Nicholas County students receive training on cyber safety

Nicholas County students receive training on cyber safety

December 10, 2011 @ 12:00 AM

The Herald-Dispatch

HUNTINGTON — More than 30 students from Nicholas County High School’s Future Business Leaders of America organization spent Friday afternoon getting trained on cyber safety from officials with the Marshall University Forensic Science Center.

The students, said teacher Susan Jones, will take what they learned and make presentations to students in Nicholas County’s two high schools, two middle schools and to parents.

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Marshall University faculty provide training on digital forensics

Marshall University faculty provided digital forensics training to arson investigators at the West Virginia Fire Investigation Conference sponsored by the West Virginia Chapter of the International Association of Arson Investigators.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of the Forensic Science Center; John Sammons, assistant professor in the Integrated Science and Technology Department; and Margaret Phipps Brown, professor of Criminal Justice, were featured speakers on Monday, Oct. 3, at the two-day conference in Beckley. Continuing education credits were available to eligible participants.

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Forensics lab dissects the tech | Charleston Daily Mail

Tuesday August 9, 2011

by Zack Harold, Daily Mail staff

As with everything else, crime is moving online. And thanks to experts at the West Virginia State Police Digital Forensics Unit, there’s a new way to dust for fingerprints.

 

Cpl. Robert Boggs runs the unit’s Huntington lab, housed in the Marshall University Forensic Science Center.

 

A self-confessed geek, Boggs has been hunting down and catching digital criminals since 2006. He was the only investigator in the lab at the time. He now has help from Chris Vance, the Huntington unit’s mobile forensics expert, as well as university graduate students…

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Article in DFI by our own Josh Brunty

Digital forensics professor, Josh Brunty, is featured in this month’s Digital Forensics Investigator News. Read an excerpt here:

“Validation of Forensic Tools and Software: A Quick Guide for the Digital Forensic Examiner

With the field of digital forensics growing at an almost warp-like speed, there are many issues out there that can disrupt and discredit even the most experienced forensic examiner. One of the issues that continues to be of utmost importance is the validation of the technology and software associated with performing a digital forensic examination. The science of digital forensics is founded on the principles of repeatable processes and quality evidence. Knowing how to design and properly maintain a good validation process is a key requirement for any digital forensic examiner. This article will attempt to outline the issues faced when drafting tool and software validations, the legal standards that should be followed when drafting validations, and a quick overview of what should be included in every validation…” READ MORE.


Digital evidence conference begins Tuesday at Marshall University Forensic Science Center

http://www.marshall.edu/pressrelease.asp?ID=2078
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. – The Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence (AIDE), a nonprofit organization dedicated to serving professionals and students of the legal, technical and business communities that work with digital evidence, is sponsoring its first conference at the Marshall University Forensic Science Center. Each day will focus on one of the four sub-groups of digital evidence: digital forensics, electronic discovery, law enforcement and network security.

John Sammons, an assistant professor in Marshall’s Integrated Science and Technology Department, helped found the AIDE to serve as a resource to help professionals better handle the intricacies of digital evidence in both civil and criminal litigation.

Tuition for the event is free, but registration is required. For more information, contact Sammons at 304-633-3411or visit http://aide.marshall.edu/.

WHAT: Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence Conference for lawyers, judges, digital forensic examiners, network security professionals and law enforcement personnel

WHERE: Marshall University Forensic Science Center

WHEN: Tuesday, July 27-Friday, July 30; Tuesday through Thursday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

WHO: The Appalachian Institute of Digital Evidence is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to serving the professionals and students of the legal, technical and business communities that work with digital evidence.

SPONSORS: Sponsors for the event include Jackson Kelly Attorneys at Law, AccessData, Second Creek Technologies, Marshall University Forensic Science Center, Marshall University Department of Integrated Science & Technology and Marshall University Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology.


Marshall University signs on to work with the world leader in digital forensics software

>http://forensics.marshall.edu/MUFSC/News/2010/News-10.02-1.html
Feb 10, 2010, MUFSC News – Marshall University Forensic Science Center, in conjunction with the Department of Integrated Science and Technology, has announced two agreements with a world leader in digital forensic software. According to the first Memorandum of Understanding, Marshall University will conduct research for AccessData…
http://forensics.marshall.edu/MUFSC/MUFSC-News.html