Stuttering

Faculty-Led Research

Community Centered Assessment of Stuttering

Led by Professor Craig Coleman and Dr. Mary Weidner, this study aims to measure the holistic impact of stuttering on a person’s life using various assessment tools designed for the person who stutters, as well as his/her teachers, parents, and clinicians.

Overall Assessment of Speaker’s Experience with Stuttering

Led by Professor Craig Coleman, this study focuses on comparing the communication experiences of people who do and do not stutter using the widely-used instrument, the Overall Assessment of Speaker’s Experience with Stuttering (OASES).

The InterACT Program

Led by Dr. Mary Weidner, this research seeks to measure and change the stuttering attitudes among young children using the newly developed educational program, the Attitude Change and Tolerance program (InterACT).

 

Faculty-Student Collaboration

Children’s Perspectives on Stuttering: A Video Project

The purpose of this project was to create a video that can be used as a therapy tool so children, particularly those in rural areas who may not know any other children who stutter, can view the experiences and reactions of others who stutter. It was produced to: (1) add a new and updated resource to similar existing videos, (2) serve as a clinical resource to help people who stutter learn about others’ stuttering experiences and discuss their own, and (3) potentially be used as an intervention to improve public attitudes toward stuttering.

Perceptions of “Relapse” in Stuttering and Other Chronic Conditions 

The purposes of this study were to analyze public interpretations of the term relapsein various conditions, including stuttering, and to gauge the appropriateness of the term to describe fluctuations of stuttering following treatment. Persons 18 years or older were invited to participate in the study, which involved taking an anonymous survey. The survey link was distributed through various platforms, including social media, personal contacts, etc. It included the open-ended prompt to define relapse followed by a series of Likert-scale items related to the prevalence of relapse in various conditions.

Parent Education of Stuttering During a Summer Program for Children: Student Perspectives 

Previous research has examined parent satisfaction and knowledge levels before and after camp, however, no research has been carried out to assess student experiences with the training opportunities that the camp provides. The purpose of this poster presentation is to highlight narratives from the four graduate students who have been involved in running the parent sessions over the past two years.

Knowledge and Perceptions of Stuttering: Perspectives from Pre-Service Educators 

The purpose of the proposed study is to examine pre-service educators’ perceptions and knowledge of stuttering. This is important information, as children spend a significant amount of time in the classroom and stuttering can impact educational and social performance. As such, teachers should be equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage a classroom with a child who stutters. This study measured pre-service educators’ knowledge and perceptions of stuttering. An anonymous survey, comprised of 16 quantitative and qualitative questions, was distributed to undergraduate students in Marshall University’s Education Department via e-mail. Knowledge, professional involvement, perceptions, and reactions were assessed using quantitative Likert-scale questions. Open-ended questions assessing real-life scenarios concerning students who stutter in the general education classroom were included but are not presented in this data analysis.