Deciding Your Major

GroupOfStudents3Choosing a major should be thought about generously. There are a couple of ways you can go about choosing a major, if you haven’t already. One way is to search different majors and keep a list of the ones that interest you, factoring in skills, knowledge, and grades you already have along with your personality and interests. Research careers to see what you think you might want to do when you graduate from college and find out what majors can help you prepare for a career in that field. It is common for most students to be undecided about their career goals and/or major. At most colleges you won’t have to choose a major until your sophomore year. The links below will help you get started exploring different majors and careers.

Majors – The Princeton Review
Careers – The Princeton Review

Choosing a School

There are a variety of college options. College options include two-year community colleges, four-year universities, technical, vocational and trade schools. Figure out what is important to you and which of these options will best help you achieve your career goals. There are a number of things to consider when making your decision.

Things to consider: distance from home, population and diversity, the campus, local facilities, tuition and housing costs, and many more. The link below provides useful information in helping you pick out what college is right for you.

Preparing to Choose a School

Along with considering your own preferences you should consider the preferences of the schools you are interested in attending. Most schools have an idea of what they’re looking for in a potential student, and some of the qualifications include test scores and GPA’s. Be aware of these when choosing a school that is suitable for you and your needs as a student. Go to the schools admission page to find out what their minimum test scores are and there preferred GPA along with other requirements they may have.

Once you have narrowed down your search and have a list of schools you are interested in, you should request information from each of those schools. Most schools have a place on their website where you can request an informational package.

After you have done some substantial research on colleges of interest, you may want to schedule a campus visit of the schools you are interested in attending. This can be a fun opportunity to check out the atmosphere, test out the cafeteria food, see what campus and local facilities are really like and simply get a feel for the place and whether it’s somewhere you could live for a few years. Looking through brochures and reading about a place is a totally different experience than seeing it in person and can change your perspective on things.

Other than the look, feel, and extent to which you like the school and the surrounding area, there are some other important things to consider while you are there. You may want to consider the following questions when visiting different campuses.

  • Do the faculty and staff seem helpful?
  • How do you register for classes?
  • What do current students think of the college?
  • Are the buildings and campus grounds well maintained?
  • How safe is the campus?
  • Is it easy to get around the campus?
  • Is public transportation easily accessible?
  • What about parking? Can you park close to campus and where you will be living?
  • Do you have a good overall positive feeling about the campus?