All 2014 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 30, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University reaches agreements with Hamrick, Holliday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced it has agreed in principle with both athletic director Mike Hamrick and head football coach John "Doc" Holliday on new contract terms that include increased compensation and six-year contracts.

The exact terms of the contracts will be finalized over the next several weeks.

"We are indeed pleased to have secured Mike Hamrick and Coach Holliday as our athletic director and head coach for the long term," said Michael G. Sellards, chairman of the Marshall University Board of Governors. "They have both done outstanding work in their respective jobs and their commitment to Marshall University and the success of our student-athletes both on and off the field is truly commendable. We look forward to continued success in the coming years."

A Marshall graduate and former football player, Hamrick returned to his alma mater as director of athletics in July 2009. He has led a transformation of the university's athletics programs, including heading up the Vision Campaign that provided Marshall with one of the best collegiate soccer complexes in the country. In addition, with the new Chris Cline Athletic Complex, all 350 of Marshall's student-athletes have access to one of the country's finest collegiate indoor athletic complexes, including a 120-yard football field and 300-meter track, a sports medicine institute, an academic center and a hall of fame.
Under Hamrick's leadership, Marshall student-athletes have excelled in the classroom. In the 2013-14 school year, 157 Marshall student-athletes were named to the Conference USA Academic Honor Roll with grade point averages of 3.0 or better, and 37 earned C-USA Commissioner's Academic Medals for posting cumulative GPAs of 3.75 or better.

Hamrick is responsible for securing four home-and-home football contracts with Purdue, Louisville, North Carolina State and Pittsburgh. All four teams are members of the Power 5 conferences. The Thundering Herd also will play host to the Naval Academy, which will mark the first time a military academy football  program has played in Huntington.

The Clendenin native served as athletic director at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, for six years before returning to Marshall. Prior to that, he was athletic director at East Carolina University and University of Arkansas Little Rock, and assistant athletic director at Illinois State University and the University of Kansas.

Holliday was named Marshall's head coach on Dec. 17, 2009, in his first collegiate head coaching job. A native of Hurricane, he has more than 30 years of collegiate coaching experience, including previous stops at the University of Florida, North Carolina State University and West Virginia University.

His 2014 team (13-1) won the school's first C-USA Championship and the inaugural Boca Raton Bowl. The bowl was the Thundering Herd's third postseason appearance in the last four years. Holliday is 3-0 in postseason bowl games and took home this year's C-USA Coach of the Year award. Last week, he was named the Gazette-Mail Sportsman of the Year.

Holliday ended this season with a 40-25 record at Marshall. His teams won 19 of their last 20 games.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 29, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Board of Governors names White interim president

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Board of Governors today named Gary G. White interim president of the university, effective Jan. 1, 2015.

The board selected White during an emergency meeting this afternoon on the Huntington campus.

White's appointment is pending approval by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. The commission is expected to meet tomorrow to consider the appointment.

"I'm gratified and humbled the board of governors has asked me to serve in this important interim role," said White. "I look forward to working with members of the board, the faculty and the staff to keep our university moving ahead and focused on students."

White will serve for the duration of the search process for a permanent president, which is expected to take approximately six to nine months. His salary will be $400,000. He is not a candidate for the permanent position.

Chairman of the Board of Governors Michael G. Sellards said, "Gary is an outstanding choice to be the interim president. He reflects the mission and values of Marshall University and has a tremendous background in academic affairs, having served as chairman of this board in the past and as a member of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. The board is appreciative he has agreed to lead the university during this interim period."

White replaces Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, who died suddenly Dec. 17. Kopp served nearly 10 years at Marshall's helm.

A graduate of Marshall (Regents Bachelor of Arts, 1997), White is a former member and past chairman of the Marshall University Board of Governors, former member and vice president of the West Virginia Board of Education, and former member of the University of Pikeville Board of Trustees.

He is on the boards of directors of United Bankshares Inc., ARC Logistics Partners LP, Cabell Huntington Hospital, the Marshall University Foundation, the West Virginia Coal Association and the Larry Joe Harless Community Center Foundation Inc. He also serves on the board of advisors of West Virginia Media Holdings LLC.

White has been executive vice president of Blackhawk Mining LLC since October. He was president and chief executive officer of International Industries Inc. for a large part of his career--from 1992-2007. He also previously served as president and chief operating officer of International Resource Partners LP, a subsidiary of James River Coal Company, president and chief executive officer of the West Virginia Coal Association, manager of underground mining at Amherst Coal Company and corporate training coordinator at Island Creek Coal Company.

He is a former member of the Community Trust Bancorp Inc. Board of Directors and the RAG American Coal Inc. Board of Directors. He served as director of transition for Governor Cecil Underwood.

White received the 2004 Distinguished Service to the Community Award from the Marshall University Alumni Association, the 2006 Distinguished Achievement Award from the West Virginia Education Alliance, the City of Hope "Spirit of Life Award" and in 2003 was inducted into the Business Hall of Fame at Marshall. In 2006 and again in 2008, he was named one of the "Fifty Most Influential Individuals in West Virginia" by West Virginia Executive magazine.

To accept the appointment as interim president, White has resigned from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, effective upon his confirmation by the commission. He has been a member of the commission since being appointed by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin in August 2013.

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Related:
High-resolution official portrait of President White

HerdVideo:  Meet Marshall University Interim President Gary G. White (Jan. 8, 2015)
Higher Education Policy Commission confirms appointment of Gary G. White as interim president of Marshall University (Dec. 30, 2014)



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 23, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Medicine graduate lead author on Ebola care article in prestigious journal

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. G. Marshall Lyon III, M.D., M.N.Sc., a 1994 Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (MU JCESOM) graduate, is the lead author of an article published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine on one of the world's most gripping health issues, Ebola virus disease (EVD).

Lyon, who graduated from both Huntington High School and Marshall's School of Medicine, served on the Emory University medical team that treated two patients stricken with the deadly Ebola virus earlier this year.

The article, "Clinical Care of Two Patients with Ebola Virus Disease in the United States," was written by Lyon and members of Emory's Serious Communicable Diseases Unit and chronicles the care two patients received at Emory after contracting the virus in Liberia. The authors concluded that the limited experience with two patients cannot be extrapolated to all patients with Ebola, but that "intensive nursing care, aggressive rehydration, electrolyte supplementation, and blood transfusions appear to be critical for a positive outcome."

In addition to Lyon's education in Huntington and at Marshall's School of Medicine, he completed a residency in medicine/pediatrics at Duke University, followed by a fellowship in infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital. He also completed a master's degree in clinical investigations in 2003 at Harvard University and received additional training at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The New England Journal of Medicine is considered among the most prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals and is the oldest continuously published one.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 22, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's Huntington campus to observe holiday hours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Selected departments, offices and facilities on Marshall University's Huntington campus will be open at various times during the holiday break, which takes place from Tuesday, Dec. 23, through Thursday, Jan. 1.

The holiday hours are listed in the online chart at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/web/HolidayHours_2014.pdf.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 19, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Senior Vice President for Communications and Marketing, 304-696-4621

Update regarding arrangements for President Stephen J. Kopp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Arrangements for services for Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, who died Wednesday, Dec. 17, are being finalized.

A private family service will be held this weekend. The university asks that the family's request for privacy be honored. Arrangements are by Beard Mortuary, Huntington.

Plans are being made for a public memorial service to be held when students return the week of January 12, 2015. Those details will be released in the coming days.

Condolences may be sent via e-mail to president@marshall.edu or by mail to Office of the President, Old Main, Marshall University, Huntington, WV  25755.

The university is setting up a memorial website at http://www.marshall.edu/kopp-tribute for people to see photographs, videos and highlights of President Kopp's time at Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday December 19, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Public memorial service arrangements for Kopp announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University officials today announced details about the public memorial service for President Stephen J. Kopp, who died Wednesday.

The public service will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, at the Cam Henderson Center arena on the Huntington campus.

Condolences may be sent via e-mail to president@marshall.edu or by mail to Office of the President, Old Main, Marshall University, Huntington, WV  25755.

The university is setting up a memorial website at http://www.marshall.edu/kopp-tribute for people to see photographs, videos and highlights of Kopp's time at Marshall University.

A number of people have inquired about making donations to the university in Kopp's memory. A fund at the Marshall University Foundation Inc. has been created for this purpose. The Kopp family will determine how the funds will be used to benefit the university and its students. Checks should be made payable to the MU Foundation, with the donation designated on the memo line "For the Dr. Stephen J. Kopp Memorial Fund." Mail donations to the MU Foundation, Foundation Hall, 519 John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25703.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 18, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Senior Vice President of Communications and Marketing, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Board of Governors to hold emergency meeting this afternoon

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Board of Governors will hold an emergency meeting at 3 p.m. this afternoon in the John Spotts Room of the Memorial Student Center. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the timeline and process for naming an interim president following the sudden death yesterday of President Stephen J. Kopp. It is expected that the Board will convene an executive session to discuss personnel matters.

Michael Sellards, Board chairman, said, "I met this morning with the university's cabinet/senior vice presidents to review the university's continuity of operations plans. I can assure you that President Kopp had an exceptional leadership team in place and I am confident that, together, we can continue the business of the university in a manner that would make him proud.

"The Board of Governors is vested with the authority to run the university. In the absence of a president, to whom those duties are usually delegated, I have directed that the day-to-day operations be covered in the interim by the senior leadership team. These extremely dedicated individuals are committed to keeping the university moving ahead in an expeditious manner."

That leadership team includes Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost/senior vice president for academic affairs; Layton Cottrill, general counsel/senior vice president for executive affairs; Brandi Jacobs-Jones, chief of staff/senior vice president for operations; Dr. Jan Fox, senior vice president for IT/chief technology officer; Ginny Painter, senior vice president for marketing and communications; Mary Ellen Heuton, senior vice president for finance/chief financial officer; Dr. Ron Area, senior vice president for development; Mike Hamrick, athletic director; Dr. John Maher, vice president for research; and Dr. Joseph Shapiro, dean of the school of medicine.

Sellards continued, "Our primary concern at this time is for Jane, their children Adam and Liz, and their grandchildren. We are doing everything possible to assist the family, and ask that you keep them in your thoughts and prayers."

Arrangements for a service have not yet been finalized but will be announced as soon as they are available.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday December 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU Board of Governors meets to discuss next steps

Click here to watch a video of Board of Governors Chairman Michael Sellards' comments after today's board meeting.


HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors met this afternoon to discuss the next steps in naming an interim, and eventually, a permanent successor to Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, who died Dec. 17.

Thirteen of the 16 board members were present in person and two attended by conference call.

Board Chairman Michael G. Sellards began the meeting by asking all present to observe a moment of reflection on President Kopp's legacy. He then called upon Marshall University General Counsel F. Layton Cottrill to review the procedures that will govern the appointments.

Cottrill said he is in the process of compiling a list of possible search firms for both an interim and permanent presidential successor.

Sellards asked board members to submit to him or another member of the executive committee of the board any names to be considered for the position of interim president.

Cottrill said that presidential searches at Marshall have typically taken from 6 to 9 months. The board expects to name an interim president in the next several weeks. Until that time, Marshall cabinet members, most of whom are senior vice presidents or vice presidents, will be responsible for their individual areas.

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Photo: Marshall University's Board of Governors met Thursday, Dec. 18, to establish the next steps in selecting an interim successor to Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, who died Wednesday, Dec. 17.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 17, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Carrolls make major commitment to Marshall University for special projects and scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles and Norma Carroll, longtime Huntington residents and benefactors to Marshall University, have made a generous financial commitment to the Marshall University Foundation Inc. to support scholarships and other university projects close to the couple's hearts. The bequest, which is in their wills in the form of a planned gift, will bring their total contributions to Marshall to at least $1 million.

"This major commitment from the Carrolls will support 14 different programs across the university," said Dr. Ron Area, foundation CEO.

Among those programs, Area said, are eight scholarships and six endowments. The scholarships are for students in the School of Art and Design; the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine; the School of Pharmacy; the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy; the College of Liberal Arts; the College of Information Technology and Engineering, and the Big Green Scholarship Foundation, including both golf and baseball.

The endowments are for Arts and Media's Global Horizons program; the Honors College; the Graduate College, the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy and the College of Business.

"It is an opportunity for us to give back to an institution that was so important in helping to develop our future," Charlie Carroll said. "We have had a love affair with Marshall for many, many years. We are thankful that Marshall provided us the opportunity for a college education and a degree without having to leave Huntington. It was also strongly active in helping to provide an economy that would help support my independent insurance agency that put a roof over our heads and food on our table. We appreciate the commercial influence that Marshall University has on our community."

The Carrolls are both are graduates of Marshall University and the College of Business. They met during their years as students at Marshall and later married. He pursued a career in property and the casualty insurance business, while Norma enjoyed her career as a homemaker. Charlie sold his business in 2004 and retired.
 
"Having grown up in Huntington, I remember all too well the many commercial and industrial businesses that were so prominent: Owens-Illinois, Inco, American Car and Foundry, C&O Railroad administrative offices and shops, Houdaille-Hershey, Banks-Miller Supply Co., Foster Thornburg, Emmons-Hawkins, etc. There are too many to name them all here," Charlie said.

"Now, all those firms are gone, except for Inco (now Special Metals). Our population was 95,000; now, our population is about 50,000. Without Marshall, I'm afraid Huntington would possibly be a ghost town, because, even though we have two outstanding health providers, they could not support Huntington, nor have the financial impact of Marshall. I wish more people understood that and thanked Marshall with more financial support because it is a great college and learning institution that is getting better and better and better every day. Without Marshall, I think that Huntington would be dead in the water."

Charlie Carroll is extremely impressed and grateful for what Marshall did with the former Stone & Thomas building downtown.

"Recently, Marshall opened the Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington. This department is a division of the College of Arts and Media that will operate in the former Stone & Thomas department store building," Charlie Carroll said. "Approximately 300 students will be involved in this center, thanks to Marshall. Who else besides Marshall could have taken on this task of building, renovating and remodeling this building at a cost of 14 million dollars?"

Over the years, the Carrolls have been loyal supporters of Marshall University, both in academics and athletics.  From 1987 through 2004, Charlie did not miss a football game, home or away. He attended the I-AA championship games and all the bowl games in which the Herd played during those 17 years. Norma missed just three games during that span.

"They're the perfect example of loyal fans and generous donors," Area said.

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Photos: (Above) From left, Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation, MU President Stephen J. Kopp, Norma Carroll and her husband, Charles Carroll, sign the scholarship and endowment agreements the couple will fund during a ceremony last week at the Marshall Foundation Hall. (Below) From left, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp; Charles Carroll; Charles' wife, Norma, MU Foundation CEO Dr. Ron Area and Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Arts and Media, display an oversized check for $1 million, payable from the Carrolls to the Marshall Foundation. Area said the gift from the couple will support 14 programs throughout the university. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 17, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Johnson B. Walker, M.D., chosen as December Resident of the Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.--Johnson B. Walker, M.D., a third-year surgery resident physician with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been selected as the December recipient of the Resident of the Month Award.  The award was announced today by Paulette S. Wehner, M.D., vice dean, graduate medical education. Walker is the second recipient of the new recognition award.

"The School of Medicine is fortunate to have Dr. Walker in a leadership position to utilize his fervor and passion for bettering the medical education training process," Wehner said. "As the chair of the Resident Advisory Committee, Dr. Walker has taken on extra responsibilities and projects to increase the quality of student, resident/fellow education and training here at Marshall. Despite his time-intensive surgical residency schedule, Dr. Walker is truly dedicated to making a difference in increasing the quality of the clinical learning environment for all of our training programs."

Walker is a 2012 graduate of the Marshall University School of Medicine and earned his Master of Science from Marshall. He holds an undergraduate degree in biology from Elon University.

"We are very proud of what Johnson has accomplished so early in his medical career," said Farid B. Mozaffari, M.D., surgery program residency director. "He's an excellent physician, keen scientist, and compassionate educator and has shown great leadership skills and work ethics that make him an exemplary resident. We are happy that Dr. Walker is being recognized for the work that he has done and are looking forward to the difference he will continue to make in our patients' lives and our community."

As part of his recognition of the December Resident of the Month, Walker will receive items including a certificate of recognition and a designated parking spot. Monthly winners will also be automatically entered into the Resident of the Year Award to be announced in May.

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Photo: Johnson B. Walker, M.D., right, is congratulated by David A. Denning, M.D., chair of the department of surgery, Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine after being named December's Resident of the Month.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 17, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Senior Vice President for Communications and Marketing, 304-552-1287

Statement from Marshall University regarding death of President Stephen J. Kopp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - It is with great sadness that we announce that Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp passed away this evening following a sudden illness.

He became ill at home, was transported to Cabell Huntington Hospital and was pronounced dead at approximately 9 p.m.

Michael Sellards, chairman of the university's Board of Governors, said, "We have lost one of the most dedicated and long-serving presidents in the 177-year history of Marshall University. We ask that you keep President Kopp's wife, Jane, and two children, Adam and Liz, and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

"President Kopp has a strong leadership team in place and I'm confident that together, we can continue the business of the university in a manner that would make him proud."

The University's leadership team will meet first thing tomorrow morning to review the university's continuity of operations plans.

Arrangements will be announced when available.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 16, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Woodward writes 'truly holistic account of U.S.'s role on battlefields of Europe'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The American Army and the First World War, the most recent book written by Dr. David R. Woodward, Emeritus Professor of History at Marshall University, is the latest addition to Cambridge University Press' Armies of the Great War series.

The series is published in honor of the war's centenary. And, this volume by Woodward, his second book since retiring in 2006, has been described as the first truly holistic account of the U.S.'s role on the battlefields of Europe in 1917-1918 because of its examination of social, political and economic factors.

Written for both history buffs and academics, this volume also approaches American participation from a global perspective and delves into the personal experiences of the soldiers themselves.

Through firsthand accounts from their diaries, letters and memoirs, Woodward depicts the doughboys' first encounters with regimented military life and their experience both behind and in the trenches of the world's first truly modern war.

Here is an example of an excerpt taken from a letter written by Private Henry L. Henderson, Company K, 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Division:

"Digging trenches at that time seemed to be a total loss because the temperature was 16 below zero and the ground was frozen so hard that you could spend hours trying to drive an iron stake into it ... it was so cold that they established a system where by each man would work for fifteen minutes then stand by the fire for the same length of time, you couldn't stand it any longer and even then some ears, toes or fingers were frozen."

Woodward was a professor of Modern European and Russian history and his work focused on World War I and its diplomatic and military relations. He retired in 2006 after spending 41 years in the classroom, 36 of them at Marshall.

The other book written by Woodward since he retired is his World War I Almanac, a detailed, day-by-day chronology of the events and people involved in World War I, as part of Facts on File's Almanacs of American Wars series. It was published in 2009.

The American Army and the First World War is a 481-page paperback and is available at Empire Books in downtown Huntington and through Amazon.com. Woodward said it costs $29.99 at Empire and $26.99, plus shipping costs, if ordered through Amazon.

"This reflects about three years of work," Woodward said. "I spent a lot of time on it and I enjoyed doing it. It's really the culmination of my work on the First World War. Of course, I've been working in that area for around 35 years."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday December 10, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Pharmacy receives grant money from Walgreens for diversity initiatives

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has received a $10,000 grant from Walgreens to support diversity outreach and inclusion initiatives.
  
The grant, to be disseminated as scholarships and funding for pipeline programs and other cultural initiatives, is part of Walgreens' national effort to support increasing diversity among professional student programs.
   
Receiving Walgreens scholarships this academic year are the following students, listed with their class ranks and hometowns:

James W. Frazier, P-3, Louisville, Ky.
Yanick N. Hicks, P-2, Marietta, Ga.
Minh Thu T. Tran, P-1, Jacksonville, Fla.

"These students are exemplary in their commitment to diversity on campus," said Shelvy L. Campbell, Ph.D., assistant dean for diversity. "They have been important partners in our mission to create an inclusive environment at the School of Pharmacy that is welcoming and nurturing to all students, particularly those from underrepresented minority groups in pharmacy."

As part of the grant, Walgreens requires the school to report on how the annual funds were used to support diversity initiatives throughout the year.    Since 2008, the company has donated more than $1 million annually to support diversity initiatives at schools and colleges of pharmacy nationwide.

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Photo:  Kevin W. Yingling, R. Ph., M.D., dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, and Shelvy L. Campbell, Ph.D., assistant dean for diversity, receive a gift from Walgreens presented by (center) Deborah Harris, Pharm.D., with Walgreens.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 9, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Intercultural Holiday Affair is today at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's office of intercultural affairs is sponsoring an Intercultural Holiday Affair from 5 to 7 p.m. today (Tuesday, Dec. 9) in the lobby of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The reasons for the holiday party are twofold, said Maurice Cooley, associate vice president for intercultural affairs.

"Part of the reason for the reception is to just have a holiday affair with our university community and friends," Cooley said. "And, the other part is, we want to take time to pause to update them on what we're doing here at the university in the intercultural arena. We want people to be knowledgeable about what we are doing here. We don't want them to misinterpret what's going on here."

Cooley said he is expecting about 75 people, including Mayor Steve Williams, to attend.

"We want people to be knowledgeable about what we're doing because we haven't downgraded any of our previous African American programs, not by any measure," Cooley said. "I think there are some misconceptions in the community. We want to introduce our staff and faculty and other people of color who have risen up at Marshall - and in the community - in the past year."

The highly acclaimed Galen-Abdur Razza Flute-Juice Jazz Trio will perform.

Although the event is by invitation only, Cooley said anyone in the community who wants to attend is asked to call his office at 304-696-4637 to let them know.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 9, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, (304) 696-3296

Keramos pottery on sale at Visual Arts Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Handmade pottery from Marshall's Keramos Clay Club members will be on sale from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. today (Tuesday, Dec. 9) and at the same hours Wednesday, Dec.10, and Thursday, Dec. 11, at Marshall University's Visual Arts Center, 927 3rd Ave., across from Pullman Square.
 
Frederick Bartolovic, Marshall's assistant professor of ceramics, said that along with free hot chocolate with a mug purchase, the sidewalk display features everything from mugs to bowls to jewelry from the local artisans.
 
"These pieces are unique, one of a kind and not mass produced," Bartolovic said.
 
The pieces make great gifts this holiday season because of their potential longevity and ease to clean, "as everything the club sells is 100% safe to put in the dishwasher or the microwave," Bartolovic said.
 
All proceeds from the pottery sale will help Keramos members travel to the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts' 49th Annual Conference from March 25 to 28 in Providence, Rhode Island.
 
Bartolovic said the conference would allow members to see art exhibitions, to hear lectures on contemporary ceramics and to research residencies and post-graduation education opportunities. 
 
For more information about the pottery sale, contact Beth Caruthers at (304) 573-4536 or beth.caruthers@marshall.edu. For more information about Keramos Clay Club, visit www.marshall.edu/art/ceramics.
 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday December 9, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Christmas Kente Ceremony for winter graduates is Saturday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Consistent with 17th-century West African traditions, Marshall University will have a 2014 Christmas Kente Ceremony for African and African American students in celebration of their upcoming graduation.

Christmas Kente will take place at 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 13, in Marshall's Smith Recital Hall on the Huntington campus. The university will stage its annual winter commencement at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

"This multi-century-old rite of passage to receive their very own hand-woven kente cloth will define and capture one of the most significant moments of their lives," said Maurice Cooley, associate vice president for intercultural affairs.

This is the third year Marshall has conducted a Christmas Kente, Cooley said. It is different than, but similar to the Donning of the Kente in the spring.

"It's still a grand ceremony; it's very special," Cooley said. "The one in the spring includes a grand processional in cap and gown for all of the graduating students, but also participating are the deans, the faculty and the president. It's much more of a formal affair in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse."

Christmas Kente doesn't have those same grand formalities, but it is much more personalized because the families of each graduate are involved, Cooley said.

"In the spring, even though there are more graduates, few of the parents and relatives and kinship people are there," Cooley said, "because it takes place one week before graduation. Christmas Kente takes place a day before graduation, so, we have a significantly larger number of people who come to Kente in the winter. The families are included in presenting of the kentes, which makes it much cozier.

"The ceremony is much more casual, but the experience with the students is elevated because they are embraced by their families who become a part of presenting them with this cloth, which is a symbol of their accomplishments," Cooley continued.

Cooley estimated 22 to 25 graduates will attend the Christmas Kente. A reception will be held after the event.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday December 8, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Sawhney presents international research on child health and mortality at 142nd annual APHA conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney of the Marshall University College of Health Professions gave two oral presentations on her international research on child health and mortality in Kenya and health system efficiency in India during the 142nd American Public Health Association Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans last month.

Sawhney, director of the college's undergraduate public health program, said in most parts of the world, factors are improving with regard to child health, but this is not the case in many developing countries such as Kenya.

"While most countries experienced a decline in child mortality, Kenya experienced a rise in child mortality during the late 1990s and early 2000s, and one of my presentations reviewed the determinants for rise in child mortality in Kenya," Sawhney said. "Some of our findings indicate they are macro-level factors such as high prevalence of HIV, quality of childcare and health care providers and access to health care responsible for poor performance of child health indicators in Kenya."

Sawhney said this is a situation in certain countries, but a very timely topic now due to the Ebola outbreak.

"Officials are working to address health disasters like the 2014 Ebola epidemic and findings from this research can highlight immediate needs and focus on basic health care (child and maternal care) concerns for years to come," Sawhney said. "My research with the efficiency of health care systems was conducted in India, but is very applicable to other countries, especially the U.S., when one considers our country's economic hardships and changing populations with regard to efficient use of available resources. We need to continue to look at the bigger picture and focus on how we can improve our country's health care environment as a whole."

Sawhney presented her international research, "Determinants of the Recent Rise in Childhood Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Kenya" and "Efficiency of health care system and child health: Evidence from BIMARU states in India," Nov. 17-18.

For more information on Sawhney's research, contact her at sawhney@marshall.edu. For more information on the college's undergraduate public health program, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp.


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Monday December 8, 2014
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Capital Classic to be preceded by fan celebration in South Hall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Capital Classic, the annual basketball clash between the Marshall University and West Virginia University men's teams, will once again be preceded by a Fan Celebration Pregame Reception for Thundering Herd fans in the South Hall of the Charleston Civic Center.

The game, to be played Sunday, Dec. 14, tips off at 4:30 p.m. in the civic center, and the reception begins at 2:30 p.m. and runs until 4:15 p.m. DJ Jimmy Scott will have the party rocking, said Matt Hayes, executive director of alumni relations at Marshall.

"This reception is one of the highlights of the year," Hayes said. "We expect hundreds of our loyal fans to pack the South Hall, as they do every year, and to have a blast as they get ready to cheer the Thundering Herd on to a big victory over the Mountaineers."

Admission to the reception is $10 per person, ages 5 and up. U.S. military veterans and current service men and women will be admitted free.

Hayes said Marshall Coach Dan D'Antoni will make brief remarks during an appearance at the event.  Hayes said fans also should look for Marco, the Herd cheerleaders, the pep band and dance team to make appearances. Representatives from several campus organizations will take part in the reception, setting up displays and sharing information with visitors.
The reception is sponsored by Nationwide Insurance and Coca-Cola.


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Friday December 5, 2014
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Cyber Safety Summit returns to Marshall University Dec. 15 and 16

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host its third annual free cyber safety summit beginning  Monday, Dec. 15, according to John Sammons, assistant professor of Integrated Science and Technology and director of the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence. For the first time, the program will be repeated the following day, Tuesday, Dec. 16.

The summit will be held in the conference room of the Big Sandy Superstore Arena from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on either day. It is targeted toward adults, college students and younger students ages 12-14. During the sessions participants can learn how to prevent cyber bullying, keep themselves and their families safe online, handle the dangers of social media, keep their information and computers safe and identify scams. In addition, they can find out how and why criminals target them and more.

The event is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Science & Technology, the FBI, the Huntington Police Department, Big Sandy Superstore Arena and the Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence. For further information, or to reserve a seat, e-mail sammons17@gapps.marshall.edu by Saturday, Dec. 13, specifying the date you wish to attend, or call Sammons at 304-696-7241.


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Friday December 5, 2014
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Marshall School of Medicine receives scholarship gift from local family

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A new scholarship at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has been established through a gift from David A. Fox III and Laura J. Fox of Huntington.

The scholarship, known as the Fox Family Scholarship, has been created for a first-year medical student who is a resident of Cabell County, and is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

The scholarship recipient will be selected by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Medicine in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.

"On behalf of Dean Joseph Shapiro and the faculty, staff and students, I'm so pleased to announce this new scholarship," said Linda L. Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs.  "David and Laurie wanted to honor their entire family with this kind gesture.   In doing so, they have also contributed to the education of a future physician, which helps us all."

The scholarship was finalized in September and the first recipient is first-year medical student Forest H. Lefevre. Lefevre and fellow student Christopher Bird, who received the Tweel Scholarship in June, were recognized at a luncheon last month where they met their benefactors.

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Photo: From left to right, Larry Tweel, Christopher Bird, Forest Lefevre, Laurie and David Fox. Bird received the Larry and Cheryl Tweel Scholarship and Lefevre received the Fox Family Scholarship.


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Thursday December 4, 2014
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Video Tributes to U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller

This video debuted during a salute to Senator Rockefeller in June 2014 at Marshall's State of the University event in Washington, D.C.


A message to Senator Rockefeller from A. Michael Perry, past chairman of the Marshall University Board of Governors. Perry also served Marshall as interim president in 1999.


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Thursday December 4, 2014
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Theatre company, Literacy Council collaborate on Page-to-Stage program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Lunar Stratagem theatre company will perform staged readings of plays written by the adult learners of the Tri-State Literacy Council next week in the culmination of this year's Page-to-Stage program. The readings will take place at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 8, at the downtown branch of the Cabell County Library. 
 
In the program, learners were asked to brainstorm personal stories they wanted to dramatize into a play script. Over the course of several weeks, professional actors met with the learners and their tutors to guide them in refining their ideas into dialogue. 
 
Tri-State Literacy Council Director Emily Warder said Page-to-Stage participants have a wonderful time collaborating to write the plays.
 
"Many tutoring pairs have built a strong rapport with one another while working on the Page-to-Stage program," Warder said. "The writing process can be frustrating, but the excitement to see their words come to life is a hugely motivating factor."
 
"I was excited to work with the learners on their plays," said Carrie Edgell, an administrator with the literacy council and a literacy tutor. "They were so enthusiastic about the project." 
 
This is the second year of the Page-to-Stage program, said Nicole Perrone, producing director of the Lunar Stratagem and an associate professor of theatre at Marshall University. In the first year, the company organized a book drive in conjunction with their 2012 production of "Dead Letter Office" and the learners and tutors attended theatre productions at Marshall University throughout the year.
 
"We thought we could do more," Perrone said. "The Page-to-Stage program enables us to reach an audience that has little or no prior experience with theatre. You can really see the impact of the arts, one person at a time."
 
Warder added, "The Page-to-Stage program is an opportunity for our adult learners and volunteer tutors to interact with literacy in a completely different way. Not only does it promote literacy and improve both reading and writing skills, it allows the adult learner to see their own words come to life. It reinforces to adult learners that their life experiences and words are important and worth sharing."
 
Edgell said the program offers learners multiple benefits.
 
"I could tell one learner was grateful and eager for the chance to write creatively a welcome switch from the math we had been working on," Edgell said. "Another learner was able to express herself emotionally through her characters, surpassing a hurdle she was experiencing in her writing and in her life."
 
"It is a valuable and meaningful experience for the participants, whether tutors or learners."
 
The Page-to-Stage program is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.
 
The Lunar Stratagem is Huntington's alternative theatre company specializing in the creation of original work. The company was founded in 2011 by Perrone and her partner Matthew Earnest, a professional writer and director based in New York. The company produces one original work each year and then tours its production to festival venues in the U.S. and abroad. Their new dance-theater work, [glug], will premiere at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on Jan. 8, almost exactly one year after the devastating chemical spill in West Virginia's Elk River, the inspiration for the work.
 
To learn more about the  Lunar Stratagem and the Page-to-Stage program, contact Perrone by phone at 646-345-2710 or by e-mail at perronen@marshall.edu, or visit www.thelunarstratagem.org.
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Thursday December 4, 2014
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Winter commencement 2014 to honor nearly 1,100 graduates

The ceremony will be streamed live here, beginning at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will honor graduates from July and August 2014 and students who are tentatively scheduled to graduate this month at the annual Winter Commencement at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

The popularity and growth of the winter commencement forced Marshall officials to move this year's ceremony from Cam Henderson Center on the Huntington campus to the Big Sandy Superstore Arena.

"We simply outgrew the Henderson Center," Registrar Roberta Ferguson said. "We didn't really want to move off campus, but we had to to accommodate all of the graduates and their families. We are looking forward to a wonderful ceremony as these students celebrate a monumental milestone in their lives."

Among the 1,077 students who received or are about to receive degrees are 695 undergraduates and 379 with graduate degrees. About 450 students have indicated they plan to participate in the ceremony. Each graduate will receive congratulations from President Stephen J. Kopp and be presented with a scroll by his or her academic dean.

Ferguson said 199 students will graduate with honors. Twenty-four will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 49 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 112 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA).

Four students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors, and 10 associate degree recipients will graduate with honors.

One student has completed her baccalaureate degree with a perfect 4.0 GPA. She is Sarah Michelle Barber of St. Albans, W.Va.

Keynote speaker at the commencement will be Emeritus Professor of Mathematics Dr. Judith Silver, who taught math at Marshall University for 30 years before retiring last spring.

Marshall began conducting a winter graduation ceremony in 2008 with a convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The speaker was Dr. Montserrat Miller, a professor of history. Winter commencement began in 2009 at Cam Henderson Center and the tradition of having an MU professor deliver the keynote address continued.

Previous winter commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, in 2009; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, professor of mathematics, in 2010; Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, in 2011; Dan Hollis, associate professor of journalism and mass communications, in 2012, and Dr. Kateryna Schray, an English professor, in 2013.

DVDs available
Marshall University will produce a DVD of the winter commencement ceremony that can be purchased for $20. Orders may be submitted using the DVD order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). Orders also will be accepted Dec. 14 at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena. The Marshall University Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.

Military Service Recognition
Marshall University will recognize graduates with military service by issuing special red, white and blue cords to be worn at commencement. Military cords must be picked up in the registrar's office by 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13. Cords are to be kept by graduates.


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Wednesday December 3, 2014
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Fans can wish Herd good luck with recorded video message

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University football fans are invited to send the Thundering Herd a double dose of best wishes and good luck in its Conference USA championship game with Louisiana Tech, which will be played at noon Saturday at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

In what is officially being called Herd Green Friday, fans can come to the lobby of the Marshall Memorial Student Center from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday and record a video message to wish the Herd good luck against the Bulldogs.

"The team will watch the videos the night before the big game," said Mallory Jarrell, marketing and branding coordinator at Marshall.

Marshall community members will have the opportunity to join in a group photo outside near the memorial fountain at approximately 12:15 p.m. In case of bad weather, the photo will be taken inside the Memorial Student Center.

"You can come and record your video message before the group photo is taken, or you can record it after the group photo is taken. And, we'd like everyone to be sure to wear their Kelly green," Jarrell said.

The photo will be shown with the video and will be available on Marshall's social media sites.



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Tuesday December 2, 2014
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Marshall School of Medicine researcher receives grant to continue musculoskeletal research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Maria A. Serrat, Ph.D, assistant professor in the department of anatomy and pathology at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, and a team of multidisciplinary researchers from several institutions have received federal grant funds totaling $383,000 to continue research into the effects of temperature on bone elongation.

Serrat says the three-year award from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases is an extension of work initially funded from a bridge grant from the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

"We hope our results will facilitate the design of heat-based, drug-targeting approaches to enhance bone length using noninvasive techniques such as warm temperature applications," Serrat said. "This work is significant because it has the potential to produce transformative findings that link heat, bone lengthening and vascular access to the growing skeleton which could lead to better clinical therapies for children in particular."

Serrat's team of collaborators include Marshall graduate and medical students as well as faculty researchers from Cornell University, Mayo Clinic, the University of Kentucky and Ohio University.

"We are in the basic science stage of research and over the course of the three-year funding period hope to collect enough data to support a larger scale translational medicine project leading to a potential clinical trial with help from our collaborators at Mayo Clinic," Serrat said.

"Dr. Serrat is accomplishing great work in her laboratory which has the potential to have a tremendous clinical impact in the future," said Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., dean of the Marshall School of Medicine. "Marshall is continuing to build its research footprint and investigators like Maria Serrat are an integral part of our success."

Serrat graduated from Miami University in 1999 with a bachelor's degree in anthropology. She then earned her master's degree in anthropology from Kent State University and followed with a doctorate in biological anthropology from Kent State University in 2007. She joined the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in 2009.

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Photo: Maria A. Serrat, Ph.D., (middle), is part of a group that received federal grant funds totaling $383,000 to continue musculoskeletal research. With her are Holly Tamski (left), a student in Marshall's Ph.D. program in biomedical sciences,  and Gabriella Ion, Ph.D., a research instructor in Serrat's lab. Photo by Rick Lee.


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Tuesday December 2, 2014
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Chemistry Department faculty raises over $50,000 for the Marshall Foundation; earns membership in the John Marshall Society

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Over the past five years, faculty members from the Marshall University Department of Chemistry have donated more than $50,000 to the Marshall University Foundation Inc., earning the department membership in the university's John Marshall Society.

The John Marshall Society provides recognition to individuals, corporations and foundations that make significant gifts to the growth and development of Marshall University.

The foundation recently hosted a luncheon at which the faculty members received a certificate naming them as members of the prestigious society. Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp, Foundation CEO Ron Area and Vice President for Research John Maher attended the luncheon to congratulate the society's newest members.

"This is the first time members of one of our academic departments have donated the income they have raised in this case from lab manuals they wrote back to the university," said Area. "They've given well over $50,000, which has been put into a fund that supports students in the chemistry department. It's just fabulous that they understand what philanthropy is all about and are willing to give back."

About 12 years ago, faculty members in the department wrote two lab manuals for their freshman chemistry classes and agreed to collectively donate the proceeds to support their majors. Over the years, well over half of the department's faculty have written labs or helped manage the manuals, said Dr. Michael Castellani, department chairman.

To date, the money raised has contributed to endowments for two undergraduate scholarships and three summer undergraduate research fellowships (SURF). Students work in the department's research labs as part of both awards.

"Beginning in 2005, we used the proceeds from the lab manuals to leverage alumni donations," Castellani said. "In that year, we wrote to alumni, pledging to fully support a student working in our labs in exchange for their donations to an endowment. After funding three SURF fellowships, we started a scholarship program for our majors.

"Since then," he said, "we were added to the West Virginia Research Trust Fund program ("Bucks for Brains"), which provided a dollar-for-dollar match to the SURF fund for a few years and generated another $100,000."

Castellani estimated the sum of the department's endowments now to be at $325,000, all of it raised in partnership with their alumni.

"Original research, as part of the undergraduate curriculum and directly mentored by a faculty member, is one of the most important learning tools available to students. Because of this, we believe it is our responsibility to help as many students as possible participate and this is one way we can do that," Castellani said.

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Photo: Dr. Bill Price, an associate professor in Marshall University's Department of Chemistry, displays a certificate honoring the department's faculty as a member of the John Marshall Society. The Marshall University Foundation Inc. recently hosted a luncheon at which the faculty received the certificate naming it as a member of the prestigious society. Pictured are, from left to right, Dr. Scott Day (blue shirt), Professor Philip Alexander, Dr. Leslie Frost, Dr. Laura McCunn (green sweater), Dr. Kenneth O'Connor, Dr. Michael Castellani, Dr. Lawrence Schmitz, Price, Dr. John Hubbard, Dr. Bin Wang, Dr. John Rakus, Dr. Derrick Kolling, Dr. Rosalynn Quinones and Dr. Michael Norton. Missing from the photo is Dr. Robert Morgan. Photo by Jessica Rakus.


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Monday December 1, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Students, community to paint 12 Days of Christmas downtown

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Art and Design students and the public are invited to paint storefronts in two locations beginning at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 2 for downtown Huntington's 12 Days of Christmas.

As part of Associate Professor Ian Hagarty's 12-person foundations class, each pane from the Visual Art Center's eight and the adjacent Broh Building's four will make up the first 12 Days exhibit, while the same 12 designs will be repeated on the windows of the corner building at 8th Street and 3rd Avenue.

Sandra Reed, School of Art and Design director, said the first exhibit should be completed in one day, while she said she expects work to begin on the second location over the weekend.

"The hard part is the design and drawing," Reed said. "Luckily Ian Hagarty's foundations class has taken care of that part and will be transferring the designs, which can then be painted by anyone."

The paintings, sponsored by Latta's, are part of 13 days of activities directed by Downtown Huntington Partners, Etromay and the Downtown Live committee of the Huntington Regional Chamber of Commerce.

From Dec. 1 through Dec. 12, upwards of 20 shops and businesses downtown will feature innovative ways to express the 12 Days of Christmas, said Amy Ward, a Downtown Huntington Partners board member.

"Each location is encouraged to decorate or participate in any way to play on the day's theme," Ward said.

Dec. 1 marked the first day of shop participation, with a handful of stores committing to put up an interpretation of a partridge in a pear tree, through Dec. 7, when each will find a way to incorporate the seven swans a swimming, Ward said.

Ward said several businesses have committed to stay open until 8 p.m. on Dec. 8, while a few will be offering promotions to ladies and then gentlemen on Dec. 9 and 10, respectively.

Dec. 11 will feature 11 Marshall Marching Thunder drummers drumming from Whisk at 901 4th Ave. to the Visual Arts Center at 927 3rd Ave.

Dec. 12 marks 12 pipers piping, at which businesses are encouraged to celebrate the sounds of Christmas, Ward said.

The activities will lead up to the city's Christmas Parade of Lights at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 13, on 4th Avenue. Huntington's Kitchen will host hot chocolate and photos with Santa following the parade.

For more information about the 12 Days of Christmas paintings, contact Beth Caruthers at 304-696-3296 or beth.caruthers@marshall.edu.


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Tuesday November 25, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Health launches new online patient portal for easier access to health information

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Health has launched a new patient portal program called "Follow My HealthTM," which offers patients a secure option to view their health records online.
 
Follow My HealthTM allows patients to conveniently view, manage, transmit and download medical records of items that include office visits, immunizations and certain test results.  The portal also provides the patient with the option of requesting appointments and prescription refills, as well as the ability to send secure e-mails to the health care team, at any hour and wherever Internet access is available.
 
The portal is for non-urgent communication only.

"We are pleased to offer this new and free technology to our patients, which provides them with enhanced access to their own personal health record," said Beth L. Hammers, executive director for Marshall Health. "We hope our patients will register for the portal to gain instant access to their information which ultimately means expanded communication between them and their health care team."

Current Marshall Health patients with valid email accounts may begin using the web-based tool after providing their e-mail address in person during regular business hours.  An invitation to open a portal account is then generated by Follow My HealthTM and the patient selects a username and password.  Parents and/or guardians may also register accounts for their minor children.

"In today's world of instant information, it's imperative that we empower patients with technologies that translate to an improved experience and quality health care," said Michael J. McCarthy, chief information officer for Marshall Health.

Patients may access their health care information from any desktop computer, tablet or smartphone once the account has been established through Marshall Health.

Follow My HealthTM is a product of Allscripts Healthcare.


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Monday November 24, 2014
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Community invited to A Herd Holiday Dec. 2; activities planned for kids of all ages

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Kids of all ages from throughout the community are invited to join Marshall University for A Herd Holiday from 6 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 2, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.
 
The special evening will feature the official holiday lighting of the student center plaza by MU President and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp, along with numerous activities, snacks, giveaways and music. The event is sponsored by Marshall's Office of Communications and the Campus Activities Board.
 
The Old Main Carolers will kick off the event at 6 p.m. with Christmas Carols on the plaza before the President and Mrs. Kopp flip the switch to light the plaza.
 
After the lighting, everyone will move inside the student center for games, music from Kelley's Bridge and snacks - including hot chocolate and s'mores. Other features include holiday ornament painting with the Pottery Place (the first 100 ornaments are free), a holiday photo booth and a Marshall Bookstore fashion show with giveaways. The bookstore will remain open for holiday shopping until 9 p.m., when A Herd Holiday winds down. A lucky Marshall student will win books for the spring semester, courtesy of the bookstore, which also will give away gift cards ranging in value from $25 to $100.
 
Holiday photos with Santa-Marco will be taken throughout the evening. They will be available for free downloads beginning Monday, Dec. 8.
 
"The Campus Activities Board approached us with the idea of lighting the plaza and our staff  wanted to invite the community to get holiday photos with Marco," said Tiffany Bajus, a communications specialist with the Office of Communications. "So, we thought it would be a good idea to combine these two into a special event, which we decided to call A Herd Holiday. Once other departments started hearing about it, they wanted to join in, and it just expanded into this wonderful event. We are really excited about it and hope that our students and community are too."
 
International students will host Holidays Around the World, where they will explain how the holidays are celebrated in their native countries. Marshall student organizations will take part in a gingerbread house decorating contest, and MU students will be available to assist children in writing their letters to Santa Claus and dropping them in his mailbox.

More information can be found at www.marshall.edu/herdholiday.


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Monday November 24, 2014
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The Marshall University Foundation joins National #GivingTuesday movement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation has joined #GivingTuesday, which will take place Tuesday, Dec. 2. It's a nationwide program designed to encourage people to give to the charities and causes they support.

Coinciding with the Thanksgiving holiday and the kickoff of the holiday shopping season, #GivingTuesday will harness the power of social media to create a national movement for charitable giving around the holidays. It is similar to how Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday have become days that are, today, synonymous with holiday shopping.

"The impact social media have had recently in philanthropy is undeniable," said Griffin Talbott, program director of the annual fund for the foundation. The #IceBucketChallenge for ALS highlighted this fact and we feel #GivingTuesday can also be a success."

Seeing an opportunity to channel the generous spirit of the holiday season to inspire action around charitable giving, a group of friends and partners, led by the 92nd Street Y (92Y), came together to find ways to promote and celebrate the great American tradition of giving. The concept gained steam, and with the help of the United Nations Foundation and other founding partners, more than 10,000 organizations have joined the movement and are providing creative ways people can embrace #GivingTuesday and collaborate in their giving efforts to create more meaningful results.


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Monday November 24, 2014
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Low brass players bring TUBACHRISTMAS to town

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sounds of the area's low brass will be filling the Huntington Mall with holiday cheer at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 6, as the city celebrates the 40th anniversary of TUBACHRISTMAS.

In addition to the West Virginia TUBACHRISTMAS, it is expected that 250 more cities worldwide will present the concerts, according to West Virginia TUBACHRISTMAS Coordinator Dr. George Palton, who is also the instructor of tuba and euphonium at Marshall University.

"Depending on the population of any given geographic area, TUBACHRISTMAS ensembles may attract multiples of 100 participants aged 8 to 95 years," Palton said. "To my knowledge, Huntington has been participating since 2003."

TUBACHRISTMAS was created by Harvey Phillips in honor of his teacher, tubist William J. Bell, who was born Christmas Day, 1902.

"Every Christmas season, tuba and euphonium players of all ages, from specific geographic areas, gather to pay respect through William J. Bell to all the great artists and teachers who represent their heritage," Palton said.

Every TUBACHRISTMAS performance features traditional Christmas carols composed by Alec Wilder and specially arranged for the first TUBACHRISTMAS on Dec. 22, 1974, in New York City's Rockefeller Plaza.

"Through Wilder, TUBACHRISTMAS concerts pay grateful tribute to composers who have embraced these noble instruments with solo and ensemble compositions," Palton said. "The warm and rich, organ-like sound of this low brass choir has won the ears and hearts of every audience. It is no wonder that TUBACHRISTMAS has become an established Christmas tradition in cities throughout the world!"

All area performers are invited to participate in West Virginia TUBACHRISTMAS. Registration and rehearsal begin at 10 and 11 a.m., respectively, at the Smith Music Hall band room on Marshall's Huntington campus. Dr. Michael Stroeher, professor of low brass at Marshall University, will conduct the ensemble. For more information about these events or music at Marshall University, contact Palton by phone at 304-696-3117 or by e-mail at palton@marshall.edu.


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Friday November 21, 2014
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Marshall Ph.D. student receives Chancellor's Scholarship

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tenacious. Passionate. Driven. These are the words that Sean Piwarski uses to describe himself.

Piwarski is this year's recipient of the Chancellor's Scholarship, given to a student in Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. Program. The Chancellor's Scholar Program is intended to recruit, educate and graduate underrepresented minority students in doctoral programs. It offers a substantial tuition benefit and stipend as well as professional research and career development opportunities and a strong support network. Further, it aims to provide support as the student transitions from his or her education into university faculty or administration roles.

Piwarski grew up in a bilingual, Hispanic household in California. He said that when he was a youngster, his mother provided "a lot of love" that allowed him to take risks and explore boundaries, while ensuring that he remained polite and stayed on the right path. He was recruited to California Lutheran University on a football scholarship, where he double-majored in biology and chemistry.

One of his biggest influences was Dr. John Tannaci, who taught organic chemistry at California Lutheran, and to Piwarski's surprise, made it fun and relatable. Piwarski said that was not something that he often found in his science courses, so one of his goals is to bring that level of passion and interest to a new generation.

With his strong science background, Piwarski came to Marshall University to obtain his master's degree in forensic science, focusing on toxicology and drug chemistry. In deciding how to apply the knowledge and skills gained through that program, he realized that a Ph.D. was the logical next step, particularly with the interdisciplinary, team-based science program offered at Marshall.

Currently in his third year of a program that typically takes 5 to 6 years to complete, Piwarski is working with Dr. Travis Salisbury in the Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences cluster. His research focuses on determining how certain chemical mechanisms in specific toxins may work to stop cancer metastasis. He said it is a subject close to his heart, since several of his family members have lost battles with cancer. 

Piwarski said that being the first Hispanic student to receive the Chancellor's Scholarship is "very humbling," and gives him the opportunity to pursue his passions. He also said he believes that it gives validation to exploring his scientific ideas. When he was younger, he noticed that certain classes were considered to be only for the "smart people." 

"Science isn't so much about being the smartest person in the room; it's about tenacity," Piwarski said. "Try out creative ideas and don't be afraid to put yourself out there to further what is possible." 

Once he completes the Ph.D. program, Piwarski says he will pursue an academic position where he can put the "swagger in science" and stimulate the same passion and drive for excellence in others.


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Friday November 21, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall faculty member travels to Rome to present international biomechanics research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Suzanne Konz of the Marshall University College of Health Professions traveled to Rome last month to give an oral presentation on her biomechanics research during the 2014 International Congress on Sport Science Research and Technology Support (icSPORTS) conference.

Konz, director of the college's biomechanics laboratory, said her research focused on the reliability and validity of the XOS Motion Capture System, which is housed in the basement of the Henderson Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"We have several motion analysis systems in our biomechanics lab at Marshall and the XOS system is relatively unknown and untested," Konz said. "My graduate assistant and I did a reliability study on the system using a vertical jump component to test how high people jump. In our research, we found this system isn't as reliable as other equipment such as the Vertec, which is used in strength conditioning to test the jump height of a jump."

Konz said her research on the XOS system emphasized the technology behind the equipment instead of its practical application. Konz said this study aimed to provide protocol for strength and conditioning professionals, as well as researchers, to indicate the best practices for their assessment or research.

"By assessing the validity and reliability of the system, individuals can make research-based decisions on purchasing and implementing these new tools," Konz said. "When one considers many of these systems cost hundreds of thousands of dollars, it becomes extremely important they provide valid and reliable results."

David Cottrill, a 2014 graduate of the college's exercise science master's program, served as Konz's graduate assistant throughout her research. Cottrill, now an adjunct faculty member at West Virginia State University teaching biomechanics, said technology is taking a much larger role in motion analysis and assessment.

"If researchers and coaches are to implement these technologies into their activities, scientific validation of these systems' capabilities must be conducted," Cottrill said. "Prior to our research, no such investigation had been conducted on the XOS system. There is a high demand for research assessing the validity and reliability of new instruments, tools and methods within the fields of biomechanics."

Cottrill said because of Konz's quality of work, as well as her ability to identify research needs that may be overlooked, her work is instrumental in ensuring the field of biomechanics remains up to date and progressive.

"Dr. Konz's research provides an exciting means to apply the skills and knowledge taught within biomechanics and the exercise science department as a whole. Her high standard of performance and work ethic are contagious and set others up for future success," Cottrill said. "I am and continue to be thankful for the opportunity to learn from her during my time at Marshall."

In addition to Konz's recent trip to Rome, she also traveled to Brazil this past year for her research on muscular biomechanics and sports performance. Konz said she plans to present her research at the 25th Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics held at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Center in Glasgow, Scotland, this summer.

To learn more about the 2015 ISB conference, visit http://www.isbglasgow.com online. For more information on Dr. Konz's research, contact her at konz@marshall.edu. For more information on the Marshall biomechanics program, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: (Left to Right):  Conor Bolger of Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Trondheim Norway, Dr. Suzanne Konz of Marshall University and Peter Federolf of the Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway at the 2014 icSPORTS conference held Oct. 21-27 in Rome, Italy.
Photo Courtesy of icSPORTS.


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Friday November 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University receives in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today announced it has received an in-kind software grant from Siemens PLM Software, with a commercial value of nearly $134 million.

The in-kind grant gives students access to the same technology that companies around the world depend on every day to develop innovative products in a wide variety of industries including automotive, aerospace, machinery, shipbuilding, high-tech electronics and many more.

Graduates with this type of software training are highly-recruited candidates for advanced technology jobs.

Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp said the university is excited to work with Siemens to provide industry-leading technology in its classrooms.

"By using the same technology in the classroom that is used by companies all over the world, our students gain important real-world experience that will serve them well after graduation," he said.

Bill Boswell, senior director, partner strategy, Siemens PLM Software, said, "Siemens PLM Software is dedicated to helping develop the next generation of highly trained and highly qualified engineers and technologists. Our academic partnership with Marshall University encourages students to pursue careers that will revitalize manufacturing in the U.S. and around the world."

The in-kind grant for Marshall includes Siemens PLM Software's:

  • NX software, a leading integrated solution for computer-aided design, manufacturing and engineering (CAD/CAM/CAE); and
  • Solid Edge software, the most complete hybrid 2D/3D CAD system.

Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, Marshall's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, added, "We are pleased to partner with a global corporation that is on the leading edge of PLM technology. Our school could not develop the next generation of engineers without the support of this state-of-the-art technology from Siemens PLM Software. This partnership enables us to meet the needs of employers and prepare students for these high-paying careers in science, technology, engineering and math."

Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of Marshall's College of Information Technology and Engineering, also thanked Siemens PLM Software, saying, "This generous grant will enable our students to better prepare for successful advanced technology careers. It is exceptionally valuable because it helps us train our students for tomorrow's jobs using one of the best engineering design software solutions available."

Dr. Asad A. Salem, professor and chairman of the university's Weisberg Division of Engineering, said, "Our students are excited to have access to this industry-leading technology, and we are grateful to Siemens for its commitment to advance education opportunities for our students."

Siemens PLM Software is a leading global provider of product lifecycle management (PLM) software and services. NX and Solid Edge are trademarks or registered trademarks of Siemens Product Lifecycle Management Software Inc. or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and in other countries.

The in-kind grant was provided by the Siemens PLM Software's academic program that delivers PLM software for schools at every academic level.


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Friday November 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Local writers Marie Manilla and Nicole Lawrence to read from their work at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tri-State area natives Marie Manilla and Nicole Lawrence will read from their work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3, at the Foundation Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

The event, called Writers Harvest, is part of the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series, which receives support from the College of Liberal Arts, the Honors College, the West Virginia Humanities Council and the Department of English.

The literary reading is being done in support of the Facing Hunger Foodbank. A suggested donation of 2-3 nonperishable food items is requested for admission, and a book signing will follow.

Manilla is a Huntington native and a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her fiction has appeared in the Chicago Tribune, Mississippi Review, Prairie Schooner, Calyx, and other journals. Her collection of stories, Still Life with Plums (WVU Press, 2010), was a finalist for both the Weatherford Award and ForeWord Reviews Book of the Year.

Her novel, Shrapnel (River City Publishing, 2012), won the Fred Bonnie Award for Best First Novel. Publishers Weekly describes her newest novel, The Patron Saint of Ugly (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014) as "Clever, funny, heartbreaking, and heartwarming, all at once…A lovely, hopeful tale." Booklist calls it "Beautifully written, filled with detailed prose meant to be savored."

Manilla is a visiting faculty member in West Virginia Wesleyan's Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts program. Learn more at www.mariemanilla.com.

Lawrence is a poet who teaches at Marshall University. She grew up in Ona, West Virginia, and studied English at Marshall University, then was a fellow at Indiana University, where she received her M.F.A. She has contributed music to the local film Trace Around Your Heart (2013), which won Best Music and Best of Festival at the Coal River Film Festival and Colony Film Festival. She was a finalist for the Atlanta Review International Competition, Bertolt Clever Award for Poetry, and Ross Lockridge Award for Fiction.

For more information on the Writers Harvest, contact Carrie Oeding in the Department of English via e-mail at oeding@marshall.edu.

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Photos: Marie Manilla (above) and Nicole Lawrence (below) will read from their work at Marshall University Wednesday, Dec. 3.


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Thursday November 20, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Schray earns national honors as top professor in West Virginia

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education have named Dr. Kateryna Schray of Marshall University the 2014 West Virginia Professor of the Year. Schray was among nearly 400 top professors in the United States who were finalists.

Schray, an English professor, describes her teaching philosophy as "embarrassingly simple: provide students with a supportive learning environment, identify and build on their strengths, and make each person an active participant in his/her own education, all the while remembering that learning is inherently joyful."

She credited colleagues for playing a large part in her receiving the Professor of the Year award.

"I am so grateful for and incredibly humbled by this recognition, but it is so very important for me to put this in context," she said. "My college seeks out and recruits committed teachers, and at every step of my career my colleagues and my chair have supported and encouraged me in my teaching vocation. I have the best colleagues a professor could hope for."

Schray is in Washington, D. C., today, where the national and state winners are being announced and honored at an awards luncheon at the National Press Club. She also will be attending an evening congressional reception at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

"We are supposed to wear business/professional attire to the reception at the National Press Club, but when I looked at the official group photo of last year's award recipients, I realized that I had no idea where any of them came from," she said. "So, I'm trying to figure out a way to wear a Marshall shirt, while still meeting the dress code, so that anyone looking at the photo would know that Marshall is represented among the winners."

She said she considers herself a "pretty good" representative of her department.

"All of us strive to make our classes substantive, meaningful, productive and memorable," she said. "In addition, I've had the privilege to team teach with great teachers at Marshall Jamie Warner, Susan Gilpin, Caroline Perkins, Steve Mewaldt, Bill Price, just to name a few."

Most of all, Schray said, she continues to be "absolutely amazed" by her students.

"Their ideas, their insights, their courage, their cleverness and upbeat natures, their generosity towards one another, their desire to serve others, their determination to make the world a better place," she said. "I cannot imagine a more rewarding career and I still can't believe how lucky I am. I have a lot to be grateful for, more than I can say."

Schray, who has  been at Marshall since 1996, when she was hired as an assistant professor of English, said she also greatly appreciates the work done by her colleagues at the elementary, middle and high school levels.

"Truly these teachers do the heavy lifting and I am in awe of their talents," she said. "Now that my oldest child is in high school, I recognize how much I am indebted to the teachers who have preceded me and I am so very grateful. I've also come to understand the important role a good principal plays, and the contributions of the essential people behind the scenes: school secretaries, counselors and specialists."

Schray earned her Ph.D. in Medieval Literature from the University of North Carolina in 1997. She received her bachelor's degree from La Salle University and her master's from Georgetown University. She was named the Marshall University Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award Recipient for 2012-13, and was the keynote speaker at the university's Winter Commencement last December. She also received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award in 2001 and the Reynolds Outstanding Teaching Award in 2009.

She is the fifth professor in Marshall history to have won the prestigious award. The university's previous recipients include Dr. Karen Mitchell, a mathematics professor, in 1995; Dr. John McKernan, an English professor, in 2000; Dr. Steven Mewaldt, a psychology professor, in 2003; and Dan Hollis, a journalism professor, in 2012.
 
CASE and the Carnegie Foundation have been partners in offering the U.S. Professors of the Year awards program since 1981. Additional support for the program is received from Phi Beta Kappa, which sponsors the congressional reception, the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education and other higher education associations.

This year, a state Professor of the Year was recognized in 31 states. CASE assembled two preliminary panels of judges to select finalists. The Carnegie Foundation then convened the third and final panel, which selected four national winners. CASE and Carnegie select state winners from top entries resulting from the judging process. Schray was selected from among faculty members nominated by colleges and universities throughout the country.

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Photo: Dr. Kateryna Schray, second from left, works with three Marshall University students earlier this week. The students are, from left, Cassidy Dutcher, Chelsea Miller and Cayce Blankenship. Schray said all three are her former students who inspire her to keep striving for excellence and exemplify why she has "the best job in the world."  Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
The Carnegie Foundation is an independent policy and research center that supports needed transformations in American education through tighter connections between teaching practice, evidence of student learning, the communication and use of this evidence, and structured opportunities to build knowledge.

Council for Advancement and Support of Education
Headquartered in Washington, D.C., with offices in London, Singapore and Mexico City, CASE is a professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals at all levels who work in alumni relations, communications, fundraising, marketing and other areas.


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Tuesday November 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Thanks 4 Dreaming' Dinner planned for American Dream Movement members

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Charles C. Meyers Jr., a spring 2013 graduate of Marshall University with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree, and founder/director of the American Dream Movement, will provide members of the American Dream Movement, their families and prospective members with a free Thanksgiving Dinner.

The dinner is called a "Thanks 4 Dreaming" Dinner, and will be served beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, at the Pullman Plaza Hotel Grande Theatre in downtown Huntington.  The event will be presented by the American Dream Movement from the Huntington Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

The American Dream Movement was developed for African American male students in the 8th  through 12th grades.

Meyers said the purpose of the dinner is to thank the current members for their dedication to the program and to allow the prospective members and their families to learn about the program.

"Most importantly, it allows everyone to come together to enjoy a meal and one another's company," Meyers said.

The "4" in the title of the dinner represents the American Dream Movement's four values - bond, strength, dedication and achievement, Meyers said.

"It is important for a community to be able to come together and support one another," Meyers said. "One of the main focuses of the American Dream Movement is to ensure that each individual in the program understands that they have people in their corner who care about their success.  We must be willing to use the encouragement of family, mentors, friends and community members to help us strive to reach higher levels of success in life."

Meyers' previous initiatives have included Future Investment Day, A Gift to Remember in December, and the Words of Reflection Writing Contest.

Thirteen students became members of the American Dream Movement in September during a membership ceremony.

If anyone knows a student who would benefit from the program, or wants more information on the program, he or she may contact Meyers by e-mail at meyers12@live.marshall.edu.


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Tuesday November 18, 2014
Contact: John Winfrey, Assistant Professor of Physics, 304-696-2755

Marshall to help bring Science Olympiad to West Virginia for students in grades 6-12

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Science is helping bring a new opportunity to science students in grades 6 through 12 this academic year.

The Science Olympiad, which organizers say is the "nation's most exciting K-12 science competition," will take place in West Virginia for the first time Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Winners of the West Virginia competition will travel to Lincoln, Nebraska, for the national tournament in May.

Teams will compete in a series of 23 challenges, including those in life and social sciences; earth and space science, physical science and chemistry; technology and engineering; and scientific inquiry. Topics include entomology, fossils, crime science, bridge building and experimental design. A complete list is available online at www.soinc.org/short_event_descriptions.

Dr. John Winfrey, assistant professor of physics at Marshall who is coordinating the West Virginia event, said that in most cases, individual schools will form teams of 15 students for the competition. However, in the case of more rural locations, a team of students may represent several schools. There are also opportunities for home-schooled students.

Teams may register until Jan. 30, 2015, with registration fees due no later than Feb. 6. Cost per school team is $250, with $60 going to the national organization. Additional teams from the same school are $150. If a potential registrant is unable to pay the fees, some financial assistance may be available by contacting Helen Bonham in the College of Science office at 304-696-4672. Further information on registration and other specifics is available online at www.marshall.edu/cos/communityoutreach/scienceolympiad.

"We are very pleased to bring the Science Olympiad program to West Virginia," Winfrey said. "We think our state's students will benefit immensely from this competition."

Last academic year, 7,000 teams competed in the competition nationwide.

For further information, visit the Science Olympiad website at www.soinc.org, or contact Winfrey by e-mail at winfreyj@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-2755.



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Tuesday November 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Lots of activities planned for GIS Day Wednesday at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct GIS Day with activities planned for  local high school students and Marshall undergraduate and graduate students on the Huntington campus Wednesday, Nov. 19, Dr. Jamie Leonard, a Marshall geography professor, said today.

"This is our fourth year to participate in GIS Day, an international celebration which focuses attention on the power that Geographic Information Systems have to improve the world and make life better," Leonard said.

The event is sponsored by the College of Science, the College of Liberal Arts, the Department of Geography and the Department of Integrated Science/Technology.

Among the activities planned are a poster exhibition, GIS/Google Earth contest, geocaching and a keynote speech.

Leonard said more than 50 students from Spring Valley High School in Huntington and Fairland High School in Proctorville, Ohio, will attend. "We have more high school students coming this year than in any previous year," he said. "The high school students have a great time participating in GIS and GPS activities."

The keynote speaker will be Joseph Trimboli, Lead Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Planner in the Huntington District of the US Army Corps of Engineers.

"Joseph Trimboli began working for the US Army Corps of Engineers in 1980, right out of high school," Leonard said. "He served in the US Army from 1982 to 1986 and returned to the Corps of Engineers after his honorable discharge.  He was deployed in supporting roles in both Kuwait and Afghanistan.  He graduated from Marshall University with a Master of Science degree in Geography in 2007."

Approximately 25 Marshall undergraduate and graduate students who use GIS in their research will be presenting their work in poster form.

The poster exhibition will take place in room BE5 of the Memorial Student Center from 9 to 11 a.m. and from 12:50 to 1:45 p.m. Trimboli will speak in room BE5 from 11 to 11:45 a.m.

The GIS activities for high school students will be in the Corbly Hall computer labs, while the GPS activity will be on the campus grounds.

Leonard said he expects a hundred or so students to visit the poster sessions and attend the keynote address.


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Monday November 17, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Thank-A-Donor Days' run Tuesday through Thursday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students will have the opportunity to thank the donors who provide funding for the scholarships they receive, as well as the annual fund dollars that often support the departments and colleges in which they study, during a special three-day period this week.

"THANK-A-DONOR DAYS" are Nov. 18-20 in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

Students will be provided thank-you cards to fill out and then they will be addressed and mailed to the donors.

"The purpose of 'Thank-A-Donor Days' is to educate students about the importance of private giving by demonstrating the difference it makes in their educational experiences," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall Foundation. "It also emphasizes the importance of thanking donors for their generosity."

Free popcorn will be provided for participants by Tutoring Services, the Student Resource Center and Student Activities. There also will be free prizes and a photo booth. Students who take their picture at the photo booth, and post it on Instagram with the hashtag #MarshallUThanks, will be instantly entered to win a Keurig coffee maker.

WMUL-FM 88.1 and Career Services will be there, and Marco is expected to make an appearance or two. Career Services will be performing resume reviews and assisting students in signing up for LinkedIn accounts.


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Friday November 14, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center and First-Year Residence Halls partner again to bring holiday joy to Tri-State

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center and the Marshall University First-Year Residence halls are partnering this holiday season to help local agencies and children in the Huntington community.

Rec the Halls with Holiday Hopes can be compared to an "Angel Tree." Wish lists will be collected from local agencies such as Golden Girls, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of the Tri-State, A.D. Lewis Community Center, Ronald McDonald House, Branches, Pressley Ridge, Lily's Place and NECCO.

The wishes will be hung on a tree in the lobby of the Marshall Recreation Center and in both First-Year Residence Hall lobbies. Anyone interested may stop by the Rec or residence halls starting Monday, Nov. 17 to collect a wish! Then, he or she may bring their items back to that same location with the tag attached to help make the holiday dreams come true for someone in the Tri-State. All wish items must be dropped off by Wednesday, Dec. 10.

Nobody needs to worry about wrapping the gifts - the recreation Center and First-Year Residence Halls will take care of the wrapping. A wrapping party will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 12 to wrap the gifts for the agencies. Volunteers will be rewarded with snacks and drinks, while enjoying each other's company in a festive atmosphere.

For more information contact Dan Belcher, facility/operations coordinator, at 304-696-4651 or by e-mailing him at belcherd@marshall.edu; or, Michele Muth, assistant director, marketing & memberships, at 304-696-2943, or by e-mailing her at pallante1@marshall.edu.



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Thursday November 13, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Grand opening for Marshall Nursing Simulation Center scheduled for Nov. 19 and 20 in Huntington and Point Pleasant

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Nursing will showcase its new Nursing Simulation Center for the Huntington and Point Pleasant locations Nov. 19 and 20.
 
Dr. Denise Landry, chair of the School of Nursing, said members of the Marshall community can view the Nursing Simulation Center on the Huntington campus from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 19, and can view the Mid-Ohio Valley Center's (MOVC) Nursing Simulation facilities at the center in Point Pleasant from 3 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20.

"We wanted to provide our university community with two chances to visit our new nursing simulation laboratories," Landry said. "We plan to conduct a demonstration with the state-of-the-art equipment housed in our facilities to highlight the amazing educational opportunities our nursing students have here at Marshall University."

Landry said the demonstrations will be performed by faculty and students in the School of Nursing with special assistance from the high-fidelity mannequins.

"Our high-fidelity mannequins are run by a computer and incorporate advanced features such as a chest wall that rises and falls to simulate respiration, pulses, and programmable heart, breath and bowel sounds," Landry said. "When students work with these mannequins in the simulation center, they are preparing themselves for the real world of nursing."

Dr. Deanna Pope, coordinator for the MOVC nursing program, said the Nursing Simulation Center located at Marshall's Point Pleasant campus offers the same educational advantages, including opportunities for distance learning for traditional and non-traditional students.

"Our Nursing Simulation Center located on the MOVC campus is doing the exact same thing as the Huntington campus," Pope said. "We offer high-fidelity simulation with our mannequins which allows students to prepare for clinical work. During the simulation demonstration, we can make these mannequins talk, have seizures, change vital signs and we can even make him die. These real-life scenarios are invaluable for our nursing students to experience before they venture out into their future professions."

Angela Dorsey, a nursing student at the MOVC campus, said she will graduate in 2017 with the confidence to practice on patients with compassion and precision.

"Working in the Nursing Simulation facilities has allowed me to hone my skills as a nurse working in a small class environment and with more one-on-one interaction with my instructors," Dorsey said. "I've always wanted to work with the geriatric population and I know my time spent at Marshall will prepare me for my career as a nurse."

The grand opening reception for the Huntington Nursing Simulation Center is in Corbly Hall room 433. The grand opening reception for the Point Pleasant Nursing Simulation Center is in the MOVC campus nursing laboratory. For more information on the Marshall School of Nursing, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online. To learn more about educational opportunities at the MOVC campus, visit www.marshall.edu/movc online.


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Thursday November 13, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 691-1713

Marshall University internal medicine resident team wins state competition

School of Medicine team will represent W.Va. at national tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of resident physicians with the department of internal medicine at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine recently won a statewide medical competition, "The Doctor's Dilemma," sponsored by the West Virginia American College of Physicians (ACP). The event was part of the organization's chapter meeting in October.

Marshall's team competed against medical resident teams from West Virginia University and West Virginia University-CAMC to capture the coveted title.   Marshall now advances to the national tournament at the ACP's national meeting in April in Boston.

The Doctor's Dilemma is a medical "Jeopardy"-style competition designed to test medical knowledge of medical residents in a variety of disciplines from general internal medicine to subspecialty questions in neurology, oncology, pulmonology, cardiology and endocrinology.

"The Marshall team has worked together and prepared extremely hard, performing over and above residency requirements," said Eva Patton-Tackett, M.D., associate program director of Marshall's internal medicine resident program. "We are extremely proud of this team and know they will represent the Marshall Medical School and the state of West Virginia well at the national competition."

Marshall's team members include Hatiem M. Muafa, M.D., Alaa Y.F.Gabi, M.D. (chief resident), Aviral Roy, M.D., and Jason P. Mader, D.O. Charles E. Meadows, M.D., an associate professor with the department of internal medicine, serves as team coach.


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Thursday November 13, 2014
Contact: Mary Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Forensic Science, 304-691-8961

Forensic Science Graduate Program student organization to host crime scene investigation workshops

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University forensic science graduate students and faculty will present a crime scene investigation workshop for high school students from Meigs High School in Pomeroy, Ohio and Buckeye Hills Career Center in Rio Grande, Ohio, from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 14 at the crime scene house.

About 30 high school science students are expected to attend the CSI: Huntington workshop. They will participate in lectures, demonstrations and hands-on experiments in the areas of ballistics and firearms identification, tool mark examination, latent print development, handwriting analysis, blood pattern analysis, outdoor crime scene investigations and digital forensics.  New to the workshop is the area of drug analysis.

Mack Kilkeary, a forensic science graduate student and event coordinator of CSI: Huntington, said the format of the workshop was revised this year to give students an opportunity to experience a greater hands-on approach to each station.  "Students will solve a mock murder investigation while they learn and receive hands-on experience with some of the forensic techniques employed today," he said.

Students will be given a mock case report on a murder that occurred inside the crime scene house. Eight stations will include a lecture and demonstration portion, as well as hands-on analysis of a critical piece of evidence that will contribute to the case. Kilkeary said students will use critical thinking skills to piece together the investigation and determine the suspect.

Previously, CSI: Huntington workshop stations included more lecture- and demonstration-based exercises.

The workshop will be presented by Master's United Forensic Identification Association (MUFIA), a student organization composed of forensic science graduate students in the nationally recognized two-year program. Proceeds from the workshop will go towards travel expenses to offset graduate student costs to attend the national meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in Orlando, Fla., Feb. 16-21, 2015, or other forensic science conferences. Funds also may support travel for internship or job interviews. Forensic science graduate students will be assisting with the workshop.

CSI: Huntington workshops have been conducted previously as a summer camp for middle school students and as a series of evening sessions to adults and high school students.

Dr. Pam Staton, associate professor of forensic science in the graduate program, is the faculty advisor for the CSI: Huntington workshops. Teachers who are interested in scheduling a CSI: Huntington workshop for area middle-and high-school students may contact Staton for more information at 304-691-8962. Workshops also are available to other groups upon request.

The house is located at 1524 5th Ave. in Huntington.




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Wednesday November 12, 2014
Contact: Becky Calwell, Public Information Specialist, RCBI, 304-781-1690

RCBI, Marshall to host FIRST LEGO League Tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI) and Marshall University will host challengers from across the state during the FIRST LEGO League Regional Qualifier Saturday, Nov. 15, in downtown Huntington.
 
Students ages 9 to 14 will compete in several challenges, including one in which they will program LEGO robots to maneuver a playing field. Winners will qualify for the FIRST LEGO League State Championship Dec. 6 at Fairmont State University.

The public is welcome to attend the state qualifier at RCBI, located at 1050 Fourth Ave. in Huntington, after 1 p.m. Saturday.

The event is sponsored by RCBI, Marshall University, the NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium, the Bharti family, and NASA IV & V Robotics Alliance Project.

FIRST LEGO League events are designed to help young people develop the knowledge and skills required to succeed in the 21st century. Founded in 1998, the FIRST LEGO League now has more than 25,000 teams in 80 countries. Across West Virginia, there are 102 FIRST LEGO League teams from 30 counties that will compete for spots in the state tournament.

For more information, contact RCBI's Mike Friel at 304-781-1686 or mfriel@rcbi.org.


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Wednesday November 12, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU chapter of Phi Kappa Phi achieves Chapter of Excellence status

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University chapter of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi has achieved Chapter of Excellence status, Mary Todd, Ph.D., executive director of the society, has announced.

Todd said the goal of the Chapter Recognition Program is to reward those chapters that have exhibited outstanding performance as a result of the effort of their volunteer chapter officers.

"This past year, 53 of our 316 chapters received recognition status," Todd wrote in a letter of congratulations to Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp. "Both the headquarters staff and the Board of Directors are committed to providing chapters the tools they need to achieve recognition for their work with students."

Dr. Mary Beth Reynolds, president of Marshall's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, said, "Marshall's chapter of Phi Kappa Phi thanks its officers, members, and Marshall's Honors College for making this recognition possible!"

Marshall's chapter has been in existence just 41/2 years. Its petition for a chapter of Phi Kappa Phi was approved in late May of 2010. Todd Green served as president of the Marshall chapter in 2012-13 and 2013-14.

"I am pleased that through the hard work of its members the Marshall chapter of Phi Kappa Phi achieved Chapter of Excellence status," Green said. "It means a lot to us as a newer chapter to receive this honor.  I hope we can build upon this in the future to make the Marshall chapter one of the best in the country."

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was founded in 1897 at the University of Maine. It is the nation's oldest, largest and most selective honor society for all academic disciplines.  Approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni are inducted into the society annually from 300 select campuses in the United States, Puerto Rico and the Philippines. Membership is by invitation only to the top 10 percent of seniors and graduate students and 7.5 percent of juniors. Faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction can also qualify for membership in the society.


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Tuesday November 11, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall's United Way campaign raises more than $28,700 for community

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's United Way campaign raised $28,736.89 during the 2014 university campaign Sept. 22 - Oct. 10. Thousands of lives across the region will be changed for the better with the help of funds raised by the Marshall community, according to Will Holland, director of resource development for United Way of the River Cities.

"We saw an 83 percent increase in the number of contributors - 53 donors to 97 donors - and a 30 percent pledge increase from last year's campaign total," Holland said. "Anytime we see a big increase like this, it is because of the committed individuals behind the scenes working hard to make an impact in our community. Marshall University has much to be proud of."

Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions and current board member for United Way of the River Cities, said the amount raised by Marshall employees translates into thousands of people in our area who will be helped.

"If we wanted to see the actual impact these funds had on our community, we need to consider that 420 children were helped get ready for kindergarten, 170 adults were helped with job and life skills training, 238 youth gained healthy lifestyle habits and 1,972 individuals in need received a warm meal," Prewitt said. "We have the opportunity to make a positive difference and I hope we will continue to see participation increase in our community for many years to come."

Megan Archer, 2014 campaign coordinator, said she believes the participation level of the Marshall community will continue to grow as efforts are made to increase awareness and enthusiasm campus-wide.

"Plans are already underway for creating more visibility on campus for our local United Way all year, not just during campaign season," Archer said.  "The success of the 2014 campaign would not have been possible without the dedication of our committee members and the generosity of our faculty, staff and students."

To learn more about how you can give back to United Way of the River Cities, visit www.unitedwayrivercities.org.


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Friday November 7, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

Marshall graduate student granted Student Research Travel Award for annual ASHA Convention

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Megan Foster, a graduate student in the Marshall University College of Health Professions, has been selected to receive the Student Research Travel Award (SRTA) to attend the annual American Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention in Orlando, Florida, Nov. 20-22.

The award is given to the high-rated ASHA convention papers with a student as first author in each of the 27 topic categories.

Foster, a communications disorders graduate student, said she worked with a team of researchers to improve the lives of people with various disabilities living in Appalachia.

"I worked with classmates Jordan Lewis and Hillary Johnson to explore Appalachia's reputation for being a culturally rich region and how these cultural factors influence what it means to have a disability in Appalachia," Foster said. "This award is a recognition of our collective efforts. It's great to know that our hard work is being recognized nationally and that others are interested in our research."

Foster said the results of their study led them to establish clinical implications involving rehabilitation goals and strategies for treatment within the Appalachian region. 

"We found that acceptance of a disability is ongoing throughout the rehabilitation process for those with disabilities. Additionally, people with disabilities seem to change their identities based on a 'give-and-take' relationship with their support systems," Foster said. "One of our biggest implications reinforces the need to consistently reach out to caregivers and support systems when treating clients with disabilities. People living in Appalachia heavily rely on their support systems and prefer to stay close to the region when receiving treatment."

Dr. Karen McNealy, chair of the Department of Communication Disorders, said the purpose of the SRTA is to highlight the research activities of students and encourage careers in science and research. McNealy said award recipients would receive a $500 stipend and complimentary registration to help defray costs associated with attending the convention.

"The national recognition for this study shows that our communication disorders program realizes the importance of research and evidence-based practice in our field," McNealy said. "We always encourage our students and our faculty to pursue research endeavors such as these to broaden their experiences while at Marshall University."

McNealy will join her communication disorders colleague Pam Holland and physical therapy program director Dr. Penny Kroll in giving an oral presentation on their research with interprofessional education during the convention.

For more information on Foster's research, contact her at meganfoster12@yahoo.com. To learn more about this year's ASHA convention, visit http://www.asha.org/events/convention/ online. For additional information on the Department of Communication Disorders and its research initiatives, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: Megan Foster, 24, of Gallipolis, Ohio, will graduate in August 2015 with her master's degree in communication disorders. Foster will travel to the annual ASHA convention using the Student Research Travel Award Nov. 20-22.


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Friday November 7, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Activities planned at Marshall in conjunction with Veterans Day

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate the lives and contributions of its veterans and all veterans in the community with a variety of activities being staged next week in conjunction with Veterans Day, which is Tuesday, Nov. 11.  

A Military Appreciation Board will be on display in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus from Monday, Nov. 10, through Friday, Nov. 14.

"Students, faculty, staff and community members are invited to share messages of appreciation for our military," said Tommy Reynolds, director of Military and Veterans Affairs at Marshall.

Photos of loved ones who have served or are serving may be placed on the board, along with the messages, Reynolds said.

MOMENT OF SILENCE: The Marshall ROTC will observe a moment of silence at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the World War II memorial near the northeast corner of Jenkins Hall on the Huntington campus. 

QUILT TO BE PRESENTED: The Charleston chapter of the Quilts of Valor Foundation will present a quilt to former Marshall football player Jared Turner, who was injured in 2009 while serving in Iraq. The presentation takes place at 2 p.m. on Veterans Day on the student center plaza.

The mission of the Quilts of Valor Foundation is to cover service members and veterans touched by war with comforting and healing quilts. (See more at http://www.qovf.org.)

VETERANS DAY HOT CHOCOLATE: MU's Student Resource Center will be handing out hot chocolate in commemorative Veterans Day mugs on the student center plaza, beginning at 1 p.m. on Veterans Day.

MILITARY APPRECIATION TAILGATE: The Military Appreciation Board will be on display at the Military Appreciation Day tailgate before Marshall's football game with Rice Saturday, Nov. 15. Kickoff is set for 2:30 p.m. The tailgate will be set up between the Marshall Recreation Center and the Sorrell Maintenance Building, and the public is welcome.

$10 TICKETS FOR RICE GAME: Active military or veterans who show their credentials can receive tickets for $10 to the Rice game. Twenty veterans connected to the Marshall community will be honored before the game.

"We will also do a video board recognition as well," said Aaron Goebbel, associate director of athletics for external affairs.

MILITARY AND VETERANS AFFAIRS: The office of Military and Veterans Affairs at Marshall, under Reynolds' direction, ensures that the university's active duty military and veteran men and women have the services and resources needed to achieve their academic goals at Marshall.

"When I came to Marshall, I struggled," Reynolds said. "Getting into school and going to my classes was a big adjustment from military life to civilian life. So, being able to help them to alleviate some of the problems they have ... it's great. I am one of them; they come in here and they are comfortable and they see me as one of them."

Military and Veterans Affairs offers:

  • o   Assistance in applying for benefits;
  • Transition assistance;
  • Advising and enrollment help;
  • Referrals to appropriate academic support services;
  • Veteran Upward Bound program;
  • Yellow Ribbon program;
  • Assessment of needs and programs for veterans and active students;
  • Counseling through the Marshall Counseling Center references;
  • A sense of belonging.

One of the more popular recent additions to the university is a student lounge for veterans.

"I am thankful for the lounge because I needed a place to study and be around peers," said Keith Jackson, a 12-year infantry veteran. "I would not be doing so well without it."

The lounge, located in Laidley Hall, is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

DONATIONS NEEDED FOR VETS: The Heart of Appalachia Talent Search Program, Marshall University ROTC and Veterans Affairs are working together to collect donations for local heroes.  Items will be collected on the Huntington campus through Dec. 5 and presented to the residents of the Barboursville Veterans Home.  Donation boxes are at the following locations:

  • The Memorial Student Center, Smith Hall, Corbly Hall, the Veterans Affairs Office and the Drinko Library

The following items are requested for donation:

  • Shampoo, deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrushes, shaving lotion/gel, soap/body wash, socks and board games.

Additional information can be found about this project at http://www.marshall.edu/trio/talent-search/hats-program/news/.


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Friday November 7, 2014
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

West Virginia's largest and longest-running international festival is scheduled for Nov. 15 in Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 51st Annual Marshall University International Festival will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 15, at Huntington's Big Sandy Superstore Arena. Admission to the festival is free and the event is open to the public.

Food tickets will be available for purchase, allowing guests to sample a variety of dishes from around the world.

Participating restaurants include Hibachi Japanese Steakhouse, Chateau D' Italia, Julian's Market, Marshall Dining by Sodexo, River & Rail Bakery, New China Garden Buffett, Cedar Market, Black Sheep Burritos & Brews, Margarita's and Marco's Pizza.

"This festival is a great way to go around the world in three hours and learn about different cultures and foods without the need for a passport," said Jyotsna Patel, administrator for MU Center for International Programs. "It's a great opportunity to experience the amazing diversity, present right in our own backyard!"

Marshall's current and past international students and faculty will represent more than 25 different countries at the festival. Booths will display information about the various cultures as well as activities and demonstrations. A special area will also be designated for children's activities and entertainment.

This annual event, hosted my Marshall University's Center for International Programs, has continued to grow over the years with more than 5,000 people in attendance at the 2013 festival.

"The Marshall University Center for International Programs is thrilled to once again host the International Festival," said Dr. Tammy Johnson, MU's Executive Director of Admissions and International Student Services. "This festival continues to grow in both size and quality every year. It is a wonderful event for the entire family and we encourage everyone to come out and take advantage of this opportunity to get to know Huntington's growing international community."

The festival will also feature raffles for Beats headphones, a Stonewall Resort golf package, a National Travel gift card and more.

Food Fair, Cabell County Schools and Chipotle Mexican Grill are sponsoring the 2014 International Festival.

Food tickets will be available for purchase at the festival or in advance at the Marshall University Memorial Student Center. For further details about Marshall University's annual International Festival, contact the Center for International Programs at 304-696-6265, e-mail cip@marshall.edu, or visit the International Festival website at http://www.marshall.edu/cip/festival/.


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Friday November 7, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall's department of public health seeks participants for breast cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University undergraduate department of public health is searching for women in 23 West Virginia counties to participate in breast cancer research.

Dr. Monika Sawhney, director of the undergraduate public health program, said she received a grant to conduct breast cancer research in West Virginia last spring. Sawhney said her department will have educational sessions in each of the 23 counties for those interested in learning more about early prevention of breast cancer.

"We want to reach these underserved populations in our state to raise awareness about breast cancer and help these women understand the importance of timely screenings," Sawhney said. "Participants will be asked to attend an informational meeting in their counties and then complete a survey for our research purposes."

Counties offering opportunities for the breast cancer educational sessions include Boone, Braxton, Cabell, Calhoun, Clay, Doddridge, Fayette, Harrison, Lewis, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mingo, Nicholas, Pleasants, Riley, Randolph, Ritchie, Summers, Upshur, Webster and Wyoming.

Time and location will vary for each county. For more information on how you can attend a breast cancer educational session in your area, please contact Sawhney at sawhney@marshall.edu or by calling 304-696-2602. To learn more about the Marshall Department of Public Health, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Thursday November 6, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Ashley B. Zawodniak, D.O., chosen as first Resident of the Month recipient

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ashley B. Zawodniak, D.O.,  a second-year internal medicine resident, has been selected as the first recipient of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine's Resident of the Month program, Paulette S. Wehner, M.D.,  vice dean, graduate medical education announced this week.

"It is fitting that our first recognition of a resident be someone of Dr. Zawodniak's caliber," Wehner said. "She is a conscientious and hard-working resident who takes excellent care of patients daily and who has an immense passion for community service and caring for the less fortunate."  

In his nomination of Zawodniak, Larry D. Dial, M.D., chair of internal medicine, wrote that Zawodniak is a "superstar" and that "... (she) personally bought a homeless patient clothes and assisted him in the hospital and organized a quality improvement curriculum rotation committee."

In her nomination of the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine graduate, Missy K. Browning, program coordinator in the department of psychiatry, wrote that "Dr. Zawodniak volunteered for the Marshall Medical Outreach Mam and Glam event, using one of her four days off from floor service … and spent the afternoon meeting with the ladies individually answering their questions and counseling them on women's health and overall wellness issues.    I'm certain there are many more lives touched by her generosity and compassion."

Wehner expressed appreciation to all who submitted nominations for November's recognition. 

"We had nearly a dozen outstanding resident and fellow nominees. While reviewing the nominations, we were simply amazed to learn of the exceptional educational efforts and humanitarian service that our residents and fellows display on a daily basis.  All of the nominations truly deserve recognition but unfortunately we can only choose one a month to publicly acknowledge," she said.
  
As part of her recognition as the November Resident of the Month, Zawodniak will receive items including a certificate of recognition and a designated parking spot.   Monthly winners will also be automatically entered into the Resident of the Year Award to be announced in May.

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Photo: Ashley Zawodniak, D.O., was named the inaugural Resident of the Month at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.



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Thursday November 6, 2014
Contact: Dr. David Trowbridge, Associate Professor of History, 304-696-2717

Marshall faculty, librarians launch history website and mobile app

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monica Brooks of Marshall Libraries and Drs. Dan Holbrook and David Trowbridge of the Department of History at Marshall University have announced the public launch of Clio, a website and mobile application for the study of history.

Named after the ancient muse of history, Clio, which can be found online at www.theclio.com, has been built by Trowbridge and students assisting him over the past two years. Clio picks up a user's location anywhere in the United States and tells them about the history and culture that surrounds them, with a growing database that includes nearly 4000 museums, art galleries, monuments, sculptures and historical sites. In addition, contributors across the nation are adding hundreds of sites each month, Trowbridge said.

"Clio creates a fascinating journey that illustrates historical events, people and places across America," said Jackie Wheeler, one of the students who has worked on the project. "By creating an entry on Clio, you can help to broaden the availability of rich American history and passionately share events, some of which are less known. I have enjoyed being a part of Clio and bringing history to others in a new and wonderful way."

Clio provides a summary and backstory for each location, along with links to more information, Trowbridge said. Clio can also connect users to relevant books, articles and websites when they are ready to learn more about any particular topic.
 
In addition to guiding the public to physical sites such as monuments and museums, Clio includes "Time Capsule" entries that allow users to hold their smartphones up to the modern landscape and see images and videos of historic events that have not yet been commemorated with markers. For example, Clio can guide users to the precise location of a civil rights protest or a labor strike. Users can "feel history" as they stand at that location while viewing images and videos of the event and reading primary source documents and interpretations of the event written by scholars. For example, Clio shows the precise location of sit-ins in Huntington and Charleston, allowing users with smartphones to view images and videos of the sit-ins right where they occurred.

"Clio has given me the opportunity to unearth the historical significance of DuBois High School," said Hailey Horn, another of the students who has worked on the project. "Clio allows us to bring history to the present, and inform the community members of its importance."
 
Clio's goal is to connect everyone in the United States to the history and culture that surrounds them, Trowbridge said. Each entry can provide a basic summary, detailed backstory, images and audio/video clips, as well as suggested books and articles for those who want to know more. Entries for museums and archives provide addresses, hours, phone numbers and official websites, along with turn-by-turn directions. Because Clio can pick up a user's present location, it can always guide them right to the place, he added.

"Clio reaches beyond the textbook, allowing a user to access the history that surrounds us," said J. Lee Sigmon, another of Trowbridge's students. "Events, places and people are brought to the user, [making] Clio perfect for historically inclined tourists. Launch the app and a region's history comes alive."

Students, faculty and librarians recently filmed a video introduction to Clio, highlighting its capacity to connect users to the history that surrounds them. It is available at  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ydzv9nY-Oo

Clio is available on any web browser or as a free mobile application ("app") in iTunes and Google Play.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday November 6, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

First Intercultural Students' Weekend set for Friday-Saturday at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will host the first Intercultural Students' Weekend this Friday-Saturday, Nov. 7-8, Maurice Cooley, Associate Vice President of the Office of Intercultural Affairs, announced today.

Cooley said about 125 high school juniors and seniors from throughout West Virginia and nearby metro schools will be represented at the special weekend on Marshall's Huntington campus. Counting parents, the total number of visitors for the weekend will be about 300.

"As we strive to expand our student base, we look forward to welcoming African and African American, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian-American students who will be participating in this initiative," Cooley said.

"To our knowledge, this is the first experience of this kind in the state of West Virginia," Cooley added. "High schools have selected the best and the brightest of their juniors and seniors, composing the complete range of our nation's historically underrepresented ethnic and racial minority students.  They'll  assemble in one place for recognition and to further inspire them to achieve the highest of educational goals. The faculty and leadership at this institution are among the most visionary."

Cooley said high schools nominated high-academic achieving juniors and seniors "to participate in our richly designed learning exposure to Marshall and university life."

Included among the activities planned for the students and their parents are:

  • An information session for parents at 2:30 p.m. Friday;
  • Visits with college deans of the students' and parents' choice, also at 2:30 p.m. Friday;
  • Campus tours for parents and students, beginning at 3:45 p.m. Friday;
  • An overnight stay on campus in a "campsite" at the Marshall Recreation Center, which the students will begin setting up at 8:15 p.m. Friday;
  • Multiple recreation center activities and games, beginning at 9 p.m. Friday;
  • An awards breakfast banquet at 9 a.m. Saturday that includes a welcome from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. Keynote speaker at the breakfast, which will take place in the student center's Don Morris Room, is Yusif Mohammed, a current student in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

The Intercultural Students' Weekend officially runs from 11 a.m. Friday, when the students check in at the Memorial Student Center lobby, until noon Saturday.


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Thursday November 6, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Rob Wheeler Memorial Scholarship established at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A fund known as the Rob Wheeler Memorial Scholarship, named in honor of former South Point High School teacher Rob Wheeler, has been established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc.

The recipient of the scholarship will be a full-time undergraduate student who graduated from South Point High School in South Point, Ohio with at least a 3.0 GPA. The Office of Student Financial Assistance will select the recipient.

The scholarship was transferred from South Point High School to the MU Foundation.

Wheeler died on April 25, 1994 after a long battle with cancer.

" 'I am firm in my belief a teacher lives on and on through his students.  Good teaching is forever and the teacher is immortal,' " said Peggy Byard, quoting writer Jesse Stuart. Byard, now retired, also was a South Point teacher at the time of Wheeler's death.

"This scholarship insures Rob's legacy will live on by providing much-needed financial aid to South Point High School graduates," Byard said. "Rob was a fantastic teacher, mentor and friend, and this insures his vision for students."

Byard wrote the following about Wheeler in the 1994 high school yearbook:

"Rob Wheeler was the consummate teacher, going to any and all lengths to educate those students with whom he came into contact," Byard wrote. "He not only taught classroom subjects, but he taught about life and the beautiful things it has to offer each and every one of us. He was able to bring out the best in students, having that special 'teacher talent' of being able to bridge the gap between friend and teacher."

On July 5, 1975, Wheeler's wife, Alice, gave birth to twins, Ellen and Alan. The entire family has been active members of the First Baptist Church of South Point, where Rob was a deacon and a Sunday School teacher.

"The loss of Rob Wheeler was for me, as it was for many others, a very deep and personal loss," Byard continued in her writing. "What he did, what he was and the lives he touched could fill this entire book. He was a very special person, and he will be missed by everyone who ever came into contact with him."

Peter Kim, a 1990 graduate of South Point High School and son of Dr. Chong Kim, former dean of the Marshall University College of Business, also had high praise for Wheeler. He, too, wrote about Wheeler in the '94 yearbook:

"It's been said that a true friend is one who overlooks your failures and tolerates your successes," Kim wrote. "Mr. Wheeler took on several roles in my life: educator, advisor, disciplinarian and coach. In all definitions of the word, he was an outstanding teacher; but, more importantly in my life, Mr. Wheeler was always a true friend."

In also writing about Wheeler, South Point teacher Jamie Lester Meade said simply, "with energy, patience and love for his students, Rob Wheeler taught me how to be a teacher in today's world."

Anyone wanting to contribute to the scholarship may send a check made payable to the MU Foundation to 519 John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25705, with Rob Wheeler Memorial Scholarship on the memo line.


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Wednesday November 5, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Robert Meeropol, son of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, to visit Marshall University for Rosenberg trial seminar Nov. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Robert Meeropol, one of the sons of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, will share his story with the Marshall University community during a Rosenberg trial seminar  sponsored by Marshall University's College of Health Professions and the college's Department of Social Work. He will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, in room BE-5 of  the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The Rosenbergs were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage and executed for passing information about the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union.

Dr. Peggy Proudfoot Harman, assistant professor of social work at Marshall and organizer of the event, said this seminar will be the culmination of a semester-long exploration into the implications of the well-known Rosenberg trial by her First Year Seminar (FYS) students.
           
"My FYS 'Investigation 101' students have studied the connection of how social, biological and psychological factors shape human behavior," Harman said. "From a social work standpoint, Mr. Meeropol's story is interesting for many reasons, especially when one considers that he and his older brother were abandoned by family members after his parents' execution until he was later adopted by the Meeropol family."

Harman, a former federal investigator/mitigation specialist for the Federal Public Defender in Pittsburgh, said Meeropol plans to discuss many themes, which are still relevant today.

"In light of the recent news associated with Edward Snowden, ISIS and acts of terrorism, the issues of national security, patriotism and the death penalty are still topics of great interest to many of us," Harman said. "As far as we know, Mr. Meeropol is the only U.S. attorney to have had both parents executed and with this in mind, he will bring a fascinating personal perspective to the table."

Meeropol, now in his 60s, was only six years old when his parents were put to death.  Until 2013, he was executive director of the Rosenberg Fund for Children, a public foundation he started in his parents' honor in 1990. Since retiring from that position, he speaks publicly about his parents' case less frequently, but he said the opportunity given to him at Marshall University was one he could not pass up.

"When I found out there was a group of young students dedicated to delving into my parents case at Marshall, I saw an opportunity to explore these connections and create a level of interaction I have not had in other campus events," Meeropol said.

Meeropol said he hopes the Marshall community will see the relationship between what has happened in the past and what continues to happen.

"At the end of this, I want my audience to learn how to explore for themselves," Meeropol said. "If they listen to everything I say and respond, 'okay this guy is the fountain of truth,' then they won't have gotten the point. If they reject everything I say and then respond, 'he's living in a fantasy land,' then they won't have gotten the point either. The point I want them to take away is that the truth is rarely simple and oftentimes, keeping an open mind will help us understand things in a way we never thought possible."

Meeropol also will participate in a morning session with the FYS students. It is open to the public and will take place from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in the Drinko Library. 

The Marshall University Department of Social Work will offer one Continuing Education Unit for licensed social workers for the morning session and two CEUs for the evening session.

Copies of Meeropol's book, An Execution in the Family: One Son's Journey, will be sold at the evening seminar. They will be available for $10, with proceeds to benefit the Rosenberg Fund for Children.

For more information on the Department of Social Work, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online. To learn more about Meeropol and his work with The Rosenberg Fund for Children, visit www.rfc.org online.

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Photos: (Above) Robert Meeropol, son of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, will visit Marshall University to discuss the implications of his parents' execution from a personal, social and political perspective. (Below) Meeropol and his brother, Michael, pose for a photo in the early 1950s, right around the time of their parents' trial. Meeropol said he hopes the Marshall University community will see similarities between what happened in the 1950s and what is happening today.


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Wednesday November 5, 2014
Contact: Cara Bailey, Coordinator of Yeager Society Outreach, 304-696-2474

Hubble astrophysicist to speak at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Renowned astrophysicist and best-selling author Mario Livio will be on Marshall University's Huntington campus Wednesday, Nov. 12, as the featured lecturer for the Society of Yeager Scholars annual symposium.

Livio's lecture will take place at 3 p.m. in Room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center. His visit is sponsored by the Society of Yeager Scholars and the Marshall University Honors College, and is open to the public. A book-signing and reception will take place after the talk.

Livio, an astrophysicist with the Space Telescope Science Institute, recently wrote a national best-seller titled "Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein, colossal mistakes by great scientists that changed our understanding of life and the universe." Livio also writes for the Huffington Post and has appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.

"Even the greatest scientists have made some serious blunders," Livio said. " 'Brilliant Blunders' concerns the evolution of life on Earth, of the Earth itself, of stars, and of the universe as a whole. In this talk, I shall concentrate on and analyze major errors committed by such luminaries as Charles Darwin, Linus Pauling, and Albert Einstein.

"I will also scrutinize the various types of blunders and attempt to identify their causes. Most importantly, however, I'll argue that blunders are not only inevitable, ¬but rather part and parcel of progress in science and other creative enterprises."

Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim dean of the Honors College, encourages people of all interests to attend the lecture.

"Dr. Livio's lecture should be an eye-opener for many. Science is often taught as a controlled, step wise, and logical progression toward the truth. In fact, his described blunders account for some of the greatest scientific advancements," LoCascio said. " 'Brilliant Blunders' is a fascinating read for everyone."

Copies of "Brilliant Blunders" are available in the Marshall University Bookstore.


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Wednesday November 5, 2014
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Quarterback's brother to speak at annual Memorial Service

Tom Shoebridge recalls family member lost in Herd football team plane crash in 1970

The service will be streamed live here, beginning at noon on Friday, Nov. 14, 2014.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Had Ted Shoebridge lived, he would now be 64 years old, and long since retired from a playing career in the NFL or major league baseball.

At least that's the opinion of Shoebridge's brother, Tom, who will be the featured speaker at this year's annual Memorial Service to honor the 75 victims of the 1970 Marshall University plane crash.

The service sponsored by Marshall's Student Government Association starts at noon Friday, Nov. 14, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on the university's Huntington campus. That day marks the 44th anniversary of the worst sports tragedy in U.S. history.

Ted Shoebridge was among the victims of the crash, which claimed the lives of 36 players from the team. Also killed were nine coaches and members of the athletic staff, 25 fans and the jetliner's crew of five.

Gone in an instant were the hopes and dreams of 75 people, including Ted Shoebridge.

"I firmly believe he would have played professional sports football or baseball," said Tom Shoebridge of his brother. "He was an outstanding baseball player. I watched the tapes of his last year of football at Marshall and I evaluated him as a player."

The plane carrying the Marshall University football team home from its game at East Carolina University earlier in the afternoon of Nov. 14 crashed in Kenova near Tri-State Airport just 45 minutes after taking off from Stallings Field at the Kinston (N.C.) Airport.

The plane, flying in light rain with poor visibility, clipped a tree 66 feet above the ground on a ridge just west of West Virginia Route 75, tumbled while cutting a 95-foot swath across the hillside and slammed into the hillside on the east side of the highway at a speed of 160 miles per hour. Everyone aboard the Southern Airways DC-9 died instantly.

"I was 17 years old at the time. It was a very hard time, to say the least," said Tom Shoebridge. "My mom and dad kept everything. They [Marshall] sent us his travel bag, his jerseys and his helmet."

Tom Shoebridge has since donated his brother's green jersey to The Union Pub & Grill in downtown Huntington and the white jersey the one he wore against East Carolina to Marshall to be placed in the university's new athletic hall of fame, located inside the indoor athletic facility. Ted Shoebridge wore No. 14.

In 1990, 20 years after the crash, Ted Shoebridge's parents visited Huntington. In an interview with The Herald-Dispatch, they cried openly, still heartbroken by their loss.

As a lifelong football and track coach at Lyndhurst (N.J) High School, Tom Shoebridge said he has given plenty of speeches. But, he admits, this one will be different.

"I'm a bit nervous," he said. "This is something that is very near and dear to my family's hearts. It is very important to me and my family. I want to do a representative job."

Although Shoebridge has been to some of the annual memorial services and attended Marshall's football victories over the University of Rhode Island and Ohio University this season, most of his family has not. However, a number of family members will attend the service this year, including his wife, a brother and a niece.

Tom Shoebridge said his brother Ted would be very proud of Marshall University if he were alive today as would his parents.

"My mom and dad are gone, but it would be great for them to see all the wonderful things at Marshall, all the transitions they have gone through," said Tom, who retired from teaching two years ago. He remains the head boys' track coach after 36 years, and is a volunteer coach with the football team after 30 years as an assistant coach, including 25 years as offensive coordinator.

To this day, the Marshall University family and the Huntington community still mourn the victims of the tragedy.

At the mere mention of "the crash," sadness abounds.

"It is sad ... it's very sad," said Mike Hamrick, Marshall's director of athletics and a former player for the Thundering Herd. "When you think of those young people who died in the primes of their lives, it gets you right in the gut. It hurts; it still hurts to this day. Many of the surviving family members who are still around have not gotten over it and probably won't get over it as long as they live. You just wonder, 'why?' Why did it happen? Why here? Why to Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia?"
 
For whatever the reason, the plane did crash. 44 years ago. And, 75 people died. 44 years ago.

Amazingly, the crowds have grown each year at the memorial service, packing the plaza in a reverent manner. To many of those who perhaps knew at least one of the victims, or were Marshall students at the time, or even just lived in Huntington at the time of the crash, these 44 years have gone by quickly.

Joe Wortham, who was a student assistant statistician for Gene Morehouse, the sports information director at the time of the crash, seems a bit surprised that it has been 44 years.

"I stopped counting, probably after the 10th year," Wortham said. "It doesn't feel like it has been 44 years to me."

Wortham has worked at Marshall since the fall of 1966, when he was hired as a freshman student assistant by then-Athletic Director Whitey Wilson just a few months after graduating from Huntington High School.

Wortham knows that he could have been on the plane. He alternated road trips with Larry George, the other student assistant assigned to sports information to assist Morehouse, and Wortham was slated to make the trip. But, he had to take a national exam to get his degree, and the only day it was given was Nov. 14, 1970.

"So, we swapped trips," Wortham said. "By luck or fate, I didn't take that flight. Initially, it was an uneasy feeling when you realized it could've been should've been me on that plane. But, I figure in life there is always a reason for everything."

Some people have suggested that it is time to stop having the services; that 44 years is long enough to mourn.

"No way," said Duncan Waugaman, president of the Student Government Association. "As long as there is at least one person that is still affected by the plane crash and wants to remember the lives lost from it, we will continue to have it. Marshall University went from a school to a family on November 14, 1970, and we will continue to honor our fallen family members. It's the least we can do."


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Monday November 3, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Public health students travel to Tanzania to administer 100-plus free health screenings

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University students from the undergraduate department of public health traveled to Tanzania this past summer in an effort to improve child and maternal health throughout the world.

Through this study abroad opportunity, students were given the chance to administer more than 100 free health screenings including prenatal care, HIV, pediatric and tuberculosis screenings on women, children and oPublic health students traveled to Tanzania to administer 100-plus freether afflicted patients.

Dr. Monika Sawhney, director of the undergraduate public health program, said students had the opportunity to learn about pressing health issues and gain practical experiences in a global setting.

"Our public health students were able to learn all about the Tanzanian health care system with special emphasis on child and maternal child health," Sawhney said. "We were able to offer these students an opportunity to explore aspects of our world that they would never have a chance to explore otherwise."

Minal Patel, 23, of Huntington, was one of 10 Marshall students who traveled to Tanzania to gain insight into how medicine and health care work in the developing world. Patel said she also wanted to break down any misconceptions she had about Africa.

"During our time in Tanzania, I learned there are many levels of health care, but it must all revolve around the local culture and their beliefs," Patel said. "Students should be interested in next summer's trip because there will be no shortage of learning, exploration and adventure.  Alongside seeing the real Africa and getting past all the misconceptions, you will learn so much about yourself. You gain insight into what you really want to do with your life."

Patel said the learning environment while studying abroad was unlike any other experience she's had since beginning her college career.

"This trip wasn't just about classwork and textbooks - we went into the field and visited hospitals, clinics and got a firsthand look into the Tanzanian health care system," Patel said. "We were learning from them while helping them at the same time.  This was a very interactive, hands-on learning experience, exactly what I needed to realize what public health is all about."

The upcoming Tanzania study abroad trip will take place June 8 - July 12, 2015. Cost of the trip is $4,235 plus airfare and the $250 application fee. Sawhney said students can receive undergraduate or graduate credit for coursework in public and maternal health, biology, anthropology, internship and service learning. Individuals interested in signing up before Jan. 20 can save $100. The final application deadline for the trip is Feb. 15. To learn more, please contact Sawhney by phone at 304-696-2602 or by e-mail at sawhney@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Students from Marshall University's undergraduate department of public health traveled to Tanzania last summer to study the child and maternal health in the developing world. Students had the chance to administer more than 100 health screenings to native Tanzanians and also had the opportunity to swim in the Indian Ocean and explore wildlife in a real African safari.


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Monday November 3, 2014
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Dr. Judith Silver featured speaker at winter commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Judith Silver, who taught mathematics at Marshall University for 30 years before retiring last spring, will be the featured speaker as the university celebrates winter commencement Sunday, Dec. 14, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Commencement ceremonies begin at 2 p.m.

"I am honored to be invited to give the commencement address," Silver said. "I am hoping that my remarks will be helpful to the graduates at some time in their life, so I think I will talk about 'regrets.' At this point I have five main ideas to share with them, along with some experiences."

Silver will return to the classroom next spring, when she teaches the Yeager Seminar on art and mathematics. She previously taught at Marshall from 1978 through 1983 and from 1989 through 2014.

Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, Marshall president, praised Silver, saying, "Dr. Silver made significant contributions to Marshall University, the College of Science and the Department of Mathematics; but, most importantly, to countless students throughout her remarkable career. She succeeded in making the study of mathematics challenging yet enjoyable for her students. It is exceedingly appropriate she was selected as the 2013-14 recipient of the Marshall and Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award. We are honored she is willing to speak at our winter commencement and we look forward with great anticipation and eagerness to hearing her address. She most assuredly will enhance this very important day in the lives of our graduates."

Silver, indeed, said she always tried to create a relaxed classroom for her students.

"I believe that a relaxed classroom atmosphere is essential to achieving maximal student learning," Silver said. "I do everything I can to reduce student stress and make my classes enjoyable and memorable. In each class, I feature a 'student star of the day' by showing successful homework or quizzes via the overhead projector. Most of all, I believe that learning is greatly enhanced by encouraging questions."

She likes to compare math to creating music.

"Once you have learned the basics, it is like mastering scales on a piano," Silver said. "Then, you are free to put feeling in the song, or to create your own beautiful proof of a mathematical idea."

Dr. Alfred Akinsete, chairman of the mathematics department, describes Silver as "a teacher of teachers."

"She has mentored, and continues to mentor, a large number of faculty and graduate students and teaching assistants," he added.

Mathematics professor Dr. Evelyn Pupplo-Cody said of Silver, "In the 30 years that I have known Judy, I have never heard anyone say a negative thing about her. Her colleagues appreciate all of her hard work and dedication to her job and to Marshall University. Her students appreciate her focus, clarity and fairness. I have a great admiration for Judy and what she has accomplished here at Marshall."

Silver earned her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Kentucky in August 1988. She served as interim associate dean of the College of Science twice during the 2005-06 academic year, and again during the 2008-09 academic year. From 2002 through 2005, she served as the associate chair for the Department of Mathematics, after an appointment as the interim head for the Division of Mathematics and Applied Science from 2000 through 2002.

Marshall University began conducting a winter graduation ceremony in 2008 with a convocation at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center. The speaker was Dr. Montserrat Miller, a professor of history. Winter commencement began in 2009 and the tradition of having a faculty member deliver the keynote address continued.

The five previous commencement speakers were Dr. Simon Perry, professor of political science, in 2009; Dr. Bonita Lawrence, professor of mathematics, in 2010; Dr. Jamie Warner, professor of political science, in 2011; Dan Hollis, associate professor of journalism, in 2012; and Dr. Kateryna Schray, English professor, in 2013.


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Friday October 31, 2014
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Record number of participants possible in Marshall Marathon, organizers say

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Organizers of the Marshall University-St. Mary's Marathon/Half Marathon must be doing something right when it comes to staging the event. The number of participants in this year's 11th annual marathon, known affectionately as MUM, is expected to approach last year's record number of 2,500, according to Race Director Jim Duke.

Thirty-two states and three provinces are represented in the marathon, which is scheduled to start at 7 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2. The race begins on 3rd Avenue near Marshall's Joan C. Edwards Stadium, and ends inside the stadium, where runners can carry a football to the finish line.

"One of the compelling attractions is the opportunity to run through the Marshall University campus complete with a stirring finish in the MU football stadium," Duke said. "Very few marathons offer this attraction and with the U.S. flags lining the last two hundred yards, it is a finish that few events can compete with."

The course is flat, fast and USATF (USA track and field)-certified. Events include the full marathon (26.2 miles), the half-marathon (13.1 miles), the half-marathon relay and the 5-k  run/walk. The temperature is expected to be in the low 30s when the race begins.

Just past the 25-mile mark, runners will enter MU's campus at 4th Avenue and Hal Greer Boulevard, where they will be handed a flower, which represents the 75 victims of the Nov. 14, 1970 Marshall plane crash. Those taking a flower will be asked to put it in a basket as they pass the Memorial Fountain.

"Marshall University has a tradition that we try to embrace," Duke said. "We try to reflect upon the tragedy of 1970 each year for our participants. Last year we had 75 U.S. flags lining the stadium as runners entered the stadium. This year every participant will receive a lapel pin with the Marshall 'M' and with the date November 14, 1970 in tiny letters. Very classy."

Duke said the MUM strives to show participants the best that Huntington offers, with the course running through Harris Riverfront Park, along the Ritter Park Trail, through Ritter Park, through Marshall's Huntington campus and inside the stadium for the finish.

"The MUM is West Virginia's largest marathon and one of the largest single-day running events in the state," Duke said. "The MUM is directly responsible for 300 hotel rooms being rented for Saturday night. We have hotels such as the Holiday Inn, Pullman Plaza Hotel, Hampton Inn and the Marriott acting as hosts for the MUM."

Duke said the long-term objective is to elevate the MUM to a "must-run" marathon in this region.

"To do this we are making much-needed investments in the infrastructure of the MUM," he said. "Last year we invested $7,500 in mileage flags and added a second medical tent to the course. This year we invested $7,000 in two arches to illuminate the start and halfway point. The starting arch is 35 feet wide and 15 feet high. We also added two water stations and a third medical tent, and we will place eight musical bands on the course to give some inspiration to our runners. There will also be a cannon to initiate the start."

Packet pickup is from 5 to 8 p.m. today (Friday, Oct. 31), and the race expo is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1, at the St. Mary's Conference Center, which is located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 29th Street. Online registration closed Oct. 26, but registration will reopen at 10 a.m. Saturday at the race expo.


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Friday October 31, 2014
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Students, faculty from Mexico to spend five weeks at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - One hundred and sixty-one students and faculty from Mexican universities will be arriving Saturday and Sunday on Marshall University's Huntington campus, where they will spend five weeks studying the English language as part of an international exchange program.

Officially, the program runs from Nov. 3 through Dec. 5. In a separate arrangement, 14 Saudi Arabian students will be joining this large group to receive general English instruction during the same period. The Saudi Arabian students are scheduled to arrive in Huntington today.

The visit of 160 of the Mexican students is through an international student exchange program between the U.S. and Mexico called Proyecta 100,000. Marshall intends to send American students to Mexico for future semesters to study Spanish as part of President Obama's 100,000 Strong initiative in Mexico.

Also coming to Marshall are three students who are not sponsored by the Proyecta program, but are enrolled individually. They are from Mexico, Thailand and Jordan. The total number of students visiting Marshall is 177.

One goal, said Ben White, academic program director for INTO Marshall, is for these Mexican students to return to Marshall to enter graduate school once this program ends.

"We are participating at the front end of an ambitious exchange program sponsored by the Mexican government," White said.  "There is the potential to develop links with a number of Mexican universities. It is a step toward the continued internationalization of campus."

Ryan Warner, coordinator of Study Abroad and Global Engagement at Marshall, said all the students are coming from two specific areas in Mexico - Puebla and Queretaro.

"The entire Proyecta initiative is in regard to a much larger purpose," Warner said. "Marshall University (Warner) and the HEPC (Dr. Clark Egnor) visited these two areas back in early October and Governor Earl Ray Tomlin provided us with a signed letter of invitation for the state of Queretaro's Governor (Jose Calzada Rovirosa) to visit West Virginia, and Dr. Egnor presented that letter to their governor. The plan is to potentially open up a state-to-state consortium between West Virginia and these two locations of Puebla and Queretaro, Mexico."

To celebrate the occasion and to welcome the visiting guests, the Office of Academic Affairs and INTO Marshall University will host an open house reception from 4 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5, in the Foundation Hall on the Huntington campus.

Classes will begin Monday, with orientation, which continues through Wednesday, Nov. 5. Changes have been made in housing to accommodate the students, with some students in single rooms offering to double up.

"The entire campus community, in a short period of time, has really come together to make it possible to host 177 international students," White said.

Most of the students coming to Marshall are STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) students.

Orientation includes, among other things, visits to the Student ID office and the Immigrations office, campus tours, the IT department to get their computers set up and a welcome from MU President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp Monday morning in room BE 5 of the Memorial student Center at a time to be determined.

Stephanie Hurley, director of the student experience with INTO, Marshall University, said more than 35 American students from the department of modern languages who study Spanish volunteered to work with the incoming students during arrivals and orientation.

Also, tickets have been requested for the students to attend Marshall's home football game Friday, Nov. 28 - the day after Thanksgiving - against Western Kentucky.


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Thursday October 30, 2014
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School of Medicine receives $25,000 gift for Chertow-Keller Family Endowment

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Chertow-Keller Family Endowment, established at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in 2009, has received a generous $25,000 gift from one of its original benefactors.

Eileen Keller recently made the gift in memory of her husband, Leonard, who passed away last year.

"We are honored to make this donation in memory of Leonard," Keller said.  "We know that he was committed to the endowment and so proud of our brother Dr. Bruce Chertow and his commitment to find new treatments and a cure for diabetes.  We are hopeful that this donation will make a difference and will honor Leonard's memory."

The endowment was initially created by Bruce and Janice Chertow, Leonard and Eileen Keller, Wayne and Roselyn Chertow, and their family and friends. Chertow, professor emeritus and former chief of endocrinology, established Marshall's endocrinology fellowship training program and served as the lead proponent for creation of the Diabetes Center at Marshall University which now bears his name.

"Eileen's gift reflects the family's love for Lenny and his generosity," Chertow said. "We are pleased to continue to support Marshall's school of medicine."

The funds from the endowment are awarded to an endocrinology fellow or internal medicine resident to attend a professional meeting focusing on diabetes. Additionally, the funds may also be used to assist a medical student who has an interest in endocrinology.

Larry D. Dial, M.D., chair of the department of internal medicine, says support from the Chertow-Keller Family Endowment is extremely helpful in the development of young career endocrinologists.

"In an era of increased challenges for research and education funding from sources like National Institutes of Health and others, scholarly activity continues to be at risk," Dial said.  "It's only through the philanthropic generosity of supporters like the Kellers and Chertows that we can continue to educate our physicians for the future."

The School of Medicine established its endocrinology fellowship in 1987.

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Photo: Leonard and Eileen Keller were among the founders of the Chertow-Keller Family Endowment.


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Office Depot Inc. presents Marshall with award for its proactive efforts to encourage greener purchasing behavior

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials from Office Depot Inc. visited Marshall University's Huntington campus Wednesday, Oct. 29, to present a special recognition award to Margie Phillips, Sustainability Manager at Marshall, and Stephanie Smith, MU's Director of Purchasing and Chief Procurement Officer, for the university's greener purchasing efforts.

"Every year for the past seven years Office Depot has recognized a select group of customers for leadership in greener purchasing efforts," said Yalmaz Siddiqui, Senior Director of Environmental & Supplier Diversity Strategy at Office Depot. "We are pleased to present Marshall University a Special Recognition for Community Engagement Award for their very proactive efforts to engage internal and external stakeholders in greener purchasing behavior."

Marshall University also was honored at the Office Depot Greener Purchasing Summit and Awards Ceremony Sept. 17.

"Office Depot presented 32 awards to various companies, universities, K-12, health care and public customers at the summit," said Bryan Heeb, district sales manager for Office Depot Inc.

Phillips said "Green Purchasing" is an important element to achieve sustainable development and to "Be Marshall Green."

"By choosing to purchase environmentally friendly products, the university helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions, cut solid waste, preserve natural resources and conserve energy," she said.

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Photo: From left are Jeff Frazier, Regional Sales Manager at Office Depot; Margie Phillips, Sustainability Manager at Marshall; Stephanie Smith, Director of Purchasing and Chief Procurement Officer at Marshall; Bryan Heeb, District Sales Manager at Office Depot, and Penny Shrader, Territory Development Manager at Office Depot.


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Thursday October 30, 2014
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Public forums to focus on higher education funding

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the second consecutive year, Marshall University will host a series of forums for faculty, staff, students and members of the community to discuss the future of higher education funding in West Virginia.

Forums will take place over a one-week span in mid-November on three of the university's campuses. The programs are intended to give people an opportunity to learn about budget cuts and their impact, as well as to ask questions. The forums are free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the Office of the President and the university's Faculty Senate Legislative Affairs Committee, the forums will be moderated by Beth Vorhees, news director for West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Forums begin at 6 p.m. on the following dates:

  • Thursday, Nov. 13, in the Drinko Library, third-floor atrium, on the Huntington campus
  • Tuesday, Nov. 18, in the library on the South Charleston campus
  • Thursday, Nov. 20, at the Mid-Ohio Valley Center in Point Pleasant

Legislators and representatives from the governor's office and the Higher Education Policy Commission have been invited to participate on the panels.

West Virginia's public higher education institutions have weathered more than 11 percent in cuts to their state budget appropriations over the past two fiscal years and are concerned about potential future cuts.

During the year that has passed since last year's forums, Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said his concerns have not changed. He remains highly concerned that the cost-shifting from the state to students and their families will continue if state government continues its recent approach of transferring more of the direct financial costs of a public college education to students and their families through further reductions in the institutions' state budget appropriations.

"In addition to working to keep a college education attainable and affordable for our residents, we all need to evaluate the long-term effects that these types of budget cuts have on future state economic development and vitality," Kopp added. "Continuing cuts of this nature have never yielded a path to prosperity. Failure to invest sufficiently in our state's most precious resource -- our people -- portends damaging and enduring consequences for our state, region and future."

Dr. William Price is a chemistry faculty member and chairman of the Legislative Affairs Committee. He said it is important for the faculty to work closely with the university's administration to make sure people understand the impact additional cuts will have on higher education in the state.

"When cuts are made to state funding for higher education, the institutions have to increase tuition and eliminate programs at the same time other services to students decline," he said. "We are not asking the state to increase our funding, but we do want to make sure our voice is heard regarding the possibility of future cuts."

Kopp said he is optimistic that attendance at the forums will surpass last year's.

"Last year's forums were very successful and well attended," he said. "It showed that everyone, from legislators to faculty, staff and especially students, to members of the community, is concerned about the funding of higher education in West Virginia. We are looking forward to hearing from everyone during these upcoming events."

According to an analysis by Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce, West Virginia needs to produce an additional 20,000 college degrees by 2018 just to sustain its current economy.

The analysis also found that by 2020, 51 percent of West Virginia jobs will require an associate degree or higher. Currently, only 27 percent of West Virginians fall in that category.


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Thursday October 30, 2014
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Officials from Marshall, BridgeValley sign agreement for business degree

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Officials at Marshall University and BridgeValley Community & Technical College in South Charleston have announced an agreement that will help residents of West Virginia earn an associate degree and a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in a discipline related to business.

Through the agreement, Marshall will accept a maximum of 72 hours of college-level coursework offered by BridgeValley. Such courses may be used to fulfill a portion of Marshall's general education curriculum, as well as part of a baccalaureate program of study.

"We have worked with Dean Megan Lorenz at BridgeValley for a year on this articulation agreement," said Dr. Haiyang Chen, dean of Marshall's College of Business. "Thanks to her and our people's hard work, we have a comprehensive articulation agreement between the two institutions. We look forward to working with faculty, staff and students at BridgeValley to make the transfer process as smooth as possible. We are very pleased to make this happen."

Lorenz, dean of business and legal studies at BridgeValley, said, "BridgeValley's new articulation agreement with Marshall University provides our graduates an opportunity to seamlessly progress to a four-year degree. Students can begin their college educations locally at BridgeValley and finish with a fantastic university like Marshall, or enter the workplace in a variety of career paths."

Students working toward the bachelor's degree will be encouraged to work with academic advisors to ensure their previous, current and future courses fulfill the requirements of their chosen program of study. Course substitutions may be available upon the approval of the appropriate Marshall University department chair and academic dean.

Upon completion of the Associate in Science degree, participating students will apply for admission to Marshall and must meet all admission requirements prior to acceptance and matriculation. Students who transfer to Marshall will be allowed to transfer courses as specified in the agreement.

The terms of the agreement were approved on Monday, Oct. 27, by the respective administrations of the two schools.


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Monday October 27, 2014
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New associate dean for medical education named at Marshall University School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Charles A. Gullo has been named associate dean for medical education at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the school, announced today.

Gullo, who most recently was in Singapore with the Duke/NUS Medical School and the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, will be responsible for oversight of the medical education program including curriculum improvement, development and implementation, as well as assessment and improvement of medical education evaluation methods. Additionally, he will assist in faculty development and student assessment.

"I am very happy to be here at Marshall after eleven years in Singapore," Gullo said.  "It is very apparent how strong the ties are between the medical school and the community and I'm very happy with the close-knit, family friendly atmosphere that exists here."

Gullo was deputy director for curriculum development at the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine and also served as an assistant professor in immunology at the Duke/NUS Graduate Medical School.  Prior to his affiliation with the schools in Singapore, Gullo was a scientist/investigator with the Cancer Immunology Laboratory and the Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory at Singapore General Hospital.

He holds a doctorate in microbiology/immunology from the University of Virginia and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at Beth Israel Deaconess/Harvard Medical Center in 2003.

Gullo officially joined the School of Medicine Oct. 14.


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Friday October 24, 2014
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Fate and passion bring wellness to Marshall University's artists

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In the performing arts, there is a saying: The show must go on. Unfortunately, that do-or-die mentality that often lives within actors and musicians can cause their life's work to come crashing down, potentially even causing career-ending injuries. 
 
Two of Marshall's assistant professors one in music and one in theatre teamed up to form the university's Center for Wellness in the Arts for that very reason.
 
"My ballet studio growing up had a poster on the wall that said 'No pain, no gain,' " recalled Nicole Perrone, assistant professor of theatre at Marshall University. "And I took that to heart, especially as my passion for dance grew in my teen years.
 
"I just kept pushing myself through pain, fatigue and through injury," Perrone admitted.
 
It wasn't until Perrone was an acting student at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York that she discovered health and wellness in the arts through the Alexander Technique, a practice of release of tension and freedom of movement through body awareness and mindfulness.
 
About the same time across the world, Dr. Eckhart Altenmüller, then an assistant in the Department of Neurology at the University of Tübingen researching auditory processing and motor systems in musicians, saw one of his first musician patients, a young German musician named Henning Vauth. What Vauth learned from Dr. Altenmüller, along with his own experiences, guided his pursuit to an increased focus on health in the arts.
 
"Personally, I have several friends not one or two, but several friends who had to give up their careers and lost their jobs because they injured themselves," Vauth said. "These injuries not only affected their playing, they were caused by their playing and by the way they practiced beforehand."
 
Soon after Vauth arrived to Marshall University as an assistant professor of music, a dialogue began between Vauth and Perrone that set the script for a focus of wellness in the arts in Huntington.
 
Since August, Certified Athletic Trainers in the Center for Wellness in the Arts have seen nearly 200 students, and the demand keeps growing. On Oct. 14, Vauth and Altenmüller were reunited when the now director for the Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians' Medicine in Hannover, Germany toured Huntington for four days and delivered the keynote address during the Wellness in the Arts Inauguration.
 
"I'm confident that eventually our efforts here will go beyond sprained ankles, and that we will be creating a culture of wellness that will be serving artists for years to come," Perrone said.
 
The Marshall Center for Wellness in the Arts clinic is open 4-6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays in the athletic training lab located in Gullickson Hall room 209 on the Marshall Huntington campus.  For more information about the CWA, contact Perrone at perronen@marshall.edu, Vauth at vauth@marshall.edu, or visit the center's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MarshallCWA.

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Friday October 24, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Assistant professor of science and religion at Harvard Divinity School to speak at Marshall's Visual Arts Center Nov. 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Ahmed Ragab, the Richard T. Watson assistant professor of science and religion at Harvard  Divinity School, will speak at Marshall University's Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 7.

Ragab will be the guest speaker at the 5th annual da Vinci Lecture, sponsored by Marshall's Honors College and the Office of the Provost. Ragab's talk, titled "From Plague to Ebola: The Social Life of Epidemics and the Making of Global Health," is free to the public.

"This talk will address the 'social making of epidemics;' how societies were and are affected by academics, what makes a particular infectious disease an epidemic, how governments, authorities and different societies responded to epidemics throughout history," Ragab said.

Throughout history, Ragab said, epidemics struck society's high rates of mortality, debilitating morbidity and the ability to spread rapidly across borders and boundaries. Epidemics interrupted social lives, imposed significant pressures on populations, economies and governments, and put pressure on global cooperation and international organizations, he said.

"Epidemics also tested the limits of medical innovation, the ability to provide and distribute treatments and the effectiveness of public health measures and institutions," Ragab said.

"The talk will investigate the development of quarantines, their meaning in medical and public health literature, and their cost and importance at social and political levels," Ragab said. "In exploring the history of epidemics and quarantines, the talk explores the making of global health policies, priorities and institutions and how they developed through debates, negotiations and conflicts surrounding such events."

Ragab joined Harvard Divinity School in July 2011 as the Richard T. Watson assistant professor of science and religion. He is a physician, historian and scholar of the medieval and modern Middle East, with a medical degree from Cairo University and a doctorate in the history and philosophy of science from the Ecole Pratiques des Hautes Etudes in Paris.

"I find this topic to be very timely," said Dr. Nicki LoCascio, interim dean of the MU Honors College. "Putting the current Ebola concerns into context with how other disease outbreaks were addressed by political and cultural settings is important. Dr. Ragab will show us what we know and can learn from prior epidemics. Given his numerous accolades and accomplishments it is an honor to have Dr. Ragab speak at Marshall University."

Ragab's work includes the history and development of medieval Islamic sciences, the relationship between science and religion in the medieval and modern Middle East, the history of medieval Islamic hospitals, and the intellectual and cultural history of women in the region.

He has completed monographic studies of institutionalization and modernization in medieval and early modern science and medicine within Islamic cultures, and he writes on contemporary questions at the foundations of science, religion and culture. Ragab is also the author of numerous articles and book sections and papers. His book, Al-Qawl al-Sarih fi ilm al-Tashrih: Anatomy, medicine and religion in the Ottoman Middle East, is an edition of a rare manuscript on anatomy from eighteenth-century Ottoman Egypt.

He is currently completing two book projects:  A Biography of a Hospital: Medicine, Religion and Charity in the Medieval Middle East, which is a study of the medieval Islamic hospital; and, In the Name of God the Healer: Prophetic Medicine in the Medieval and Modern Middle East, a study of the development of prophetic medicine from the medieval to the contemporary period. Ragab is also working on a research project on perceptions of bodies, genders, and sexualities in medical, religious, and cultural views in the Islamic world.


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Friday October 24, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Pharmacy sponsors first Research Days event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Posters and presentations will be plentiful at the Marshall University School of Pharmacy beginning Monday, Oct. 27, as faculty and students showcase their research projects during the school's first Research Days event.

Chris Gillette, Ph.D., event organizer and assistant professor of pharmacy practice, administration and research, said the three-day event is meant to encourage pharmacy students to explore areas of research, as well as serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary engagement.

"We hope this event will become an annual platform that allows students to see the wide spectrum of research opportunities available to them not only through the School of Pharmacy, but also through interdisciplinary projects with the College of Health Professions, School of Medicine and other sciences across Marshall's campus," Gillette said.  "We will feature research in areas like pharmacy/medical education, pharmaceutics, immunology and neuroscience."

Posters will be on display beginning Monday in the lobby of the School of Pharmacy, located on the campus of the Huntington Veterans Affairs Medical Center at 1542 Spring Valley Dr.

The researchers will be available starting at noon Wednesday, Oct. 29, in the lobby at the School of Pharmacy.  The session is open to all Marshall University faculty, staff and students, and lunch will be served.
 
For more information, contact Gillette at 304-696-7395.


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Thursday October 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Countdown to Commencement is Nov. 4-5 at Marshall University

Graduates can take care of pre-commencement responsibilities in central location

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will conduct its semi-annual Countdown to Commencement Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 4 and 5, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus.

The purpose of Countdown to Commencement is to assist those participating in this year's winter commencement, which is set for 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 14, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington. It is for July, August and tentative December 2014 graduates.

Previous winter commencement ceremonies took place in the Henderson Center on the Huntington campus, but the continued growth in the number of graduates forced the university to switch to the Big Sandy.

Countdown to Commencement is designed to assist graduates in communicating with campus administrative offices in a central location. It, too, has grown in recent years.

"This event continues to grow in popularity," Registrar Roberta Ferguson said of Countdown to Commencement. "We encourage everyone who plans to attend winter commencement to stop by the Don Morris Room November 4th or 5th. We guarantee that, because everything is in a central location, 'Countdown' will save them a lot of running as they take care of pre-commencement responsibilities."

Countdown to Commencement is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days.

The following services will be available at Countdown to Commencement:

Registrar's Office - Students can verify graduation status, name format, and address for mailing diplomas; confirm commencement participation; obtain commencement instructions; receive recognition cords for military service or ROTC; pick up honor cords and tassels (if graduating with academic honors); and have an opportunity to report any special needs or concerns related to the event.

Marshall University Bookstore - Students can be measured for and purchase their caps and gowns, as well as purchase tassels, diploma frames, class rings and much more.

Jostens - Students can purchase their Marshall University Class of 2014 rings. Rings are on sale for as low as $169 for women and $189 for men. Also, students can order graduation announcements.

GradImages Photography - Cap and Gown portraits will be taken. There is no sitting fee, no obligation to purchase and free proofs will be available within 24 hours of the sitting.

Framing Success - Diploma frames will be available for purchase.

Graduate College - A graduate admission counselor will be available to discuss graduate programs and assist with the admission process.

Career Services - Students are encouraged to let the Career Center know their post-graduation plans so it can help them along their career paths. Students may stop by the Career Services table to register for JOBTRAX (online job search assistance). Information and support will be available on job-related questions, resume assistance, interview skills and much more.

Office of the Bursar - Students may talk with staff about anything concerning their student accounts, holds, account balances and loan counseling interviews.

Financial Aid - Students may pick up information about upcoming financial aid workshops in which they may learn about default prevention, debt management, loan repayment, loan consolidation and loan forgiveness/cancellation programs. They also will have the opportunity to complete their loan exit counseling.

Campus ID Office - Issues regarding students' HigherOne accounts or Points accounts may be resolved.

Alumni Relations - Students can learn about the benefits of a Marshall University Alumni Association membership.

Center for African American Students - All African and African American graduates are encouraged to stop by for information and to enroll for purposes of participating in the Christmas Donning of Kente celebration, scheduled Dec. 13 in the Smith Recital Hall.

Military and Veterans' Affairs - Veterans may pick up their graduation cords at this event.

For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 304-696-6410.


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Thursday October 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Services to conduct fall Etiquette Dinner next Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its bi-annual Etiquette Dinner, featuring etiquette consultant Terri Thompson, Tuesday, Oct. 28.

During the four-course meal, Thompson will offer business etiquette tips for handling dinner-time interviews and networking events, along with answering any questions students might have.

"This is an important event for students," said Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach at Career Services. "They leave with more confidence to handle those sometimes stressful social situations or interviews that include a formal meal."

All current Marshall students may attend. However, juniors, seniors and graduate students are especially encouraged to attend. The dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. in room BE5, located in the basement of the Memorial Student Center.  Doors open at 6 p.m., and professional dress is required.

Tickets must be picked up in advance at the Career Services Center by Monday, Oct. 27. A $5 reservation fee is required but will be refunded at the dinner.
 
Thompson is an etiquette coach and reinvention expert who started the companies Etiquette in Action and Swizzle Stick Speaking. Throughout her career, she has helped thousands develop professional poise, confident communication skills and personal polish.

For more information, contact Career Services at 304-696-2370.


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Thursday October 23, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Internationally heard chamber choir to perform free concert

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Fresh off opening for Jay Leno last week, the Marshall University Chamber Choir will be offering a free concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 9, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Directed by College of Arts and Media Associate Dean Dr. David Castleberry, the performance will include music by Brahms, Vaughan Williams and Victoria, as well as a variety of folk and contemporary selections.

Castleberry said the members of this year's Chamber Choir were chosen by audition.

"I'm excited about the number and quality of the new singers in this year's choir," Castleberry said. "I'm looking forward to many upcoming projects."

Castleberry said the group has been recognized through recordings and performance tours, including a 2012 tour to France. He said plans are in the works for another international tour, this time a trip to Spain slated for spring 2016.

For more information about the Marshall University Chamber Choir, visit www.marshall.edu/music. For more information about this performance, contact Castleberry at castlebe@marshall.edu or (304) 696-2963.


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Thursday October 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Masquerade ball, silent auction to benefit Women's Studies Program and SAFE, Inc.

Entire Huntington community encouraged to participate

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Women's Studies Masquerade Ball and Silent Auction will take place from 6:30 to 11 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Proceeds from the event will go towards supporting Marshall's Women's Studies Program and SAFE, Inc., a domestic violence shelter serving McDowell, Mercer and Wyoming counties in West Virginia.

"We encourage our guests to come in costume or to come in formal wear and a mask," said Dr. Jill M. Treftz, an assistant professor of English at Marshall. "We will also have some masks available at the party.  We welcome community involvement and hope that members of the entire Huntington community will help us to make this event a success."

Tickets cost $15 for students and $25 for non-students, and must be pre-purchased. Included in the ticket price is access to an open wine bar, a variety of non-alcoholic beverages, assorted snacks and desserts, and a chance to win door prizes.

Donors for the silent auction include Blenko Glass, Le Bistro, Bottle & Wedge, Glenn's Sporting Goods, Paula Vega Cupcakes, Pottery Place and the Pullman Square Starbucks, along with a number of other local businesses and individuals.

Tickets can be purchased from Treftz (treftz@marshall.edu) in Corbly Hall 312; Dr. Robin Conley (conleyr@marshall.edu) in Smith Hall 740B; Dr. Dawn Howerton (howertond@marshall.edu) in Harris Hall 305; Dr. Laura Michele Diener (diener@marshall.edu) in Harris Hall 107; Dr. Zelideth Rivas (rivasz@marshall.edu) in Smith Hall 743, or Leslee Browning (browning108@marshall.edu) in Old Main 357.


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Wednesday October 22, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Hager wins two championships as Thundering Word performs well at UK

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word speech and debate team, with just half of its team participating, placed second in combined speech and debate at the Bluegrass Invitational Oct. 11-12 at the University of Kentucky.

Marshall finished third in Individual Events and was awarded as the top Pi Kappa Delta team at the competition. Among the other schools participating in the event were the University of Kentucky, Carson-Newman University, Ohio University, Texas Christian University, Eastern Michigan University, Bowling Green State University and Western Kentucky University.

Individually for Marshall,

  • Alyssa Hager, a sophomore Communication Studies major from West Hamlin, West Virginia, was the tournament champion in both Persuasive Speaking and Broadcasting. She placed second in Dramatic Interpretation and fourth in Poetry Interpretation.
  • DeVan Sample, a senior Honors English major from Martinsburg, West Virginia, placed second in Dramatic Duo with Kaiwon Tresvant, a junior Criminal Justice major from Detroit, Michigan, and sixth in Dramatic Duo with Juliet Djietror, a senior pre-med Biology major from Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Sample placed sixth in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Djietror was fourth in Prose Interpretation.
  • Taryss Mandt, a junior Geology major from Arlington, Virginia, was third in Persuasive Speaking.
  • Logan Spence, a sophomore Communication Studies major from Davie, Florida, was sixth in Informative Speaking and fifth in Poetry Interpretation.
  • Garrett Walker, a senior Spanish major from Beckley, West Virginia, was fifth in Rhetorical Criticism and fourth in Extemporaneous Speaking.

-----------

Photo: From left, Garrett Walker, Sarah Nix, Kaiwon Tresvant, Jada Morton, Taryss Mandt, Devan Sample, Alyssa Hager, Logan Spence and Juliet Djietror pose with trophies they won at the Bluegrass Invitational.


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Wednesday October 22, 2014
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Marshall celebrates Food Day Oct. 23 with '100-Mile Meal'

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Last year, more than 300 universities across the U.S. organized events to celebrate Food Day and this year, Marshall University is joining the movement. Food Day, a nationwide celebration of healthy and affordable foods, advocates for better food policies on a local, state and federal level.

Christina Gayheart, president of Marshall's Student Association of Nutrition and Dietetics, said the organization has partnered with Marshall's Dining Services and Sustainability Department to host a "100-Mile Meal" from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23, in Towers Marketplace on the Huntington campus.

"Food for this dinner will be sourced within 100 miles of Marshall University, helping to support our area farmers and to create a more stable, sustainable economy," Gayheart said. "This is an opportunity to educate the public about locally produced, healthy foods and push for a change in the American food system."

The meal will be free for students who have a meal plan and cost $10.49 for the rest of the Marshall community.

"This will be a meal prepared using local resources including chicken, dumplings and smoked ham from Kentucky Proud in Walton, Kentucky; mashed potatoes from Mrs. Dennis's Farms in Wauseon, Ohio; mixed fall vegetables from Holthouse Farms in Willard, Ohio; brown-and-serve rolls from Heiner's Bakery in Huntington; and ice cream topped with baked West Virginia-grown apple slices from Broughton's Milk and Ice Cream," Gayheart said.

Lauren Kemp, Local Food Business Programs Director at Unlimited Future Inc. and a sponsor for Marshall's 100-Mile Meal, said she oversees the 30-Mile Meal Huntington program, which is a regional flavor and food development initiative working in the tri-state area. Kemp said the 100-Mile Meal will begin to show students the wealth of food that can be grown in this region.

"It is so great to see Marshall's student leaders asking for local foods in the university dining halls," Kemp said.  "Student leadership from the Student Association of Nutrition and Dietetics shows that students are starting to care about where their food comes from and this could lead to great opportunities to connect the campus with our community."

Special events will be hosted by the Wild Ramp, 30-Mile Meal, Marshall's Sustainability Department and the Student Association of Nutrition and Dietetics including a photo booth, informational tables, video games and prizes. The campus radio station, WMUL-FM 88.1, will provide music and entertainment. For more information about the 100-Mile Meal, contact Gayheart at gayheart@marshall.edu or visit http://www.marshall.edu/100milemeal/ online.

Local media are welcome to attend this event.


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Wednesday October 22, 2014
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MU professor, Dr. Richard F. McCormick, honored with Koch Award by the West Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Richard F. McCormick, a professor of engineering at Marshall University, was given the Roy D. Koch Award for his lifetime of service to the West Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) at the Section's annual meeting Sept. 27 at Oglebay Park in Wheeling, West Virginia.

The award is the highest honor given by the West Virginia Section of ASCE, and it was established in 1974 "to recognize those individuals who have provided meritorious service to the West Virginia Section for an extended period of time."

McCormick served as treasurer, vice-president and president of the Section in the late 1980's, wrote the first Section handbook in 1996, and has remained active in the Section since that time.  However, he was mainly recognized with the Koch Award because of his many years of work with ASCE student chapters at WVU Tech and Marshall University.  He served as the Tech ASCE faculty advisor for more than 20 years, and is the founding advisor of Marshall's new ASCE student chapter.

McCormick was nominated for the award by his dean, Dr. Wael Zatar, with the final decision being made by the Section's board of directors.



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Tuesday October 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

COEPD undergoes numerous major transitions; Clinical experiences office and student services office merge into S.C.o.P.E.S.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Education and Professional Development (COEPD) has undergone major transitions since last semester. From a total basement renovation in Jenkins Hall, to office and classroom relocations across campus, there have been many changes within the college.

One sufficient variation has transformed the clinical experiences office and student services office into S.C.o.P.E.S - Student Center of Professional Education Services. S.C.o.P.E.S has merged two offices into one in hopes of better serving the students. The office provides a one-stop shop for all questions and concerns relating to COEPD advising, certification, clinical experiences and graduation.

"We want to provide consistency to both our students and faculty. Our goal is to become more efficient. The merging of these two offices just made sense. Everyone in the office is excited for this new adventure," said S.C.o.P.E.S. Director Kandice Napier.

New Roles:

Napier joined the College of Education and Professional Development in 2011. She has worked in a staff role at MU for 15 years. Napier has served as the director of the college's student services department since 2011, and will now serve as director for S.C.o.P.E.S.
Kandice.napier@marshall.edu, 304-696-6842, Jenkins Hall 226

Amanda Preece is a fresh face in the COEPD. Preece has transitioned from serving as a public educator for 12 years in Wayne County and now joins the S.C.o.P.E.S. team as assistant director. Preece's experience will be an asset to the office.
Amanda.preece@marshall.edu, 304-696-3100, Jenkins Hall 204

Betty Lewis continues in her role as the program's academic advisor. Lewis has been with the college of education for more than 29 years, and is a vital contact for students and faculty alike.
lewis@marshall.edu, 304-696-2865, Jenkins Hall 231

Tammy Aliff is the program's education credential specialist as a liaison to the West Virginia Department of Education in regards to certification and to the university regarding graduation. Aliff boasts more than 31 years of service at MU.
aliff@marshall.edu, 304-696-2857, Jenkins Hall 230

Toni Ferguson worked with the clinical office and student teaching department prior to the S.C.o.P.E.S. merger. Ferguson now serves as support to the S.C.O.P.E.S office as program associate. Her MU service includes eight dedicated years.
fergusont@marshall.edu, 304-696-3239, Jenkins Hall 200

Susan Midkiff is the program's administrative secretary, senior. Midkiff has been with the COEPD for one year, and is currently an MU student majoring in elementary education. She provides a unique understanding of the perspectives of both the staff and students. 
Midkiff53@marshall.edu, 304-696-2861, Jenkins Hall 225

For more information, stop by the office in Jenkins Hall 225 or visit http://www.marshall.edu/coepd/.


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Friday October 17, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall band faculty to present first performance together

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre will present the university's Symphonic Band and Wind Symphony at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 23, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The performance, which will include nearly 200 performers, will be the first to include both new band directors at Marshall as conductors.

Marshall Director of Bands Steven Trinkle, who will be conducting the Wind Symphony, said this matchup with the Symphonic Band, conducted by Marshall Director of Athletic Bands Dr. Adam Dalton, will bring a new musical approach to the city.

"This is a big change for this school," Trinkle said. "The setup, the size it's just radically different from what's happened here before."

Dr. Richard Kravchack, director of the School of Music and Theatre, said he's excited to present the first performance by the new band faculty members.

"Our program has been incredibly enriched by their artistry, pedagogical skill and commitment to student achievement," Kravchak said.

For more information about music at Marshall University, visit www.marshall.edu/music.



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Thursday October 16, 2014
Contact: Dr. Kelli Prejean, Associate Professor of English, 304-696-4015

Marshall alumnus to return as visiting scholar Oct. 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Todd Snyder, who received both B.A. and M.A. degrees in English from Marshall University, will return to the university's Huntington campus Tuesday, Oct. 28 as a visiting scholar. He will speak from 5 to 7 p.m. in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center.

Snyder, now an assistant professor of English at Siena College in Loudonville, New York, is returning to Marshall to celebrate the publication of his first book, The Rhetoric of Appalachian Identity, which, according to the promotional material from the publisher, "blends critical theory, ethnographic research, and personal narrative to demonstrate how family work histories and community expectations both shape and limit the academic goals of potential Appalachian college students."

"Todd's thinking about these issues of identity, social class and language first began during his studies at Marshall," said Dr. Kelli Prejean, associate professor of English at Marshall, "and he is thrilled to return to Huntington to discuss his research and teaching."

In addition to the event at the Memorial Student Center, Snyder will be appearing at Empire Books and News in Huntington from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 26, to sign copies of the book.

More information on the author may be viewed online at  www.hillbillyspeaks.com/. The events of Oct. 26 and 28 also are on Facebook: book signing at Empire Books (https://www.facebook.com/events/1478500725733328/) and Oct. 28 speaking event (https://www.facebook.com/events/635142343273345/).


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Thursday October 16, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, University Communications, 304-746-1964

Marshall officials continuing infectious disease preparedness efforts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Infectious diseases have been in the news lately and although the risk of a case of the Ebola virus in the Marshall University campus community is remote, university leaders and health officials have been working to make sure the university is prepared to deal with that possibility, as well as the potential for outbreaks of influenza and Enterovirus D68.

Tracy Smith, director of Marshall's Department of Environmental Health and Safety, says representatives of his office, the university's Student Health Education Programs, Student Health Services, Department of Housing and Residence Life, and the INTO Marshall University program for international students have been coordinating infectious disease preparedness efforts for weeks, including reviewing the university's Communicable Diseases Response plan and discussing procedures and immunization requirements for students.

Director of Student Health Education Programs Amy Saunders said the university follows guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and coordinates with the Cabell-Huntington Health Department regarding plans to address potential outbreaks of all infectious diseases. She added, "We have a great partnership with our local health department and work closely with them on the prevention of infectious diseases. We have a well-developed emergency response plan, and we are currently reviewing our policies and procedures so we can make sure that we are doing everything we can to be prepared."

The CDC advises the following measures to help prevent the spread of germs:

  • Get a flu vaccination.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.
  • If an outbreak of flu or another illness occurs, follow public health advice.

Specifically related to the Ebola virus, the Marshall planning group is taking the following measures:

  • Monitoring Ebola advisories from the CDC;
  • Coordinating with other campus groups and the Office of the President;
  • Advising travelers traveling to and from areas of ongoing transmission;
  • Developing plans to monitor and evaluate returning travelers who may be at risk;
  • Assessing and reinforcing infection control measures and equipment; and
  • Proactively planning with local and state public health officials and campus partners, who know how to manage a potential exposure or a suspected case of Ebola.

Smith said, "The safety of the Marshall University community is our top priority. We are monitoring the Ebola situation very closely and are taking precautionary measures as recommended by federal, state and local public health officials."

Medical personnel from Marshall Health and the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine also have been coordinating with university and community colleagues to determine risk and ensure the safety of the community.

They recommend that anyone who has traveled outside of the U.S. within the last 21 days and has a fever of more than 100.4 degrees F (38 degrees C) or has headache, weakness, muscle pain, vomitting, diarrhea, abdominal pain or unexplained bleeding seek medical care immediately  at the nearest hospital emergency department.

Dr. Joseph Werthammer, chief medical officer at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said, "Marshall Health and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine are actively engaged in discussions regarding our protocols in the highly unlikely event a person with Ebola would present at one of our clinics or on our campus. We, like dozens of academic health centers and hospitals around the U.S., are following CDC guidelines and have in place procedures that protect our patients, students and staff."

To learn more about infectious diseases, review the information on the CDC's website at www.cdc.gov.

Marshall students with questions about infectious diseases should contact Student Health Education Programs at 304-696-4800 or shep@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/shep.

The university's emergency management plan is available at http://www.marshall.edu/emergency/


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Thursday October 16, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Musical theatre talents from the Greenbrier to visit Marshall music and theatre students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two Greenbrier Resort and Casino talents will be visiting Marshall University School of Music and Theatre students Tuesday, Oct. 21.

Music Director and Entertainment Consultant Tyler Griffins and Springhouse Entertainers' Lead Singer Maddie Casto will provide workshops to students and insight into the business to a MUS 100 class, which will be open to the public and take place from 2 to 2:50 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

School of Music and Theatre Director Dr. Richard Kravchak said the students could learn a lot from the young professionals.

"It's one thing for an old guy like me to tell them, 'This is what you can do,'" Kravchak said, "but it's another thing for people who look like them, and are doing what they want to do, to say it."

Kravchak said he hopes the visit will pique more students' interest into the world of musical theatre, a degree program that Marshall University doesn't currently offer, but one in which students and faculty alike are interested.

Griffin earned his B.F.A. in Musical Theatre from East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. He has been the director of music and pianist for "The Last Five Years" at Los Labradores Opera House in Mexico City, Mexico; the director of music and arranger for "Pass the Remote: TV Revue" at Bristol Valley Theatre in Rochester, New York; and musical director and co-director of shows for Norwegian Cruise Lines and The Spot Theatre in Santa Maria, California.

Casto is a native of Westerville, Ohio, and earned her B.F.A. in Musical Theatre from Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. After doing professional regional theatre throughout Ohio and West Virginia, Casto moved to New York City and went out on her first two national tours, "How I Became a Pirate" and "The D*Word (Ditched, Dumped, Divorced, and Dating)."

For more information about the Marshall University School of Music and Theatre, visit www.marshall.edu/somt.


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Wednesday October 15, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Marshall Symphony Orchestra to give 'scary concert' Tuesday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Elizabeth Reed Smith, will present "Who's Afraid of the Orchestra?" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21, in Marshall's Smith Recital Hall.

The concert, which is free and open to the public, will feature scary music by classical composers Johann Strauss Jr., Charles Gounod, Hector Berlioz and Manuel De Falla, and will end with a medley of music from "Phantom of the Opera" by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Dr. Larry Stickler, professor of music at Marshall, will narrate.

The 52-member orchestra will perform in costume, and the audience is invited to dress in costume as well. Glow bracelets will be handed out at the door.

The performance is free and open to the public. For further information please contact the School of Music and Theatre at 304-696-3117.


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Wednesday October 15, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, 304-488-8863

Marshall nursing faculty to conduct research on student retention to meet demand for nurses; participants needed

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -   A Marshall University nursing faculty member is seeking persons who started, but did not complete, Bachelor of Nursing degrees in the last ten years to participate in a study. Participants will be compensated for their time.

Dr. Nancy Elkins of the Marshall University College of Health Professions will begin her qualitative research soon with students who did not complete their four-year baccalaureate nursing programs in West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Virginia. Elkins said the results from this research study would help to improve retention rates at Marshall University and surrounding universities.
Volunteers who are interested in participating in the study can contact Elkins by e-mail at elkinsn@marshall.edu or by calling 304-696-2617. Participants in the study will receive $50 for a one-hour interview.
Elkins said research such as this is necessary when one considers the number of nurses who will be needed over the next several years.

"The nursing shortage is expected to grow and it is projected that the United States will need an additional 340,000 nurses by the year 2020, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing," Elkins said. "Because this nursing shortage continues to grow, nurse educators cannot afford to lose qualified students hoping to become RNs. We must increase the retention rate of nursing students who take one of the limited, sought-after positions in a nursing program."

Elkins said the registered nurse workforce is one of the top ten occupations in the United States with an expected job growth of 26%, which is an increase of 1.2 million nursing jobs through 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

"The results of this study may assist administrators of BSN programs with nursing student retention and program completion, which will help meet challenge of the nation's growing deficit of nurses," Elkins said.

Elkins will conduct her research alongside her co-investigator and fellow nursing colleague, Dr. Joy Cline. Cline said the results from this study could increase the number of nursing graduates and therefore improve health care throughout the U.S.

"Let's face it, our country is facing a surge in patients as baby boomers age and right now the literature shows we aren't educating enough nurses to meet the demands of the American public," Cline said. "Currently, there is no research that measures student perspectives or outcomes about their unsuccessful experiences in their nursing program. We are hoping to change that."

Dr. Denise Landry, department chair of the Marshall School of Nursing, said many students are dealing with factors that can affect their performance in the clinical and classroom setting, such as psychological stress, test-taking anxiety, juggling family obligations, work responsibilities, health issues and economic instability. Landry said she commends her colleagues for initiating research that will improve all nursing programs in the country.

"Dr. Elkins has begun to implement strategies within our School of Nursing to help prepare students to successfully complete their BSNs through her proposed Introduction to Nursing course," Landry said. "The School of Nursing is reviewing and revising the curriculum and it is a course that may exist in upcoming semesters."     

For more information on research initiatives in the Marshall School of Nursing, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: Dr. Nancy Elkins of the Marshall University School of Nursing is planning a study on people who started, but did not complete, bachelor's degrees in nursing.



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Tuesday October 14, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Octubafest to bring tricks, treats and tubas to the Tri-State

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Tricks, treats and tubas that's what's in store during this year's Octubafest at Marshall University.

Solo performances by the university's Tuba and Euphonium Studio members Friday, Oct. 24, will kick off the annual celebration. TUBAWEEN!, an event chock-full of free candy, kid-friendly activities, costumes and an array of Halloween-themed compositions by Tubonium, Marshall University's tuba/euphonium ensemble, will take place Thursday, Oct. 30. Both events begin at 7:30 p.m. in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The more-than-a-decade-old Octubafest has grown tremendously in the past seven years since the inclusion of TUBAWEEN!, according to Dr. George Palton, adjunct professor of tuba at Marshall.

"Our ensemble works very hard to bring the performance together," Palton said. "We strive for a family-like atmosphere, and the result is an event that is a lot of fun."

This year's TUBAWEEN! will feature a combined ensemble that will include students and faculty from Marshall's music department, as well as local high school students and community members.

"The most significant things about Octubafest are the involvement we receive from so many different individuals and the orchestration of new music each year," Palton said. "Every year I arrange a new medley of tunes especially for the concert."

Admission to Octubafest activities is free and open to the public. To get involved, or for more information, contact Palton at (304) 696-3117 or palton@marshall.edu.


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Monday October 13, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

'Take Back the Night' event Oct. 14 to combat domestic and sexual violence

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Women's Studies Student Association and Women's Center will join CONTACT of Huntington and Branches in a rally at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 14, to raise awareness of sexual and domestic violence. The event will take place on the Memorial Student Center Plaza on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The rally will be accompanied by several other events, said Dr. Dawn Howerton, assistant professor of psychology at Marshall. Here is a list of the events:

Monday, Oct. 13: A poster-making party will be held at 8 p.m. in the First-Year South residence hall lobby in preparation for the Take Back the Night Rally. The Marshall University Women's Studies Student Association will lead a consent workshop.

Tuesday, Oct. 14: During the day (10 a.m. to 2 p.m.), the following groups will have tables set up in the Memorial Student Center lobby: Branches (domestic violence shelter), CONTACT (rape-crisis center), Psychology Department Clinic, Women's Center, Women's Studies Student Association.

In the evening (7-10 p.m.), the local band "The Disappearing Man" will play in the Memorial Student Center lobby. Then, members of the Huntington and Marshall communities will share readings and stories of domestic and sexual violence and survival. Following the scheduled readings, there will be an open invitation for anyone present to share his or her own story.

After the readings, everyone will be asked to take a sign and join the Take Back the Night Rally march across the campus. A leader will shout chants for everyone to repeat in order to spread awareness to the Marshall community. The rally will finish up back on the Memorial Student Center plaza for a candlelight vigil, where there will be another opportunity for anyone who wants to share his or her story in a smaller setting.


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Monday October 13, 2014
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Unity Walk canceled for today, Monday Oct. 13

With sincere apology on behalf of the Unity Walk Planning Committee, a decision has been reached to cancel today's plans.

There are numerous factors that will likely impede a high successful event, if held today.

Consequently, we will  search for other creative ways and dates to carry on this tradition of Unity at MU.

 

Have a great week!


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Monday October 13, 2014
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Tri-State Marching Festival to feature 33 bands

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 33 area high school bands will march to their own drummers Saturday, Oct. 18, during the annual Tri-State Marching Festival at Marshall University's 30,000-seat Joan C. Edwards Stadium on the Huntington campus.

Hosted by the Marshall University Marching Thunder and the university's band service fraternity, Kappa Kappa Psi, the 12-hour competition will divide more than 1,000 performers into four classes ranging from 15 to more than 200 young musicians per group.

"The festival allows for some of the Tri-State's best young musicians to go head to head," said Dr. Adam Dalton, Marshall University's director of athletic bands. "It's a great opportunity to welcome many young musicians to the Marshall campus and give them a chance to perform in the beautiful Joan C. Edwards Stadium."

Each group will be judged on their music, visual and general effects and percussion, while separate judges will focus on majorettes, featured twirlers, dance lines and color guards. Bands also will be provided with audio commentary from Marshall adjudicators.

Those taking awards home will be the top three bands in each class, those with the highest music, visual and general effects regardless of class, and overall second and first runner-ups. The best group will be named grand champion for the day.

Admission to the festival is $5, with gates opening at 10 a.m. and performances beginning at 10:15. The festival will end at 10 p.m. The Marching Thunder will perform a special exhibition at 8:30 p.m., giving a sneak peek at their next show.

For more information in the Tri-State Marching Festival, visit www.marshall.edu/band online.


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Thursday October 9, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

School of Medicine celebrates its 28th annual homecoming with special activities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. It's a double celebration this weekend at Marshall University where both the university and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine are marking alumni homecoming weekend.  

Classes being honored at this weekend's events include the class of 1984, which is having its 30th reunion and the class of 1989, which celebrates its 25th.  Additionally, the classes of 1994, 1999, 2004 and 2009 are marking special milestones.
 
The School of Medicine's Alumni Association has named C. Douglas Phillips, M.D., Class of 1984, as its Distinguished Alumnus.  Phillips will be recognized during the annual homecoming banquet Friday evening at the Memorial Student Center, BE5.  He is a professor of radiology at the Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York and also serves as the director of the facility's Head and Neck Imaging practice.

Phillips and fellow graduate Thomas B. Maloney, Class of 1984, will both present continuing education sessions during alumni weekend. Maloney is a pediatrician with Group Health Associates in Cincinnati.  The presentations are as follows:

  • 2 p.m., Friday, Oct. 10, "Tinnitus: An Evidence-Based Radiology View " with Phillips
  • 3 p.m.,  Friday, Oct. 10, "Surviving Medical School with ADHD" with Maloney

Beginning at 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 11, Phillips will present another lecture, "Imaging of Hyperparathyroidism," followed by Maloney's lecture on ADHD. All lectures, which are open to the public, will be in the Harless Auditorium on the ground floor of the Marshall University Medical Center on the campus of Cabell Huntington Hospital.
 
"We are very excited to welcome Drs. Phillips and Maloney and all our graduates back for this fabulous  weekend," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs at the School of Medicine.  "Not only is it a great time for everyone to renew relationships and visit, it's a fantastic opportunity for our current students to network with our graduates." 

Saturday's events also include a "MUSOM, Mountains & Memories" tailgate party, which will be located in the parking lot between the MU Recreation Center and the Sorrell Building on 20th Street. 

More information is available from the School of Medicine at 304-691-1711.



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Thursday October 9, 2014
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'Night of the Living Dead' to be shown Oct. 22 in the Drinko Library

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The Marshall University Libraries will host a free public screening of George A. Romero's influential zombie classic Night of The Living Dead in the Drinko Library Auditorium from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 22.

The critically acclaimed 1968 film follows characters Ben (Duane Jones), Barbra (Judith O'Dea), and a group of survivors as they fend off bloodthirsty "ghouls" in a rural Pennsylvania farmhouse. Considered one of the most significant horror films of all time, the low budget, black-and-white film still continues to inspire filmmakers and audiences more than 45 years after its release.

"Romero invented the modern zombie," Chris Hodge, a Marshall University student and organizer for the event, said. "Without Night of The Living Dead there wouldn't be television shows like The Walking Dead or movies like World War Z. The entire zombie genre is built around the mythos and terror Romero established in Night of The Living Dead. If you haven't seen the movie, this is the perfect opportunity to see what kicked off the zombie craze."

Before the film, the Marshall University Libraries will present a 15-minute lecture about the cultural significance and public domain status of Night of The Living Dead called "Rights of The Living Dead: How a Copyright Error Gave Birth to The Modern Zombie Genre."

Popcorn and refreshments will be provided and individuals are encouraged to arrive early, as seats are expected to fill up quickly.

For more information about the Night of The Living Dead movie screening, contact Hodge at hodge41@marshall.edu.

WHO: The Marshall University Libraries

WHAT: A public film screening of George A. Romero's influential 1968 zombie movie Night of The Living Dead with a discussion of the film's influence and public domain status

WHERE: Drinko Library Auditorium (DL402), Drinko Library, Marshall University

WHEN: Wednesday Oct. 22, 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. (Movie starts at 6 p.m.)


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Wednesday October 8, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Spots still open for Visual Arts Center art education program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Visual Arts Center will open its doors to middle schoolers for four Saturdays beginning Oct. 18 during The Collaborative, a hands-on, student-centered workshop that allows youth to explore a range of art materials within the dynamic artistic space.

Classes will be held from 10 a.m. to noon for four consecutive Saturdays beginning Oct. 18 on the 5th floor of the recently opened Visual Arts Center at 927 3rd Ave. Participants are encouraged, but not required, to join the 9:30 a.m. student-led tour of the building on Oct.18.

Dr. Maribea Barnes, a Marshall University Art and Design faculty member and the lead educator for this year's program, said the Saturday art workshop will allow sixth-eighth graders to paint, draw and think outside the box.

"These students won't be confined by desks," Barnes said. "They will be fully engaged with a variety of art materials, conduct interviews and examine artists who tell stories through their work."

Students will tell their stories through their own art, which will be on display during the final workshop session on Nov. 8. Parents, guardians and friends are encouraged to attend this session.

Barnes, a licensed Pre K-12 visual arts teacher, will be joined by Shelby Spence and Kayla Varndell, two art education students and president and vice president of the university's National Art Education Association Student Chapter, respectively.

The cost for each child is $40. Financial assistance is available. Support for the development of this youth program comes from a Hedrick Grant for Teaching Innovation. Each class is limited to 20 students in order to provide high quality, individualized instruction and registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information, contact Barnes at barnesm@marshall.edu or 304-696-2895.


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Photo: Dr. Maribea Barnes conducts an art education class in the new Visual Arts Center. Photo by Rick Lee.


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Wednesday October 8, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

German neurologist and flutist to visit Marshall's Huntington campus Oct. 13 for Center for Wellness in the Arts inauguration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eckart Altenmuller will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus Oct. 12-15 to give the keynote address for the inauguration of the Center for Wellness in the Arts (CWA).

Since August, Marshall's College of Arts and Media and the College of Health Professions have offered performing arts students the chance to work with Certified Athletic Trainers to prevent injury from occurring during performances through the CWA.

Altenmuller, director for the Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians' Medicine in Hannover, Germany, holds a master's degree in classical flute and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in neurology and neurophysiology. Altenmuller said it is important to have collaborations of this nature because musicians and other performing artists have special health care needs, which frequently are not addressed during the training of health care professionals.

"The professional life of performing artists is becoming more and more demanding," Altenmuller said. "From our research we've learned strong performance anxiety frequently has its roots in early childhood, in over-demanding parents, low self-esteem and other anxieties. Musicians are like athletes working to their limits, and they need to develop excellent self-management skills to function at such a high level for many decades."

Altenmuller said he hopes to encourage the performing arts students to develop to their best individual potential during his keynote address Monday evening.

"We will teach them healthy practice habits, including how to cope with stressors, how to gain self-confidence and recognize unfavorable postures and habits and how to improve them," Altenmuller said. "They need to learn the importance of taking breaks and physical exercise, mental training, psychological stability and how to integrate self-awareness to prevent burnout and frustration."

Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Arts and Media, said he believes it will be interesting to see the response to such a progressive focus in medicine for an often-underserved clientele.

"We feel fortunate to introduce our collaborative Center for Wellness in the Arts initiative alongside Dr. Altenmuller, a world-renowned performing arts physician," Van Horn said. "I think his expertise will lend insight into the importance of this specialty, which addresses a variety of conditions and injuries related to or impacting on an artist's ability to perform."

Van Horn said because there are so many performing artists in need of this service, he hopes the future CWA program will include a degree program specifically tailored to wellness in the arts.

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said he believes this partnership between health professions and arts and media will be beneficial for all parties.

"We wanted to invite Dr. Altenmuller to Marshall University to create long-term solutions for our campus community in regard to wellness in the arts," Prewitt said. "We hope to integrate a sustainable program on performing artists and their well-being. We believe Marshall University will eventually be known for this particular collaboration and provide more stimulating opportunities for research with our faculty and students."

Altenmuller will have the chance to discuss his research with students from the Marshall University Department of Orthopaedics before he travels back home to Germany. Dr. Ali Oliashirazi said Altenmuller will conduct Grand Rounds from 6:30-7:30 a.m. Oct. 15.
 
"It is with great pleasure and honor that we welcome Dr. Altenmuller as our Grand Rounds' Visiting Professor; he clearly bridges the gap between the arts and sciences," Oliashirazi said.

Altenmuller will give his keynote address during the CWA inauguration at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 13, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center located on Marshall's Huntington campus. Opening remarks will be given by Van Horn, theatre professor Nicole Perrone, music professor Dr. Henning Vauth, and Prewitt. For more information on the CWA inauguration, visit www.facebook.com/MarshallCWA online or contact special projects coordinator, Beth Caruthers, at roberts102@marshall.edu or 304-696-3296.

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Photos: (Above) Dr. Eckart Altenmuller said when he turned 17 he knew he wanted to become a professional musician, but his parents encouraged him to "study something real" and thus, he made the decision to study medicine. Two years later, he received a scholarship to continue his study of medicine in Paris, France - and it was there he started to take private lessons in flute with a professor from the Conservatoire de Paris, Christian Larde. (Below) After Dr. Eckart Altenmuller graduated with his M.D. in 1983, he received his first Ph.D. position in brain research. Altenmuller said his supervisor gave him the liberty to conduct research in issues in which he was interested and he began to study the differences in brain activity in musicians and non-musicians while listening to music, and later got interested in the brain mechanisms of motor learning in musicians.


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Tuesday October 7, 2014
Contact: Anna Tupper, WMUL Promotions Director, 304-377-3826

13th annual homecoming car bash set for Thursday, Oct. 9, on Buskirk Field

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - WMUL-FM, Marshall University's public radio station, will sponsor its 13th annual homecoming car bash from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, on Buskirk Field in the middle of Marshall University's Huntington campus as part of MU's Spirit Week and homecoming festivities.
 
This year, however, instead of bashing a car, participants will be bashing a truck.  They will pay $1 to bash a Chevrolet S-10 truck for two minutes. The truck is being donated by Kelly's Radiator Service, and WMUL-FM will provide the gloves, sledgehammers and goggles. 
 
"The car bash is a great way to foster a sense of school spirit," WMUL Promotions Director Anna Tupper said. "It is a homecoming tradition we are proud and excited to continue."
 
The Chevy S-10 will be painted in the colors of Marshall's homecoming opponent Middle Tennessee State University, which are royal blue and white.
 
"Homecoming is an exciting time, but it also falls right before midterms," Tupper said. "The car bash provides a way to show your Marshall pride and to take out some of the stress of worrying about midterms."
 
The dollar will provide participants with two minutes of full access to the S-10 to relieve stress and get the students excited about the football game Saturday.
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Tuesday October 7, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall graduate student chosen as PROGENY finalist for research on interdisciplinary education

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A Marshall University student has been chosen as a finalist to participate in the American Speech-Language Hearing Association's (ASHA) PROGENY research program at the association's annual conference Nov. 20-22 in Orlando, Fla.

Ryan Kerns, 22, of Romney, W.Va., is a first-year graduate assistant in the Marshall University department of communication disorders. Kerns conducted his research on faculty attitudes and perceptions of interprofessional (IPE) education. He will share this research in a poster presentation during the annual ASHA conference in November.

According to the ASHA website, "PROGENY pairs faculty researchers with undergraduate students who are first authors on poster presentations at the annual ASHA Convention. PROGENY highlights and supports the work of these undergraduates by providing them with an opportunity to talk with experienced scientists about their research, and about pursuing an academic-research career."

IPE, the topic of Kerns' research, refers to occasions when students from two or more professions in health and social care learn together during all or part of their professional training with the object of cultivating collaborative practice for providing client- or patient-centered health care. Kerns said he became interested in IPE and how it's used in the educational curriculum for future allied health professionals. Kerns collected data from faculty in the Marshall Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy as well as the College of Health Professions.

"I observed a few planning sessions for IPE sessions and thought a survey would be beneficial to help educators reflect on their experiences," Kerns said. "I also did this research because I think it is important students play an active role to ensure they gain the most out of educational opportunities."

Pam Holland, director of clinical education for the department of communication disorders, said the department's Community of Research Practice group is one way these students learn about research and the opportunities offered through the PROGENY program.

"PROGENY stands for PROmoting the future GENeration of researchers," Holland said. "That is exactly what we do at Marshall - we motivate our students and encourage them to conduct research projects which allow them to explore an academic-research career."

Kerns said he feels extremely blessed to attend an institution like Marshall University, which gives students the opportunity to strengthen and develop research skills, which can help throughout his professional career.

"Since becoming a member of the Community of Research Practice group in fall 2013, I've felt empowered and capable of doing research at this level," Kern said. "I would like to personally thank our department for helping me get to this point by supporting me and providing essential feedback, especially Dr. Susan Thomas-Frank and Mrs. Pamela Holland for being the best professional mentors I could ask for."

Holland, who also serves as an assistant professor of communication disorders, said developing research skills enhances students' clinical capabilities and prepares them to be evidence-based practitioners. Since the Community of Research Practice group began in 2008, Marshall has had eight students, including Kerns, represented in the PROGENY program in the past six years.

"We are so proud of our students and their involvement with ASHA because it highlights their continued hard work in this field," Holland said. "No matter the size of your school or department, it is possible to have a significant impact on a whole discipline. These students do this because they love it, not because they have to."

The Community of Research Practice sessions are held from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. every other Friday in Smith Hall 113 on the Huntington campus.  Students can learn more about these sessions by visiting www.marshall.edu/corp online. To find out more about ASHA, visit www.asha.org, or to learn about PROGENY, visit www.asha.org/Research/PROGENY/ online.

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Photo: Since coming to Marshall, Ryan Kerns has worked as a resident advisor, and now as a graduate assistant for The College Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Kerns said the facilitation of a successful college experience is best when a team of professionals works together. "The reiteration of these values through my time here at Marshall inspired me to do this research," Kerns said. "The feeling of being part of Marshall's community is why I chose to continue my education here." For more information on Ryan's research, you can contact him via e-mail at kerns33@marshall.edu.



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Tuesday October 7, 2014
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Homecoming parade set to begin at 8:30 a.m. Saturday

Lineup for participants to start at 7:30 a.m.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The start time of the Marshall University homecoming parade, which takes place Saturday, Oct. 11, in downtown Huntington, has been set for 8:30 a.m. at the request of city officials.

The early start time is intended to help alleviate traffic congestion near Joan C. Edwards Stadium, where Marshall's football team will play Middle Tennessee State University at noon.

Parade participants are asked to line up at 7:30 a.m. at the intersection of 8th Street and 4th Avenue. The parade will start precisely at 8:30 a.m. and will head east on 4th Avenue to 12th Street, where it will turn right. It will then turn left on 5th Avenue and finish at 20th Street near the stadium.


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Monday October 6, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall athletic training students travel to State Capitol to discuss importance of licensure in West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Faculty and students from the Marshall University College of Health Professions visited the State Capitol last month to meet with senators and delegates about the importance of instituting athletic training licensure in West Virginia. Currently, 42 states have athletic training licensure and six states, including West Virginia, require only athletic trainer registration.

Zach Garrett, assistant professor of athletic training in the college, said he and his students were given the opportunity to educate state legislators about their profession and discuss the seriousness of mandating regulation for athletic trainers.

"We want to define a scope of practice for our field because there is a concern amongst the athletic training community that there are individuals who practice, but aren't qualified to do so," Garrett said. "You want your nurses to be licensed and you want your doctors to be licensed, so why wouldn't you want your athletic trainers to be licensed?"

Garrett said the state of West Virginia has 290 secondary schools with athletics and only 49 high schools have certified athletic trainers, with fewer than half who work full time. Of the 290 schools, only five are recognized by the National Athletic Training Association (NATA) to be "Safe Sport Schools," according to Garrett.

West Virginia Del. Richard J. Iaquinta said he supports the idea of athletic training licensure in West Virginia. Iaquinta said it seems like a necessary step when one considers the increasing number of injuries occurring in high school sports.

"We want to protect the safety of our young athletes and any time an injury occurs, we want to set our state's standards at the highest level for preventing injury," Iaquinta said. "It makes me sad to know our state is lagging behind and we aren't providing a necessary service in this competitive sports environment to allow our students to perform to the best of their ability."

Iaquinta said the athletic training community should expect to see this issue put on the table for the upcoming legislative session in January.

"We want to make this happen no matter how long it takes…it's too important to ignore," Iaquinta said.

Rachel Blum, an athletic training student in Marshall's program, said having the chance to discuss important issues such as these with state legislators was an amazing experience.

"This is the future of our profession and being given the opportunity to weigh in on this topic that has such impact in the athletic training community was awesome," Blum said. "Students and faculty from University of Charleston, West Virginia University and Concord will be visiting the State Capitol during the next several months and we hope with our combined efforts, we will be able to make athletic training licensure a possibility in West Virginia."

To learn more about the NATA Safe Sport Schools, visit http://www.nata.org/safe-sports-school-award online. For more information on other states' athletic training regulations, visit and view the state regulation map at http://www.bocatc.org/state-regulation/map.

To learn more about the Marshall University Department of Athletic Training, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Monday October 6, 2014
Contact: Maurice Cooley, Associate Vice President for Intercultural Affairs, 304-696-5430

Unity Walk Canceled for Oct. 6; rescheduled for Oct. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The third annual "We Are ... Family! Unity Walk Celebration," scheduled for today on Marshall University's Huntington campus, has been postponed because of rain and rescheduled for 5 p.m. Monday, Oct. 13.

The walk will start at the Marshall Recreation Center and end at the Memorial Student Center plaza. Participants in the walk are asked to gather at the Marshall Recreation Center at 4:30 p.m.

The purpose of the walk is to bring students, organizations, resident halls, athletic teams, fraternities, sororities, and faculty together and celebrate being a part of the same "family."

The homecoming court announcement will still take place as scheduled at 4:30 p.m. today in the Memorial Student Center lobby.

For more information, contact Maurice Cooley at 304-696-5430.


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Monday October 6, 2014
Contact: Carl Mummert, Department of Mathematics, (304) 696-7153

Mathematics professor awarded grant to prepare students for local industries

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Michael Schroeder, assistant professor of mathematics at Marshall University, has been awarded a competitive grant to prepare students for local careers in applied mathematics. The grant is part of the Preparation for Industrial Careers in Mathematical Sciences (PIC Math) program.

"Students are sometimes not aware of the relationship between careers and what they learn in class," Schroeder said. "The goal of PIC Math is to show students how mathematics is integral to business, industry and government."

Schroeder was selected by the national PIC Math program to teach a section of a special course for mathematics majors, in which students focus on semester-long research problems provided by local businesses. The first section of this course will be offered at Marshall and other universities nationwide in spring 2015. In the course, students will analyze real-world problems in detail, and produce video and written reports of their proposed solutions.

Students in the class will work in research groups. "I will essentially act as their manager on campus," Schroeder said. "The students and I will meet weekly to discuss progress, and we will consult regularly with a company liaison to keep the company up to date with our progress and gather feedback."

Schroeder said he is reaching out to local businesses such as Amazon.com in Kinetic Park to find problems of interest to local employers. "We want to engage local businesses to foster a relationship between Marshall and the business community. Our students often stay in the area after graduating, and this program can help them find lucrative jobs in the region."

The PIC Math program is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Mathematical Association of America and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Its goal is to educate mathematics students and faculty about non-academic employment. It also aims to develop ties between universities and local businesses.

The videos and reports from the PIC Math sections nationwide will be judged in June 2015, and the best will be recognized at a national conference in August 2015.

Schroeder has been a faculty member at Marshall for four years. He earned a Ph.D. in mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2011. His research focuses on discrete mathematics and graph theory.


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Monday October 6, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Homecoming court named at MU; Miss Marshall, Mr. Marshall to be announced at halftime of Saturday's game

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The field of candidates for Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall has been narrowed to 10 after Marshall University announced its homecoming court today in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

Homecoming 2014, with a theme of "Marco's Favorite Heroes and Toughest Villains," began today and runs through Saturday.

The five candidates for Miss Marshall are: Paige Dodrill; Lila Mangus; Ashley Prichard, Morgan Wright and Jazmine McDowell.

The five candidates for Mr. Marshall are John Alley; Cam Lyons; Derek L. Robinson, Jacob Longoria and Benjamin Russell.

Miss Marshall and Mr. Marshall will be announced during halftime of Marshall's homecoming football game Saturday against Middle Tennessee State. Kickoff is at noon at Joan C. Edwards Stadium.

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Photo: Members of Marshall University's homecoming court pose for a photo today in the Memorial Student Center. They are, from left to right, Morgan Wright; John Alley; Paige Dodrill; Derek L. Robinson; Lila Mangus; Cam Lyons; Jazmine McDowell; Jacob Longoria and Ashley Prichard. Not pictured: Benjamin Russell. Photo by Braxton Crisp/Marshall University.


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Friday October 3, 2014
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, Communications Specialist, 304-696-6397

Marshall University Alumni Association launches new website

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Herdalum.com, the Marshall University Alumni Association's website, has a whole new look this week after a complete design overhaul. The new design is a result of feedback and recommendations from alumni and fans.

"We began the redesign process last year with the help and support of our web partner, iModules," said Matt Hayes, executive director of the Alumni Association. "From our research and recommendations from the iModules design team, we were able to put together a variety of elements we believe will position us at the forefront of alumni association sites."

The new design addresses requests for more photos, mobile compatibility and an improved browsing experience.

"From the beginning, this project was all about Marshall University alumni, friends and fans," said Rob Ellis, associate director of Alumni Relations. "What we've been able to create through this redesign process is the result of their collective voice. I like to think of the new herdalum.com as your one-stop shop for everything Marshall."

The new site also offers a social media hub for alumni to connect directly with colleges, departments and campus groups.

"We're very excited to finally launch this new site design," Hayes said. "It's hard to believe it's been a year since we started the redesign process. So much innovative thinking and collaboration went into this project. We hope Herd Nation will embrace this new site and utilize it to its capacity, all the while continuing our dialogue toward maximizing the full potential of this great organization."


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Friday October 3, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

School of Medicine sponsors Ambrose Health Policy Panel on the cost of Hepatitis C drugs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A panel discussion focused on the cost of new medications aimed at treating Hepatitis C is scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 9, at the Harless Auditorium in the Marshall University Medical Center on the campus of Cabell Huntington Hospital.
 
The Paul Wesley Ambrose Health Policy Panel is sponsored by the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (MU JCESOM) and its department of family and community health and health policy residency track.

Panelists include:

  • James B. Becker, M.D., Director of WV Medicaid and Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, MU JCESOM
  • Harry K. Tweel, M.D., Physician Director, Cabell-Huntington Health Department
  • Yaser M. Rayyan M.D., Associate  Professor of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, MU JCESOM

Matthew Q. Christiansen, M.D., a family medicine resident and Ambrose health policy fellow, says the discussion will center on the rising number of cases of Hepatitis C in West Virginia and the cost of the medications on patients and the state budget.
  
"We are very pleased to sponsor this discussion, which will explore the ramifications of these novel drugs, some of which have a starting price of $80,000," Christiansen said.   "We encourage physicians, health care providers and anyone else who is interested to join us for what promises to be a lively discussion."

The event is open to the public.


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Friday October 3, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Jim Justice and family to serve as grand marshals in homecoming parade

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Jim Justice, a Marshall University alumnus and owner of the famed Greenbrier Resort, along with wife, Cathy, daughter, Jill, and son, Jay, will serve as grand marshals for Marshall's 2014 homecoming parade, set for Saturday, Oct. 11.

Participants in the parade will line up at 8:30 a.m. at the intersection of 8th Street and 4th Avenue in downtown Huntington. The parade will begin as soon as everyone is lined up, heading east on 4th Avenue to 12th Street, where it turns right. It then turns left on 5th Avenue and finishes at 20th Street.

The Justices have a proud Marshall history.  Jim Justice received a B.B.A. degree in 1974, followed by an M.B.A. in 1976.  Jim was captain of the golf team at Marshall, where he fell in love with Cathy. They had known each other before and she was part of the reason he transferred to Marshall from the University of Tennessee.

Cathy Justice graduated from Marshall in 1975 and she is a large part of the family's success. Jill was an outstanding student-athlete at Marshall, where she played basketball for the Thundering Herd, earning her degree in 2007. She graduated from the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, and she opened a cupcake boutique in Blacksburg in 2012 called Gobble Cakes. Jay, a Virginia Tech graduate, helps run the family business.

"We are truly honored to welcome the Justice family back to Marshall as the 2014 homecoming grand marshals," said Marshall President Stephen J.  Kopp. "Through their entrepreneurial business investments, their dedication to our state and their personal philanthropy, Jim, Cathy, Jill and Jay represent what is best about West Virginia and its people - compassion, character and generosity. Jim often talks about having a passion for life and loving what he does for a living. Clearly, they all share in that passion and it is our good fortune to count them among the true sons and daughters of Marshall University."

Nancy Pelphrey, assistant director of alumni programs at Marshall, said she is "thrilled" that the Justice family has agreed to serve as the parade's grand marshals.

"Mr. Justice has done so much to promote our state and Marshall University," Pelphrey said. "Everybody is invited to come out and enjoy the parade and show the Justice family how much we appreciate them and everything they have done for Marshall University and the state of West Virginia."

Jim Justice brought the world-class Greenbrier Resort back into the news with the addition of a new restaurant, casino and the popular Greenbrier Classic, the first PGA golf tournament in West Virginia.  The tournament opened in 2010 to glowing reviews and has continued to flourish, annually drawing top-flight golfers and their fans to the mountain state. The resort's addition of a training camp for the New Orleans Saints professional football team this past summer brought legions of fans to the Greenbrier Valley area as well.

This year's homecoming theme is "Marco's Favorite Heroes and Toughest Villains."  The following events are scheduled for homecoming week:

Monday, Oct. 6

Campus office decorating contest begins. Winners of the decorating contest will be announced at the Picnic on the Plaza Friday, Oct. 10. Those participating in the contest are asked to decorate using this year's theme, "Marco's Favorite Heroes and Toughest Villains." The judging will be done by members of the Marshall University Alumni Association board of directors.
 
4:30 p.m. - Third-annual Unity Walk Celebration, Memorial Student Center plaza. This event brings together Marshall students, alumni and members of the community to celebrate our unity and the fact that we are all part of the Marshall family. Contact Matt James at james65@marshall.edu or Maurice Cooley at cooley@marshall.edu for more information.
                                                           
Thursday, Oct. 9

9 a.m. - Office decorating judging begins. Winners will be announced at the Picnic on the Plaza Friday, Oct. 10.

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. - WMUL-FM's annual homecoming car bash will take place on Buskirk Field.

Friday, Oct. 10

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Free picnic on the plaza with music, prizes, games and lunch, sponsored by the MU Alumni Association and the Office of Development. This is the first official alumni event of homecoming weekend. Winners of the campus office decorating contest will be announced during this event. Those attending are asked to bring canned goods to be donated to the Facing Hunger Food Bank.

7 p.m. - Pep Rally on Buskirk Field. This event, co-sponsored by the Alumni Association and the Campus Activities Board, will get Herd fans excited for the MU-Middle Tennessee State football game. The Marching Thunder, MARCO, the MU cheerleaders, student organizations, alumni, fans and friends will be on Buskirk Field at this "Yell Like Hell" Pep Rally. For more information, contact the Campus Activities Board at cab@marshall.edu.  

7:30 -9:30  p.m. - Welcome Back Champagne Reception co-hosted by the Marshall University Alumni Association and the Black Alumni Association in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center. The cost is $25 per person for advance registration and $30 the day of the event.  For reservations contact Fran Jackson at jacksonf@marshall.edu  or Nancy Pelphrey at Pelphrey@marshall.edu.

Saturday, Oct. 11

8 a.m. - 5K Alum Run.  The course starts on Veterans Boulevard and ends near Pullman Square.  The entry fee is $25.  The run is co-sponsored by the MU Alumni Association and the Huntington Lions Club.  To register contact David Specht at spechtl@frontier.com 

7:30 a.m. - Homecoming parade participants line up, followed by the start of the parade at 8:30 a.m. It starts downtown at 8th Street and 4th Avenue and finishes at Joan C. Edwards Stadium. The Marching Thunder, under the direction of new band director Adam Dalton, will be featured, along with MARCO, the Marshall cheerleaders, Marshall dignitaries and members of the homecoming court. For more information, or to register for the parade, contact Student Government Association President Duncan Waugaman at waugmand@marshall.edu.

9 a.m. - Tailgate blast. The MUAA, SGA and MU Black Alumni Association are hosting a tailgate party at 18th Street and 5th Avenue. The cost is $25 per person. Contact jacksonf@marshall.edu or pelphrey@marshall.edu for more information.

Noon - Kickoff for the homecoming football game as the Thundering Herd takes on Middle Tennessee State's Blue Raiders.  Crowning of Mr. and Miss Marshall 2014 will take place at halftime.  For tickets call 304-696-HERD, or visit www.herdzone.com. Use the promo code HC14 to save $5 on each ticket purchased.

7 p.m. - The National Pan-Hellenic Council will be hosting the Step Show at the Keith Albee Theater. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets may be bought in advance for $10 at the Center for African American Students, $12 tickets for Greek (fraternity and sorority members) wearing Greek letters, and $15 for general admission. For more information please contact Jamecia at 304-524-4542 or Cliff at 718-419-0121.

"The Marshall University Alumni Association would like to thank our homecoming sponsors - Huntington Bank, Coca-Cola and Sheetz," said Matt Hayes, executive director of the MUAA. "Sponsorships such as these afford us the ability to provide better programming to all Marshall University alumni and friends."


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Thursday October 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Third annual Unity Walk Celebration to kick off Marshall homecoming week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's third annual "We Are… Family! Unity Walk Celebration" is set to take place at 4:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6, beginning at the Recreation Center on the Huntington Campus.

The purpose of the walk is to bring students, organizations, resident halls, athletic teams, fraternities, sororities, and faculty together and celebrate being a part of the same "family."

"We are Marshall and we are one," said Maurice Cooley, associate vice president for intercultural affairs, who was among the creators of the event in 2012. "We invite all Marshall University students, staff, faculty and alumni, along with the Marshall community, to come and enjoy this most festive walk with us as we again demonstrate our loyalty, unity, inclusiveness and oneness."

Organizers plan to make a statement for the Huntington community with an anticipated attendance of more than 1,500 students and alumni enhanced by group banners, cheers, chants and music. Those traveling 3rd and 5th Avenues during the 5 p.m. drive will witness these students walking in unity around campus.

The walk will begin at the Recreation Center where groups will split in half, march around the perimeter of campus then meet at Old Main to continue the march through campus to the ending celebration at the Memorial Student Center plaza.

Each participating student group will introduce their organizations to the crowd and Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will share a brief message before the announcement of the 2014 homecoming court.  

All students, organizations, resident teams, athletic teams, fraternities and sororities are invited to take part. Participants in the event are encouraged to bring signs and banners to show their support for the school, their organization and the homecoming theme, Marco's Favorite Heroes and Toughest Villains.

The Unity Walk is sponsored by the Student Resource Center, Student Affairs, Greek Affairs, Marshall Athletics, Housing and Residence Life and the Center for African American Students.

In the event of rain on Monday, Oct. 6, the walk will take place Monday, Oct. 13.

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Photo: Marshall University students, led by MARCO and the cheerleaders, walk through campus during the Unity Walk Celebration in 2013.


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Thursday October 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

RCBI hosts West Virginia Makes Festival on National Manufacturing Day Friday, Oct. 3

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Makes Festival, a new event that celebrates creativity and innovation in all forms, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, in downtown Huntington at the corner of 4th Avenue and 11th Street.

Sponsored by the Robert C. Byrd Institute for Advanced Flexible Manufacturing (RCBI), Advantage Valley, the City of Huntington and Marshall University, the design challenge will reward makers who submit their creative, new inventions to a panel of judges during the festival.

The challenge kicks off during National Manufacturing Day 2014 activities at RCBI.

"We expect to attract tinkerers and hobbyists of all ages," said Charlotte Weber, RCBI Director and CEO, "as we celebrate makers, manufacturers, entrepreneurs and innovators in West Virginia."

"Advantage Valley is pleased to partner with RCBI in this new event to help spur innovation and creativity across the region," said Chris Slaughter, chairman of Advantage Valley. "Our region offers leading-edge training and equipment in the area of 3D Printing, and showcasing these Additive Manufacturing assets as part of National Manufacturing Day is well timed."

Weber said Manufacturing Day "should inspire everyone."

"Our festival will focus on motivating makers and creators, and tap individuals who want to participate in the surging growth of Additive Manufacturing technology with 3D Printers," Weber said. "RCBI is excited to encourage and reward the inventors and makers who can, and will, benefit from the resurgence of manufacturing."

Participants who earn prizes will be introduced as design challenge winners during a 12:30 p.m. presentation.

Creators in five categories will be awarded up to $1,000. Registration is free and easy; call 800-469-RCBI (7224) or register at www.rcbi.org/wvmakes.


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Thursday October 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University School of Pharmacy announces activities for American Pharmacists Month

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - October marks American Pharmacists Month and the Marshall University School of Pharmacy has organized several activities to promote awareness of a career that is expected to be one of the top health care professions in the next decade.
 
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics the pharmacy profession is expected to grow 14.5 percent by 2022.   Pharmacists mix technical, organizational and people skills in research, hospital, clinic and retail environments worldwide.

This month's awareness activities include the following:

  • American Pharmacists Month luncheon, 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 3, in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.   The special guest speaker is Dr. Lawrence "LB" M. Brown, who is the associate dean of student and academic affairs at Chapman University School of Pharmacy in Orange, Calif.   Dr. Brown will speak on "A New Image of Pharmacists for a New Health Care System."

  • Student Societies of Health-System Pharmacy (SSHP) health event, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18, at Drug Emporium, #3 Mall Road, Barboursville.  "Health Check" will feature blood pressure screenings and other wellness initiatives.

  • American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Immunization, Monday, Oct. 20, and Tuesday, Oct. 21, in the Memorial Student Center lobby on Marshall's Huntington campus.  Pharmacy students will share health information about different vaccines at various times throughout the day.
      
  • APhA-ASP Generation Rx members Friday, Oct. 24, at Wayne High School.   Pharmacy students will present information on the dangers of prescription drug abuse.        

Marshall's School of Pharmacy welcomed its first class in 2012 and will graduate its first class in 2016.


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Thursday October 2, 2014
Contact: Patricia Proctor, Director, Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, 304-696-2801

David O. Stewart, award-winning author, to focus speech at MU on Aaron Burr's treason trial before John Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series, sponsored by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy at Marshall University, will welcome David O. Stewart as its second lecturer of the 2014-15 series Tuesday, Oct. 7.

Stewart is the award-winning author of several books, a former clerk to Supreme Court Associate Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., and had a long and high-profile career as an attorney in Washington before beginning his career as an author. 

Stewart's lecture, "American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America," will focus on Burr's treason trial before Chief Justice John Marshall.  The trial resulted from Burr's misadventures after he left the vice presidency in 1805 while under indictment for murder in the dueling death of Alexander Hamilton.

As described by Stewart, Burr spent the next two years pursuing his dream of facilitating "an insurrection in New Orleans, a private invasion of Spanish Mexico and Florida, a great empire rising on the Gulf of Mexico, and the secession of America's western lands to join that empire."

President Jefferson ultimately ordered that his former vice president be prosecuted for treason.  According to Stewart, during Burr's trial, Chief Justice Marshall established aspects of the American legal system that still prevail today.

Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, said, "Our lectures that focus on important moments in United States legal history are always very interesting and I anticipate that this one will be fascinating.  David Stewart's books demonstrate that he is a fabulous storyteller, and the story of Burr's exploits and his trial before Chief Justice Marshall is one well worth hearing."

Stewart, a graduate of Yale University and Yale Law School, is the author of several well-regarded books, including The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution, which was a Washington Post bestseller and won the Washington Writing Award as the Best Book of 2007.  His book Impeached:  The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln's Legacy, was reviewed as "the best account of this troubled episode" by Harvard Professor David Donald.  Stewart won the 2013 History Prize from the Society of the Cincinnati for his book American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America.  His 2013 historical novel, about the John Wilkes Booth Conspiracy, is titled The Lincoln Deception, and was called the "best historical novel of the year" by Bloomberg View.

The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall located in the Marshall University Erickson Alumni Center. The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series is supported by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.


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Wednesday October 1, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University herbarium plays key role in NSF-funded digitization initiative to document a biodiversity hotspot

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University herbarium is playing a key role in a National Science Foundation-funded effort to digitize collections that chronicle a global hotspot of plant diversity in the southeastern United States. The Marshall University Herbarium is located on the third floor of the Science Building and is directed by Dr. Emily Gillespie, an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences.

In all, the NSF awarded six grants this year totaling approximately $7.5 million to digitize biodiversity collections, a nationwide effort coordinated by the iDigBio (www.idigbio.org) program based at the University of Florida. MU has united with dozens of other southeastern universities in a Thematic Collections Network project entitled "The Key to the Cabinets: Building and Sustaining a Research Database for a Global Biodiversity Hotspot." The digitization will make the collections at MU and its partner institution in West Virginia (WVU) instantly accessible to anyone with Internet access. Appalachian State University, in Boone, North Carolina, is the lead institution for this regional collaborative effort.

The MU herbarium, which houses West Virginia's second-largest collection of dried plant specimens, received $138,795 from the National Science Foundation to direct West Virginia's part of a four-year, 12-state initiative. The effort will develop an imaged and databased set of more than 3 million of the estimated 15 million southeastern U.S. specimens from 107 herbaria in the region.

With these funds, Gillespie said, "We will build collaboration among four important communities. The four communities are 1) the scientists working with the collections and their students, 2) affiliates who use the herbaria in their day-to-day work, such as conservation biologists, 3) information technologists who will build the data pipeline to move information and facilitate communication, and 4) citizen scientists who will gain virtual access to the collections and the working scientists via this data pipeline." 

"In building collaboration among these communities, we will be exploring methods to engage citizen scientists in the process of doing science," Gillespie said. "The data generated through this effort will be of significant value in basic fields of biology, such as ecology and evolution, as well as in applied areas of conservation and regional planning. Ultimately, we intend to use the information gained from these community interactions to inform other scientific efforts on ways to give the public opportunities to do science and have a real impact on the world around them."

For more information, contact Gillespie at 304-696-6467, or by e-mail at gillespiee@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Dr. Emily Gillespie, director of the Marshall University herbarium, looks at a dried plant specimen through a microscope in her lab Wednesday afternoon. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.



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Tuesday September 30, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center announces Kids' Night Out

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Parents who would like to have their own night out can drop off their kids at the Marshall Recreation Center for a special Kids' Night Out from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 10.

Children ages 4-12 are welcome and will be entertained in a fun, safe environment. They will experience climbing on the Rec Center's rock wall, swimming in the indoor pool, playing ball on the courts and having a pizza party.

The deadline to register for Kids' Night Out is Thursday, Oct. 9. Parents are asked to please register their children in advance, as space is limited.

The cost for members is $15 ($10 for each additional sibling), and the cost for non-members is $20 ($15 for each additional sibling). Cash, credit cards or checks made out to the Campus Rec Club will be accepted.

Kids' Night Out will be occurring multiple times throughout the 2014 fall season. Dates for each night out are to be announced.

Forms, waivers, and online registration for this event can be found on www.marshallcampusrec.com. Parents are asked to return the forms to the Marshall Recreation Center Welcome Desk or mail them to: Marshall Recreation Center, Attn: Dan Belcher, 402 Thundering Herd Dr., Huntington, WV 25755.

For more information, please call Belcher, the Facility Operations Coordinator, at 304-696-4651.


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Monday September 29, 2014
Contact: Debby Stoler, MU Career Services, (304) 696-7153

More than 80 employers expected to attend this fall's Career Expo

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct its annual Fall Career Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on the Huntington campus. The expo is open to all Marshall students, faculty and alumni.  Recruiters will be sharing information on part-time, full-time and internship positions.

More than 80 employers are expected to have recruiters at the event, representing the areas of customer service, IT/computer science, health care, media sales, engineering, insurance/financial services, corrections, retail management and many others. A continually updated list of employers planning to attend the Career Expo is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/events/careerexpo.html.

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to dress professionally and come prepared with multiple copies of their resumes. Hogsett said even if students are not looking for a job, attending the expo presents an excellent networking opportunity.

Leading up to the event, the "Resume Doctor," Senior Career Counselor Mirek Bialk of Career Services, will be reviewing resumes for students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6, and Tuesday, Oct. 7, in the student center lobby. No appointment is necessary.  Students may also attend an Open House at Career Services from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6, for tips on working the Career Expo or to create or review their resumes with a career counselor.

If you have questions about the event, please contact Career Services front desk at 304-696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu


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Monday September 29, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, 304-691-1713

Multi-million dollar federal grant renewed for Marshall researchers and statewide collaborators

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Gary Rankin with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and co-investigators at institutions around West Virginia, including West Virginia University, have received a five-year renewal grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling more than $17 million for the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE).

Rankin, who is chairman of the department of pharmacology, physiology and toxicology, serves as the grant's principal investigator.

"We are really happy to be able to continue the work of the WV-INBRE program across our state," Rankin said. "These funds will provide much-needed support for investigators at West Virginia colleges and universities to develop biomedical research programs and receive critical new equipment for their research activities."

Rankin explained that researchers with the WV-INBRE research network are already studying many important health issues germane to West Virginia including cancer and cardiovascular disease, and the grant allows for expansion in those areas.

"The grant will also allow us to continue providing biomedical research opportunities for undergraduate students and faculty in all parts of West Virginia and help us train the state's future workforce in science and technology," Rankin said.

WV-INBRE is part of NIH's Institutional Development Award (IDeA) program housed in the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at NIH. The goals of the IDeA programs are to enhance biomedical research capacity, expand and strengthen the research capabilities of biomedical faculty, and, for INBREs, provide access to biomedical resources for promising undergraduate students throughout the 23 eligible states and Puerto Rico in the IDeA program.

"Our INBRE puts the IDeA approach into action by enhancing the state's research infrastructure through support of a statewide system of institutions with a multidisciplinary, thematic scientific focus," Rankin said. "For WV-INBRE this focus is cellular and molecular biology, with a particular emphasis on chronic diseases. We have also started an initiative to support natural products research in the areas of cancer and infectious disease research."

Rankin said the research goals are accomplished through mentoring and administrative support provided by both Marshall University and West Virginia University.  


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Friday September 26, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

Marshall's Department of Social Work provides job opportunities to students through child welfare program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  For the past 20 years, the Marshall University Department of Social Work has given students the chance to secure jobs before they even graduate. This opportunity is sustained through the Title IVE Child Welfare Scholar program, which allows social work students to receive a stipend if they agree to work for the West Virginia Division of Health and Human Resources (WV DHHR) for the amount of time they received the stipend, with a one-year minimum after graduation.

Jo Dee Gottlieb, primary investigator for the Title IVE Child Welfare project and a social work professor in the College of Health Professions, said the purpose of this program is to professionalize child welfare services while preparing students to be potential employees at the WV DHHR.

"Our students receive a stipend each semester for up to $3,000 and sign a contract to complete a 400-hour practicum and work for DHHR in child welfare after they graduate," Gottlieb said. "Students gain amazing clinical experience during their practicum work and have the opportunity to obtain jobs in Child Protective Services, foster care, adoption and youth services."

Hope Smith, community services manager at the Cabell County DHHR and a 1995 graduate of the Department of Social Work, was one of the very first students to receive the child welfare stipend. Smith said this program gave her the chance to experience a profession she otherwise would not have chosen for herself and one she still enjoys to this day.

"When I went into social work, I wasn't sure where I wanted to go in my career. The last place I thought I would work was in public child welfare, but the stipend gave me the opportunity to experience something rewarding and I fell in love with it," Smith said. "Child welfare is a great starting place for any social worker, especially at DHHR, because you get exposed to everything in our field. It's a great stepping stone to just about any job in the social work profession."

Social work student Mikyla Stewart, 22, of Parkersburg, West Virginia, said she knew she wanted to work in Child Protective Services before learning about the program. When Stewart realized she could get financial assistance while working closely with experienced professionals in her field, she said the decision was simple.

"When I heard about the child welfare program, I knew I would be able to get my education while working toward a lifelong career," Stewart said. "I am so grateful I made this decision in the first place because it just shows the heart of my profession. They have taught us everything we need to know about social work and how to be good people. I hope this program sets an example for other departments on campus and across the state, so they too can provide these amazing opportunities for their students."

Five Marshall students have received the program's stipend for the 2014 academic year:  Mikyla Stewart, Alyssa Hall, Cindy McDaniel, Melissa Nibert and Tiffany Adkins. 

For more information on the Title IVE Child Welfare program, contact Gottlieb at gottlieb@marshall.edu. To learn more about WV DHHR and their career opportunities for recent graduates, visit www.dhhr.wv.gov. To find out more about our Department of Social Work, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp.

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Photo: From left to right, Cindy McDaniel, Mikyla Stewart, Tiffany Adkins and Alyssa Hall have received the Title IVE Child Welfare Scholar stipend for the 2014 academic year. Not pictured: Melissa Nibert.


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Friday September 26, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. Arijit Sen to discuss 'Reading American Landscapes' on Marshall's Huntington and South Charleston campuses

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Dr. Arijit Sen, associate professor of architecture at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, will be on Marshall campuses Oct. 2 and 3 as part of the Graduate Humanities Program's new Major Scholar Seminars, an initiative offered in partnership with the Glenwood Center for Scholarship for the Humanities.

Sen, who is also co-coordinator of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Milwaukee Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures collaborative doctoral program, will visit both the South Charleston and Huntington campuses.  His visit is sponsored by the Graduate Humanities Program and the Glenwood Center for Scholarship in the Humanities, along with the College of Liberal Arts, Department of History and the College of Education and Professional Development.

The Major Scholars Program is designed to engage Graduate Humanities students in scholarly activity with major outside scholars and public intellectuals.  Over the course of a semester classes meet via electronic conference media and have face-to-face meetings during the scholar's campus visit.

Sen's seminar, "Reading American Landscapes," is described as  examining not only ways of reading and interpreting the built world, but also to "interrogate how our individual reading practices frame the way we understand, interpret, and act in this world."  His lecture schedule is:

-  Oct. 2, noon, GC 319, South Charleston campus, "Learning from Everyday Places: Teaching Cultural Landscapes," part of the COEPD brown bag luncheon series
-  Oct. 3, 2 p.m., Shawkey Dining Room, Huntington campus, a public talk on "Recasting Placemaking: Ways of Seeing and Interpreting our Everyday World"

Sen's research focus has centered on ethnicity and urban ethnic spaces, food landscapes, immigration history, American cultural landscapes, architectural history and environment and behavior studies, among others. He is currently completing his book Creative Dissonance: The Politics of Immigrant World Making, and co-edited a monograph, Devon Street, Chicago: Interpreting Landscapes of Transnationalism.  Sen received his PhD.  from the University of California, Berkeley and served as a Center for 21st Century Studies Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and a Quadrant Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

The Glenwood Center for Scholarship in the Humanities is a public-private partnership involving Marshall University, West Virginia State University and the Historic Glenwood Foundation. It is housed at the Glenwood Estate, home to many of the Kanawha Valley's pioneer families, on Charleston's west side. The newly formed center is working toward hosting regular speaker series, classes and workshops in conjunction with academic programming in MU's Graduate Humanities Program and WVSC's History program, according to Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, center co-director and chair of MU's Graduate Humanities Program. Long-range plans call for supporting humanities-based research through the two universities, hosting visiting scholars, involving students in archival work and other preservation projects at Glenwood and advancing collaborative grand and fund development, he added.

The Major Scholar Seminar for Spring 2015 will feature Dr. Lauren Onkey, Vice President of Education and Public Programs for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio.  Her seminar is titled "Fight the Power: Can Pop Music Foster Change?" Dates and details of her visit will be announced at a later date.


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Friday September 26, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Forensic Science graduate student receives prestigious scientific scholarship award from the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - David Preston Miller, a Marshall University Forensic Science graduate student from Dallas, Texas, is the first student from Marshall to receive a prestigious, nationally recognized scientific scholarship award from the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation.

Miller was presented with a check for the $25,000 scientific scholarship Friday, Sept. 26, at the Forensic Science Center by William D. Branon, chairman of the board and director of the J. Edgar Hoover Scholarship Foundation.

Branon said Miller was a very strong candidate for the scholarship with a very impressive background. Along with his achievements of academic excellence and dedication to his interest in forensic science, he demonstrated strong character, professionalism and motivation.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp said the Forensic Science Graduate Program has had many firsts, and Dr. Terry W. Fenger and the faculty have done an outstanding job developing the nationally recognized program that produces graduates who go on to fill leadership roles in the field.  "When you think forensic science, and you think forensic science excellence, it's Marshall University that comes to people's minds immediately," he said. "It's a real source of pride for us."

"Marshall University is honored to have the distinction to be among the educational institutions to have a student as a recipient of this very prestigious national award," Kopp said. "We at Marshall are very proud of Preston Miller for being selected as the recipient of this year's scientific scholarship from the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation."

Miller, 23, is the 14th recipient of the award. He received his B.A. in biochemistry at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. At Marshall, his areas of concentration in forensic science are digital forensics and crime scene investigation.

Miller said it is a great honor to receive the prestigious J. Edgar Hoover Foundation's scientific scholarship. "Since its inception in 2001, the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation has been assisting students to achieve goals that would otherwise be unobtainable," he said. "I am humbled to have been selected as the recipient for the 2014 year. I would like to thank my family, friends, mentors and, of course, the foundation itself."

He said he chose to attend Marshall because of the Forensic Science Graduate Program's high rankings and flexible curriculum. "Additionally, its unique relationship with the West Virginia State Police (WVSP) permitting graduate students to work in the WVSP Digital Forensics Unit was a deciding factor," he said. Miller has been a graduate assistant providing technical support for the unit since he started his studies at Marshall.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center, stated that the quality of the curriculum at Marshall attracts students with high levels of credentials. "Preston is a shining example for other students," he said.

Branon said the foundation awards only one full scientific scholarship each year to a candidate who is interested in pursuing a forensic science-related career in law enforcement.

The foundation's board of directors solicits candidates for the scientific scholarship from colleges and universities with accredited forensic science programs. During the annual meeting of the foundation's board, the candidates are reviewed and a deserving recipient is selected.

Prior winners of the scientific scholarship have been from Ohio University, the University of New Haven, Michigan State University, Saint John's University, the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine, California State University, Cleveland State University, the University of Georgia, George Washington University (two recipients), Columbia University, Stetson University and the University of Maryland.

Since it was founded the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation has distributed more than $3.5 million for scholarships, grants for education, as well as legal and professional law enforcement training.

The J. Edgar Hoover Foundation is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to the ideals of fidelity, bravery and integrity promoted by J. Edgar Hoover, who served under seven presidents,  and influenced the professional development of modern law enforcement in the United States.

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Photo: William D. Branon, right, congratulates David Preston Miller after presenting Miller, a student in Marshall University's Forensic Science Graduate Program, with a prestigious scientific scholarship award of $25,000 from the J. Edgar Hoover Scholarship Foundation today during a ceremony at the MU Forensic Science Center. Branon is chairman of the board and director of the J. Edgar Hoover Scholarship Foundation.
Photo by Braxton Crisp/Marshall University.




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Thursday September 25, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

MU's College of Health Professions and College of Arts and Media team up to provide Center for Wellness in the Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two of Marshall University's largest colleges have joined together to provide a new opportunity for students in the performing arts.

Since August 2014, the College of Health Professions and the College of Arts and Media are offering performing arts students the chance to work with athletic trainers to prevent injury from occurring during performances. This idea was initiated by two young faculty members and has developed into what is now being called the Marshall University Center for Wellness in the Arts (CWA).

Dr. Henning Vauth, assistant professor of music in the College of Arts and Media, said he and his colleague, theatre professor Nicole Perrone, visited Ohio University last year and toured their Clinic for Science and Health in Artistic Performance. Vauth said the clinic is a place where injured performing artists can be evaluated by licensed athletic trainers who have the proper knowledge and equipment to treat their injuries. 

"We met with the director of the Ohio University clinic and brainstormed ways to implement this same type of program at Marshall University," Vauth said. "When we first envisioned CWA, we thought there would be three components: education, treatment and research. Many performing arts students have developed a mentality that a certain amount of pain is a part of the performer's process. We want to change the culture and educate students so they look at pain as a problem and treat it accordingly so they can enjoy long careers."

Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Arts and Media, said he commends Vauth and Perrone for developing this program and for reaching out to the College of Health Professions.

"We're taking some very positive and aggressive steps toward ensuring that our students have the opportunity to go to a place on campus where they can receive evaluation and suggestions to alleviate pain and injuries associated with the repetitive actions their work requires, particularly in the performing arts," Van Horn said.

Dr. Mark Timmons, an assistant professor of athletic training and a facilitator of the CWA, said finding the right athletic trainer was a very important part of this unique collaboration.

"We wanted to find an athletic trainer who had worked with musicians, dancers, actors…someone who could appreciate the type of treatment we are trying to provide for our performing arts students," Timmons said. "The most qualified candidate we chose had previous work experience with Disney and the Varsity Spirit Corporation."

Elliot Smithson was recruited by the college's School of Kinesiology to work with the performing arts students to prevent injuries before they happen. Smithson is a licensed athletic trainer and a graduate assistant in the College of Health Professions.

"My experience working at Disney made me realize these performers do the same type of intense movements for hours at a time and at the same intensity as many professional athletes," Smithson said. "Many well-known organizations such as Cirque du Soleil and Broadway have implemented athletic training into their industry. We need to start considering these performers as a part of the active population because leaving them out is doing them a great disservice."

Timmons said there have been discussions about the possibility of offering an interdisciplinary degree program for wellness in the arts in the future.

The Marshall Center for Wellness in the Arts clinic is open 4-6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays in the athletic training lab located in Gullickson Hall room 209 on the Marshall Huntington campus.  For more information about the CWA, contact Van Horn at vanhorn@marshall.edu, Timmons at timmonsm@marshall.edu or by visiting the center's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MarshallCWA online.

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Photos: (above) Elliot Smithson (far left) is shown leading warm-ups for theatre students in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse before they begin rehearsals for their upcoming play, Tom Sawyer. Theatre faculty member Nicole Perrone said, "The work we're doing on Tom Sawyer is very physical and I feel better knowing that if a company member were to be injured in rehearsal, they now have access to immediate, skilled treatment.  I think having Elliot here for rehearsal and warm-ups gives the students and myself peace of mind." (Below) John Marks, 25, of Palatka, Fla. is a senior theatre student within the College of Arts and Media. Marks said he believes the recent CWA sessions have helped strengthen the physical and mental approach necessary to ready one's body for performance.


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Wednesday September 24, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall's Health Informatics program ranked No. 1 most affordable in the nation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Health Informatics graduate program has been ranked the No. 1 most affordable program in the U.S. according to MBA Healthcare Management. The program was ranked first among 25 other universities in the nation based on criteria determining the overall quality, flexibility and research trends within each program.

Dr. Girmay Berhie, program director for health informatics, said Marshall University's program is a prime example of how both affordability and quality can go together. 

"This news should be important to students because of the growing debt ratio concern. Students will spend less money on tuition and after graduation will have a better chance of finding good-paying jobs to repay any loans," Berhie said. "Students graduating with a master's degree in health informatics can typically get jobs as CIOs, program managers, data analysts, consultants, professors or security officers.  The salary range for most of our graduates is from $60,000 to $125,000 a year."

Berhie said the program consists of a partnership between three of Marshall University's colleges including the College of Health Professions, the College of Business and the College of Information Technology and Engineering.  Berhie said he believes it is the combined knowledge, expertise and skills from the three colleges that make the health informatics program unique.

"This is the only health informatics program in the state of West Virginia, and one of three programs in the United States to be accredited by the Commission of Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management (CAHIIM)," Berhie said. "In addition, the fact that the program was accredited within its first three years only speaks to its quality."

Chief Information Officer for the West Virginia Health Information Network David M. Partsch serves on the advisory committee for the program. Partsch said students should take advantage of this opportunity to get quality education at an affordable cost.

"In this day and age of soaring tuitions and shrinking career opportunities, it is imperative to offer the best education at the lowest cost," Partsch said. "Marshall University has clearly accomplished both of those goals and set itself as a visionary in the field of health informatics."

Michael Jones, a 2014 graduate of the program, said it wasn't until receiving his degree at Marshall that he found the career where he could truly succeed.

"As a nurse with a background in neuroscience, health research and data analysis, I had been seeking the right graduate program that could combine the kind of education and experience with today's cutting-edge health information sciences," Jones said. "I found my answer at Marshall University's health informatics program.  As a recent graduate, I now have an exciting and rewarding career as a health informatics specialist working in the area of informatics and health data analytics."

For more information about the program's No.1 ranking, visit the MBA Healthcare Management web article here: http://mba-healthcare-management.com/best/masters-healthcare-informatics/. For more information on Marshall's master's program in health informatics, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Wednesday September 24, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington mayor featured speaker Thursday at Marshall's Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Huntington Mayor Steve Williams will be the featured speaker at the Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility which takes place Thursday, Sept. 25, at Marshall University. He has titled his address "Civic Responsibilities and Obligations Citizens Have to Local Government."

The speech, which is the last major event hosted by Marshall during Constitution Week, starts at 12:30 p.m. in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, which is located inside the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington Campus.

The event is free to the public.


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Wednesday September 24, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center to hold second annual Big Pink Volleyball tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will hold its second annual Big Pink Volleyball tournament at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The tournament will benefit the St. Mary's Pink Ribbon Fund and PATH to the Cure, which raises money for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.  

The event, which features a bright pink volleyball measuring 4 feet in diameter, raised $1,000 for the organization last year.

Participants can register during PATH to a Cure registration on Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena, or at the Recreation Center's welcome desk by Oct. 13.  Cost to register for the event is $5 per person.

There will be divisions for student organizations, residence halls, businesses and individuals. Teams must have a minimum of four people.

The amount of teams registered will determine if the tournament will be single or double elimination. The winning team will receive an award following the final round.

Shirts can be purchased at the event for $10 for short sleeves and $13 for long sleeves. Participants are encouraged to wear pink in support of Breast Cancer Awareness.


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Wednesday September 24, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Winners announced in O'Hanlon Essay Competition

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sophia D. Mills, a sophomore from Proctorville, Ohio, took first place in the sixth annual Dan O'Hanlon Essay Competition at Marshall University. The results of the competition were announced during a brief ceremony Monday evening in the John Marshall Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center on MU's Huntington campus.

Mills will receive $1,000 for her winning essay, which is titled "A Step Too Far: Protecting Privacy in a Digital Age."

Olivia Milam of Spanishburg, W.Va., took second place and will receive $500 for her essay, which is titled "The NSA's Bulk Metadata Program and the Fourth Amendment: Holding True to the Spirit of the Constitution in the Face of Technology."

Milam, who already has earned bachelor's degrees in History and Philosophy, is enrolled in the College of Information Technology and Engineering's Computer Science program.

This year's question, titled "Edward Snowden, Counter-terrorism and the National Security Agency: Does the Government's Collection of Telephone Metadata Violate Our Fourth Amendment Rights?  The Courts Do Not Agree," focused on the constitutional implications of the National Security Agency's domestic surveillance and data gathering practices.

Contestants were asked to analyze conflicting decisions on the topic by federal judges in the Southern District of New York and the District of Columbia and explain which judge's rationale they found to be the strongest and why.  They also did additional research to support their conclusions.

Mills said she entered the contest because she is "really interested in writing and political science." She admits the topic was difficult.

"At first when I was reading the decisions, I thought, 'Oh, gosh, I don't know if I can finish this,' " Mills said, "because each one was about 50 pages. But, once I got into it, I was really interested and I learned a lot and I wanted to finish it."

She said she is "really honored' to have placed first in the contest. "I thought this was a good chance to put those two things (writing and political science) together and do something that might get some recognition," Mills said.

Milam said she entered the contest because of her major - computer science.

"We're learning the skills to do these kinds of things," she said. "We kind of need to know where they fit in, where the trends are going, so we'll know in the future what to do."

She agreed with Mills that the topic wasn't easy.

"It was difficult," Milam said. "You had to have a lot of background knowledge and you had to really understand the opinions, and you had to capsulize the opinions. It was pretty difficult."

The competition was established in 2009, after an anonymous donor requested that Marshall find a way to promote scholarship related to the Constitution and simultaneously honor retired Cabell County Circuit Court Judge Dan O'Hanlon.  Prior to his long career on the bench, O'Hanlon served as a professor and chair of the Marshall University Criminal Justice Department.

The contest is now administered by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.  The full text of the essay question can be found by visiting  www.marshall.edu/spc.

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Photo: From left, Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy at Marshall University; Olivia Milam, who finished second in the sixth annual Dan O'Hanlon Essay Competition; Sophia D. Mills, who won the contest; and Dan O'Hanlon, retired Cabell County Circuit Court Judge and the person for whom the contest is named, pose for a photograph Monday following a ceremony announcing the winners of the O'Hanlon contest. Photo by Braxton Crisp/Marshall University.


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Tuesday September 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Thundering Word starts season with strong performance in Kentucky

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word, competing in its first speech and debate event of the season, placed well this past weekend in a tournament at defending national champion Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky.

"It was a very competitive tournament with five of the best teams in the nation in the competition," said Thundering Word Coach Danny Ray.

As a team, the Word placed fifth in Individual Events on Saturday and fourth on Sunday. Marshall was fourth in combined sweepstakes for the weekend, despite having a much smaller squad than other teams in the tournament, Ray said.

The top teams in the tournament were the University of Alabama, fourth-ranked Illinois State University and Gustavus Adolphus College from Minnesota.

Ray said other schools in the competition were the University of Kentucky, Bowling Green State University, William Carey University, Wiley College, Truman State University, Western Kentucky University, Murray State University, and others.

On Saturday, Marshall had three contestants make it to the final round. Victoria Ledford, a senior Honors Communication Studies major from Erwin, Tenn., placed fourth in Communication Analysis. Garrett Walker, a senior Spanish major from Beckley, W.Va., placed sixth in Extemporaneous Speaking, and Alyssa Hager, a sophomore Communication Studies major from West Hamlin, W.Va., placed fifth in Persuasive Speaking. All three of these students were among the top speakers at the tournament.

On Sunday, Marshall performed even better, Ray said. In Persuasion, Hager was the tournament champion and Ledford was second, making Marshall the only team to place first and second in the same event other than defending national champion Western Kentucky. In Communication Analysis, Ledford was second and Walker placed sixth. Hager was fourth in Dramatic Interpretation. Ledford was sixth in Quadrathon, which is an event for students who compete in four or more events.


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Tuesday September 23, 2014
Contact: Avia Huisman, College of Science, 304-696-3987

Second annual Water Festival set for Friday, Sept. 26, at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Science will welcome to the Huntington campus about 200 local elementary school children Friday, Sept. 26, to take part in the second annual Water Festival.
 
The event runs on Buskirk Field from 9 a.m. to 1:25 p.m., with a lunch break from 11 to 11:25 a.m. The children will participate in activities that use active learning techniques to teach them many fascinating facts about water.
 
Water festivals are held across West Virginia and have a strong history of providing children a fun way of learning about water - where it comes from, where it goes and why it's important to our health and well-being.
 
The goal of this event is to provide children in the Huntington area the opportunity to benefit from the learning opportunities that a water festival provides.
 
A secondary goal of the event is to give students a broader understanding of the types of science careers available to them. Not many of these students may know that the jobs that the presenters hold exist, and this is a good chance for them to learn about what they do.
 
In addition to Marshall faculty, representatives from the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, West Virginia Division of Forestry, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, West Virginia American Water and the Division of Air Quality will be among those staffing stations the children will visit.
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Monday September 22, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

100 percent of graduating family medicine residents at Marshall University will practice in Appalachian communities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Every family medicine resident who graduated in June, 2014,from the family and community health residency program at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will practice medicine in central Appalachia, the department's chairman, Stephen Petrany, M.D., announced today.
 
"Seven of the eight graduates (88%) are practicing in West Virginia," Petrany said.  "Four (50%) of the graduates are practicing in federally qualified health centers (FQHC) in rural West Virginia.  The one who is not practicing in West Virginia will be practicing in rural North Carolina in an FQHC after completing a few months with the Indian Health Service in South Dakota.   We take seriously our school's mission of educating a physician workforce for central Appalachia and this year's graduating class of medical residents is a prime example of that commitment."
 
W. Mitchel Shaver, M.D., residency director for the department, said historically Marshall Family Medicine has produced physicians to meet the unique needs of rural Appalachian populations.
 
"Over the last 10 years we have completed 75 residents," Shaver said.  "Fifty-seven of them, or about 76%, are practicing in West Virginia.  Sixty-six (88%) are practicing in the general Central Appalachia geographic area."
 
According to the National Rural Health Association, only about 10 percent of physicians practice in rural America despite the fact that nearly one-fourth of the population lives in those areas.  
 
Dean Joseph I. Shapiro says Marshall's mission of educating students for rural practice remains a top priority.
 
"It's absolutely essential for the overall health of our nation's citizens to educate doctors to practice in rural parts of the country," Shapiro said. "Studies show that rural Americans are more likely to suffer from chronic health conditions and face greater difficulty getting adequate health care, so providing doctors in towns and small cities is essential to meet the demand."
 
For more than a dozen times over the past two decades, Marshall has been recognized with an Achievement Award from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) for efforts to foster student interest in family medicine and produce graduates who enter the specialty.
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Friday September 19, 2014
Contact: Jennifer Brown, Career Services, 304-696-3396

Career Services to host part-time job and internship fair

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will host Job-A-Palooza, a part-time job and internship fair, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, in the Memorial Student Center lobby on the Huntington campus. The event is open to all Marshall Students, faculty and alumni. 

"Job-a-Palooza is an excellent opportunity for students to start learning how to utilize networking skills in a more casual environment," Jennifer Brown, Program Manager for Internships and Experiential Learning at Career Services, said. "This event is held once a semester and allows recruiters to reach out to Marshall students for their hiring needs during busy seasons.  Students have the opportunity to gain experience that provides skills that can be transferred to future careers."

More than 20 employers are expected to attend Job-A-Palooza, such as Aflac, Bath and Body Works, Pepsi and Speedway. A continually updated list of registered employers is available at http://www.marshall.edu/career-services/events/JAPcompanies.html.

Denise Hogsett, director of Career Services, said students are encouraged to bring resumes and their best networking skills to the fair. For tips on how to talk with employers or to have their resumes reviewed, they should stop by Career Services.  No appointment is necessary.

If you have questions about the event, please contact Jennifer Brown in Career Services by phone at 304-696-3396 or by e-mail at brown346@marshall.edu, or call the Career Services front desk at 304-696-2370.


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Friday September 19, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Huntington mayor, Supreme Court justices entered in quoits tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The President's Media Quoits Challenge, one of the most popular events in the annual Constitution Week activities at Marshall University, will feature some new entrants in this year's event, which will take place at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 24, at the west end of Buskirk Field on MU's Huntington campus.

Huntington Mayor Steve Williams has joined the 15-team field, along with his partner, former Marshall Student Government Association President Sean Hornbuckle. West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals Justice Menis Ketchum and his partner, fellow Justice Allen H. Loughry II, also are entered. They'll call their team "The Supremes."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp is teaming up with Maurice Cooley, the university's associate vice president for intercultural affairs. Kopp and Cooley defeated history professors Dr. Dan Holbrook and Dr. Bob Deal, two games to one, in the presidential round of the university tournament a week ago. Kopp and Cooley each had a ringer in the victory.

Other teams entered are the MU Student Government Association, the Ironton Tribune, the Ashland Daily Independent, The Parthenon, WCHS-8, the West Virginia Record, The Herald-Dispatch, WOWK-13, WMUL-FM, defending champions Tim Irr and Keith Morehouse from WSAZ-3, R.B. Bookwalter and Billy Biggs from Marshall, and Kevin Yingling and Bob Gallagher from Marshall's School of Pharmacy.

The tournament will be preceded at 11 a.m. by President Kopp cutting John Marshall's birthday cake, which will be served free along with kettle corn and punch.


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Friday September 19, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University physician achieves new certification in subspecialty care for women

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kevin J. Conaway, an associate professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has earned certification by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS), making him the only such credentialed physician in Huntington.

In 2013, FPMRS became the fourth subspecialty in obstetrics and gynecology joining maternal fetal medicine, reproductive endocrinology/infertility and gynecologic oncology.

Often referred to as "urogynecology," the subspecialty involves care of urinary tract dysfunction and disorders resulting from loss of support of the pelvic structures.    Specifically, Conaway treats patients for pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence with surgical and non-surgical interventions.   The National Institutes of Health estimates one-third of women in the United States will experience pelvic disorders in their lifetime.

Conaway is board certified in both obstetrics and gynecology and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. He is a graduate of Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Class of 1991, and completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Akron General Medical Center.

Conaway sees patients at Marshall Obstetrics and Gynecology located at 1600 Medical Center Dr. in Huntington and also at Marshall Obstetrics and Gynecology in Teays Valley.

Appointments may be made by calling 304-691-1400 for the Huntington location and 304-691-1800 for the Teays Valley site.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 19, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

United Way Fall Campaign to kick off Sept. 22 on Marshall University's Huntington campus

Online giving and special events aim to increase participation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Every year, Marshall University conducts the United Way of the River Cities fundraising campaign, which allows the organization to improve the lives of thousands in our community. The annual university campaign will begin Sept. 22.

Megan Archer, campaign coordinator, said the goal for this year's university campaign is to provide the Marshall community with an incentive to participate.

"Instead of setting a monetary goal for our university campaign, we want to increase participation by 200 percent. We had 52 contributors give last year and with a university of this size, we hope to increase this number in the 2014 campaign," Archer said. "To encourage our Marshall community to get involved, we have made it easier for them to give back. We will offer an e-pledge system, which will allow contributors to donate online directly from their e-mail account. We will also host a 'United Way Day' on campus with free health screenings provided to all faculty, staff and students."

Archer said the United Way Day health fair on Oct. 1 will give participants the chance to receive pulmonary function tests, as well as blood glucose, blood pressure, BMI and flexibility screenings with opportunities to learn more about healthful living.

Laura Gilliam, executive director of United Way of River Cities, said she hopes the free screenings provided at the health fair will raise awareness about the campaign. However, ticket sales for the autographed football signed by Head Coach Doc Holliday and Heisman-candidate Rakeem Cato may be the special event that generates the most attention, according to Gilliam.

"We are so grateful to Marshall Athletics for graciously donating the autographed football to help us raise awareness and funds for this year's campaign," Gilliam said. "Our overall campaign goal is to change 30,000 lives in the River Cities region and in order to accomplish this, we need to raise $1.2 million. This would not be possible without the university's support every year, which makes our fundraising campaign successful."

For more than 20 years, the Marshall University community has supported United Way of the River Cities in a variety of ways. Faculty and staff contribute financially and serve on grants-review committees, as well as on the organization's four coalitions.  Students participate in forums on current issues, have provided useful tools through service learning projects and internships, and provide staff support to United Way as work-study placements.

This year's university campaign concludes Friday, Oct. 3. Marshall community members interested in making a donation may go to www.unitedwayrivercities.org/give. Faculty and staff will have the choice to use the new e-pledge system via their e-mail account or the traditional paper pledge forms used in the past.  Those completing the paper pledge can turn in their forms to the Marshall Recreation Center for a free week's pass; to an individual's departmental office; or to Archer via campus mail at Prichard Hall 317 or by faxing 304-696-6739. Pledge forms can be downloaded at http://www.unitedwayrivercities.org/docs/2014_updated_pledgeform_final_grayversion.pdf. To learn more about United Way of the River Cities, visit http://www.unitedwayrivercities.org.

Schedule of Special Events:

United Way Day

  • Wednesday, Oct. 1, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
    Free health screenings provided by Marshall Health, the St. Mary's Schools of Respiratory Care, Medical Imaging and Nursing, Department of Athletic Training, PEIA Pathways to Wellness and many more;
  • Fitness demonstrations and challenges with prizes provided by the Marshall Recreation Center;
  • Entertainment provided by WMUL Radio Station with live remote conducted during the event;
  • Drawing for autographed football signed by Holliday and Cato at 1:30 p.m.

Ticket Sales for Autographed Football
Sales will conclude Oct. 1

  • 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus;
  • 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sept. 20 at the Barbells and Babes Crossfit Competition at Crossfit Thunder, 2516 5th Ave., Huntington, W.Va.;
  • 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. on Sept. 24 in the Cabell Huntington Hospital atrium;
  • For more information on how to purchase your ticket, contact campaign coordinator Megan Archer at archer15@marshall.edu.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Shaheen, LeMay will read from their work Oct. 6 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Glenn Shaheen and Eric LeMay will read from their work at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6, in room 402 of the Drinko Library on Marshall University's Huntington campus. Their appearance at MU is part of the A.E. Stringer Visiting Writers Series.
 
Shaheen is the author of the poetry collection Predatory (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011), which won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and was the runner-up for the Norma Farber First Book Award. He is also the author of a chapbook of flash fiction, Unchecked Savagery (Ricochet Editions, 2013). His work has appeared in The New Republic, Subtropics Ploughshares and elsewhere. He lives in Kalamazoo, Mich., where he is a doctoral candidate at Western Michigan University.
 
LeMay has taught writing at Harvard, Columbia and the University of Chicago. He is on the faculty of the writing program at Ohio University, his alma mater. He serves as an associate editor for the New Ohio Review and the web editor for Alimentum: The Literature of Food. He also is a host on the New Books Network. He is the author of three books, The One in the Many, Immortal Milk, and In Praise of Nothing: Essays, Memoir, and Other Experiments. His work has appeared in The Paris Review, Gastronomica, Poetry Daily, the Best Food Writing Series, and other venues. He lives in Athens, Ohio, with his wife and fellow writer, Kristin LeMay.
 
This event is possible with support from the College of Liberal Arts, the Honors College, and the West Virginia Humanities Council.
 
A reception and book signing will follow.
 
For more information, contact Rob Engle at 724-263-9991.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University celebrates grand opening of 'world-class' Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall College introduced an art program on the school's Huntington campus in 1902, despite having no facility dedicated to the arts.

It took a while a little more than 112 years to be exact but today, finally, the Marshall University School of Art and Design has its own facility. A large crowd of members of the Marshall and Huntington communities witnessed the official opening of the university's Visual Arts Center, which was celebrated with a ribbon cutting at the renovated, six-story former Anderson-Newcomb (Stone & Thomas) Department Store building.

Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp joined with Donald Van Horn, dean of the College of Arts and Media, and several others for the ribbon cutting at the building located across 3rd Avenue from Pullman Square.

"The dedication of our Downtown Visual Arts Center is a historic event in the annals of Marshall University's history," Kopp said. "After decades of unfulfilled promises, the dream of a modern, aesthetically magnificent edifice that will support and energize the creativity and imagination of our visual arts students and faculty has now been realized. Much hard work and ingenuity have gone into the transformation of the old Anderson-Newcomb building, preserving its distinctive architectural lines, while creating a world-class visual arts center. Everyone associated with this city and the Marshall family should be very proud of this accomplishment. We now have a beautiful, iconic showplace in downtown Huntington that epitomizes who we are. I expect to see more Marshall University facilities moving in that direction. This first step opens up all sorts of possibilities for the university to grow and our community to prosper."

In 1902, the building known then as the Valentine, Newcomb & Carder Department Store opened downtown as a three-story structure. Little could anyone imagine what the future connection would be between Marshall's art program and that building, which added three floors in 1920 and became known as the Anderson-Newcomb Department Store.

While Marshall's art department continued to grow through many decades, the department store thrived, too, before running its course. Marshall purchased the building, which had been closed for years, in 2011 for $750,000, with the idea of turning it into a Visual Arts Center. Van Horn credited Kopp for seeing the project through when others before him did not.

"I think that Dr. Kopp was presented with a vision of something that could happen downtown, and he recognized the strength of that vision and purchased that building," Van Horn said. "And, here we are, three years later. Those past promises were never fulfilled for a variety of reasons. It's a whole new paradigm for visual arts education. I think we'll see the benefits from this for years and years to come."

Hannah Saxton, a sophomore graphic design major, said the building is a huge asset to Marshall, the School of Art and Design, and downtown, where she works for a locally owned business.

"Not only is the Visual Arts Center a fantastic new facility, but the location will make a huge impact," Saxton said. "Downtown is beginning to come back to life and thrive. Not only will the students benefit by being more in the heart of the city, but the other businesses will benefit from having the students downtown as well. Personally, I couldn't be more excited to get the semester underway."

Shortly after the fall semester began, Saxton said, the center already had met all her expectations.

"From big things, like the new equipment, to the small details, such as each floor's color coordination, it's all been planned out thoroughly and it shows," she said.

Daniel Kaufmann, an associate professor in the School of Art and Design, teaches photography in the Visual Arts Center.

"Everything is great!" Kaufman said. "The new darkroom sink and equipment are a huge improvement over what we had in Smith Hall. The students have been very excited and impressed with the new facilities. Generally, I think the biggest difference is having the space we need. Everything has its own room rather than the multipurpose rooms we had before."

Zoe Myers, a junior printmaking major, said studying in the new Visual Arts Center is like "a breath of fresh air," especially when compared to the old location on the sixth floor of Smith Hall.

"The first time I got to see the building, I was like a kid in a candy store," Myers said. "It is absolutely beautiful on every floor. Even though the sixth floor at Smith Hall is where we got the creative juices flowing, the Visual Arts Center has given us students and professors inspiration. I am thankful and excited to be a part of this building in its beginning stage."

Michael Gallimore, another student, recalls being "packed like sardines" in Smith Hall.

"We were in this very small space with a growing number of students and a change was most certainly needed," Gallimore said. "Now we have bigger spaces with room for the school to grow."

The renovation, which included the addition of 65,000 pounds of steel in a 66,000-square-foot area, cost $13.7 million and is being paid for with bonds and private donations. The renovation incorporates the building's original hardwood floors with smart lighting, highly efficient heating and cooling, and Wi-Fi throughout.

The ground floor features retail space and a 2,200-square-foot gallery with nearly 150 feet of linear display space.

Art education, art history, fibers, foundations, graphic design, painting, photography and printmaking students are studying their crafts on floors two through five. The sixth floor includes administrative space and a picturesque view of downtown and six blocks of the Old Main Corridor leading to Marshall's Huntington campus. 

Sculpture and ceramics will stay in the university's art warehouse on 20th Street.

"The renovated building will bring some cohesion to the program that they have not had and a stronger sense of purpose," Van Horn said. "It gives the program an opportunity to grow. Over time what we will see is the development of some new programs that heretofore we have not had a place for. And, new programs will bring more students to Marshall. Putting Marshall in downtown is a wonderful step for the university."

Van Horn feels certain the center will bring commerce downtown.

"To bring a couple of hundred students and faculty downtown on a daily basis has to have a pretty dramatic impact on the economy of downtown Huntington," he added. "And, as time moves on and we see the kind of growth that we expect will happen, those numbers will only get bigger. Bringing this program downtown will have a far-reaching impact on the health of our community."



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 17, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Creation of several new scholarships announced at School of Medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced today the creation of six new scholarships to assist students with tuition and other medical school expenses.

In announcing the new scholarships, Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs, thanked the donors for their generous commitment and applauded the two most recently graduated classes for endowing scholarships.

"These awards are designed to help students defray some of the costs associated with obtaining a medical education.  Our donors understand the financial burden that many of our students incur and we are forever grateful that they are helping ease that burden," Holmes said.  

The following scholarships were recently created:

  • The Sean K. and Beth L. Hammers Scholarship, once endowed, will be awarded to an entering medical student with first preference given to a resident of Lawrence County, Ohio, or Cabell County, West Virginia. Second preference will be given to a resident of West Virginia. This award is renewable for three additional years pending academic progress.
  • The Huntington Clinical Foundation MUJCESOM Expendable Scholarship is a gift of $30,000. A one-time, $10,000 scholarship will be awarded annually for three years to an entering first-year student.  The MU JCESOM Scholarship Committee, in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance, will select the brightest, most academically gifted student for the award. The Huntington Clinical Foundation will review the recipient's qualifications before the award is offered.
  • The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Class of 2013 Endowed Scholarship will be awarded to a first-year medical student, and is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress. The recipient will be selected by the Scholarship Committee in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.
  • The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Class of 2014 Endowed Scholarship will be awarded to a first-year medical student, and is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress. The recipient will be selected by the Scholarship Committee in cooperation with the Office of Student Financial Assistance.
  • The Mr. and Mrs. Guy C. Nangle Scholarship Fund  has been established through a gift from the Mae E. Nangle Trust.  The scholarship will be awarded to a Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine medical student and is renewable pending normal academic progress.
  • An endowed fund known as the Radiology Graduates' Scholarship has been created at the School of Medicine under the direction of Dr. Peter Chirico, chairman of the department of diagnostic radiology.  The scholarship will be awarded to a deserving medical student who will be selected by the Scholarship Committee of the School of Medicine.  The award is renewable.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 16, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Pharmacy begins academic year with expanded faculty

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University School of Pharmacy has added seven new faculty members and three new staff members to its ranks this academic year, Dean Kevin W. Yingling announced today.

"I am pleased that we have welcomed these outstanding educators and professionals to our school of pharmacy family," Yingling said.  "This time next year we will be at full capacity with all four classes enrolled.  Operationally speaking, this means for the first time since our opening in 2012, we will have the full complement of courses and programs required to graduate our first class.  It's a very exciting time for us as we continue to grow."

The new faculty members and their departments are listed below:

  • Christopher J. Booth, Pharm. D., assistant professor, department of pharmacy practice, administration and research
  • Ashley S. Brown, Pharm. D., assistant professor, department of pharmacy practice, administration and research
  • Crystal D. Heise, Pharm. D., assistant professor, department of pharmacy practice, administration and research (beginning  11/1/14)
  • Jeremy  P. McAleer, Ph.D.,  assistant professor, department of pharmaceutical science and research
  • Shekher Mohan, Ph.D., assistant professor, department of pharmaceutical science and research
  • Megan E. Peterson, R.Ph., assistant professor, department of pharmacy practice, administration and research
  • Brian C. Train, Ph.D., instructor, department of pharmaceutical science and research

In addition to the new faculty members, Hannah R. Mick, B.S., is a new research technician in the department of pharmaceutical science and research and  Laura M. Rudolph, M.S., has been named as the director of recruitment and development. Michael J. Rudolph, M.S., has been selected as the director of assessment and planning.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 15, 2014
Contact: Angela Holley, , 304-638-3432

5K Run/Walk to benefit foundation for American Syringomyelia and Chiari Alliance Project

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Army ROTC program is helping to sponsor a 5K run/walk event Saturday, Sept. 27, to assist persons with Chiari malformation, syringomyelia and related disorders. It will take place beginning at 8 a.m. at Ritter Park.
 
Chiari malformation is an abnormality in the lower part of the brain and is often congenital. Symptoms include headaches, visual problems, balance difficulties and cranial nerve compression, resulting in swallowing difficulties, facial numbness, temporary loss of consciousness or other problems.  Syringomeyelia is a chronic spinal cord disorder in which fluid enters the interior of the spinal cord, causing damage. It is often related to Chiari malformation.
 
"We hope this event will help raise awareness about these conditions," said Angela Holley, a Marshall employee who is one of the organizers of the event. "Everyone is invited to participate, and we will host various other activities in order to make it fun for the whole family."
 
Early registration for the event is available for $20 and will continue until Thursday, Sept. 25. After that date, registration will cost $25. Registration is available online at www.tristateracer.com.
 
Proceeds from the event will benefit the American Syringomyelia and Chiari Alliance Project, which is a foundation dedicated to research, education and support regarding these conditions. Its website is at www.asap.org.
 
The event will begin at the shelter in Ritter Park and proceed west through the park to North Blvd., then  continue west on North Blvd. to W. 5th St. , north to W. 11th Ave., west to W. 7th St., east on Memorial Blvd./North Blvd., and finish back at the shelter.
 
For further information, persons may contact Holley at 304-638-3432 or by e-mail at holley1@marshall.edu.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 15, 2014
Contact: Sarah Trador, Faculty Senate, 304-696-4376

Fall General Faculty meeting is Sept. 23; 62 new faculty to be introduced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Fall General Faculty meeting of the 2014-2015 academic year will take place at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre of the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center.

The agenda will consist of welcoming remarks by the Faculty Senate Chair Dr. Larry Stickler; the introduction of new administrators by Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gayle Ormiston; introduction of 62 new faculty by Stickler, School of Medicine Dean Dr. Joseph Shapiro and School of Pharmacy Dean Dr. Kevin Yingling; a State of the Faculty Address by Stickler and a State of the University Address by University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.

All faculty, staff, students and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting a reception to honor the new university personnel will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.

New administrative positions to be introduced are: Dr. R. B. Bookwalter, dean of the College of Liberal Arts; Dr. Dru Bora, associate dean of the College of Science; Dr. Leonard White, School of Medicine associate dean for diversity; Dr. Ali Olashirazi, School of Medicine vice dean of business development/external affairs; and Dr. James Becker, School of Medicine senior associate dean for clinical affairs.

New faculty to be introduced are:

  • College of Education and Professional Development - Tina Allen, Ruthann Arneson, Jane Bogan, Teresa Clark, Jeradi Cohen, Rebecca Jennings-Knotts and Camille Ramsey;
  • College of Arts & Media - Johan Botes, Adam Dalton, Jason Lovins, Sandra Reed, Steven Trinkle and Ryan Wilson;
  • College of Health Professions - Joseph Beckett, Elizabeth Casey, Jessica Maynard, Robert Powell and Kelly Rutherford;
  • College of Information Technology and Engineering - Gregory Michaelson and Sarder Sadique;
  • College of Liberal Arts - Charles Arthur, Joel Peckham and Maggie Stone;
  • College of Science - Whitney Flesher, Herman Mays Jr. and Jennifer Mosher;
  • College of Business - Erik Bushey, Jonathan Butler, Ben Eng, Susan Lanham, Uyi Lawani, Keri Lucas and Ralph McKinney;
  • Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine - Akash Ajmera, Sutoidem Akpanudo, Mohammed Al-Ourani, Amanda Arrington, Kathryn Bell, Nadim Bou Zgheib, Todd Derreberry, Jennifer Gerlach, Suzanne Holroyd, Rodhan Khthir, Yehuda Lebowicz, Mary Legenza, Muhammad Mahmood, Sarah Miles, Jan Muizelaar,  David Rupp, Jonathon Salava, Elizabeth Saunders, Mahmoud Shorman, Kara Willenburg and Charles Yarbrough;
  • School of Pharmacy - Christopher Booth, Ashley Brown, Crystal Heise,  Jeremy McAleer,  Shekher Mohan and Megan Peterson;
  • University Libraries - Jackie Diorio and Lori Thompson.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday September 15, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Tickets for chance to win autographed football on sale through Oct. 1; proceeds to benefit Marshall's United Way campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ticket sales began today in the Memorial Student Center lobby for an autographed football signed by Marshall University's Head Football Coach Doc Holliday and Heisman Trophy hopeful Rakeem Cato. 

Will Holland, director of resource development for United Way of the River Cities, said this signed football is just one aspect of the fundraising efforts put forth by Marshall University.

"The United Way campaign on Marshall's Huntington campus kicks off on Sept. 22, but we wanted to give the Marshall community an opportunity to support us sooner by offering this giveaway a week early," Holland said. "The university doesn't have a monetary goal this year, but rather, a goal of increased participation."

Last year, 52 Marshall University employees contributed to the campaign. Holland said this year they are hoping to increase that number by 200 percent.

"We hope by offering special promotions such as the chance to win this autographed football that more members of the Marshall community will find it easier to contribute this year," Holland said. "We are very appreciative of the Marshall Athletics Department for donating this football to help us raise money for our fall campaign."

Tickets for the autographed football will be $3 each or two tickets for $5 and can be purchased from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily in the Memorial Student Center lobby through Oct. 1. Marshall will hold United Way Day on Oct. 1 with free health screenings for the community. The winning ticket for the autographed football will be drawn during this event. The United Way campaign kicks off on Marshall's Huntington campus Sept. 22 and will conclude on Oct. 3.

For more information on how you can purchase your ticket, contact Megan Archer, Marshall University campaign coordinator, at archer15@marshall.edu. For more information on this year's United Way of the River Cities campaign, please visit www.unitedwayrivercities.org.

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Photo: The autographed football signed by Rakeem Cato and Doc Holliday was donated by the Marshall University Department of Athletics. Tickets will be $3 for a single ticket or two tickets for $5 and can be purchased in the Memorial Student Center lobby from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily through Oct. 1.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 12, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-7153

Grand opening of Visual Arts Center slated for Sept. 18-19

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will celebrate the grand opening of its Visual Arts Center in downtown Huntington next week with a series of events open to the public over a two-day period.
 
The center is the renovated former Anderson-Newcomb, then Stone & Thomas department store, located at 927 3rd Ave. Marshall purchased the building in 2012 and work began in January 2013 to transform it to the permanent home of the School of Art and Design. The building opened when fall classes began Aug. 25.
 
Here is a look at each day's public activities:
 
Thursday, Sept. 18
 
3 p.m., ribbon-cutting ceremony begins.
Speakers include:
College of Arts and Media Dean Donald Van Horn;
Barry Taylor, chair of the Campaign for Distinction;
Sandra Reed, Director of the School of Art and Design;
Hannah Saxton, Marshall student in the School of Art and Design;
Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp; and,
Huntington Mayor Steve Williams
 
3:45 p.m., actual ribbon-cutting; includes each of the ceremony speakers, plus
Marshall Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gayle Ormiston; HMDA Board President Roger Smith; and HADCO President Gary Walton.
 
A reception will follow.
 
Friday, Sept. 19
 
5 to 8 p.m., Community Open House

  • This open house will provide the only chance for the public to tour floors two through six, which normally are reserved for students, faculty and staff. The first floor is the only floor that is regularly open to the public.
  • Student tour coordinators will guide visitors through the building.
  • The Visual Arts Center's grand opening exhibition, "We ART Marshall," will be on display in the first-floor gallery. It will feature works by artists and art educators who have made a significant contribution to the School of Art and Design over the years. Additionally, work by faculty, alumni and friends of the School of Art and Design will be exhibited throughout floors two through six. An opening reception for the exhibition will take place at 4 p.m.
  • A demonstration will take place on the 3rd floor by printmaking professor Peter Massing and photography associate professor Daniel Kaufmann.
  • A hands-on workshop will take place on the 5th floor by art education professor Dr. Maribea Barnes. The first 100 participants of this workshop will receive a Visual Arts Center imprinted apron.
  • Attendees will have the opportunity to have their memories of the building's past archived at Marshall University. Students will have a Story Booth set up on the first floor where they will be privately interviewing participants using audio and video. As space and time for these interviews may be limited, the public is encouraged to call 304-696-4822 to make appointments for interview space.
  • 5 to 5:30 p.m., and 6 to 6:30 p.m., live music. Marshall University's Jazz Combo will play at Pullman Square.
  • 5:40 p.m., Bison unveiling. Mayor Steve Williams, Metropolitan Partners' Bill Dargusch and College of Arts and Media Dean Donald Van Horn will join School of Art and Design sophomore Brianna Jarvis for the unveiling of the life-size fiberglass bison that will make its home at Pullman Square across the street from the Visual Arts Center. Earlier this year, Jarvis won a public art competition called New Connections, a project funded by Pullman Square and representing the new connections that the Visual Arts Center will make to the future and community.
  • 6:30 to 8 p.m., radio broadcast. The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications' WMUL-FM will broadcast live at the event.
  • Light refreshments will be served on the first floor.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 12, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall faculty member is first physical therapist recognized as David K. Brown Geriatric Scholar in West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Tamara Gravano of the Marshall University College of Health Professions is the first physical therapist in the state to complete the requirements to be recognized as a David K. Brown Geriatric Scholar through the West Virginia Geriatric Education Center (WVGEC).

Gravano, an assistant professor and director of clinical education in the college's School of Physical Therapy, said she has worked toward the promotion and advancement of geriatric physical therapy since 2004. 
                                                           
"With this scholarship, I hope to have more insight and training to help strengthen our geriatric community," Gravano said. "Being the first physical therapist to receive this honor was a surprise to me. Through this, I hope to encourage other colleagues who are interested in geriatrics to go through these courses and find out how they can also care for this growing population in our state."
                                                                           
Nancy Daugherty, associate director for the WVGEC, said West Virginia is currently the second most elderly state in the country, and the percentage of the state's population over 65 continues to increase. Daugherty said the David K. Brown Geriatric Scholar program seeks to strengthen the expertise in the field of geriatrics study, which will lead to improved care of our older adults.

"David K. Brown was the associate director of education at the WVU Center on Aging, a professor at WVU and served as a leader in geriatrics education prior to his death in 2009. This program honors his contribution to scholarship and advocacy," Daugherty said. "The WVGEC is excited to partner with Dr. Gravano because we don't have enough health care providers who specialize in geriatrics. We need more physical therapists and other health care professionals who do specialize in geriatric care because anything we can do to provide continuing education in this area would benefit our elderly community."                                   
Dr. Penny Kroll, program director for Marshall's School of Physical Therapy, said Gravano's achievement would blaze the trail for others in her field and encourage their colleagues to pursue similar opportunities.

"Dr. Gravano's level of commitment and dedication to her field has been evident since coming to the Marshall School of Physical Therapy in 2011," Kroll said. "This is a great example of how members of the Marshall community will continue to use their knowledge and passion to better those around them. I am delighted she was chosen for this honor, which she undoubtedly deserves."

Gravano received an award of $1,000 to use toward further training in geriatric care. She will attend the Advanced Geriatric Skills program March 26-28 at Lakeview Conference Center in Morgantown, W.Va., where she will present her research on balance and falls.

To learn more about West Virginia's geriatric community, visit www.wvgec.org. For more information on Gravano and the School of Physical Therapy, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp.

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Photo: Nancy Daugherty (left) of the West Virginia Geriatric Education Center stands with Dr. Tamara Gravano (right) after Gravano was recognized as the first physical therapist to receive the David K. Brown Geriatric Scholar award. Gravano has been a physical therapist with board certification in geriatrics since 2005.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 11, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center unveils mobile application

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center has released a mobile application for iPhone and Android users to stay connected with all aspects of campus recreation.

The app features schedules for classes, games and events happening at the Recreation Center. Users can add events to their calendars, set reminders and invite friends through social media sharing capabilities.  Members can also book a personal trainer session, register for a fitness class and stream equipment orientation videos directly from the app.

Recreation Center officials say they hope the app will make it easier for users to stay updated with "Rec Alerts" - a feature that sends push notifications about important announcements. 

"With Rec Alerts we can keep our members updated on any changes in our facility hours, such as early closings during football games, and announce any events coming up at the Recreation Center," said Michele Muth, Assistant Director of Marketing and Memberships.

The Recreation Center's annual Fitness Challenge will also be featured on the app, giving users the opportunity to view and update logs easily from their mobile devices. 

The app can be downloaded free from the Apple App Store and Google Play by searching Marshall Campus Recreation. For more information on the Marshall Recreation Center, visit http://www.marshallcampusrec.com/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 11, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Reed named director of School of Art and Design

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sandra Reed has been named as the new director of Marshall University's School of Art and Design.

Reed said she is honored to join the university right when its commitment to the visual art and design is transforming historic downtown Huntington.

"This is a special place at a special time," Reed said. "The opportunity to lead the faculty and students of the School of Art and Design as they fulfill the potential of the Visual Arts Center as a destination for vibrant study, creative production, dialogue, and exhibition was a major factor in my decision to accept the position as Director of the School of Art and Design."

College of Arts and Media Dean Donald Van Horn said Reed's appointment comes at an important time for the university.

"We reviewed many quality candidates from across the country, but it was Sandra's talent, knowledge and experiences that made her the best choice," Van Horn said. "The Visual Arts Center downtown is the premier center for the visual arts, and Sandra will represent it well. She's a great fit."

Reed said her two decades of experience and administration at the Savannah College of Art and Design have prepared her for the position.

"I've hit the ground running," Reed said.

A painter by trade, Reed has held leadership roles in New York City and a position as the academic director for two full academic terms at the Savannah College of Art and Design site in Lacoste, France. Reed's educational background includes two degrees earned with honors: a bachelor's from Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, and a master's in painting from the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She has had work featured in the National Museum of Women in the Arts in D.C., the Ogden Museum of Art in New Orleans, Blue Gallery in Lacoste, and Gallery in Cork in London.

Grand opening events for the Visual Arts Center are scheduled for next week, including a ribbon-cutting at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 18. There will be an opening reception for the first art exhibition, "We ART Marshall," at 4 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 19, as well as a community open house from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 19.

A video about Reed can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WTxjtY_JCU.

To learn more about the School of Art and Design or the Visual Arts Center, visit www.marshall.edu/art.

----------------

Photo: Sandra Reed has been named as the new director for Marshall University's School of Art and Design.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 10, 2014
Contact: Emily Troutman, Press Secretary, Marshall University Student Government Association, 540-808-9088

Marshall University Homecoming Parade set for Oct. 11

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Student Government Association is organizing the annual Marshall University Homecoming Parade, which will take place Saturday, Oct. 11.

The exact time of the parade is yet to be determined. It will be based on the time that will be set for kickoff of the homecoming football game with Middle Tennessee State.

The theme of homecoming this year will be "Marco's Favorite Heroes and Toughest Villains."

Marshall University Student Government is encouraging any organizations or local businesses who want to have a float in the parade this year to please contact Chief of Staff, Caitlin Grimes, by e-mail at Grimes26@live.marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-2289.

Any businesses or organizations who are interested in learning more about the Homecoming Parade can also visit the SGA's website at http://www.marshall.edu/sga2011/homecoming-2014.

For further information, contact:  Marshall University Student Government Association,  MSC 2W29B, One John Marshall Dr., Huntington, WV 25755, 304-696-5260.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 10, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Greening Marshall Committee begins monthly meetings

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Members of the Marshall University community interested in participating in the Greening Marshall Committee are invited to the kickoff meeting for the fall semester at 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11.
 
Meetings last approximately 1.5 hours and are located in the Conference Room at the Sorrell Maintenance Building, otherwise known as the Physical Plant building. Attendees make recommendations to the Sustainability Department for Marshall's green initiatives.
 
Margie J. Phillips, manager of the Sustainability Department, says students are especially encouraged to participate in these monthly meetings.
 
"It's a great opportunity to meet like-minded peers, to network and to pursue your passion for being sustainable and for making a difference in your world," Phillips said.
 
Marshall's Greening Marshall Committee was formed by President Stephen J. Kopp in September 2008 to address issues of sustainability for the university and to explore ways to conserve water and energy, reduce waste and incorporate green technologies and materials into Marshall's planning and operations.
 
One year later, Marshall students became the first college students in the state and one of the few in the country to propose and vote for a $5 student Green Fee, which funds the Sustainability Department. Since its beginning in 2009, the department has brought programs to Marshall including the student gardens and the Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program located at  the Marshall Recreation Center, to name a few.

For more information, contact Phillips at 304-696-2992 or philli10@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 10, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Tickets on sale for gala to celebrate state's coal mining community

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - Miners, community members and others connected with the state's coal mining industry will gather at Tamarack in Beckley on Thursday, Oct. 2, for the 2014 Miners' Celebration a gala reception and dinner to celebrate the past, present and future of West Virginia's coal mining enterprise. Tickets for the event are now on sale.

According to organizers, the purpose of the annual event is to recognize those who play a role in the success of the state's mining enterprise.

"Every person who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders, educators and mining families," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences.

"What's really special about this event is that our planning committee is made up of people and organizations from across the spectrum from industry, education, business, labor and our local communities. Everyone comes together to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved and to spotlight the region's long history in mining."

At the event, Hinton native Sylvia Mathews Burwell, U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services, will be honored with a special Spirit of the Coalfields award and "Rocket Boys" author Homer Hickam will present the Homer Hickam Collier Award to a working coal miner, Delbert Weaver of Philippi, who epitomizes the spirit, dedication and skills of the mining profession.

Conference organizers also will present "Because of You" awards for significant contributions to West Virginia's coalfields heritage in a number of categories, including Community Involvement (Coal River East Business Unit of Alpha Natural Resources), Women in Mining (Tanya James of the United Mine Workers of America), Safety Professional (Pinnacle Mining Company Blue Mine Rescue Team), Educator of the Year (Joanne Jaeger Tomblin of Southern West Virginia Community and Technical College) and Champion for Coal (Roger Horton of Citizens for Coal).

The Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will present the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts (West Virginia Dance Company for Fire in the Hole:  A Coal History), the Coal Heritage Award for Interpretation (Layland Miners' Memorial Group) and the Coal Heritage Award for Research and Documentation (Author Jay Chatman of McDowell County).

The evening's entertainment will be provided by the Coal Fired Band from Logan.

The gala will begin at 5 p.m. with a free reception in the Tamarack atrium. Dinner and the awards ceremony, which require a ticket, will begin at 6 p.m. in the ballroom. Tickets for the dinner and awards ceremony are $50/person. To purchase tickets, call 304-696-4029 or e-mail spradlin13@marshall.edu.

For more information about the Miners' Celebration, visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/mcc.

The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; Strategic Solutions LLC; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 10, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall graduate creates American Dream Movement for African American male students who need sense of hope

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University alumnus Charles C. Meyers Jr. believes that "success is earned by having a vision for your life and putting in the work to turn your potential into reality."

With that thought in mind, Meyers, a 2013 Marshall graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree, developed the American Dream Movement for African American male students in this community whom, he said, "just need a sense of hope and direction to become successful individuals."

Meyers, whose previous initiatives have included Future Investment Day, A Gift to Remember in December, and the Words of Reflection Writing Contest, plans to conduct a ceremony later this month for new members of the American Dream Movement.

"When members of the community take the time to provide the students with wisdom and guidance, the students have a much better chance of becoming motivated to succeed and to dream of a better life for themselves," Meyers said. "I developed the American Dream Movement because I know the power of influence.  When you take the time to invest in someone's future, the impact that you can make on someone's life is worth the investment."

Twelve students will become members of the American Dream Movement, of which Meyers is the director, during a new membership ceremony called "Gathering of Dreamers" at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20, at First Baptist Church, 801 6th Ave., in Huntington.

Those students are Elijah Murphy, Jadon  Hayes, Daishaun Johnson, Lee Johnson, Mark  Ziegler, QuaShawn Thompson, Thaddaeus Jones, Malik Brown, Isaiah  Nash, Mikal Dawson, Malik Grier and Shymeik  Burger.

Jones is an eighth-grade student who attends Huntington Middle School and the others attend Huntington High school. The program is for students in the eighth grade through the 12th grade.

It is conducted through the Huntington alumni chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. and the supporting organizations are Antioch Missionary Baptist Church and First Baptist Church of Huntington, as well as the Nu Nu chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., and Nu Beta chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc.

Meyers said the need for the program is clear.

"In today's society, the dedication and encouragement to achieve the 'American Dream' has dissipated in the hearts of many African American males in Huntington, West Virginia," he said. "The motivation to pursue happiness and success has been truncated to fulfilling desires with short-term thinking leading to long-term consequences. Now, more than ever, it is critical for African American males growing up in society to understand the importance of faith, family, education, and having a career.

"In order for African American males to reach their full potential in life, they must be encouraged to achieve their dreams and to take the proper steps to success. An investment in the lives of African American male students in the Huntington community is needed, in order to change the trajectory of their lives in a positive direction."

Meyers said the mission of the program is to invest in the education of African American male students in all aspects of their lives, in order to elevate their thinking, behavior and dreams.

The purpose of the program is to allow African American male students to have a better opportunity to succeed in life through positive reinforcement, education and guidance.

And, their values are their bond, their strength, their dedication and their achievement.

If anyone knows a student who would benefit from the program, or wants more information on the program, he or she may contact Meyers by e-mail at meyers12@live.marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 5, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine announces the creation of several new scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Several new scholarships have been established at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine to assist medical students with their educational expenses.  They are:

  • The Anthony M. Alberico, MD, Scholarship, which will be awarded to a first-year medical student who has financial need as per the Office of Student Financial Assistance standards. Dr. Anthony Alberico, chairman of the department of neuroscience for the School of Medicine, created the scholarship, which is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.
  • The Virginia D. Kirkwood Scholarship, which will be awarded to a first-year medical student who is a resident of West Virginia. The scholarship is renewable pending normal academic progress.  It was created by Virginia Kirkwood, who earned her bachelor's degree from then-Marshall College in 1954 and then went on to a 30-year teaching career in Ohio.
  • The Dr. Ezra B. Riber Scholarship, which has been established by Dr. Ezra Riber, Class of 1984, in memory of his parents, Hanna and Israel Riber, and in honor of his wife, Mandy, and their two children.  The recipient will be an in-state, first-year medical student and is renewable pending normal academic progress.  First preference will go to students who are environmentally conscientious and involved in sustainability efforts. Second preference will be given to students displaying leadership qualities.
  • The Dr. Catherine Anne Gallant Steele Memorial Scholarship, which will be awarded to a rising fourth-year medical student who is interested in psychiatry. Dr. Steele was a graduate of the Class of 1986, and practiced medicine as a psychiatrist before her death in March 2014.
  • The Larry and Cheryl Tweel Scholarship, which was created by the Tweels, who live in Huntington. The scholarship will be awarded to an entering medical student with first preference to a Cabell or Wayne County resident. The second preference will go to a student from Lawrence County, Ohio or Boyd County, Ky. This award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.
  • The Dr. Monica L. Richey Walker Scholarship, which will be awarded to a full-time, first-year medical student who displays academic excellence and has financial need as determined by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.  It was created by Dr. Monica L. Richey Walker, a member of the Class of 1986 and a practicing dermatologist in Florida.  First preference will be given to a student from Wellsburg, W.Va., second preference will be given to a resident of Brooke County and third preference to an in-state student.
  • The 1439 Scholarship, which was created by Dr. Steve C. Lochow in honor of Dr. Kevin M. Milam, Class of 2002, who passed away earlier this year from ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease).  The scholarship will be awarded to a first-year medical student who is a resident of West Virginia and a nontraditional student.  The scholarship was initially funded through a special event, Walk for Kev, which occurred in May at Ritter Park.


For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 5, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, (304) 696-7153

Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

"As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members," said Jim Terry, director of public safety at Marshall. "This system allows us to contact university community members as quickly as possible."

The most recent test of the system occurred Jan. 29.

The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall and delivered thru the Blackboard Connect service, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday September 5, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center provides American Red Cross CPR/AED and first aid classes

HUNTINGTON, W. Va. - The Marshall University Recreation Center is providing American Red Cross CPR/AED (CardioPulmonary Resuscitation and Automatic External Defibrillator) and first aid classes open to the public in September and October.

The CPR/AED classes are offered from 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 7; from 2 to 6 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 5; and from 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 19.

The price for Marshall Rec members to attend a CPR/AED class is $65 and it is $90 for non-members.

The CPR/AED classes are for individuals who need to respond to emergencies. The program consists of video and hands-on training, discussions and real-life rescue scenarios that will help decision-making skills. The course will teach participants how to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies for not only adults, but children and infants as well.

First aid classes are offered from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8; from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.7; and from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 13.

The cost for Marshall Rec members to attend a first aid class is $25 and it is $30 for non-members.

The first aid classes are for individuals who need to respond to emergencies. This program also consists of video and hands-on training, discussions, and real-life rescue scenarios. The course will cover first aid topics like: heat- and cold-related emergencies, diabetic emergencies, sprains and broken bones, severe bleeding and more.

To register for classes visit the Welcome Desk at the Marshall Recreation Center or go to www.marshallcampusrec.com.

For more information, contact Dan Belcher at 304-696-4691.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 4, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Pharmacy faculty publish in peer-reviewed journal

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four faculty members of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy may take issue with Shakespeare's Juliet and her age-old question, "what's in a name?"

The team recently published a commentary on the importance of defining the term "polypharmacy," which according to the authors has at least 24 distinct meanings and should be more narrowly defined to reduce confusion in research as well as education.

Faculty members Chris Gillette, Ph.D., Leesa Prunty, Pharm.D., Janet Wolcott, Pharm.D., and Kimberly Broedel-Zaugg, R.Ph., M.B.A., Ph.D., contributed to the manuscript, which was published in late August in the journal "Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy."

Gillette says the need to redefine the term polypharmacy is ultimately a drug safety issue.

"The goal of our paper is meant to start a dialogue within the health services research community that ultimately means better health care for patients," he said.  "We propose the term be defined as patients going to more than one pharmacy for their prescriptions."

The team also proffered a new term, "extraordinary prescribing," to define patients who are taking medications that are either grossly excessive or not beneficial for those patients.

In its manuscript, the Marshall team acknowledged that neither of the current terms in the new lexicon is perfect in description, but if accepted by the research and education community should reduce confusion.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday September 4, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Medicine early adopter of new national faculty development program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is one of the first five medical school programs in the United States to implement a new faculty development program, Teaching for Quality (Te4Q).  The program trains clinical faculty and staff how to effectively teach quality improvement and patient safety to medical students, residents and other clinicians.

The program, created by the American Association of Medical Colleges, was implemented at Marshall in August.

"Today, more than ever, the emphasis in health care is on patient safety and quality improvement," said James B. Becker, M.D., senior associate dean for clinical affairs at the School of Medicine. "This program will enable us to promote those elements across the full range of our educational mission.  The work we do will benefit patients most, but it will also add to our research activities."

As part of the Te4Q certification process, participants must develop and present an educational project plan.  The plan must address an identified gap in the education of students, residents, and/or practicing clinicians regarding quality improvement and patient safety, design an educational innovation to fill that gap, and implement and assess the impact of the innovation.
 
Program directors from the residency/fellowship programs at the School of Medicine who participated are creating a joint project to develop and implement a required curriculum in patient safety and quality improvement to ensure all residents/fellows develop a minimal competency in quality improvement before entering practice.

"We are planning a learning experience that is a combination of didactic and project-based work to ensure that all of our trainees reach a certain level of competency before entering their clinical practice," explained Paulette S. Wehner, M.D., vice dean, graduate medical education.    "By building these educational experiences in health care improvement and stressing the importance of quality improvement, we can ultimately impact patient care outcomes as our trainees emerge into practice."   

Darshana Shah, Ph.D., associate dean for faculty affairs and professional development, said Te4Q delivers a system that allows quality improvement and patient safety concepts to be woven into every facet of medical education.

"We are very excited to bring this very important professional development program to Marshall," Shah said. "Our goal is to develop a collaborative partnership with other health professions to improve quality of care and patient safety throughout every level of our organizations." 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 3, 2014
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

Newly formed Glenwood Center to promote scholarship in the humanities associated with history of Charleston and region

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Glenwood Center for Scholarship in the Humanities, a public-private partnership involving Marshall University, West Virginia State University and the Historic Glenwood Foundation, has been launched in an effort to promote scholarship in the humanities associated with the history of Charleston, the Kanawha Valley, the state of West Virginia and the Appalachian region.

The center is based at Glenwood, the pre-Civil War mansion on Charleston's West Side that was home to several of the Kanawha Valley's pioneer families, including the Quarriers, Summers and Laidleys. Before her death in 1983, the last occupant of the house, Lucy Quarrier, passed it on to the then West Virginia College of Graduate Studies (COGS) Foundation.

Under the auspices of the COGS Foundation the exquisitely preserved estate hosted numerous cultural and educational events before it was turned over to the Historic Glenwood Foundation, which now owns and manages it. Through the years, a series of seminars and symposiums, as well as classes, have taken place there, mainly under the auspices of Marshall's Graduate Humanities program. One class built an elaborate traveling exhibit, Window to the West Side, which has been taken to schools, libraries and other educational and cultural venues and is still being circulated.

In the short term, the newly formed center will work toward hosting regular speaker series, classes and workshops in conjunction with academic programming in Marshall's Graduate Humanities program and West Virginia State's History program, according to Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, center co-director, and director of MU's Graduate Humanities program.

Long-term plans call for supporting humanities-based research through the two universities, hosting visiting scholars, involving students in archival work and other preservation projects at Glenwood, and advancing collaborative grant and fund development, Lassiter said.

"We've been doing partnerships involving Marshall, West Virginia State University and the Historic Glenwood Foundation for some time and we decided to make it official," Lassiter said. "We wanted to bring the resources together to undertake more ventures and to do more community-based projects. Our goal is to continue to have classes held at the estate, to host scholars who will work with the archives or various projects that will involve the region and state, and to promote both research and teaching."

"We're providing the location and the historic background for all this to occur," said Kemp Winfree, vice president and operating officer of the Historic Glenwood Foundation. "The documents that will be a part of this are all a part of the Glenwood Foundation, all 30,000 of them. There are 30,000 sheets of paper that the families saved, which contain everything from wills, to bills of sale, to correspondence of all types."

Students in previous classes held at Glenwood have uncovered a treasure trove of relics in its archives, Lassiter said and archival work will continue in future classes. The biggest find to date was two perfectly preserved Abraham Lincoln presidential campaign posters, which a WVSU student doing an internship discovered in a large ledger book.

"Faculty and students have come across a lot of unknown items in the house and archives and there will be more uncovered as our research continues," Lassiter said. "Another item of interest was a set of old film that had not been viewed for many years. We recently had a presentation as a result of a Graduate Humanities History of Charleston seminar, taught by Dr. Billy Joe Peyton, where the students could show off their finds and the film was included."
Fortunately the families that lived in the house had a keen sense of their place in local history and preserved prodigious amounts of documents including letters and journals, according to Peyton, associate faculty in the Graduate Humanities program. a faculty member in the history program at West Virginia State University and center co-director.

"They had a very good sense of history and were very conscious of their places in it. These documents have allowed us to get a glimpse into their daily lives. It was Miss Lucy Quarrier's foresight that allowed the materials to remain on the estate," Peyton said.

"The property and the house from the very first day it was constructed have been home to leaders of West Virginia and the availability of these items will give new insight into how things happened and why they happened," Winfree said. "The foundation is grateful for the two universities for suggesting that we partner together because without them, we wouldn't be able to take full advantage of the material that was saved for over 100 years. The two universities are the ones that will help interpret all these documents and how they fit together in the history of West Virginia. We're just happy to be a part of it and look forward to the future with the two schools."

Students in Peyton's Marshall humanities seminars and WVSU classes at Glenwood have been poring over a cache of hundreds of archival documents located in the quarters building, a smaller adjacent house that was once used as servant quarters and a summer kitchen. They've been transcribing letters, some dating to the 1850s, as well as journals that range from the 1850s to the 1920s. And through the letters of Lewis Summers, the students have been able to follow an intriguing 19th-century love story as it unfolded.

Lewis Summers was the only surviving child of George and Amacetta Summers, who moved into Glenwood in 1857, and he was something of a Romeo, according to Peyton. "He had girlfriends and when he met his future wife, Lucy, who lived in Marietta; they courted by post. Through their correspondence we have almost a complete record of their courtship and their early years of marriage." Lewis, who lived between 1843 and 1928 and spent most of his life at Glenwood, also kept journals and Peyton said there are hundreds of documents yet to be gone through that date into the 1920s.

"Future classes will help us use the materials and help us interpret Glenwood and preserve the legacy of the house and the families that lived there as well as the larger history of our area," Peyton said. "George Summers was a lawyer and judge, as well as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and was a staunch advocate of the Union so the entire history of West Virginia is contained in that house. We hope to provide a service not only for the area but for the state, and of course, our institutions."

Administrative offices will be located on the estate. The center's website is hosted by Marshall University at www.marshall.edu/glenwoodcenter.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday September 3, 2014
Contact: George Carico, Director, West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center, (304) 696-7153

West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center announces keynote and special guest speakers for State Brownfields Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University has announced keynote and special guest speakers for the upcoming State Brownfields Conference, which is slated for Sept. 11-12 at the Big Sandy Superstore Convention Center in Huntington.

The annual statewide conference is hosted by the West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center at Marshall University in conjunction with the Northern Brownfields Assistance Center at West Virginia University, the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and the West Virginia Development Office.

The yearly program has evolved into one of West Virginia's premier redevelopment events, combining educational programs with networking opportunities for communities, local governments, development professionals and service providers. The event features expert panels, interactive workshops, technical training, an exhibitor hall and project case studies.

This year's keynote speaker will be Shawn Garvin, a regional administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has held the position since November 2009 and has worked in intergovernmental affairs for more than 20 years. He will be recognizing the latest West Virginia EPA Brownfields grant recipients as part of his remarks.

Huntington Mayor Steve Williams will be the special guest speaker. Williams will outline the city's recent efforts to deal with issues related to dilapidated housing, increasing economic development opportunities, and community planning and enhancement projects, many of which utilize brownfields properties.

Brownfields properties can include former industrial sites, closed service stations, abandoned buildings or vacant properties. Brownfields may have potential environmental impairments but often have significant prospects for business, housing or recreational redevelopment.

Conference details are available at http://wvbrownfields.org. Although on-line registration closed Aug. 29, on-site registration will be available for anyone interesting in attending.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

School of Medicine professor wins national teaching award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kelly E. Melvin, an assistant professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been selected to receive an Association for Academic Psychiatry (AAP) Early Career Development Award.

The AAP says the annual award involves a competitive process and was created to facilitate career development and recognize young faculty who are innovative in their teaching techniques and skills.

Melvin was nominated by Dr. Suzanne Holroyd, chairwoman of the department.

"Dr. Melvin is a fantastic clinician and dedicated teacher," Holroyd said. "His passion for psychiatry shines while teaching our students, which has had a very positive effect on the students' interest in psychiatry. He is an ideal academic faculty member and I am fortunate he is in our department. I am thrilled he was chosen for this national recognition, which he most certainly deserves."

Melvin is a 2005 graduate of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  He completed a residency in general adult psychiatry as well as a child psychiatry fellowship at Vanderbilt University and joined Marshall's School of Medicine in November, 2012.

"Receiving this award is a huge honor," Melvin said.  "It's very humbling that Dr. Holroyd nominated me and multiple students wrote letters on my behalf.  I love teaching.  It gives me the opportunity to make students excited about caring for patients who have mental health conditions."

Melvin will receive the award at a meeting in September in Portland, Oregon.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday September 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Maelzel Woodwind Quintet to present "Music from the Age of Invention"

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four Marshall University music faculty members, flutist Dr. Wendell Dobbs, hornist Dr. Stephen Lawson, bassoonist Kay Lawson and oboist Dr. Richard Kravchak will be joined by guest clarinetist Dr. Richard Spece for a program titled "Music from the Age of Invention." It will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, in Smith Recital Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The five chose to call themselves the Maelzel Woodwind Quintet, as their "Age of Invention" program nods to the early 19th century - a time when inventions such as Maelzel's time-keeping contraption and musical and technical innovations marked the artistic landscape in Europe.

"Though woodwind quintet music has been well represented at Marshall, this particular program will be different since all involved will not perform on modern instruments, but on historical reproductions of instruments that existed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries," Dobbs said. "The instruments vary considerably from their modern counterparts. They naturally sound differently and they require a whole new technique when playing."

This repertoire of music for five wind instruments began life in late 18th and early 19th century Paris, when numerous multi-movement works featuring the five winds of the classical era orchestra - flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn - were composed by Anton Reicha, Franz Danzi and others. Though the horn is not a woodwind instrument, the convenient name woodwind quintet has described the combination for many generations.

"Music from the Age of Invention" will feature works by Reicha and Danzi, as well as by Peter Müller.

"One might ask: Why go to the trouble to learn a new technique and perform on instruments that are often more difficult technically than the modern counterparts?" Dobbs said. "Exploring this music on the original instruments provides musicians the opportunity to fully understand the intrinsic problems of blend, balance and intonation, and most importantly, the interpretation, oftentimes inspired by these instruments.

"In essence, we hear the same sounds as the composers and musicians from the era and this informs our decisions on numerous aspects of the music and indeed permits us and our audience to understand the music in ways that may be obscured by the louder, more homogenized sounds of modern instruments."

Spece has taught at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Campus, and performs regularly with a host of groups including Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Portland Baroque Orchestra, Ama Deus Ensemble, California Bach Society, Magnificat, Classical Consort, Concert Spirituel, and Opera Lafayette. He is also a founding member of Circa 1800 Chamber Winds. His newest adventure in his new home in Richmond, Virginia, is to establish a period instrument orchestra that will be called the Mannheim Rocket. Spece's appearance is sponsored by a contribution from Dr. Alan Gould, director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall.

The Sept. 11 program is free and open to the public. Call 304-696-3117 for more information.

The program will be repeated at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14, as part of the Ariel Chamber Theatre Series at the Historic Ariel-Dater Hall in Gallipolis, Ohio. Admission for the repeat performance is $5; call 740-446-ARTS for more information on that performance.


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Tuesday September 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Supreme Court of Appeals returns to Marshall for fall session

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals returns to Marshall University's Huntington campus Tuesday, Sept. 16, to conduct a session in which it will hear four appeals.

The Court's appearance will be its sixth at Marshall in the past decade. It is one of many events to be staged during the annual Constitution Week celebration at MU, which begins Monday, Sept. 8.

The docket for the Supreme Court's visit can be found at http://www.courtswv.gov/supreme-court/calendar/2014/sept14.html. Robin Jean Davis is the Court's chief justice. Justice Menis E. Ketchum II served as chief justice in 2012. He is a former member and chairman of Marshall University's board of governors. Other justices are Brent D. Benjamin, Margaret L. Workman and Allen H. Loughry II.

The public is invited and encouraged to attend the session, which begins at 10 a.m. in the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, and will be followed by a reception honoring the judges in the Performing Arts Center lobby. In addition to hors d'oeuvres, pizza will be served.

The four cases cover a variety of appeals:

  • Estella Robinson v. City of Bluefield, No. 13-0936 - Procedural background: This first appeal arises from an order entered in the Circuit Court of Mercer County that affirmed the Municipal Court of Bluefield's order to euthanize the petitioner's dog.
  • State of West Virginia v. Justin Sean Gum, No. 12-1292 - Procedural background: In Case No. 2 on the docket, the petitioner, Justin Sean Gum, appeals the Lewis County Circuit Court's order finding sufficient evidence to support a conviction of second-degree murder and sentencing the petitioner to 40 years at the William Sharpe Hospital.
  • Alcan Rolled Products Ravenswood, LLC v. Terry W. McCarthy, No. 13-1080 - Procedural background: In the third case, the petitioner, Alcan Rolled Products Ravenswood, LLC, appeals the Kanawha County Circuit Court's order, which reversed the Board of Review and the Administrative Law Judge's decision that the respondent, Terrry W. McCarthy, engaged in "gross misconduct" under West Virginia Code 21A-63.
  • State of West Virginia v. Christopher D. Cox, No. 13-0778 - Procedural background: In the final case on the docket at Marshall, the petitioner, Christopher D. Cox, appeals his conviction for first-degree murder without recommendation of mercy.

"All Marshall University students and faculty, and high school students and faculty in the Tri-State Area are invited to join us for this unique opportunity to witness the Court in action as it hears and rules on these interesting, noteworthy appeals," said Dr. Alan Gould, director of the John Deaver Drinko Academy at Marshall, which sponsors Constitution Week activities.

Constitution Week at Marshall is an annual observance to commemorate the adoption of the United States Constitution and the contributions of Chief Justice John Marshall, for whom the university is named. Constitution Week activities are sponsored by the John Deaver Drinko Academy.

Gould said Constitution Week was started by United States Senator Robert C. Byrd in order to draw attention to the important document that our system of government is based upon.

"Included within federal legislation that was passed in 2004 was a provision requiring educational institutions that receive federal funds to set some time aside on or near the September 17th anniversary of the document's signing to study the United States Constitution," he said.

Highlighting the other events planned during Constitution Week is the annual quoits tournament. Quoits, which is similar to horseshoes, was John Marshall's favorite sport.

On Monday, Sept. 8, teams of faculty, staff, students, fraternities and sororities can sign up to play for trophies and prizes. To sign up, participants need to stop by the quoits pits on the west end of Buskirk Field between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. that Monday, or e-mail Kristen Pack at milhoan4@marshall.edu, or Renee Denney at denney@marshall.edu. Deadline for team registration is 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9.

Competition begins Tuesday, Sept. 9, and runs through Thursday, Sept. 11. The winning team will play in the Quoits Presidential Round, taking on MU President Stephen J. Kopp. That game is scheduled to start at 3 p.m., Friday, Sept. 12.

On Wednesday, Sept. 24, as in years past, the President's Invitational Quoits Media Challenge will take place at 11:30 a.m. WSAZ's Tim Irr and Keith Morehouse will return to defend their championship. All quoits action takes place on the west end of Buskirk Field. Before the media quoits challenge begins, President Kopp will cut the John Marshall birthday cake on the Memorial Student Center plaza. In addition to cake, kettle corn and punch will be served.

Here is a brief look at other Constitution Week events:

  • Thursday, Sept. 11 - 7 p.m., in the Marshall Foundation Hall - The Amicus Curiae Lecture, featuring guest speaker Laura K. Donohue, professor of law at the Georgetown Law Center;
  • Monday, Sept. 22 - 5:30 p.m., in the John Marshall Room in the Memorial Student Center - announcement of the winner of the Dan O'Hanlon Constitution Week and John Marshall Celebration Essay Competition;
  • Thursday, Sept. 25 - 12:30 p.m., in the Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center - The Robert C. Byrd Forum on Civic Responsibility, featuring the Hon. Steve Williams, mayor of Huntington. He will speak on "Civic Responsibility and Obligations Citizens have to Local Government."

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Thursday August 28, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine announces creation of six new scholarships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Six new scholarships have been established at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine to assist medical students with their educational expenses. 
 
The following scholarships were created through the school's "Adopt a Medical Student" program, which is a graduated giving program that allows gifts to be made annually until the fund becomes fully endowed.
 
-  The Becker Family Scholarship was created by Dr. James "Jim" B. Becker, Class of 1993 and senior associate dean for clinical affairs at the school of medicine, and will be awarded to a rising fourth-year medical student who is planning to pursue a career in family medicine. The $1,000 award will be given to three medical students annually.

-  The Elizabeth Scholarship will be awarded to an entering medical student from West Virginia, and was created by Dr. Cindy Z. Pinson, Class of 1996. This scholarship is in memory of Liz Pinson and Beth Bondurant, two women who bravely fought cancer. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Evans Family Scholarship was created by Dr. Joseph "Joe" E. Evans, Class of 1982 and chairman of the school's department of pediatrics, and will be awarded to an entering medical student with first preference to a graduate of Spring Valley High School in Wayne County, W.Va. This award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. and Mrs. Scott E. Miller Family Scholarship will be awarded to a first-year medical student who is a West Virginia resident and has financial need as per Office of Student Financial Assistance standards. Dr. Miller, Class of 1986, who is a cardiologist in Charleston, created the scholarship in honor of Cynthia A. "Cindy" Warren, director of admissions for the School of Medicine. The award is renewable for three additional years pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. Thomas B. Styer Scholarship was endowed by Dr. Styer, Class of 1982, and Mrs. Julia Styer. The recipient will be an entering medical student, with first preference given to a graduate of Piarist School in Floyd County, Ky. The second preference will be given to a graduate of St. Joseph Central Catholic High School in Huntington and the third preference given to a Cabell County resident. The award is renewable for three additional years to the first two preferences, pending normal academic progress.

-  The Dr. Donnah Wolodkin Whitaker Scholarship was created by Dr. Wolodkin Whitaker, Class of 1984, who is a practicing anesthesiologist in northeast Ohio.  The recipient of this scholarship will be an entering medical student who is a resident of West Virginia.   First preference will be given to a resident of Wheeling, W.Va. If there are no applicants from Wheeling, preference will be given to a resident of Ohio County, Marshall County, or any other county in W.Va., in that order.
 
"Our medical school's core mission is dedicated to educating students who will become primary care doctors and serve our nation's rural populations," said Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs for the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. "By helping reduce student debt, we allow students freedom to choose specialties based on interest and not on how they are compensated."

For more information on the scholarships or to make a gift to the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes at 304-691-1711 or holmes@marshall.edu.


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Thursday August 28, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Medical Outreach teams with Cabell Huntington Hospital for women's health event

Future outreach events planned this fall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Medical Outreach, a medical student-led organization that provides free medical care to the homeless and unemployed population in the area, recently teamed with Cabell Huntington Hospital (CHH), the CHH Breast Health Center and the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center to provide an afternoon of health and wellness events for more than two dozen women.

Twenty-five women, identified through local social service agencies, were invited to the inaugural "Mamm & Glam" event where free mammograms were provided through a grant awarded from Susan G. Komen for the Cure West Virginia.  The mammograms were read on site by a Cabell Huntington Hospital radiologist.

Wellness consults, hair and nail services, lunch, yoga instruction, and goodie bags including health, hygiene, and makeup items were also offered.
  
In addition to the major sponsors listed above, the following businesses participated: True Blue Salon; Studio 8; Cabell Huntington Health Department; Qdoba Mexican Grill; Honeybaked Ham; River & Rail Bakery; plus dozens of individuals and private groups.

Missy Browning, education coordinator for the department of psychiatry at the School of Medicine and  MMO events coordinator, said the focused event on women's health was a huge success.
 
"We were so pleased to be able to collaborate with our partners and offer free mammograms to these at-risk women," she said.  "Having the results read while the ladies were on site was also important, because it can be difficult to follow up with this population in the event further screening is needed, since many of them do not have permanent housing or telephones. Therefore, we planned an event for the ladies to participate in - hair styling, manicures, a makeup bar, yoga instruction, and lunch - ensuring they could enjoy an afternoon of royal treatment while the radiologist read the scans."

Browning thanked the community for its response to the event which included donations by religious groups, work-site groups and individuals. She said social media played a huge role in spreading the news about donations for the event. 

"I was amazed at the community's response to this event.  While we have a dedicated group of individuals who assist on MMO projects, the Mamm & Glam event resulted in volunteers and organizations that hadn't previously served with our team," she said.  "After posting the event on Facebook, we had an outpouring of support."
  
"Our team was amazed at the outpouring from the community to help sponsor this event," said Marsha Dillow, RN MSN CBCN, Director, Breast Health Center and Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Diagnostic Breast Center.  "Missy Browning and her team did a tremendous job with the planning of the event. She is very compassionate about reaching out to others and it showed through the great success of this event.  The success of partnering with Marshall Medical Outreach was demonstrated during the Mamm & Glam and we look forward to working with them in future events."
   
Marshall Medical Outreach provides monthly care one Saturday a month beginning at 9 a.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church in Huntington.  Future dates are as follows:

-  September 20th
-  October 25th
-  November 22nd
-  December 27th

For more information or to volunteer, please contact Missy Browning at clagg11@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday August 27, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Georgetown professor of law will be first speaker this fall in Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Laura K. Donohue, a professor of law and director of the Center on National Security and the Law at Georgetown University Law Center, will be the featured speaker Thursday, Sept. 11, in the first installment of the fall 2014 Amicus Curiae Lecture Series at Marshall University.

The Amicus Curiae - or "Friend of the Court" - Lecture Series on Constitutional Democracy focuses on issues of law, history, politics and governance in the United States of America. It is sponsored by Marshall's Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, with financial support from the West Virginia Humanities Council.

Donohue's lecture, titled "The Future of Privacy, Uncertain," will take place at 7 p.m. at the Marshall University Foundation Hall, Home of the Erickson Alumni Center, on the Huntington campus. Two other Amicus Curiae lectures will be given this fall. Donohue describes her lecture as focusing on individual privacy in an age of terrorism and resulting heightened security.

"On June 6, 2013, the Washington Post and The Guardian captured public attention by reporting that the intelligence community was collecting large amounts of information about U.S. citizens," she explained. "The National Security Agency (NSA) was tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person's movements and contacts over time.  The NSA, it has since been learned, relied upon post-9/11 legislation to support these and other surveillance programs. Information obtained by the intelligence committee for national security purposes can then be used for criminal prosecution, without any of the protections that ordinarily accompany law enforcement investigations."

Donohue has been a project director for the U.S. Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security on projects related to mass-terror incidents. She earned her A.B. in Philosophy (with Honors) from Dartmouth College, her M.A. in Peace Studies (with Distinction) from the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, her J.D. (with Distinction) from Stanford Law School, and her Ph.D. in History from the University of Cambridge. She is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Here is a brief look at each of the other two speakers and their topics scheduled this fall:

7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014: David O. Stewart, a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School and a former law clerk to Supreme Court Associate Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr., will speak on the subject of his book, "American Emperor: Aaron Burr's Challenge to Jefferson's America."

7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014: Samuel Issacharoff, the Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University's School of Law, will speak on the future of voting rights in America in his lecture, "Ballot Bedlam."

Stewart's and Issacharoff's lectures also will take place in the Foundation Hall.

"We are thrilled that, for the fourth consecutive year, the Simon Perry Center will be able to offer this series to the community, and grateful for the financial support of the West Virginia Humanities Council that enables us to do so," said Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy.

For more information on the Amicus Curiae Lecture Series, contact Proctor at 304-696-2801.


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Tuesday August 26, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall celebrates grand opening of Towers Learning Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University celebrated the grand opening of the Towers Learning Center, a new academic support resource for students, with a ribbon cutting today in the Twin Towers East lobby on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The center was developed to provide late-night, peer tutoring and mentoring to first-year students. The facility has up-to-date technology and ample space for study groups and academic programs. Faculty-in-residence and student academic mentors will staff the center.

"This is a very important event recognizing a resource initiative for and on behalf of our students," said Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp. "Hopefully, this is the start of something that will continue to grow around campus. We have an absolute commitment to the success of our students - every student. We are pleased to provide these types of opportunities for our students. I commend the residence hall staff, the student mentors and the support staff for bringing this project to fruition."

The center is open to all Marshall students not just those living in Towers East. The student academic mentors will staff the Towers Learning Center from 5 to 11 p.m. Monday-Thursday. At all other times, students can check out the key at the front desk of Twin Towers East.

The center has a number of resources available to students, including:
-          SMART board
-          Computer
-          Printer
-          General education books
-          Study skills materials
-          Office/school supplies
-          Large study table and chairs

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Photo: Marshall University President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp, left, joins in a ribbon cutting celebrating the grand opening of the Towers Learning Center today in Twin Towers East. Joining Kopp in the ribbon cutting are, from left, Amy Lorenz, assistant director of academic initiatives with the Department of Housing and Residence Life, student academic mentors Keigan Aabel-Brown and Brittany Ochoa, and John Yaun, director of Housing and Residence Life. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.  



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Monday August 25, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Violauta duo to perform Aug. 28 and 29

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Violauta Duo, composed of Marshall University faculty members Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flute, and Dr. Julio Alves, guitar, will give two performances later this week. They will perform at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, in the Jomie Jazz Forum on Marshall's Huntington campus and give a repeat performance at Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church in downtown Huntington at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 29. Both events are free and open to the public.

The duo devotes this program to music that tells a story or draws a picture starting with Giorgio Signorile's "Two Miniatures," the first a charming depiction of a snowball followed by a nostalgic encounter between two individuals. Two folksongs by Hungarian composer Ferenc Farkas follow, and the first half of the program ends with "Three Characterizations" by Belgian composer Franz Constant.

The program's second half begins with two Latin dances by a composer/guitarist from French Guyana Fabrice Pierrat.  After that, the duo will play "Five Tableaux," a work inspired by the life and works of the Renaissance cleric, philosopher and mathematician Giordano Bruno by Czech guitarist/composer Stephan Rak. Bruno's teaching assignments led him from Italy to France, England and Germany before his return to Italy in 1593. He was tried and executed by the Roman Inquisition for heresy in 1600. The program will conclude with Armenian composer Laurent Boutros' "Amasia," a work depicting a hypothetical supercontinent that will someday join Asia with North America. Boutros employs a hypnotic repertoire of sounds to describe the joining of the two lands.

Alves and Dobbs both teach in the School of Music and Theatre at Marshall. Contact the School of Music and Theatre office at 304-696-3117 for more information.

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Photo: The Violauta Duo, composed of Marshall University faculty members Dr. Wendell Dobbs, flute, (left) and Dr. Julio Alves, guitar, will perform Aug. 28 and 29.


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Thursday August 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Career Expo for first Physical Therapy graduating class is Tuesday, Aug. 26

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In an effort to assist students as they begin their job searches, as well as health care organizations that might be hiring, Marshall University Career Services has partnered with the MU School of Physical Therapy to present the first Physical Therapy Career Expo from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 26, at the PT School.

The Marshall School of Physical Therapy will graduate its first class in May 2015. The school is located at 2847 5th Ave. in Huntington.

More than a dozen health care organizations will have table displays and communicate with the soon-to-be graduates, sharing company and employment information.

Confirmed attendees include:

Cabell Huntington Hospital, Charleston Area Medical Center, Genesis Rehabilitation Services, HCR Manorcare, Holzer Medical Center, Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital, Premier Physical and Occupational Therapy, Rebound Physical Therapy, St. Mary's Medical Center, Teays Physical Therapy Center,   Williamson and Beckley ARH Hospitals.

For more information on this Career Expo, contact Debby Stoler in Career Services at 304-696-6679 or stolerd@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday August 20, 2014
Contact: Mallory Jarrell, Marketing and Branding Coordinator, 304-696-3490

Herd supporters encouraged to participate in Green Fridays

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University fans show their support and pride for the Thundering Herd in many different ways, one of which is by wearing their green Marshall gear every Friday throughout the football season in celebration of Green Fridays.

Marshall kicks off this season's Green Fridays on Aug. 29 - the day before the Herd's season-opening game at Miami (Ohio) - by participating in the 10th annual National College Colors Day. Fans across the nation are encouraged to wear their college colors and support their favorite university.

College Colors Day, organized by the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), coincides with "back to school" and the kickoff of intercollegiate athletics. By participating in College Colors Day, Marshall is continuing a tradition of encouraging members of the MU community to wear their Thundering Herd gear on this special day.

The university continues this practice throughout football season with the annual Green Fridays promotion, asking its employees, students and fans everywhere to participate.

In addition, employees of local businesses, schools and other organizations may take part in a contest in which they wear their Marshall gear and have the opportunity to win prizes from the university. Organizations must register with Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University marketing and branding coordinator, to be eligible to win. Registration is available at www.marshall.edu/greenfridays.

Organizational participants will be asked for their location and the number of participating employees. A winner will be chosen every Friday before a home football game throughout football season.

Individual fans also can show their pride and possibly win prizes this year by entering the Fan of the Week contest. To enter the contest, Herd fans are asked to submit a photo of themselves in their Marshall gear through the contest page at www.facebook.com/marshallu or use #HerdGreenFridays on Instagram.

As for the organizational winners, a Fan of the Week will be chosen every Friday before a home football game throughout football season. Winners will be notified by e-mail if they have been chosen.

The winner will receive a $50 gift card to the Marshall University bookstore, courtesy of the bookstore.

For more information, contact Jarrell at 304-696-3490 or by e-mail at haye1@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday August 20, 2014
Contact: Margie Phillips, Sustainability Department, (304) 696-2992

Sustainability Department welcomes students with bike tour of city and campus garden tours

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Sustainability Department is hosting a Critical Mass Bike Ride and two Campus Garden Tours to welcome students for the Fall semester.

New students are invited to explore their new home away from home during an hour-long Critical Mass Bike Ride through the City of Huntington on Thursday, Aug. 21, at 6:50 p.m.

"The event is open to all members of the Marshall University community - new and returning students, faculty, staff and community members," said Margie Phillips, manager of the Sustainability Department, which is sponsoring the event. "This is the perfect way to see the city, make new friends and work off some pre-semester jitters! And, of course, it's environmentally responsible."

Riders are to meet at the Marshall University Recreation Center at 6:50 p.m. The ride will depart promptly at 7 p.m. and wind through Huntington including popular destinations:

-  Ritter Park and Fountain
-  Memorial Arch
-  Memorial Park
-  Central City
-  Wild Ramp
-  City Hall
-  Courthouse
-  Harris Riverfront Park
-  Heritage Station
-  Pullman Square
-  Marshall Hall of Fame Café
-  Huntington Cycle and Sport

Students, faculty or staff without a bike are encouraged to arrive at the Recreation Center earlier to check out for free one of the 13 bikes in the Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program provided by Marshall's Sustainability Department. Bikes are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis and you must present your Marshall ID and a credit card to reserve your bike. To learn more about the bike loan program and to see a map of the ride, go to marshall.edu/sustainability.

Students, parents, faculty and staff are also invited to learn more about the Sustainability Department's student gardens and green initiatives on Thursday, Aug. 21, at 5 p.m. and Saturday, Aug. 23, at 10 a.m. Both tours leave from the Memorial Student Center and will showcase the Student Vegetable Garden with a Pollinator Garden, Monarch Waystation, Butterfly Garden, Rain Garden, Native Herb Garden and the Science Building's Rooftop Garden.  During the tour, Be Marshall Green initiatives will be discussed including Marshall recycling efforts, OASIS Bottle Fill Stations, composting efforts, Marshall's greenhouse, recycling compactor, shredding program, Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program, how to be green in your residence hall and the Enterprise Car Share Program. 


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Tuesday August 19, 2014
Contact: Tiffany Bajus, University Communications, 304-696-6397

Marshall University to host Thundering Herd community kick-off event

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University and Kindred Communications are excited to host a community event to kick off the school year and fall sports on Friday, Aug. 22, at Pullman Square in downtown Huntington. The event will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. with a fashion show, music, activities and Thundering Herd athletes.

The first hour will include music from the popular local radio station Hits 97.9 and a Green Fridays Fashion Show featuring some of Marshall's licensed gear. The show will give fans the opportunity to view some of the new fall apparel available at various local retail locations.

"Marshall University employees, students and fans everywhere are encouraged to participate in Green Fridays throughout the season," Mallory Jarrell, Marshall University marketing and branding coordinator, said. "This will be a sample of some of the items fans could wear each Friday to show their Thundering Herd pride."

Brought to you by the Marshall University Campus Activity Board, the second hour will feature music by vocal ensemble Six Appeal. Swearing off instruments, the award-winning vocal band Six Appeal takes you on a journey that spans decades of music, performing classic oldies, current chart toppers, and catchy original tunes - all sung a cappella.

The final hour will feature Marshall University's fall sports teams, cheerleaders, dance team, the Marching Thunder and everyone's favorite bison, Marco. Stop by to meet the athletes, get autographs and hear from Herd Football coach Doc Holliday.

Throughout the evening, guests can get photos with Marco and participate in various activities. Those with a Marshall student ID, Big Green card or proof of being a season ticket holder are encouraged to take advantage of discounts at the Marshall Hall of Fame Café, Roosters and Cold Stone Creamery during the event.

Here is a brief look at the schedule for Friday's kick-off event at Pullman square:

-  6 p.m. - Music by Hits 97.9
-  6:30 p.m. - Green Fridays Fashion Show
-  7 p.m. - Six Appeal performs
-  8 p.m. - Marshall athletics pep rally



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Tuesday August 19, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

BB&T continues support for capitalism center at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University today received the seventh installment in a series of gifts from BB&T supporting the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at MU's College of Business.

David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, presented the latest check for $100,000 to Marshall President Dr. Stephen J. Kopp.

Marshall's Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism sponsors a lecture series and upper-division course in capitalism for business students, among other activities.

"The course has been very intriguing for our students and the objective of the program has been more than met," Kopp said. "We're very proud of our association with BB&T."

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Photo: David L. Helmer, Senior Vice President and Regional Corporate Banking Manager for BB&T, third from left, presents a check for $100,000 to Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, second from left, in support of the BB&T Center for the Advancement of American Capitalism at MU's College of Business. Also representing BB&T is Patrick Murphy, second from right. The center is under the direction of Dr. Calvin Kent, left. Dr. Haiyang Chen, right, is dean of Marshall's College of Business. The presentation took place today in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center on MU's Huntington campus. The BB&T Foundation also presented Marshall with a second check for $15,000. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Monday August 18, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Marshall University Choral Union rehearsals begin Sept. 8

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - If you're interested in being a part of a unique choral ensemble that combines talented students with enthusiastic, choral music-loving members of the greater Huntington community, Marshall University Choral Union Conductor Robert Wray knows the place for you.
 
Open to any interested community members, Marshall University's Choral Union will hold its first rehearsal of Handel's "Messiah" at 7 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 8, in room 150 of Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.
 
Following about a dozen Monday rehearsals, the group will perform with Marshall University's orchestra at 7:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 4, and Sunday, Dec. 7, respectively, at the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church in downtown Huntington.
 
" 'Messiah' is arguably the most well-known large work for a chorus and orchestra," Wray said. "It's a great opportunity as a conductor to be able to perform these types of works."
 
Wray said this work of Handel tells the story of Jesus Christ, from Isaiah's prophecy of salvation to the acclamation of the Messiah. It was first performed in London in the eighteenth century.
 
There are no membership fees to be a part of the group, but members are responsible for the purchase of their own music. For more information about joining the Marshall University Choral Union, contact Wray by phone at 304-696-2399 or by e-mail at wrayr@marshall.edu. To stay up to date on rehearsals, visit the group's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MUchoralunion.
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Friday August 15, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall and Mountwest team up to offer collaborative programs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The Marshall University College of Health Professions and Mountwest Community & Technical College have joined together to provide collaborative programs that will allow students to earn an Associate of Science degree at Mountwest and then transfer to Marshall for a bachelor's degree.

Dr. Carol Perry, dean of the Liberal Arts & Transfer Division at Mountwest, said for many students, higher education is an intimidating undertaking. Perry said collaborative programs such as these help ease the transition of transfer students by providing a clear pathway to earning a bachelor's degree.

"By starting at a community and technical college, students can enjoy smaller class sizes, adjust to postsecondary education and build their self-confidence," Perry said. "Students also can earn a credential that will provide them with something to build upon as they continue their academic endeavors to obtain a baccalaureate degree."

Perry said the program also will allow students to take on less debt while starting their academic career, which is an important factor to consider when pursuing higher education.

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said this partnership will provide a mutually beneficial relationship for both institutions and their students.

"We are seeing a reduction in high school graduates in the state. An increase in the transfer student population will help to combat this and hopefully work toward improving the overall economic development within our community," Prewitt said. "Because our students will be able to make a seamless transition from a two-year to a four-year program, we can help them succeed while improving overall retention and graduation rates."

Collaborative programs will be offered in the fields of athletic training, biomechanics, communication disorders, dietetics, exercise science, health sciences, medical imaging, medical lab technology, nursing, public health, respiratory care, social work and sport management/marketing.

"This is a forward-looking opportunity to redesign and rethink the collaboration between the community colleges and the senior institutions by providing students open pathways to pursue a wide array of degree opportunities," said Dr. David Pittenger, Marshall's interim associate vice president for outreach and continuing studies and dean of the graduate college. "It gives the students flexibility in terms of their long-term planning. This is a model that Marshall University is eager to pursue with the community colleges in the region so that we can better address our responsibility to provide accessibility to high quality education to all West Virginia students."

For more information on Mountwest, visit www.mctc.edu. For more information on Marshall's College of Health Professions, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp.


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Thursday August 14, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine names new assistant dean of student affairs

Amy M. Smith promoted to new role

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Amy M. Smith, BSN, M.Ed., has been appointed assistant dean of student affairs at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the school's dean, Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., announced today. Smith began her new role Aug. 1.

"I'm very excited about Ms. Amy Smith for this position," Shapiro said.  "She has a terrific connection with our students; in fact, during the search process students spontaneously came together to endorse her candidacy. She is also a dedicated and caring teacher who understands the unique mission of our medical school. I couldn't be more pleased that she has taken on this expanded role with the school."

Since 2009, Smith has worked at the School of Medicine as the assistant director of medical education, specifically directing the clinical skills center and standardized patient program. Prior to joining the school, she served as the director of women's and children's services at Cabell Huntington Hospital, as well as nurse manager for the neonatal intensive care unit at CHH.

"I would like to thank the search committee and Dr. Shapiro for allowing me to serve in this position," Smith said. "I feel very humbled and blessed to be given the responsibility to work with a team of outstanding faculty, staff and administrators that will work together to meet the needs of the medical students.  I am looking forward to moving future physicians into the next chapters of their lives."

Smith received her diploma in nursing from St. Mary's School of Nursing in 1990.  She then completed a bachelor's degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix and a master's in education from the University of Cincinnati.
 
She serves on various committees at the School of Medicine including Admissions, Curriculum, Multicultural Advisory and Interprofessional Education.   Smith received the Student Appreciation Award in May 2012 and the Dean's Award for Excellence in Collaboration in 2014.


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Wednesday August 13, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall freshmen to be greeted with numerous Week of Welcome activities

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - When Marshall University begins fall classes on Monday, Aug. 25, its freshmen will be well prepared and - hopefully - comfortable in their new surroundings.

At least that is the plan, said Dr. Gayle Ormiston, MU's provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. As usual, Marshall officials have planned a large number of fun and informative activities for the incoming freshmen as part of the annual Week of Welcome (WOW), which runs from Wednesday, Aug. 20, through Sunday, Aug. 24, on MU's Huntington campus.

"Week of Welcome is exactly that - a week dedicated to all freshmen, a week welcoming them to Marshall University," Ormiston said. "It is important that the freshmen feel comfortable with the university before classes start on Aug. 25. We really want to make the transition into college as smooth and easy as possible for all of our new students."

In the days leading up to the start of classes, about 1,700 freshmen will take part in WOW activities. The freshmen will actually begin their first class at Marshall during Week of Welcome. The UNI 100 Freshman First Class is an introduction to academic structures and expectations of college life. Those who successfully complete the course earn one hour of elective credit.
 
The course is made up of two parts: (1) attending large group sessions and small class sessions during Week of Welcome, and (2) attending seven additional 50-minute class sessions, once per week in the first seven weeks of the semester.
 
"The excitement is building as Week of Welcome will be here in just a few days," said Sherri Stepp, director of Marshall's University College. "Staff and student volunteers are getting everything ready for the event to begin.  We are preparing to stuff student packets, unpacking boxes of T-shirts and making sure all of our class sessions and social events are ready when the students arrive."

Stepp said MU has worked all year to plan this event to welcome its new students and help them feel at home at Marshall.

"It's a great time to meet new people, explore new ideas and just get acquainted with campus and the Huntington community," she said.  "We will provide them with information that will support their entire experience at Marshall University and we hope to have a lot of fun."

Week of Welcome and UNI 100 provide an opportunity for students to arrive early to campus and make new friends, Stepp said. They will meet President (Stephen) Kopp at the President's Convocation, meet their academic deans at their college sessions, and begin learning the things they need to know to help them be successful students both academically and socially.

Among the most popular events of WOW are the family picnic, the President's Convocation and the group photo. The picnic will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20, on the student center plaza. The group photo will be taken at 9:15 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 21, at the John Marshall Statue, located in the circle between Old Main and the Drinko Library.

The convocation, held in recent years at the Cam Henderson Center, starts at 9:45 a.m. Friday, Aug. 22, at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center in downtown Huntington. Students will meet in their UNI 100 classrooms at 8:30 a.m., walk to the John Marshall statue, then head west on 4th Avenue to the Keith-Albee at 9:15 a.m. At the conclusion of the convocation the students will walk back to campus in time for 11 a.m. sessions.

The convocation will be streamed live at www.marshall.edu/it/livestream.

Commuter students and students living on campus will need to check in for Week of Welcome on Wednesday, Aug. 20, in the Marshall Recreation Center. For any commuter students who cannot check in on Wednesday, there will be a short registration time on Thursday morning before the Freshman First Class session in the Henderson Center arena.

The complete WOW schedule is available at www.marshall.edu/wow.

Here is a brief look at some of the fun and informational events scheduled during Marshall's Week of Welcome:

Wednesday, Aug. 20
10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. - WOW registration and T-shirt pick-up, for residence hall and commuter students, Recreation Center basketball courts.

3:30 p.m. - Students are invited to visit the practice field and watch the Marching Thunder perform while learning the Marshall songs and cheers they will hear at athletic events.

5 to 6:30 p.m. - Family picnic, Memorial Student Center plaza. Enjoy free food, the Marching Thunder, and live music by student bands. Sponsored by Academic Affairs and Student Affairs.

9 p.m. - Hypnotist Kevin Hurley Show, Memorial student Center, room BE 5 (lower level). Hurley's unique stage hypnosis, comedy, and magic has been requested by Fortune 500 companies, celebrities, royalty, a former U.S. president and more than 400 college campuses. Admission is free for students with MU ID. Sponsored by Student Activities and Campus Activity Board.

9 p.m. to midnight - First Night Block Party, Marshall Recreation Center. The night will be filled with entertainment, such as relay races, black light climbing, world class musical chairs, inflatables, and much more. For those who want a late-night snack, pizza, drinks, and snow cones will be provided. The Rec Center will also be open throughout the night for swimming, workouts, and basketball.  Sponsored by Marshall Recreation Center, Center for African American Students, and Office of Intercultural Affairs.

Thursday, Aug. 21
7:30 to 8:15 a.m. - WOW registration and T-shirt pick-up for commuter students, Cam Henderson Center concourse.

8:30 to 9:15 a.m. - Freshman First Class, Cam Henderson Center arena. This session will introduce students to staff from the Student Resource Center, Student Affairs, and Housing and Residence Life who will lead interactive activities to get students energized for their first semester at Marshall.

9:15 to 9:45 a.m. - Freshman class photo, John Marshall Statue, near Old Main and the Drinko Library.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Herd compass, Memorial Student Center plaza. Students may look for MU staff and students stationed under a green tent to provide them with directions to WOW activities, their  classrooms, and other useful  MU information. Sponsored by Student Involvement, Career Services and University College.

4 to 5 p.m. - Meet & Greet with fraternity and sorority leadership, Memorial Student Center BE 5 (lower level).

4 to 6 p.m. - Intramural sports sampler, Marshall Recreation Center. Features friendly competition, including a variety of basketball and football competitions, such as a free throw shoot-out, as well as punt, pass, and kick. Sponsored by the Marshall Recreation Center.

5 to 6 p.m. - Garden Tours, Memorial Student Center plaza. Students may tour the Marshall University Gardens, plus discover the Green initiatives on campus. Sponsored by the Office of Sustainability.

5 to 7 p.m. - Revolution Cookout, Christian Center lawn. Enjoy great fellowship.

5:30 to 7 p.m. - Design on Wheels, Buskirk Field. Paint with Wine and Design. Local artists will help students create their own Marshall masterpiece. Sponsored by Housing and Residence Life.

7 to 8 p.m. - Critical Mass Bike Ride through the City of Huntington, Marshall Recreation Center. Plan to leave promptly at 7 p.m. and return in approximately one hour. Sponsored by Office of Sustainability. 

7 to 9 p.m. - Fitness Class Sampler, features free 30-minute classes, Marshall Recreation Center. Classes include: Indoor Cycling, Zumba, Cardio and Strength, and Yoga. Sponsored by Marshall Recreation Center.

8:30 to 11 p.m. - Cosmic Frisbee, Buskirk Field. Students are invited to come and play (or watch) an insane game of Glow in the Dark Ultimate Frisbee.  Sponsored by CRU.

9 p.m. - Screen on the Green, Recreation Center Field, features a night at the movies, with free popcorn and soda. Sponsored by Marshall Recreation Center and Housing and Residence Life.

Friday, Aug. 22
9:45 to 10:30 a.m. - President's Convocation, Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. - Herd compass, Memorial Student Center plaza. Students may look for MU staff and students stationed under a green tent to provide them with directions to WOW activities, their  classrooms, and other useful  MU information.

3 to 4 p.m. - Meet college deans. Students will meet the deans and the associate deans and staffs of their respective colleges.

4 to 5 p.m. - John Marshall Emerging Leaders information session, Memorial Student Center room BE 5 (lower level).

5 to 6 p.m. - UnRaveled!, Harless Media Room. The group UnRaveled! will be providing a great learning experience in the needle arts of crocheting and knitting. All experience levels welcome. Crocheting and/or knitting is a great way to be creative, productive, and relieve stress. Sponsored by UnRaveled! Student Organization.

6 to 9 p.m. - Thundering Herd kickoff party, Pullman Square in downtown Huntington; features music, activities, football player autographs, cheerleaders, the dance team and Marco.

7 p.m. - Six Appeal, Pullman Square in downtown Huntington. Features a world class vocal ensemble infused with impeccable comedic timing and the energy and vitality of a rock band. Sponsored by Student Activities and Campus Activities Board.

Saturday, Aug. 23
10 to 11 a.m. - Garden Tours, Memorial Student Center plaza. Students may tour the Marshall University Gardens, plus discover the Green initiatives on campus. Sponsored by the Office of Sustainability.

Noon to 3 p.m. - RecFest, Marshall Recreation Center, featuring more than 100 venders, door prizes, giveaways, activities and food; Sponsored by Marshall Recreation Center.

1 to 5 p.m. - Target, Huntington Mall, Wal-Mart Shuttle, MUPD parking lot. Transportation will be provided every hour on the hour until 5 p.m. in the MUPD parking lot across 5th Avenue from Twin Towers. Sponsored by Student Involvement.

3 to 6 p.m. - Marshall football season kickoff party, Joan C. Edwards Stadium. Features a scrimmage that only MU students may attend.

7 to 9 p.m. - Fitness Class sampler, features free 30-minute classes, Marshall Recreation Center. Classes include Indoor Cycling, Zumba, Cardio and Strength, and Yoga. Sponsored by Marshall Recreation Center.

7 to 9 p.m. - Coffee House/Open Mic, Harless Media Room. Sponsored by Revolution.

8 to 10 p.m. - CRU Freshman Mixer, Marco's (lower level of Memorial Student Center).

9 to 11 p.m. - Party Hearty, First-Year Residence Halls. Residents will be able to wear beer goggles and ride golf carts with MUPD, while learning how to stay safe out on the town. Sponsored by First-Year Residence Halls and Housing & Residence Life.

Sunday, Aug. 24
1 to 4 p.m. - Classroom schedule walk-through. Students may bring their schedules to the Memorial Student Center plaza. Sponsored by Housing & Residence Life.

1 to 5 p.m. - Target/Huntington Mall/Wal-Mart shuttle, begins in the MUPD parking lot, located across 5th Avenue from Twin Towers. Sponsored by Student Involvement.

1 p.m. - MU women's soccer vs. VCU in the team's home opener at the Veterans Memorial Soccer Complex.

4 to 6 p.m. - Intramural sports sampler, Marshall Recreation Center. Features friendly competition, including a variety of basketball and football competitions, such as a free throw shoot-out, as well as punt, pass, and kick. Sponsored by the Marshall Recreation Center.

4:30 to 6 p.m. - Design on Wheels, Buskirk Field. Paint with Wine and Design. Local artists will help students create their own Marshall masterpieces. Sponsored by Housing and Residence Life.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday August 11, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Health opens new community pharmacy at medical center

Facility to provide inpatient and outpatient services

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Health, in partnership with the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, the Marshall University School of Pharmacy and Cabell Huntington Hospital, has opened a new community pharmacy offering patients access to prescription medications at the Marshall University Medical Center.

Marshall Pharmacy is a convenient option for patients and the public visiting the health sciences campus, as well as hospital and medical center staff.  It offers a full range of prescription medication services, including personalized pharmacist services, and carries limited over-the-counter medications and diabetic and medical supplies.

Future plans include delivering discharge medications to Cabell Huntington Hospital inpatients before they leave the hospital, and delivering prescription medications directly to patients upon leaving the doctor's office.

The Marshall Pharmacy is staffed by professional registered pharmacists and pharmacy technicians and accepts most major prescription drug plans.  There are plans to add additional insurance plans in the coming months.

"Marshall is continuing its commitment to our patients and our community by providing high quality pharmacy services at this new facility," said Beth Hammers, executive director of Marshall Health. "Our on-site pharmacy is a tremendous asset for our patients and employees and will enhance the educational experience for our students at the Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine."

In describing the new pharmacy and its educational impact, Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, called it a key milestone in the growth of the health sciences programs at Marshall. He emphasized the impact of medication therapy management delivered by pharmacists in ambulatory practice settings has proven value for improving patient safety and clinical outcomes.

"I can't stress enough the importance of this new venture, which allows better collaboration among physicians, pharmacists and other health care providers, which in turn provides interdisciplinary education that is absolutely crucial in today's health care arena," Yingling said.   "Working as a team with our colleagues at the School of Medicine and Marshall Health enhances the experiences for all our students."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, said the opening of the Marshall Pharmacy reflects the changing health care landscape.

"The collaborative effort among our university counterparts and our hospital partner is indicative of the relationships that must exist as we move forward in the health care arena," Shapiro said.   "These partnerships allow us to be more patient focused and deliver high-quality care for the region."

"The new Marshall Pharmacy is a welcomed addition to our campus because it delivers an important health care service for our patients by making an easier transition from hospital to home," said Kevin Fowler, senior vice president and chief operating officer for Cabell Huntington Hospital. "The pharmacy is easily accessible for patients attending appointments with their physicians at Marshall or picking up new medications following a hospital stay, and for patients receiving treatments at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. The pharmacy offers patients a convenient option following procedures or treatments by eliminating an extra stop when they're heading home to continue their recovery. This is a unique opportunity to provide patients with on-site education about their medications that coincides with the doctor's visit, typically resulting in improved outcomes and safety."

The Marshall Pharmacy is led by Brian Gallagher, R.Ph., JD, director of pharmacy services and Ben Kelly, R.Ph., the managing pharmacist. The service is located at the front entrance of the Marshall University Medical Center.  It is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Patients may access pharmacy services by calling 304-691-6879 (MURx) or by visiting  http://www.marshallhealth.org and selecting "Pharmacy"  under "Services." A smartphone app is also available for download through the iTunes(R) Store or Amazon's Android app store.



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Monday August 11, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

'Tech Up' helps nontraditional students with technology concerns

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Tech Up," a program designed to help nontraditional students succeed at Marshall University by being technologically up to speed by the time they take their first course, is being offered at MU for the second consecutive year.

Steve Hensley, dean of student affairs at Marshall, said many of MU's students, particularly those who have been out of school for a few years, are not as tech-savvy as they would like - or need - to be.

"Tech Up is designed for students of the generation before technology was an everyday part of our lives," Hensley said. "Sometimes, students who are a little older come back to school and have good learning abilities and they're going to be great students, but they don't have the technology expertise in negotiating the electronic environment we find in many classes."

Many people, Hensley said, don't know the basics simply because they never had to use computers before in their everyday lives.

"Sometimes it's as simple as using e-mail, and Blackboard (a global technology company used for online course delivery at Marshall) e-mail is a step beyond that," Hensley said. "So, we start with the very basic levels of how to access Marshall e-mail and the Marshall web page and we go from there. We kind of give students a short course in utilizing technology."

Last year, about 25 students attended the Tech Up sessions, Hensley said.

"The students who participated reported that they learned a lot and they felt very confident in their ability to do what they do online," Hensley said. "For one thing, the classes are conducted in a computer lab; it's not just talking to people, it's them actually doing it themselves. And, our computing people enjoy helping people get teched up."

IT (Information Technology) personnel will conduct the "Tech Up" sessions. They are scheduled from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 21 (during the Week of Welcome), in Drinko Library 138; and, from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27 (during the first week of classes), also in Drinko 138.

To reserve a space, students may call the Office of Student Affairs at 304-696-6422, or e-mail studentaffairs@marshall.edu.


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Monday August 11, 2014
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

One week remaining to get tickets to Paint the Capital City Green

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Thundering Herd fans have one week remaining to buy tickets and reserve tables for Marshall University's Paint the Capital City Green pep rally in Charleston Thursday, Aug. 21, at the Embassy Suites hotel.

Special guests, including Marshall University Head Football Coach Doc Holliday and his senior players, will speak about the future of Marshall University football. A Marshall football VIP will also be seated at sponsored tables.

"There is a lot of talk about our team this year," Holliday said. "This event is the one pre-season opportunity for fans to hear directly from me and from our student athletes and it's always a sellout. Don't miss it. It's one night in Charleston, and then it's back to practice for us."

Paint the Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for the Herd. Fans will enjoy a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. The 17th annual event, presented by Friends of Coal and sponsored in part by Huntington Bank, is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.
 
To order tickets, call 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu. Individual tickets are $60 and will not be sold at the door. Ticket sales close Friday, Aug. 15.

All ticket holders will be entered into a drawing to win hotel accommodations and free admission to a road game.


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Thursday August 7, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Nine MU students to spend 2014-2015 academic year studying in Japan

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nine students from Marshall University will be going to Japan for the 2014-2015 academic year to study at two institutions: Kansai Gaidai University and Chukyo University.

"I am thrilled that these students will have the opportunity to study abroad in Japan.  This will be a life-changing experience and will lead to great opportunities in the future," said Dr. R. B. Bookwalter, dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts.

Seven students will be attending Kansai Gaidai University in the Osaka prefecture. They are:

  • Michael Joseph Haverty (Parkersburg, W.Va. -- Japanese major with a double minor in Asian Studies and International Affairs);
  • Leah Goss (Fairmont and Elkins, W.Va. -- Double major in Japanese and Visual Arts with an emphasis in photography);
  • Kyle Elliot Walters (Cowen, W.Va. -- Double major in International Affairs and Japanese);
  • Lucy J. Ward (Huntington, W.Va. -- Double major in International Business and Japanese);
  • Kiersten Ward (Pineville, W.Va. -- Double major in Geography and Japanese);
  • Savannah Henry (Boyd County, Ky. -- Double major in Japanese and Visual Arts with an emphasis in Graphic Design); and,
  • Brianna McLaughlin (Beaver, W.Va. - Japanese major).
     
    Two students will be attending Chukyo University in the Nagoya prefecture. They are:

  • Katherine Green (Beckley, W.Va. -- Japanese major with a minor in English); and,
  • Shaina Wallace (Lewisburg, W.Va. -- Triple major in Japanese, English and Education).

Together, the group will receive more than $34,000 from the following awards: Art Department Tuition Waiver, Kimbler Award, Art Department Scholarship, River Cities Scholarship, Cracker Barrel Foundation International Scholarship, American Association of Teachers of Japanese Bridging Scholarship, Benjamin A. Gilman Scholarship and Morgan-Stanley Bridging Scholarship.

"I am deeply grateful for the financial support of our benefactors, whose generosity makes it possible for students to take advantage of an opportunity that some would otherwise have to pass up," Bookwalter said. "I greatly appreciate the excellent work of the Modern Languages program, Dr. [Caroline] Perkins, Dr. [Natsuki] Anderson, Dr. [Zelideth] Rivas and Ms. Kawada Webb, in preparing these students for their work in Japan and for nurturing the partnerships that have helped this program grow."


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Tuesday August 5, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Smith, McComas assume interim roles at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Gayle Ormiston, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Marshall University, today announced that two university administrators have assumed new roles.
 
Dr. Sherri Smith, executive director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, has accepted an interim appointment as associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of undergraduate studies.  Smith's appointment took effect July 28, 2014, and runs through June 30, 2015. 
 
Also, Ormiston announced that Dr. Karen McComas, assistant director of the Center for Teaching and Learning, has agreed to serve as executive director of the center in an interim appointment, which began July 28, 2014, and runs through June 30, 2015.
 
"I look forward to the many positive contributions Sherri and Karen will undoubtedly make to advancing student persistence and success initiatives, positive learning experiences, and supporting faculty professional development and success," Ormiston said.
 
Smith served as the director of the Service Learning Program from its inception in 2002 until she was appointed director of the Center for Teaching and Learning in 2008.
 
As part of a service learning course that she taught, Smith founded Dress for Success River Cities in 2006 and also served as executive director until July 2009. This nonprofit organization provides appropriate attire and a social network to disadvantaged women who are seeking a new career.

Smith earned a BA in 1986 in English and Journalism Education from Marshall; an MA in 1989 in Theology and Ethics from Northern Theological Seminary; an MA in 1993 in English from Northwestern University; and a Ph.D. in 2000 in Victorian Literature, with a doctoral certification in women's studies from Indiana University.
 
As a member of the English department faculty from 1999 to 2008, she has taught numerous courses at Marshall, including British Literature; 19th Century British Novel, Pre-Raphaelite Literature and Introduction to Women' Studies. She has also taught First Year Seminar during her appointment in the Center for Teaching and Learning.

McComas joined the faculty of Marshall University in August of 1986, teaching and supervising in the undergraduate and graduate programs in the Communication Disorders department. Previously, she worked as a speech-language pathologist in the public school systems of Carter County, Kentucky, and Lincoln County, West Virginia, from 1978 to 1986.
 
McComas earned a BA in 1977 and an MA in 1978 in Speech Pathology and Audiology from Marshall. In 2011, she earned a doctoral degree, majoring in Curriculum and Instruction with an area of emphasis in social inquiry.

She has taught numerous courses at Marshall, including the capstone course for undergraduate students majoring in Communication Disorders, phonological disorders, and therapeutic procedures. McComas' research interests include the development of research identities in women, the cultural practices of a community of research practice, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

In addition to her duties in the Center for Teaching and Learning, McComas also serves as the university's NCAA Faculty Athletic Representative.


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Monday August 4, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dean's list available on Marshall website

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Spring 2014 semester are available on the Marshall website for use by the media.

To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. Marshall has 2,564 students included on the website. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list.

Many students and their parents have requested that Marshall make the dean's list available to publications that cover their hometowns.

Each student's name, hometown, county (for West Virginia) and state are included on the dean's list, which is accessible at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/deans-list-for-spring-2014/.


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Friday August 1, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall Psychology faculty, students present session at Comic-Con

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two faculty members from Marshall University's psychology department, along with two doctoral students, presented a session at the 45th Comic-Con International Convention in San Diego. Comic-Con is an educational corporation that creates awareness of, and appreciation for, comics and related popular art forms.

Dr. April Fugett and Dr. Keith Beard, as well as doctoral students Elijah Wise and Britani Black, presented "From Spider-Man to Darth Vader - How Your Personality Influences Our Favorite Characters." The session was attended by nearly 200 people.

The researchers surveyed more than 400 people from across the country on the characters that they liked and with which they identified. Participants took a personality test as well. From there, the researchers looked to see if there was any relationship between personality characteristics found from the test and the characters that participants liked and identified with.

The study results showed that people who like pop culture characters are often imaginative, like variety and have numerous interests. They also tend to be energetic, talkative, optimistic and friendly. 

"There were also differences between the characters selected based on gender, income and age," Fugett said. "Younger individuals tended to like characters from more recent movies such as characters from Batman, The Avengers and X-Men, and Hunger Games, while those older individuals tended to like more classic characters like those in Star Wars and Star Trek."

For the students, the presentation was an exciting opportunity.

"I hadn't presented at many conferences or conventions, and this was huge," Black said. "It was Comic-Con! For someone who loves pop culture and does research in that area, there isn't really anything bigger than that."

"Never in my life did I expect that I could discuss the character profile of Batman through a psychological lens, in an academic way, and as part of an international conference," Wise added.

"Not only is it a great thing when you can talk about the research you have been working on," Beard said, "but to involve students in it and for the outcome to be as exciting as presenting at Comic-Con, is something that I am very glad I could help facilitate and allow these students to experience."

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Photo: From left, Dr. Keith Beard, professor of psychology; Britani Black and Elijah Wise, doctoral students in psychology; and Dr. April Fugett, associate professor of psychology, represented Marshall University at the Comic-Con International Convention July 24-27.


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Friday August 1, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University administrators assume new roles

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp today announced that two university administrators have assumed new roles.

Senior Vice President for Operations Brandi Jacobs-Jones has been promoted and assumed additional responsibilities as the chief of staff/liaison to the Marshall University Board of Governors, reporting directly to the president. In this new capacity, Jacobs-Jones will continue to serve as senior vice president for operations, while also providing executive-level support to the president and working with the board.

Ginny Painter, communications director for the Marshall University Research Corporation  (MURC) since 2009, has been promoted and named interim senior vice president for communications and marketing. In her new position, Painter will have responsibility for the university's overall communications, media and public relations, research-based messaging, marketing and branding activities. She will continue to provide support for key MURC communications initiatives.

Jacob-Jones joined Marshall earlier this year. Prior to that, she served three Huntington mayors as the city's director of administration and finance. She also has served the city as acting public works director. She worked as the outreach coordinator/development officer for Ebenezer Medical Outreach Inc. in Huntington, and from 2001 to 2003, she was a housing and urban development fellow at Eastern Kentucky University.

"I am quite proud to announce the promotions of these two dynamic individuals to their respective senior leadership positions at Marshall University," Kopp said. "They both bring considerable experience, expertise and savvy to their new roles. I look forward to their many leadership contributions and the many fine achievements they will realize on behalf of advancing our university."

"During her brief time with us, Brandi has distinguished herself as a highly motivated and dedicated person of remarkable capacity. I am confident she will do an outstanding job in her new role as chief of staff, while continuing to perform well in her relatively new role as senior vice president for operations.

"I have had the privilege of working closely with Ginny on various important budget and marketing initiatives and have been impressed by her resourcefulness, dedication and commitment to excellence. She is also a very driven and focused person who will provide strong leadership and vision for the University's strategic and integrated marketing, public relations and communications functions."

Jacobs-Jones was named to the West Virginia State Journal "Generation Next 40 Under 40" in 2012. The West Virginia Women's Commission recognized her in 2010 with the Lena Lowe Yost Award for Women in Public Service, and in 2009, she received the U.S. Department of Justice Award for Public Service. In 2005, she received the Neighborhood Institute Community Service Award and was named the Mountain State Bar Association Citizen of the Year.

She is a member of the boards of directors of the Huntington Urban Renewal Authority, Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Tri-State and the Child Development Academy at Marshall University.

Jacobs-Jones has a master's degree in public administration from Eastern Kentucky University and a regents bachelor of arts degree from Marshall.

Painter has more than 25 years' experience in higher education, nonprofit and government communications and administration, including at the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission and the University of Charleston. She also has served as communications director and deputy commissioner of the West Virginia Division of Culture and History and in communications roles for the state affiliate of the American Lung Association and Black Diamond Girl Scout Council.

She is on the boards of directors of the West Virginia Jobs Investment Trust and TechConnect West Virginia.

In 2001, the West Virginia chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) recognized Painter with its prestigious Practitioner of the Year award, and she has received the organization's Chapter Service Award twice. She was honored with the Distinguished West Virginian Award in 2009 for her work on the new West Virginia State Museum.

She has a bachelor's degree in journalism/public relations from Marshall University and a master's degree in business administration from the University of Charleston.


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Thursday July 31, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Sawhney's tobacco research published in West Virginia Medical Journal

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney of the Marshall University College of Health Professions has recently had her research article titled "Comprehensive Tobacco Control in West Virginia - Going from Intersection to Integration" published in the West Virginia Medical Journal.  Sawhney co-authored the study with officials from the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department in Charleston, W.Va.
 
Sawhney, program director for the undergraduate public health program at Marshall, said their research showed West's Virginia adult daily smoking rates have not declined when comparing numbers to the rest of the nation or even surrounding states.
 
"West Virginia has a lot of tobacco usage and this research looks at the neighboring states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia and how they have made progress over time for tobacco-related indicators," Sawhney said. "These states have implemented policies that encouraged residents to give up smoking or smoke less. West Virginians have many health challenges and it is so important that we pay attention to tobacco policies in our state."
 
Sawhney said although many effective cessation and clean indoor air programs have been developed, the research recommends additional tobacco control funding mechanisms that promote strategies to be integrated at the community level.
 
According to the Division of Tobacco Prevention at the West Virginia Bureau of Public Health, West Virginia is aggressively addressing this problem by implementing evidence-based, comprehensive tobacco control programs. Annual federal and state funding for these efforts in West Virginia totaled just over $6.2 million in 2014 (an 8 percent decrease in funding levels of the past eight years), which is 22 percent of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of $28 million annually.

Despite the fact that the consequences of tobacco use are well-known to West Virginians, residents continue to use tobacco in alarming numbers, according to the Division of Tobacco Prevention, and tobacco use is the number one preventable cause of premature death and disease. Bruce W. Adkins, director for the division, said tobacco use, both by smoking and using smokeless tobacco, is deeply rooted in our West Virginia culture.

"It is important that we continue to use best practices, adopt effective policies, and maintain research-based, known-to-work interventions to address tobacco control in West Virginia," Adkins said.
 
To learn more about West Virginia's current tobacco policies, visit www.wvdtp.org. For more information about Sawhney's research, visit page 22 of the July/August issue of the WV Medical Journal at http://digital.graphcompubs.com/publication/?m=30875&l=1 online. To learn more about Marshall University's department of public health and its work toward improving our region's health, contact Sawhney at sawhney@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Thursday July 31, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University School of Medicine announces appointment of new department chairman

Dr. Charles L. Yarbrough to lead newly formed department of dermatology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Charles L. Yarbrough, a longtime Huntington dermatologist, has been named inaugural chairman of the newly formed department of dermatology at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. 

In making the announcement, Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, said the addition of Yarbrough to the medical school faculty is another step in the school's expansion of its medical education and clinical offerings.

"It's imperative that Marshall continue to build and nurture its infrastructure in order to ensure we are providing the best medical education possible," Shapiro said.  "I am pleased to welcome Charles Yarbrough and am confident that under his leadership our new department of dermatology will flourish clinically, educationally and in the research arena."

Yarbrough graduated from the Medical College of Virginia and completed a residency in dermatology at Emory University.   He is board-certified in dermatology by the American Academy of Dermatology and also is board-certified by the American Boards of Pathology and Dermatology in Dermatopathology. Yarbrough has served as a clinical professor at Marshall since 1977.

"I am humbled and honored to accept this appointment and would like to thank all who advocated on my behalf," Yarbrough said.  "I will promote excellence in patient care through education, research and access to the health care system."
 
Yarbrough currently serves as secretary/treasurer of the board of directors for Doctors Care of Cabell County, Inc., an organization he co-founded in 1990, that serves to fill in the gap to access to medical care for people in need by providing health care referral and access. 

He also is a clinical professor with the School of Medicine's department of pathology.

Yarbrough is a member of the West Virginia Dermatological Society, the American Society of Dermatopathologists and the American Academy of Dermatology.

He will continue to see patients at his office located at 1934 11th Ave. in Huntington. His appointment is effective Aug. 1.


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Wednesday July 30, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Graduation ceremony to be held at the Marshall University Luke Lee Listening, Language and Learning Lab July 30

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Three preschoolers will graduate from the Luke Lee Listening, Language and Learning Lab, also known as "The L," at 11 a.m., Wednesday, July 30, in the Atrium of Smith Hall on Marshall University's Huntington campus.

After several years of working to improve their speaking and hearing abilities, these three children will graduate with something much more important than a diploma, according to program director Dr. Jodi Cottrell.

"Although we do award our graduates a diploma, they will leave here with something much more exciting: the ability to speak and hear," Cottrell said. "Many of these children have been in this program for almost their whole lives. I have one that started when she was 6 months old, one when she was 15 months and another when she was two and they are now 5, 5, and 6 respectively."

The L was the first preschool program in West Virginia providing listening and spoken language outcomes to children with hearing loss. Since 2006, it has provided services to infants, toddlers and preschoolers to achieve a listening and spoken language outcome. Cottrell said this allows them to mainstream into their schools with age-level listening and spoken language skills, which allows them to communicate with their peers.

"The parents have dedicated an enormous amount of time to bringing their children here and have spent countless hours working with them at home," Cottrell said. "We want these kids to leave here with a sense of accomplishment and the opportunity for continued success throughout their lives."

For six years, the preschool has held a graduation ceremony to celebrate these children and the work accomplished through intensive auditory-verbal education.  The preschool program is composed of four days a week with three days of classroom activities from 8:30 a.m. to noon Monday through Wednesday.

Members of the 2014 "L" Graduating Class:

Clara Johnson, 5 years old
Parents: Amanda and E.J. Johnson
Clara started at the L when she was 15 months old. Clara began attending the preschool in January 2011 at age two and travels 53 miles to the L four days a week to learn to listen and talk as well as her twin sister.

Ella Quisenberry, 5 years old, Danville, West Virginia
Parents: Jerry and Melanie Quisenberry
Ella started coming to therapy at the L when she was six months old and started in the preschool at age two in January 2011. Her parents chose the L because it is the only program that provides listening and spoken language therapy and education in the state.

Rylee Collins, 6 years old, Greenup, Kentucky
Parent: Mary Collins
Rylee started in the Parent Infant Program (PIP) at the L in January 2011 at just two years old and then started in the preschool in May 2011 at age three. Greenup County Schools pays for her tuition and provides her transportation to be in the program four days a week.

For more information on programs offered through "The L," contact Cottrell at 304-696-3455. To learn more about services provided through the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: (Left to right) Ella Quisenberry, Clara Johnson and Rylee Collins have spent several years learning to speak and hear at The Luke Lee Listening, Language and Learning Lab at Marshall University. On July 30, they will graduate from the preschool program.




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Wednesday July 30, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Medical students at Marshall University publish second edition of creative works

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sir William Osler, often referred to as the father of modern medicine, is credited with calling the practice of medicine an art, not a trade.
 
Certainly echoing that sentiment is "Aenigma Medicorum," an annual literary and art review by medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, which contains dozens of submissions about life and death as seen through the eyes of medical students and physicians.

The 56-page booklet, which was financially supported through the School of Medicine's Office of Diversity, seeks to give creative voice to health care providers through writings like poetry and short stories as well as photography.

The book's executive editor, Sarah Slocum, a fourth-year medical student, says the publication is an attempt to strengthen the medical school community by reaffirming commitment to the human experience and clinical excellence.
 
"As providers, we do our best to connect with our patients on several levels," Slocum said. "Our experiences creating art, whether it be visual, written or aural, allow us another opportunity to better relate with the people around us."

Submissions are made in the fall, reviewed by a student advisory board and selected for publication after assistance from faculty advisors.  Submissions for the 2015 edition may be emailed to aenigmamedicorum@gmail.com.
 
Complimentary printed copies of the current edition are available at the Office of Student Affairs in the Byrd Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Education on the third floor of the  Marshall University Medical Center. It may be viewed digitally at http://musom.marshall.edu/students/AenigmaMedicorum/.


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Wednesday July 30, 2014
Contact: Dr. Tony Szwilski, Director of CEGAS and forum chairman, 304-696-5457

Geohazards forum to address shared transportation challenges

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Consultants, contractors and representatives of state and federal agencies involved with planning, monitoring, design and construction of transportation systems will gather at the Clarion Hotel in Lexington, Ky., Aug. 5-7 for the 14th annual Technical Forum, Geohazards Impacting Transportation in Appalachia.

The forum, sponsored by the Marshall University Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences (CEGAS) and hosted by the Kentucky Geological Survey, is an opportunity for geotechnical professionals to share information and best practices, and collaborate on transportation-related projects.  As in previous years, the 2014 forum will include a pre-conference field trip on Tuesday, Aug. 5.

"Federal, state and private entities that deal with the prevention and remediation of similar geologic problems such as rock falls on highways in the Appalachian Region, gain tremendous benefit by sharing best practices," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, CEGAS director and forum chairman.

Topics for the 2014 forum include scour mitigation and stream restoration;  tunneling;  karst;  instrumentation;  seismic impacting infrastructure design;  remote sensing;  innovative landslide mitigation and correction;  rockfalls,  hydrogeology and the impacts of mining.

Vendors from across the country will be on hand to display some of the latest technologies. Exhibitor space and sponsorship opportunities are still available.

For the full technical program, registration and hotel information visit www.marshall.edu/cegas/events/GITAR/.


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Monday July 28, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Grant from Enterprise Holdings Foundation to MU Career Services to fund student internships

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services recently received a $2,000 grant from the Enterprise Holdings Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company that operates the Enterprise Rent-A-Car, National Car Rental and Alamo Rent A Car brands.  This grant will be used to fund four six-week student internships at local nonprofit agencies.

"Our nonprofit agencies in the Huntington area can provide valuable work experiences for our students who are interested in the nonprofit sector.  Unfortunately, these agencies do not always have funding to provide a paid internship.  This grant will allow four Marshall students to have a six-week paid internship in the nonprofit sector," said Debby Stoler, assistant director for development and outreach in Marshall's Career Services Center.

According to Stoler, Enterprise Rent-A-Car has provided and continues to provide internship and entry level employment opportunities to Marshall students.

"Enterprise has a top-notch program.  They offer an exciting and progressive career path for those students and graduates who are passionate about a career in sales and management," Stoler said.

Career Services' goal is to have everything in place and be ready to offer these internships in the fall semester.  The internships will be posted to Marshall JobTrax, and students will be able to apply through their JobTrax account.

For more information, contact MU Career Services at 304-696-2370 or career-services@marshall.edu.

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Photo: Debby Stoler, second from right, assistant director for development and outreach in Marshall's Career Services Center, accepts a $2,000 check from Raymond Washington with Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Looking on are, from left, Nikki Gray, also with Enterprise, and Denise Hogsett, director of Marshall's Career Services Center.



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Monday July 28, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall faculty member receives NASA research award

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Kumika Toma of the Marshall University College of Health Professions has received a research award to study sex and age differences in skeletal muscle responses to weakness and recovery.  As part of a NASA-funded project in space biology and medicine, Toma's study is aimed at better understanding how microgravity will impact crew members on extended missions. 

Toma, program director for the undergraduate exercise science program in the college's School of Kinesiology, said the study will use rats to examine the long-term exposure to microgravity.

"Seemingly, there are sex and age differences among the degree of muscle weakness and also the degree of recovery," Toma said. "This study uses rats whose hind limbs will be suspended for a week so that they don't use hind limbs. After one week of hind limb suspension, they will be back to their normal activity (recovery). Since the diameter of skeletal muscle is correlated to the muscle strength, I'll be able to see the muscle size differences among sex and age. If there are differences, then, we can develop age- and sex-specific tactics to minimize loss and maximize recovery."

Toma said decreased skeletal muscle size, or what is known as atrophy, due to space flight is well known and research has been conducted to investigate the degrees of atrophy and recovery.

"The principle of skeletal muscle is 'use it or lose it,' " Toma said. "In the environment of microgravity, muscle hardly works because there is no resistance. The skeletal muscle of astronauts is weak and since NASA estimates about nine months of space flight, significant muscle atrophy occurs among Type I muscle fiber and other adverse health effects are a major concern. Given the range of expertise required for a Mars mission, it is anticipated that crew members may be diverse in age and sex. However, there is no systematic study investigating the age and sex differences of skeletal muscle atrophy and recovery."

Dr. William Pewen, associate dean of research for the college, noted, "Future extended missions will require crews with greater breadth and depth of expertise and experience, so we must ensure their ability to perform successfully. At the same time, Dr. Toma's work will add to our knowledge on the loss of function which so many experience when illness or disability restricts activity - a critical problem right here on the ground."

Toma said because microgravity is the example of extreme disuse, the results from this study will be applicable to anyone who is sedentary or bedridden. She will finish collecting data by March 2015 and after months of data analysis, she will have the initial research report completed by September 2015. Toma said she plans to apply for another grant to extend her research project into the following year.

For more information on Toma's microgravity research, contact her at tomak@marshall.edu or 304-696-2651. For more information on other research initiatives taking place in the College of Health Professions, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online or www.marshall.edu/murc online.

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Photo: Dr. Kumika Toma has conducted her microgravity research with the microscope featured in this photo. This microscope was used by the late Dr. Gary Dudley, who started a muscle study for NASA 20 years ago at Marshall University in the basement of Gullickson Hall.


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Wednesday July 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Brian Bracey named associate vice president for development at MU

HUNTINGTON, WV - Brian Bracey, who enjoyed a successful career in pharmaceutical sales and marketing, has been named an associate vice president for development with the Marshall University Foundation Inc., Dr. Ron Area, the foundation's CEO, announced today.

Area said he is excited about the addition of Bracey to Marshall's development staff.

"Brian brings a wealth of experiences in sales and marketing to the foundation," Area said. "He is bright, smart and a relationship-builder. Brian will help the foundation and the university go to the next level of private support."
The Marshall University Foundation's newest major gift officer has lived in Huntington for just nine years, but it wasn't long after his arrival from the southern part of the country that he and his family developed a love for the community and Marshall University.

"I have a great pride for this community and Marshall is in the center of this community," said Bracey, who assumed his duties at MU July 1. "I see the balance between the operations of the city and the university. They co-exist together and are strengthened by one another. I do believe one wouldn't be here without the other."

Bracey, his wife, Angie, and their children, Michael, now 23, and Megan, now 20, arrived in Huntington after moving from Atlanta nine years ago in a job-related move.

At Marshall, Bracey describes himself as "a broker between people's desires and affinity for this university and matching them with the needs and direction and the vision of this campus." In other words, he helps raise funds for the university to support its growth.

Angie Bracey works for the City of Huntington as an executive to mayor Steve Williams. Because, Brian Bracey said, of his wife's persistence, he earned his master of business administration (MBA) from Marshall in December of 2009, which earned him the credentials needed for his current position at the foundation.

"It was a bucket list goal for me," Bracey said. "I had come up with every excuse not to do it. Marshall had an open house, advertising their executive MBA program, and my wife saw it in the paper. She cut it out of the paper and said, 'You need to go to this.' " I walked in to the open house and there was an old friend I hadn't seen in a long time. It was (Marshall professor) Uday Tate, who had taught where I went to undergraduate college - at Nicholls State in Thibodaux, Louisiana. "I thought, 'what are the odds?' Marshall University opened the door for me to do it. It was the right time. As my wife said, 'It was meant to be.' I had no more excuses." So, Bracey pursued and received his MBA.

Bracey earned his bachelor of science in business management from Nicholls State in 1995. He has held multiple leadership positions throughout his career and has received numerous awards, recognitions and certifications.


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Tuesday July 22, 2014
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, 304-746-1989

Tickets, sponsorships available for Paint the Capital City Green

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Individual tickets and corporate sponsorships are now available for Marshall University's Paint the Capital City Green pep rally in Charleston Thursday, Aug. 21, at the Embassy Suites hotel.

To order tickets or become a sponsor, call 304-696-7138 or e-mail paintthecapital@marshall.edu. Individual tickets are $60 and will not be sold at the door. Ticket sales close Friday, Aug. 15.

Paint the Capital City Green is the nation's largest indoor pep rally for the Thundering Herd. Fans will enjoy a tailgate spread, entertainment by mascot Marco, the cheerleading squad, dance team and members of the Marshall University Marching Thunder. Special guests, including head football Coach Doc Holliday and his senior players, will speak about the future of Marshall University football.

Ticket holders will be entered into a drawing to win hotel accommodations and free admission to an away game.

The 17th annual event, presented by Friends of Coal and sponsored in part by Huntington Bank, is hosted by the Big Green Scholarship Foundation and the Marshall University Alumni Association.


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Monday July 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Donna Underwood creates two scholarships to honor her late husband

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Donna Underwood has two main goals in life. They are to provide students with opportunities that she didn't have after graduating from high school, while - at the same time - honoring her late husband, John.
 
Underwood recently met both of those objectives by funding a pair of scholarships at Marshall University. The new scholarships, established by the Marshall University Foundation, Inc., are an endowment called the John and Donna Underwood Endowment for the Yeager Scholars Program, and an expendable scholarship called the John and Donna Underwood Scholarship for the School of Pharmacy.
 
"I wasn't privileged to be able to go to college after I graduated from high school," said Donna, who was raised on a working farm near Lafayette, Ind. Yet, she was able to work her way up in the business world with just a high school diploma.
 
Donna was co-owner of Dunhill of Huntington, a professional employment agency, and she is a retired Lexis-Nexis statistical process control production supervisor. She also is a past board member of the Chillicothe (Ohio) Country Club, and a past board member and secretary of the Adams County (Ohio) American Cancer Society. Her past and present hobbies include golf, bridge, showing and training horses, and gardening, and she is an avid fan of Thundering Herd athletics.
 
Realizing that many young people - most for financial reasons - are unable to attend college, she established the two scholarships not only to give students opportunities equal to what she had, but to exceed what she was able to do ... much like parents would want for their children.
 
She said that her parents never went to college and, since their needs were pretty much met by the farm, college was never mentioned when she was living at home.
 
"Three kids later, working, struggling to make ends meet, there was never enough money, time or energy to think about college," she said.
 
"My husband, John, had his master's degree.  His friends would ask me where I went to college.  It was hurtful to say that I had never attended a university. That is what motivates me to fund these scholarships and also honor John in doing so."
 
John Underwood graduated from Marshall in 1964 with a bachelor's degree in business. He later obtained his master's degrees in both business and sports administration from Ohio University. He served on many boards in support of Marshall University, including the Real Estate Foundation Board of the Marshall University Foundation, Inc. He was a native of Huntington.
 
"For a university to be progressive and entice students to want to attend, it has to be 'State of the Art,' " Underwood said. "This is the reason that John and I had been so supportive of Marshall University and in supporting the growth of new buildings and future planning.  Now that John is gone, I plan to keep his memory alive in keeping the support alive."
 
Underwood said her husband always wanted to leave some legacy behind as he knew his time on earth was going to be very short.
 
"After speaking several times with Ford Price, our minister at Central United Methodist Church in the west end of Huntington, a plan came together," she said. Thus, John Underwood created a sports camp at the church.
 
"The sports camp was basically to give the west end kids a free, week-long, structured, and disciplined event to give them perhaps a different way of thinking," Donna Underwood said. "Some, not all, come from very impoverished living conditions and they would never be able to attend a sports camp.  The camp provides several different avenues of sports and Christian morals.  It is taught by volunteers and volunteer coaches from the community."
 
She said that free breakfast and lunch is provided to all participants.
 
"After they complete the week of activities, the street is blocked off, games, speakers, music, awards, and a free cook-out are provided for the whole community," she said. "Without the support of other churches and our church family, along with the community and Marshall University allowing us to use some of their athletic fields, this would never been accomplished.  I have to give thanks to all those other folks who step up to help make this successful."
 
Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall Foundation, described Donna Underwood as "one of the most caring and giving people I know. She has a passion for making other people's lives better. Donna and John lived by the belief, 'To whom much is given, much is expected.' "
 
Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of Marshall's school of Pharmacy, said, "Through my interactions with Donna Underwood, in addition to her kind and gracious spirit, she demonstrates that she understands the value of each person and loves to encourage people to be their best. She knows the value of individual potential, the 'make a difference' character of a person.  She exemplifies this in her occupational endeavors and in her charitable endeavors across our campus.  Their scholarships (Donna's and John's) are yet one more example of her generous nature and eagerness to directly 'make a difference' for those who will do the same for others."
 
Dr. Ronald Bieniek, dean of Marshall's Honors College, reiterated the impact of these gifts, saying, "Donna Underwood's generosity increases Marshall's ability to provide financial assistance and experiential opportunities to deserving students who can run full throttle with such scholarship support.  I am grateful for her caring investment in our students and their potential."

Donna and John Underwood have supported many other programs at Marshall, including:

  • The Vision Campaign - the Underwood Sports Medicine Research Center Endowment
  • The Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center
  • The Marshall University Foundation Hall
  • Athletics, including the Thunder Club

They also are members of the President's Circle, for which they qualified by giving at least $100,000 to MU, and the Old Main Society, for those who have remembered Marshall University in their will, trust, or through other planned gifts.


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Monday July 21, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall medical students provide treatment to more than a thousand Hondurans during international mission

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A team of Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students, faculty physicians, a medical resident and other health care workers from the tri-state community traveled to Honduras earlier this month for an international mission that resulted in medical care for nearly 1,060 patients.

One of the students described the experience as a seminal event in his life. The Marshall team provided health care to men, women and children including general physicals, medication dispensing, Pap smears and dental care.

"It is an amazing experience to see your classmates make the leap from student to practitioner, and to watch the second-year students get their first exposure to operating a clinic," said John M. Davitt, a fourth-year medical student and co-organizer of the trip.  "The level of compassion, teamwork, and enthusiasm that everyone displayed throughout the week was truly inspiring, and was responsible for making this such a successful brigade."

Aaron M. Dom, a fourth-year student who also served as co-organizer, said the team traveled daily six hours round trip to a remote community where they provided health care to hundreds every day.

"I'm very impressed and proud of our team's work. What surprised me most was how much our group gained from this trip. We went to Honduras with a purpose of providing care to the people without health care access, but I think we actually ended up with an even more rewarding experience than the patients," he said.

The Honduras mission has become an annual event for Marshall medical students interested in global health care and is the outgrowth of an initiative to memorialize a Marshall School of Medicine graduate killed in the September 2001 terrorist attacks.

An endowed fund honoring Paul W. Ambrose, MUSOM Class of 1995, significantly underwrites the annual mission trip.  Ambrose's parents, Dr. Kenneth and Sharon Ambrose, also have personally supported the international medical trips and Sharon Ambrose, a retired nurse, has traveled with the team on several occasions, including this year.

Donations of medical supplies and medications from Marshall Health, the Marshall University School of Pharmacy and the school of medicine's annual Mission M-Possible 5K also helped support the trip.

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Photo: A team of Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine students, faculty physicians, a medical resident and other health care workers from the tri-state community are shown in Honduras where they provided health care to more than 1,000 men, women and children during an international mission earlier this month.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 18, 2014
Contact: Mary M. Thomasson, Public Information Officer, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, 304-691-8961

Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program again ranks number one in the nation on national assessment test scores

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program once again ranked number one in the country for its students receiving the highest overall test scores on the Forensic Science Assessment Test, a qualifying test offered each year by the American Board of Criminalistics. This is the fifth time the program achieved the number one ranking in eight years since its students began taking the test in 2007.

Of the top 26 highest test scores ranked, six were students from the Marshall Forensic Science Graduate Program. Marshall's students captured the number one and number two rankings for highest overall test results among 202 students from 16 other forensic science programs that participated in the test.

Of the 202 students who took the test, the individual rankings of Marshall's students were 1,2,4,7, 9 and 26.

Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program ranked number one for overall rankings in the disciplines of Controlled Substances, Trace Analysis, Toxicology, Latent Prints and Firearms. The program ranked number two in Forensic Biology and Fire Debris and number three in Questioned Documents.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the program, said the test is useful for assessing the program's strengths and demonstrating to prospective students and the general public its ability to meet national standards.

"The results demonstrate not only the quality of the program and its students, but the dedication of its full-time faculty and the many adjunct faculty members," he said. "The program greatly benefits from the input of law enforcement and criminal justice system professionals here locally and across the state."

Dr. Pamela Staton, program coordinator, said the test scores are evidence of the high quality education the program provides.

"The quality of an academic program can be measured by a program's achievement of national accreditation as well as how well its students perform on national board examinations," she said. "The Forensic Science Program at Marshall University has achieved both of these honorable distinctions. This translates to high quality forensic science services for law enforcement, the legal profession, and the public as graduates of this program become forensic scientists in the field."

Marshall's Forensic Science Graduate Program is FEPAC-accredited by the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

The students who participated in the examination that was administered in spring 2014 are now graduates of the nationally recognized Forensic Science Program. The test is offered to students in their last semester of an academic forensic science program. While seeking their first job, recent college graduates may use their test results to demonstrate their knowledge across a broad range of forensic science disciplines.

The American Board of Criminalistics offers a wide array of testing and certification services that focus on the forensic sciences.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday July 18, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-696-2624

Marshall Speech and Hearing Center holds 'Tiny Talkers' programs for children with speech disorders

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four-year-old Harry Shivel was born with hyperlexia, which gave him the ability to read words far above what would be expected of a child his age. But although he can read the words, he experiences difficulty with understanding what the words mean.

According to researchers, children with hyperlexia have a significantly higher word decoding ability than their reading comprehension levels and some have trouble understanding speech.

Harry's mother, Holly Shivel, said her son's condition made it difficult for him to communicate his ideas about what he reads. When Shivel heard about the Tiny Talkers Book Club held at the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center (MUSHC), she hoped they could help.

"I wanted him to get socialized and this seemed like a perfect opportunity during the summer months to improve his social skills," Shivel said. "We wanted to have Harry come last year, but the Book Club filled up so quickly. I made a point to get him enrolled this year because I want him to make new friends and communicate his ideas about the books he reads with ease."

In order to help children like Harry, the Speech and Hearing Center created two programs to facilitate speech therapy through the use of books and other activities. The Tiny Talkers Book Club was established in 2013 and focuses on emergent literacy for 4- to 5-year-olds. The Tiny Talkers Language Class was created this summer for 2-to-3-year-olds and their parents to improve their communication skills through activities like reading, singing, playing and art. Jen Baker, speech language pathologist in the MUSHC, said programs like these provide a solid foundation for youth in regard to language and literacy.

"Harry's hyperlexia is so amazing because while we are trying to teach the other kids how to identify and blend sounds, he already knows how to do that. It's his story comprehension and communicating his ideas that need improvement," Baker said. "Kids with speech and language delays are at risk for having challenges with literacy. We saw a great need for a program like this, which would help strengthen a child's language skills in a group setting to decrease the chances of literacy problems in the future."

Baker said the program holds parent seminars once a month to provide strategies for families to continue teaching their children at home.

"We want to build a solid foundation for our clients," Baker said. "While working with these children, we are also able to provide great training opportunities for our graduate students within Marshall's College of Health Professions."

The final session of the Tiny Talkers Book Club will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 29, and the final session of the Tiny Talkers Language Class will take place from 9:45 to 11 a.m. Thursday, July 31, in the MUSHC located on Marshall's Huntington campus in Smith Hall. For more information about this program, please contact Jen Baker at jen.baker@marshall.edu. For more information on the services provided by the MUSHC, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photos: (Above) Harry Shivel was born with hyperlexia, which means he could read before learning to talk. Harry is able to practice his reading comprehension during the Tiny Talkers Book Club held each summer at the Marshall Speech and Hearing Center. (Center) Marshall graduate student and clinician Samantha Tarker reads to children during the Tiny Talkers Language Class, which encourages communication through activities like art, reading, singing and eating snacks. (Below) Jennifer Baker works with Charlie Dodrill, age 3, in the Tiny Talkers Language Class, which structures each activity to the individual child and his or her needs.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 17, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Dalton named Marshall University Director of Athletic Bands

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Beginning this fall, Dr. Adam Dalton will assume the lead role in the Marching Thunder.

Formerly a high school and elementary school band teacher in Atlanta, Georgia, the new Director of Athletic Bands said he is excited and anxious to be teaching at the university level.

"It kind of just hits me," Dalton said. "I think, 'You're director of athletic bands at a university right now.' That's a big deal!"

Marshall University School of Music and Theatre Director Dr. Richard Kravchak said Dalton's wide range of experience, including working with the Million Dollar Band at the University of Alabama, to serving as one of the color guard captain heads with the renowned drum corps Madison Scouts, made him a great fit for the position.

"Professor Dalton will honor the beloved traditions of the Marching Thunder while bringing a contemporary excitement and energy to our performances," Kravchak said. "We can't wait for football season to start!"

A native of Virginia, Dalton earned a Bachelor of Music in Music Education at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. He went on to receive a Master of Arts in Music Education and a Doctor of Musical Arts in instrumental conducting from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.
 
Dalton performed in every ensemble he could during his undergraduate studies, including the Marching Royal Dukes and the Wind Ensemble. While at the University of Alabama, he performed with the Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps for three years, earning two world championships and a gold medal in individual and ensemble. He has also marched in various independent winter guards, consistently making the finals at Winter Guard International. His color guard teaching experience includes the world champion Phantom Regiment and the Carolina Crown Drum and Bugle Corps, as well as numerous winter guards around the southeast such as CrownGUARD and the University of Alabama Alta Marea.

For more information about Marshall University's Marching Thunder, please visit http://www.marshall.edu/band.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 17, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall researcher's work presented at international conference on Alzheimer's disease

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Research  to identify hospital patients who suffer from cognitive impairment - which can indicate dementia and the more acute problem of delirium - is being showcased this week at the 2014 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Denmark, thanks to the work of Dr. Shirley Neitch and colleagues from around West Virginia.

The research project was the outgrowth of a West Virginia project called Make a Plan (MAP) for Alzheimer's, a consortium of stakeholders familiar with the issues germane to Alzheimer's.

"Our chapter welcomes opportunities to provide and enhance care and support for individuals with Alzheimer's and other dementias and their care partners," said Laurel Kirksey, executive director of the Alzheimer's Association, West Virginia chapter.  "This project provided a unique opportunity to create an observation method to assist staff in acute care settings to recognize cognitive impairment in an effort to help improve patient outcomes for West Virginia's citizenry. We look forward to the opportunity to pilot this project in partnership with direct care staff."

Neitch, a geriatrician and the section chief of geriatrics in the department of internal medicine at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has researched dementia for decades and says identifying patients with cognitive impairment in an acute care setting is difficult because the symptoms or signs are often very subtle.

"Many people can identify severe delirium or advanced Alzheimer's because it's visible, but earlier or milder cognitive impairment is more difficult to assess," she said. "The protocol we've developed and dubbed Universal Observations is an empowering and useful tool for all health care workers in the acute care setting that helps them identify patients who need to be screened for dementia."

Universal Observations is a system of red flag observations of patient behaviors, including patients who are given food trays but never eat, patients who appear to be bewildered or fearful, or those who wander or engage in non-purposeful activity. Unlike screening tools for defining dementia, which are numerous, Neitch says there are few guidelines to identify exactly which patients need to be further screened.

"This protocol allows everyone in the hospital setting, from food service workers and maintenance folks to the doctors and nurses, to have input on what they see. Our motto is, 'if you see something, say something.' Our hope is that cognitive impairment, which can have a significant impact on patient outcomes, will be picked up, identified and addressed."

Neitch says the next step for the project is implementation of a pilot program, which she hopes will occur in the next year.

The project was funded by the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and is the collaborative work of Neitch; Jane Marks, B.A., CDP, Dementia Specialist/Consultant; Mary Emmett, Ph.D., CAMC Research Institute; the Acute Care Workgroup of West Virginia's Make a Plan for Alzheimer's Program and the Alzheimer's Association, West Virginia Chapter.

Marks is presenting the research poster in Denmark.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 16, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Bruce Felder named director of human resource services at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Bruce Felder, a Huntington native and manager of human resources at Cabell Huntington Hospital for the past 13 years, has been named director of human resource services at Marshall University.

Felder's new position at Marshall took effect July 2.

"The main reason for me leaving Cabell was for the challenge," he said. "I was comfortable in my role. I was at the peak of my profession there. But, I needed to get out of that comfort zone. I had to ask myself, 'If you are going to be a human resource practitioner, don't you want to be a human resource practitioner that has multiple levels of experience?'  So, I jumped off the plane into free fall, and here I am."

Felder graduated from Marshall in 2002. He was a double major in business management and management information systems (MIS). In 2007, he earned a master of science in strategic leadership from Mountain State University. He is certified as a senior professional of human resources (SPHR).

"All of that training and being certified in your industry really gives you more of a global view on how HR should look and how HR should run," Felder said. "My focus is going to be, 'how can we maximize the people and resources to meet the strategic plan and the objectives?' That's really what I bring to the table, just a different methodology or viewpoint. But, it's really HR Fundamentals 101."

He said he also brings more of a corporate background to Marshall.

"Working in health care at Cabell, it's very high-volume, fast-paced, with a lot of moving parts," Felder said. "It's a teamwork effort and all the parts on the team have to be integrated and playing together. It's a concept of integration and not isolation and we're going to focus on bringing all the parts together as a well-oiled machine."

Felder spent 20 years in the U.S. Army National guard. In 2005-2006, he was deployed for 14 months to Iraq. There, he said he learned the meaning of perseverance as temperatures at times reached 140 degrees.

"I bring that military background and leadership (to Marshall), but again, it's still fostered around that team concept," he said. "Everybody's got to know what the next person is doing in order to be successful."

He is married to his wife of 13 years, Ja'net Hill-Felder and said he is grateful for her love and support.

Felder added, "With God, all things are possible."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 15, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Production to begin on life-size fiberglass bison

HUNTINGTON, W.VA. - A six-foot tall by eight-foot long fiberglass bison has been delivered to Marshall University's art warehouse where it will spend the next two months going through a transformation by Brianna Jarvis, winner of a public art competition called New Connections.

Jarvis, a sophomore graphic design major, said she would use the $2,500 prize money toward her room and board at Marshall University.

"I'm a strong believer in education being the key to success, and paying for college can be quite the financial struggle sometimes," Jarvis said. "I haven't had to take out any loans so far, and I'd like to keep it that way."

Huntington Mayor Steve Williams, Paul Davis, executive director of the Tri-State Transit Authority, and College of Arts and Media Dean Donald Van Horn judged the public art competition, which is funded by Pullman Square and represents the new connections that the Visual Arts Center will make to the future and community.

"This is a great opportunity to unite our students with our community and a downtown business partner to bring public art to Pullman Square," Van Horn said.

The final project will be unveiled at Pullman Square during the Visual Arts Center community open house on Friday, Sept. 19.
 
For more information about the Visual Arts Center, please visit www.marshall.edu/art/vac.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 10, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Research institute and medical school to partner with international company in drug development venture

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research (MIIR) and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine today announced they will be partnering with an international biosciences company to develop potential anti-cancer drugs.

Under the agreement with Shanghai-based HD Biosciences Co. Ltd., the three partners will share the costs and risks of discovery and development of these new drugs. They also will jointly own any intellectual property and commercialization rights to products developed through the collaboration.

According to Dr. Zijian Xie, MIIR's director, getting new drugs from the research laboratory to clinical trials where it is determined if the treatment is safe and effective for humans is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking.

"Normally, it would take tens of millions of dollars and as long as a decade to translate the technology MIIR and the school of medicine have developed over the last several years into viable drug candidates," he said. "This joint effort with HD Biosciences will significantly shorten the process because of their expertise in drug discovery, and ultimately will reduce the risk for all the partners.

"In short, this represents a bold approach that will not only advance MIIR's mission of innovation, discovery, enterprise and advancement, but will also create new business opportunities and add value for all of us."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the school of medicine, said the partnership was formed with the goal of bringing new treatments to cancer patients as quickly as possible.

"We couldn't be happier to work with HD Biosciences. Our venture allows lab-based scientists and clinical researchers to share ideas, move them forward at a quicker pace and ultimately provide better patient care," he said.

Dr. Xuehai Tan, president and CEO of HD Biosciences, added, "We are very pleased to have established this collaboration with Marshall University. This agreement is another example of our company's strategy and commitment to long-term growth. We will contribute with our extensive capabilities in preclinical drug discovery and new drug development in the Chinese market, and our ability to create value for the company and our partners, while the university is well versed in translational medicine, clinical trials and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines."

Dr. John Maher, Marshall vice president for research, said the venture has significant economic development potential for Marshall and the entire region.

He added, "By working together to examine the commercial viability of the disease targets and treatments being developed at MIIR and the medical school, we will be able to accelerate the translation of research from our labs into discoveries that will both help improve human health and stimulate economic development in the region."

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About the Participants


Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research
MIIR is Marshall University's key vehicle for advancing regional economic development. The institute's scientists are developing a focused program of biotechnology research dedicated to exploring new treatments for cancer and heart and kidney disease, producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries. Learn more at www.marshall.edu/miir.

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
The Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine is a community-based, Veterans Affairs-affiliated medical school dedicated to providing high-quality medical education and postgraduate training programs to foster a skilled physician workforce to meet the unique healthcare needs of West Virginia and Central Appalachia. The school seeks to develop centers of excellence in clinical care, including primary care in rural underserved areas, focused and responsive programs of biomedical science graduate study, biomedical and clinical science research, academic scholarship and public service outreach. For more information, visit www.musom.marshall.edu.

HD Biosciences Co. Ltd.
Based in Shanghai, HD Biosciences Co. Ltd. is a biology-focused preclinical drug discovery contract research organization. The company offers comprehensive service platforms around target validation, plate-based pharmacology, hit identification and lead discovery, therapeutic antibody discovery and in vivo pharmacology, as well as other research and development services. The company currently collaborates with eight of the 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in the world and has established strategic partnerships in many key research and development areas. For more information, visit www.hdbiosciences.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 9, 2014
Contact: Dr. Robert Rabe, Dr. Robert Rabe, Graduate Coordinator, Journalism and Mass Communications, 304-696-2360

Online Master of Arts in Journalism, New Media Studies emphasis launches

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Marshall University is offering a fully online graduate program in New Media Studies beginning this fall.

It is a 30-credit-hour program that serves individuals who want to enter mass communications for the first time or veterans who are retooling for a changing industry. The online Master of Arts in Journalism maintains the school's commitment to advanced study and research, but it approaches mass communications' storytelling and graduate scholarship in innovative ways. Students will study, write, design and produce digital work that will be distributed through emerging technology including mobile devices.

The "master's initiative" requirement of the program is a three-semester project that produces a non-traditional thesis. Six hours of branch electives help students tailor the program to meet their individual needs and interests.

"We are excited to begin offering this new online master's degree that will allow students the flexibility and innovative coursework to meet the demands of the 21st century mass media," said Dr. Robert Rabe, graduate coordinator for the school of Journalism and Mass Communications. "Students will be able to tailor an individualized sequence of courses and experiences that prepare them for exactly the kinds of careers they hope to pursue."

In addition to the new program, the School of Journalism and Mass Communications offers its traditional Master of Arts in Journalism, an M.A.J. with a health care emphasis and three free-standing 15-hour certificate programs in Media Management, Integrated Strategic Communications and Digital Communications.

For more information about the programs, and for admission requirements, contact Rabe by phone at 304-696-2360, or visit the school's website, www.marshall.edu/sojmc.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 9, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University Career Services offering Community Career Workshop Series during July

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services will conduct a Community Career Workshop Series, open to the public, during July.  All workshops are free to attend and will take place at the Career Services office, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and 17th Street in Huntington.

The workshop dates and topics are:

Tuesday, July 15, 4:30-5:30 p.m. - "Building a Standout Resume"
Thursday, July 17, 4:30-5:30 p.m. - "The Job Hunt - Tips and Strategies to Maximize Success"
Tuesday, July 22, 4:30-5:30 p.m. - "Can Twitter Help You Get Hired? Using Social Media Effectively"

Please call Career Services at 304-696-2370 for more information and to reserve your spot.  Reservations are appreciated but walk-ins also are welcome.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 8, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall School of Medicine faculty member elected to national post

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Darshana Shah, associate dean for faculty affairs and professional development at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, is the new chair-elect of the  Association of American Medical College's Group on Faculty Affairs (GFA) Steering Committee.

The mission of the GFA is to build and sustain faculty vitality in medical schools and teaching hospitals. 

"I feel honored and privileged to have been elected to this post, "Shah said.  "GFA professionals feel a great responsibility to prepare our faculty to meet the challenges of the 21st century.  My training as a biomedical scientist, and experiences in the medical education and professional development arenas, will serve the GFA well during this time of educational and health care reform."

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine, congratulated Shah on her election to the national post, which includes committee members from schools across the country.

"This is an important and prestigious position which reflects well on Dr. Shah and the entire Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine," Shapiro said.  "We are extremely pleased and proud that she will take on this new responsibility."

Shah currently serves as chairwoman of the GFA annual conference program planning committee. This year's conference will take place next week in Boston.

Shah is a professor and chief of the pathology academic section, department of pathology and has been with the School of Medicine since 1997.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday July 7, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University student researcher presents at national conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Mohit Harsh, a research student at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and an entering first-year medical student, presented his team's findings last month during a poster session at the 16th International Congress of Endocrinology in Chicago.   

The research was done in the laboratory of Dr. Nader G. Abraham, one of the foremost researchers on the topic of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the world, as well as the Vice Dean for Research for the School of Medicine.  The study focused on fructose and a metabolic by-product of fructose metabolism called uric acid and their effects on bone marrow-derived stem cell development.  The use of fructose is becoming increasingly popular as a sweetener in western society and has been linked to worsening obesity and obesity-related complications like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  

"This was a significant study because it's the first study to demonstrate that fructose treatments on stem cells increase the development of fat cells and actually decrease the secretion of adiponectin, a hormone known to have cardio-protective properties," Harsh said. "Our results may provide an avenue for our better understanding of diet-induced obesity and obesity-related cardiovascular complications." 

Harsh worked with fellow students Jordan P. Hilgefort, a second- year medical student, and George E. Banks V, also a second-year medical student.  Faculty members on the team include Zeid J. Khitan, M.D.; Joseph I. Shapiro, M.D., dean of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine;  Komal Sodhi, M.D.;  Luca Vanella, Ph.D.; and Abraham.

"Obesity is preventable and can be achieved by controlling calorie intake and physical activity," Abraham said. "Our goal is to empower our community with science-based information about what can be done to prevent child and adult obesity and how an increase in fructose intake can be detrimental on body weight gain and heart disease."

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Brickstreet Foundation.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday July 3, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

HSTA Summer Institute to attract 112 students from southern West Virginia

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - About 112 high school students from southern West Virginia will visit Marshall University's Huntington campus July 13-18 to take part in the annual Health Sciences and Technology Academy (HSTA) Summer Institute, conducted in collaboration with West Virginia University.
 
This will be the 10th year of "Fun With Science" at Marshall, which enables the students to learn more about science and the opportunities that are available to students majoring in science.
 
"The Health Sciences and Technology Academy's (HSTA) vision was founded in 1994 on the faith, resilience, spirit and commitment of individuals, communities and universities throughout the state," said Ann Chester, state director of HSTA. "HSTA is a 9th-12th grade math and science enrichment program built in West Virginia, by West Virginians, for West Virginians which encourages aspirations, opens doors, and empowers minority and underrepresented students and communities.
 
"This partnership brings students and teachers to campuses each summer for laboratory and classroom training and activities. The partnership then provides the infrastructure and support for community-based science projects mentored by scientists, teachers, health professionals, students and volunteer community leaders during the school year. Through HSTA, our students and alumni are building a better tomorrow by improving our education, our lifestyles, our health literacy and our communities today."

The week will get underway at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 13, with the annual HSTA Summer Institute kickoff dinner in room BE5, located on the lower level of the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus. All 112 students, plus many HSTA club teachers, HSTA field site coordinators and MU department chairs, faculty and staff will attend the dinner.
 
"This statewide initiative was created to inspire and teach first-generation, rural and African American youth to attend college and offset the disparity of this population in science and health care professions," said David Cartwright, director of the HSTA summer Institute.
 
Cartwright said the program is important for the HSTA students in many ways. One of the most important, he said, is that they find Marshall to be a warm and friendly place so that in the future, they may choose MU as their university.
 
The goal of HSTA is to increase the number of underrepresented and minority students who complete a postsecondary education in the health professions and remain in West Virginia as primary caregivers. The program was established with 45 students from two counties in 1994.
 
Co-directors of the event are Maurice Cooley, Dr. Girmay Berhie and Mark Mallory. Helen Bonham will assist Cartwright, Cooley, Berhie and Mallory.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday July 2, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

MU guitar ensemble to visit University of Costa Rica

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Four students from Marshall University's guitar ensemble will travel to Costa Rica in August to perform with students of the University of Costa Rica's counterpart. Associate Professor of Music and Brazilian native Dr. Julio Alves will accompany guitar students Kareem Mccullough, Rodrigo Almeida, Jonathan Thorne and Erik Anderson from Aug. 7 to 17 in San Jose, Costa Rica.

Alves formulated and presented the trip to Marshall University's School of Music and Theatre and the University of Costa Rica's School of Musical Arts in hopes of creating an exchange program to broaden students' musical experiences.

"It's an academic opportunity for students to learn about music education while getting acquainted with a different culture and gaining preparation for the job market of the 21st Century," Alves said. "The students will be exposing themselves to the music of Costa Rica and receiving instruction by the faculty of the university there, and I will be providing instruction to the University of Costa Rica's guitar ensemble."

Marshall's guitar ensemble will enjoy recitals and workshops about the local music, as well as give presentations on Appalachian music during their first-ever trip to Costa Rica. Marshall students also will perform concerts by themselves and with their Central-American counterparts. Performances from the trip will be available to watch on YouTube, Alves said.

"The goal is that next year the guitar ensemble from the University of Costa Rica will have the opportunity to come to Huntington," Alves said.

The trip will be supported and funded by the College of Arts and Media.

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Photo: Marshall guitar ensemble students Kareem McCullough, Rodrigo Almeida, Jonathan Thorne and Erik Anderson stand with Associate Professor of Music and Brazilian native Dr. Julio Alves (center) before their trip to Costa Rica.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 1, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU professor, student 'giving back' through local Guitars for Vets program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University associate professor Dr. Julio Alves and Jonathan Thorne, a senior music education major, are "giving back" to local veterans through the Guitars for Vets (G4V) program at the VA Medical Center in Spring Valley.

Guitars for Vets is a federally registered 501(C)(3) not-for-profit founded in 2007 with headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisc. Through the program, local vets are taught how to play guitar by volunteers such as Alves and Thorne.

"It's a great opportunity to give back to those who have served the country so bravely," Alves said. "And, it is an opportunity for John and others to develop even further."

G4V operates more than 40 chapters in more than 20 states and has in excess of 150 volunteers such as Alves and Thorne. G4V is dedicated to sharing the healing power of music with veterans suffering from significant combat-related mental and emotional stress, particularly post-traumatic stress.

Guitars for Vets pursues its mission by providing free, private guitar instruction, a practice guitar, accessories and a method book in a structured program run by volunteers primarily through the VA facilities.

Dave Ball is a veteran who is participating in the program.

"Personally, I've been trying to play for 12 or 13 years," Ball said. "With Jonathan's instruction, it's been coming a whole lot easier. It's a good hobby to have, I just really enjoy it. I like country music. That's the good thing about Jonathan, he can adapt to teach you whatever your interest is."

Melissa Stillwell, who, as chapter coordinator, heads up the local G4V program, said it takes 12 weeks of instruction for a student to graduate. Then, the organization gives him or her a new guitar, a new stand, new picks, a new gig bag, strap, tuner and strings. Thus far, Guitars for Vets has given more than 20,000 lessons and distributed more than 2,000 new guitars to veterans.

"This really is a fantastic way to get people interested in playing music," Thorne said. "Playing guitar gives you something to take your mind off of your daily troubles. Music is such a great thing; it's like an escapism where you can get away from the bad parts of the world for a while."

Veteran Tim Burton described the program as "sweet."

"It's very nice. It gives you a hobby, if you don't have one already," he said.

Each chapter is encouraged to do some fundraising to help pay for the equipment. However, donations are welcome, and can be made through www.guitarsforvets.org. Or, persons may send a check payable to Guitars for Vets to: Guitars for Vets Processing Center, 11933 W. Burleigh St., Wauwatosa, WI 53222, or call 1-855-G4V-HERO/1-855-448-4376 for more information.

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Photo: Marshall University associate professor Dr. Julio Alvez, left, and Jonathan Thorne, a senior music education major, are "giving back" to local veterans through the Guitars for Vets (G4V) program at the VA Medical Center in Spring Valley. Photo by Dave Wellman/Marshall University.



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Tuesday July 1, 2014
Contact: Tarabeth Brumfield, , 304-696-2945

June Harless Center to host 'Camp Create' in Gilbert

GILBERT, W.Va. - The June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, part of the College of Education and Professional Development at Marshall University, is offering "Camp Create" at the Larry Joe Harless Community Center in Gilbert, W.Va. Sessions will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily July 8-11. The camp is free, and is open to students entering 2nd through 5th grades. Lunch will be provided for the children.

"Camp Create," which is being held in memory of James H. "Buck" Harless, will focus on engaging children with real technology and creative robotics while integrating the arts. Each child will be creating his or her own robot, which will be displayed at the community center. A showcase of the creative robots will be held at the Larry Joe Harless Center from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday, July 11, and is open to the public.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 1, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall Board of Governors tours new School of Physical Therapy facilities; Health Professions highlights new programs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Since 2012, the Marshall University School of Physical Therapy has been open to students who want to receive their Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT). Last week, the Marshall Board of Governors toured these new facilities and learned more about the program from department director, Dr. Penny Kroll.

"One of our overall goals is to get the community and clinicians within this community involved in our research endeavors and the overall education of our students," Kroll said. "I was honored to be given the opportunity to introduce the members of the Board of Governors to our comprehensive, contemporary physical therapy program and to make them aware of the qualifications and achievements of our faculty and students in the program. We were able to provide a tour through our space, which is so well designed to meet the needs of the program."

Kroll said this was an opportunity to highlight the benefits of the physical therapy program to the university and the community.

"I was very pleased to be given the occasion to thank the members of the board for their support in creating and sustaining the School of Physical Therapy and the Doctor of Physical Therapy program," Kroll said. "This was an opportunity to emphasize the congruency between our mission and goals and that of the university."

Mike Sellards, CEO and president of St. Mary's Medical Center and incoming Board of Governors chair, said the board is responsible for the direction of the university and for fulfilling the university's mission through understanding the needs of the students and the Marshall community.

"This program has been needed in our area for quite some time," Sellards said. "The board was very impressed with the progress of the DPT program and the leadership it takes to get a program like this off the ground and moving toward accreditation."

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the College of Health Professions, said establishing a School of Physical Therapy was necessary due to the shortage of trained and qualified physical therapists in the region. Due to changes in population and increasing concerns over chronic disease, the School of Physical Therapy will maintain wellness, prevent the onset and progression of disability and restore function at the highest possible level.

"The School of Physical Therapy is one of several new programs developed in the last four years within the College of Health Professions which allow our health professionals to treat the emerging healthcare needs in our region," Prewitt said. "We are proud to offer programs, which address these needs including public health, biomechanics and health informatics and we will continue to develop programs which meet the needs of our surrounding communities."

For further information on the School of Physical Therapy and new programs offered within the college, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photos: (Above) The Marshall University Board of Governors visited the School of Physical Therapy Tuesday, June 24 to learn more about the new DPT program, which will graduate its first class in 2015. (Below) Mike Sellards (far left) discusses benefits of the relationship between St. Mary's Medical Center and Marshall University with other board members during Dr. Penny Kroll's presentation on the School of Physical Therapy. Sellards has begun his term as the chair of the Board of Governors effective July 1.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday July 1, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine announces new administrative chair of ophthalmology

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. R. Mark Hatfield, a Charleston-based retina specialist, has been appointed administrative chairman of Marshall University's department of ophthalmology.

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, said the appointment is effective today.

"We are thrilled to have Dr. Hatfield join us at Marshall," Shapiro said.  "He is an accomplished, successful, private practice physician whose expertise, both clinically and in business, will be a tremendous asset as Marshall navigates the bold new world of health care and medical education."

Hatfield earned a doctor of optometry degree from Illinois College of Optometry before graduating from the Marshall University School of Medicine in 1983.  He completed a surgical internship at Marshall, an ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois School of Medicine and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's in Chicago.

He is the founder of Retina Consultants, which has five locations in West Virginia.

"I am very pleased to accept this new position at my alma mater," Hatfield said. "Making health care more accessible to those across this region is very important to me. I look forward to working with Dr. Shapiro and others at Marshall to not only continue the mission of educating doctors for Appalachia, but also expanding clinical services in the area."

Hatfield has received dozens of honors and awards, including the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary Distinguished Alumnus Award and the 2013 Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Alumni Association's Distinguished Alumnus

In addition to his medical practice, Hatfield is a busy lecturer who has presented at a number of professional meetings, including ones sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control, the West Virginia Optometric Association and the West Virginia Academy of Ophthalmology.

Marshall's department of ophthalmology, located at 5187 U.S. 60 E. in Huntington, is a referral center for eye surgery and eye disease including cataract evaluation and surgery, diabetic eye care and treatment, glaucoma evaluation and treatment as well as ocular injures, emergency eye care and comprehensive diagnostic services. 

Hatfield replaces Michael A. Krasnow, D.O., Ph.D. who has retired as chairman, but will continue to serve as a professor in the department. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 27, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall Department of Communication Disorders helps local youth improve literacy at the Huntington Reading Camp

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Unlike many nine-year olds, Kevin Vickers said he enjoys spending time at the library, surrounded by books. Vickers, a third-grader at St. Joseph  Catholic Elementary School, has attended the Huntington Reading Camp for two years and plans to come back next year.

"I came last year and I had so much fun because I made lots of friends outside of school," Vickers said. "I have learned more about reading here because it's not boring. I'll be here next year too!"

The Huntington Reading Camp is a free five-day event for children who are struggling readers.  The camp provides each camper with 15 hours of reading instructions, strategies and skill builders taught by local teachers.

Dr. Susan Thomas Frank is one of the camp's many advocates. Frank, an associate professor within Marshall's Department of Communication Disorders, said this intensive one-week camp helps struggling readers learn to love to read, improve study and reading skills and have fun with others who share their goals and difficulties they have reading in the classroom.

"In this country, we have a tremendous illiteracy problem and we know reading and writing problems cross socio-economic lines. A camp like this is so important because we live in the information age where literacy is a necessary element for academic achievement," Frank said. "Through this camp, we want to instill a love of reading and writing and provide them with the confidence to succeed outside of the classroom."

The camp is sponsored by three local Episcopal churches in Huntington and has been held at the St. John's Episcopal Church for the past two years. Frank said the initiatives of the camp are conducted nationally and internationally and would not be possible without the support of local teachers, students and members of the community.

Catherine Brewer, a 2013 graduate of the Department of Communication Disorders, said her experience working with children to improve their literacy inspired her to get involved.

"As a graduate student, my focus was literacy and I learned how important it is to emphasize the fundamentals of language and reading," Brewer said. "As an alumna, it feels great to give back. I have a tremendous sense of pride graduating from a university that is so involved in its community." 

Twenty-four campers attended this year's Huntington Reading Camp and outdoor activities at Beech Fork State Park, the Huntington Museum of Art and the former Proctor Farm. The camp concludes today and participants will receive a backpack with four books, one being an autographed copy by Colleen Anderson, children's author of "Missing: Mrs. Cornblossom," who visited the camp earlier in the week.

To learn more about the Huntington Reading Camp and how your child can attend, visit www.readingcampinhuntington.org online. To learn more about Marshall's Department of Communication Disorders and its involvement in the community, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photos: (Above)  Nine-year old Kevin Vickers said his favorite reading session during the Huntington Reading Camp is the "Pleasure Reading," which allows campers the opportunity to interact and read with animals. (Below) Catherine Brewer, a 2013 communication disorders graduate from Marshall University, is shown working on reading comprehension with local youth to improve their literacy. Brewer said the camp provides children with the chance to build upon what they learn during the school year and maintain that skill level throughout the summer months. 


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Wednesday June 25, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

New computer science master's degree will fill need for advanced computer and software industry graduates

Marshall Board of Governors approves program to help meet growing demand for STEM field professionals

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University soon will offer a high-demand master of science degree in computer science, following today's approval of the program by the Marshall University Board of Governors at its regular meeting.

The MSCS is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skill and professional practices to develop complex software systems and will prepare students who desire to pursue further graduate work leading to the Ph.D.

"A master's degree in Computer Science (MSCS) is long overdue at Marshall University," said Dr. Venkat Gudivada, a professor in the College of Information, Technology and Engineering (CITE) at Marshall, who did much of the primary work on the new degree. "Given the high demand for computer science graduate education and excellent job opportunities, this new degree will serve the needs of the southern West Virginia population and beyond. As software has deeply entrenched in all aspects of our lives, computer science graduate education is a critical component for economic growth in the state with potential for software startup companies."

The new degree was proposed by the Weisberg Division of Computer Science in the College of Information Technology and Engineering. It requires 30 credit hours of graduate work.

Gudivada said that, according to United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than half of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics job openings in 2020 will be in the computing discipline. The 2011 average annual pay for software professionals was $96,250, and the same for software managerial positions was $125,660, based on labor statistics, Gudivada said.

"According to a 2013 Forbes report, software development is the occupation that created the most jobs in the U.S.," Gudivada said. "Forbes also ranks a master's degree in computer science as the second best master's degree for jobs."

A bachelor's degree in computer science is often inadequate for computing jobs given the rapid advances in the field, Gudivada said.

"West Virginia companies such as MATRIC and BrickStreet Insurance find it hard to recruit people with advanced software knowledge and skills," he said. "A leading-edge, graduate degree in computer science education will produce highly sought-after professionals capable of thriving in the challenging environments demanded in today's business world. Because our society is becoming increasingly dependent on technology for every aspect of our lives, computer scientists are sought after in pretty much every industry and in a wide range of capacities."

Gudivada said there is also a great demand for the MSCS degree from international students.

"This new program will contribute to attracting more international students to Marshall's campus," he said.

Prior to the start of their studies, students are required to complete a plan of study in consultation with their academic advisers. All students must take CS 620-Applied Algorithms and CS 660-Big Data Systems. Working with their advisers, students will then select courses from a menu that includes database systems, bioinformatics, information retrieval, software design, software testing, machine learning, visual analytics, computer architecture, software specifications, artificial intelligence principals and methods and high performance computing.

Students then choose a thesis option or a project option. They must summarize their thesis work in a formal written document and deliver an oral presentation. Thesis work is typically done over two semesters. Students select a topic for the project option in consultation with their academic adviser. Project work requires effort equivalent to a three-credit-hour course and is typically completed in the last semester of study.

In other news, the board approved an updated policy to allow registered support animals on Marshall's campuses, which brings the university into compliance with federal law concerning individuals with disabilities.

The policy defines the difference among pets, service animals, and support animals, and outlines the rules and regulations regarding where they are allowed on campus.  For example, a service animal could be a dog trained to perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability. A support animal is defined as an animal that provides emotional support to help alleviate symptoms or effects of a person's disability.

Sandra Clements, director of Marshall's Office of Disability Services, said students seeking support animal accommodation at Marshall must provide documentation of a psychological evaluation where the student has been diagnosed with a disability and a doctor has outlined that a specific support animal is necessary and appropriate for the student. Also required is documentation of vaccinations and a statement from a veterinarian that the support animal is healthy enough to be on campus and around people.

"As with any special accommodation, there is a specific process," Clements said. "It's a process that requires a 30-day period to allow for verification of documents and review of the situation for the Office of Disability Services."

If the student requires university housing, there are specific Housing and Residence Life rules the student must follow, Clements said.

Other than service and approved support animals, Marshall University does not allow animals or pets on campus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 24, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University's graduation list available for media use

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of more than 1,500 students who were awarded degrees from Marshall University May 10 are listed on the university's website and may be used by the media.
 
The name, hometown and home county, along with the degree earned and honor (if applicable), are listed for graduates from West Virginia. For those from other states, the name, hometown, state, degree and honor (if applicable) are listed.
 
The graduation list is available at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/graduates-may-2014/.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 23, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall athletic training students win fundraising competition for LivON Foundation to help prevent colon cancer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Athletic training students from Marshall University and the University of Charleston joined forces last month to compete against students from five other states to win a fundraising competition for the LivON Foundation, which helps support prevention of colon cancer.

The competition took place during the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Training Conference held in Virginia Beach, Va.

Zach Garrett, interim director for the department of athletic training, said the competition was called a Penny War and students were given positive points for collecting change and negative points for bills.

"Students competed against other states in the district and the state of West Virginia came out on top raising over $162 in change in just a little over a week," Garrett said. "Many other states didn't even realize West Virginia was at the conference, let alone participating in the competition. It felt good to be recognized amongst the other states for such a worthy cause."
 
Casey Kyriacopoulos, a 21-year old athletic training student in Marshall's College of Health Professions, said at first she wanted to participate in the fundraiser due to her competitive nature, but once she learned more about the LivON Foundation, everything changed.

"LivON focuses on preventing cancer for young people and it makes it a little closer to home for us," Kyriacopoulos said. "Once I read more about LivON, I wanted to do it even more. I am so happy we did this."

Olivia Naples Bostic, founder of the LivON Foundation, said she was diagnosed with Stage IV metastatic colon cancer at age 37. As a physician assistant for 10 years, Bostic said she has developed a relationship with local athletic trainers.

"I have been a physician assistant for 10 years specializing in sports medicine," Bostic said. "With LivON, I knew I wanted to do something, to put my talents and experience out there, but only if I was truly inspired. One of the local athletic trainers heard my story and turned it over to the Mid-Atlantic Athletic Training Conference for help."

Bostic said the money raised by the West Virginia athletic training students during the fundraising competition will help support diagnosis of colon cancer for those under 50 years of age. According to their web site, many individuals under age 50 go undiagnosed because symptoms are unnoticed, embarrassing to discuss or are explained away for a person with no history of colon cancer. As a result, the LivON Foundation is working to increase awareness of symptoms and hopeful prevention of colon cancer.

"You will never know when something traumatizing will happen to you," Bostic said. "It makes you realize that the little issues you worry about are minimal.  People ask me how I handle this with grace and happiness and I answer: someone always has it worse. One must always look on the bright side of everything."

To learn more about the LivON Foundation and ways you can help, visit www.livonfoundation.org online. To learn more about Marshall's athletic training department, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Thursday June 19, 2014
Contact: Cara Bailey, Coordinator of Yeager Society Outreach, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University announces new class of Yeager Scholars

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eight exceptional high-school seniors have been selected by the Honors College at Marshall University to enter its Yeager Scholars Program this fall semester. One is the first international student in the history of this prestigious scholarship program.

Each new Yeager class is named after a strong supporter of academic achievement opportunities at Marshall. The James and Verna Gibson Class of 2018, which is the 28th Yeager class, includes a student from Ontario, Canada, and several high school valedictorians.

Dr. Ronald Bieniek, dean of Marshall's Honors College, said, "In their high school lives, our new Yeager Scholars exhibited a strong desire and ability for broad intellectual and leadership activity. I am so pleased that we are able to offer them such a superb academic package for their developmental benefit - and for their future contributions to a global society. I am proud to be so closely associated with the Society of Yeager Scholars."

The James and Verna Gibson Class of 2018 will have an enhanced curriculum throughout their college careers. Some of the requirements include: maintaining a high cumulative grade point average, completing four challenging interdisciplinary seminars, and involvement in campus and community activities. They will also have the opportunity to study literature, political science or history abroad at Oxford University in England as well as further study abroad in a country of the scholar's choice.

These students went through an extended competition, involving a challenging written application and two interviews -- one by telephone and one by a panel of interviewers on the Huntington campus of Marshall University. The final selection was made by university faculty and staff, university alumni, Society of Yeager Scholars board members and community members.

The Society of Yeager Scholars is named for U.S. Air Force Brigadier General (Ret.) Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager, who is a native of Lincoln County, W.Va. In October 1947, Yeager became the first supersonic pilot by breaking the sound barrier in a Bell X-1 experimental aircraft in California.

Jim and Verna Gibson attended Marshall University in the mid-1960s and are currently retired. Jim has had several small businesses, and Verna has been CEO of The Limited Corporation; on the board of Chico's women's fashion clothing store, and president of Outlook Consulting. Verna is credited for drastically moving the companies forward.

The Gibsons are longtime supporters and contributors to the university. Their giving level is in the "Pathway of Prominence" ($1 million to $5 million) range. They were contributors to the first phase of the H.E.L.P. building construction. They love and support Marshall and the Big Green Foundation.

The Society of Yeager Scholars James and Verna Gibson Class of 2018 are:

Sonia Chandi, of Mississauga, Ontario, the first international Yeager Scholar. Chandi is a graduate of Port Credit Secondary School in Mississauga, and will be taking pre-med classes in hopes of becoming a neurologist. In 2013, Chandi was given the Duke of Edinburgh Bronze Award, an international leadership award. The award is based on community involvement, physical activity, development of one specific skill and the pursuit of an adventurous journey. She also plays ice hockey and was the captain of a championship team.

McGinnis Dalton, of Logan, W.Va., a graduate and valedictorian of Logan High School. He plans to study theatre and creative writing, in hopes of becoming a voice actor. Dalton was named an Ambassador for Justice during his junior year by U.S. Attorney Booth Goodwin. Students are chosen who have shown outstanding leadership skills and a commitment to social justice. Dalton was also a Governor's Honors Academy Legislature Representative and has received numerous educational awards.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday June 18, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Ambrose Health Policy Forum features president of Milbank Memorial Fund

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Christopher Koller, president of the Milbank Memorial fund, will be the guest speaker at the third annual Paul W. Ambrose Health Policy Forum, which will take place at 6 p.m. today at the Marshall University Medical Center's Harless Auditorium. The event is free to the public.
 
The forum is sponsored by the Department of Family and Community Health, the Robert C. Byrd Center for Rural Health and the Paul W. Ambrose Fellows. The Milbank Memorial Fund is an endowed operating foundation that works to improve the health of populations by connecting leaders and decision makers with the best available evidence and experience. Founded in 1905, the fund engages in nonpartisan analysis, collaboration, and communication on significant issues in health policy.
 
Koller plans to talk about "The Affordable Care Act and the Future of Primary Care."
 
"Our hope is that exceptional resident physicians will benefit from engaging state and federal representatives and other health care experts in thoughtful discussions of policy formation and develop innovative skills to serve their community as  more effective providers, healthcare advocates and community leaders," said Jennifer T. Plymale,  co-chair of the Paul W. Ambrose Health Policy Fellows.

Dr. Stephen Petrany, also a co-chair of the Ambrose Fellows, said, "Bringing someone with the national reputation and credentials in the health policy field like Christopher Koller to speak to Marshall University and the Huntington community is what the Paul Ambrose Health Policy Forum is all about. We are very excited to have such an experienced and erudite individual share his insights regarding the Affordable Care Act and its impact particularly on primary care medicine.  This is an issue that has very real relevance for our medical school, our local community, and the state of West Virginia."

A reception with light refreshments will follow the forum.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 17, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

MIIR lecture series to feature drug discovery pioneer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Commercializing scientific research will be the focus of an upcoming program featuring Dr. Shaomeng Wang, who is widely recognized for his pioneering work in the field of drug discovery and his ongoing efforts to bring the fruits of that work to the market.

The talk titled "Translating Your Research Discoveries into Practice:  It Takes a Village!" will begin at 11 a.m. Wednesday, June 25, in Room 102 of the Robert C. Byrd Biotechnology Science Center on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The event is part of a series of public lectures hosted by the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research.

Wang is the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor of Medicine and professor of internal medicine and pharmacology in the University of Michigan Medical School, and professor of medicinal chemistry in the College of Pharmacy. He also serves as co-director of the Molecular Therapeutics Program at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and is the director of the Cancer Drug Discovery Program. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the most-cited journal in the field.

As part of his research, Wang's laboratory has successfully developed several classes of anticancer drugs designed to specifically kill tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed.

His work has resulted in 33 U.S. patents and four license agreements.

He co-founded Ascenta Therapeutics with former Michigan faculty members Drs. Marc Lippman and Dajun Yang in 2003, and established Ascentage Pharma Group in 2009. More recently, he created OncoFusion Therapeutics with fellow faculty member Dr. Arul Chinnaiyan to develop personalized cancer therapies.

To date, he has advanced four novel cancer drugs into Phase I/II clinical development and several more drugs into late-stage preclinical development.

Wang received a B.S. in chemistry from Peking University in 1986 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Case Western Reserve University in 1992. After completing postdoctoral training in drug design at the National Cancer Institute in 1996, he served as assistant and associate professor at Georgetown University until 2001. He then joined the faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School as a tenured associate professor in 2001 and was promoted to professor in 2006.

In March, he was honored with the University of Michigan's Distinguished University Innovator Award, which honors faculty who have made important and lasting contributions to society by developing novel ideas and insights through their research, and then translating them to practice.

For more information about the program, contact Hollie Bailey at bailey134@marshall.edu or 304-696-3549.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 17, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

CareerParents program enables parents to help son or daughter take ownership of career

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Career Services has partnered with the Office of Parent Programs in Student Affairs to create an online parent portal called CareerParents.

The program will give parents helpful career information so that they can help their son or daughter take ownership of his or her career. Among the program's features are videos, resources and webinars:

  • Videos: Six videos share techniques, mistakes your grad will make, 18 soft skills they need and more.
  • Resources: Books, reports, articles and information will help you understand what your student needs to do.
  • Webinars: Once-a-month Webinars featuring the latest career tips by authors, career coaches and hiring managers will be offered.
  • Community: Join other parents to ask questions and share issues.

For more information, go to http://www.marshallcareerparents.info.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 16, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University, West Virginia State University sign educational agreement

Partnership provides collaboration with MU School of Pharmacy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - West Virginia State University (WVSU) students now have a more direct route to a doctorate in pharmacy from Marshall University thanks to an agreement signed today by the schools' top academic officers.

From Marshall, Dr. Gayle L. Ormiston, senior vice president and provost, and Dr. Kevin W. Yingling, dean of the School of Pharmacy, signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that defines plans of study that, once completed by WVSU students,  fulfill the prerequisite requirements for the Marshall University School of Pharmacy. Dr. R. Charles Byers, provost and vice president for academic affairs at WVSU, along with Dr. Katherine L. Harper, dean of the WVSU's College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, also signed the MOU.

The agreement allows students who are in good standing and meet the admissions requirements to enroll at Marshall's School of Pharmacy and receive full credit for up to 72 hours of college-level coursework.    Additionally, once students satisfactorily complete two years of pharmacy coursework at Marshall, they will be eligible to receive their bachelor's degree in chemistry or biology from West Virginia State.

The signing ceremony took place at Marshall's School of Pharmacy located on the campus of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Huntington. Following the signing, Yingling led the guests from West Virginia State on a tour of the School of Pharmacy.

"We are very pleased to offer this option to students at West Virginia State," Ormiston said. "This collaboration helps streamline the process for students to pursue a Pharm D. degree, which ultimately helps us meet our goal of educating pharmacists for West Virginia and the Appalachian region."

"We are excited for the new opportunity that this agreement creates for our students," said Byers. "The close proximity of our two universities, and the seamless transition into the Pharmacy School will create even more educational and career options for our graduates."

The agreement stipulates that Marshall will guarantee admission during each academic year to two WVSU students provided the students meet all admission requirements as articulated in the MOU.

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Photos: (Above) From left, Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, Dr. R. Charles Byers, provost and vice president for academic affairs at West Virginia State University, Dr. Katherine Harper, dean of WVSU's College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president and provost at Marshall, participate in a signing of a memorandum of understanding. The signing took place earlier today at the School of Pharmacy. (Below) Dr. Kevin Yingling, dean of the Marshall University School of Pharmacy, leads Dr. Katherine Harper, left, dean of West Virginia State University's College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Dr. R. Charles Byers, provost and vice president for academic affairs at WVSU, on a tour of the School of Pharmacy at MU. Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 16, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Men's Health Fair to offer free screenings for Marshall employees and students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - In honor of Men's Health Month, the Marshall University College of Health Professions and the Public Employees Insurance Agency (PEIA) will sponsor a Men's Health Fair 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday, June 18, on the Memorial Student Center plaza on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Sharon Covert, director of the PEIA Pathways to Wellness program, said free screenings will be provided for all Marshall employees and students and members of the Huntington community, with special emphasis on men's health.

"We see a lot of advertisements for women's health issues like 'wearing red' or 'going pink,' but we need to generate more awareness about the issues concerning men's health," Covert said. "I think it's important for men of all ages to develop a relationship with a primary care physician and understand - just like women - that there are signs and symptoms for which they should be on the lookout."

Covert said fitness demonstrations will also be provided by PEIA employees including yoga and aerobic exercises. The Marshall University Recreation Center will hold fitness challenges on their portable exercise equipment with prizes given to participants. More than 15 health organizations and groups have committed to participating in the Men's Health Fair including St. Mary's School of Medical Imaging, Marshall Cardiology and Family Medicine, The Diabetes Center, the Marshall Department of Dietetics and many more.

Dr. Michael W. Prewitt, dean of the college, said this is a great opportunity for the Marshall community to come together and promote healthy living for both men and women.

"We will provide free blood pressure, blood sugar and lung screenings, flexibility tests and many other services," Prewitt said. "This is a chance for Marshall faculty, staff and students to learn more about preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease for both men and women."

For more information on Men's Health Month, visit www.menshealthmonth.org. For more information on PEIA, visit www.peia.wv.gov. For further information on the programs and services offered within the College of Health Professions, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday June 13, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Collaborative outreach program beginning next week at Marshall University showcases STEM fields

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A summer program called Health Care Pipeline Initiative, which is aimed at exposing high school students from across the region to an array of careers available in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) sectors, is set to begin Monday at Marshall University.

The camp is sponsored by the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University School of Pharmacy and Bluegrass Community and Technical College in Lexington, Ky. Partners include the Marshall University Office of Intercultural Affairs, Southern West Virginia Area Health Education Center, West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (diversity grant), Walgreens (diversity grant), and the National Partnership For Action to End Health Disparities.

Dr. Shelvy Campbell, assistant dean for diversity at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and Marshall University School of Pharmacy, says the inaugural program showcases careers ranging from medicine and pharmacy to health informatics and bioengineering.

"We are very excited to introduce these students to both Marshall University and the opportunities that await them in the STEM fields, "Campbell said. "It's vitally important for students who are interested in math and sciences to know what is available to them career-wise, particularly since, by most estimates, significant future job growth is expected in health care-oriented fields."

Campbell said the partnership with Bluegrass Community and Technical College is a foundation for future collaborations with Marshall's School of Pharmacy.

Lecture sessions during the week include topics such as rural health, aging and health, computer science, engineering, safety technology, health informatics and health disparities, and also will feature hands-on experiences including computer mapping, pharmacy compounding, suturing, heart sounds and ear exams. 


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Friday June 13, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Widener recognized for 35 years of CCRN certification

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Jeanne Widener of the Marshall University College of Health Professions recently received national recognition for reaching a significant milestone in the nursing profession. Since 1979, she has maintained CCRN certification offered through the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Certification Corporation. Widener is one of 82 CCRNs being honored this year by the corporation and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses for 35 years of continuous certification.

CCRN certification is one of the most advanced professional credentials that can be achieved by a nurse in the field of acute and critical care. As a result, the CCRN credential is highly regarded as recognition of advanced knowledge and clinical expertise in the care of acutely and critically ill patients and their families. There are currently more than 68,000 CCRN-certified nurses practicing worldwide who specialize in the care of adult, pediatric and/or neonatal patient populations, according to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

Widener said although it was a challenge to maintain her CCRN certification, it was necessary to remain competent in her field.

"This has defined who I am as a nurse," Widener said. "My CCRN certification gives other clinical nurses a sense of trust in my capabilities in the critical care area. Although I am an educator, I plan to stay involved in critical care nursing because I enjoy being with patients."

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the college, said Widener has served as an associate professor in the college's School of Nursing since 2010. Prewitt said she has always been motivated to achieve clinical excellence in a constantly changing critical care environment.

"We encourage and support our nursing faculty members to demonstrate their level of commitment to patients by maintaining certifications such as these," Prewitt said. "Dr. Widener has gone above and beyond and continues to impress those in our college with her dedication to the nursing profession."

For more information about AACN or AACN Certification Corporation, visit www.aacn.org or call (800) 899-2226. For more information about Widener and the college's School of Nursing, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Friday June 13, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, (304) 696-3296

Full circle: Former Anderson-Newcomb/Stone and Thomas employees tour world-class Visual Arts Center

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Eleven Anderson-Newcomb Co./Stone and Thomas employees were given a tour of Marshall University's new Visual Arts Center June 3.

Strolling the original oak floors, the group reminisced about their more than 230 years of combined service to the department stores.

"I have so many photographs from my time here," Lottie Woody, who spent 44 years with the companies, said. "I even have photographs of my daughters helping wrap presents and tying bows during Christmastime."

Yvonne Newman, who worked in accounting, remembered lingering on the phone with a young Virgil Newman from delivery. They met and married while they both worked there. Virgil started in 1963 and stayed until the doors to Stone and Thomas closed in 1996.

"Even after I was drafted to Vietnam, I would still work when I came home on leave," Virgil Newman said. "I never missed a day of work."

College of Arts and Media Senior Director of Development Melanie Griffis said the group's affinity to the six-story building on Third Avenue goes beyond their incredible years of service. 

"Our community had such strong ties to those stores," Griffis said. "We hear so often someone say they grew up in Anderson-Newcomb or Stone and Thomas."

Before Marshall University purchased the 66,000-square-foot building, it was just a few years away from demolition. With $9 million in bonds and $4 million in private donations, Marshall University reinforced the infrastructure with 65,000 pounds of new steel and updated windows to match the 112-year-old, original ones.

"With the upgrades, this structure will stand for at least another 100 years," Griffis said.

The building is on track to open to students this summer, while grand opening events for the public, including a ribbon-cutting ceremony, are to take place Sept. 18-20.

For more information about the Visual Arts Center, visit http://www.marshall.edu/cam.

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Photo: From left,  Fern Fitzpatrick, Lottie Woody, Elsie Singleton, Lula Cremeans; Donna Rawley; Opal Blake; Yvonne and Virgil Newman; and Jerry and Shirley Blake, the former Anderson-Newcomb employees who toured the building, stand with an early 1900s printing press originally owned by The Anderson-Newcomb Co. When A-N was bought out by Stone and Thomas, the press was donated to Marshall University's printing department, where it has been used for the past few decades. The press has now found its way back "home" to the Marshall University Visual Arts Center (formerly the Anderson-Newcomb/Stone & Thomas building), where it will continue to be used by students of printmaking.


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Wednesday June 11, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, (304) 696-7153

Marshall alum receives national recognition for award-winning true crime book

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  After a dozen years of research and writing, James G. Hollock published his first book titled Born To Lose: Stanley B. Hoss and the Crime Spree That Gripped a Nation, which tells the violent story of a Pennsylvania cop killer who later confessed to killing a young Maryland woman and her child. After his conviction, Hoss continued his crime spree in prison through his brutal murder of an African American corrections officer.

Hollock, a 1970 graduate of Marshall University's Department of Communication Disorders, said he had a 30-year career with the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. He held various positions along the way at Western Penitentiary, a maximum security prison in Pittsburgh, Pa. It was here Hollock became intrigued with the tale of Stanley B. Hoss.

"This story is arguably the most notorious and remembered criminal episode in western Pennsylvania and, perhaps, western Maryland," Hollock said. "I researched five years before I wrote a word. I interviewed scores of individuals who lived the roles depicted on the pages. Hoss's victims of assault and rape, police and prison personnel, assorted cutthroats, the prosecution and defense, judges, the wife and mistress - all talked for the first time on record."

Born To Lose was published by Kent State University Press in May 2011. It is the gold medal winner for true crime by the 2012 Independent Publisher Book Awards and also a finalist for the ForeWord Book of the Year Awards. Hollock said in 2013, the book was put on Kindle and later the same year received  an uncommon distinction with its selection by the Carnegie Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled for nationwide distribution as an audio book.

Hollock said although Born To Lose has been procured by nearly 600 universities across the U.S. and Europe and is on the shelves of the law libraries of such prestigious  institutions as Princeton, Yale and Harvard, he is most proud of its placement in Marshall's own Drinko Library.

"Born to Lose is part of Marshall University's Authors' Collection at the Drinko Library," Hollock said. "It is a regional best-seller and has received favorable comparisons with such American crime classics as Mailer's The Executioner's Song, Capote's In Cold Blood or Wambaugh's The Onion Field." 

Involved with academics, student government and athletics during his four years at Marshall, a crowning achievement for Hollock was his inclusion in the 1970 edition of Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. Hollock said he is a proud part of the Marshall community.

"There is no doubt of the influence my 'Marshall Years' have had on me," Hollock said. "My academic confidence started there and has served me well ever since."

To learn more about Hollock and Born to Lose, contact him at j23hollock@comcast.net. For further information on Marshall alumni and their accomplishments, visit www.herdalum.com online. For more information on the programs within the College of Health Professions, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photos: (Above) Jim Hollock smiles after receiving the gold medal for true crime by the 2012 Independent Publisher Book Awards for his book Born To Lose: Stanley B. Hoss and the Crime Spree That Gripped a Nation. (Below) The author, Jim Hollock, donning his Marshall letter sweater earned in 1967, the same year he set Marshall's swim team diving record. Photo Courtesy of Sarah Hollock.


 





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Wednesday June 11, 2014
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Marshall faculty offering science camps for local students this summer

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Three faculty members from Marshall University's College of Science are offering hands-on science exploration experiences for middle and high school students on Marshall's Huntington campus this summer beginning Monday, June 30.

Kids will have the opportunity to participate in fun and engaging hands-on laboratory activities during both the 4-day and 1-day camps, said Marshall Biology Professor Dr. Suzanne Strait, who is offering the camps, along with colleagues Dr. Wendy Trzyna, associate professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Mindy Armstead, assistant professor of integrated science and technology.

Depending on which camp or camps students choose, they will be interacting with and learning about microbes, the environment or skeletons.

Costs for the camps are $65 for a 4-day experience and $20 for a half-day camp. Other camp expenses are covered by a grant from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission.

Camps for students who will be freshmen through seniors during the 2014-2015 school year and want to explore careers in science are as follows:

Monday-Thursday, July 7-10, 1-4:30 p.m. - Microbes In, On and Around You
Dr. Wendy Trzyna, Department of Biological Sciences

Find out why microbes are the hottest single cells around by getting into the lab and culturing them! Students will be fascinated by diversity of microbes that are living everywhere around them - from their kitchen sinks and shower floors, to their cell phone covers, the foods they eat and their own bodies. We will culture and identify common microbes and learn a variety of microbiological laboratory techniques including the use of microscopes, preparation of microbial specimens for viewing, and tests for identification of microbes while we do fun and exciting hands-on lab activities. (16 students)

Monday-Thursday, July 14-17, 1-4:30 p.m. - Environmental Science
Dr. Mindy Armstead, Department of Integrated Sciences and Technology

This session will focus on maintaining aquatic resources for human and ecological uses. We will explore the beneficial uses of streams, lakes, and rivers and determine whether the water in being protected for those uses. These sessions will include discussions, as well as hands-on investigation of aquatic systems and organisms. Students will get to perform water quality testing, fish identifications and other hands-on aspects of aquatic investigations. (16 students)

Monday-Thursday, July 21-24, 1-4:30 p.m. - Bones: The Forensic Evidence
Dr. Suzanne Strait, Department of Biological Sciences

This session will introduce students to the human skeleton. They will work with skeletons to learn the bones of the human skeleton and how we reconstruct their stature, age, ethnicity, gender, and more from just bones. They will even be able to prepare a skeleton of their own if interested! (16 students)

Camps for students who will be in 6th, 7th  or 8th grades during the 2014-2015 school year are as follows:

Monday-Thursday, June 30-July 3, 1-4:30 p.m. -  Microbiology
Dr. Wendy Trzyna, Department of Biological Sciences

Find out what it is like to work in a Microbiology lab as we introduce you to the fascinating "unseen" microbial world around you! Students will have the opportunity to learn about a variety of different microbes through fun, hands-on activities. We will be collecting, growing and observing microbes from diverse environments. Students will learn how to culture microbes, prepare samples for viewing, and perform selected tests for identifying microbes. (16 students)

Monday, July 21, 9 a.m.-Noon - Bones: Forensics Investigations

Learn about human bones and how forensic scientists are able to physically reconstruct a person using just their bones. (20 students)

Tuesday, July 22, 9 a.m.-Noon - Heart Anatomy: Pumping Blood

Students will learn how the heart works using interactive techniques, models, and having the opportunity to dissect a real deer or cow heart! (20 students)

Wednesday July 23, 9 a.m.-Noon - Water Quality

Students will learn which animals use our local water, how to conserve water resources, and how to test for water quality. (20 students)

Thursday, July 24, 9 a.m.-Noon - Snakes, Turtles and More

Learn all about the amphibians and reptiles around us in West Virginia. Learn about their habitat and anatomy and how to identify local species. Opportunities include observing non-venomous species. (16 students)


"This is the first summer these educational activities are available for local kids right here in their own backyards," Trzyna said.

For additional information about the camps and for an application, please e-mail Strait at straitho@marshall.edu, or Trzyna at Trzyna@marshall.edu.



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Tuesday June 10, 2014
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Biomedical sciences researcher to present results of clinical trials on personalized chemotherapy

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, a researcher at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, is traveling to Paphos, Cyprus, next month to present his work to personalize chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

Claudio was invited to give the talk at the 5th International Conference on Recent Advances in Health and Medical Sciences, which will be held July 6-12.

He will be discussing the results of clinical trials conducted at the Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center. The studies tested ChemoID, a cell culture method he developed with colleague Dr. Jagan Valluri to measure the sensitivity of patients' tumors to chemotherapy treatment for lung, brain/spine and breast cancer.

He says more evaluation of the technology is needed, but preliminary tests on a small number of patients found ChemoID 100 percent accurate in predicting which drug is more effective in treating patients affected by brain cancer if the tumor-initiating cancer stem cells were evaluated.

"Oncologists every day face many challenges in determining the best course of therapy for an individual cancer patient," says Claudio. "The basic problem is that patients with similar diagnoses don't always respond to the same chemotherapy. This technology we have developed could help physicians select the appropriate chemotherapy for an individual patient giving them an edge in the fight against cancer."

He says the good news for cancer patients is that ChemoID may make possible personalized treatment by predicting the most effective drug combination to successfully target that specific patient's cancer increasing the chance the drugs will work and perhaps reducing side effects by helping the patient avoid unnecessary drugs.

In addition to presenting his own research at the conference, Claudio will be moderating a session, "Advances in Oncology and Anticancer Research. Cancer Pathology."

Summaries of the research presented at the meeting will be published in the journal Frontiers in Bioscience.
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Tuesday June 10, 2014
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First session of orientation set for June 17 at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first of three New Student Orientation sessions at Marshall University will take place June 17-20 on the Huntington campus. Orientation also is planned July 8-11 and Aug. 7-8.
 
Registration is closed for all four June dates, when about 200 students are expected to attend each session, but spots remain for the July and August orientation dates.
 
Students who have been admitted for fall 2014 and have paid their $100 enrollment deposit are eligible to register for a New Student Orientation session. The sessions are designed to get students started on the path to success as Marshall students.
 
"We always look forward to getting to spend time with our new students and their families at orientation," said Beth Wolfe, MU's director of recruitment. "It's encouraging to see their excitement, and it's a great experience for them in preparing for their start as Marshall students."
 
Wolfe said orientation is important to the new students and their parents. A program specifically designed for parents is available, she said.
 
"The parents will receive valuable information on how to support their sons or daughters and help them to be successful," Wolfe said.
 
Most important, Wolfe said, is the time students spend with their advisers to go over their schedules - including their entire four-year plan.
 
Wolfe said each orientation session is a full-day program that includes many activities, such as:
-  Registration and advising for fall course schedules
-  Sessions for both commuting students and those living on campus
-  Student I.D. photo sessions
-  Campus technology resource workshops
-  Overviews of academic requirements, tuition payment methods, and campus safety
-  Multiple optional activities including campus tours and a financial aid workshop
 
Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp will speak to the students, as will Student Government Association President Duncan Waugaman.
 
Call the orientation office at 304-696-2354 for more information.
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Tuesday June 10, 2014
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MU engineering grad makes pledge toward purchase of equipment for Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering complex

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Leonard C. "Lance" Atkins, founder of Atkins Engineers in Palmetto Bay, Fla., and a 1970 graduate of Marshall University, has made a three-year pledge of a gift toward the purchase of equipment for the Arthur Weisberg Family Applied Engineering Complex, currently under construction on MU's Huntington campus.
 
Atkins, the principal consulting engineer of the company, has worked in the engineering field since 1967 and received his bachelor of civil engineering degree from Marshall in 1970.
 
"We are very thankful for the generous gift from Mr. Atkins," said Dr. Wael Zatar, dean of MU's College of Information Technology and Engineering. "It will be used to acquire specialized state-of-the-art equipment and innovative technological capabilities required to provide futuristic opportunities for Marshall University's engineering students to develop into the leaders of tomorrow."
 
Atkins Engineers was founded by Atkins to provide the highest quality engineering services to local, national and international clients.

"The education I received from Marshall has endured throughout my career and has been there for me every day," Atkins said. "Working my way through college at a local engineering company was a great experience and then being fortunate enough to graduate from MU was the best foundation an engineer can get. I am confident that with the new Weisberg Complex the tradition of exceptional education will continue at Marshall. I have always been proud of being a graduate from Marshall. As a young engineer during college I was given the opportunity to help design the student center and Smith Hall and also had the distinct pleasure of designing a State Electric building for Mr. Weisberg. My hat is off to the Arthur Weisberg family for their contribution to Marshall University. Thank you Marshall and the Weisberg family."
 
Zatar said Atkins' gift "will play a central role in preparing talented minds to discover, innovate and create the future. The result will be well-educated STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) graduates who are confident and prepared to enter the workforce and empowered to lead innovation."
 
"The complex will serve to transform Marshall University, the broader Huntington community and countless lives," Zatar said. "The economic impact that this facility and the programs it will support in the surrounding geographic region will be extensive."


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Monday June 9, 2014
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Sustainability offers free pallet gardening workshop this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. If you've ever thought your yard is too small to garden, you just never thought about growing a vertical garden.
 
Marshall's Sustainability Department and Student Garden staff are hosting a free workshop on vertical pallet gardening on Thursday, June 12, from 10 to 11 a.m. at the southeast corner of the greenhouse behind the Science Building.
 
Used pallets can be used to grow both food and flowers in a tight space.
 
"Please come and watch us create our first pallet garden at Marshall and gain a practical understanding of how it's done," said Margie Phillips, manager of the Sustainability Department.  "If you need a pallet to get your garden started, let us know when you RSVP and we can provide you one to take home for your garden."
 
The demonstration is open to students, faculty and staff as well as anyone from the community. RSVPs are required at bemarshallgreen@marshall.edu. The first 10 people to register will be given a free vegetable or herb seedling.

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Friday June 6, 2014
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Nearly 200 of West Virginia's most promising high school sophomores visit Marshall for leadership seminar

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nearly 200 of West Virginia's most promising high school sophomores are staying on Marshall's campus this week, participating in unique leadership training, service-learning and motivation-building experiences.
 
The Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership Seminar (HOBY) for West Virginia high school sophomores began Thursday and runs through Sunday on Marshall's main campus and in downtown Huntington.

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp helped kick off the seminar Thursday when he welcomed students during the opening ceremonies. Kopp shared with the HOBY attendees, who are selected by their schools to participate, how Marshall students and alumni exhibit the tenets of the HOBY mission: leadership, service and innovation.

Kopp challenged the students to exceed the expectations of those who made it possible for them to attend the seminar, as well as to recognize the importance of a college education for their future and that of the State of West Virginia.

HOBY is named for O'Brian, the motion picture and television star whose claim to fame on TV was when he played legendary lawman Wyatt Earp.

The HOBY organization was established to develop young leaders, and has more than 425,000 alumni nationwide. HOBY's vision is to motivate and empower individuals to make a positive difference within the global society through understanding and action based on effective and compassionate leadership.

The seminars began in 1978 with sophomores from 45 high schools throughout the state in attendance. From these beginnings, the seminar has grown each year to include annually more than 130 ambassadors. From its roots at Jackson's Mill, the West Virginia HOBY Seminar has called Alderson Broadus College, University of Charleston, West Virginia State University, Ramada Charleston, and West Virginia University home.

Activities are planned throughout the event, with several guest speakers on the agenda. Jim Justice, owner of The Greenbrier, will speak at 8:30 a.m. Saturday in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center.

The closing ceremonies are at 2 p.m. Sunday in the Don Morris Room. For more information on the HOBY seminar, call Beth Wolfe, MU's director of recruitment, at 304-696-6007.

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Photos: (Above) Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp addresses nearly 200 sophomores from throughout West Virginia during the opening ceremonies of the Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership Seminar Thursday at MU. (Below) Students attending the Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership Seminar Thursday at Marshall University warm up and get acquainted during the opening ceremonies with an "energizer" exercise.

Photos by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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Friday June 6, 2014
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Researcher receives $432,000 grant to study progression of cancer, involve students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Vincent E. Sollars, an associate professor of biochemistry and microbiology at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has received a $432,000 grant from the National Cancer Institute to research a cutting edge concept to fight cancer.
 
The Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) will fund a three-year project in "epigenetics," a relatively new concept in cancer therapies that has shown great promise.
 
"The basic question we are trying to answer is 'What are the processes that enable a normal cell to start misbehaving and become cancer cells?'" says Sollars.
 
As he explains, the process that cells undergo to become cancer cells ultimately produces a cell that stops listening and cooperating with neighboring cells. That communication, however, is necessary for the complex mixture of cells our bodies contain.
 
He says, "This grant will investigate a process known as 'canalization.' Much like a canal for water directs the flow of water, canalization directs a cell as it matures into the specific type of cell needed by the body. Disrupting the canalization process can cause a cell to change and lose its direction, potentially pushing it down paths that lead to cancer."
 
Sollars said his team will be testing the role of canalization in the process of maturing cells and cancer development. They will be targeting leukemia specifically with this grant but the results of their study can apply to all types of cancers.
 
"We think our work can have a great impact on science's understanding of  how cancer progresses and will even help develop new treatments for most cancers," he added.
 
This particular award is specifically designed to give students practical opportunities to participate in cutting-edge academic research. Over the course of the project, Sollars anticipates involving eight students from Marshall's undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as students from the medical school. The grant also will fund a full-time technician.
 
The National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, is the federal government's principal agency for cancer research and training.



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Thursday June 5, 2014
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Student researchers from 11 institutions participating in summer research opportunities at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixteen undergraduate students from 11 institutions are spending the summer conducting biomedical research in Marshall University's laboratories. The students are participating in nine-week programs offered through the West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE) and the university's Summer Research Internship for Minority Students (SRIMS) initiative.

Dr. Elsa I. Mangiarua is a professor in the Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Toxicology at the university's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and directs the WV-INBRE summer program. She said both programs allow participants to gain valuable, hands-on experience doing graduate-level research in the labs of some of Marshall's top scientists.

"We are providing in-depth, mentored research opportunities for very talented undergraduates," she said. "The programs also promote awareness of Marshall's graduate degree programs and available careers in biomedical research."

Kelly Carothers, who coordinates the SRIMS program, agreed, adding, "This is a chance for these students to do meaningful laboratory research, network with others in their field and enhance their academic competitiveness for graduate school."

While at Marshall, the interns are working in the university's state-of-the-art facilities on research projects related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes, neuroscience, toxicology, immunological diseases and bioinformatics.

The students will present their research results at a symposium at the end of the summer.
In addition to the formal research training they each receive from their Marshall faculty mentors, the interns are taking part in workshops and seminars about a variety of topics related to research and graduate education. Students in the two programs attend the same seminars and interact socially through a bowling outing, hiking and other special events outside of the laboratory environment.

Students participating in the WV-INBRE summer program include:

  • Rebecca Goydel, Fairmont State University (Dr. Eric Blough, mentor)
  • Alnairouz Katrib, West Virginia State University (Dr. Beverly Delidow, mentor)
  • Ankita Khunt, University of Charleston (Dr. Richard Egleton, mentor)
  • Jonathan Kinder, Bluefield State College (Dr. Piyali Dasgupta, mentor)
  • Kyle Lehosit, Bethany College (Dr. Hongwei Yu, mentor)
  • Renuka Mahatara, University of Charleston (Dr. Monica Valentovic, mentor)
  • Kenny Nguyen, University of Charleston (Dr. Pier Paolo Claudio, mentor)
  • Courtney Pierron, University of Charleston (Dr. Sandrine Pierre, mentor)
  • KM Tanim, West Virginia State University (Dr. Travis Salisbury, mentor)
  • Jordan Tate, West Virginia Wesleyan College (Dr. Gary Rankin, mentor)
  • Judith Urbanic, Glenville State College (Dr. Larry Grover, mentor)
  • Linh Vu, University of Charleston (Dr. Monica Valentovic, mentor)

The WV-INBRE program also sponsors summer fellowships for instructors. This year's fellowship recipient is Dr. Sobha Gorugantula, an assistant professor of chemistry at Alderson Broaddus University, who is working with Dr. Travis Salisbury.

WV-INBRE is funded through a $16 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. Marshall in partnership with researchers at West Virginia University received the award to help build expertise in biomedical research.

Students in this year's SRIMS program are:

  • Luisa Hernandez, Fayetteville State University (Dr. Zijian Xie, mentor)
  • Steven Paniagua, University of California-Santa Cruz (Dr. Jung Han Kim, mentor)
  • Sheryl Vermudez, Chaminade University (Dr. Gary Rankin, mentor)
  • Saidah Wright, Claflin University (Dr. Jung Han Kim, mentor)

Support for the SRIMS program comes from the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission's Division of Science and Research, and private donations to the Marshall University Foundation SRIMS fund.

Each intern receives a stipend. Depending on the program in which they are participating, they may also receive room and board, and reimbursement for travel to and from Marshall.

For more information about the WV-INBRE program, visit www.wv-inbre.org or contact Mangiarua at mangiaru@marshall.edu or 304-696-6211. For more information about the SRIMS program, visit www.marshall.edu/bms/srims or contact Carothers at carothers@marshall.edu or 304-696-7279.


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Wednesday June 4, 2014
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Bookwalter named dean of Marshall's College of Liberal Arts

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Robert Bookwalter has been named dean of the Marshall University College of Liberal Arts, according to Dr. Gayle Ormiston, senior vice president of academic affairs and provost. Bookwalter has served as interim dean of the college since June 1, 2013. His new appointment begins July 1.

"I am honored to have been selected as dean of the College of Liberal Arts," Bookwalter said. "I look forward to working with the faculty and the students to face the challenges that we are presented with now in higher education. I understand that this is my greatest responsibility - to serve our students and to help strengthen our programs, along with the faculty and administration."

Ormiston said, "Dr. Bookwalter brings a wealth of knowledge and experience that is highly valued by everyone on our campus. His 'students-first' philosophy makes the academic programs he and the faculty within the College of Liberal Arts are building even more outstanding."

Bookwalter praised the faculty in Marshall's College of Liberal Arts.
 
"I have the benefit of working with the best faculty at Marshall in majors that are providing the very foundation of university education and provide the preparation that our students need for success in their personal, professional and civic lives," he said. "I look forward to strengthening the college and creating better efficiency, effectiveness, engagement and expansion in the years to come."
 
Amber Wright, who will be a graduate student at Marshall beginning this fall and currently is an office assistant in the College of Liberal Arts, spoke highly of Bookwalter.
 
"I can't think of a better man for the job," Wright said. "I am fairly new to the area, and Dr. B has gone above and beyond to welcome me to the Marshall community, giving me work within the College of Liberal Arts and encouraging me to pursue graduate studies within the college which I will be beginning in the fall. As interim, he has already demonstrated an obvious competence for the duties of the position, and I'm so glad that he will be carrying on in more official terms. I've observed a kind-hearted, levelheaded nature in his personality and can testify that he genuinely has the success and well-being of the student as a priority. Likewise he cares about the faculty and staff and always takes a personal interest in the matters concerning the operations of the college. I admire that he carries himself with exceptional professionalism and without pretention. I am confident the College of Liberal Arts is in good hands as I begin my education at Marshall."
 
Bookwalter joined the Department of Speech (now Communication Studies) in 1987.  His teaching and research interests are in the areas of peace and conflict studies, interpersonal communication, group dynamics, leadership and language.  While at Marshall he has served as chair of the College of Liberal Arts Academic Planning Committee and Curriculum Committee and served on the college's Promotion and Tenure Committee.
 
He served as director of the Oral Communication component of the General Education program for 15 years.  In 2009, he led the university's General Education Council which oversaw the transition to the new Core Curriculum. He also served as Faculty Athletics Representative to the NCAA from 2002 to 2012.
 
A native of San Jose, Calif., Bookwalter received his B.A. in Speech Communication from Fresno State University in 1979, his M.A. in Interpersonal Communication from the University of Montana in 1982 and his Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Kansas in 1989.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday June 3, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine recognizes national medical honorary inductees

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Ten individuals with the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine were recently inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA), the nation's medical honorary which was founded in 1902. The inductees include medical students, resident physicians, and faculty members, each selected based on academic achievements and significant contributions to medicine.

The student inductees are as follows:

  • George H. Clements, Class of 2015
  • Aaron M. Dom, Class of 2015
  • Jessica A. Layne, Class of 2015
  • Jonathan S. Seibert, Class of 2015
  • Adam J. Van Horn, Class of 2015

In addition to the students selected for the honor, the following medical residents and faculty members were also honored:

  • Kamran Abolmaali, M.D.,  Department of Surgery, 4th-year resident physician
  • M. Samhar Alkhalaf Alali, M.D., Department of Pediatrics, 2nd-year resident physician
  • Daniel J. Poole, M.D.,  Department of Family and Community Health, 2nd-year resident physician
  • Wade G. Douglas, M.D., Department of Surgery, associate professor
  • Kelly E. Melvin, M.D., Department of Psychiatry, assistant professor

Dr. Sydnee A. McElroy, an assistant professor with the department of family and community health, serves as the chapter's faculty advisor.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 2, 2014
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

MU program for kids K-12 extends registration deadline

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The enrollment deadline for Marshall University's summer enrichment program in the Charleston area for students in grades K-12 has been extended to Monday, June 9.

The five-week program, which integrates hands-on, activity-based learning experiences with supervised clinical training for Marshall graduate students, will take place each Monday through Thursday from June 16-July 17 at Stonewall Jackson Middle School. Sessions will run from 8 to 11:30 a.m., with breakfast and lunch provided for those under 18 years of age.

Students from the university's special education, school counseling and school psychology departments will work with participants, offering learning experiences in reading, writing and math. Assessment and counseling services are also available.

"Both group counseling and individual counseling will be available," said school psychology student Marci Hankins. "It's important to note that group counseling can be beneficial for everybody; a student doesn't have to be having problems to benefit. It's an opportunity to work on interpersonal skills, such as working together, taking turns, or social skills. Individual therapy is helpful if a student is having a little more difficulty behaviorally or academically. It's more focused. Students will have access to both."

Christa Rucker, also in the school psychology program, says a unique aspect of the program is its approach to learning and its camp-like atmosphere. "We differ from the regular classroom setting because we do lots of hands-on activities. You're learning while doing all these fun things!" she said. And using the theme, "America the Beautiful," the classes will be integrating activities with geographical areas of the country, she added.

Assessment is a big part of the program, but it's not a requirement, said Kami Wendel, who will be another of the supervised school psychology students working in the program. "We try to do assessment before sessions start so that we have a curriculum-based measure to use with math and reading, for example," she said.

Graduate students participating in the program are closely supervised and receive daily feedback. "We're excited about taking part; it's going to be good for us, our mentors and teachers, and for every student," Hankins said.

The cost for the program is $100 per student, which supports the operating costs. Tuition assistance is available, so no one should let cost deter them from applying, according to Dr. Sandra Stroebel of Marshall's College of Education and Professional Development, who is coordinating the program. For additional information or to register, contact Stroebel by phone at 304-746-2032 or 800-642-9842, ext. 2032, or by e-mail at stroebel@marshall.edu


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday June 2, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Sawhney's global research on child and maternal mortality published in The Lancet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Monika Sawhney of the Marshall University College of Health Professions served as co-author for two articles published last month in The Lancet on research related to child health and maternal health. The Lancet is one of the world's leading general medical and specialty journals in oncology, neurology and infectious diseases.

Sawhney, director of the undergraduate public health program in the college, said her research began last summer after traveling to Greece for the Global Burden of Disease workshop held May 7-17, 2013.

"This has been an international effort through the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) to address maternal and child mortality throughout the world," Sawhney said. "The United Nations established MDGs (Millennium Development Goals) to decrease maternal and child deaths by 2015. If we continue on this path, child deaths will fall from more than 6 million in 2013 to fewer than 4 million in 2030."

Sawhney was one of more than 40 authors who worked on this study with her major emphasis and contribution for countries such as India, Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Sri Lanka and Nepal. The results of each article were featured in the Science Daily Journal on May 2.  

According to the journal, the first installment in IHME's new updates to the Global Burden of Disease study shows that child death rates dropped by 48 percent globally between 1990 and 2013. Maternal deaths also decreased over the same period, though 293,000 women still died in 2013 from pregnancy-related causes. The majority of countries have seen faster declines in maternal and child deaths -- with child deaths reduced by 3.5 percent per year since 2000 and maternal deaths by 2.7 percent per year since 2003.

"Working on an international project such as this demonstrates the importance of an organization like IHME and the impact it has on our world," Sawhney said. "My collaboration with IHME has placed Marshall University on the international front and future work will increase partnerships with people all across the world who are working toward improvements in children's health and wellness."

To read more about IHME's initiatives toward improving the Global Burden of Disease, view The Lancet articles online at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673614604979
and http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673614606966. For more information on Marshall University's department of public health and its work toward improving maternal and child health, contact Sawhney at sawhney@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: Dr. Monika Sawhney talks to students about the Child Obesity Awareness Campaign May 19 at Highlawn Elementary School. Sawhney has conducted research on child and maternal health for more than a year and hopes to implement this research in the Marshall University undergraduate department of public health. Photo by Lori Wolfe/The Herald-Dispatch.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 29, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, (304) 696-7153

ALS/Lou Gehrig's Disease awareness event set for Friday at Ritter Park

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A one-mile walk around Ritter Park is planned for Friday evening in honor of Dr. Kevin Milam, a 2002 Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine graduate who is living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

The awareness event also is a fundraiser for the 1439 Scholarship, which benefits a nontraditional medical school student and was created in Milam's honor through the efforts of Dr. Steve Lochow, president of the Class of 2002 and his friend.

Milam, who had a 20-year career in professional ballet before he attended medical school, has been a lifelong advocate of fitness and healthy living.   He successfully completed the world renowned Hawaiian Ironman competition in 2006 in 14 hours, 39 minutes which set the name for the 1439 Scholarship.
 
Donations and registration will be accepted at 6 p.m. at the park and the walk begins at 7 p.m. Questions about the walk may be directed to walkforkev@yahoo.com .

Gifts may be made to the 1439 Scholarship by contacting Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs, at 304-691-1711.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 28, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Service awards luncheon to honor Marshall University employees

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's 30th annual Service Awards Luncheon will take place from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, June 26, in the Don Morris Room in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.  In addition to the service awards, the Employee of the Year will be named during the luncheon.

The following is the list of university staff members who will receive awards:

For 10 Years of Service:  Jason Adkins, Phillip Alexander, Cathrine Alford, Richard Bledsoe, Arthur Brown, Cynthia Canterberry, Mary Chapman, Cynthia Cole, Richard Combs, Robert Dorado, Laura Drake, Sonia Ford, Stacy Good, Andrew Gooding, Melanie Griffis, Greta Hill, Joshua Hoover, Kevin Hughes, Teah Miller, Betty Morrell, Brian Patton, Sharon Peters, Erika Riley, Joey Salyers, John-Richard Shafer, Sherri Simpson, Jennings Stiltner, Steven Taylor, Eric Wallace, Chad Wilcox and Amy Workman.
 
For 15 Years of Service:  Marlene Alley, Teresa Bolt, Sonja Cantrell, Brenda Crawford, Loan Cummings, Marcus Danner, Wanda Dyke, Debra Elliotte, Shelia Fields, Eric Himes, Danny Holland, Camella Holley, Annalisha Johnson, Angela Jones, Patricia Martin, Kevin Maynard, Nada Prickett, Debra Templeton and Irvin Watts.

For 20 Years of Service:  James Atkinson, Prudence Barker, Muhammad Chaudhry, Vicki Cole, Darlene Cordle, Phillip Haye, Anita Hill, Joseph Justice, Michael McCarthy, Terri Moran, Gregory Pickens, Calvin Rowlings, Elizabeth Sheets, Rebecca Sloan and Beverly Surratt.

For 25 Years of Service:  Raddar Atchley, Paula Beasley, Lorna Browning, Dana Edmonds, Teresa Holschuh, Leslie Lucas, Tammy Moore, Stephanie Smith, Tony Waugh, Sandra White and Phyllis White-Sellards.

For 30 Years of Service: Tammy Aliff, Gregory Beach, Paul Benford, Karen Bledsoe, Mary Bowsher, Sandra Lloyd, William Lucas, David McKenzie, Marty Newman, Margaret Putt, Sherry Salyers, Phillip Sergent and Johnny Walker.

For 35 Years of Service: Rick Haye, Sherri Noble, Arissa Prichard and Allen Taylor.

For 40 Years of Service:  Patricia Gebhart.

Retirees to date: Barbara Becker-Cottrill, Karen Bledsoe, Lorna Browning, Larry Dillon, Thomas Dorsey, James Eans, Patricia Gebhart, Stephanie Gray, Karen Greybill, George Hewitt, Damon Holley, Jo Ann Jordan, Karen Kirtley, Robbie Layne, William Lewis, John McComas,  Linda McLain, Dorothy McGraw, Arnold Miller, James Morris, Virginia Nelson, Sherri Noble, Terrence Olson, Karl Shanholtzer, LuAnn South, Jerry Ann Stowasser, Mark Ward, Deborah Watson, Patricia Webb and Joe Vance.

To be eligible for awards employees must have completed 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 or 40 years of service to Marshall University by May 1, 2014.

If anyone has been left off this list, or has a preference on how his or her name should be listed in the program, please contact Joe Wortham at 304-696-5402.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday May 28, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine plans major scholarship fundraiser

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine (JCESOM) is hosting a major scholarship fundraiser Saturday, June 7, in an effort to raise funds for medical student scholarships.  

The event, "Outstanding in Our Field," is being coordinated by two Marshall "first ladies," Jane Kopp and Mary Shapiro, along with Linda Holmes, JCESOM's director of development and alumni affairs, and is hosted by Dr. Bobby and Eric Harden-Miller.

"We are so thrilled to offer this exciting and fun evening which will benefit our students in the years to come," Holmes said.   "The event is being held at a beautiful, bucolic farm just outside Huntington and features food and wine pairings.  We're calling it country casual and hope many people from our community will join us."

Steven Nakano, a rising 4th-year medical student, will serve as chef.  The school's dean, Dr. Joseph Shapiro, is on board as the sous chef and will be joined by Judge Dan O'Hanlon as sommelier.

"The Jillettes," a musical group from northeastern Ohio that includes Dr. Donnah Wolodkin Whitaker,  JCESOM Class of 1984, will provide the evening's entertainment.

Title sponsors are Cabell Huntington Hospital and St. Mary's Medical Center.  Other sponsors include Valley Health, Marshall Orthopaedics, Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Kopp, Retina Consultants, Edward Tucker Architects, Inc., Thomas Health System and State Electric Supply Co.

Individual tickets are $125 and may be purchased by calling Tami Fletcher at 304-691-1701 or by email at fletcher@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 27, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Hovland named 2014 Outstanding Young Dietitian; Davis named 2014 Outstanding Dietetic Student

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Department of Dietetics, which is housed in the College of Health Professions, had two of its own honored last month at the West Virginia Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (WVAND) state conference.

Jana Hovland, an assistant professor in the department, received the 2014 Outstanding Young Dietitian Award and Tonya Davis, a recent graduate of the program, was chosen for the 2014 Outstanding Dietetic Student Award.

Both individuals were selected based on their commitment to the profession and their passion for creating opportunities to improve the health of those in West Virginia, according to the department's chair, Dr. Kelli Williams.

"Since moving to our state several years ago, Professor Hovland has become actively involved in our professional organization and worked with many local groups to promote a healthy diet and physical activity throughout the state. We are very fortunate to have her as a member of the faculty at Marshall University," Williams said.

"While Tonya was an excellent student, I have been most impressed with her performance outside the classroom.  For several years, she worked as the foodservice director at the Marshall University Early Education STEM Center, where she planned and prepared healthy meals for the pre-school children who attend there," Williams continued. "I have known Tonya for several years and can think of no one better qualified for this honor."

Hovland, a West Virginia delegate to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics House of Delegates, said she feels honored to be recognized as the Outstanding Young Dietitian of the Year.

"Being involved at the state and national level allows me to provide our students with leadership and networking opportunities," Hovland said. "I am excited to see what our students accomplish and ways our department and WVAND will continue to impact the health of West Virginians."

Davis, 27, of Huntington, said receiving the honor of the 2014 Outstanding Dietetic Student came as a surprise considering she was only doing something she loved.

"My goal was never to get an award or be recognized," Davis said. "I became so involved with the department because I genuinely enjoyed working for our university and the community."

In addition to her award at the WVAND state conference, Davis was also chosen as the 2014 Outstanding President during Marshall's Student Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony May 2.

"We are influenced by our professors every day and the faculty within the Department of Dietetics is a strong, well-connected group of men and women who support their students," Davis said. "I couldn't ask for a better group of mentors and receiving these awards motivates me to become a better student and better dietitian in my community."

The WVAND state conference was held May 13-14 at Fairmont State University. For more information on the meeting and those who received awards, visit http://www.wvda.org/ online.

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Photos: (Above) Jana Hovland (far right) received the 2014 Outstanding Young Dietician Award at the annual WVAND state conference. Hovland serves as director of the Marshall University DPD program and as a member of the National Nutrition Month committee for WVAND. With her in the picture are Mallory Mount (left), scholarship and awards chair for WVAND, and Sharon Maynard of the American Dairy Association Midwest. (Below) Tonya Davis (shown center) stands with Mallory Mount, scholarship and awards chair for WVAND, and Dietetics Department Chair Dr. Kelli Williams during the 2014 annual WVAND state conference, where she was recognized as the Outstanding Dietetic Student of the Year.




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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 23, 2014
Contact: Dr. Keith Beard, Psychology Clinic Director, 304-696-2781

Marshall Psychology Clinic to offer transgender group beginning June 10

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Psychology Clinic will be conducting a group focusing on transgender-related issues this summer from June 10 until July 3. The group sessions will be conducted by Kellee Boster, M.A., and Corey Wilks, B.A.

"It is important to provide and assist in giving needed support and resources to individuals who may be experiencing any type of problems related to being transgender," Boster said. "There are limited resources or support networks available in this area for the transgender community. We've received several requests for a transgender group in the Psychology Clinic, and we want to make the group available to anyone who is interested."

Dr. Keith Beard, the psychology clinic director, added, "We've run this group in the past with great success. There is definitely a need and we are very pleased to be able to provide the service. I'm also very pleased that we have clinic staff who are willing to and interested in providing services to a community that is often ignored."

"We hope that the group will help provide guidance and a sense of support to group members," Wilks said. "We will discuss a wide variety of common issues, as well as address the unique concerns of the members. Essentially, the chief goal in conducting this group is to provide an open forum for discussion and assistance in navigating the full range of physical and emotional concerns involved with being a transgender individual."

Organizers said that the group will be a safe and supportive group environment to discuss a variety of issues -- such as coming out, discrimination, transformation, and family/relationship issues -- with others in similar situations, whether they  are just coming to realize they are transgender, are in the process of transitioning, or have fully transitioned.

Group sessions will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Those interested in participating should send an e-mail to wilksc@marshall.edu by June 5.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 22, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Two students to fill role of Marco at Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University officials have selected two students to fill one of the institution's most important positions - the role of Marco, the school's beloved mascot.

Makenzee Ruley, a senior from Redding, Calif., and Tristan Bowen, a freshman from Ashford, W.Va., impressed the judges with their auditions including intense interviews and off-the-hoof dance routines.

"We talked after the auditions and unanimously agreed to offer the position to two students," said Matt Turner, chief of staff at Marshall and one of the judges.

The position of head bison is an important one and Marco has a busy schedule, Turner said.  He roams the sidelines during both football and basketball season, appears at groundbreakings and ribbon cuttings, and participates in homecoming festivities, student events and private functions, as well.

The candidates for the position were questioned by a panel of five judges including Dr. Allen Young, who appeared as Marco from 1986 to 1991 and won a national mascot championship in 1990, as well as representatives from the Marshall University Alumni Association. Candidates for the head bison were asked how to react in various scenarios including frightened children and antagonistic fans.

Ruley said she looks forward to being a role model to the little ones.

"To be the fun face of the university that represents the students, the history, the stories and the memories of Marshall University will be a blast," Ruley said.

Bowen was encouraged by friends to audition for the coveted role. 

"I have wanted to go to school at Marshall since I was a child. To be Marco will truly show my love for this school." Bowen said. "Marco is the face of the school.  He makes every event fun and who doesn't love a big, lovable bison that dances and cheers?"

For their roles as Marco, Ruley and Bowen each will receive a $2,000 scholarship, $1,000 for textbooks, an exclusive parking space, and a personal trainer at the Marshall Recreation Center.

Marco (so named for MARshall COllege) first appeared as a sketch in the 1954 Chief Justice yearbook and became a costumed character for the university in 1965.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 22, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Wendell Memorial Scholarship honors victim of 1977 car accident

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Foundation Inc. has established an endowed fund known as the Richard Gray Wendell Memorial Scholarship. The fund was established by Richard Gray Wendell's brother, Charles H. Wendell. Richard Wendell tragically was killed in a 1977 car accident.

Richard Wendell graduated from Marshall University in 1973 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business and a major in accounting.

The recipient of this renewable award will be a full-time student majoring in accounting in the College of Business who is in good academic standing.

"He was a business major at Marshall just like I was, so I wanted (the scholarship) to be for a business student," Charles Wendell said. "He was killed shortly after graduating from Marshall, so I just wanted to establish a scholarship in his memory."

Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the MU Foundation, said, "We are extremely pleased that Charles Wendell, a new member of the Marshall University Foundation Board of Directors, has agreed to establish a six-figure endowed scholarship in memory of his brother. Scholarships like this live on forever and the income will benefit many university students with their higher education expenses both now and in the future."

Charles Wendell, who lives part of the year in Fayetteville, W.Va., and part of the year in Charleston, S.C., said he worked closely with Lance West, vice president in the Office of Development at Marshall, in establishing the scholarship.

"We are very blessed to have Charlie and his family establish this new scholarship and we look forward to awarding it to a deserving Marshall student," West said.

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Photo: Richard Wendell is being remembered with a scholarship in his name at Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 19, 2014
Contact: Pat Dickson, University Communications, 304-746-1971

Summer Enrichment Program for Grades K-12 now accepting applications

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Registration is now underway to enroll students in grades K to 12 in Marshall University's month-long summer enrichment program at Stonewall Jackson Middle School in Charleston, which will run June 16 through July 17.

The program is designed to provide children under 18 with activity-based learning experiences in writing, reading and math, with the theme "America the Beautiful," according to Dr. Sandra Stroebel from Marshall's school psychology program. She will be coordinating the summer event.  

The program utilizes supervised graduate students in clinical experiences leading to certification or licensure in special education, school counseling and school psychology, Stroebel said. 

Counseling and assessment services are also available, Stroebel said.  The program runs from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, with breakfast and lunch provided for those under 18. Participants will be scheduled for an orientation session from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. on either Wednesday, June 11, or Thursday, June 12.  

The cost for each child is $100.  Some limited tuition assistance is available on a need basis. Since this is a full inclusion program, regular education and special education students are encouraged to apply.

To receive a brochure/application or for more information, contact Stroebel by phone at 304-746-2032 or toll-free at 1-800-642-9842, ext.  62032;  or by e-mail at stroebel@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 19, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Marshall College of Arts and Media opens 16th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz summer camp for younger students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The 16th annual Jazz-MU-Tazz event for students grades 7-12 kicks off Monday, June 9, in Marshall University's Jomie Jazz Center on the Huntington campus. It will end with a finale concert Saturday, June 14, at Pullman Square Plaza.

Marshall Jazz Professor Dr. Ed Bingham said the camp offers the students a better understanding of playing jazz, particularly with improvisation. He also sees Jazz-MU-Tazz as an enrichment program for attendees.

"There's this sort of synergy that happens when you bring students from all over to one place to make music," Bingham said.

This year's special guest, Dr. Jeff Bair, received his master's and doctoral degrees in music from the University of North Texas and has appeared with show orchestras, including those with The Temptations, Rich Little and Frank Sinatra Jr.

The tuition for this year's Jazz-MU-Tazz is $200. Participants can choose to stay at Marshall Commons and/or add an inclusive meal plan at the same complex for an additional cost. Jazz-MU-Tazz staff members and residence hall personnel will supervise school-age students throughout the duration of the camp.

To learn more about Jazz-MU-Tazz or to apply, visit www.marshall.edu/somt/music or contact Bingham by e-mail at bingham@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-3147.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 19, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MUAA, Huntington Bank enter collaborative partnership

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Alumni Association and Huntington Bank have entered into a collaborative partnership, said Matt Hayes, executive director of the alumni association.
 
Hayes said the new partnership will "allow the alumni association and Huntington Bank to collaborate and build our respective organizations, leveraging the mutual relationships we have in the community."
 
Tom Bailey, community president of Huntington Bank, said partnering with the MU Alumni Association is another example of the bank's continual expansion beyond its traditional resources through new alliances, community involvement and business relationships.  "These alliances remain an integral part of our strategic thinking," Bailey said. "I am thrilled having the opportunity to partner with the Marshall University Alumni Association."
 
The new partnership is part of an affinity marketing strategy undertaken by the Office of Alumni Relations as it pursues lifelong, mutually beneficial relationships among all constituent groups and organizations resulting in optimal levels of engagement and philanthropic support for the university, Hayes said.
 
"We're looking to partner with organizations that will benefit from a collaborative business relationship with the Marshall University Alumni Association," Hayes said. "We have much to offer organizations and groups in the community. We are working to bring the very best benefits available to active alumni and the friends of Marshall University to help everyone remain connected and engaged.  Our partnership with Huntington Bank will result in an increased level of affinity among both our constituencies.  We are interested in cultivating collaborative partnership opportunities in the best interest of our alumni and friends in all 50 states and across the globe."
 
Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the MU Foundation, said the Foundation is pleased to have Huntington Bank as a new partner.
 
"Their willingness to help us in supporting alumni events and activities adds significant value to our alumni programming," Area said. "I am sure that the visibility that Huntington Bank will receive will be a catalyst for others in the corporate and business community to follow."

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 16, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall senior receives scholarship from meteorology society

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University senior Shawn Michael Cheeks, who is double-majoring in computer science and applied mathematics and minoring in meteorology, has been selected by the American Meteorological Society to receive the national Mark J. Schroeder Endowed Scholarship in Meteorology.

"I was truly surprised when I was notified that I had received this scholarship," Cheeks said.  "I couldn't do it without my network of family, friends and great professors at Marshall.  In particular, I would like to thank Dr. Paulus Wahjudi of the Computer Science department and Dr. Kevin Law of the Geography department, as I have worked closely with them on various projects during my time here at Marshall, and I believe their recommendations played a key role in my receiving this award."

Cheeks is an honors student from War, W.Va., with a perfect GPA of 4.0, according to Dr. Ronald Bieniek, dean of Marshall's Honors College.

"This recognition reflects Shawn's drive, initiative, and accomplishments," Bieniek said.  "It is a wonderful affirmation of his achievements and promise."

Notification of the selection was made by William Gail, president of the American Meteorological Society.

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Photo: Marshall University senior Shawn Cheeks, who has received a scholarship from the American Meteorological Society, is shown presenting a poster at the society's 2014 conference in Atlanta.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 16, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Child Obesity Awareness Campaign at local elementary schools to kick off May 19

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Childhood obesity is on the rise in West Virginia and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 14% of all adolescents under 18 years of age in the state were considered to be obese in 2012.

If this weren't alarming enough, an article released last month by USA Today shows how over a lifetime, the medical costs associated with childhood obesity total about $19,000 per child when compared to those for a child of normal weight.

Dr. Vikas Khurana, national treasurer for the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI), said the organization wants to bring about awareness of childhood obesity through a program called Adopt a School - Childhood Obesity Awareness Campaign. Khurana said this is the first time the national AAPI has worked directly with communities and schools for health promotion and disease prevention.

"Our main goal for this project is to adopt at least 100 schools across the U.S. within the next year," Khurana said.

Khurana said 43 schools across the nation have committed to participating in the campaign in the states of Alabama, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas and now, West Virginia.

Dr. Monika Sawhney, director of the undergraduate program of public health at Marshall University, said due to West Virginia's high rate of obesity, the Child Obesity Awareness Campaign was developed to fight this national and global epidemic at the ground level.

"The Child Obesity campaign will be a collaborative effort amongst AAPI, the public health students at Marshall University, the School of Medicine and local physicians," Sawhney said. "We want to teach our youth the importance of nutrition and daily activity to help them avoid long-term health issues related to obesity."

Sawhney said three elementary schools in Huntington have committed to the project: Highlawn Elementary School, Guyandotte Elementary School and Altizer Elementary School. She said an estimated 400 children would be reached throughout the campaign.

Robin Harmon, principal at Highlawn Elementary School, said she is proud and excited their school was chosen to be a part of this initiative.

"Projects such as these, which help our students become healthier, are very important," Harmon said. "We've been involved with the Action for Healthy Kids organization, so we've done other activities that focus on improving healthy lifestyles for our children. We think this is a great idea and we are looking forward to it."

The first phase of the Child Obesity Awareness Campaign kicks off at 12:15 p.m. Monday, May 19, at Highlawn Elementary School. The second phase will take place at 12:45 p.m. Friday,  May 23, at Guyandotte Elementary School and the third phase will take place at 1 p.m., Tuesday, May 27, at Altizer Elementary School.

Dr. Ashok Khanna, a pediatrician with 40 years of experience in clinical practice, will serve as guest speaker during all three phases of the campaign. Khanna has held the positions of clinical associate professor of pediatrics with University of Louisville  and of clinical professor of pediatrics with the University of Pikeville-Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine.

For more information on the Child Obesity Awareness Campaign, please visit http://aapiusa.org/education/childhood-obesity-awareness-program.aspx online or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AAPIChildhoodObesity?ref=hl. For more information on child obesity rates in West Virginia, visit www.cdc.gov online. To read the USA Today article, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/04/07/childhood-obesity-costs/7298461/ online. To learn more about the Marshall University College of Health Professions and its involvement with the campaign, contact Sawhney at 304-696-2602, sawhney@marshall.edu or visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.


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Thursday May 15, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University School of Medicine approved for psychiatry residency program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has been awarded initial accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) to offer a psychiatry residency training program beginning in 2015, Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine announced today. The ACGME is the national body responsible for post-M.D. training programs in the United States.

"The addition of a psychiatry residency training program allows us to continue our mission of educating a physician workforce for central Appalachia," Shapiro said. "Physicians tend to practice in the geographic area where they complete their residency training which translates to more doctors for our region."

Dr. Paulette S. Wehner, vice dean for graduate medical education, said the four-year program will train up to four residents a year for a total of 16 resident physicians at capacity.

"The development of a psychiatry residency program is certainly advantageous for West Virginia as well as the Tri-State," Wehner said. "The mental health care system is strained by the number of people who need help and a shortage of psychiatrists to meet that need. The situation has reached a crisis point, and under the direction of the new chairman of the department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine, Dr. Suzanne Holroyd, the creation of this new residency will allow Marshall to address this crisis."

Holroyd, who joined Marshall in January from the University of Virginia School of Medicine, says the new program will have outstanding training in psychiatry due to community collaboration as well as recruitment of new department of psychiatry faculty.

"We have worked collaboratively with the area's facilities and providers to build a residency program that will provide state-of-the-art training in psychiatry, which will ultimately translate into improved access and psychiatric care for the entire region," Holroyd said. "I am grateful to our community partners for their dedication to making this residency program a reality for Marshall."

With the addition of the psychiatry residency, the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine offers a total of eight residency programs in Family and Community Health, Internal Medicine, Medicine/Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Pediatrics and Surgery. Additionally there are five fellowship training programs which include Cardiology, Endocrinology, Interventional Cardiology, Medical Oncology and Pulmonary.

For more information on the new residency program, please visit: http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/files/web/PsychiatryResidencyProgramFacts_05-15-14.pdf


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Wednesday May 14, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Senior Vice President's office renamed as Jacobs-Jones begins position

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University office of the Senior Vice President for Administration is now known as the office of the Senior Vice President for Operations. This change comes as Brandi Jacobs-Jones takes over this senior vice president role.

Jacobs-Jones officially began her duties at the university May 12 while taking on the responsibilities of the office of the Senior Vice President for Administration. She believes that the new name for the office more clearly explains the office responsibilities.

"The renaming of the division from administration to operations better describes the mission and objectives pursued by our remarkable staff," Jacobs-Jones said.

It is the responsibility of the office to oversee the daily operations of many university services and departments. These services and departments include:

-  Physical Plant
-  Housing and Residence Life
-  Campus ID Card Office
-  Printing Services
-  Mail Services
-  Environmental Health and Safety
-  Purchasing
-  Food Services

"This rebranding will not diminish the high level of service that the students, alumni, faculty, staff and community have become accustomed to receiving by the institution," Jacobs-Jones said.

For more information contact the office of the Senior Vice President for Operations at (304) 696-2487 or by e-mail at mckenna5@marshall.edu.


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Wednesday May 14, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Marshall's tuba ensemble joins with three others to premiere new work at international conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -The tuba euphonium ensembles of Marshall University, the Hartt School of Music in Connecticut, Indiana University of Pennsylvania and the Eastman School of Music in New York will premiere a commissioned piece at the International Tuba Euphonium Ensemble Conference on Friday, May 23, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind.

This is the first year Marshall's Tuba Euphonium Ensemble has been invited to the conference sponsored by the International Tuba Euphonium Association, according to Dr. George Palton, an instructor of tuba and euphonium at Marshall.

"It's been a long, long road to get here," said Palton. "The four ensembles joined to raise the funds to commission 'The Dark Chocolate Suite,' an original piece by Barbara York."

In addition to the cost of the commission, funds for the students to attend the conference were raised through student contributions, fundraisers sponsored by the Marshall University chapter of the International Tuba Euphonium Association and a contribution from the College of Arts and Media at Marshall University.

"Our students really worked hard to raise the money," Palton said. "We held fundraisers throughout the year like 'tuba valentines' and this conference was our main goal."

A mix of 10 students and community members make up the Marshall ensemble. In addition to the three other ensembles in the premiere, groups from institutions like the University of Michigan and Louisiana State, Texas Tech and Baylor universities also will perform at the conference.

Palton himself will be performing solo with the premiere of "Perpetuum Mobile," an original work by Dr. Mark Zanter, professor of theory and composition at Marshall.

"Contributing new compositions to our medium is very important," Palton said. "The conference overall is a wonderful experience for our studio, because they'll be able to hear the top tuba euphonium players from around the world."

For more information, e-mail palton@marshall.edu or visit www.georgepalton.com.


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Tuesday May 13, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center 'shutdown week' in effect through May 18

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Monday, May 12, marked the beginning of the sixth annual "shutdown week" for the Marshall Recreation Center. The facility will re-open Monday, May 19.

"Shutdown week" means the entire Recreation Center staff is cleaning and renovating the facility. Staff members will be working as a team to complete the duties assigned to them by the assistant director of facilities and operations, Keith Hernstrom.  Some duties include deep cleaning of equipment and the climbing wall, pool maintenance and repair, locker room cleaning and maintenance, and gym floor recoating.

Each year specific areas get special attention, but no part of the facility goes untouched.  This year the focus will be on pool- and gym-floor maintenance.

The Rec would like to thank all members and guests for their patience and understanding during this short time. They look forward to opening their doors May 19. 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 9, 2014
Contact: Kelli Mayes, Marshall Technology Outreach Center, 304-696-3325

High school students can receive scholarships for Marshall online summer courses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Up to 30 eligible high school students participating in Marshall University's Online College Courses in the High Schools (OCCHS) program will receive a reduced rate for online courses offered during the 2014 summer school terms.

"The OCCHS program is an integral part of Marshall University's ongoing K-12 outreach efforts," said Kelli R. Mayes, director of the Marshall Technology Outreach Center. "It allows students to get an early start on their college careers."

For each of the four summer sessions offered this year, eligible students will pay $25.00 per credit hour instead of the regular online course fee. "This is a significant discount for parents who are trying to save for college," said Mayes. "The rate will be $134.00 per credit hour this fall, so our hope is to provide some financial support when kids are out of school and more available to take online courses this summer."

During summer 2014, nearly 50 courses are being offered in the high school program from an array of academic disciplines such as anthropology, chemistry, economics, geography, history, integrated science, journalism, mathematics, music, public health, psychology, sociology and more.

Marshall's OCCHS program offers qualified, highly motivated and self-disciplined high school students the opportunity to take Marshall University courses online-100% via the Internet. "Some students can get up to their first year completed while they're still in high school," said Tyler Sharp, the outreach assistant for the Marshall Technology Outreach Center.
Online courses at Marshall are developed by university professors and reflect the same scope and depth of material offered in the traditional college classroom.  Students earn the same college credit as they would earn in on-campus classes. All of the learning tools students need - syllabi, course materials, e-mail, assignments, tests, and communications - are included in each course. Accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, Marshall University Online serves thousands of distance education students worldwide.

To qualify for the OCCHS program, students must meet the following conditions:

  • Be currently enrolled in high school and possess a minimum GPA of 3.0;
  • Submit a transcript and letter(s) of recommendation from a school counselor or principal;
  • Have the following minimum scores to take math and English classes:
    • Math ACT 19/SAT 460 & above, depending on course;
    • English ACT 18/SAT 450;
  • Complete an admissions application; submit application and materials to the Marshall Technology Outreach Center (a member of the staff will assist prospective students with the admission process).

High school students or their parents may visit the OCCHS website for details regarding admission to Marshall University and registration for summer courses offered during 2014 at www.marshall.edu/occhs.

Mayes said that questions may be directed to the  Marshall Technology Outreach Center by e-mail at  occhs@marshall.edu or by phone at 304-696-7084.

Marshall's summer school dates are as follows: Intersession, May 12 to June 5; Session 1, May 19 to Aug. 8; Session 2, June 9 to July 11; Session 3, July 15 to Aug. 15.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 9, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Birke Art Gallery named one of the state's top ten galleries to visit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Birke Art Gallery on Marshall University's Huntington campus has been named one of "West Virginia's 10 Contemporary Art Galleries You Should Visit," by global art, food, culture and travel website The Culture Trip.

London-based author Vincent Wood said it was the gallery's public display of student art that piqued his interest and solidified the Birke's spot on the list he compiled.

"It was this combination of promoting the arts and education and helping unestablished artists in their initial steps into the art world whilst still being an open forum that caught my attention," Wood said.

Jessica Long, director of the Birke Art Gallery, said the Birke promotes students' work and professional development.

"The Birke Art Gallery is a great place for other students and members of the community to gather and see what we as a department are capable of doing," Long said. "At the same time, we also like to have at least one exhibit per year showing the work of bigger-name artists, so that the students can immerse themselves in how working artists operate and present their art."

Long said the extra space provided by the Visual Arts Center (opening this summer) will give the School of Art and Design a more visible presence in the community, while allowing a greater variety of work from artists of all disciplines to be shown at the Birke Art Gallery. 

"With the opening of the new Visual Arts Center, it's my hope to curate a number of shows at the Birke Art Gallery that feature everything from drawing to sculpture, as well as work directly from area secondary schools and The Huntington Museum of Art," Long said.

Long said visiting Marshall University's galleries stands to create a tighter relationship among area artists while also promoting a more closely-knit community.

"It's important to me that the people of Huntington are able to see what's new with our program, and that students and faculty are available on-site to answer questions and discuss their work with anyone who is curious," Long said. "A greater interest in the arts is fostered when both the art and artist are in the center of everything."

See the full list by The Culture Trip at www.theculturetrip.com. To learn more about Marshall University's art program, visit www.marshall.edu/CAM.


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Friday May 9, 2014
Contact: Dr. Stan Maynard, June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development, 304-696-2945

Three to be inducted into Harless Hall of Fame

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The College of Education and Professional Development's June Harless Center for Rural Educational Research and Development will conduct its 12th annual Harless Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on Thursday, May 15.

The ceremony will be held in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center.  A showcase of the center's work begins at 5:30 p.m. with dinner following at 6:30 p.m.

Dr. Stan Maynard, executive director of the center, said the ceremony provides an opportunity to show appreciation and give recognition to those people who have been identified as outstanding contributors to West Virginia's educational system with special focus on the rural areas of the state. 

Inductees into the Hall of Fame typically include one teacher, one administrator, and one business/educational partner or organization that has provided exemplary leadership to ensure the success of the education of all students in West Virginia.

This year's inductees are:  Dr. Kathy D'Antoni, Assistant State Superintendent of Schools with the West Virginia Department of Education, Division of Technical and Adult Education Services; Michael J. Farrell, Esq., founding member of Farrell, White & Legg, PLLC, a Huntington law firm, past interim president of Marshall University and current Commissioner of the Higher Education Policy Commission; and the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), which assists 16 member states including West Virginia to improve public education from pre-K through Ph.D.

A showcase of the Harless Center's work and the presentation of the Hallie Harless Distinguished Teacher Award will also be part of the evening's activities. This year's awardee is Amanda Sowards, a second-grade teacher from Midway Elementary School in Lincoln County.  In addition, Cathy Walker, retiring Math Specialist with the June Harless Center and Dr. James Phares, West Virginia Superintendent of Schools, will be recognized for their unwavering support of West Virginia educational initiatives.

The mission of the June Harless Center is to provide leadership in educational initiatives for West Virginia educators and students, and provide educators and families of rural West Virginia with a support system that addresses educational issues, sustains school improvement and provides positive growth in all educational factors.  The June Harless Center currently has ongoing projects with many counties in the state focused on providing support and professional development.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday May 8, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, (304) 696-3296

Eleventh annual Empty Bowls raises $13,355 for Facing Hunger Foodbank

MU ceramics, B'nai Sholom Congregation, Christian Associates
present check to food bank executive director

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - A check for $13,355 from Huntington's 2014 Empty Bowls event was presented to Facing Hunger Foodbank Executive Director Tiffany Tatum yesterday at the Marshall University Ceramics Building at 201 21st St.

Marshall University ceramics students and representatives from B'nai Sholom Congregation and Christian Associates presented the check, which represented the proceeds from the 11th annual event April 11.
The funds raised will allow the food bank to put nearly 100,000 meals on Tri-State tables, according to Tatum.
Marshall ceramics students created about 1,300 bowls for the day, while local area potters, University of Rio Grande faculty members, the Pottery Place and the Huntington Museum of Art donated an additional 300, according to Frederick Bartolovic, Marshall's ceramics faculty member,
Bartolovic said the Huntington event has become so popular since its inception in 2003 that he created a service learning class so his students could create a more formal relationship with the food bank while creating more bowls for the benefit.
In addition to walking away from the four-hour event with a handcrafted, ceramic bowl, for their $15 donation patrons were also offered a modest soup lunch. The serving portion and style is meant to emulate a soup kitchen and really brings home the purpose of the event, which is to help feed the hungry.
All supplies and food for the lunch, as well as goods and services that were sold as part of a silent auction, were donated by area businesses. More than 100 Marshall University students and other community members volunteered to run this year's event. 
Facing Hunger Foodbank serves more than 113,000 food-insecure individuals in 17 counties across West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio.

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Photo: Tiffany Tatum, Facing Hunger Foodbank executive director, far left, is shown accepting the $13,355 check from (left to right) B'nai Sholom Congregation representative Sam Kincaid, ceramics students Amanda West and Alyssa Vickers, Christian Associates representative Diana Van Horn, ceramics student Grace Skiles and ceramics professor Frederick Bartolovic. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday May 6, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Lose the Training Wheels Camp at Huntington High teaches individuals with disabilities to ride two-wheel bicycles

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - For the fourth consecutive year, Marshall University's School of Kinesiology is hosting the Lose the Training Wheels Camp July 14-18 at Huntington High School.  The program, offered in concert with the non-profit charity iCanShine, teaches participants with disabilities how to independently ride a two-wheel bicycle.

iCanShine is a national organization that works with local organizations to host camps in individual communities. Staff members travel the country conducting the camps, and have an average success rate of more than eighty percent. Participants attend one 75-minute session each day for five consecutive days.

Dr. Gregg Twietmeyer, associate professor of kinesiology at Marshall, said the benefit is two-fold: one, participants can learn the joys of riding a bike, which can lead to increased self-esteem and confidence; and two, Marshall students who volunteer as spotters for the riders get to see firsthand the important role of physical activity in human well-being and culture.

"The School of Kinesiology is honored to again host the Lose the Training Wheels Camp. We're hoping to have the maximum 35 riders this year.  The more riders enrolled the more people we can help discover the joys of riding a bike," Twietmeyer said.

To be eligible to register for the camp, participants must be at least 8 years old and have a diagnosed disability. They must have a minimum inseam of 20 inches, weigh less than 220 pounds and be able to walk without assistive devices. Teens and adults may participate as well.

The registration fee is $100 and some scholarships are available. For more information on registration or volunteering, visit www.marshall.edu/lttw. For more information on Marshall's School of Kinesiology, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

For more information on the camp or to inquire about scholarships, call Twietmeyer at 304-696-2938 or Dr. Jarrod Schenewark, associate professor of kinesiology, at 304-696-2937.

Individuals interested in helping to defray the costs of the camp through financial donations may contact Rick Robinson, Director of Development with the Marshall University College of Health Professions, at 304-696-7081.

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Photo: Marshall staff member Megan Archer (left), stands with COHP student Amy Bowen (center), and camp volunteer Brianna (right) as they help 10-year- old Sarah Brown learn to ride a bike during the 2013 Lose the Training Wheels Camp. For more information on this year's camp, visit www.marshall.edu/LTTW.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 5, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine marks annual commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixty-seven medical students will receive their Doctor of Medicine degrees Friday in the Investiture Ceremony of Marshall University's Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine. The event is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at the Keith-Albee Performing Arts Center.

Admission is by invitation.

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp, Ph.D., who is among the speakers, will confer the students' degrees. 

Graduates of the Class of 2014 include 11 students who have maintained perfect 4.0 GPAs as well as six students who will continue their military service at military residency programs across the country. The students have matched into highly competitive residency specialties like dermatology, orthopedics and ophthalmology, as well as prestigious programs in primary care.

This year's investiture speaker is Robert C. Gallo, M.D., co-discoverer of the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS.   Gallo, who since 1996 has served as the Director of Human Virology and Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is also credited with identifying the first human retrovirus and with others showed it was a cause of a particular form of human leukemia.

He has been awarded 31 honorary doctorates from universities around the world and will receive an honorary Doctor of Science degree at the Marshall ceremony.

The investiture, which is being streamed live at www.marshall.edu/it/livestream, will also include recognition of graduates of Marshall's Biomedical Sciences Program and the announcement of the School of Medicine Alumni Association's Honorary Alumnus for 2014.

In addition to this ceremony, there will be a senior awards ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Erma Ora Byrd Clinical Center Auditorium.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday May 5, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall Speech and Hearing Center and WVU to host Stuttering U. camp in July

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - One out of every 100 people stutter, according to Marshall communication disorders professor and stuttering specialist, Craig Coleman.

"Many people think of stuttering as a disruption in the flow of speech, but that's disfluency - not stuttering. It's much more than that," Coleman said.  "It is the physical tension, the eye blinking, the hand tapping, the head nodding, it's the negative feelings and emotions people experience, the negative reactions of those around them in their environment and the overall impact stuttering has on their communication."

Coleman said stuttering may not be eliminated in most older children and teenagers, but it can be effectively managed through treatment. He said this is why the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center has joined with West Virginia University to hold the Stuttering U. summer camp to help children 7-18 years of age become better communicators.

"Through this collaboration, we wanted to offer diverse experiences that will empower these individuals to succeed socially, academically and one day, professionally," Coleman said.

Mary Weidner, a speech-language pathologist and a current doctoral student in the West Virginia University Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, said working with rural populations allowed her to see the need for this partnership.

"In a rural state like West Virginia, many kids who stutter have never met another child who stutters," Weidner said. "This is a unique opportunity for those in rural settings to meet somebody else who has gone through this shared experience and the value of this is immeasurable.  Our overall goal is to empower kids with knowledge about stuttering and allow them to connect with others kids who stutter so they can really start to develop and uncover the skills that are necessary to be confident communicators."

Weidner said speech-language pathologists who attend the camp will be provided a 12-hour continuing education workshop July 15-16. The cost of the 3-day camp is $175 and will provide children and parents community-centered stuttering intervention through education, consultation, treatment and support.

For more information on the Stuttering U. summer camp and how to register, contact Coleman at craig.coleman@marshall.edu or visit http://www.marshall.edu/cohp/index.php/health-services/mu-speech-and-hearing-center/stuttering-clinic/resources2/ online.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday May 2, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall director of undergraduate public health program receives grant for breast cancer research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Dr. Monika Sawhney of the Marshall University College of Health Professions has received a grant through the Higher Education Policy Commission of West Virginia to conduct breast cancer research in rural communities across the state.
           
Sawhney, director of Marshall's undergraduate public health program, said this research will provide an opportunity for student-focused research training in regard to breast cancer screenings. The students chosen to work on this project include undergraduate public health students Minal Patel and Cory Lambert; School of Medicine resident Mohamed Alsharedi; and medical students Andrew Myers and Chad Crigger.

"These students will collaborate and practice the skills they've been learning in the classroom and apply them within a practical setting," Sawhney said. "As director of the public health undergraduate program, I think it is essential for our students to gain exposure to public health research of this nature and enrich their educational experience."

Crigger, a second-year medical student from Charleston, W.Va., said he was interested in becoming involved in this research study due to personal reasons.

"I have a history of breast cancer in my family so there's a strong personal interest for me," Crigger said. "I also wanted to do something outside of a lab and get more involved in improving the health in our rural communities."

Patel, 22, of Huntington, is a senior public health and biology student. She said growing up in West Virginia allows her to view this research study with an open mind.

"Many people associate stigmas with our state especially within our rural areas," Patel said. "Because many of us grew up in West Virginia, we will be able to relate to our rural community members and in turn, hopefully we can produce better data and results because of that level of understanding."

Lambert, 20, of Cross Lanes, W.Va., is a junior public health student in the college. Lambert said he believes Sawhney will continue to expand and advance the initiatives of the public health department at Marshall.

"Research at Marshall is going to a different level - it's expanding and becoming more multi-disciplinary," Lambert said. "This is such a young program and being able to partner with our medical school says a lot about our program director and how she really cares about her students and their opportunities to gain real-world experience here at Marshall."

Sawhney submitted her application for the grant in December 2013 and received notification of   acceptance in February 2014. The one-year granted is titled, "Improving recruitment of health workers in rural areas through student-focused research training: The case of breast cancer screening in rural West Virginia." To learn more about the student-focused research training in regard to breast cancer screenings, contact Sawhney at sawhney@marshall.edu. To learn more about the public health program at Marshall, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photo: (Pictured left to right) Mohamed Alsharedi, Minal Patel, Chad Crigger, Dr. Monika Sawhney and Cory Lambert will work together for the next year to conduct breast cancer research in rural communities of West Virginia. Not pictured: Andrew Myers.



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Friday May 2, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

'Creek Geeks' exploring effects of humans on region's waterways

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The recent water crisis in Kanawha and surrounding counties put a spotlight on the quality of West Virginia's rivers and streams.

A wide variety of research at Marshall University is focused on many of the issues raised by the crisis, including how to detect contaminants in the region's water supply, predicting how dangerous those toxins may be and finding the best ways to remove them from the environment.

Dr. Mindy Armstead, an associate professor of integrated science and technology, is heading up some of that water research. She leads a group of Marshall students who call themselves the "Creek Geeks" and work both in the lab and in the field to study stream ecology and the effects humans have on those ecosystems.

Although their name is funny, the group is doing vital research.

"Our name truly describes how we blend technology with old-fashioned field biology to address some of the most pressing environmental issues in West Virginia and the Appalachian region," says Armstead, who joined the Marshall faculty in 2012 through the state's Eminent Scholars Recruitment and Enhancement initiative to attract nationally recognized researchers.

She says her group's current research projects include studying the effects of selenium on fish communities and evaluating the effects of total dissolved solids on the small organisms like mayflies, dragonflies and crayfish that live among the stones and sediment in streams, rivers and lakes. She adds that biological communities are used to evaluate the quality of freshwater systems and can indicate the presence of chemical contaminants.

Another topic of interest to the "Creek Geeks" is the invasive species Prymnesium parvum. Often referred to as the "golden algae," the organism produces toxins that, while not believed to be dangerous to humans, cause extensive fish kills worldwide. Armstead and her students are evaluating new methods of controlling the algae and studying how environmental conditions affect production of the toxins.

Research assistant Mandee Wilson manages the lab and is available to give students ready access to direction and assistance to help keep their projects moving along.

Armstead says, "Our philosophy is to give everyone a chance to get hands-on experience with research that is interesting to them. Some of our research is externally funded, and we often pay students for help on those projects, but we also encourage students to ask their own questions and conduct their original research separate from the funded projects."

She adds the student researchers have access to modern facilities, including a wet lab for water chemistry analysis and stream mesocosms, which are experimental water enclosures that simulate conditions close to the natural environment, as well as a full complement of field sampling and monitoring equipment.

A nationally respected aquatic toxicologist with 15 years' experience in the commercial sector, Armstead has led numerous projects to determine water quality standards, assess aquatic community health and develop strategies to improve or protect stream ecosystems. Research in her lab is currently funded through the Appalachian Research Initiative for Environmental Science (ARIES) and the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement through a sub-contract with West Virginia University.

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Photos: (Above) Dr. Mindy Armstead. (Center) Marshall University students doing water quality research in the laboratory of Dr. Mindy Armstead have access to a wet lab and simulated environments to help them evaluate the quality of freshwater systems. (Below) Field work gives Marshall University students working with Dr. Mindy Armstead valuable hands-on opportunities to study stream ecology and the effects humans have on those ecosystems.


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Friday May 2, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

2014 Research and Practice Day winners announced

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The first Research and Practice Day sponsored by the Marshall University College of Health Professions took place Friday, April 25, with awards presented to 11 students.

The event showcased the work of undergraduate and graduate students in both oral and poster presentations. Entries included such topics as communication disorders in Appalachia, smartphone applications in medicine and innovations in nursing practice.

The winners for Outstanding Research Presentation were as follows:

Graduate

Having a Disability in Appalachia: Social, Cultural, and Political Considerations
Sara Henson, Megan Foster, Hilliary Johnson, Jordan Lewis, Katie Wilson
Communication Disorders
Adviser: Dr. Karen McComas

Undergraduate

Utilization of Unilateral Heat to Increase Extremity Bone Length in Mice
Jenna Vance
School of Kinesiology
Adviser: Dr. Kumika Toma

The winners for Outstanding Practice Presentation were as follows:

Graduate

Pre-Service Teachers' Knowledge and Perceptions of Stuttering
Emily Barney
Communication Disorders
Adviser: Craig Coleman

Undergraduate

Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Critical Care Patients
Megan Evans, Chelsea Cottrell, Kristen Deise, Elizabeth Sites            
School of Nursing
Adviser: Dr. Anita Swartzwelder

Dr. William Pewen, associate dean of research for the college, applauded all the participants, noting, "As an inaugural event for our college, this forum provided a sample of the remarkable breadth of our students' endeavors. We hope this event helps provide a springboard for our graduates to continue their work in advancing our knowledge and improving practices to promote health."

For more information about Research and Practice Day, contact Pewen at pewen@marshall.edu or 304-696-3743.

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Photos: (Above) Jenna Vance (right), an undergraduate student in Marshall's School of Kinesiology, explains her work on the "Utilization of Unilateral Heat to Increase Extremity Bone Length in Mice." Vance received the award for Outstanding Research Presentation in the undergraduate category.(Center) Shane Cook (left), a third-year medical student in the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, shares his research on smartphone applications that enhance the diagnosis of skin cancer. Cook explains his work to communication disorders student Emily Barney (right), the award winner of the Outstanding Practice Presentation in the graduate category.(Below) Dr. Michael Prewitt (right), dean of the College of Health Professions, presents the award for Outstanding Practice Presentation to undergraduate nursing student Megan Evans for her group's work on "Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in Critical Care Patients." She shares the award with team members Chelsea Cottrell, Kristen Deise and Elizabeth Sites.


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Thursday May 1, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Investigator joins Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Sandrine V. Pierre has been named associate investigator and education coordinator at the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research.

Pierre most recently was on the faculty of the University of Toledo College of Medicine, where she had served as an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology since July 2013. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor in the same department. From 2003 to 2011, she was an assistant professor in the college's Department of Physiology and Pharmacology. In addition, she was a research instructor and post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Physiology at Texas Tech University from 2000 to 2003.

She has a bachelor's degree in cell biology and a doctorate in cell communication in endocrinology from Aix-Marseille II University in France. She is an active member of the steering committee of the American Physiology Society's Cell and Molecular Physiology section.

Pierre's group at MIIR will explore new treatments for heart attacks and other cardiovascular conditions by studying how the dual role of this sodium-potassium pump regulates cardiac cell physiology in health and diseases.

As the institute's education coordinator, Pierre will work with Marshall academic program directors to facilitate students' access to research opportunities in the MIIR labs.

MIIR is Marshall University's key vehicle to advancing regional economic development through entrepreneurship and commercialization of scientific discoveries. Scientists at the institute are developing an intensive program of biotechnology research dedicated to producing patentable scientific breakthroughs and creating new businesses based on those discoveries.

Research at the institute is focused on a protein, the Na+, K+-ATPase, which is commonly referred to as the "sodium-potassium pump" because it controls the active transport of potassium and sodium in and out of cells. This "pump" plays a second, distinct role by directing many cellular processes in the heart, kidneys and other tissues. Through their studies to learn more about the molecular mechanisms by which this cellular signaling occurs, MIIR researchers are working to develop new treatments for cancer, heart and kidney disease.

"I am very pleased to have Dr. Pierre join us," said Dr. Zijian Xie, director of MIIR. "She fits very nicely because her skills not only complement the research and innovation strengths at the institute, but also enhance our educational mission. She brings national exposure to MIIR through her experience in student recruitment and her service to the American Physiology Society."

Pierre said, "I simply can't think of a role that could better suit my scientific and academic interests. I am thrilled by the prospect of exploring concrete applications for our research. I am also looking forward to working with my new colleagues at Marshall to build MIIR as an environment that will help further position students for success in biomedical research and entrepreneurship."

For more information about MIIR, visit www.marshall.edu/miir


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Thursday May 1, 2014
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Marshall Recreation Center 'shutdown week' is May 11-18

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sunday, May 11 will mark the beginning of the sixth annual "shutdown week" for the Marshall Recreation Center. The facility will re-open Sunday, May 18. 

"Shutdown week" is comprised of the entire Recreation Center staff cleaning and renovating the facility. Staff members will be working as a team to complete the duties assigned to them by the assistant director of facilities and operations, Keith Hernstrom.  Some duties include deep cleaning of equipment and the climbing wall, pool maintenance and repair, locker room cleaning and maintenance, and gym floor recoating.

Each year specific areas get special attention, but no part of the facility goes untouched.  This year the focus will be on pool- and gym-floor maintenance.

The Rec would like to thank all members and guests for their patience and understanding during this short time. They look forward to opening their doors May 18.


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More than 1,500 to graduate from Marshall University

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - More than 1,500 students will graduate from Marshall University Saturday, May 10, in a pair of commencement ceremonies at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

For the third consecutive year, Marshall will conduct two commencements. The 9 a.m. ceremony is for undergraduates, and a 2 p.m. ceremony the same day is for graduate students. Among the 1,528 students receiving degrees are 1,039 undergraduates, 426 graduate students and 63 from the School of Medicine.

Marshall Registrar Roberta Ferguson said 438 students will graduate with honors. Seventy-two will graduate summa cum laude (3.85 to 4.0 GPA), 138 magna cum laude (3.6 to 3.84 GPA), and 216 cum laude (3.3 to 3.59 GPA). Three students receiving associate degrees will graduate with high honors and nine receiving associate degrees will graduate with honors.

A large crowd is expected, based on the number of graduates that have indicated they will attend.

"At our annual Countdown to Commencement, we had 703 tentative graduates attend, which is the most we have ever had," said Registrar Roberta Ferguson. 'So, we are looking for a big crowd at commencement."

Marshall will continue a practice that began in 2006 of recognizing individually each graduate who attends commencement. Each graduate will walk to the area in front of the stage, where his or her name will be announced and he or she will receive congratulations from President Stephen J. Kopp and a representative scroll from the Marshall Alumni Association.

During the morning ceremony, Marshall will recognize its graduating honor students. Based on tentative grade point averages, 19 students will complete their baccalaureate degrees with perfect GPAs. Those students are:

  • Brittanee Lynn Barton of Dublin, Ohio, BA in broadcast journalism, College of Arts and Media
  • Cailin Marie Chatterton of Huntington, BSN in Nursing, College of Health Professions
  • Cadara Jo Cole, BA in Elementary Education, College of Education
  • Elizabeth Danishanko of Ravenswood, W.Va., BA in Spanish and International Affairs, College of Liberal Arts
  • Rachael Julia Hager of Hamlin, W.Va., BS in Cellular Molecular Medical Biology, College of Science
  • Kelsi L. Halbert of Washington, W.Va., BBA in Accounting and Applied Mathematics, College of Business
  • Betsy Haugh of Earlysville, Va., BA in Sports Management and Marketing, College of Health Professions
  • Michelle D. Hogmire of Gerrardstown, W.Va., BA in English, College of Liberal Arts
  • Amy Lynn Holly of Fayeteville, W.Va., BBA in Accounting, College of Business
  • Rebecca Hovemeyer of Huntington, BS in Computer and Information Technology and Applied Mathematics, College of Science
  • Randy Dean Jackson of Gallipolis, Ohio, BSN in Nursing, College of Health Professions
  • Savannah L. Keller of Seville, Ohio, BA in International Affairs and Economics, College of Liberal Arts
  • Alexis Leigh Kessel of Ripley, W.Va., BA in English, College of Liberal Arts
  • Lindsey Janelle Miller of Crown City, Ohio, BS in Communication Disorders, College of Health Professions
  • Molly Miloscia of Stow, Ohio, BA in Advertising, College of Arts and Media
  • Chelsea M. Nichols of St. Albans, W.Va., BA in Political Science and History, College of Liberal Arts
  • Taylor Scott Ross of Kenova, W.Va., BSE in Engineering, College of Information Technology and Engineering
  • Karey Mariah Waller of Fort Gay, W.Va., BSN in Nursing, College of Health Professions
  • Christian Nathaniel Warner of Ironton, Ohio, BS in Chemistry and Cellular Molecular Medical Biology, College of Science

Also, the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine will mark its Doctoral Investiture and Medical School Commencement at 7 p.m., Friday, May 9 at the Keith Albee Performing Arts Center. Dr. Robert C. Gallo, co-discoverer of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) which causes AIDS, will be the featured speaker. Gallo's pioneering research in retrovirology also led to the discovery of a virus that causes one form of leukemia. Gallo will be presented with an honorary Doctor of Science degree.   A reception for the students and their families is scheduled in the Don Morris Room of the Memorial Student Center following the ceremony.

Other graduation activities for the School of Medicine include the 16th Annual Golf Classic for the Class of 2014 on Tuesday, May 6 at Silo in Lavalette and the annual Senior Awards Ceremony at 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 7, in the Byrd Clinical Center Auditorium.

Here is a list of some of the upcoming commencement-related events:

Thursday, May 1

5 p.m., Donning of the Kente, Celebration of Achievement, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Friday, May 2

1 p.m., End-of-the-year BBQ, Center for African American Students, Buskirk Field

1 p.m., White Coat Ceremony and Presentation Day, School of Physical Therapy

1 p.m., College of Education and Professional Development, ceremony for undergraduates, Memorial Student Center, Don Morris Room

4 p.m., Leadership and Service Awards Ceremony, sponsored by Student Affairs, Memorial Student Center, John Marshall Dining Room

7 p.m., Drinko Honors Convocation, Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center

Sunday, May 4

2 p.m., WMUL end-of-the-year picnic, Marco's in the Memorial Student Center.

2 p.m., nurses pinning ceremony, Mid-Ohio Valley Center
Tuesday, May 6

11 a.m., 16th annual Golf Classic for the School of Medicine's Class of 2014 at Silo in Lavalette.

Wednesday, May 7

3:30 p.m., annual School of Medicine senior awards ceremony in the Byrd Clinical Center Auditorium

Thursday, May 8

7 p.m., College of Education and Professional Development hooding ceremony, St. Albans High School

7 p.m., College of Health Professions nursing recognition ceremony, Christ Temple Church, 2400 Johnstown Rd.

Friday, May 9

1 p.m., MU Forensic Science Open House, 1401 Forensic Science Dr., Huntington; event is open to the public.

4 p.m., H.E.L.P. Program graduation ceremony, Myers Hall

4 p.m., Clinical Lab Sciences and Dietetics Department recognition ceremony, Marshall University Physical Therapy Department, in the St. Mary's building on 5th Avenue

5 p.m., College Program for Students with Asperger Syndrome (CPSAS) graduation reception, Old Main 315

5 p.m., Yeager Medallion Ceremony, Drinko Library, third-floor atrium

6:30 p.m., School of Journalism and Mass Communication spring banquet, Memorial Student Center, Room BE-5

7 p.m., Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Doctoral Investiture and commencement, Keith Albee Performing Arts Center

7 p.m., College of Health Professions, St. Mary's Medical Center School of Nursing, School of Respiratory Care and School of Medical Imaging, Recognition and Pinning Ceremony, First Baptist Church of Proctorville

Saturday, May 10

9 a.m., Marshall University's 177th commencement ceremony for undergraduates, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

11:30 a.m., or, immediately following morning commencement, College of Information Technology and Engineering graduation reception, Arthur Weisberg Family Engineering Laboratories

2 p.m., Marshall University's commencement for graduate students, Big Sandy Superstore Arena

4:30 p.m., College of Science hooding ceremony, Smith Hall 154

5 p.m., Forensic Science Hooding and Graduation Reception, BE-5, Memorial Student Center; event is closed to the public.


Commencement notes

  • Each commencement ceremony will be streamed live on the Web. The link will be available on the MU website at  www.marshall.edu/it/livestream.
  • Marshall University will produce a DVD of the commencement ceremonies for purchase at $20 per copy. Orders may be submitted using the order form on the registrar's office website (www.marshall.edu/registrar). In addition, orders will be accepted at the arena May 10. The MU Alumni Association will process the DVD orders.
  • Marshall will provide shuttle buses to transport graduates and guests to the arena. Graduates and guests are encouraged to park on university lots at the 6th Avenue Parking Facility, the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Joan C. Edwards Stadium or across from Smith Hall (Lot F). Shuttle service will begin at 7:45 a.m. for the 9 a.m. ceremony and at noon for the 2 p.m. ceremony. After commencement, buses will transport passengers back to campus.
  • Legacy Photographics will take photographs of the graduates, then send proof information to graduates using e-mail addresses a few days after the ceremony. Purchase of photographs is optional.

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Dr. Eric R. George, successful hand surgeon, to speak Friday at Convocation

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Eric R. George, recently named winner of the Distinguished Alumnus Award by the Marshall University Alumni Association, will be the featured speaker Friday evening at the Elizabeth Gibson Drinko Honors Convocation at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.
 
The convocation, part of Marshall's 20th annual Celebration of Academics, starts at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. Marshall students will be recognized for academic achievement by their colleges and departments. The convocation will be followed by a public reception.
 
The convocation is named for the late Elizabeth Gibson Drinko, who was a longstanding supporter of academic programs at Marshall.
 
George is a highly sought-after hand surgeon practicing medicine in Louisiana. A native of Huntington and a graduate of Huntington East High School, he received both his undergraduate and medical degrees from Marshall. He completed a General Trauma Surgery Residency at Michigan State University, then completed a fellowship in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Grand Rapids Area Medical Education Center in Grand Rapids, Mich.
 
George currently is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La., and an adjunct assistant professor of orthopaedics in the Department of Orthopaedics at Tulane. His practice, the Hand Center of Louisiana, is a state-of-the-art facility, which treats everyone from NFL players to key players in the oil and gas industries, and is the largest in the Gulf South region. He owns a luxury hospital, the Omega Hospital, and several ambulatory surgery centers, urgent care clinics, and assisted living centers.
 
Last year, a Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholarship was provided by George in memory of his late brother, Aaron C. George, a fighter pilot who was killed in a crash. He earned his undergraduate degree - a bachelor of science in chemistry - in 1985, and graduated from MU's School of Medicine in 1989.
 
Although George stood out in medical school he was the class representative for the Liaison Committee for Medical Education and the class representative for the Medical School Advisory Board his success did not come easily. In his first year of medical school, he found himself struggling to keep up despite late nights reading and studying. In a School of Medicine publication, an associate dean told the story of seeing George struggle as a student in histology class. He recalled him staring at a slide unable to comprehend it. Still, he said, "He was getting B's where others were failing. I caught a glimpse of what must be phenomenal intelligence."

Medical school administrators sent George for testing in Boston where it was determined he had an IQ of 160. He was referred to the Higher Education for Learning Problems Center, or H.E.L.P. Center, at Marshall. Tests would show that he was reading at a speed much lower than most of his medical school peers. George then worked on techniques to overcome his learning challenges. He excelled, scoring record numbers on Part 1 of the National Medical Boards.

Today, he is an owner of Hand Surgical Associates, a multi-specialty practice with a more-than 40,000 square-foot facility, 50 employees, four hand surgeons, a neurologist/hematologist and nine therapists.

He still calls Huntington home. "We still like to get a Stewart's hot dog, a Tudor's biscuit and go to a Marshall game," George said. Through his philanthropic endeavors, George is a major contributor to many causes including the St. Martin's Episcopal School George Cottage, for early education of pre-school children in New Orleans, La., and through his children's foundation, Chloe and Cassidy George developed a school for orphans in Mombasa, Kenya.

George also co-founded Tipitina's Foundation, which supports Louisiana and New Orleans' music community and preserves the state's unique musical cultures through programs that give musical instruments to underprivileged kids. Earlier this year, it was reported that the founders of that organization bought the historic Orpheum Theater in New Orleans and are going to reopen it next year. It has been closed since Hurricane Katrina.


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Tuesday April 29, 2014
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Marshall Speech and Hearing Center partners with INTO to hold dialect coaching sessions

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  The Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center (MUSHC) has joined with INTO Marshall to provide dialect coaching sessions for international students on the Huntington campus who want to improve their English skills.

Loukia Dixon, assistant professor in the Marshall Department of Communication Disorders, said since August 2013, the MUSHC has offered an elective course in dialect modification coaching to INTO students from countries around the world including Brazil, Iraq, Jordan, South Korea, Vietnam, China, Taiwan, Russia and Kazakhstan.

"Before this partnership with INTO, most of us lived in a bubble with no idea of the conversational opportunities available to us here on Marshall's campus," Dixon said. "Giving our students a chance to interact with individuals from different countries provides invaluable cultural experience and encourages them to learn about our world."

Dixon, who is the supervisor of the elective course, said the dialect modification sessions consist of four clinical groups of INTO Marshall students, who meet with graduate clinicians for 50 minutes once a week for the entire semester.

Sara Henson, a 22-year-old graduate student in the department of communication disorders, said the MUSHC and INTO Marshall collaborate weekly to plan and implement large and small group activities that address conventional pronunciation of English sounds as well as the rate of speech, stress, rhythm and idiomatic expressions used every day in the U.S.

"Over the past two semesters, I've had the opportunity to provide services to clients from five different countries and it's rewarding to listen to them talk about their native countries, cultures and traditions," Henson said. "The partnership between the INTO program and MUSHC is so important because it not only gives the graduate students a unique clinical experience, but it also helps the INTO students communicate more successfully with their professors, classmates and new friends they've made here on Marshall's campus."

Mollie McOwen, coordinator for the Learning Resource Center at INTO Marshall, said students enrolled in the dialect coaching elective are provided personal instruction which provide them with the clarity of speech necessary to be understood by native and non-native English speakers. 

"INTO Marshall students are given the opportunity to engage in social interaction with local residents on meaningful levels," McOwen said. "INTO students learn more about the cultures of Marshall and Huntington and gain understanding of the perspectives of those native to the American culture."

McOwen said the dialect coaching elective is a popular one with INTO Marshall students and always seems to be full.

"The cultural opportunities to learn from one another are great and often differ from semester to semester, based on the inclinations, experiences and personalities of those participants," McOwen said. "This partnership is one that INTO Marshall values greatly, and we do hope to continue offering the elective to students each fall and spring semester."

To find out more about INTO Marshall, visit http://www.intohigher.com/us/en-us/the-universities/into-marshall-university.aspx online. To learn more about the Marshall University Speech and Hearing Center, visit www.marshall.edu/cohp online.

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Photos: (Above) INTO_MUSC_1: Ahmed Al-Doori and Kelsey Dowler have worked as conversation partners all semester. Al-Doori, originally from Iraq, joined INTO in August 2013 and Dowler is a junior in the communication disorders program. (Center) Jonathan Brewster (shown left) is a junior in the department of communication disorders and INTO student Filipe Streb (shown right) is from Brazil. Both said they prefer to walk around campus for their dialect coaching sessions as it makes for a more comfortable and casual learning experience. (Below) INTO students Shuai Zhang and Zihao Wang (from left) work with graduate clinician Sara Henson each week to improve their English skills. Shang and Wang joined INTO Marshall in August 2013 from China.


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Tuesday April 29, 2014
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Silicon Valley CEO, Kenova native Brad Smith to deliver speech at Marshall's spring commencement

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Brad Smith, a Kenova, W.Va., native who says he owes his incredible success in Silicon Valley to Marshall University, will be the guest speaker at MU's 177th commencement Saturday, May 10, at the Big Sandy Superstore Arena in downtown Huntington.

Smith, a 1986 Marshall graduate, will speak at the 9 a.m. Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony. Commencement for graduate students begins at 2 p.m. that same day at the arena.

Smith is President and Chief Executive Officer of Intuit, the accounting software giant that makes Quicken, QuickBooks and TurboTax. He was just 43 years old when he was named the CEO of Intuit, which employs more than 8,000 people worldwide. Under Smith's leadership, Intuit has cultivated an agile, experimentation culture, despite being a 30-year-old Silicon Valley company. This start-up mindset, combined with the ability to reinvent and transform itself along the way, has established Intuit as an innovative company that is consistently ranked as one of the top 100 best places to work, placing at number eight this year, and is among the most-admired software companies in the world.

Smith is recognized worldwide as a motivational and inspirational leader. In April, he was featured in a New York Times interview in which he talked about career advice and life lessons. He is expected to share those lessons and advice during his address to Marshall's graduates.

"I am honored to be returning to Marshall," Smith said. "Everything I have accomplished I owe to Marshall and the spirit of teamwork and perseverance that I experienced there.  I look forward to speaking with the class of 2014 as they set out to make their own marks on the world."

Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp said the university community is elated to welcome Smith back as the guest speaker at MU's spring commencement.

"Brad is a shining example of what makes a true Son of Marshall," Kopp said. "He is a very humble person who, though remarkably successful, has never forgotten his roots and his love of his alma mater and hometown. His story is incredibly inspiring. Brad is one of those people you can point to and know that life's horizons are limitless with a solid education, hard work, humility and strong conviction that never loses sight of what got you where you are. I am really eager to hear him speak to our graduates."

Smith also will become the 169th person in Marshall history to receive an honorary degree.

Born in Huntington, Smith grew up in nearby Kenova, population about 3,500. He was just six years old when the Marshall plane crash occurred on Nov. 14, 1970. He said he lived so close to the crash site that he could look out the window and see the mountain glowing red.

Smith graduated from Ceredo-Kenova High School, a school known for decades for its football prowess. He played football for the Wonders until his sophomore year when he decided to focus on martial arts rather than football. By the time he was a senior, he had earned his black belt. Following high school, Smith was accepted into the United States Military Academy at West Point, but decided he would return to his roots and enroll at Marshall.

At Marshall, business was the focus of his studies, but he truly excelled in marketing. Smith earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree with an emphasis in marketing. After graduating from Marshall, he went to work for Pepsi, moving several times before landing in Grand Rapids, Mich.

In Grand Rapids, Smith earned his master's degree in management from Aquinas College, where he attended night classes. He did well in sales management and business development at Pepsi before leaving for ADVO, the largest direct mail marketer in America. Later he excelled at ADP, one of the world's largest providers of business outsourcing solutions. He then joined Intuit and began his five-year climb within the company before becoming CEO.
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Tuesday April 29, 2014
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Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine launch accelerated B.S./M.D. program

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr.  Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, today announced creation of an accelerated program that allows students to earn a bachelor's degree and a doctor of medicine degree in seven years, compared to the traditional eight years.

The program, open to academically qualified West Virginia students, is now accepting applications for the 2015 fall semester. The MCAT, medical education's traditional entrance exam, will be waived for students who successfully complete the undergraduate requirements of the program. In addition, those who successfully finish the undergraduate portion of the program also will receive a tuition waiver for all four years of medical school.

"Marshall is dedicated to developing a physician workforce for this region," Shapiro said.  "One of the ways we can facilitate that goal is to create programs that attract our state's best and brightest.  This accelerated program allows us to place those highly performing students on a fast track to medical education."

Jennifer T.  Plymale, associate dean for admissions at the School of Medicine, says the collaborative program provides an exciting alternative for students who already are high achievers.

"Both Marshall University and the School of Medicine realize the importance of providing unique academic programs that tap into what students need and want," Plymale said. "By working with our recruiting and admissions colleagues on the main campus, as well as the College of Science and Honors College, we were able to identify an educational niche and create a joint program that is tailor-made for West Virginia students who want to pursue a medical degree." 

Eric K. Hardin, M.A., has been named program coordinator for the newly created initiative. He joined the School of Medicine in January with 14 years in adult and higher education at Ashland Community and Technical College and Mountwest Community and Technical College. 

Plymale congratulated Hardin and School of Medicine team members Christi  L. Adkins, Deborah H. Curry, Amber M. Vance and Cindy A.  Warren, who, along with representatives from the Honors College and College of Science, have spent the last year designing the program.

Admission requirements include a minimum ACT of 30/1330-1350 SAT and an ACT math score of 27 or SAT equivalent of 610, a cumulative high school GPA of 3.75 on a 4.0 scale, three letters of recommendation and an on-campus interview.

Students accepted into the program will follow an accelerated undergraduate program in biological sciences. Once they successfully complete their first year of medical school, they will receive their bachelor's degrees.   

In addition to its M.D. program, Marshall's School of Medicine also offers an M.D./Ph.D. program for those students with an interest in research.


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Monday April 28, 2014
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Florence study-abroad program offers full Italian experience

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - This spring 17 students and two faculty members from Marshall University's College of Arts and Media will journey more than 4,000 miles to immerse themselves in Italy's rich history and culture for three weeks.

This is the fifth year for the Florence program and, although the place stays the same, the students and faculty change, making for a different experience every year. Natalie Larsen, assistant professor of art and design and one of the two faculty members spearheading this year's trip, said Florence is unique to artists because of the city's continued effect on the art world.

"Florence is the birthplace of the Renaissance," Larsen said. "And the influence of that is still seen everywhere in Western art and civilization."

Larsen said the trip gives students the opportunity to see in person what they study at Marshall.

"Seeing work in a book and seeing it in person in the context of a city like Florence are two very different experiences," Larsen said. "It opens the students' minds to a different way of thinking about the world and art."

Outside of the classroom, students in the May 11 - May 31 program will be free to experience a true Italian immersion, each residing in several apartments throughout the city with a mix of students and local community members.

Belinda Mullins, a senior photography major planning to take the upcoming trip, said anyone who has the opportunity to study abroad should take it.

"This is an excellent, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," Mullins said. "It is important that we don't limit ourselves to the people and cultures within our immediate grasp."

Every year students from a variety of disciplines take advantage of the many study abroad programs offered by the university, according to Ryan Warner, coordinator of Study Abroad and Global Engagement with Marshall University. Warner said about 80 students will be studying abroad and nine faculty members will be teaching abroad this year.

"Students really mature when they go abroad," Warner said. "When students go out and experience a different culture, it really opens their eyes so they can grow as people and students."

Larsen said she wants students from the Florence trip to return home excited about art and traveling.

"I hope they come back wanting to experience more of the world," Larsen said. "I hope they look for ways to make that happen."

This year the college has awarded each student a $1,500 scholarship to use toward the cost of the trip. Additional scholarships were available from CAPA International Education, the company that sponsors the program.

The Florence program holds a price tag nearing $4,200 for three-credit hours and $4,368 for six-credit hours. The cost includes tuition, housing, ground transportation from Rome to Florence and a Florence Museum pass, as well as 24-hour support services and medical and travel insurance provided by CAPA.



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General faculty meeting set for Tuesday; awards to be presented

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Awards of distinction will be presented and retiring faculty recognized during Marshall University's spring general faculty meeting Tuesday, April 29, at the Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center on the Huntington campus.

The meeting begins at 2 p.m. and will include remarks from Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp and Faculty Senate Chair Eldon Larsen.

Three people will receive the Distinguished Service Award and three will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award.

To qualify for Distinguished Service Awards, persons must have at least 20 years of service at Marshall University, a record of distinguished service to the university and/or college, and a record of distinguished teaching as evidenced by peer, administrative and/or student evaluations. The Distinguished Service Award winners, each of whom will receive $1,000, are:

-  Dr. Mary Jo Graham, professor, College of Education
-  Dr. Barbara Nicholson, professor, Leadership Studies
-  Dr. Mary Grassell, professor, Art and Design

Three individuals will receive the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award. To be eligible for the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards, faculty members must either be tenured or hold tenure-track appointments. The purpose of the award is to recognize distinction in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity on the part of the Marshall faculty. The senior recipients of the Distinguished Artists and Scholars Awards receive $2,000 apiece while the junior recipient receives $1,000. The Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award will be given to:

-  Dr. Joshua Hagen, professor and chair, Department of Geography, Senior Award in Arts, Business, Education, Humanities, and Social Sciences; 
-  Yoram Elitsur, M.D., professor in pediatrics, School of Medicine, Senior Award in Science and Technology;
-  Ian Hagarty, assistant professor, School of Art and Design, College of Arts and Media, junior recipient in all fields.

Two people will receive the John and Frances Rucker Graduate Adviser of the Year award, which acknowledges the contributions of Marshall's outstanding graduate advisers. They are:

-  Dr. Jonathan Lent, assistant professor, Graduate School of Education and professional Development;
-  Dr. Eldon Larsen, professor, College of Information Technology and Engineering.

Sixteen retiring faculty, who have a combined 377 years of service, will be recognized. They include:

-  Richard Abel, assistant professor, Integrated Science, College of Science, 7 years;
-  Dr. Daniel Babb, professor, Chemistry, College of Science, 41 years;
-  Dr. Laura Boswell, associate professor, Special Education, College of Education and Professional Development, 9 years;
-  Dr. Elizabeth Evans, assistant professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, School of Medicine, 11 years
-  Dr. Jeanette Farmer, professor, Special Education, College of Education and Professional Development, 7 years
-  Dr. Mary Jo Graham, professor, Early Childhood Education, College of Education and Professional Development, 20 years
-  Dr. Cynthia Kolsun, assistant professor, Leadership Studies, College of Education and Professional Development, 3 years
-  Dr. Glenda Lowry, associate professor, Family and Consumer Science, College of Education and Professional Development, 27 years
-  Dr. Jeffrey May, professor, Biological Sciences, College of Science, 22 years
-  Dr. Clayton McNearney, professor, Religious Studies, College of Liberal Arts, 42 years
-  Dr. Mary B. Moore, professor, English, College of Liberal Arts, 19 years
-  Dr. Stephen O'Keefe, professor, School of Psychology, College of Education and Professional Development, 38 years
-  Dr. Judith Silver, professor, Mathematics, College of Science, 29 years
-  Dr. David Allan Stern, professor, Safety Technology, College of Information Technology and Engineering, 37 years
-  Dr. John Walden, professor, Family and Community Health, School of Medicine, 31 years
-  Dr. W. Joe Wyatt, professor, Psychology, College of Liberal Arts, 34 years

Also recognized at the meeting will be five faculty awards winners, announced earlier this week. They are:

  • Dr. William Palmer, professor of history, Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award;
  • Dr. Judith Silver, professor, department of mathematics, Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award;
  • Dr. Anne Axel, assistant professor, department of biological sciences; Dr. Kristen Lillvis, assistant professor, department of English; and Dr. Zelideth Maria Rivas, assistant professor, department of modern languages, Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Awards.

All faculty, staff, students, and members of the public are invited to attend. After the meeting, a reception to honor the retiring and award-winning faculty will be held in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center.


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Friday April 25, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Dr. Judith Silver to give lecture, 'An Accidental Professor,' May 7

HUNTINGTON, W.Va.  - Marshall University's mathematics department will sponsor a public lecture by professor of mathematics Dr. Judith Silver at 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 7, in room 154 of Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Silver, who plans to retire at the end of the spring semester, will speak on the topic "An Accidental Professor," describing her experiences over the 29 years she has been at Marshall.

"This won't be a lecture solely on mathematics or the usual retirement reception," said Dr. Clayton Brooks, a colleague of Silver who is one of the organizers of the event. "There will be something for both town and gown in her remarks."

A reception will follow the lecture.

The lecture is expected to be the first in a series titled AfterMath, to be given by every willing retiring professor in the mathematics department.


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Thursday April 24, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall College of Health Professions to host first Research and Practice Day April 25

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University College of Health Professions will hold its first Research and Practice Day from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday, April 25, in the Drinko Library on Marshall's Huntington campus.

Dr. William Pewen, associate dean of research for the college and organizer of the event, said Research and Practice Day will showcase oral and poster presentations submitted by undergraduate and graduate students across disciplines.

"In a growing college of nearly 100 faculty and over 2500 students, this event will highlight just a small slice of our work in innovation and research," Pewen said. "This meeting offers students valuable experience in communicating their achievements and developing professional collaborations."

Dr. Michael Prewitt, dean of the college, said this is one of the few times in the academic year that everyone in the school community gathers to learn about the research taking place within the College of Health Professions.

"Research and Practice Day is a campus-wide event to promote faculty and student development," Prewitt said. "Through the exchange of exciting research and conversation, students will have the opportunity to network with peers and colleagues and develop their skills in research and practice."

This year's entries include projects that focus on communication disorders in Appalachia, smartphone applications in medicine as well as many innovative nursing practices. Awards will be given to the best graduate and undergraduate submissions in both the research and practice categories.


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Thursday April 24, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall School of Nursing to hold 2nd annual Evidence-Based Nursing Conference

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -  Marshall University faculty and students from the School of Nursing will present research at the 2nd annual Evidence-Based Nursing Conference at Cabell Huntington Hospital from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, April 25.

Dr. Denise Landry, chair of the Marshall School of Nursing, said there was a need within the academic community to have students exposed to evidence-based practice (EBP).

This is a wonderful opportunity for our students to present a plan for change utilizing evidence-based practice," Landry said. "Implementation of EBP is a challenging endeavor for all health care agencies. The Marshall School of Nursing introduces our students to this process as part of their educational experience. We hope to instill in our students and graduates a confidence in the process of implementing change based on EBP as they move forward in their nursing careers."

The conference is sponsored by the Marshall University College of Health Professions, the Nu Alpha Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing and Cabell Huntington Hospital. Currently, Cabell Huntington Hospital is the largest clinical site for students within the Marshall School of Nursing.



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Thursday April 24, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, 304-696-3296

Inaugural College of Arts and Media convocation to honor 189 students

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixty-five endowed scholarships and 125 tuition scholarships will pass into students' hands at Marshall University's inaugural College of Arts and Media convocation at 2 p.m. Friday, April 25, in the Joan C. Edwards Playhouse on Marshall's Huntington campus. 

Dr. Richard Kravchak, director of the School of Music and Theatre at Marshall, said his award-winning students gain more than financial assistance from the accolades.

"The recognition that they're excelling in their chosen professions that's truly wonderful," Kravchak said.

Endowed scholarships are exclusive, some requiring candidates to display talent in their fields, others to maintain above-average grades or participate in extra-curricular activities. Faculty and directors of the respective schools art and design, journalism and mass communications or music and theatre decide most recipients for them. College-wide awards are even more coveted. The competition for those eight awards is bigger and better and recipients are usually selected with help from the dean.

"With so many exciting opportunities arising for our new college, it's especially important to take the time to show students that their hard work doesn't go without merit," said Don Van Horn, dean of the College of Arts and Media.

The new College of Arts and Media combined the College of Fine Arts with the W. Page Pitt School of Journalism and Mass Communications last July. A major venture of the newly established college is the downtown Visual Arts Center, slated to open its doors across from Pullman Square later this year.


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Thursday April 24, 2014
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Marshall University part of $2.5 million initiative to increase diversity in high-tech fields

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University is part of a nine-university initiative to increase the number of underrepresented minority students studying in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

A five-year, $2.5 million National Science Foundation grant will fund the Kentucky-West Virginia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation.

The partnership of higher education institutions is being led by the University of Kentucky. In addition to Marshall and UK, alliance members include the University of Louisville, West Virginia University, Western Kentucky University, Centre College, Kentucky State University, West Virginia State University, and Bluegrass Community and Technical College. The grant, which was announced last week by UK, marks the second phase of the diversity effort, which began in 2006.

With an undergraduate focus, the new funding will sponsor programs and initiatives at the alliance members' institutions to attract greater numbers of diverse students to the STEM fields, increase retention and graduate up to 500 students over the next five years. In addition, the alliance will seek out cross-institutional opportunities for students in undergraduate research and internships. The alliance has the potential to significantly impact the lives of up to 5,000 underrepresented undergraduate students in the two Appalachian states.

"Expanding opportunities that encourage diversity and inclusiveness is among Marshall University's foremost strategic priorities. The Kentucky-West Virginia LSAMP program serves as an important means for advancing this goal," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "In today's complex world, mobilizing and engaging the talents of all people is more important than ever. We are pleased to be a member of this alliance and look forward to working with our partners to attract, retain and graduate more underrepresented students in high-tech and high-demand fields."

UK President Eli Capilouto said, "The University of Kentucky is proud to lead an alliance of exceptional public and private colleges and universities in our region. The LSAMP initiative provides rich opportunities that we hope will excite more underrepresented students to explore, delve into, and thrive in academic and research programs in STEM fields. Their increased participation will stimulate and improve the alliance institutions' outcomes in disciplines critical to the future of our state, our region and the nation."

The alliance's specific goals include:

-          Increasing minority student enrollment in the STEM fields alliance-wide by 15 percent by 2016, with a 10-20 percent increase yearly thereafter.

-          Increasing the 4-5 year graduation rate for minority STEM majors alliance-wide by 50 percent or more and maintaining or increasing that rate thereafter.

Accomplishing these goals by the fifth year of the project will translate into 260 or more STEM baccalaureate graduates each year among the nine institutions.

The goals are ambitious, but alliance members plan to reach them with strategic recruiting and a focus on senior-year attrition. National studies show that underrepresented minority students enroll as STEM majors at the same rate as their counterparts, but graduate at significantly lower rates. The project leaders say that the key to retention will be providing timely and effective individual support and that they will be developing programs to provide that support.

The first alliance-wide conference will be held at UK during the 2014-15 academic year.

The overall aim of the National Science Foundation Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program is to cultivate a greater number of diverse students to successfully compete in the nation's STEM baccalaureate degree programs, and to increase the number of students interested in, and academically prepared to enter graduate study programs. The program defines under-represented groups as African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans.


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Thursday April 24, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Public Affairs Director, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Wellington Professorship of Cardiology established at Marshall University School of Medicine

Long-time chair of cardiology tapped for position

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Mark Studeny, professor and chair of the department of cardiology at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, has been named the inaugural Bernard C. and Pansy P. Wellington Professor of Cardiology.

The professorship is funded by a generous $800,000 grant facilitated by Robert H. Beymer, chairman of the board of First Sentry Bank and trustee of the Bernard C. and Pansy P. Wellington Foundation. The gift will support medical education and cardiovascular research at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death in our region, as well as the United States.  The endowment provides opportunities to explore new avenues available for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease.   

"It is a tremendous honor to be named as the first Wellington Professor," Studeny said.  "We are grateful  for this wonderful gift which will benefit the people of our region.   I am excited to expand our  work into the disease processes that affect so many in our area."

"Pansy Wellington graduated from Marshall and she absolutely loved the school," Beymer said. "She was a kind, caring person and I know Pansy would be pleased that so many people will be helped through  this gift to the School of Medicine."

Additionally, the gift has the option of supporting a scholarship for a medical student.  For information on this gift or to make a gift to the School of Medicine, please contact Linda Holmes, director of development and alumni affairs, at 304-691-1711.


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Wednesday April 23, 2014
Contact: Rhonda Frye, University Communications, (304) 696-3958

Auditions for Marco to take place Sunday

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Auditions to become the next Marco, Marshall's beloved and national award-winning mascot, are 1 p.m. on Sunday, April 27, in the Memorial Student Center on the Huntington campus.

This year's Marco was played by two Marshall students, Ben Heil, 19, a junior nursing major from Dayton, Ohio, and Drew Navy, 22, a senior College of Liberal Arts major from Huntington. The next talented bison impersonator will have big hooves to fill. Marco won the 2013-14 Conference USA mascot championship as voted by fans across the country. And, one of the judges of this year's auditions, and an official Marshall mascot consultant, is Dr. Allen Young, who won the national mascot championship in the 1990s when he was an undergraduate.

In addition to the adoration of his thunder-clapping fans, the next Marco will enjoy a partial tuition waiver, free choice parking across from the student center, a book voucher and the privilege of traveling with the Herd's outstanding athletic teams.

Next year marks the 50-year anniversary of Marco the mascot. Since then, dozens of Herd faithful have played the role of Marco, thousands have worn his likeness on their clothing or displayed it on their cars and homes, and millions have seen him on national TV. This Sunday, one or two lucky students will be selected to be the next Marco as he approaches a half-century of cheers for the Thundering Herd.

Applications for Marco are still being accepted. To apply to be Marco, visit www.marshall.edu/bemarco.


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Wednesday April 23, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

Marshall Board approves budget for 2015

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Board of Governors today approved the institution's budget for fiscal year 2015.

"We've achieved a balanced budget without furloughs or layoffs due to the hard work of our Budget Work Group," said Marshall President Stephen J. Kopp. "These group members include faculty, staff, students and administrators who have worked tirelessly in addition to their regular duties, alongside the finance and budget offices, to prepare the budget. All of us at Marshall owe them our thanks."

"It was truly a collaborative effort," said Mary Ellen Heuton, the university's chief financial officer. "We needed to overcome a reduction of nearly $900 per West Virginia student in state appropriations in just the last two years."

The budget includes a tuition increase of about 4 to 6 percent for undergraduate students, which is $155 per semester for full-time, in-state students, $290 per semester for out-of-state students and $325 per semester for students in the "metro" areas in Kentucky and Ohio. Tuition for graduate students will increase similarly, from 4 to 6 percent, with a few exceptions in the professional schools.

"Marshall University continues to be an outstanding value for students in this region," Kopp said. "Although we never like to take the action of raising tuition, the university is faced with cuts in state appropriations for the second year in a row. This budget will allow us to continue to provide outstanding education and student support services while keeping Marshall on sound financial footing."

The board also approved new policies for promotion, tenure and salaries for faculty members, which had been passed previously by the university's Faculty Senate. Board members elected Mike Sellards as the next chairman of the board, which will become effective at the June meeting. He succeeds Dr. Joe Touma, whose term as chairman is expiring, although he remains a member of the board.
 
Also at the meeting, the board approved proposals to plan three new degree programs: a Bachelor of Arts in the Arts; a Bachelor of Arts in Sport Management; and a Master of Science in Computer Science.

Dr. Andrew Nichols, a Marshall College of Information Technology and Engineering associate professor and a traffic engineer, was recognized by Dr. Paul Hill, chancellor of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, for his research to make roadways safer and more efficient. Nichols was featured on the cover of the most recent issue of Neuron, the West Virginia journal of science and research.



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Wednesday April 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Sixteen individuals, Mid-Ohio Valley Club to be honored at awards banquet

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Sixteen individuals and one club will be honored at the Marshall University Alumni Association's 77th annual Alumni Awards Banquet, sponsored by Ohio Valley Bank, Saturday, April 26, in the Memorial Student Center's Don Morris Room on Marshall University's Huntington campus. The awards banquet highlights Marshall's 2014 Alumni Weekend, which takes place Friday and Saturday, April 25-26. Honoring distinguished alumni, friends and students, the banquet starts at 7 p.m. Cost to attend the banquet is $75 per person or $140 per couple. Contact Nancy Pelphrey by phone at 304-696-3134 or by e-mail at Pelphrey@marshall.edu for more information.

Here is a complete list of the distinguished alumni award winners for 2014, who will be honored at the banquet:

 

National Awards


 Distinguished Alumnus Award - Dr. Eric R. George

 

Dr. Eric R. George is a hand surgeon practicing medicine in Louisiana. A native of Huntington and a graduate of Huntington East High School, he received his medical degree from Marshall. He completed General Trauma Surgery Residency at Michigan State University, then completed a fellowship in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Grand Rapids Area Medical Education Center in Grand Rapids, Mich. George currently is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La., and adjunct assist professor of orthopaedics in the Department of Orthopaedics at Tulane. His practice, the Hand Center of Louisiana, is a state-of-the-art facility which treats NFL players and key players in the oil and gas industries, among other businesses, and is the largest in the Gulf South region. He owns a luxury hospital, the Omega Hospital, and several ambulatory surgery centers, urgent care clinics, and assisted living centers.

 

He earned his undergraduate degree - a bachelor of science in chemistry - in 1985, and graduated from MU's School of Medicine in 1989. His success has not come easily. At Marshall, he was diagnosed with dyslexia, and reading at barely a high school level. Dr. Pat Brown, associate dean of academic and student affairs, said, "Still, he was getting C's where others were failing. I caught a glimpse of what must be phenomenal intelligence." George still calls Huntington home. "We still like to get a Stewart's hot dog, a Tudor's biscuit and go to a Marshall game," he said. Last year, a Marshall University Society of Yeager Scholarship was provided by George in memory of his late brother, Aaron C. George, a fighter pilot who was killed in a crash. Through his philanthropic endeavors, Eric George is major contributor to many causes including the St. Martin's Episcopal School George Cottage, for early education of pre-school children in New Orleans, La., and through his children's foundation. Chloe and Cassidy George developed a school for orphans in Mombasa, Kenya.

 

Alumnus Community Achievement Award - Karen Williams

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Karen Williams is a native of Charleston's west side. She attended Glenwood Elementary, Woodrow Wilson Junior High and Stonewall Jackson High School. Once Williams graduated from Marshall University in 1975, she immediately started teaching at Glenwood Elementary. During her five years of teaching at Glenwood, she discovered one of her major loves and passions was reading. This love was passed on to her students and the community and resulted in her obtaining her first master's degree from MU in reading K-12. This move allowed her to give back to the community working with the Kanawha Home for Children, being a reading specialist at the district level and being an advocate for reading and literacy in the Kanawha Valley area.

 

Her commitment to community and literacy are exhibited in her involvement with numerous organizations that place emphasis on  reading and a solid education and how it is imperative that this starts in our homes and communities. She has been the national and state chair of the Association for Developmental Education, on the board and an active member of Kanawha County International Reading Association, on the Board of Directors and a clinician of the Literacy Volunteers of Kanawha County, charter member of the Charleston District Outreach Ministries Tutor Training, a member of the National Dropout Prevention Network and the Kanawha  County Literacy Coalition. Throughout her life, she has placed emphasis on giving back to her community and its residents.

 

Distinguished Service Award - Charles C. Lanham

 

Charles C. Lanham had a distinguished career in banking for 55 years after graduating from Marshall College in the spring of 1952. While developing his banking career, he served his alma mater on numerous high levels for decades. Lanham was active for many years with the Alumni Association in Huntington and later became actively involved with the Mason/Gallia/Meigs chapter located in Point Pleasant. He nurtured that chapter which provided thousands of dollars for scholarships for the Big green. In 1977, Lahham was honored by the Alumni Association with the Alumnus Community Achievement Award.

 

Lanham served for 12 years on the President's Advisory Board, the forerunner to the current Board of Governors. He also served on three presidential search committees, selecting in order Dr. John Barker, Dr. Dale Nitzschke and Dr. Robert Hayes. Lanham served for more than 30 years on the board of Directors of the MU Foundation. For his active and productive work in  supporting the MU library, Lanham was honored in 2005 with the John Drinko Distinguished Service Award. And, the Mid-Ohio Valley Center, hailed as a "godsend" to the region by local leaders, is now owned free and clear by Marshall University, thanks in large part to Lanham's effforts. "Over the past 19 years, the time the MOVC has been in existence, the center has served thousands of Marshall University students, which is a direct connection back to the vision of one man, Mr. Charles Lanaham," said Homer Preece, director of the center. Jim Farley, president of Nursing Care Management and past Distinguished Alumnus winner said, "The only thing that exceeds these accomplishments is the man himself, as he is described by many as a man of character, honesty, integrity and with a humble, easygoing personality."

 

Club of the Year - Mid-Ohio Valley Club

 

The Mid-Ohio Valley Club, which directly influenced the decision of 12 students to attend Marshall University through scholarships awarded, is the Club of the Year. The club raised enough money to award 11 $1,000 scholarships to local students, not only from Wood County, but surrounding counties as well as a result of its annual scholarship and fundraising banquet in March 2013. He banquet drew a crowd of 274 people, including local alumni, parents, students and Marshall officials. The club also was awarded one $3,000 medical school scholarship to a local student attending Marshall's School of Medicine. The Mid-Ohio Valley Club also co-sponsors the "Rally in the alley," an annual summer coaches' tour stop at the North End Tavern in Parkersburg. In the past four years, the club has donated $11,750 in total to the MU Foundation for the Vision Campaign, which included $4,000 in 2013.

 

Nancy Pelphrey Herd Village Scholarship - Kristopher Pack and Katelyn Daly

 

Kristopher Pack of Beckley is a member of Marshall's cheerleading squad, and he is majoring in nursing. Jessica Maynard, Pack's clinical instructor during his sophomore year at MU, said he has displayed "a high degree of integrity, responsibility, and ambition. Mr. Pack is a dependable team player and expresses a drive for learning and patient interaction." Among his volunteer activities are Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity philanthropics; Big Brothers, Big Sisters; Homes for our Troops; Humane Society; RAINN, Ronald McDonald House charities and Race for the Cure.

 

Katelyn Daly of Vienna, W.Va., is an environmental science major and a member of the marching band. Among her volunteer activities are the MU Campus Flood (a religious organization); Team Amplify (drama team), CYG Refuge (a youth group) and  membership in the 19th St. Church of God. She also teaches swimming during the summer. "I have found Kaelyn to be very professional in her approach to class and assignments," said Samuel T. Colvin, who teaches Daley in his IST 321 Resolution of Environmental Problems class. "She is faithful in attendance and submits quality work in a timely fashion."

 

Nate Ruffin Scholarship Award - London Straughter

 

London Straughter is from Charleston, W.Va., the son of Karl and Teresa Straughter. Before attending Marshall University in the fall of 2011, he attended West Virginia University Institute of Technology on a baseball scholarship. He currently is a senior at Marshall majoring in Management, Marketing, and Energy Management with a minor in Entrepreneurship. After graduation, he plans to continue his studies at Marshall, as he pursues a master's in business administration and a master's of science in human resource management. He said he is heavily involved on campus and is proud to be considered a "son of Marshall."

 

Young Alumni Award - James Lester

 

James Lester graduated from Marshall in 2007. The winner of the young alumni award is 35 years years old or younger, an active member of the alumni association, shows outstanding achievement in their field of endeavor, has a personal commitment to their community and demonstrates personal commitment to Marshall University and its students. Lester is a counselor with the United States Department of Veterans Affairs and a doctoral candidate in the field of psychology.  As a disabled military Veteran, he strives to improve the lives and liberties of his fellow veterans and others with disabilities, not only professionally, but also by serving several organizations and agencies around the state on boards of directors, advisory groups, and multiple committees. Lester makes it his personal aim for his ripples in the world to be constructive and long-lasting. He believes it is important to help in any way, whether it is sitting back and quietly providing monetary donations, getting on the phone and advocating for support from local politicians, volunteering at local centers, or by serving on committees or boards.

 

Carolyn Hunter Faculty Service Award - Adam M. Franks, M.D.

 

Adam M. Franks is an associate professor in the Department of Family and Community Health at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  A 1994 graduate of the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Dr. Franks completed a residency in family medicine at Marshall and a fellowship in advanced maternal care (surgical obstetrics) at the University of Tennessee-Memphis.   Since joining the faculty at Marshall in 2001, Franks has provided comprehensive primary care at Marshall Family Medicine in Lavalette in Wayne County.  In his nomination letter for the Carolyn B. Hunter-Distinguished Faculty Award,  Dr. Stephen Petrany, chairman of the department, described Franks as a dedicated physician, outstanding scholar and committed community volunteer. Franks has served as an assistant scoutmaster and medical officer for the Tri-State Area Boy Scout Council, is an active member and Elder at  Highlawn Presbyterian Church and a volunteer coach for the Wayne County Youth Soccer League.

 

 

           

Awards of Distinction

 

College of Education and Professional Development - Charles R. Shuff

 

Charles R. Shuff grew up in Huntington. He graduated from Huntington High School and then Marshall University, earning a B.A. in physical education and social studies. As a professional educator, Shuff  spent his entire career in the Prince Georges County Public School System  (1968-2004) in Maryland, primarily teaching physical education. Shuff also coaches soccer at Suitland High School in Maryland. He was recognized in 1984 by the Prince Georges Journal (Newspaper) as co-coach of the year. In 1987, he was selected as the MAHPERD Elementary Physical Education teacher of the year for Prince Georges County. Shuff retired from teaching in Prince Georges County in 2004 after 36 years of service, educating children. Today, he lives in Annapolis Maryland, where he enjoys following the Herd and keeping up with things happening at Marshall.

 

College of Business - John C. Burris (awarded posthumously)

 

John C. Burris' musical ability earned him a full scholarship to Duke University after graduating as salutatorian of Wahama High School in 1973. He chose, however, Marshall University's academic scholarship to study business administration, graduating summa cum laude in 1977. After graduation, AT&T and Lucent Technologies offered Burris a position in its management trainee program.  His tenure with the phone company took him all over the world.  He began with assignments in the Mid-Atlantic region living in West Virginia, Virginia, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. In 1991, Burris became the Managing Director/Vice President-Europe for the AT&T Business Products joint venture in London.  His success in this part of the world led to him being sent to Sydney, Australia, and then Hong Kong as the Managing Director/VP for Asia Pacific.  He engineered the entire infrastructure of the organization. In 1994, Burris returned to the United States as the VP and General Manager of the Gulf States Area and settled in Fort Lauderdale.  In 1998, he was chosen for Leaders Council, the highest honor in Lucent Technologies. In 1999, Burris joined Citrix Systems for a 10-year run.  He was a key contributor to the company's growth with revenues increasing from $400 million to $1.4 billion.

 

College of Information technology and Engineering - Charles Neighborgall

 

Charles Neighborgall, who was born in Huntington, has worked his entire career at the Neighborgall Construction Company. He started as a water boy, and now he is Chairman of the Board of Directors. He has been a laborer, carpenter, assistant estimator, estimator, assistant project manager, project manager, senior project manager, general manager, vice president, chief operating officer, president and chief executive officer. During this time, the company put nearly a billion dollars worth of commercial and institutional building construction in place. Neighborgall earned a bachelor of engineering science degree at Marshall in 1967 and currently serves as an advisory board member for the engineering program. He has remained very active with ties to many organizations at Marshall, such as the Artists Series, the Society of Yeager Scholars, he Alumni Association, the Thunder Club, the Big Green and the Quarterback Club.

 

College of Liberal Arts -- Aubrey King

 

Aubrey King received his B.A. degree magna cum laude from Marshall in 1963.While at MU, he majored in political science with minors in economics and history and was a four-year member of the Marshall debate team. Born and raised in Iaeger in McDowell County, he was a 1959 graduate of Iaeger High School. After graduating from Marshall, he was awarded a Rotary International Fellowship for a year's study at the Indian School of International Studies in New Deli, India. He later received his master's degree in political science from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. King has spent more than three decades as a professional lobbyist in Washington, D.C., where he has represented diverse trade associations and other clients. He also has been an adjunct lecturer at George Washington University, teaching the politics of tourism and recreation.

 

Marshall University School of Medicine - R. Mark Hatfield

 

R. Mark Hatfield, O.D., M.D., F.A.C.S., is founder and managing member of Retina Consultants, PLLC, in Charleston.   After earning a doctor of optometry degree from Illinois College of Optometry, he received his M.D. degree from the Marshall University School of Medicine in 1983.  He completed a surgical internship at Marshall, an ophthalmology residency at the University of Illinois School of Medicine, and a vitreoretinal fellowship at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's in Chicago.  Hatfield has been honored with numerous awards over his career including Outstanding Student Awards in 1980 and 1981 and was elected to membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society while at Marshall.   Last year, he received the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary Distinguished Alumnus Award and was named by the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine Alumni Association as the 2013 Distinguished Alumnus.  

 

In addition to his medical practice, Hatfield is a busy lecturer who has presented at a number of professional meetings, including ones sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control, the West Virginia Optometric Association and the West Virginia Academy of Ophthalmology.   He is a generous supporter of Marshall University and the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.  A native of Logan, Hatfield is married to the former Monica Wilton, former chair of the Marshall Foundation and a two-time Marshall graduate. They are the parents of three adult children.

 

College of Arts and Media - William Campbell and Leslie Petteys

 

William "Skip" Campbell was born in Huntington in Memorial Hospital (now the location of the Food Fair on 1st Street and 6th Avenue). He spent most of his boyhood shuttling between a little farm in southern Ohio and his mother's ancestral home in Huntington because of his brother, Don's, bout with rheumatic fever which necessitated the family being close to a hospital. Skip attended a number of different schools due to his brother's illness. He joined the Navy reserve in 1964 after graduating from Huntington High School. In 1968, he returned to Huntington and earned a degree in math from Marshall. After graduating from MU, he taught math and computer science at South Point High School in South Point, Ohio, for 17 years. In 1989, Campbell retired from teaching and opened up Huntington Software (a local computer software company), and ran it until 2002. In 2002, he started working at River Valley Child Development Services in Huntington. He retired from RVCDS in 2011 and is living with his wife, Leslie Petteys, in the family's ancestral home on 7th Avenue. Skip loves all forms of art and is eager to help with art education in Huntington.

 

Dr. Leslie Petteys is professor emeritus of piano and graduate studies in music at Marshall. Her work in American music and interest in women composers gained Petteys national recognition. She contributed numerous articles to scholarly journals and publications and has been invited to present lectures and lecture-recitals for the national meetings of several scholarly associations. She has performed as a solo and collaborative pianist in 13 states and the District of Columbia. Her greatest joy at Marshall was her work with students, many of whom have gone on to become teachers and professional musicians. Since retirement, she continues to work with young people as a mentor. Petteys and her husband, William "Skip" Campbell, have recently become active members in the city-wide committee, River to Rail project, and in various other projects to preserve and beautify the west end of Huntington.

 

College of Health Professions - Kelly Levy

 

Kelly Levy, who originally is from Springfield, Ohio, has dedicated her life to giving back to those in the Tri-State communities. Currently, she serves as vice president of family service at Hospice of Huntington where she is responsible for developing and coordinating bereavement, chaplain, social work and volunteer programs for hospice patients and their families. Levy graduated cum laude from Marshall in 1983 with her bachelor's degree in social work. She now serves on the university's social work advisory board and also as a field instructor for the work practicum students. She remains active in the National Association of Social Workers.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday April 22, 2014
Contact: Beth Caruthers, College of Arts and Media, (304) 696-3296

Accomplished classics CEO to return to Huntington for lecture

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. Darius Arya, archaeologist, professor, documentary host and co-founder and CEO of the American Institute for Roman Culture, will present "How can we tell stories successfully about history through social and digital media?" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 29, in the Shawkey Dining Room in the Memorial Student Center.

A Huntington native, Arya said he developed a passion for history, Latin and the Romans in none other than our city's schools. That passion would take him on a journey from Huntington, across the United States, to Rome and back a couple of times, and finally back to Rome where he works with AIRC to tell Rome's story, in part through social and digital media.

Having been overseas for the majority of this century, Arya said he is happy to be coming back to his hometown to speak about his work in Rome. He said he is looking forward to exploring ways to engage the Huntington community, as well as students from many disciplines, including history, the classics, mass communications, journalism, and art and design.

"It's all in order to talk about how we can preserve our common history and heritage through new media outlets," Arya said.

Arya has appeared as a guest lecturer, expert and host for numerous documentaries, including ones for the Discovery Channel, the History Channel and the National Geographic Channel, while AIRC's social media sites have more than 50,000 followers, likes and pins.

Arya received his bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania and his master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Texas at Austin. He first studied in Rome in 1992, and returned to the city in 1998 on a Fulbright Fellowship. He is a Rome Prize recipient from the American Academy in Rome in 2000 and received a fellowship from the university.

For more information about AIRC, visit www.romanculture.org.

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Photos: (Above) Dr. Darius Arya, who is originally from Huntington, will speak at Marshall University April 29. (Below) The American Institute for Roman Culture celebrated Rome's 2,766th birthday April 21 with this picture on its Twitter account, @saverome.


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Monday April 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dr. William Palmer selected as Outstanding Faculty Award winner

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Dr. William Palmer, a professor of history at Marshall University, has been selected as MU's Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award winner for 2013-2014.
 
Palmer will receive $5,000 through a grant from Charles B. and Mary Jo Locke Hedrick. The award is named in honor of Charles Hedrick's father, Charles E. Hedrick, a former history professor and later Chairman of the Graduate Council, and one of the founders of Marshall's graduate program.
 
Marshall's Center for Teaching and Learning announced the Hedrick Award and two others honoring four faculty members. They are:
 
Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award: Dr. Judith Silver, professor, department of mathematics.
Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award: Dr. Anne Axel, assistant professor, department of biological sciences; Dr. Kristen Lillvis, assistant professor, department of English; Dr. Zelideth Maria Rivas, assistant professor, department of modern languages.
 
Here is a brief look at the awards and the winners:

Charles E. Hedrick Outstanding Faculty Award
 
This award recognizes a full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty member who has a minimum of seven years teaching experience at Marshall and has a record of outstanding classroom teaching, scholarship, research and creative activities.
 
Dr. William Palmer has been teaching history at Marshall University since 1984, when he was hired as an assistant professor. He became a full professor at MU in 1992.
 
"He is and for years has been an outstanding faculty member who excels in all areas of faculty responsibility," said Dr. Robert Sawrey, a recently retired history professor at Marshall. "It is difficult to imagine any other MU faculty member more qualified to receive this prestigious award.

"He is a stunningly brilliant example of the quality of instruction we desire to have across the entire campus."

Palmer said he teaches "on the assumption that history is a way of learning about how human beings operate just as much as psychology, anthropology, political science and sociology are."

He says his fundamental goal in the courses he teaches is to help students learn the methodologies of history and to think historically. "Thinking historically means that students should be able to utilize the basic tools of historical analysis such as objectivity in studying the past, how to read and analyze primary source documents, and the importance of placing events in context. From a historian's point of view, these tools are the essence of critical thinking."
 
Because  of  his experience in Yeager Scholars 272: Seminar in the Arts and History, Palmer said he also utilizes a great deal of material from music and visual arts in his teaching, and uses PowerPoint to present it.
 
Dr. Kateryna Schray, a professor in the department of English, has long been a strong supporter of Palmer.

"Dr. Bill Palmer is truly an outstanding teacher, scholar, and campus citizen, earning the respect and admiration of students and colleagues alike," Schray said. "His many contributions to Marshall are invaluable, his energy is impressive, and his commitment to teaching is inspiring. I am proud to be part of a university that can boast of such faculty."
 
Dr. Kevin Barksdale, an associate professor of history, also praised Palmer.
 
"I believe Bill Palmer is as committed and gifted a teacher as anyone I have ever worked with," Barksdale said. "His classrooms are lively and his courses are challenging (just ask his students). He teaches a wide range of innovative history courses that always find a welcoming student body. Out of the classroom, Bill devotes huge blocks of time to his students. The hallway outside of our offices is always filled with students waiting to meet with Bill. I often overhear his conversations with students and am impressed with the rapport he has developed with many of them."
 
Palmer earned his Ph.D. from the University of Maine in Orono, Maine, in 1981.

Marshall & Shirley Reynolds Outstanding Teacher Award
 
This award includes a $3,000 stipend, and all tenured or tenure-track faculty members at or above the rank of assistant professor who have completed six or more years of service at Marshall are eligible.

Dr. Judith Silver has been teaching at Marshall since 1989, when she was hired as an assistant professor. She likes to compare math to creating art.

"Once you  have  learned  the basics, it is like mastering scales on a piano," Silver said. "Then, you are free to put feeling in the song, or to create your own beautiful proof of a mathematical idea."

Silver said she tries to create a relaxed classroom for her students.

"I believe that a relaxed classroom atmosphere is essential to achieving maximal student learning," Silver said. "I do everything I can to reduce student stress and make my classes enjoyable and memorable. In each class, I feature a "student star of the day" by showing successful homework or quizzes via the overhead projector. Most of all, I believe that learning is greatly enhanced by encouraging questions."

Dr. Alfred Akinsete, chair of the math department, describes Silver as "a teacher of teachers."

"She has mentored, and continues to mentor, a large number of faculty and graduate students and teaching assistants," he said.

Professor Evelyn Pupplo-Cody said of Silver, "In the 30 years that I have known Judy, I have never heard anyone say a negative thing about her. Her colleagues appreciate all of her hard work and dedication to her job and to Marshall University. Her students appreciate her focus, clarity and fairness. I have a great admiration for Judy and what she has accomplished here at Marshall."
Silver earned her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Kentucky in August 1988.

Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award
 
Each of these three award winners receives a $1,000 stipend. The award honors outstanding junior faculty. All faculty members teaching on a full-time, tenured or tenure track appointment who are at the instructor or assistant professor rank and who have completed one to five years of service at Marshall are eligible.
 
Dr. Anne Axel came to Marshall in August 2012 from the University of Michigan, where she had been since September 2009. She is an assistant professor of biology and remote sensing in MU's department of biological sciences.
Axel takes a simple approach to teaching.

My first rule of thumb is that learning should be taken seriously, but it should also be enjoyable," she said. "I show my students that it's OK to laugh in class. Each day, I start with an amazing photo, a screenshot of a relevant news item, or something silly.

"I ask students to tell me what they know about the image. I share my excitement with them, and we chat about how it's related to something we have seen in class. Sometimes, they ask great questions that just can't be ignored, so I allow the short detour. This is important because, here, at this moment you can see students beginning to take responsibility for their own learning!"

Dr. David Mallory, chair of the department of biological sciences, said that Axel's nomination for this award was very much a "no-brainer."

"She is the ideal instructor," Mallory said. "Students are at ease and eager to interact with her. She integrates her research/field experience and creates an excitement that is contagious!"

Axel earned her Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 2011.
 
Dr. Kristen Lillvis came to Marshall in 2012 from the University of Kansas. She is an assistant professor in Marshall's English department.

Lillvis says she is drawn to the idea of multiplicity: the multiplicity of perspectives she believes students must engage with in order to understand course texts and their contexts, the multiplicity of options students have to choose from when deciding how to communicate their ideas, and the multiplicity of ways in which English courses shape students' lives in and outside of academia.

"The most important skills I want to help students master through and within these multiplicities are critical thinking, reading and writing," Lillvis said.

Dr. Jane Hill, chair of the English department, described Lillvis as "a walking advertisement for collegiality and student-centered teaching."

"Kristen Lillvis is universally respected, consummately professional, productive in her scholarship (she published two articles in refereed outlets in her first year), and an unimaginably fortunate addition to the MU faculty."

Lillvis earned her Ph.D. in 2011 from the University of Kansas.
 
Dr. Zelideth Maria Rivas came to Marshall from Grinnell College in 2012. At Marshall, she is an assistant professor in Japanese.
 
Dr. Caroline Perkins, chair of the department of modern languages, said Rivas "is a rigorous teacher, yet her classroom is warm, open and relaxed. Her classes are highly structured, yet she flows seamlessly from topic to activity and back to topic. She uses technology extremely effectively and maintains an environment of active learning. Her students in the classroom are engaged and involved and she gets good results from majors and non-majors alike."

Perkins said Rivas main