January 2014 News Releases



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 31, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall library staff launches 'Marshall Reads 150-Plus' campaign

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Libraries is encouraging students, faculty and staff to join a program of the West Virginia Center for the Book in reading 150 books or more during the course of 2014.

A launch party will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13, in the Drinko Library Atrium on the Huntington campus, said Sabrina Thomas of Marshall University Libraries. 

"Marshall University Libraries encourages our patrons to read 150-plus books individually or by joining a team here at the library to read 150-plus books collectively," said Thomas, who is a digital learning librarian at Marshall. 

Teams can have any number of members, choose a name, select a leader to keep track of the books read by team members and register at the library.  All participants will be eligible for a chance to win prizes, Thomas said.  Those interested in forming a team are asked to fill out the registration form on the library's website at http://www.marshall.edu/library or fill out a paper form at the Drinko Library Circulation Desk. For more information, call 304-696-2334.

The books can be in any format (printed book, e-book, downloadable text, audio book, etc.) and from any source.  Books can be on any topic, fiction or non-fiction.

At the end of each semester, names will be drawn from all participants and prizes will be awarded.  To be eligible for the first drawing, forms must be submitted by Tuesday, April 15.  The first prize drawing is Wednesday, April 30.

The program is sponsored by the West Virginia Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, which promotes the importance of books and reading. The West Virginia Center for the Book brings this message to audiences statewide. The center highlights the state's unique literary heritage, from its earliest storytellers to modern novelists and poets.

The West Virginia Center for the Book is a project of the West Virginia Library Commission. More information is available at www.librarycommission.wv.gov or http://www.marshall.edu/library/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 31, 2014
Contact: Laura Michele Diener, Assistant Professor of History, 304-696-2954

Premiere of 'The Vagappalachialogues' to take place Saturday, Feb. 15

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University Women's Studies program will present The Vagappalachialogues, an original work inspired by Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues, at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, in Marco's in the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"This new production speaks to the experience of people in our own area," said Dr. Laura Michele Diener, assistant professor of history at Marshall and one of the 11 writers represented in the work. The 90-minute production includes original monologues, stories and poems about sexuality and identity. 

Why the funny title?  "While Eve Ensler examines femininity and sexuality in a global context, the Appalachian women and men at Marshall have demonstrated how rich the material is rooted right in home soil," Diener said.  "We wanted something that described what the project was - stories of sexuality and identity born of the experience of West Virginians."

After two years of producing The Vagina Monologues together, Diener and co-editor Liz Deal said they realized that, as important as it is to know and share the experience of women around the world, women and men fight their own wars here:  to be heard, to be understood, to grow up without being abused, to overcome the effects of violence and to celebrate who they are.

"Society seems to give us a limited forum and a limited vocabulary for expressing our sexuality," said Deal, who in addition to directing the show contributed several pieces to the performance. "I have been inspired by the courage of other women in telling their stories and I have found it empowering to be given a place to tell my own.  I hope to encourage people to find their own voices and their own forum for speaking up, speaking out and healing."

The monologues, essays, stories and poems were written by Marshall faculty members, students, former students and members of the local community.  Many of them originated as class assignments.  The fourteen monologues tackle a range of human emotions; some are poignant, others tragic, and many funny and romantic.  Several pieces, such as "Lament of the Coal Goddess," "An Appalachian Fairy Tale," and "Gender Queer Hillbilly" are rooted in the culture and environment of West Virginia.  Embedded in the text is a memoir trilogy on the insidious power of sexual abuse.  The actors are all members of the Marshall community. 

Admission is $5 and all ticket sales will benefit the Hovah Hall Underwood Children's Home in Ona.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 31, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center to celebrate 5th anniversary

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will celebrate its 5th anniversary Wednesday, Feb. 5. A variety of activities will take place and prizes will be given out. A membership special also will be offered.

Anyone who wishes to join the Rec that day can do so and receive their first month free with a 12-month membership commitment. Potential new members are eligible to join the Recreation Center if they have an affiliation with Marshall University such as alumni status, or memberships in campus groups such as Big Green.

All members that attend the celebration will receive water bottles, Chapsticks and other goodies. Those who have been members since the Rec Grand Opening in 2009 will receive gym bags. T-shirts also be given out randomly throughout the day.

A special reception, which is open to the public, will be held in the Rec Center lobby for cake, coffee and snacks at 12:30 p.m. All fitness classes are free and open the entire day of the anniversary.

A full list of the class schedule is listed below. Campus Recreation also will be raffling off a 1-year membership along with other great prizes. The raffle will be held at the Welcome Desk and patrons and guests are encouraged to enter to win as they come in the building.

The Rec Center is encouraging members to document the celebration on social media using the hashtag #5YearsStrong.

Since opening in 2009, the Marshall Recreation Center has aided many students, employees and members of the community on the journey to live a more healthful lifestyle. 

Fitness Schedule
Spinning: 6:15-7 a.m.
Aqua Fitness: 9-10 a.m.
Intro to Yoga: 11-11:45 a.m. and Noon-1 p.m.
Spinning: Noon-12:45 p.m.
Intro to Weights: 3 p.m.-3:45 p.m.
Body Sculpt: 4:15-5 p.m.
Total Intensity: 5:15-6 p.m.
Spinning: 5:30-6:15 p.m.
Women's Workout: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
TRX Training: 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Yoga Body Burn: 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Belly Dance Sculpt: 7:30-8 p.m.
Zumba: 8-9 p.m.
Boxing Body Beatdown: 9-10 p.m.

For more information on the Marshall University Recreation Center, visit http://www.marshallcampusrec.com/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 31, 2014
Contact: Jennifer Sias, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, 304-696-2522

Journalism school to welcome radio host Glynn Washington Tuesday, Feb. 4

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's School of Journalism and Mass Communications will host an evening with Glynn Washington, host and executive producer of the popular public radio program "Snap Judgment," at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4. The event will take place in room BE-5 of the Memorial Student Center on Marshall's Huntington campus.

"Snap Judgment" is a themed, weekly NPR storytelling show sponsored by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and distributed through NPR and Public Radio Exchange (PRX). According to the producers, Washington and the Snap Judgment team highlight "compelling personal stories - mixing real life with killer beats to produce cinematic, dramatic and kick-ass radio." The show's web page (http://www.snapjudgment.org) offers podcasts of the program and background on the stories' participants. It can be heard locally Sundays at 9 p.m. on West Virginia Public Radio,  89.9 FM in Huntington and 88.5 FM in Charleston.

Before creating "Snap Judgment," Washington says he worked as an educator, diplomat, community activist, actor, political strategist, fist-shaker, mountain-hollerer and foot stomper. He composed music for the Kunst Stoff dance performances in San Francisco, rocked live spoken word poetry in Detroit, joined a band in Indonesia, wrote several screenplays, painted a daring series of self portraits, released a blues album and thinks his stories are best served with cocktails.

Washington's appearance is part of the Marshall University Birke Fine Arts Festival, which is based on the theme, "Trending Now: Artists and Audiences in the Information Age." A list of festival events is available at www.bit.ly/2014BirkeFestival. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 29, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall speech and debate team wins second consecutive tournament

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's speech and debate team, known as the Thundering Word, won its third tournament of the 2013-2014 season, and the second tournament in two weeks at Webster University's 16th annual Gorlock Invitational this past weekend in St. Louis.

"We have had tremendous success this year and hope it turns into a successful national tournament season, which is in March and April," said Danny Ray, coach of the Thundering Word. "Marshall placed first in Individual Event Sweepstakes, and second in Combined Speech and Debate Sweepstakes. We had the top three places in pentathlon, which is awarded to the top students in the tournament that have at least five events and at least one in each genre of competition."

Here are the results of Marshall competitors:

Persuasive Speaking

Victoria Ledford, first
Juliet Djietror, second
Marji McCoy, top novice

Improvisational Pairs

Josh Gainer and Alyssa Hager, sixth

Impromptu Speaking

Victoria Ledford, semifinalist
Kai Stewart, semifinalist
Garrett Walker, excellence award
Christian Adams, excellence award

Dramatic Interpretation

Juliet Djietror, second
Devan Sample, excellence award

Poetry Interpretation

Christian Adams, second
Devan Sample, third
Logan Spence, excellence award and top novice
Taryss Mandt, excellence award

Extemporaneous Speaking

Garrett Walker, semifinalist

Dramatic Duo

Victoria Ledford and Devan Sample, first
Christian Adams and Marji McCoy, fourth
Alyssa Hager and Logan Spence, top novice

Informative Speaking

Alyssa Hager, second and top novice
Garrett Walker, fourth

Prose Interpretation

Alyssa Hager, first and top novice
Christian Adams, sixth
Taryss Mandt, semifinalist

Communication Analysis

Garrett Walker, sixth

Programmed Oral Interpretation

Taryss Mandt, sixth

Next weekend is the last major tournament Marshall will attend before the state tournament on March 7-8.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 29, 2014
Contact: Megan Archer, Alumni and Outreach Coordinator, College of Health Professions, 304-488-8863

Marshall sports student to present baseball research at 2014 National Conference for Undergraduate Research

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - One Marshall University student has been given the chance to present her research on Al Oliver, a Portsmouth, Ohio, native and former major league baseball player for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Betsy Haugh, a 20-year old sport management and marketing student in the university's College of Health Professions, said her research mainly focused on the media's portrayal of Al Oliver over the course of his 18-year career.

"For better or worse, the media play a huge role in many sports," Haugh said. "I thought the media's representation of Al Oliver was interesting due to its impact on his career in baseball and its effect on his Hall of Fame status."

Dr. Jarrod Schenewark, associate chair in the college's School of Kinesiology, served as Haugh's faculty mentor and encouraged her to contact Oliver for a personal interview.

"Although I provided guidance, Betsy is a member of the Honors College and worked very independently," Schenewark said. "I would love to see her research published and find out if it makes a difference in Al Oliver's life and his chances of becoming a member of the Hall of Fame."

Haugh's manuscript, "Al Oliver: A Career Worthy of the Hall of Fame," was chosen for a poster presentation out of 4,000 submissions, according to Dr. Gary McIlvain, associate dean for the College of Health Professions and chair of the School of Kinesiology.

"Ms. Haugh was chosen because she brought something unique to the table," McIlvain said. "Like many Marshall students, she has held her own and done work worthy of national recognition. Betsy represents the caliber of students we have in the College of Health Professions and our School of Kinesiology."

Haugh will graduate in May 2014 with her bachelor's degree in sport management and marketing after only three years at Marshall.  Originally from Earlysville, Va., she hopes to attend graduate school next fall to study media communications.

The 2014 National Conference for Undergraduate Research will be held April 3-5 at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. According to the conference website, its mission is to promote undergraduate research, scholarship and creative activity done in partnership with faculty or other mentors as a vital component of higher education. For more information about Haugh's research, please email haugh@marshall.edu. For further information about this year's conference, visit http://www.cur.org/ncur_2014/ online.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 28, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

2014 Birke Fine Arts Festival opens with exhibition, artist talk

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's College of Arts and Media will kick off its Birke Fine Arts Festival this Thursday, Jan. 30, with the opening of an exhibition of collaborative student art projects created with the guidance of guest artist Harrell Fletcher and Marshall faculty members Natalie Larsen and Daniel Kaufmann.

For more than 15 years, Fletcher has been at the forefront of an art field called social practice, a medium engaging audiences directly through the creation of intangible, collaborative experiences.

The exhibition, titled "27 Marshall University Students Research and Represent Aspects of the City of Huntington, West Virginia," will open at 6 p.m. in the Birke Art Gallery, which is located in Smith Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. Harrell will give an artist talk at 7 p.m. in the gallery, which will be followed by an opening reception for the entire festival in the Birke Atrium. The evening's events are free and open to the public.

The collaborative projects explored downtown Huntington, Kaufmann said. Students from his photography class and Larsen's drawing class were grouped and assigned a particular perspective aesthetic, historic, scientific or social to study on the block on which Marshall's new Visual Arts Center will be located. Each group then made a collaborative piece for display.

"Among the many interesting works that resulted from this project are 12 wall-mounted aquariums referencing the 1937 flood; a magazine highlighting five key, historic buildings; and etchings, photographs and drawings based on the Keith-Albee Theatre and vaudeville films," Kaufmann said.

Fletcher, who teaches art at Portland State University in Oregon, received his Bachelor of Fine Arts from the San Francisco Art Institute and his master's degree from California College of the Arts. He studied organic farming at UCSC and went on to work on a variety of small Community Supported Agriculture farms, which affected his work as an artist. Fletcher has produced a variety of socially engaged collaborative and interdisciplinary projects since the early 1990s. His work has been shown at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the de Young Museum; the Berkeley Art Museum, the Wattis Institute; The Seattle Art Museum in Seattle; Signal in Malmo, Sweden; Domain de Kerguehennec in France; The Tate Modern in London and the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia.

This year's Birke Fine Arts Festival is based on the theme, "Trending Now: Artists and Audiences in the Information Age." Nicole Perrone, assistant professor of theatre at Marshall and chair of the festival committee, said the theme is designed to consider "how the arts are responding to an audience that has grown accustomed to constant pop-ups, tweets and status updates." 

The Birke Fine Arts Festival was endowed by Helen Birke and her daughter, Julie, in 1979, reflecting their personal interests in cultural and educational activities in the Tri-State area and recognizing the leadership role of Marshall University.

Following is a list of remaining festival events. All are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

Glynn Washington // Public Radio Storytelling with a Beat
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4
Memorial Student Center, Lower Level BE5

Troika Ranch // SWARM:  Immersive Multimedia Performance
Friday Feb. 7 and Saturday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m. each evening
Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Edwards Playhouse

Eula Biss // Literary Reading
8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 12
Memorial Student Center, Upper Level Shawkey Room
           
John Bresland // Literary Reading
8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 @ 8pm
Memorial Student Center, Lower Level BE5

Dead Man's Cell Phone // a play by Sarah Ruhl
Wednesday, Feb. 19 - Saturday, March 1 at 7:30 p.m. each evening
Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre
Note: there is a charge for this event. Call 696-ARTS for tickets.

Dan Senn // Sound Installation Exhibit
8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25
Gallery 842

Marshall University Festival of New Music Concert 1
Music of Dan Senn
8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26
Smith Music Recital Hall

Marshall University Festival of New Music Concert 2
Music of Dan Senn
8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27
Jomie Jazz Center Forum

Marshall University Festival of New Music Concert 3
Lindsey Goodman, flute // Guest Artist Recital
Noon, Friday, Feb. 28
First Presbyterian Church, 1015 Fifth Ave., Huntington
                                  
Marshall University Festival of New Music // Soundwalk
2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28
Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center Atrium and Jomie Jazz Center Forum
                                   
Marshall University Festival of New Music Concert 4
Music of Dan Senn
8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28                                          
Smith Music Recital Hall

Vanessa German // Artist Talk
7 p.m. Thursday, March 6
Joan C. Edwards Performing Arts Center, Francis-Booth Experimental Theatre
Birke Festival Closing Reception immediately to follow in the Playhouse Lobby


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 28, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center presents MELT: a workshop for sports-related pain and injury

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will be hosting two special hours of MELT with Susan Robarts at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9, and at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11. The class that was scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 21, was cancelled due to bad weather.

MELT is a self-treatment technique that helps people get out of and stay out of chronic pain.  MELT is not exercise.  It is not a diet.  It is a simple method using soft balls and a soft roller that you can do at home to restore neurological balance, stability, and joint mobility.  In this workshop, you will learn how to MELT at home. 

Robarts, BSc, CPT, and instructor of the class, explains, "MELTing your body is just as important as brushing your teeth in regards to self-care.  You brush your teeth for two reasons:  one, to have fresh breath for the short term, and two, to keep your teeth healthy for the long term.  Look at MELT the same way.  Here are two reasons to MELT:  one, to rid your body of the 'stuck stress' that has accumulated throughout the day, and, two, to give your joints and tissues the proper hydration they need to keep you free of pain and disease over time.  MELT takes about as long as it does to brush your teeth, so why not give your body the self-care it deserves and needs?"

Members and non-members of the Rec Center are all welcome. This class is ideal for athletes and anyone with chronic pain. The cost is $20 for members and $28 for non-members. Call 304-696-4732 for more information. To sign up visit the Rec Center Welcome Desk or www.marshallcampusrec.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 27, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Dean's list available on Marshall website

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The names of Marshall University students who made the dean's list for the Fall 2013 semester are available on the Marshall website for use by the media.

To make the dean's list, students must have a 3.3 or above grade point average for a minimum of 12 hours. Marshall has 2,692 students included on the website. Students who requested their names not be published are excluded from the list.

Many students and their parents have requested that Marshall make the dean's list available to publications that cover their hometowns.

Each student's name, hometown, county (for West Virginia) and state are included on the dean's list, which is accessible at http://www.marshall.edu/ucomm/deans-list-for-fall-2013/.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 27, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

MU cheerleaders host annual junior clinic Feb. 22 at Gullickson Hall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall University cheerleaders will conduct the annual Junior Thundering Herd Cheer Clinic at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at Gullickson Hall on the Huntington campus.

Participants learn some of the cheers and a dance that the Marshall Cheerleaders perform at games, as well as receive instruction on various cheer techniques.

Children pre-K through fifth grade are invited to participate. The cost of the clinic is $40 per child and includes: cheer clinic, a ticket for the child to the men's basketball game vs. Middle Tennessee State University, which tips off at 2 p.m.; a pre-game performance; a clinic t-shirt, a picture with Marco and pizza before the game.

Registration for the clinic can be found on the cheerleading link on Herdzone.com. Please fill out the registration form and mail it with payment to Marshall Cheerleaders, P.O. Box 1360, Huntington, WV 25715. The cutoff date for receipt of the registration and payment is Feb. 10 to ensure the participant receives a clinic t-shirt. Once your registration is received, you will receive a confirmation e-mail. Walk-ins and late registrations are welcome, but no t-shirt is guaranteed. Cancellations after Feb. 10 will forfeit $10 of the registration fee.

Check-in begins at 8:30 a.m. and the clinic begins at 9 a.m. At noon, participants will have a pizza party with the Marshall cheerleaders. Then, participants will prepare to perform during pre-game at the Marshall men's basketball game vs. MTSU. Parents are encouraged to stay for the clinic to see their cheerleaders hard at work.

Please feel free to contact the coaching staff for any questions regarding the Junior Thundering Herd Cheer Clinic by emailing mucheercoach@aol.com.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 27, 2014
Contact: Lalena Price, University Communications, (304) 696-7153

Students can sign sustainability pledge this week

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Is it possible to live a sustainable lifestyle while living on a college campus? Yes, say organizers of an interactive competition for students living in Marshall University's residence halls.

This week, the Marshall community will be challenged to sign a Green Pledge during a series of informational parties, which also will give them ideas about how to live a more sustainable life while in college. Then, in February, students who live in the residence halls will put their knowledge and new habits to use when they compete to see which residence hall can most reduce its water and electricity usage numbers compared to last year's numbers.
 
Informational parties are set for:
 
Jan. 28             Buskirk Hall Lobby                                                    8 p.m.
Jan. 29             Holderby Hall Lobby                                                 8 p.m.
Jan. 29             First Year Residence Hall South Classroom            8 p.m.
Jan. 30             Twin Towers East Front Lobby                                 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30             Harless Hall Media Room                                         8:30 p.m.
 
Green Pledges also may be signed online at www.marshall.edu/housing/green-pledge or during the Green Pledge Kick-Off event, Wednesday, Feb. 5, from 12:30 to 3 p.m., in the Memorial Student Center lobby. During the kick-off event, the entire Marshall community can learn about the following initiatives:

  • Housing and Residence Life - Get the scoop on green practices in the residence halls.
  • Greening Marshall Committee - Learn how to become involved in environmental projects on campus.
  • Recycling - What is recyclable and other interesting facts about recycling at Marshall.
  • Student Gardens - Did you know we have rooftop gardens, as well as vegetable, rain and butterfly gardens?
  • Eco Cycle Bike Loan Program - Learn how to check out a bike for free!
  • Storm Water Management - How storm water runoff affects students and campus.

Signing the Green Pledge is meant to be informative for campus residents, but the hope is that it also will inspire and challenge all students to reduce energy and water use and recycle while living at or near Marshall, their home away from home for most of the year, according to co-organizers Tiffany Hughes and Sarah Martin, members of the Housing and Residence Life Sustainability Committee.
 
"We created this event to promote a more sustainable housing department overall and to make our residents aware of easy ways they can make a difference for the environment while they are here," Martin said.
 
Hughes agreed, "We want to help students understand the impact they can have on the Marshall community and we also want them to know about some of the great programs Marshall has for them."
 
Margie Phillips, sustainability manager for MU, said the Green Pledge concept is great for students, for the university and beyond.
 
"Our residence hall community can make a huge difference," Phillips said. "And we all know how competitive students are, so this turns making good lifestyle choices into a lot more fun. If something is fun, you are more likely to do it. We also encourage off-campus students, faculty and staff to sign the Green Pledge and take these ideas for sustainability to their homes.
 
"Once we do these things for a while, they become habits. Then, we take those habits out into the world with us and suddenly, our environmental footprint shrinks, but our reach expands."
 
For more information, contact the Sustainability Department at 304-696-2992 or philli10@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 23, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall to test MU Alert emergency messaging system

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. -Marshall University communications officials will conduct a test of the MU Alert emergency messaging system at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 29.

Marshall community members who are subscribed to MU Alert are asked to be sure that they have received the message that morning. If a message has not been received by noon, a subscriber should review and update his or her contact information in the myMU/MU Alert Web interface. If this contact information was already correct, but a message was still not received, then he or she should send an e-mail to mualert@marshall.edu with details on which contact method (text, e-mail, voice) did not work as expected.

"Recent weather conditions and water situations have emphasized the need for MU Alert," said Jim Terry, director of public safety for the university. "As always, our primary concern is protecting the safety and health of university community members."

The most recent test of the system occurred Sept. 18.

The MU Alert system, which is operated by Marshall and delivered thru the Blackboard Connect™ service, allows Marshall students, faculty and staff to provide several methods for the university to use when making emergency contacts. Most common are text messages, cell phone calls and e-mail. Those who would like to subscribe or update their information for this test are asked to visit the myMU page at http://www.marshall.edu/MyMU, log in, click on the MU Alert red triangle and complete their subscription or update by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28. Others external to the campuses or centers (i.e. news media, alumni, campus neighbors) should watch other outlets, such as the Marshall website, Twitter, Facebook, etc., for relevant news releases.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 23, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Marshall Internal Medicine opens specialized hypertension clinic

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall Internal Medicine has opened a new clinic aimed at treating patients with resistant and difficult-to-treat hypertension, commonly referred to as high blood pressure.
 
The clinic is located at the Marshall Kidney Care and Hypertension Center at the J. Robert Pritchard Dialysis Center on 1690 Medical Center Dr. in Huntington.   The physicians also provide inpatient and consultative services at Cabell Huntington Hospital and, beginning next month, at St. Mary's Medical Center.

Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine and a nephrologist (kidney specialist), has teamed up with division of nephrology colleagues Drs. Hala M. Alshayeb, Wafa Badwan, Neha Garg and Zeid J. Khitan to provide the dedicated hypertension clinic.

Additionally, Dr. Mark Studeny, chair of the department of cardiology, and Dr. Charles Meadows, department of internal medicine, are providing specialized care at the clinic.

Appointments may be made by calling 304-526-2532.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 23, 2014
Contact: Robert Wray, Associate Professor of Music, 304-696-2399

Marshall University Choral Union to begin rehearsals Jan. 27

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University Choral Union begins rehearsals for its spring performance at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 27, in the choir room in Smith Music Hall on Marshall's Huntington campus. 

Robert Wray, associate professor of music at Marshall and director of the group, said this concert will highlight 20th-century American composers including Randall Thompson, Norman Dello Joio and Leonard Bernstein. Choral Union is open to all interested residents of the Tri-state area.

Rehearsals are Monday evenings from 7 to 9 p.m. The performance will take place at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26.

Music will be available for purchase at rehearsal. Music reading skills are a plus, but not necessary, and any singing level is accepted, Wray said.

For further information, please contact Wray by phone at 304-696-2399 or by e-mail at wrayr@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, 304-696-7153

Thundering Word posts second victory of season

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Thundering Word Speech and Debate Team won its second tournament of the season this past weekend at the RedHawk Rumble Invitational Tournament hosted by Miami University on the campus of Butler University in Indianapolis.

Marshall defeated four of the country's best teams, two of which had larger entries than the Thundering Word. Marshall finished first, followed by Ball State University, Bradley University, Eastern Michigan University and Illinois State University.

For the first time Marshall had at least one finalist in every event. Each of these four teams finished in the top 10 at nationals last year. For the first time in the history of the team, Marshall received the Quality Award.

"This award is given to the team who has the highest average points per slot entered into the tournament," said Coach Danny Ray. "Marshall had 38 entries and 16 of them reached the final round. We also had several students who were seventh in their event. This would be the next person to reach the final round in those events."

Marshall also had three students win Individual Sweepstakes Awards, meaning they were three of the best speakers overall in the tournament. To be eligible for this award, students had to enter four or more events. Marshall team members placed first, third and fifth in this category.

Individual award winners for Marshall were:

AFTER-DINNER SPEAKING
Garrett Walker, first, Christian Adams, sixth

COMMUNICATION ANALYSIS
Victoria Ledford, second, Matt Osteen, fifth

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION
Devan Sample, second; Josh Gainer, fifth

DRAMATIC DUO
Victoria Ledford and Devan Sample, second;
Marjie McCoy and Christian Adams, sixth

EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING
Matt Osteen, fifth;

IMPROMPTU SPEAKING
Victoria Ledford, second;

INFORMATIVE SPEAKING
Victoria Ledford, fourth;
Garrett Walker, fifth

PERSUASIVE SPEAKING
Alyssa Hager, second;
Juliet Djietror, fourth

POETRY INTERPRETATION
Taryss Mandt, second

PROGRAMMED ORAL INTERPRETATION
Taryss Mandt, second;
Devan Sample, fourth

PROSE INTERPRETATION
Christian Adams, first

Marshall travels to St. Louis this weekend to compete in one of the largest combined speech and debate tournaments in the country, The Gorlock Gala, hosted on the campus of Webster University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 23, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall president to speak at PROMISE Scholarship Forum Jan. 28

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp will be featured as a panelist at the PROMISE Scholarship Forum at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the Clay Center in Charleston.

The event is cosponsored by Generation Charleston, a committee of the Charleston Area Alliance, and Generation West Virginia, and will be moderated by Senate Education Chair Robert Plymale.

Marshall financial aid officials say that 1,843 university students are receiving PROMISE scholarships in the current financial aid year.

Other members of the panel include the keynote speaker, former West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise; Dr. Paul Hill, chancellor of the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission; Lloyd Jackson, member of the West Virginia Board of Education; Lizzy Margolin, former PROMISE Scholarship recipient; and Kristen Pennington, chair of the West Virginia University Student Advocates for Legislative Advancement.

Organizers say the forum is free of charge to attend and open to the public. All are encouraged to register through the "Attend an Event" section (under "Programs and Events") of the Charleston Area Alliance's website at www.charlestonareaalliance.org.

For further information on the forum, persons may contact the Charleston Area Alliance at 304-340-4253.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 22, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Former United Bank executive new VP with Marshall's Office of Development

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Scott Miller, most recently a United Bank executive, has joined the Office of Development at Marshall University, where he is serving as vice president.

"Scott brings with him a wealth of sales experience and a myriad of career accomplishments," said Dr. Ron Area, CEO of the Marshall University Foundation Inc.  "He has served in many capacities as a banking executive and received many wonderful accolades. He is a welcomed addition to our team."

Miller has served the past five years at United Bank, where he was market president for Cabell County. Prior to that, Miller was responsible for founding and managing Citizens First Bank in Ravenswood, which achieved increased earnings for seven consecutive years.

He is a graduate of Marshall University with a B.A. in Business Administration, the West Virginia School of Banking and the American Bankers Association. He will graduate from Marshall again this May with a Master of Arts (M.A.) in Leadership Studies.
 
"As a Marshall alum I am excited to take on the challenge of working for the Marshall Foundation team," Miller said. "I'm really eager and ready to work for my alma mater in this fundraising capacity. It is really exciting to be going to work for the school I love."

During his career, Miller also:

  • Had 17 years of increased profits for three different banking companies;
  • Served on the advisory board of Marshall University College of Business;
  • Served on the Huntington Area Development Corp.;
  • Has been an adjunct professor at WVU-Parkersburg;
  • Received the 2012 Marshall University Alumni Community Achievement Award.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 22, 2014
Contact: Bonnie Prisk, Director, MU Teays Valley Regional Center, 304-757-7223

MU Teays Valley Regional Center classes canceled for Wednesday, Jan. 22

SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's Teays Valley Regional Center classes are canceled for this evening, Wednesday, Jan. 22, due to the closure of the Putnam County Schools. This includes classes at Hurricane High School.
 
Instructors have been asked to use e-mail to contact students.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 22, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Marshall University research and commercialization experts to speak at statewide bioscience summit

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University representatives are among more than 25 life science experts who will share experiences and discuss strategies for successfully expanding the state's bioscience industry during the upcoming West Virginia Bioscience Summit.

Sponsored by the Bioscience Association of West Virginia (BioWV), the summit will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the Embassy Suites in Charleston. The annual event brings together members of the bioscience community with policy and opinion leaders, economic developers and others who are interested in learning more about how to grow and nurture the industry in West Virginia.

At the summit, Dr. Zijian Xie, who recently was appointed director of the Marshall Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, will talk about commercializing university research. Xie, whose laboratory is internationally recognized for its groundbreaking work to understand the behavior of cellular pathways and their relationship to cancer, renal disease and cardiac failure, holds international patents and patent applications on seven medical inventions and has been involved with the creation of two spin-off companies from his research.

Dr. Todd Davies, director of research development and translation for the Marshall Clinical Research Center at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, is on the program to share information about clinical trials being conducted at Marshall, and Dr. Michael Norton, a Marshall professor of chemistry whose lab focuses on developing chemical sensors to detect threat agents in the environment, will join colleagues from West Virginia University, West Liberty University and West Virginia Wesleyan College on a panel highlighting some of the bioscience research being conducted at universities and colleges in the state.

In addition, representatives of two Marshall spinout companies, Derek Gregg of Vandalia Research and Dr. Jagan Valluri of Cordgenics, are scheduled to be on a panel of bioscience company representatives to discuss creating an environment for life science growth in the state and the challenges of raising capital. Gregg and Valluri both founded their companies on technology they developed in Marshall University labs.

Dr. John Maher, Marshall's vice president for research, also will be participating in the summit and said, "The West Virginia Bioscience Summit is a tremendous opportunity to bring attention to the significant economic development happening via our state's life sciences community. We have a great deal of exciting biotechnology and economic development work happening here at Marshall and we are delighted to have this chance to share it with our colleagues and friends from around the state and region."

Gregg, who serves as the chairman of BioWV, added, "A successful life science industry begins with research, which then leads to discoveries. Those discoveries provide the basis for company development and economic growth for the state. West Virginia is having success but there is much more that can be done to help grow this industry within  our borders."

The summit's keynote speaker will be Hurricane native Dr. Mark Bates, CEO and founder of translational research company Nexeon MedSystems Inc. A physician, inventor and successful medical device entrepreneur, Bates will discuss the successes and challenges he's faced in working to improve patient outcomes through commercializing his medical innovations. He is the founder of several successful medical startup companies and holds more than 60 U.S. issued and pending patents in the areas of stents, embolic protection, gene therapy, stem cell implantation, regenerative therapy, nanotechnology, spinal cord injury, catheter design and drug delivery.

Event sponsors include the international Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO), Amgen, Fisher Scientific, Mylan, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), Sanofi, Steptoe & Johnson LLP, TechConnect West Virginia and the West Virginia Small Business Development Center. BioWV also receives funding through a grant from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation.

Marshall University is a founding member of BioWV. The purpose of the association is to promote and strengthen the bioscience industry in the state by developing a cohesive community that unites biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device and research organizations.

For more information or to register for the summit, visit www.biowv.org.

-----------

Photos: Dr. Zijian Xie (above), Dr. Todd Davies (center) and Dr. Michael Norton (below) will participate in the West Virginia Bioscience Summit in Charleston Jan. 28.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 21, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University cancels all classes beginning at 3:30 p.m. today and later

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Due to worsening winter road conditions and temperatures expected to reach the single digits this evening, Marshall University is canceling all classes beginning at 3:30 p.m. and later Tuesday, Jan. 21. This applies to all campuses and centers, and includes night classes.

Students are advised to contact their instructors for any updates to their course schedules and assignments.
 
Marshall's Housing and Residence Life Department is offering free overnight accommodations for students, faculty and staff who do not wish to commute home this evening. Those students and employees who are interested should contact Tracey Eggleston at 304-696-6004 or email their name and 901# to eggleston3@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 17, 2014
Contact: Patricia Proctor, Director, Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, (304) 696-7153

Award-winning author of books about Lincoln to speak at Marshall

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Amicus Curiae Lecture Series, sponsored by the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy at Marshall University, will resume on Tuesday, Feb. 4, when it welcomes Dr. Brian R. Dirck, award-winning author of several books about Abraham Lincoln, and Professor of History at Anderson University.

Dirck's lecture, "Abraham Lincoln and Constitutional Optimism," will focus on the challenges Lincoln faced as he struggled to fight the Civil War within the boundaries created by the U.S. Constitution and how he found ways to use the Constitution as a source of power and inspiration, rather than difficulty and restriction. Dirck also will discuss Lincoln's behavior as providing lessons for the ways we view the Constitution and government power in our time.

Patricia Proctor, director of the Simon Perry Center for Constitutional Democracy, said, "In the month in which we celebrate President Lincoln's birthday, it is fitting that we should focus on his struggles and accomplishments.  We are fortunate to have such a knowledgeable speaker to discuss the fascinating issue of Lincoln's relationship with the U.S. Constitution during the Civil War."

Dirck is the author of four well-regarded books about Lincoln:  Lincoln and Davis: Imagining America, 1809-1865; Lincoln the Lawyer, which won the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Lincoln in 2007; Lincoln and the Constitution; and Lincoln and White America. He also edited and contributed to a collection of essays entitled Lincoln Emancipated: The President and the Politics of Race.

The lecture will begin at 7 p.m. in the Marshall University Foundation Hall, home of the Erickson Alumni Center, and is free and open to the public.  The series is supported by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 17, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Nominations being accepted through June 1 for 'Spirit of the Coalfields' Miners' Celebration awards

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Nominations are being accepted for "Because of You" awards to honor people who have made significant contributions to West Virginia's coal mining enterprise and the state's mining heritage.
 
Awards in nearly a dozen categories will be presented at a gala dinner and awards ceremony planned as part of this year's "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration to be held Oct. 2 at Tamarack in Beckley.
 
According to event organizers, representatives of the state's mining industry and community leaders will gather at the event to recognize miners, engineers, safety and environmental professionals, community members and innovators. Nominations for the awards are being accepted through June 1.
 
"West Virginia's mining industry is linked to many of our activities, including employment for many of our safety and engineering graduates," said Dr. Tony Szwilski, chairman of the event planning committee and director of Marshall University's Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences. "Every one of the thousands of individuals, in a number of different roles, who works in the industry whether they are a safety engineer, miner, environmental professional or equipment supplier contributes to each ton of coal produced, as do countless community leaders and mining families.
 
"This event is intended to honor and recognize the contributions of everyone involved. Last year's celebration was a rousing success and we look forward to this year's program being even bigger and better."
 
According to Szwilski, "Because of You" awards will be presented in the following categories:  Innovation in Mining, Safety Professional, Women in Mining, Community Investment, Environmental and Engineering Professional, Community Involvement, Educator of the Year and Champion for Mining. In addition, the Homer Hickam Collier and the Spirit of the Coalfields awards will be presented.
 
Representatives of the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area will be on hand to present several of that organization's top awards, including the Nick Joe Rahall Award for Outstanding Achievements in Coal Heritage Preservation, the Coal Heritage Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Coal Heritage Marketing Award and the Coal Heritage Research and Documentation Award.
 
The "Spirit of the Coalfields" Miners' Celebration will feature a gala dinner and awards ceremony beginning at 6 p.m.
 
To nominate someone for the "Because of You" awards or for more information about the Miners' Celebration, contact Teresa Buckland at 304-696-3568 or buckland@marshall.edu.
 
For more information about the Coal Heritage Highway Authority/National Coal Heritage Area awards, call 304-465-3720 or e-mail info@coalheritage.org.
 
The Miners' Celebration is a cooperative project of the Center for Environmental, Geotechnical and Applied Sciences at Marshall University; the National Coal Heritage Area; the United Mine Workers of America; the West Virginia Coal Association; Strategic Solutions LLC; and the West Virginia Division of Energy, Office of Coalfield Community Development.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 16, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

Parts of Marshall University's Huntington campus affected by water outage Jan. 16

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - THURSDAY, JAN. 16, 8 A.M. Water service to portions of Marshall's Huntington campus remains disrupted as West Virginia American Water crews continue to repair the water main break near Corbly Hall.

Classes continue as scheduled, although students and employees are asked to use restrooms in adjacent buildings that were not affected.

The following buildings are without water service:

  • Corbly Hall
  • Foundation Hall/Erickson Alumni Center
  • Memorial Student Center
  • Career Services
  • Holderby Hall
  • Campus Christian Center

 

Neither of Marshall's main dining centers, Harless Dining Hall and Twin Towers Marketplace, have been affected. No other residence halls are affected.

For residents of Holderby Hall, guest shower and restroom facilities are available at the neighboring residence hall, Twin Towers West. Students also may use the shower facilities in the student recreation center. They should bring their own towels and bathing supplies.

Persons may visit www.marshall.edu/water for more information. Marshall officials will continue to update the university website and social media as more information is available.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 16, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

School of Medicine students successful in specialized match process

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Two fourth-year medical students at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have matched into ophthalmology residency positions through a specialized national matching process called the San Francisco Match.

"We are very pleased with our students' performance in the San Francisco Match," said Dr. Marie Veitia, associate dean for student affairs. "Both students matched into their first choice and I think it speaks to their outstanding capabilities. We are very proud of them."

The students and their match locations are as follows:

Zubair A. Ansari, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute,  University of Miami Health,  Miama, Fla.; Joshua  F. Hendrix, Dean McGee Eye Institute, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Okla.

Ophthalmology residencies begin after the resident completes an internship year.  These two students also will participate in the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) to determine where they will spend their preliminary year.

This year's NRMP is scheduled for Friday, March 21.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday January 15, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Cooley takes new position with Marshall University; named associate vice president for intercultural affairs

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Maurice Cooley, director of the Center for African American Students at Marshall University for the past 11 years, has been named associate vice president for intercultural affairs, university President Stephen J. Kopp announced today.

Cooley assumes his new position Friday, Jan. 17. Intercultural Affairs is the new name for the former Office of Multicultural Affairs and now reports to the Division of Academic Affairs.
 
"The title of intercultural affairs more accurately reflects the paradigm and the kind of work that we must do in universities in our global society," Cooley said. "And that is to focus on the intercultural process of bringing people together."

Cooley is a two-time graduate of Marshall University. He graduated from MU with a bachelor's degree in Sociology in 1970, then served three years' active duty in the U.S. Army as a psychology specialist. He returned to Marshall and earned his Master of Arts degree in counseling in 1975.

Before joining Marshall in January 2003, Cooley was employed for more than 25 years at Prestera Center for Mental Health, where he was a clinician, psychotherapist, program director, and served as a divorce custody mediator with the local family law court.

Kopp praised Cooley for his job performance at Marshall the past 11 years.

"Maurice sincerely cares about the students at Marshall University," Kopp said. "He has implemented many exemplary programs and activities such as the Black Scholars Program and recently the annual Unity Walk, which takes place homecoming week and brings together students, faculty and staff from all over the university. He currently serves on a number of university committees and has delivered over 25 programs, events, enrichment experiences and educational presentations through the Center for African American Students. Maurice has big plans and goals in this new role, and I am confident that he will accomplish them all. I look forward to his leadership and the contributions he will make in his new role."

Cooley said he wants to create plans to increase the underrepresented minority students at the university, and work with international students who now live on campus.

"I am looking forward to working very, very closely with the deans, faculty and certainly the students in the INTO program, with development of immersion programs so they will become an integral part of the Marshall family," Cooley said. "We want them to not just be happy here, but to feel like they are a part of the Marshall family. We need to develop processes and a culture where our students will learn from international students and international students will learn and develop new perspectives about life in America."
 
Ultimately, Cooley said, when the international students and non-international students from Marshall complete their journeys in school and go off to work in professional work settings across the country and the world, they will take with them knowledge gained in the Marshall experience, which includes having had the experience here of living, learning, working and socializing and learning from students from around the world.
 
The former office of multicultural affairs, Cooley said, has been "carefully redesigned to where it moves the role of the university to more of a current age of what we must do to prepare our students for global change.  The change of the name reflects the change in the vision¸" he said.
 
The support services and the vision for the development and growth of African and African American students will remain intact, Cooley said. He will continue to direct the Center for African American students and all the related programs as well as the Marshall University Society of Black Scholars. At the same time, he will integrate the Center for African American Student concepts into the overall intercultural concepts.

Other accomplishments by Cooley while at Marshall include:

  • He is a founding member, and still serves on the Cabell-Wayne County Health Science and Technology Academy (HSTA) local governing board.
  • He has been, since 2008, a member of the MU-HSTA Summer Institute, serving as summer staff director and on the planning team.
  • He is the director of the annual Outstanding Black High School Student Weekend and Scholars Initiative.
  • He created and directed programs and individualized interventions that led to the following recognition - Marshall received national recognition in 2010 for being among the top 26 rated public universities in the United States, when comparing African American student graduation rates with Caucasian student graduating rates.
  • He is 2003 founder and director of the highly acclaimed Marshall University Society of Black Scholars.
  • He is redesign director of the prestigious annual Donning of the Kente celebration.
  • He is chair of the annual Diversity Breakfast.
  • He is founder and director of the Black Alumni Connections Network.


Cooley said he hopes to eventually establish a center for intercultural affairs at Marshall, featuring an open environment in which students from throughout the world can come to MU and seek not just academic advising, but at the same time "learn and socialize, and grow and live with one another. That is one of my personal ambitions here at the university."


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 14, 2014
Contact: Leah C. Payne, Director of Public Affairs, Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy, 304-691-1713

Dr. Suzanne Holroyd to lead department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Dr. Suzanne Holroyd has been named chairman of the department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine.

Holroyd joins Marshall from the University of Virginia (UVA) School of Medicine where she served as vice chair for education in the department of psychiatry and neurobehavioral science, among several other administrative appointments and academic positions.
 
"Dr. Holroyd is a fantastic addition to our institution, "said Dr. Joseph I. Shapiro, dean of the School of Medicine.  "We performed a national search which identified a number of excellent candidates, but she was, hands down, the first choice of everyone who came in contact with her during the interview process. I am optimistic that Dr. Holroyd will help us expand the educational and care capabilities we already have in the department and over time, truly impact the care that we can deliver in this region.  We are looking forward to her expert leadership as we forge new ground in this critically important area of health care."

As chairman, Holroyd will be responsible for administrative functions on both the clinical and academic operations of the department including development of a graduate medical education program in psychiatry.

"I am thrilled to be joining the Marshall department of psychiatry," Holroyd said.  "We have just submitted our application for an accredited psychiatry residency training program, with plans to add  fellowship training in geriatric psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry in the future.  We will be collaborating with many of the community psychiatric facilities to provide superb training and I look forward to working with everyone to provide state-of-the-art psychiatric care."

Holroyd earned her medical degree from the University of Virginia and completed a residency in psychiatry and a clinical research fellowship in geriatric psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Following her residency, she served as an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins.  She joined the University of Virginia in 1992, first as an assistant professor and rising to the rank of professor in 2004. She served there until late last year, when she accepted the position at Marshall. Clinically, she specializes in psychiatric disorders in the elderly, including those with dementia or memory loss disorders.

Holroyd has been honored by Castle Connolly, Ltd. as one of America's Top Doctors every year since 2004 and directed UVA's division of geriatric psychiatry.

In additional to her clinical practice, Holroyd is a busy researcher and published author in the field of psychiatry.  Her current research interests include psychiatric disorders in the elderly while being treated in various facilities, visual hallucinations in late life disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and well as late-life depression.    She has authored or co-authored dozens of peer-reviewed articles.

Holroyd is the second female physician to lead Marshall's department of psychiatry and behavior medicine.   Dr. Mildred Mitchell Bateman served as the inaugural chair of the department from 1977 to 1982.

Holroyd officially joined the School of Medicine Jan. 1.


Direct Link to This Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday January 14, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall University's South Charleston Campus, Teays Valley Regional Center to reopen Wednesday, Jan. 15

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Marshall University's South Charleston campus and Teays Valley Regional Center will reopen Wednesday, Jan. 15, after having been closed because of the water emergency in the greater Charleston area.

On Wednesday, all Marshall campuses and centers will be open as scheduled.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 13, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6713

Marshall University's Teays Valley Regional Center to be closed Monday, Jan. 13

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Due to the ongoing water emergency and the closure of the Putnam County Schools today (Monday, Jan. 13), classes for Marshall University's Teays Valley Regional Center are cancelled.

The water emergency DOES NOT affect Marshall's main campus in Huntington or other locations around the state, including Point Pleasant  and Beckley.

In Huntington, residence halls opened this weekend and students who live on campus have returned. The water supply on the main campus was never interrupted and classes in Huntington resumed as scheduled on Monday for the start of the spring semester.

Marshall officials will update the university's official website, www.marshall.edu, and social media channels as more information is available about the reopening of the South Charleston campus and the Teays Valley Regional Center.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 13, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center presents MELT: a workshop for sports-related pain and injury

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center will be hosting a special hour of MELT with Susan Robarts at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21.

MELT is a simple self-treatment technique that helps people get out of and stay out of chronic pain.  MELT is not exercise.  It is not a diet.  It is a simple method using soft balls and a soft roller that you can do at home to restore neurological balance, stability, and joint mobility.  In this workshop, you will learn how to MELT at home to decrease the "stuck stress" that has accumulated in your body from normal activities and daily living. 

Robarts, BSc, CPT, and instructor of the class, said, "MELTing your body is just as important as brushing your teeth in regards to self-care.  You brush your teeth for two reasons:  one, to have fresh breath for the short-term, and two, to keep your teeth healthy for the long-term.  Look at MELT the same way.  Here are two reasons to MELT:  one, to rid your body of the 'stuck stress' that has accumulated throughout the day, and two, to give your joints and tissues the proper hydration they need to keep you free of pain and disease over time.  MELT takes about as long as it does to brush your teeth, so why not give your body the self-care it deserves and needs?"

Members and non-members of the Rec Center are all welcome. This class is ideal for athletes and anyone with chronic pain. The cost is $20 for members and $28 for non-members. Call 304-696-4732 for more information. To sign up, visit the Rec Center Welcome Desk or www.marshallcampusrec.com.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 13, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, 304-696-6173

Marshall University's South Charleston Campus, Teays Valley Regional Center to remain closed Tuesday, Jan. 14

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Due to the continued water supply emergency in the greater Charleston area, Marshall University's South Charleston campus and Teays Valley Regional Center will remain closed on Tuesday, Jan. 14.
 
This emergency DOES NOT affect Marshall's main campus in Huntington or other locations around the state, including Point Pleasant and Beckley. Only  the South Charleston campus and the Teays Valley Regional Center will be closed.
 
Marshall officials will update the university's official website, www.marshall.edu, and social media channels as more information is available about the reopening of the South Charleston campus and the Teays Valley Regional Center.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Sunday January 12, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

Marshall University's South Charleston campus to remain closed on Monday, Jan. 13

Spring classes to begin as scheduled on HUNTINGTON campus.
Water emergency DOES NOT affect Marshall's other campuses

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. Due to the continued water supply emergency in the greater Charleston area, Marshall University's South Charleston campus will be closed on Monday, Jan. 13.

This emergency DOES NOT affect Marshall's main campus in Huntington or other locations around the state, including Point Pleasant, Hurricane and Beckley. Only the South Charleston campus will be closed.

In Huntington, residence halls opened this weekend and students who live on campus have returned. The water supply on the main campus was never interrupted and classes in Huntington resume as scheduled on Monday for the start of the spring semester.

Marshall officials will update the university's official website, www.marshall.edu, and social media channels as more information is available about the reopening of the South Charleston campus.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday January 11, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University students allowed to check in to residence halls early

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University will assist students who need a place to stay by allowing them to check in to their residence halls after 5 p.m. today, or a day earlier than usual for the start of the spring semester, the university has announced.

Matt Turner, MU's chief of staff, said Marshall's main campus in Huntington was not affected by the water emergency centered in the Charleston area, but for those students who live in areas that were affected, opening the residence halls early could provide some relief - and, some water.

A resident advisor for each hall will be on duty tonight to assist students. Students in Twin Towers East, Twin Towers West and Gibson Hall will have immediate card access, and the First-Year residence halls are currently open.

For all other halls, students will need to call the RA on duty, whose cell phone number will be posted on the hall entrance door. Card access will be back on for these halls by 9 a.m.  Sunday, when the halls officially reopen for the spring semester.

Any student who currently does not reside on campus and needs a room can come to the front desk of Holderby Hall. The staff there can assist students with getting checked in and have linen packs available.

The university also plans to have a water station available at the fenced-in area on the north side of the maintenance building on 20th Street from noon to 5 p.m. Monday. Anyone who needs water may pull off  20th Street, into the fenced area. MU physical plant employees will assist those who need water.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 10, 2014
Contact: Matt Turner, Chief of Staff, (304) 696-6713

Marshall University's Huntington campus not affected by Charleston water emergency

Classes, residence halls on Huntington campus scheduled
to operate normally when the spring semester begins Monday

South Charleston campus situation being monitored

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's main campus in Huntington has not been affected by the water supply emergency centered in the Charleston area, and classes will begin as scheduled on that campus Monday, Jan. 13. Huntington is served by a public water source that is different from the ones affected by the emergency advisory issued Thursday.
 
Residence halls, classrooms, libraries and offices on the Huntington campus are operating normally and ready to accommodate students as they begin the spring semester, said Matt Turner, Marshall's chief of staff.

Marshall also has a campus in South Charleston that was closed on Friday due to the "Do Not Use" notice issued by West Virginia American Water. Turner said university officials will wait for further information from public safety officials this weekend to determine whether the South Charleston campus can be reopened on Monday.
 
Marshall's facilities in Hurricane, Beckley and Point Pleasant were not affected by the emergency.

 


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday January 10, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

South Charleston campus closed today due to water emergency

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Due to the water emergency in Kanawha County and the shortage of potable water, Marshall University's South Charleston campus will be closed Friday, Jan. 10, 2014.

Employees and students are asked to consult the website regarding operations on Monday, Jan. 13.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 9, 2014
Contact: Ginny Painter, Communications Director, Marshall University Research Corporation, 304-746-1964

Anthropologist using 3-D printing technology to enhance research and student learning

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - As a biological anthropologist and assistant biology professor at Marshall University, Dr. Paul Constantino studies human evolution. His research focuses on how the skull and teeth have developed and how diet has influenced that development.

The shelves of his office are lined with life-size skull models illustrating the range of human evolution and his lab is filled with experiments designed to measure things like the force required to crack nuts and the jaw motions of giant pandas as they chew bamboo.

Ironically, perhaps, for someone studying and teaching about humans who lived tens of thousands of years ago, Constantino is using one of today's hottest technologies in his lab and classroom.

He recently bought a state-of-the-art 3-D printer to give students in his human anatomy courses hands-on access to replicas of specimens they are studying.

He says, "We purchased the printer so we could make reproductions of specimens at the size we need to inspect them. For example, some of the teeth we are examining are tiny, almost microscopic, so they are very difficult to see. Now we can print a model of that tooth that's large enough to handle and shows all the detail, right down to the ridges and grooves on the surface of the actual specimen."
 
Or, he adds, perhaps the actual specimen they want to see is one-of-a-kind and in a collection on the other side of the world. All Constantino's team needs is a 3-D data file of the object and they are able to print a realistic model they can hold in their hands right here in Huntington.
 
Constantino said they are continuing to expand their capabilities and have recently ordered a portable 3-D scanner to complement the printer.
 
"We will be able to take the 3-D scanner out in the field to a museum or archeological site for example scan a specimen, come back to the lab and print a reproduction of it that we can study," he added. "We will also be able to scan moving objects, like a person's head while they are talking, and capture and print a particular expression in 3-D."
 
Constantino is working to get the word out that access to the equipment is available to other departments across the university. He said he can envision teaching and research applications in a number of fields, including engineering, science, the arts and medicine.
 
"We want to make sure this valuable tool is used as much as possible. The equipment has to be run regularly to keep it in working order, so we are making it available to the university community," he said. "We can provide scaled-up versions of whatever faculty and students might be studying molecules or microbes, for instance.
 
"The printer is great for creating 3-D models of almost anything, including design prototypes, maps and anatomical structures. All we really need to print a model is a 3-D image. We can use CT or laser scans, even data from confocal microscopes. Anything like that will work. We can even do color models."
 
For more information, contact constantinop@marshall.edu.
 
Constantino joined the faculty at Marshall in 2010. Prior to that, he was a postdoctoral scientist at George Washington University.
 
He has a bachelor's degree in biology from St. Michael's College, a master's degree in anthropology from Florida Atlantic University and a doctorate in hominid paleobiology from George Washington University. In April, he was honored with the Marshall University Distinguished Artists and Scholars Award, which recognizes achievements in the fields of artistic and scholarly activity.

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Photo: Marshall Professor Dr. Paul Constantino holds a skull created in MU's 3-D printer. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday January 6, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall University to delay office opening Tuesday, Jan. 7, due to extreme temperatures

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Due to extreme low temperatures, Marshall University will delay opening of all its campuses on Tuesday, Jan. 7, until 10 a.m.

Only essential personnel should report before 10 a.m. Classes for the spring semester do not begin until Jan. 13, so this will not affect course schedules.


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Friday January 3, 2014
Contact: Susan Tams, Director of Editorial Services, 304-746-2038

Marshall to present annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - Marshall University's annual "Living the Legacy" Awards Luncheon will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23, in the Don Morris Room on Marshall's Huntington campus.

The event will feature bestselling author Omar Tyree, whose works include the nonfiction The Equation: Applying the 4 Indisputable Components of Business Success and novels such as Flyy Girl, Welcome to Dubai (The Traveler) and For the Love of Money.

Dr. Shari Clarke, Marshall vice president for multicultural affairs, said the luncheon is free to the Marshall University community, but reservations are required. Reservations may be made by e-mailing allen1@marshall.edu or calling 304-696-4677. Deadline is Wednesday, Jan. 15.

Clarke also said the program is dedicated to the memory of Janis Winkfield, who was a staff member in the Office of Financial Aid at Marshall until her death in 2009. Winkfield also was member of the Marshall University Foundation Board of Directors and a past president of the Marshall Black Alumni. Donations will be collected at the luncheon for the scholarship in Winkfield's name.

The event is sponsored by Marshall's Office of Multicultural Affairs, with assistance from corporate sponsor Walmart.


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Friday January 3, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

Marshall Recreation Center division of Outdoor Pursuits releases spring calendar of events, trips

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - The Marshall Recreation Center division of Outdoor Pursuits has released its calendar of events and trips for the spring 2014 semester. Advance registration is required unless otherwise noted. Here is the schedule:

January
27 - Winter Warmer Film Series: 180 Degrees South - The first installment of the Rec's 4-week Outdoor Film Series will be held in the Outdoor Pursuits Lounge.

February
Jan. 31-Feb. 2 - Ski Trip at Snowshoe - A 3-day, 2-night skiing and snowboarding trip to the Snowshoe Mountain Resort. Various packages are available.

3 - Winter Warmer Film Series: The Shorts - The second installment of the Rec's Outdoor Film Series will be held in the Outdoor Pursuits Lounge. Featuring 23Feet, MoveShake and Gimp Monkeys

10 - Winter Warmer Film Series - The third installment of the Rec's Outdoor Film Series held in the Outdoor Pursuits Lounge, featuring Wild Water

15 - Ski Trip to Winterplace - 1 full day of skiing and snowboarding fun at Winterplace Ski Resort. Optional snowtubing will be available.

17 - Winter Warmer Film Series - Final installment of the Rec's Outdoor Film Series held in the Outdoor Pursuits Lounge featuring Flight of the Frenchies (subject to change).

March
1 - 2nd annual Climbing Competition - Climbing Competition will be held at the Rec and complete with new routes, prizes and awards. Registration includes a t-shirt.

8 - Mountain biking at New River Gorge - 4-hour biking trip in the mountains of the New River Gorge National Park.

17-21 - Spring break in Charleston, S.C. - The Rec's annual spring break celebration trip to Charleston, S.C.

28-30 - Canoe/kayaking trip to the Greenbrier River -a 2-day, 1-night canoe and kayaking trip. No experience is necessary.

April
5 - Rock Climbing at New River Gorge - A 2-day, 1-night rock-climbing trip to the New River Gorge National Park.

12-13 - Whitewater rafting at New River Gorge - A 2-day, 1-night whitewater rafting/camping trip at the lower New River

25-27 - Backpacking at Shenandoah National Park - A 3-day, 2-night backpacking trip on the Appalachian Trail inside the park. Previous hiking experience is required.

May
3-4 - Spring Thaw Bouldering Competition - The Rec's inaugural bouldering competition will be held in the Outdoor Pursuits Center complete with new bouldering problems, prizes and awards.

 

For rates or additional information, contact Chad Steen, Outdoor Pursuits coordinator, by phone at 304-696-4653, or by e-mail at steenc@marshall.edu.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday January 2, 2014
Contact: Dave Wellman, Director of Communications, (304) 696-7153

In Memoriam: Buck Harless

Marshall University President Stephen J. Kopp issued the following statement about James H. "Buck" Harless, who passed away Wednesday night:

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. - "Truly the rarest of the exceptional human beings who have graced our world, James H. "Buck" Harless was a devoted West Virginian who dedicated himself to making this state a better place to live, work and raise a family. He was renowned for his business acumen and esteemed by the elite and well-connected. He was a touchstone for political aspirants; however, it was the countless lives of everyday people he touched through his generosity, caring and willingness to share his wisdom that set him apart. His love of the people of West Virginia was genuine and endeared him to all who knew him. He understood the virtue of hard work and lived it every day, even at the age of 94. He understood the virtue of compassion for others less fortunate and was the embodiment of a life well-lived. I regard Buck as a legend who exemplified the power of serving and the virtue of empowering others.

Buck was revered by the Marshall University community and we thank him for all he has done for the people of West Virginia and Marshall University. The greatest honor he could have bestowed on us was the 'Harless' name. It is a proud and lasting legacy that affirms the profound influence that he had on this university, our people and our beloved state."

Harless was born in Taplin, in Logan County, on Oct. 14, 1919, but lived most of his life in Gilbert, W.Va. He enjoyed success in the timber and coal industries, and was Chairman of the Board with International Industries, Inc. He was past chairman of the Marshall University Board of Advisors and a former member of the Marshall University Foundation Board.

Harless also received an honorary doctorate from Marshall, was named to the Marshall University Business Hall of Fame, and received the John Marshall Medal of Civic Responsibility.

His generous financial contributions have supported the Buck Harless Student Athlete Program at Marshall, and the June Montgomery Harless Center for Rural Educational Research & Development at Marshall is named for his late wife. The Harless Dining Hall at Marshall, which opened in January 2004, also is named for him. And, the Harless Auditorium at the Marshall University Medical Center is named after Buck's late son, Larry Joe Harless.

Harless also was one of the first contributors to the Society of Yeager Scholars at Marshall University.

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Photo: James H. "Buck" Harless speaks at Marshall University during dedication of the Harless Dining Hall in 2004. Photo by Rick Haye/Marshall University.


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