    and made available online Thursday, March 15, 2012.

Radio Sports Reporting: "Ed Geth," written and produced by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012.

                                
BEA Awards

WMUL students received one third-place award and one honorable mention award during the Eleventh Annual Broadcast Education Association Festival of Media Arts Student Audio Competition ceremony Monday, April 8, 2013. The event took place at the. Las Vegas Hotel and Convention Center.

The third-place award-winning entry in audio was:

Newscast: "The 5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast Friday,  Feb. 24, 2012. Participants were Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham.

The honorable mention award-winning entry in audio was:

Sports Play-by-Play: The Marshall versus Houston college football game at the Joan C. Edwards Stadium, broadcast Saturday, Nov.  17, 2012. Calling the game were Aaron Payne, Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, James Collier and Sam Craigo.

 

Communicator Awards

Students from WMUL received one Award of Excellence and four Awards of Distinction in the 19th Annual Communicator Awards 2013 Audio Competition.  The winners were named Monday, June 3, in New York, N.Y.

The Communicator Awards come from the International Academy of Visual Arts that recognizes outstanding work in the communications field. The 2013 contest had more than 6,000 entries from radio stations, ad agencies,  interactive agencies, production firms, in-house creative professionals, graphic designers, design firms, public relations firms, corporate communications departments and government entities.

The Award of Excellence winning entry by WMUL-FM is in the following category:

Sports Program:  "Herd Roundup," broadcast and made available online Friday,  Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Adam Rogers and Aaron Payne.

The Award of Distinction winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the following categories: 

Sports Package: "Ed Geth," written and produced by Aaron Payne, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88" and made available online Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012.

Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report:  Halloween Spooktacular 2: The Spookening," broadcast Friday, Oct. 26, 2012.  The students   who participated were Scott Hall, Adam Rogers, Jarrod Clay, Hunter Morrison, Alec Hildebeidel, Joshua Rose and Andrew Harrison.

Sports Program: "The Conference USA Report: Week 8 Future," broadcast Friday, Oct. 19, 2012. The students who participated were Aaron Payne, James Collier, Jimmy Sanders, Will Vance, Joshua Rose, Hunter Morrison and Sam Craigo.

Music/Entertainment Program: "On a Higher Note: Zapp," with host Aaron Payne, broadcast Monday, Nov. 19, 2012.

 

Hermes Awards

WMUL students received one Platinum Award and four Gold Awards in The Hermes Creative Awards 2013 Competition.  The winners were named in a letter dated Monday, June 17, from Arlington, Texas

The Platinum Award-winning entry was in the Radio Promotional Announcement category:

Promo:"WMUL Knockout," an in-house promotional announcement broadcast in WMUL-FM's Promotion Announcement rotation from Monday, April 23, 2012, to the present time, written and produced by Will Vance.

"This is an outstanding accomplishment to be recognized as having produced one of the best promotional announcements in the country," Bailey said. "I am proud and grateful for the honor this Hermes Creative Platinum Award bestows on  WMUL-FM, the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications and Marshall University."

The Gold Award-winning entries by WMUL-FM were in the Radio Newscast, Radio News Reporting Podcast, Radio Sports Reporting Podcast  and Radio Sports Play-By-Play categories.

Newscast: The "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," broadcast and made available online Friday, Feb. 24, 2012. The students who participated in were Adam Rogers, Leannda Carey, Marcus Constantino, Joshua Rose and Nathan Barham.

Radio News Reporting: "Anti-Valentine's Day Party," by Marcus Constantino, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013.

Radio Sports Reporting: "The Youth of Marshall Softball," by Joshua Rose, broadcast during the "5:00 p.m. Edition of Newscenter 88," Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012.

Sports Play-by-Play: WMUL-FM's broadcast of the Marshall University versus East Carolina University women's college basketball game played at the Cam Henderson Center Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. The students calling the game were Adam Rogers, James Collier, Nick McKendree, a senior from Gallipolis Ferry, and Joshua Rose.

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Photo: Adam Rogers, left, a senior from Charleston, and Laura Hatfield, a graduate student from Chapmanville, show off their first-place awards after the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association's awards ceremony June 8 in Charleston.


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Monday July 8, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall announces upgraded student e-mail system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - An upgraded student e-mail system at Marshall University will result in more available services and an easier, single sign-on system for student accounts, beginning July 15.

The system, powered by Microsoft Office 365 (previously known as Live@edu), will be available for all Marshall students. The upgrade will not impact MU faculty and staff using the university-hosted Outlook/Exchange e-mail.

Marshall has been part of the Live Mail program with Microsoft since 2010. Microsoft has since discontinued the Live Mail service and replaced it with Office 365. Some of the features of Office 365 are improved e-mail and calendaring, web conferencing, instant messaging, file storage and sharing and team web sites. Not all of the new services will be available immediately but will be in the near future.

"Office 365 is a big upgrade for students that will give them online tools much like the Microsoft Outlook services used by companies around the world," said Jody Perry, executive director of Technology Services with Marshall University Information Technology. "It's more than just better email - it includes calendar and task management features that will help them keep up with their busy schedules and coursework."

Perry said students using mobile devices to connect to their e-mail will need to update their credentials and log in with their MUNet username and password to access their e-mail. If they don't do this, they will not automatically receive e-mail on their phones. Students who do not know their MUNet credentials may visit www.marshall.edu/munetlookup to get their usernames and reset their passwords. Their e-mail address will remain the same.

The upgraded Office 365 system will be easily accessible through the updated Marshall University Portal, myMU (www.marshall.edu/myMU).

More information about Office 365 is available at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/academic/. Students also may contact the IT service desk at itservicedesk@marshall.edu, or call 304-696-3200.


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Wednesday July 3, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

Medical students at Marshall University publish inaugural edition of creative works

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Aenigma Medicorum," a literary and art review recently published by medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, features poetry, photography, musical selections and short essays about life as seen through the eyes of medical students and physicians.

The idea germinated with the student members of the school's Multicultural Affairs Committee which seeks to advance institutional diversity initiatives.
 
The book's executive editor, Matthew Q. Christiansen, M.D., a 2013 graduate of the JCESOM and  first-year resident in the Department of Family Medicine, says the publication is an attempt to strengthen the medical school community by reaffirming commitment to the human experience and clinical excellence.
 
"The name 'Aenigma Medicorum' translates roughly to 'the puzzle of doctors' and is a reference to the intangible aspects of medicine that are so important to a successful medical practice," Christiansen said.  "It is an acknowledgment that, although we may be very good at treating disease, we are still learning and perfecting our practice.  Each patient teaches us and makes us a better clinician."

Submissions are made in the fall, reviewed by a student advisory board and selected for publication after assistance from faculty advisers.  Submissions for the 2014 edition may be e-mailed to aenigmamedicorum@gmail.com.

Printed copies of the current edition are available through the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs, 3rd floor, Marshall University Medical Center.  It may be viewed digitally at http://musom.marshall.edu/students/AenigmaMedicorum/.


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Wednesday July 3, 2013
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine volunteer faculty member awarded teaching honor

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Mathew Weimer, M.D., a family physician in Milton who completed a family medicine residency at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (JCESOM), is among a select group of physicians honored by the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation for his commitment to education in the field of family medicine.

Weimer was selected to receive a 2013 Pfizer Teacher Development Award based on his scholastic achievement, leadership qualities and dedication to family medicine.   He was nominated by colleagues in the Marshall Department of Family Medicine where he is currently a part-time instructor.

"Medical students benefit in their interaction with Dr. Weimer from the comprehensive care he delivers to his patients in the context of a practice enhancing its patient centeredness and as an attending physician with outstanding patient care skills," said Dr. Mitch Shaver, residency program director for family medicine. "Dr. Weimer's dedication to patient care as a resident physician was validated  by superlative patient evaluations that reflected the ease at which he develops rapport and the high level of advocacy he displays for patients."

Weimer earned his medical degree from the Medical College of Ohio (now the University of Toledo College of Medicine) and completed a residency in family medicine at JCESOM in 2008. He serves as a volunteer clinical faculty member with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

"I view teaching as an essential responsibility for physicians," Weimer said.  "I also enjoy working with budding health professionals; they bring a fresh perspective to my practice and raise important questions as I make decisions about care.  I hope to expose my students to the many joys and challenges of family medicine, at the core of which is the unique relationship that a physician is privileged to share with patients."

This is the third consecutive year a Marshall University Family Medicine residency graduate has received the prestigious award.   In 2012, Dr. Jason Hudak was given the award and in 2011, Dr. Scott Davis was recognized.


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About the Pfizer Teacher Development Awards

The Pfizer Teacher Development Awards Program recognizes outstanding, community-based family physicians who combine clinical practice with part-time teaching of family medicine. Each nomination is reviewed and scored by a panel appointed by the AAFP Foundation. The award provides funding for each recipient to attend an activity of choice to further their professional development and teaching skills. This program is supported by a grant from Pfizer Inc. For more information, including eligibility criteria, please visit www.aafpfoundation.org/ptda.


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Tuesday July 2, 2013
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University School of Pharmacy passes second step in national accreditation process

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has earned "candidate" accreditation status from the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), the national accrediting body for schools of pharmacy in the United States, according to the school's dean, Dr. Kevin W. Yingling.
 
Candidate accreditation status is the second step of a three-step process that culminates with  graduation of the first class and adherence to all ACPE accreditation standards.   The new status is based on a site visit made to the school in April.

In its decision to grant candidate status to Marshall's Doctor of Pharmacy program, the ACPE's Board of Directors reported, "action was taken upon the determination that planning for the Doctor of Pharmacy program has adequately taken into account ACPE standards and guidelines, and that reasonable assurances exist for moving to the next step in the accreditation process, namely that of Full accreditation status. The Candidate accreditation term granted for the Doctor of Pharmacy program extends until June 30, 2015, which represents the customary two-year cycle for programs granted Candidate accreditation status. A focused on-site evaluation for purposes of considering the continuation of the Doctor of Pharmacy program Candidate accreditation status and its transition to Full accreditation status shall be scheduled during the 2014-2015 academic year."

"I am so very pleased to announce that Marshall has passed this very pivotal point in the accreditation process," Yingling said. "The ACPE was very complimentary of our faculty and staff for their outstanding efforts to build a dynamic, forward-thinking school of pharmacy which will educate the next generation of pharmacists and help meet the growing health care needs of our state and region."

Yingling went on to say that receiving candidate status is the result of months of building robust experiential and clinical platforms, as well as developing operational policies and procedures for faculty, staff and students.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the School of Pharmacy's progress under Yingling's guidance is a testament to his outstanding leadership abilities.

"Dr. Yingling has assembled a dedicated, highly-qualified group of individuals who, working together as a team, are molding what will become one of the premier pharmacy schools in the country," Kopp said. "Our commitment to the success of Marshall University and our students is unwavering; our vision to create an outstanding academic program designed for the 21st century is clear."

The Marshall University Board of Governors voted unanimously in December 2009 to approve the awarding of the Doctor of Pharmacy degree.   The first class was admitted in August 2012.

ACPE accredits Doctor of Pharmacy programs offered by colleges and schools of Pharmacy in the United States and selected non-U.S. sites. It is located at 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503, 312/644-3575; FAX 312/664-4652, website www.acpe-accredit.org.


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Tuesday July 2, 2013
Contact: Jaye Ike, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Works of artist Craig Hill to be featured in exhibition at Gallery 842

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Visiting artist Craig Hill will be featured in a solo exhibition beginning this weekend at Marshall University's Gallery 842 at 842 4th Ave. in Huntington.

The exhibit opens Friday evening, July 5, with a public reception from 6 to 8 p.m. and will feature both paintings and drawings. Light refreshments will be served.

"We're excited to welcome an artist of Mr. Hill's reputation to campus," said Marshall University gallery director John Farley. "His paintings are equal parts playful and thoughtful, with content that is both accessible and challenging. The familiar imagery derived from popular culture - superheroes, toys and ray guns - found in Hill's paintings offers viewers deceptively simple points of entry for the discussion of much more complex ideas."

Hill earned his B.F.A. in drawing from the Atlanta College of Art and his M.F.A. in painting and printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design. He teaches drawing, painting and printmaking at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. His work appropriates imagery and techniques from pop culture and modernist works of art, and addresses issues of masculinity and male rites of passage.

Hill has exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions across the country at such venues as the Danna Center Gallery at Loyola University in New Orleans, La., the Shremshock Gallery in Westerville, Ohio, and the L2 Gallery in Washington, D.C.

The exhibition will be on display until Aug. 23. Gallery 842 is free and open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 7 p.m.


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