Sociology is the study of human societies. We ask basic questions like “why do humans do what we do” and “how does society work”. Along the way we pick up essential human questions like: What does it mean when we say that we live in a socially constructed reality? What is the place of the individual in society? Do we have “free will,” or are our personal actions determined by social forces? Is social life really what Thomas Hobbes called the “war of all against all”? Why do we have social order?

If you have ever thought about questions like these or find yourself concerned with social issues, then you may want to consider a degree in sociology.  Humans are social beings and we interact in a social environment. Sociology is the scientific discipline that studies human behavior and social interactions of individuals, groups, organizations and whole societies. Sociology is a science, and was identified in the 1830s as one of the five “mother sciences” along with astronomy, chemistry, physics, and biology, and as such overlaps with other social sciences (political science, economics, psychology, and anthropology) though we maintain our unique perspectives. Sociology focuses primarily on contemporary societies, though we incorporate a historical and developmental perspective.

The sociology program at Marshall University offers students the opportunity to study the intricacies of social life: how to negotiate the collaboratively constructed institutions through which our social world works, how social stratification affects opportunities for individuals and groups, how to critically analyze the problems inherent in the way we construct society, how to empirically determine the facts we construct into truths. The social and analytical skills developed through the program are essential for any job dealing with people and organizations – especially those dealing in multiethnic and global environments and that require breadth and adaptability.

You do not often see jobs with “sociologist” in the title, but a BA with a major in sociology is recognized as an excellent preparation for a wide variety of occupations, especially for careers in social policy, education, union organizing or other social movements, health care, criminology, aging network, industrial or public relations, marketing, human resource management, organizational research, or community and social services. Of course, Marshall University’s sociology program also offers an excellent preparation for professional degrees and /or advanced degrees in sociology. A 2009 study by CareerCast.com ranked sociology as the eighth most appealing job in its analysis of 200 occupations based on job characteristics such as perceived work environment, income, employment outlook, physical demands, security and stress.

The sociology program at Marshall University seeks to ensure that each student develops a solid foundation in the principles, theories and techniques of analysis in the discipline. While allowing for a great deal of flexibility to accommodate students’ diverse interests, the curriculum ensures that students are introduced to social theory, stratification and institutions and courses in the basic methods of the discipline.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology focuses on applied sociology and anthropology, especially the analysis of social and cultural issues, policies and trends in Appalachia. We also offer courses in social theory, with an emphasis on inequality. Anthropology majors may participate in a summer field school that provides hands-on experience in archaeological excavation at significant local sites. Sociology majors may be placed in a local community organization or public agency through SOC 470, Sociological Field Experience.

For information about the value of an education in Sociology see the Why Sociology? page.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

To graduate with a major in sociology, a student must take 39 credits of required core classes and electives as described below.

The required core of the sociology major consists of 18 credits (6 classes):

SOC 200 Introductory Sociology

SOC 344 Social Research I

SOC 345 Social Statistics I

SOC 360 Sociological Perspectives

SOC 391 Junior Seminar

SOC 492 Senior Seminar (Capstone)

Sociology Electives

An additional 21 credits (7 classes) of electives must be chosen from classes with the SOC prefix. These electives must include:

a) a minimum of three classes from courses in one of the focus areas listed below to develop program depth; this selection must include the italicized course as the foundation course for that focus area.

b) classes that contribute to three other focus areas to develop program breadth.

c) free electives: the remaining 3-9 credits can be fulfilled by any class with the SOC prefix, including Independent Study and Internship. The number of remaining credits will vary dependent on the selection of courses to satisfy requirement a) and b) above. Some classes are listed in more than one focus area and a student can count such classes in more than one focus area for this requirement; however, the requirement for the total number of credit hours must of course still be met.

Focus Areas:

Organizations & Institutions:  SOC 300, SOC 362, SOC 408, SOC 433, SOC 450 or SOC 464

Stratification/Diversity: SOC 375, SOC 423, SOC 425, SOC 432, SOC 440 or SOC 455

Social Problems & Collective Behavior:  SOC 310, SOC 311, SOC 313, SOC 413, SOC 420, SOC 435, or SOC 460

Demography, Health & Human Environments: SOC 362, SOC 401, SOC 432, SOC 440, SOC 442 or SOC 452

Marshall Plan Computer Competency Requirement

By successfully completing SOC 344, sociology majors fulfill the Computer Competency requirement.

Marshall Plan Capstone Requirement

By successfully completing SOC 492, sociology majors fulfill the Capstone requirement.

 

Minor in Sociology

A minor in sociology requires at least 15 credits. As listed below, 9 of these credits constitute the core of the minor. The reminder of the required credits can be taken from any class with the prefix SOC. A maximum of 6 credits below 300-level can be counted towards the minor.

The required core of the sociology minor consists of 9 credits (3 classes):

SOC 200 Introductory Sociology

SOC 344 Social Research I

SOC 360 Sociological Perspectives

 

Students majoring or minoring in sociology are strongly encouraged to discuss with an advisor (in the department and/or in the office of the dean of the College of Liberal Arts) ways in which the requirements in the major/minor simultaneously cover parts of the general education requirements in the College of Liberal Arts and/or the Marshall Plan.

 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE CATALOG

SOCIOLOGY STUDENT ADVISING SHEETS

Academic Year 2010+

Academic Year 2009-2010

 

Masters of Arts in Sociology

For more information visit the Graduate Program in Sociology.