Previous Seminar Schedules

For current Graduate Humanities Seminars, see here.

Fall 2017

HUMN 603: History and Theory of the Arts (Hilliard), Wednesdays, 7 – 9:50 PM

Core course provides chronological survey of the arts, emphasizing the social, political and/or religious motives that underlie artistic production.

This seminar will explore the theory and practice of expressive arts, with consideration of visual, verbal, cinematic, public, protest, “outsider,” and performance forms, among others. Using anthropological, folkloristic, and arts and cultural studies theoretical frameworks, we will explore the engaged relationship of the arts to society and consider how these concepts can inform current work in arts administration, museums, public folklore, and community development. The course will rely on participatory critical analysis and discussion, with some excursions to area museums, organizations, artist studios, and public installations.

Emily Hilliard is the West Virginia state folklorist and founder of the West Virginia Folklife Program at the West Virginia Humanities Council. She holds an M.A. in folklore from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and a B.A. in English and French from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. For the past ten years she has worked at cultural heritage organizations including Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, the American Folklife Center, the National Council for the Traditional Arts, and Maryland Traditions. Her writing and media work has been published by NPR, Humanities Magazine, Ecotone, The Bitter Southerner, and Southern Cultures, among others. Find more of her work at emilyehilliard.com.

HUMN 604: Expository Writing for Research (Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 PM

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research.

Cat Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HUMN 650 – MAJOR SCHOLAR SEMINAR – Storying Climate Change (Crate) 

More on the Major Scholar Program is here.

CLASS LIMIT: 5. By permission of the Director only.

Meetings on Thursday, August 24, 7-9:50 p.m.; Thursday, August 31, 7-9:50 p.m.; Thursday, September 21, 7-9:50 pm; Thursday, October 26, 7-9:50 pm; and Thursday, December 14, 7-9:50 pm.

Anthropogenic climate change is an incredibly urgent issue in the 21st century that transcends any political view or position, and must be addressed to ensure the perpetuation of life as we know it on the planet.  Indisputable among serious scientists, the facts speak for themselves.  Yet little is being done to address this world-wide crisis.  Among those reasons include a naive position in which people use their own experience (such as not feeling the effects of climate change in their own lives) to evaluate a world-wide problem.  In an effort to increase awareness of the experience of others around the world who are already directly experiencing climate change, many scientists are turning to story to raise awareness.  This Major Scholar Seminar will explore some crucial parts of this effort, highlight the stories of people around the world struggling to adapt to rapid change, and encourage participants to understand how the power of story may be an important key to unlocking how the world will deal with this most critical issue.

Dr. Susan Crate has been documenting the perceptions, understandings and responses of change, in its many forms, with indigenous communities in Sibera since 1988. Since 1991 she has worked with Viliui Sakha, Turkic-speaking horse and cattle breeders in arctic Siberia and in 2006 she began working with them on issues of climate change as they face an increasingly unpredictable environment. She continues that work and also to document the experience of climate change in other global communities who are feeling uncontestable effects.  She and her daughter, Katie Yegorov-Crate, are the subjects of a new documentary on Crate’s work titled “The Anthropologist,” a film that the New York Times called “a stealthily insightful film [that] improbably mixes that topic with a mother-daughter story to produce a distinctive study of change and human adaptability.”  Crate is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University.

Note: graduate course credit for this seminar is also available from MU’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology (SOC 580 and ANT 580).

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Summer 2017

HUMN 600: Introduction to Graduate Study in the Humanities (Lassiter), Thursdays, 5 – 8:00 PM

Interdisciplinary core course addresses questions/concepts central to the humanities. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, the arts and the sciences provide insights into selected historical periods.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter is director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology.

HUMN 650 – Section 431 (Special Topics) Projects in the Humanities (Lassiter) 

Face to Face Meetings on Tuesday – May 16, June 13, July 18, and August 1: 5 – 8:00 PM

This course provides students the opportunity to work on the earliest stages of design and implementation of their final project required for the MA in Humanities or for the Appalachian Studies Certificate. Though the seminar is primarily for students new to the program, projects can be organized at any stage of development—it might include, for example, initial explorations of larger literatures or implementing the earliest stages of an applied project.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2017

A&S 600: Belonging: Folklore and the Ties that Bind Us (Campbell), Wednesdays: 7 – 9:50 p.m.

In this era of globalization, folklore—the traditional arts, knowledge, and practices that cultural groups and communities preserve, adapt, and pass on—is as present and important as it has ever been. Folklore has always shaped and reflected the identities of cultural groups; today, as Martha Sims and Martine Stephens write, folklore “helps us to form and express identity in the midst of an always complex, sometimes confusing social context, in which our sense of who we are is frequently questioned and challenged.” In this class, participants will explore and document how American folklore helps to form, express, and connect our many identities.

Dr. Beth Campbell is an Associate Professor in the College of Education and Professional Development. She coordinates the ESL Program, and teaches qualitative research and writing, and educational foundations. Originally trained as a folklorist and ethnographer, Beth has worked with public history, humanities, and arts organizations to produce museum exhibits, local history projects, and arts and culture programs. Her research interests include collaborative research and writing, community-university partnerships, and oral history. She is especially interested in how collaborative research can work—through shared agency, shared commitment, and shared humanity—to make and remake those who engage it. She is the co-author of Doing Collaborative Ethnography Today.

CULS 611: Appalachian Studies: Themes & Voices (Cat Pleska), Mondays: 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the significant issues and research in Appalachian studies. Important political, social, and cultural issues will be considered. Research areas are introduced. (This core course in the Graduate Certificate in Appalachian Studies may be taken by degree students in Humanities.)

Ms. Cat Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HUMN 605: Western Traditions and Contemporary Cultures (Lassiter), Tuesdays, 7 – 9:50 PM

Using primary materials from different cultural periods, as well as contemporary critical analyses, this core course explores epistemological questions that underlie conflicts between cultures.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter is director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Fall 2016

CULS 600: Family & Children in Appalachia (Howard), Thursdays: 7 – 9:50 p.m., with online and face-to-face meetings

Seminar is Technology Enhanced, hybrid with online and live meetings. Check the Graduate Humanities Program website before the semester begins for updates on live meeting times.

This seminar is designed to explore the unique aspects of families in Appalachia.  It will focus on connections to larger social contexts, but it will also touch on local connections to community.  We’ll address both the joys and challenges of raising children here, and what it means to be a family in Appalachia.  And, finally, we’ll talk about issues that don’t always get talked about such as literacy, disability, and poverty.

Dr. Lori Howard is an Assistant Professor of Special Education.  She began her career in special education working with deaf and hearing impaired students. Subsequently, she earned a doctoral degree from the University of Virginia in educational psychology. Most recently, she received the Pickens-Queen Excellence in Teaching Award. Her current interests are including students with disabilities into math and science courses, co-teaching, and inclusion.

LITS 600: Digital Humanities (Heaton), Wednesdays: 7 – 9:50 p.m., with online and face-to-face meetings

Seminar is Technology Enhanced, hybrid with online and live meetings. Check the Graduate Humanities Program website before the semester begins for updates on live meeting times.

Explore the digital humanities through reading of related literature and hands-on practice using various technologies to produce artifacts such as digital stories. An emphasis will be placed on experiential learning, learning through experience and reflection.

Dr. Lisa Heaton is Professor and Program Director of Elementary and Secondary Education in the College of Education and Professional Development.  Her work for the past 20 years has focused on using technology to enhance teaching and learning. Educational experiences in English Language Arts (B.S.) and Instructional Technology (Ph.D.) merge to form her particular interest in using digital media to produce products such as data archives, photo essays and digital stories.

HUMN 604: Expository Writing for Research (Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 PM

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research.

Ms. Cat Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Summer 2016

CULS 610: Seminar in Appalachian Culture (Lassiter) – Hybrid Online & Face to Face Seminar Meetings

Face to Face Meetings on Thursday – May 19, June 16, July 21: 5 – 8:00 p.m.

Exploration of selected aspects of culture (e.g., art, music, folklore, history, literature), emphasizing regional culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. This course is offered on-line with three live meetings on Thursday, May 19, June 16, July 21: 5 – 8:00 p.m.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter is director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology.

HUMN 600: Introduction to Graduate Study in the Humanities (Lassiter) – Hybrid Online & Face to Face Seminar Meetings

Face to Face Meetings on Wednesday – May 18, June 22, July 20, & August 3: 5 – 8:00 p.m.

Interdisciplinary core course addresses questions/concepts central to the humanities. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, the arts and the sciences provide insights into selected historical periods. Open to non-degree students.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2016

CULS 600: West Virginia’s Activists: Stories of Social Change (Tierney and Lassiter), Wednesdays, 7-9:50 PM

This seminar will explore the more recent history of West Virginia through the eyes of activists who worked to make West Virginia a better place. We’ll meet activists in the local area and explore the traditions of literature and portraiture of activism. Participants will be guided through the process of shaping an oral history or creative nonfiction piece as a public exhibit to share the stories they have to tell about West Virginia’s past, present, and future.

Mr. Michael Tierney, Executive Director of Step by Step, is a songwriter, photographer, children’s book fanatic and has been a member of the Catholic Worker movement since he was 18. Michael Tierney has been a community activist for over 37 years working in areas of rural community organizing, leadership development, local history and participatory research documentation, and alternative education. He founded the regional non-profit Step by Step in 1988 and from his home base on Big Ugly Creek in Lincoln County, has collaborated on projects throughout the Appalachian region, in inner city Boston, Nicaragua, Slovakia, South Africa, and Scotland. He graduated from Harvard College with an independent major focusing on the interplay of family, work, school and activism including a study of an isolated community in Mingo County. 

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has written widely on topics concerning anthropology, folklore, ethnomusicology, and ethnography. His latest book, titled Doing Ethnography Today, co-authored with Elizabeth Campbell, explores the complexities of doing collaborative ethnography in dynamic and shifting fieldwork sites.

CULS 612: Time & Place in Appalachia (Maslowski), Tuesdays, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the importance of geography, topography, and geology to the history and development of the Appalachian region.

Dr. Robert Maslowski, retired Archeologist for the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, possesses extensive knowledge of Appalachian archeology, culture, and history. He was executive producer of three award winning films, Ghosts of Green Bottom, Red Salt & Reynolds, and Secrets of the Valley. His numerous publications have appeared in venues such as World Archaeology, National Geographic Society Research Reports, Pennsylvania Archaeologist, Wonderful West Virginia, and West Virginia Archeologist (which he also serves as Editor).

HIST 600 – MAJOR SCHOLAR SEMINAR – Native Identities in Contemporary America (Ellis) 

CLASS LIMIT: 4. By permission of the Director only.

Meetings on Thursday, January 14, 7-9:50 p.m.; Thursday, February 11, 7-9:50 p.m.; Thursday, March 10, 7-9:50 pm; and Thursday, April 21, 7-9:50 pm.

Despite decades of pressure to assimilate, Indian people across the country continue to embrace social, cultural, political, and religious practices that give their lives as Native people meaning. These expressions often reflect complex combinations of contemporary and historical forces, so our seminar will read widely on religion, forms of gathering, politics, and community dynamics in an effort to understand a wide variety of examples.

Dr. Clyde Ellis, Professor of History and University Distinguished Scholar, Elon University, is a nationally renowned scholar who has spent much of the past 25 years living and working on the Southern Plains in the Kiowa community of southwest Oklahoma conducting extensive fieldwork on boarding schools Christian missions, Native hymn traditions, and powwow culture. More recently he has expanded his research to include southeast North Carolina’s Indian communities and has recently published a series of important studies on that region’s powwow culture.

HUMN 602: Historical Studies (Lassiter), Wednesdays, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

Core course acquaints students with problems of historical knowledge, changes in the interpretation of history, nature of historical forces, and methods of historical research.

Open to non-degree students.

LITS 600: Memoir (Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

Memoir (from French meaning memory or reminiscence) is a collection of memories that an individual writes about of moments or events that took place in one’s life. Memoir has been with us since the times of Seneca and St. Augustine’s Confessions, but it has only been in the last several decades that the genre has stepped up in its rightful place next to poetry and fiction. This class will explore this literary nonfiction genre via readings of major texts and selections. You need not have extensive practice in writing to take this course, but you will be asked to explore your own experiences to capture a true revelation of what it means to remember, to reflect, and to shape those memories in your own voice.

Ms. Cat Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Fall 2015

A&S 600: Song Traditions & Musical Experience (Lassiter), Wednesdays, 7-9:50 PM

This seminar will explore song traditions from a variety of perspectives and cultural contexts. It will focus, in particular, on the field of ethnomusicology and develop understandings of musical experience as an individual, as well as a social, process.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has written widely on topics concerning anthropology, folklore, ethnomusicology, and ethnography. His latest book, titled Doing Ethnography Today, co-authored with Elizabeth Campbell, explores the complexities of doing collaborative ethnography in dynamic and shifting fieldwork sites.

HIST 600: Appalachian Archaeology, A Glenwood Seminar (Maslowski), Selected Saturday Meetings

Saturday Meetings on Sept. 5, 19, 26; Oct. 3, 17, 24; Nov. 7, 21: 9 AM – 2:30 PM

This seminar will engage participants in the archaeology of Appalachia, and involve a special focus on the Glenwood Estate, the lens through which the archaeology of the region will be viewed. Through a Federal Historic Preservation Grant, and in partnership with the Glenwood Center for Scholarship in the Humanities, students will be involved in archaeological survey, excavation, and lab analysis in their study of both Glenwood and the Appalachian region. Please note that there will be 8 Saturday seminar meetings across the semester.

Dr. Robert Maslowski, retired Archeologist for the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, possesses extensive knowledge of Appalachian archeology, culture, and history. He was executive producer of three award winning films, Ghosts of Green Bottom, Red Salt & Reynolds, and Secrets of the Valley. His numerous publications have appeared in venues such as World Archaeology, National Geographic Society Research Reports, Pennsylvania Archaeologist, Wonderful West Virginia, and West Virginia Archeologist (which he also serves as Editor).

HUMN 601: Literary Theory & Criticism (McConnell), Tuesdays, 4:30 – 6:50 PM

Core course introduces modern critical approaches, concepts and methods of research and scholarship in the broad field of literature.

Dr. Anne McConnell teaches world literature, critical theory, and writing in the English Department at West Virginia State University. Her recent book, Approaching Disappearance, published by Dalkey Archive Press, explores the work of Maurice Blanchot, Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, and Nathalie Sarraute.

HUMN 604: Expository Writing for Research (Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 PM

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research.

Ms. Cat Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Summer 2015

CULS 600: Appalachian Folklore (Lassiter), Hybrid Online & Face to Face Seminar Meetings

Face to Face Meetings on Tuesday, May 19, June 16, July 14, & August 4: 7-9:50 p.m.

This seminar will explore the wide range of human expression (story, song, art, belief, etc.) in Appalachia via the field of Folklore. The course will take up the various kinds of folklore in Appalachia, as well as the folklore traditions found among different groups in the region.

HUMN 600: Introduction to Graduate Study in the Humanities (Lassiter), Hybrid Online & Face to Face Seminar Meetings

Face to Face Meetings on Wednesday May 20, June 24, July 22, & August 5; 7-9:50 p.m.

Interdisciplinary core course addresses questions/concepts central to the humanities. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, the arts and the sciences provide insights into selected historical periods. Open to non-degree students.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium, Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2015

Major Scholar Seminar – CULS 600: Fight The Power: Can Pop Music Foster Social Change? (with Lauren Onkey)

CLASS LIMIT: 3. By permission of the Director only.

Meetings on Thursday, January 15, 7-9:50 p.m.; Thursday, February 26, 7-9:50 p.m.; and Thursday, March 26.

Popular music has been associated with social change and even protest ever since rock and roll exploded in the 1950s. The music, and its integrated fan base, helped fight racial segregation. At times, musicians and activists have put the music to use specifically to further a cause or advance a message. At the same time, pop music is viewed by many as irresponsible, apolitical, simply too unruly to advance a political agenda. This course will explore how pop music has been used–by musicians, fans, and social activists–to fight, disrupt and conserve social norms of all kinds.

Dr. Lauren Onkey is the Vice President of Education and Public Programs at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. Onkey is executive producer of the Museum’s American Music Masters series, conducts interviews for the Museum’s many public programs and teaches rock and roll history courses at Case Western Reserve University.

For more information on Onkey’s seminar and campus visit, see our Major Scholar Seminars website.

CULS 611: Appalachian Studies: Themes & Voices (Cat Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 PM

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the significant issues and research in Appalachian studies. Important political, social, and cultural issues will be considered. Research areas are introduced. (This core course in the Graduate Certificate in Appalachian Studies may be taken by degree students in Humanities.)

Ms. Pleska earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and book reviewer for The Charleston Gazette. Her latest book, Riding on Comets: A Memoir, is published by West Virginia University Press.

HIST 600: Charleston Water Crisis Oral History & Documentary (Luke Eric Lassiter), Wednesdays, 4 – 6:50 PM

This seminar will produce a digital documentary on the January 9, 2014 chemical spill in Charleston, West Virginia, an event affecting the drinking water of over 300,000 people—the largest disaster of its kind in American history. The documentary will pull from the oral history research of three different research projects, carried out by the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy, University of California-Berkeley researcher Gabe Schwartzman, and Charleston-based documentarian Laura Harbert Allen. In addition to the documentary, seminar participants will produce conference papers and other essays. The project will be facilitated by Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter (Graduate Humanities Program Director) in collaboration with Schwartzman and Allen.

By permission of the Director only.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has authored and edited several books involving community-based oral history and ethnography. His latest book, titled Doing Ethnography Today, co-authored with Elizabeth Campbell, explores the complexities of doing collaborative ethnography in dynamic and shifting fieldwork sites.

HUMN 605: Western Traditions & Contemporary Cultures (Anne McConnell), Tuesdays, 7 – 9:50 PM

Using primary materials from different cultural periods, as well as contemporary critical analyses, this core course explores epistemological questions that underlie conflicts between cultures.

Dr. Anne McConnell teaches world literature, critical theory, and writing in the English Department at West Virginia State University. Her recent book, Approaching Disappearance, published by Dalkey Archive Press, explores the work of Maurice Blanchot, Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, and Nathalie Sarraute.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

LITS 600: Creative Hybrids: A Writing Workshop (Kent Shaw), Wednesdays, 7 – 9:50 PM

The lines separating out the various genres have continued to blur. The “short short” or “flash fiction” is often indistinguishable from the prose poem. Additionally, the lyric essay, a term originally coined by John D’Agata has developed into its own subgenre. But is it a subgenre of poetry? Of the personal essay? This course will explore both these blurred spaces and lead seminar participants with prompts for writing the lyric essay and flash fiction. By the end of the course, participants will have a full lyric essay, a series of short short’s, and the start of a lyric essay as well.

Dr. Kent Shaw teaches in the English Department at West Virginia State University. His first book Calenture was published by University of Tampa Press. His work has since appeared in The Believer, Ploughshares, Boston Review, Witness, TriQuarterly and elsewhere. He regularly reviews books at The Rumpus and is a poetry editor at the online magazine Better: Culture & Lit.

Fall 2014

A&S 600 Major Scholar Seminar: Reading American Landscapes (Arijit Sen), meetings on Thursday, August 28, 7-9:50 p.m. (Skype); Thursday, October 2, 7-9:50 p.m. (face-to-face); and Thursday, November 13 (Skype). CLASS LIMIT: 3. By permission of the Director only.

Places and landscapes frame and influence our actions and identities. Yet we rarely examine the ways we interpret and read the material world around us. Do we ever stop to ask why a gas station looks the way it does? Do we critically examine why a bank building gets built only in certain locations? Do we think that we behave in scripted ways inside a 7-11 store? The goal of this reading seminar is not only to examine “ways of reading” the built world; but also to interrogate how our individual reading practices frame the way we understand, interpret, and act in this world.

Dr. Arijit Sen is an Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, where he teaches architectural design urbanism and cultural landscapes. He is the co-coordinator of the Buildings Cultures Landscapes doctoral program initiative between the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Milwaukee. His research interests include physical and cultural landscapes of immigration in the United States.

CULS 612 Time & Place in Appalachia (Bob Maslowski), Tuesdays, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the importance of geography, topography, and geology to the history and development of the Appalachian region.

This year’s seminar participants will have the option of participating in test excavations at Fort Blair, Point Pleasant, on September 13 and 14. A public lecture on Frontier Forts, presented by Dr. Stephen McBride, is scheduled for September 9.  Both the lecture and excavations are funded by the West Virginia Humanities Council.

Dr. Robert Maslowski, retired Archeologist for the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, possesses extensive knowledge of Appalachian archeology, culture, and history. He was executive producer of three award winning films, Ghosts of Green Bottom, Red Salt & Reynolds, and Secrets of the Valley. His numerous publications have appeared in venues such as World Archaeology, National Geographic Society Research Reports, Pennsylvania Archaeologist, Wonderful West Virginia, and West Virginia Archeologist (which he also serves as Editor).

HUMN 602 Historical Studies (Luke Eric Lassiter), Wednesdays, 7 – 9:50 p.m. 

Core course acquaints students with problems of historical knowledge, changes in the interpretation of history, nature of historical forces, and methods of historical research.

Open to non-degree students.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter is director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology.

HUMN 604 Expository Writing for Research (Cat Pleska), Mondays, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research. Open to non-degree students.

Cat Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Summer 2014

CULS 610: Seminar in Appalachian Culture (Luke Eric Lassiter); Summer 1 (May 19 – August 11) online T-course with live meetings

Exploration of selected aspects of culture (e.g., art, music, folklore, history, literature), emphasizing regional culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. This course is offered on-line with three live meetings on Tuesday, May 20, 6-9 PM; Tuesday, June 17, 6-9 PM; Tuesday, July 22, 6- 9 PM.

Dr. Luke Eric Lassiter is director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology. His latest book, co-authored with Elizabeth Campbell, is Doing Ethnography Today (forthcoming from Wiley Blackwell in the fall).

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2014

Spring Semester 2014 Poster

Press Release: Local foundation provides tuition assistance for class on history of Charleston

Tuition Assistance Program for Spring 2014 Semester

CULS 620: Women, Men, and Cultural Change (Luke Eric Lassiter) Wednesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

Did you know that some societies name and recognize three or four genders?  Did you know that women and men may have different dialects in some parts of the world, even though they speak the same language? Did you know that in some places men and women can live in altogether separate households throughout their adult lives? Did you know that same-sex marriage is not a modern phenomenon, that in some societies it is actually a very old practice? Learn about this and more in CULS 620: Women, Men and Cultural Change, a course about sexuality, gender, and a process of cultural change between and among women and men that is centuries old.

Dr. Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has authored and edited several books on anthropology and culture change including Invitation to Anthropology and Explorations in Cultural Anthropology.

HIST 600 – SelTp: Glenwood (section 231: 1 hour) and the History of Charleston (section 232: 3 hours) (Billy Joe Peyton), Tuesday, 7:00 – 9:50 p.m. 

This seminar will meet at Glenwood, an iconic 1850s estate that stands in the hills of Charleston’s West Side.  Students will get up close and personal with the past as they utilize elements of the historic Glenwood collection to examine the 150-year development of Charleston from a small 19th century village into a modern 21st century capital city. Sponsored in part by the Historic Glenwood Foundation.

This seminar is split into two sections:

HIST 600-231, Glenwood (1 hour):  OPEN TO THE PUBLIC; APPLY AS NON-DEGREE STUDENT TO MU

HIST 600-232, History of Charleston (3 hours): SCHOLARSHIP AVAILABLE FOR COURSE; APPLY THROUGH HUMANITIES PROGRAM

**CONTACT THE PROGRAM OFFICE FOR DETAILS: 304-746-2022**

Dr. Billy Joe Peyton, associate professor of history at West Virginia State University.  He is the author of Charleston Then and Now, and has researched and written extensively on the history of Charleston and West Virginia

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

  • Museum Studies
  • Film Criticism
  • Studies in Appalachian Music
  • Studies in Poetry
  • Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

LITS 600 – SelTp: Appalachian Literature: Exploring the Soul of a Region (Cat Pleska), Monday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This seminar will engage selected literature by Appalachian writers to explore the region’s history and culture. Some authors covered will include Denise Giardina, Charles Frazier, James Still, Scott McClanahan and several others.  Readings will examine the past and present public perception of Appalachia, as well as noting what comprises the soul of this vast region.

Ms. Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio. She also is the Editor-in-Chief of Mountain State Press and Senior Editor of Fed from the Blade: Tales and Poems from the Mountains.

Fall 2013

CULS 540 – World Religions (Luke Eric Lassiter), T, 4:30 – 6:50  p.m.

Study of several religions as they developed within their individual times and cultures.

Dr. Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has written extensively in several books and essays on the relationship of encounter, experience and story, especially as they relate to issues of belief and worldview, language and culture, memory and identity.

CULS 600 – Directed Reading Seminar – SpTp: Explorations in Language & Identity (Robin Conley), Arranged

SEMINAR PARTICIPANT LIMIT: 3. “Directed Readings” is a new kind of seminar for Fall 2013. These seminars will be limited to 3 students who will read 3–5 books over the course of the given semester along with a faculty expert in a particular area. Faculty and students will arrange times to discuss the books

This seminar will draw from literary works including memoir, ethnography, and autobiography to explore the connections between language and identity. Working from a social science perspective, we will investigate how language in different cultural and historical contexts helps to construct a variety of identities in the U.S. and abroad.

Robin Conley is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Marshall University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research and teaching focus on legal, linguistic, and cultural anthropology; gender and language; and violence and empathy in democratic institutions.

HIST 585 – Coal Mine Life, Work & Culture (Michael Workman), Th, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This course provides students with a better understanding of the continuing economic, political, environmental and cultural impact which the extraction of coal has had on West Virginia.

Michael Workman worked in the underground coal mines of southern West Virginia before earning degrees in political science and his doctorate in history at WVU.  He has written and published on coal and labor history, and currently is Assistant Professor of History at WVSU.

HUMN 601 – Literary Theory & Criticism (Ann McConnell), M, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

Core course introduces modern critical approaches, concepts and methods of research and scholarship in the broad field of literature. Open to non-degree students.

Dr. Anne McConnell teaches world literature, critical theory, and writing in the English Department at West Virginia State University. She recently published Approaching Disappearance at Dalkey Archive Press; the book explores the work of Maurice Blanchot, Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, and Nathalie Sarraute.

HUMN 604 – Expository Writing for Research (Cat Pleska), T, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research. Open to non-degree students.

Cat Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

  • Museum Studies
  • Film Criticism
  • Studies in Appalachian Music
  • Studies in Poetry
  • Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Summer 2013

CULS 611 – Appalachian Studies: Themes and Voices (Luke Eric Lassiter); Summer 1 (May 20 – August 09) online T–Course with live meetings.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the significant issues and research in Appalachian studies. Important political, social, and cultural issues will be considered. Research areas are introduced. (This core course in the Graduate Certificate in Appalachian Studies may be taken by degree students in Humanities.)

This course is offered on-line with live meetings on T, May 21, 6-9 p.m.; T, June 18, 6-9 p.m.; T, July 23, 6-9 p.m.

HUMN 600 – Introduction to the Study in the Humanities (Luke Eric Lassiter); Summer 1 (May 20 – August 09), Th, 6-9 p.m.

Interdisciplinary core course addresses questions/concepts central to the humanities. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, the arts and the sciences provide insights into selected historical periods. Open to non-degree students.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

  • Museum Studies
  • Film Criticism
  • Studies in Appalachian Music
  • Studies in Poetry
  • Language and Communication

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2013

A&S 501 – Studies in Non-Western Art & Music (Luke Eric Lassiter), Thursday, 7:00-9:50 p.m.

Studies emphasizing non-Western art or music.  This seminar will explore the various dimensions of art and music ethnographically, as well as examine the role of art and music in people’s lives everywhere as a cross-cultural phenomenon.

Dr. Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has written extensively in several books and essays on the relationship of encounter, experience and story, especially as they relate to issues of belief and worldview, language and culture, memory and identity.

CULS 612 – Time & Place in Appalachia (Robert Maslowski), Tuesday, 7:00-9:50 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the importance of geography, topography, and geology to the history and development of the Appalchian region.

Dr. Robert Maslowski, retired Archeologist for the Huntington District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, possesses extensive knowledge of Appalachian archeology, culture, and history. He was executive producer of three award winning films, Ghosts of Green BottomRed Salt & Reynolds, and Secrets of the Valley. His numerous publications have appeared in venues such as World ArchaeologyNational Geographic Society Research ReportsPennsylvania ArchaeologistWonderful West Virginia, and West Virginia Archeologist (which he also serves as Editor).

HUMN 605 – Western Traditions & Contemporary Cultures (Ann McConnell), Monday,  7:00-9:50 p.m.

Using primary materials from different cultural periods, as well as contemporary critical analyses, this core course explores epistemological questions that underlie conflicts between cultures.

Dr. Anne McConnell teaches world literature, critical theory, and writing in the English Department at West Virginia State University.  She recently published Approaching Disappearance at Dalkey Archive Press; the book explores the work of Maurice Blanchot, Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, and Nathalie Sarraute.

HUMN 650 – Selected Topics as independent study arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

LITS 600 – SpTp: Writing Creative Nonfiction: Focus on the Personal Essay (Cathy Pleska), Wednesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

You may be familiar with the personal essay; that is, a genre of writing that uses the “I” as the center to explore inner and outer worlds via experience and memory. Did you know the personal essay comes in many flavors, such as the memoir essay, nature, travel, and radio, to name a few? In this course we will study models in each of four sub-genres and then write and workshop the essays. Expect field trips!

Ms. Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio.

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Fall 2012

CULS 600 – SpTp: Experience, Story, and (Auto)Biography (Luke Eric Lassiter), Tuesday, 4:30 – 6:50 p.m.

How does encounter and experience factor into the stories we tell about ourselves and others? How do personal narratives affect how we come to understand the world? What role do things like culture, language, and memory play in the construction of meaningful story? To what extent do stories reflect our pasts and shape our futures? This seminar will explore these and other questions as well as involve participants in the crafting of autobiographical and biographical narratives.

Dr. Lassiter, director of the Graduate Humanities Program and professor of humanities and anthropology, has written extensively in several books and essays on the relationship of encounter, experience and story, especially as they relate to issues of belief and worldview, language and culture, memory and identity.

HIST 600 – SpTp: The Lore of Lost Civilizations: Archeological Myths and Realities (David Anderson), Monday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

<<  THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED >>

The “lost wisdom” of ancient civilizations presents an irresistible lure for many modern Americans. This interest has lead to an innumerable quantity of popular books, television shows, movies, and more that allege to present the hidden truth behind the many mysteries of the past. Professional archaeologists have long stood in firm opposition to these alternative interpretations of past civilizations, and yet this opposition often seems to provide more credit to the alternative theorist than discredit. In this seminar, we will examine both sides of the debate, asking how do we learn about the prehistoric past and what can we truly know about ancient civilizations.

Dr. Anderson is an anthropolgical archaeologist who received his Ph.D. from Tulane University in 2010. His research interests include Maya culture, Preclassic Mesoamerica, archaeoastronomy, and the relationship between mainstream and alternative interpretations of the ancient past.

HUMN 602 – Historical Studies (Dan Holbrook), Thursday, 6:30 – 9 p.m.

Core course acquaints students with problems of historical knowledge, changes in the interpretation of history, nature of historical forces, and methods of historical research. Open to non-degree students.

This seminar will be offered in conjunction with the Department of History’s HST 600 – Methodology: Seminar in Historical Methods, taught by Dr. Dan Holbrook. Holbrook will teach HST 600 on the Huntington campus. Graduate Humanities students must sign up for the HUMN 602 course. Students can join this cross-listed seminar in person on the Huntington campus or via PolyCom from the South Charleston campus. Check our website for classroom assignments.

Dr. Holbrook is a historian of technology and the Chair of MU’s Department of History, and is very interested in local and public history..

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 604 – Expository Writing for Research (Cathy Pleska), Tuesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This core writing course develops proficiency in writing for research. Note: a degree student may demonstrate competency through an alternative assessment to have the requirement waived. Open to non-degree students.

Ms. Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio.

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

LITS 600 – SpTp: Reading and Writing America’s Poetries (Cathy Pleska), Wednesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This seminar will explore our lives and the many and varied lives in America (including Appalachia) through reading and studying poems as if we were the ones whose lives depended on them as well as doing writing exercises, creating poems, and workshopping together. No previous experience required! Just open hearts and hungry minds.

Ms. Pleska teaches writing at West Virginia State University, where she is also the Director of the WVSU Writing Center. She earned her MFA in creative nonfiction writing at Goucher College in Baltimore and is an essayist for West Virginia Public Radio.

Summer 2012

CULS 610 – Seminar in Appalachian Culture (Luke Eric Lassiter); Summer 1 (May 21 – August 10) online T–Course with live meetings.

Exploration of selected aspects of culture (e.g., art, music, folklore, history, literature), emphasizing regional culture from an interdisciplinary perspective. This course is offered on-line with four live meetings on Tuesday, May 22, 6-9 PM; Tuesday, June 19, 6-9 PM; Tuesday, July 24, 6- 9 PM. See http://www.marshall.edu/SUPERSATURDAY/ for more information, including classroom assignment for live meetings.

HUMN 600 – Introduction to the Study in the Humanities (Luke Eric Lassiter); Summer 1 (May 21 – August 10), Th, 6-9 p.m.

Interdisciplinary core course addresses questions/concepts central to the humanities. Texts from philosophy, history, literature, the arts and the sciences provide insights into selected historical periods. Open to non-degree students.

HUMN 650 – Special Topics – Independent Studies arranged between instructor and student (contact Director to arrange course)

For students who need to conduct independent research and/or reading in a specific topic in the humanities, the Program will offer independent studies in those topics as funds allow. Contact the Director for more information. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project. Arranged with the Program Director.

Spring 2012

A&S 600 – SpTp: Film Music: Magical Tunes from Wagner’s Valkiries to Williams’s Wizards (Kay Lawson), Thursday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

Richard Wagner’s ideas for creating the total work of art by merging music and drama have influenced more than a century of composers and film makers.  The study of a variety of film genres and the impact of their musical scores on audiences is the basis for examining the history of this popular art form.

CULS 611 – Appalachian Studies: Themes and Voices (Chris Green), Wednesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

This interdisciplinary course orients students to the significant issues and research in Appalachian studies. Important political, social, and cultural issues will be considered. Research areas are introduced.

CULS 600 – SpTp: Globalizing Foods (Bob Maslowski), Tuesday, 7 – 9:50 p.m.

From Homo erectus to McDonalds, this course will cover the history of food from hunting and gathering and agricultural societies to the modern industrial food chain with an emphasis on Appalachia. It will incorporate tastings and field trips to give students a better understanding of where food comes from, what people eat and how food preferences develop.

HUMN 650 – Independent Studies in Selected Topics (Luke Eric Lassiter) – Arranged

Students wishing to set up an independent study in area of special interest with an approved graduate instructor may do so in consultation with the Program Director. For more information, contact the Program Director before the start of the term. Examples of Special Topics might include:

* Museum Studies
* Film Criticism
* Studies in Appalachian Music
* Studies in Poetry
* Language and Communication

HUMN 680 – Independent Research Symposium (Luke Eric Lassiter), Arranged

A pro-seminar required of all Humanities degree students who are beginning the thesis or final project.  Arranged with the Program Director.

LITS 600 – SpTp: Reading & Writing Memoir (Fran Simone), Monday, 7 – 9 p.m.

Memoir is a story from a life. It is about how our past selves continue to inform our present selves. The class is organized around discussions and workshops which are designed to help writers transform life stories into engaging narratives. Students will read and discuss selected works. They will participate in writing workshop, draft and revise narratives and reflect on their writing process.

CI 677 – Writing for Publication (Luke Eric Lassiter), Wednesday, 4:30 – 6:50 p.m.

GSEPD doctoral seminar: For professional educators and students who wish to study and practice writing articles for publication in scholarly journals in the field of education.  Humanities students may register for the seminar by permission only.  Contact Lassiter for more details.