GSEM: Lessons

GSEM Home Lessons Resources

Choose Lessons sorted by Topic or sorted by Science Standard.

 

Sorted by Topic
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Buy Fresh, Buy Local Buying Local – Students will research the buying local movement.
Edible Plant Parts Edible Plant Parts – Students will investigate how plant form relates to structure through observation and dissection of an assortment of plants and vegetables. They will learn to locate and label the parts humans use for food (i.e. seeds, stem, leaf, fruit, root, flower). Students will be able to classify plant foods as fruit, vegetable, tuber, or roots.
Garden Wildlife Garden Wildlife – Students will explore insect mouthparts and food sources through a form and function lab activity. They will infer how insects affect gardens by discussing the benefits and harms of garden “friends and foes”. Students will learn how to identify such critters in a garden then apply these skills in the garden.
Green Roof Green Roofs – Students will hypothesize and test an experiment simulating the effects of green roofs.
Energy House Energy Efficiency – Insulation – Students will practice identifying areas of energy waste in the buildings on Marshall’s campus through measuring localized temperatures with a heat gun and detecting drafts with a hand-crafted flag device. Students will analyze how this costs energy and develop plans to eliminate the energy waste.
Light Bulb Energy Efficiency – Light & Energy – Students will learn the basics of Energy and Electricity, and then compare and contrast the efficiency of light bulbs through experimentation of incandescent, fluorescent, and LED light. They will understand the differences and transfer of energy. Students will connect energy use at home to energy use nationwide and worldwide.
nutrition Nutrition & Nutrients – Students will realize the connection between essential plant nutrients and essential nutrients for humans through a “hamburger dissection”. They will measure soil and plant health through observation and soil nutrient testing.
Planting Seed Plants Seeds & Needs – Students will actively investigate seed dispersal through searching for seeds on campus and examining the seed forms. They will hypothesize the modes of transportation for such seeds and what seeds require for growth. Students will learn what plants need to be healthy and how to measure such needs.
pollination Pollination – Students will investigate pollination frequencies through a scientific experiment. They will draw conclusions from their data and make inferences relating their data to pollinator activities as a whole.
energy-house Sustainable Community – Students will understand the significance of conductors and insulators and how they relate to energy. They will identify, describe, and use efficient and conservative measures for “building” a sustainable community. They will also discover how energy efficient options are the most cost-effective choices in the long run.
MU Green Trail Sustainability Scavenger Hunt – Students will identify sustainable practices on Marshall’s campus through a scavenger hunt. They will experience how sustainability can be applied in a community then dream of how it can be practiced elsewhere during discussions.
Field and Trees Tree Scavenger Hunt – Students will identify trees using tree identification guides during a tree scavenger hunt. They will discover the biodiversity of trees on Marshall’s campus throughout their search then learn about the significance of biodiversity through class discussions.

 

Next Generation Science Standards:

  • K-ESS3-3 – Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment.
  • MS-ESS2-4 – Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity
  • HS-ESS3-4 – Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems.
  • HS-ETS1-1 – Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.
  • HS-ETS1-2 – Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
  • HS-ETS1-2 – Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.
  • HS-LS2-2 – Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.
  • HS-LS2-7 – Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
  • HS-LS2-8 – Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce.
  • HS-PS3-1– Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
  • HS-PS3-3 – Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.
  • MS-ETS1-3 – Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
  • MS-ESS3-3 – Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing a human impact on the environment.
  • MS-ESS3-4 – Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.
  • MS-ETS1-3 – Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
  • MS-LS1-4 – Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • MS-LS1-5 – Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.
  • MS-LS1-6 – Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
  • MS-LS1-7 – Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
  • MS-LS2-1 – Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
  • MS-LS2-2 – Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
  • MS-LS2-5 – Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  • MS-PS1-4 – Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.
  • MS-PS1-6 – Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.
  • MS-PS3-4 – Plan an investigation to determine the relationships among the energy transferred, the type of matter, the mass, and the change in the average kinetic energy of the particles as measured by the temperature of the sample.

 

21st Century Science Content Standards and Objectives for WV Schools